WorldWideScience

Sample records for computer experiment method

  1. The Experiment Method for Manufacturing Grid Development on Single Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Youan; ZHOU Zude

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an experiment method for the Manufacturing Grid application system development in the single personal computer environment is proposed. The characteristic of the proposed method is constructing a full prototype Manufacturing Grid application system which is hosted on a single personal computer with the virtual machine technology. Firstly, it builds all the Manufacturing Grid physical resource nodes on an abstraction layer of a single personal computer with the virtual machine technology. Secondly, all the virtual Manufacturing Grid resource nodes will be connected with virtual network and the application software will be deployed on each Manufacturing Grid nodes. Then, we can obtain a prototype Manufacturing Grid application system which is working in the single personal computer, and can carry on the experiment on this foundation. Compared with the known experiment methods for the Manufacturing Grid application system development, the proposed method has the advantages of the known methods, such as cost inexpensively, operation simple, and can get the confidence experiment result easily. The Manufacturing Grid application system constructed with the proposed method has the high scalability, stability and reliability. It is can be migrated to the real application environment rapidly.

  2. Experiences using DAKOTA stochastic expansion methods in computational simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Ruthruff, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods bring rigorous statistical connections to the analysis of computational and experiment data, and provide a basis for probabilistically assessing margins associated with safety and reliability. The DAKOTA toolkit developed at Sandia National Laboratories implements a number of UQ methods, which are being increasingly adopted by modeling and simulation teams to facilitate these analyses. This report disseminates results as to the performance of DAKOTA's stochastic expansion methods for UQ on a representative application. Our results provide a number of insights that may be of interest to future users of these methods, including the behavior of the methods in estimating responses at varying probability levels, and the expansion levels for the methodologies that may be needed to achieve convergence.

  3. Methods for Factor Screening in Computer Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-03-01

    of the dat-a In a-space, impacto the variable selection problem s ign if Lrast ly. S-arch-type variable selection methods include the all-po"sible...i.iv 41.1 ti * n wt- -iu’pt-v c C it st’vt’re mu It ico11 inear it v is pro-crtnt Lind. , ii;.qt4pai tlv * Iti’lt- c- j c. tic j icivnt, art, verv

  4. Computational Experience with Globally Convergent Descent Methods for Large Sparse Systems of Nonlinear Equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukšan, Ladislav; Vlček, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3-4 (1998), s. 201-223 ISSN 1055-6788 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/96/0918 Keywords : nonlinear equations * Armijo-type descent methods * Newton-like methods * truncated methods * global convergence * nonsymmetric linear systems * conjugate gradient -type methods * residual smoothing * computational experiments Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  5. Computer-simulated experiments and computer games: a method of design analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome J. Leary

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the new modularization of the undergraduate science degree at the University of Brighton, larger numbers of students are choosing to take some science modules which include an amount of laboratory practical work. Indeed, within energy studies, the fuels and combustion module, for which the computer simulations were written, has seen a fourfold increase in student numbers from twelve to around fifty. Fitting out additional laboratories with new equipment to accommodate this increase presented problems: the laboratory space did not exist; fitting out the laboratories with new equipment would involve a relatively large capital spend per student for equipment that would be used infrequently; and, because some of the experiments use inflammable liquids and gases, additional staff would be needed for laboratory supervision.

  6. Design of Computer Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian

    The main topic of this thesis is design and analysis of computer and simulation experiments and is dealt with in six papers and a summary report. Simulation and computer models have in recent years received increasingly more attention due to their increasing complexity and usability. Software...... packages make the development of rather complicated computer models using predefined building blocks possible. This implies that the range of phenomenas that are analyzed by means of a computer model has expanded significantly. As the complexity grows so does the need for efficient experimental designs...... and analysis methods, since the complex computer models often are expensive to use in terms of computer time. The choice of performance parameter is an important part of the analysis of computer and simulation models and Paper A introduces a new statistic for waiting times in health care units. The statistic...

  7. Assessment of medical communication skills by computer: assessment method and student experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, R. L.; Mollema, E. D.; Hoos, A. M.; de Haes, J. C. J. M.; Donnison-Speijer, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND A computer-assisted assessment (CAA) program for communication skills designated ACT was developed using the objective structured video examination (OSVE) format. This method features assessment of cognitive scripts underlying communication behaviour, a broad range of communication

  8. Computational methods for fracture analysis of heavy-section steel technology (HSST) pressure vessel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the capabilities and applications of the general-purpose and special-purpose computer programs that have been developed for use in fracture mechanics analyses of HSST pressure vessel experiments. Emphasis is placed on the OCA/USA code, which is designed for analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) conditions, and on the ORMGEN/ADINA/ORVIRT system which is used for more general analysis. Fundamental features of these programs are discussed, along with applications to pressure vessel experiments

  9. Methods of physical experiment and installation automation on the base of computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupin, Yu.V.

    1983-01-01

    Peculiarities of using computers for physical experiment and installation automation are considered. Systems for data acquisition and processing on the base of microprocessors, micro- and mini-computers, CAMAC equipment and real time operational systems as well as systems intended for automation of physical experiments on accelerators and installations of laser thermonuclear fusion and installations for plasma investigation are dpscribed. The problems of multimachine complex and multi-user system, arrangement, development of automated systems for collective use, arrangement of intermachine data exchange and control of experimental data base are discussed. Data on software systems used for complex experimental data processing are presented. It is concluded that application of new computers in combination with new possibilities provided for users by universal operational systems essentially exceeds efficiency of a scientist work

  10. Computational methods for fracture analysis of heavy-section steel technology (HSST) pressure vessel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the capabilities and applications of the general-purpose and special-purpose computer programs that have been developed at ORNL for use in fracture mechanics analyses of HSST pressure vessel experiments. Emphasis is placed on the OCA/USA code, which is designed for analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) conditions, and on the ORMGEN/ADINA/ORVIRT system which is used for more general analysis. Fundamental features of these programs are discussed, along wih applications to pressure vessel experiments. (orig./HP)

  11. Methods of computer experiment in gamma-radiation technologies using new radiation sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bratchenko, M I; Rozhkov, V V

    2001-01-01

    Presented id the methodology of computer modeling application for physical substantiation of new irradiation technologies and irradiators design work flow. Modeling tasks for irradiation technologies are structured along with computerized methods of their solution and appropriate types of software. Comparative analysis of available packages for Monte-Carlo modeling of electromagnetic processes in media is done concerning their application to irradiation technologies problems. The results of codes approbation and preliminary data on gamma-radiation absorbed dose distributions for nuclides of conventional sources and prospective Europium-based gamma-sources are presented.

  12. Computational Experiment Study on Selection Mechanism of Project Delivery Method Based on Complex Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Project delivery planning is a key stage used by the project owner (or project investor for organizing design, construction, and other operations in a construction project. The main task in this stage is to select an appropriate project delivery method. In order to analyze different factors affecting the PDM selection, this paper establishes a multiagent model mainly to show how project complexity, governance strength, and market environment affect the project owner’s decision on PDM. Experiment results show that project owner usually choose Design-Build method when the project is very complex within a certain range. Besides, this paper points out that Design-Build method will be the prior choice when the potential contractors develop quickly. This paper provides the owners with methods and suggestions in terms of showing how the factors affect PDM selection, and it may improve the project performance.

  13. Blending Qualitative and Computational Linguistics Methods for Fidelity Assessment: Experience with the Familias Unidas Preventive Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Carlos; Pantin, Hilda; Villamar, Juan; Prado, Guillermo; Tapia, Maria; Ogihara, Mitsunori; Cruden, Gracelyn; Brown, C Hendricks

    2015-09-01

    Careful fidelity monitoring and feedback are critical to implementing effective interventions. A wide range of procedures exist to assess fidelity; most are derived from observational assessments (Schoenwald and Garland, Psycholog Assess 25:146-156, 2013). However, these fidelity measures are resource intensive for research teams in efficacy/effectiveness trials, and are often unattainable or unmanageable for the host organization to rate when the program is implemented on a large scale. We present a first step towards automated processing of linguistic patterns in fidelity monitoring of a behavioral intervention using an innovative mixed methods approach to fidelity assessment that uses rule-based, computational linguistics to overcome major resource burdens. Data come from an effectiveness trial of the Familias Unidas intervention, an evidence-based, family-centered preventive intervention found to be efficacious in reducing conduct problems, substance use and HIV sexual risk behaviors among Hispanic youth. This computational approach focuses on "joining," which measures the quality of the working alliance of the facilitator with the family. Quantitative assessments of reliability are provided. Kappa scores between a human rater and a machine rater for the new method for measuring joining reached 0.83. Early findings suggest that this approach can reduce the high cost of fidelity measurement and the time delay between fidelity assessment and feedback to facilitators; it also has the potential for improving the quality of intervention fidelity ratings.

  14. Non-invasive coronary angiography with multislice computed tomography. Technology, methods, preliminary experience and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Egidio; Bertoli, Giuseppe; Barazzoni, Giancarlo; Baldi, Maurizia; Tramarin, Roberto

    2004-02-01

    The recent technical developments in multislice computed tomography (MSCT), with ECG retro-gated image reconstruction, have elicited great interest in the possibility of accurate non-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. The latest generation of MSCT systems with 8-16 rows of detectors permits acquisition of the whole cardiac volume during a single 15-20 s breath-hold with a submillimetric definition of the images and an outstanding signal-to-noise ratio. Thus the race which, between MSCT, electron beam computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, can best provide routine and reliable imaging of the coronary arteries in clinical practice has recommenced. Currently available MSCT systems offer different options for both cardiac image acquisition and reconstruction, including multiplanar and curved multiplanar reconstruction, three-dimensional volume rendering, maximum intensity projection, and virtual angioscopy. In our preliminary experience including 176 patients suffering from known or suspected coronary artery disease, MSCT was feasible in 161 (91.5%) and showed a sensitivity of 80.4% and a specificity of 80.3%, with respect to standard coronary angiography, in detecting critical stenosis in coronary arteries and artery or venous bypass grafts. These results correspond to a positive predictive value of 58.6% and a negative predictive value of 92.2%. The true role that MSCT is likely to play in the future in non-invasive coronary imaging is still to be defined. Nevertheless, the huge amount of data obtainable by MSCT along with the rapid technological advances, shorter acquisition times and reconstruction algorithm developments will make the technique stronger, and possible applications are expected not only for non-invasive coronary angiography, but also for cardiac function and myocardial perfusion evaluation, as an all-in-one examination.

  15. Experiments in computing: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedre, Matti; Moisseinen, Nella

    2014-01-01

    Experiments play a central role in science. The role of experiments in computing is, however, unclear. Questions about the relevance of experiments in computing attracted little attention until the 1980s. As the discipline then saw a push towards experimental computer science, a variety of technically, theoretically, and empirically oriented views on experiments emerged. As a consequence of those debates, today's computing fields use experiments and experiment terminology in a variety of ways. This paper analyzes experimentation debates in computing. It presents five ways in which debaters have conceptualized experiments in computing: feasibility experiment, trial experiment, field experiment, comparison experiment, and controlled experiment. This paper has three aims: to clarify experiment terminology in computing; to contribute to disciplinary self-understanding of computing; and, due to computing's centrality in other fields, to promote understanding of experiments in modern science in general.

  16. Comparison of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) versus traditional textbook methods for training in abdominal examination (Japanese experience).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayumi, A K; Kurihara, Y; Imai, M; Pachev, G; Seo, H; Hoshino, Y; Cheifetz, R; Matsuura, K; Momoi, M; Saleem, M; Lara-Guerra, H; Miki, Y; Kariya, Y

    2004-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of computer-assisted, text-based and computer-and-text learning conditions on the performances of 3 groups of medical students in the pre-clinical years of their programme, taking into account their academic achievement to date. A fourth group of students served as a control (no-study) group. Participants were recruited from the pre-clinical years of the training programmes in 2 medical schools in Japan, Jichi Medical School near Tokyo and Kochi Medical School near Osaka. Participants were randomly assigned to 4 learning conditions and tested before and after the study on their knowledge of and skill in performing an abdominal examination, in a multiple-choice test and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), respectively. Information about performance in the programme was collected from school records and students were classified as average, good or excellent. Student and faculty evaluations of their experience in the study were explored by means of a short evaluation survey. Compared to the control group, all 3 study groups exhibited significant gains in performance on knowledge and performance measures. For the knowledge measure, the gains of the computer-assisted and computer-assisted plus text-based learning groups were significantly greater than the gains of the text-based learning group. The performances of the 3 groups did not differ on the OSCE measure. Analyses of gains by performance level revealed that high achieving students' learning was independent of study method. Lower achieving students performed better after using computer-based learning methods. The results suggest that computer-assisted learning methods will be of greater help to students who do not find the traditional methods effective. Explorations of the factors behind this are a matter for future research.

  17. Essential numerical computer methods

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    The use of computers and computational methods has become ubiquitous in biological and biomedical research. During the last 2 decades most basic algorithms have not changed, but what has is the huge increase in computer speed and ease of use, along with the corresponding orders of magnitude decrease in cost. A general perception exists that the only applications of computers and computer methods in biological and biomedical research are either basic statistical analysis or the searching of DNA sequence data bases. While these are important applications they only scratch the surface of the current and potential applications of computers and computer methods in biomedical research. The various chapters within this volume include a wide variety of applications that extend far beyond this limited perception. As part of the Reliable Lab Solutions series, Essential Numerical Computer Methods brings together chapters from volumes 210, 240, 321, 383, 384, 454, and 467 of Methods in Enzymology. These chapters provide ...

  18. Computational methods for fracture mechanics analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive computational analyses are required to determine material parameters and optimum pressure-temperature transients compatible with proposed pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) test scenarios and with the capabilities of the PTS test facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Computational economy has led to the application of techniques suitable for parametric studies involving the analysis of a large number of transients. These techniques, which include analysis capability for two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D) superposition, inelastic ligament stability, and upper-shelf arrest, have been incorporated into the OCA/USA computer program. Features of the OCA/USA program are discussed, including applications to the PTS test configuration

  19. Computational methods for fracture mechanics analysis of pressurized-thermal-shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive computational analyses are required to determine material parameters and optimum pressure-temperature transients compatible with proposed pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) test scenarios and with the capabilities of the PTS test facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Computational economy has led to the application of techniques suitable for parametric studies involving the analysis of a large number of transients. These techniques, which include analysis capability for two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D) superposition, inelastic ligament stability, and upper-shelf arrest, have been incorporated into the OCA/ USA computer program. Features of the OCA/USA program are discussed, including applications to the PTS test configuration. (author)

  20. Methods for building an inexpensive computer-controlled olfactometer for temporally-precise experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundstrom, J.N.; Gordon, A.; Alden, E.C.; Boesveldt, S.; Albrecht, J.

    2010-01-01

    Many human olfactory experiments call for fast and stable stimulus-rise times as well as exact and stable stimulus-onset times. Due to these temporal demands, an olfactometer is often needed. However, an olfactometer is a piece of equipment that either comes with a high price tag or requires a high

  1. Analysis methods of neutrons induced resonances in the transmission experiments by time-of-flight and automation of these methods on IBM 7094 II computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corge, C.

    1967-01-01

    The neutron induced resonances analysis aims to determine the neutrons characteristics, leading to the excitation energies, de-excitation probabilities by gamma radiation emission, by neutron emission or by fission, their spin, their parity... This document describes the methods developed, or adapted, the calculation schemes and the algorithms implemented to realize such analysis on a computer, from data obtained during time-of-flight experiments on the linear accelerator of Saclay. (A.L.B.)

  2. Computing for an SSC experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, I.

    1993-01-01

    The hardware and software problems for SSC experiments are similar to those faced by present day experiments but larger in scale. In particular, the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) anticipates the need for close to 10**6 MIPS of off-line computing and will produce several Petabytes (10**15 bytes) of data per year. Software contributions will be made from large numbers of highly geographically dispersed physicists. Hardware and software architectures to meet these needs have been designed. Providing the requisites amount of computing power and providing tools to allow cooperative software development using extensions of existing techniques look achievable. The major challenges will be to provide efficient methods of accessing and manipulating the enormous quantities of data that will be produced at the SSC, and to enforce the use of software engineering tools that will ensure the open-quotes correctnessclose quotes of experiment critical software

  3. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  4. Research and Teaching: Computational Methods in General Chemistry--Perceptions of Programming, Prior Experience, and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Chiu, Jennie L.; Grisham, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how integrating computational tools into a general chemistry laboratory course can influence student perceptions of programming and investigates relationships among student perceptions, prior experience, and student outcomes.

  5. Computer loss experience and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Donn B.

    1996-03-01

    The types of losses organizations must anticipate have become more difficult to predict because of the eclectic nature of computers and the data communications and the decrease in news media reporting of computer-related losses as they become commonplace. Total business crime is conjectured to be decreasing in frequency and increasing in loss per case as a result of increasing computer use. Computer crimes are probably increasing, however, as their share of the decreasing business crime rate grows. Ultimately all business crime will involve computers in some way, and we could see a decline of both together. The important information security measures in high-loss business crime generally concern controls over authorized people engaged in unauthorized activities. Such controls include authentication of users, analysis of detailed audit records, unannounced audits, segregation of development and production systems and duties, shielding the viewing of screens, and security awareness and motivation controls in high-value transaction areas. Computer crimes that involve highly publicized intriguing computer misuse methods, such as privacy violations, radio frequency emanations eavesdropping, and computer viruses, have been reported in waves that periodically have saturated the news media during the past 20 years. We must be able to anticipate such highly publicized crimes and reduce the impact and embarrassment they cause. On the basis of our most recent experience, I propose nine new types of computer crime to be aware of: computer larceny (theft and burglary of small computers), automated hacking (use of computer programs to intrude), electronic data interchange fraud (business transaction fraud), Trojan bomb extortion and sabotage (code security inserted into others' systems that can be triggered to cause damage), LANarchy (unknown equipment in use), desktop forgery (computerized forgery and counterfeiting of documents), information anarchy (indiscriminate use of

  6. MetaQTL: a package of new computational methods for the meta-analysis of QTL mapping experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charcosset Alain

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of multiple results from Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL studies is a key point to understand the genetic determinism of complex traits. Up to now many efforts have been made by public database developers to facilitate the storage, compilation and visualization of multiple QTL mapping experiment results. However, studying the congruency between these results still remains a complex task. Presently, the few computational and statistical frameworks to do so are mainly based on empirical methods (e.g. consensus genetic maps are generally built by iterative projection. Results In this article, we present a new computational and statistical package, called MetaQTL, for carrying out whole-genome meta-analysis of QTL mapping experiments. Contrary to existing methods, MetaQTL offers a complete statistical process to establish a consensus model for both the marker and the QTL positions on the whole genome. First, MetaQTL implements a new statistical approach to merge multiple distinct genetic maps into a single consensus map which is optimal in terms of weighted least squares and can be used to investigate recombination rate heterogeneity between studies. Secondly, assuming that QTL can be projected on the consensus map, MetaQTL offers a new clustering approach based on a Gaussian mixture model to decide how many QTL underly the distribution of the observed QTL. Conclusion We demonstrate using simulations that the usual model choice criteria from mixture model literature perform relatively well in this context. As expected, simulations also show that this new clustering algorithm leads to a reduction in the length of the confidence interval of QTL location provided that across studies there are enough observed QTL for each underlying true QTL location. The usefulness of our approach is illustrated on published QTL detection results of flowering time in maize. Finally, MetaQTL is freely available at http://bioinformatics.org/mqtl.

  7. COMPUTER CONTROL OF BEHAVIORAL EXPERIMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIEGEL, LOUIS

    THE LINC COMPUTER PROVIDES A PARTICULAR SCHEDULE OF REINFORCEMENT FOR BEHAVIORAL EXPERIMENTS BY EXECUTING A SEQUENCE OF COMPUTER OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH A SPECIALLY DESIGNED INTERFACE. THE INTERFACE IS THE MEANS OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE EXPERIMENTAL CHAMBER AND THE COMPUTER. THE PROGRAM AND INTERFACE OF AN EXPERIMENT INVOLVING A PIGEON…

  8. The software developing method for multichannel computer-aided system for physical experiments control, realized by resources of national instruments LabVIEW instrumental package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskaya, E.A.; Samojlov, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    This work is describing the method of developing the computer-aided control system in integrated environment of LabVIEW. Using the object-oriented design of complex systems, the hypothetical model for methods of developing the software for computer-aided system for physical experiments control was constructed. Within the framework of that model architecture solutions and implementations of suggested method were described. (author)

  9. Pharmacology Experiments on the Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    A computer program that replaces a set of pharmacology and physiology laboratory experiments on live animals or isolated organs is described and illustrated. Five experiments are simulated: dose-effect relationships on smooth muscle, blood pressure and catecholamines, neuromuscular signal transmission, acetylcholine and the circulation, and…

  10. Computational methods for stellerator configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt, O.

    1992-01-01

    This project had two main objectives. The first one was to continue to develop computational methods for the study of three dimensional magnetic confinement configurations. The second one was to collaborate and interact with researchers in the field who can use these techniques to study and design fusion experiments. The first objective has been achieved with the development of the spectral code BETAS and the formulation of a new variational approach for the study of magnetic island formation in a self consistent fashion. The code can compute the correct island width corresponding to the saturated island, a result shown by comparing the computed island with the results of unstable tearing modes in Tokamaks and with experimental results in the IMS Stellarator. In addition to studying three dimensional nonlinear effects in Tokamaks configurations, these self consistent computed island equilibria will be used to study transport effects due to magnetic island formation and to nonlinearly bifurcated equilibria. The second objective was achieved through direct collaboration with Steve Hirshman at Oak Ridge, D. Anderson and R. Talmage at Wisconsin as well as through participation in the Sherwood and APS meetings

  11. Computing Nash equilibria through computational intelligence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, N. G.; Parsopoulos, K. E.; Vrahatis, M. N.

    2005-03-01

    Nash equilibrium constitutes a central solution concept in game theory. The task of detecting the Nash equilibria of a finite strategic game remains a challenging problem up-to-date. This paper investigates the effectiveness of three computational intelligence techniques, namely, covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategies, particle swarm optimization, as well as, differential evolution, to compute Nash equilibria of finite strategic games, as global minima of a real-valued, nonnegative function. An issue of particular interest is to detect more than one Nash equilibria of a game. The performance of the considered computational intelligence methods on this problem is investigated using multistart and deflection.

  12. Computational methods for data evaluation and assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Data evaluation and data combination require the use of a wide range of probability theory concepts and tools, from deductive statistics mainly concerning frequencies and sample tallies to inductive inference for assimilating non-frequency data and a priori knowledge. Computational Methods for Data Evaluation and Assimilation presents interdisciplinary methods for integrating experimental and computational information. This self-contained book shows how the methods can be applied in many scientific and engineering areas. After presenting the fundamentals underlying the evaluation of experiment

  13. Method for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    1980-01-01

    In transversal computer tomography apparatus, in which the positioning zone in which the patient can be positioned is larger than the scanning zone in which a body slice can be scanned, reconstruction errors are liable to occur. These errors are caused by incomplete irradiation of the body during examination. They become manifest not only as an incorrect image of the area not irradiated, but also have an adverse effect on the image of the other, completely irradiated areas. The invention enables reduction of these errors

  14. Computational methods working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    During the Cold Moderator Workshop several working groups were established including one to discuss calculational methods. The charge for this working group was to identify problems in theory, data, program execution, etc., and to suggest solutions considering both deterministic and stochastic methods including acceleration procedures.

  15. Computer Based Road Accident Reconstruction Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Batista

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since road accident analyses and reconstructions are increasinglybased on specific computer software for simulationof vehicle d1iving dynamics and collision dynamics, and forsimulation of a set of trial runs from which the model that bestdescribes a real event can be selected, the paper presents anoverview of some computer software and methods available toaccident reconstruction experts. Besides being time-saving,when properly used such computer software can provide moreauthentic and more trustworthy accident reconstruction, thereforepractical experiences while using computer software toolsfor road accident reconstruction obtained in the TransportSafety Laboratory at the Faculty for Maritime Studies andTransport of the University of Ljubljana are presented and discussed.This paper addresses also software technology for extractingmaximum information from the accident photo-documentationto support accident reconstruction based on the simulationsoftware, as well as the field work of reconstruction expertsor police on the road accident scene defined by this technology.

  16. Computational Methods in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Intelligence requires Logic. But its Classical version shows too many insufficiencies. So, it is absolutely necessary to introduce more sophisticated tools, such as Fuzzy Logic, Modal Logic, Non-Monotonic Logic, and so on [2]. Among the things that AI needs to represent are Categories, Objects, Properties, Relations between objects, Situations, States, Time, Events, Causes and effects, Knowledge about knowledge, and so on. The problems in AI can be classified in two general types
    [3, 4], Search Problems and Representation Problem. There exist different ways to reach this objective. So, we have [3] Logics, Rules, Frames, Associative Nets, Scripts and so on, that are often interconnected. Also, it will be very useful, in dealing with problems of uncertainty and causality, to introduce Bayesian Networks and particularly, a principal tool as the Essential Graph. We attempt here to show the scope of application of such versatile methods, currently fundamental in Medicine.

  17. Analysis methods of neutrons induced resonances in the transmission experiments by time-of-flight and automation of these methods on IBM 7094 II computer; Methode d'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons dans les experiences de transmission par temps-de-vol et automatisation de ces methodes sur ordinateur IBM-7094 II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corge, C

    1967-07-01

    The neutron induced resonances analysis aims to determine the neutrons characteristics, leading to the excitation energies, de-excitation probabilities by gamma radiation emission, by neutron emission or by fission, their spin, their parity... This document describes the methods developed, or adapted, the calculation schemes and the algorithms implemented to realize such analysis on a computer, from data obtained during time-of-flight experiments on the linear accelerator of Saclay. (A.L.B.)

  18. Analysis methods of neutrons induced resonances in the transmission experiments by time-of-flight and automation of these methods on IBM 7094 II computer; Methode d'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons dans les experiences de transmission par temps-de-vol et automatisation de ces methodes sur ordinateur IBM-7094 II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corge, C

    1967-07-01

    The neutron induced resonances analysis aims to determine the neutrons characteristics, leading to the excitation energies, de-excitation probabilities by gamma radiation emission, by neutron emission or by fission, their spin, their parity... This document describes the methods developed, or adapted, the calculation schemes and the algorithms implemented to realize such analysis on a computer, from data obtained during time-of-flight experiments on the linear accelerator of Saclay. (A.L.B.)

  19. CMS distributed computing workflow experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer; Gutsche, Oliver; Haas, Jeffrey D.; Prosper, Harrison B.; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Hahn, Kristian; Klute, Markus; Mohapatra, Ajit; Spinoso, Vincenzo; Kcira, Dorian; Caudron, Julien; Liao, Junhui; Pin, Arnaud; Schul, Nicolas; De Lentdecker, Gilles; McCartin, Joseph; Vanelderen, Lukas; Janssen, Xavier; Tsyganov, Andrey; Barge, Derek; Lahiff, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The vast majority of the CMS Computing capacity, which is organized in a tiered hierarchy, is located away from CERN. The 7 Tier-1 sites archive the LHC proton-proton collision data that is initially processed at CERN. These sites provide access to all recorded and simulated data for the Tier-2 sites, via wide-area network (WAN) transfers. All central data processing workflows are executed at the Tier-1 level, which contain re-reconstruction and skimming workflows of collision data as well as reprocessing of simulated data to adapt to changing detector conditions. This paper describes the operation of the CMS processing infrastructure at the Tier-1 level. The Tier-1 workflows are described in detail. The operational optimization of resource usage is described. In particular, the variation of different workflows during the data taking period of 2010, their efficiencies and latencies as well as their impact on the delivery of physics results is discussed and lessons are drawn from this experience. The simulation of proton-proton collisions for the CMS experiment is primarily carried out at the second tier of the CMS computing infrastructure. Half of the Tier-2 sites of CMS are reserved for central Monte Carlo (MC) production while the other half is available for user analysis. This paper summarizes the large throughput of the MC production operation during the data taking period of 2010 and discusses the latencies and efficiencies of the various types of MC production workflows. We present the operational procedures to optimize the usage of available resources and we the operational model of CMS for including opportunistic resources, such as the larger Tier-3 sites, into the central production operation.

  20. CMS distributed computing workflow experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer; Gutsche, Oliver; Haas, Jeffrey D; Prosper, Harrison B; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Hahn, Kristian; Klute, Markus; Mohapatra, Ajit; Spinoso, Vincenzo; Kcira, Dorian; Caudron, Julien; Liao Junhui; Pin, Arnaud; Schul, Nicolas; Lentdecker, Gilles De; McCartin, Joseph; Vanelderen, Lukas; Janssen, Xavier; Tsyganov, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of the CMS Computing capacity, which is organized in a tiered hierarchy, is located away from CERN. The 7 Tier-1 sites archive the LHC proton-proton collision data that is initially processed at CERN. These sites provide access to all recorded and simulated data for the Tier-2 sites, via wide-area network (WAN) transfers. All central data processing workflows are executed at the Tier-1 level, which contain re-reconstruction and skimming workflows of collision data as well as reprocessing of simulated data to adapt to changing detector conditions. This paper describes the operation of the CMS processing infrastructure at the Tier-1 level. The Tier-1 workflows are described in detail. The operational optimization of resource usage is described. In particular, the variation of different workflows during the data taking period of 2010, their efficiencies and latencies as well as their impact on the delivery of physics results is discussed and lessons are drawn from this experience. The simulation of proton-proton collisions for the CMS experiment is primarily carried out at the second tier of the CMS computing infrastructure. Half of the Tier-2 sites of CMS are reserved for central Monte Carlo (MC) production while the other half is available for user analysis. This paper summarizes the large throughput of the MC production operation during the data taking period of 2010 and discusses the latencies and efficiencies of the various types of MC production workflows. We present the operational procedures to optimize the usage of available resources and we the operational model of CMS for including opportunistic resources, such as the larger Tier-3 sites, into the central production operation.

  1. Numerical methods in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Björck, Åke

    2015-01-01

    Matrix algorithms are at the core of scientific computing and are indispensable tools in most applications in engineering. This book offers a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of modern methods in matrix computation. It uses a unified approach to direct and iterative methods for linear systems, least squares and eigenvalue problems. A thorough analysis of the stability, accuracy, and complexity of the treated methods is given. Numerical Methods in Matrix Computations is suitable for use in courses on scientific computing and applied technical areas at advanced undergraduate and graduate level. A large bibliography is provided, which includes both historical and review papers as well as recent research papers. This makes the book useful also as a reference and guide to further study and research work. Åke Björck is a professor emeritus at the Department of Mathematics, Linköping University. He is a Fellow of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  2. Numerical computer methods part D

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to brief researchers of the importance of data analysis in enzymology, and of the modern methods that have developed concomitantly with computer hardware. It is also to validate researchers' computer programs with real and synthetic data to ascertain that the results produced are what they expected. Selected Contents: Prediction of protein structure; modeling and studying proteins with molecular dynamics; statistical error in isothermal titration calorimetry; analysis of circular dichroism data; model comparison methods.

  3. Nuclear stethoscope and myocard check-like computed method for loading experiments in the State Hospital for Cardiology, Balatonfuered, Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M.; Boeszoermenyi, E.; Nemeth, L.; Kellenyi, L.; Karman, M.; Ludvigh, K.; Erdelyi, K.; Hajduczki, I.; Kantor, E. (Allami Szivkorhaz, Balatonfuered (Hungary))

    1982-05-01

    The radio-cyclographic technique (RCG) by ECG-triggered coherent averaging has been elaborated firstly for the presentation of cyclical fluctuation of the radioactive indicator in the heart during the equilibrium period. Later it was extended to other cardiac products, e.g. mechano-cardiography (M-CG). The stroke volume (SV) equivalence of the RCG's amplitude was verified first in Balatonfuered, by dye dilution comparative experiments (corr. coeff. 0.96 in the 40-75 ml/m/sup 2/ SV-index range). The pressure/volume paralellogram as expression of the momentary cardiac activity has been attempted from the right part of the heart by means of micro-catheterization and RCG, similarly was the RCG-volume and apex-CG 'pressure' loop processed; nowadays the derivation of the left ventricular systolic pressure pattern is attempted on the basis of RCG-volumetry. The ICA-70 multichannel analyser (KFKI) served for the A/D conversion analog curves, directly or from impulse-code modulated magnetic stores, in millisec time resolution. Apart from the averaging, the system can also be used for beat to beat analysis. The mathematical operations are: time interval histogram, smoothing of different cyclograms by Fourier processing giving also the accuracy of the fitting by corr. coeff. The program evaluates the time and velocity parameters, like PEP, LVET and their quotient in basal state and during bicycle ergometric load carried out in supine position, under influence of (cardiac) drugs. The program also serves for the volumetric control of the atrial diagnostic pacing and for arrhythmic analysis. RCG-measured SV-monitoring with simultaneous serum myoglobin level determination provides useful prognostic index (by their inverse relations) in the hyperacute state of AMI in the coronary care unit bedside.

  4. Nuclear stethoscope and myocard check-like computed method for loading experiments in the State Hospital for Cardiology, Balatonfuered, Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M; Boeszoermenyi, E; Nemeth, L; Kellenyi, L; Karman, M; Ludvigh, K; Erdelyi, K; Hajduczki, I; Kantor, E [Allami Szivkorhaz, Balatonfuered (Hungary)

    1982-05-01

    The radio-cyclographic technique (RCG) by ECG-triggered coherent averaging has been elaborated firstly for the presentation of cyclical fluctuation of the radioactive indicator in the heart during the equilibrium period. Later it was extended to other cardiac products, e.g. mechano-cardiography (M-CG). The stroke volume (SV) equivalence of the RCG's amplitude was verified first in Balatonfuered, by dye dilution comparative experiments (corr. coeff. 0.96 in the 40-75 ml/m/sup 2/ SV-index range). The pressure/volume paralellogram as expression of the momentary cardiac activity has been attempted from the right part of the heart by means of micro-catheterization and RCG, similarly was the RCG-volume and apex-CG 'pressure' loop processed; nowadays the derivation of the left ventricular systolic pressure pattern is attempted on the basis of RCG-volumetry. The ICA-70 multichannel analyser (KFKI) served for the A/D conversion analog curves, directly or from impulse-code modulated magnetic stores, in millisec time resolution. Apart from the averaging, the system can also be used for beat to beat analysis. The mathematical operations are: time interval histogram, smoothing of different cyclograms by Fourier processing giving also the accuracy of the fitting by corr. coeff. The program evaluates the time and velocity parameters, like PEP, LVET and their quotient in basal state and during bicycle ergometric load carried out in supine position, under influence of (cardiac) drugs. The program also serves for the volumetric control of the atrial diagnostic pacing and for arrhythmic analysis. RCG-measured SV-monitoring with simultaneous serum myoglobin level determination provides useful prognostic index (by their inverse relations) in the hyperacute state of AMI in the coronary care unit bedside.

  5. Nuclear stethoscope and myocard check-like computed method for loading experiments in the State Hospital for Cardiology, Balatonfuered, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, M.; Boeszoermenyi, E.; Nemeth, L.; Kellenyi, L.; Karman, M.; Ludvigh, K.; Erdelyi, K.; Hajduczki, I.; Kantor, E.

    1982-01-01

    The radio-cyclographic technique (RCG) by ECG-triggered coherent averaging has been elaborated firstly for the presentation of cyclical fluctuation of the radioactive indicator in the heart during the equilibrium period, later it was extended to other cardiac products, e.g. mechano-cardiography (M-CG), too. The stroke volume (SV) equivalence of the RCG's amplitude was verified first in Balatonfuered, by dye dilution comparative experiments (corr. coeff. 0.96 in the 40-75 ml/m 2 SV-index range). The pressure/volume paralellogram as expression of the momentary cardiac activity has been attempted from the right part of the heart by means of micro-catheterization and RCG, similarly was the RCG-volume and apex-CG 'pressure' loop processed; nowadays the derivation of the left ventricular systolic pressure pattern is attempted on the basis of RCG-volumetry. The ICA-70 multichannel analyser (KFKI) served for the A/D conversion analog curves, directly or from impulse-code modulated magnetic stores, in millisec time resolution. Apart from the averaging, the system can also be used for beat to beat analysis. The other devices are also Hungarian-made: a four-channel radiocirculograph of Videoton, a desk calculator of the EMG type 666/B with 8 K memory, different nuclear instruments of the Gamma Works and a MEDICOR universal ergometer type KE-21. The mathematical operations are: time interval histogram, smoothing of different cyclograms by Fourier processing giving also the accuracy of the fitting by corr. coeff. The program evaluates the time and velocity parameters, like PEP, LVET and their quotient in basal state and during bicycle ergometric load carried out in supine position, under influence of (cardiac) drugs. The program also serves for the volumetric control of the atrial diaanostic pacing and for arrhythmic analysis. RCG-measured SV-monitoring with simultaneous serum myoglobin level determination provides useful prognostic index (by their inverse relations) in the

  6. CMS Distributed Computing Workflow Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Jeffrey David

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of the CMS Computing capacity, which is organized in a tiered hierarchy, is located away from CERN. The 7 Tier-1 sites archive the LHC proton-proton collision data that is initially processed at CERN. These sites provide access to all recorded and simulated data for the Tier-2 sites, via wide-area network (WAN) transfers. All central data processing workflows are executed at the Tier-1 level, which contain re-reconstruction and skimming workflows of collision data as well as reprocessing of simulated data to adapt to changing detector conditions. This paper describes the operation of the CMS processing infrastructure at the Tier-1 level. The Tier-1 workflows are described in detail. The operational optimization of resource usage is described. In particular, the variation of different workflows during the data taking period of 2010, their efficiencies and latencies as well as their impact on the delivery of physics results is discussed and lessons are drawn from this experience. The simul...

  7. Computational methods in earthquake engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Plevris, Vagelis; Lagaros, Nikos

    2017-01-01

    This is the third book in a series on Computational Methods in Earthquake Engineering. The purpose of this volume is to bring together the scientific communities of Computational Mechanics and Structural Dynamics, offering a wide coverage of timely issues on contemporary Earthquake Engineering. This volume will facilitate the exchange of ideas in topics of mutual interest and can serve as a platform for establishing links between research groups with complementary activities. The computational aspects are emphasized in order to address difficult engineering problems of great social and economic importance. .

  8. Methods and experimental techniques in computer engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Schiaffonati, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Computing and science reveal a synergic relationship. On the one hand, it is widely evident that computing plays an important role in the scientific endeavor. On the other hand, the role of scientific method in computing is getting increasingly important, especially in providing ways to experimentally evaluate the properties of complex computing systems. This book critically presents these issues from a unitary conceptual and methodological perspective by addressing specific case studies at the intersection between computing and science. The book originates from, and collects the experience of, a course for PhD students in Information Engineering held at the Politecnico di Milano. Following the structure of the course, the book features contributions from some researchers who are working at the intersection between computing and science.

  9. Empirical evaluation methods in computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Henrik I

    2002-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of methods for the empirical evaluation of computer vision techniques. The practical use of computer vision requires empirical evaluation to ensure that the overall system has a guaranteed performance. The book contains articles that cover the design of experiments for evaluation, range image segmentation, the evaluation of face recognition and diffusion methods, image matching using correlation methods, and the performance of medical image processing algorithms. Sample Chapter(s). Foreword (228 KB). Chapter 1: Introduction (505 KB). Contents: Automate

  10. Methods for computing color anaglyphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, David F.; Zhou, Ya; Sullivan, Sophia

    2010-02-01

    A new computation technique is presented for calculating pixel colors in anaglyph images. The method depends upon knowing the RGB spectral distributions of the display device and the transmission functions of the filters in the viewing glasses. It requires the solution of a nonlinear least-squares program for each pixel in a stereo pair and is based on minimizing color distances in the CIEL*a*b* uniform color space. The method is compared with several techniques for computing anaglyphs including approximation in CIE space using the Euclidean and Uniform metrics, the Photoshop method and its variants, and a method proposed by Peter Wimmer. We also discuss the methods of desaturation and gamma correction for reducing retinal rivalry.

  11. Computational and mathematical methods in brain atlasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L

    2017-12-01

    Brain atlases have a wide range of use from education to research to clinical applications. Mathematical methods as well as computational methods and tools play a major role in the process of brain atlas building and developing atlas-based applications. Computational methods and tools cover three areas: dedicated editors for brain model creation, brain navigators supporting multiple platforms, and atlas-assisted specific applications. Mathematical methods in atlas building and developing atlas-aided applications deal with problems in image segmentation, geometric body modelling, physical modelling, atlas-to-scan registration, visualisation, interaction and virtual reality. Here I overview computational and mathematical methods in atlas building and developing atlas-assisted applications, and share my contribution to and experience in this field.

  12. Can smartphones be used to bring computer-based tasks from the lab to the field? A mobile experience-sampling method study about the pace of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Stefan; Lewetz, David; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2017-12-06

    Researchers are increasingly using smartphones to collect scientific data. To date, most smartphone studies have collected questionnaire data or data from the built-in sensors. So far, few studies have analyzed whether smartphones can also be used to conduct computer-based tasks (CBTs). Using a mobile experience-sampling method study and a computer-based tapping task as examples (N = 246; twice a day for three weeks, 6,000+ measurements), we analyzed how well smartphones can be used to conduct a CBT. We assessed methodological aspects such as potential technologically induced problems, dropout, task noncompliance, and the accuracy of millisecond measurements. Overall, we found few problems: Dropout rate was low, and the time measurements were very accurate. Nevertheless, particularly at the beginning of the study, some participants did not comply with the task instructions, probably because they did not read the instructions before beginning the task. To summarize, the results suggest that smartphones can be used to transfer CBTs from the lab to the field, and that real-world variations across device manufacturers, OS types, and CPU load conditions did not substantially distort the results.

  13. Computational methods in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumudu P. Leelananda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The process for drug discovery and development is challenging, time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided drug discovery (CADD tools can act as a virtual shortcut, assisting in the expedition of this long process and potentially reducing the cost of research and development. Today CADD has become an effective and indispensable tool in therapeutic development. The human genome project has made available a substantial amount of sequence data that can be used in various drug discovery projects. Additionally, increasing knowledge of biological structures, as well as increasing computer power have made it possible to use computational methods effectively in various phases of the drug discovery and development pipeline. The importance of in silico tools is greater than ever before and has advanced pharmaceutical research. Here we present an overview of computational methods used in different facets of drug discovery and highlight some of the recent successes. In this review, both structure-based and ligand-based drug discovery methods are discussed. Advances in virtual high-throughput screening, protein structure prediction methods, protein–ligand docking, pharmacophore modeling and QSAR techniques are reviewed.

  14. Combinatorial methods with computer applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Jonathan L

    2007-01-01

    Combinatorial Methods with Computer Applications provides in-depth coverage of recurrences, generating functions, partitions, and permutations, along with some of the most interesting graph and network topics, design constructions, and finite geometries. Requiring only a foundation in discrete mathematics, it can serve as the textbook in a combinatorial methods course or in a combined graph theory and combinatorics course.After an introduction to combinatorics, the book explores six systematic approaches within a comprehensive framework: sequences, solving recurrences, evaluating summation exp

  15. Using computed tomography enterography to evaluate patients with Crohn's disease: what impact does examiner experience have on the reproducibility of the method?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlin, Stenio; Favaro, Larissa Rossini; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Taniguchi, Lincoln Seiji; Argollo, Marjorie Costa; Ambrogini Junior, Orlando; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: stenioburlin@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Loch, Ana Paula [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2017-01-15

    Objective: To assess the impact that examiner experience has on the reproducibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) enterography in the detection of radiological signs in patients with Crohn's disease. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, cross-sectional observational study involving the analysis of CT enterography scans of 20 patients with Crohn's disease. The exams were analyzed independently by two radiologists in their last year of residence (duo I) and by two abdominal imaging specialists (duo II). The interobserver agreement of each pair of examiners in identifying the main radiological signs was calculated with the kappa test. The accuracy of the examiners with less experience was quantified by using the consensus among three experienced examiners as a reference. Results: Duo I and duo II obtained a similar interobserver agreement, with a moderate to good correlation, for mural hyper enhancement, parietal thickening, mural stratification, fat densification, and comb sign (kappa: 0.45 - 0.64). The less experienced examiners showed an accuracy > 80% for all signs, except for lymph nodes and fistula, for which it ranged from 60% to 75%. Conclusion: Less experienced examiners have a tendency to present a level of interobserver agreement similar to that of experienced examiners in evaluating Crohn's disease through CT enterography, as well as showing satisfactory accuracy in identifying most radiological signs of the disease. (author)

  16. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  17. Computing challenges of the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krammer, N.; Liko, D.

    2017-01-01

    The success of the LHC experiments is due to the magnificent performance of the detector systems and the excellent operating computing systems. The CMS offline software and computing system is successfully fulfilling the LHC Run 2 requirements. For the increased data rate of future LHC operation, together with high pileup interactions, improvements of the usage of the current computing facilities and new technologies became necessary. Especially for the challenge of the future HL-LHC a more flexible and sophisticated computing model is needed. In this presentation, I will discuss the current computing system used in the LHC Run 2 and future computing facilities for the HL-LHC runs using flexible computing technologies like commercial and academic computing clouds. The cloud resources are highly virtualized and can be deployed for a variety of computing tasks providing the capacities for the increasing needs of large scale scientific computing.

  18. Sharing experience and knowledge with wearable computers

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Marcus; Drugge, Mikael; Parnes, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Wearable computer have mostly been looked on when used in isolation. But the wearable computer with Internet connection is a good tool for communication and for sharing knowledge and experience with other people. The unobtrusiveness of this type of equipment makes it easy to communicate at most type of locations and contexts. The wearable computer makes it easy to be a mediator of other people knowledge and becoming a knowledgeable user. This paper describes the experience gained from testing...

  19. Numerical computer methods part E

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    The contributions in this volume emphasize analysis of experimental data and analytical biochemistry, with examples taken from biochemistry. They serve to inform biomedical researchers of the modern data analysis methods that have developed concomitantly with computer hardware. Selected Contents: A practical approach to interpretation of SVD results; modeling of oscillations in endocrine networks with feedback; quantifying asynchronous breathing; sample entropy; wavelet modeling and processing of nasal airflow traces.

  20. Domain decomposition methods and parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurant, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we show how to efficiently solve large linear systems on parallel computers. These linear systems arise from discretization of scientific computing problems described by systems of partial differential equations. We show how to get a discrete finite dimensional system from the continuous problem and the chosen conjugate gradient iterative algorithm is briefly described. Then, the different kinds of parallel architectures are reviewed and their advantages and deficiencies are emphasized. We sketch the problems found in programming the conjugate gradient method on parallel computers. For this algorithm to be efficient on parallel machines, domain decomposition techniques are introduced. We give results of numerical experiments showing that these techniques allow a good rate of convergence for the conjugate gradient algorithm as well as computational speeds in excess of a billion of floating point operations per second. (author). 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs., 1 inset

  1. ATLAS Distributed Computing: Experience and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25 fb-1 of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100 PB distributed across more than 150 computing centers around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics program including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2014 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  2. ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25/fb of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100~PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  3. Methods and computing challenges of the realistic simulation of physics events in the presence of pile-up in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We are now in a regime where we observe substantial multiple proton-proton collisions within each filled LHC bunch-crossing and also multiple filled bunch-crossings within the sensitive time window of the ATLAS detector. This will increase with increased luminosity in the near future. Including these effects in Monte Carlo simulation poses significant computing challenges. We present a description of the standard approach used by the ATLAS experiment and details of how we manage the conflicting demands of keeping the background dataset size as small as possible while minimizing the effect of background event re-use. We also present details of the methods used to minimize the memory footprint of these digitization jobs, to keep them within the grid limit, despite combining the information from thousands of simulated events at once. We also describe an alternative approach, known as Overlay. Here, the actual detector conditions are sampled from raw data using a special zero-bias trigger, and the simulated physi...

  4. Experiments using coincidence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Dhani.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on γ spectroscopy using the simple coincidence techniques, including investigation of angular distribution of γ radiation from annihilation process in decay of Na 22 , γ - γ angular correlation technique in decay of Co 60 , decay scheme study of Bi 207 and life time measurement of nuclear Pb 207 excited state have been carried out. (author)

  5. Computational methods for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kuangyu; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains original submissions on the development and application of molecular imaging computing. The editors invited authors to submit high-quality contributions on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to: • Image Synthesis & Reconstruction of Emission Tomography (PET, SPECT) and other Molecular Imaging Modalities • Molecular Imaging Enhancement • Data Analysis of Clinical & Pre-clinical Molecular Imaging • Multi-Modal Image Processing (PET/CT, PET/MR, SPECT/CT, etc.) • Machine Learning and Data Mining in Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging is an evolving clinical and research discipline enabling the visualization, characterization and quantification of biological processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living subjects. Computational methods play an important role in the development of molecular imaging, from image synthesis to data analysis and from clinical diagnosis to therapy individualization. This work will bring readers fro...

  6. Computer methods in general relativity: algebraic computing

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, M E; Skea, J E F; Koutras, A; Krasinski, A; Hobill, D; McLenaghan, R G; Christensen, S M

    1993-01-01

    Karlhede & MacCallum [1] gave a procedure for determining the Lie algebra of the isometry group of an arbitrary pseudo-Riemannian manifold, which they intended to im- plement using the symbolic manipulation package SHEEP but never did. We have recently finished making this procedure explicit by giving an algorithm suitable for implemen- tation on a computer [2]. Specifically, we have written an algorithm for determining the isometry group of a spacetime (in four dimensions), and partially implemented this algorithm using the symbolic manipulation package CLASSI, which is an extension of SHEEP.

  7. Mental Rotation Ability and Computer Game Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecu, Zeynep; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2015-01-01

    Computer games, which are currently very popular among students, can affect different cognitive abilities. The purpose of the present study is to examine undergraduate students' experiences and preferences in playing computer games as well as their mental rotation abilities. A total of 163 undergraduate students participated. The results showed a…

  8. ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairz, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25 fb −1 of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100 PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, energies and event complexities. An essential requirement will be the efficient utilisation of current and future processor technologies as well as a broad range of computing platforms, including supercomputing and cloud resources. We will report on experience gained thus far and our progress in preparing ATLAS computing for the future

  9. Fast computation of the characteristics method on vector computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Teruhiko

    2001-11-01

    Fast computation of the characteristics method to solve the neutron transport equation in a heterogeneous geometry has been studied. Two vector computation algorithms; an odd-even sweep (OES) method and an independent sequential sweep (ISS) method have been developed and their efficiency to a typical fuel assembly calculation has been investigated. For both methods, a vector computation is 15 times faster than a scalar computation. From a viewpoint of comparison between the OES and ISS methods, the followings are found: 1) there is a small difference in a computation speed, 2) the ISS method shows a faster convergence and 3) the ISS method saves about 80% of computer memory size compared with the OES method. It is, therefore, concluded that the ISS method is superior to the OES method as a vectorization method. In the vector computation, a table-look-up method to reduce computation time of an exponential function saves only 20% of a whole computation time. Both the coarse mesh rebalance method and the Aitken acceleration method are effective as acceleration methods for the characteristics method, a combination of them saves 70-80% of outer iterations compared with a free iteration. (author)

  10. Amorphous nanoparticles — Experiments and computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Vo Van; Ganguli, Dibyendu

    2012-01-01

    The data obtained by both experiments and computer simulations concerning the amorphous nanoparticles for decades including methods of synthesis, characterization, structural properties, atomic mechanism of a glass formation in nanoparticles, crystallization of the amorphous nanoparticles, physico-chemical properties (i.e. catalytic, optical, thermodynamic, magnetic, bioactivity and other properties) and various applications in science and technology have been reviewed. Amorphous nanoparticles coated with different surfactants are also reviewed as an extension in this direction. Much attention is paid to the pressure-induced polyamorphism of the amorphous nanoparticles or amorphization of the nanocrystalline counterparts. We also introduce here nanocomposites and nanofluids containing amorphous nanoparticles. Overall, amorphous nanoparticles exhibit a disordered structure different from that of corresponding bulks or from that of the nanocrystalline counterparts. Therefore, amorphous nanoparticles can have unique physico-chemical properties differed from those of the crystalline counterparts leading to their potential applications in science and technology.

  11. The Computer Game as a Somatic Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Smed

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the experience of playing computer games. With a media archaeological outset the relation between human and machine is emphasised as the key to understand the experience. This relation is further explored by drawing on a phenomenological philosophy of technology which...

  12. Computational Methods and Function Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Saff, Edward; Salinas, Luis; Varga, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The volume is devoted to the interaction of modern scientific computation and classical function theory. Many problems in pure and more applied function theory can be tackled using modern computing facilities: numerically as well as in the sense of computer algebra. On the other hand, computer algorithms are often based on complex function theory, and dedicated research on their theoretical foundations can lead to great enhancements in performance. The contributions - original research articles, a survey and a collection of problems - cover a broad range of such problems.

  13. An experiment for determining the Euler load by direct computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.; Stein, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    A direct algorithm is presented for computing the Euler load of a column from experimental data. The method is based on exact inextensional theory for imperfect columns, which predicts two distinct deflected shapes at loads near the Euler load. The bending stiffness of the column appears in the expression for the Euler load along with the column length, therefore the experimental data allows a direct computation of bending stiffness. Experiments on graphite-epoxy columns of rectangular cross-section are reported in the paper. The bending stiffness of each composite column computed from experiment is compared with predictions from laminated plate theory.

  14. RC Circuits: Some Computer-Interfaced Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Pratibha; Verma, Mallika

    1994-01-01

    Describes a simple computer-interface experiment for recording the response of an RC network to an arbitrary input excitation. The setup is used to pose a variety of open-ended investigations in network modeling by varying the initial conditions, input signal waveform, and the circuit topology. (DDR)

  15. Incorporating lab experience into computer security courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben Othmane, L.; Bhuse, V.; Lilien, L.T.

    2013-01-01

    We describe our experience with teaching computer security labs at two different universities. We report on the hardware and software lab setups, summarize lab assignments, present the challenges encountered, and discuss the lessons learned. We agree with and emphasize the viewpoint that security

  16. Volunteer computing experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00068610; The ATLAS collaboration; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Cameron, David; Filipčič, Andrej; Lançon, Eric; Wu, Wenjing

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers’ resources make up a sizeable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one task to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  17. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Bourdarios, Claire; Lan\\c con, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers' resources make up a sizable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one job to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  18. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam-Bourdarios, C.; Bianchi, R.; Cameron, D.; Filipčič, A.; Isacchini, G.; Lançon, E.; Wu, W.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers’ resources make up a sizeable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one task to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  19. Finding of experience of the use of computer-integrated forms and methods of teaching in the process of preparation of future teachers of initial school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinopalnikova N.N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically grounded and experimentally examined that one of the trends of future teachers training for the integrated activity is gaining experience in using the integrated organization forms of learning. It is realized in the process of specially organized student's learning and during their pedagogical practice. It was promoted by conducting the special course The integrated forms of learning organization in primary school with the use of interactive forms and methods of learning, fulfilling the aimed tasks while passing pedagogical practice.

  20. Computational methods for reversed-field equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Auerbach, S.P.; Willmann, P.A.; Berk, H.L.; McNamara, B.

    1980-01-01

    Investigating the temporal evolution of reversed-field equilibrium caused by transport processes requires the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation and computation of field-line-averaged quantities. The technique for field-line averaging and the computation of the Grad-Shafranov equation are presented. Application of Green's function to specify the Grad-Shafranov equation boundary condition is discussed. Hill's vortex formulas used to verify certain computations are detailed. Use of computer software to implement computational methods is described

  1. Computational Experiments for Science and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles

    2011-01-01

    How to integrate simulation-based engineering and science (SBES) into the science curriculum smoothly is a challenging question. For the importance of SBES to be appreciated, the core value of simulations-that they help people understand natural phenomena and solve engineering problems-must be taught. A strategy to achieve this goal is to introduce computational experiments to the science curriculum to replace or supplement textbook illustrations and exercises and to complement or frame hands-on or wet lab experiments. In this way, students will have an opportunity to learn about SBES without compromising other learning goals required by the standards and teachers will welcome these tools as they strengthen what they are already teaching. This paper demonstrates this idea using a number of examples in physics, chemistry, and engineering. These exemplary computational experiments show that it is possible to create a curriculum that is both deeper and wider.

  2. Computing and data handling recent experiences at Fermilab and SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Computing has become evermore central to the doing of high energy physics. There are now major second and third generation experiments for which the largest single cost is computing. At the same time the availability of ''cheap'' computing has made possible experiments which were previously considered infeasible. The result of this trend has been an explosion of computing and computing needs. I will review here the magnitude of the problem, as seen at Fermilab and SLAC, and the present methods for dealing with it. I will then undertake the dangerous assignment of projecting the needs and solutions forthcoming in the next few years at both laboratories. I will concentrate on the ''offline'' problem; the process of turning terabytes of data tapes into pages of physics journals. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Novel methods in computational finance

    CERN Document Server

    Günther, Michael; Maten, E

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses the state-of-the-art and open problems in computational finance. It presents a collection of research outcomes and reviews of the work from the STRIKE project, an FP7 Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) project in which academic partners trained early-stage researchers in close cooperation with a broader range of associated partners, including from the private sector. The aim of the project was to arrive at a deeper understanding of complex (mostly nonlinear) financial models and to develop effective and robust numerical schemes for solving linear and nonlinear problems arising from the mathematical theory of pricing financial derivatives and related financial products. This was accomplished by means of financial modelling, mathematical analysis and numerical simulations, optimal control techniques and validation of models. In recent years the computational complexity of mathematical models employed in financial mathematics has witnessed tremendous growth. Advanced numerical techni...

  4. COMPUTER METHODS OF GENETIC ANALYSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Osipov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The basic statistical methods used in conducting the genetic analysis of human traits. We studied by segregation analysis, linkage analysis and allelic associations. Developed software for the implementation of these methods support.

  5. Computational methods in drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Sumudu P. Leelananda; Steffen Lindert

    2016-01-01

    The process for drug discovery and development is challenging, time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided drug discovery (CADD) tools can act as a virtual shortcut, assisting in the expedition of this long process and potentially reducing the cost of research and development. Today CADD has become an effective and indispensable tool in therapeutic development. The human genome project has made available a substantial amount of sequence data that can be used in various drug discovery project...

  6. Ontological and Epistemological Issues Regarding Climate Models and Computer Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezer, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Recent philosophical discussions (Parker 2009; Frigg and Reiss 2009; Winsberg, 2009; Morgon 2002, 2003, 2005; Gula 2002) about the ontology of computer simulation experiments and the epistemology of inferences drawn from them are of particular relevance to climate science as computer modeling and analysis are instrumental in understanding climatic systems. How do computer simulation experiments compare with traditional experiments? Is there an ontological difference between these two methods of inquiry? Are there epistemological considerations that result in one type of inference being more reliable than the other? What are the implications of these questions with respect to climate studies that rely on computer simulation analysis? In this paper, I examine these philosophical questions within the context of climate science, instantiating concerns in the philosophical literature with examples found in analysis of global climate change. I concentrate on Wendy Parker’s (2009) account of computer simulation studies, which offers a treatment of these and other questions relevant to investigations of climate change involving such modelling. Two theses at the center of Parker’s account will be the focus of this paper. The first is that computer simulation experiments ought to be regarded as straightforward material experiments; which is to say, there is no significant ontological difference between computer and traditional experimentation. Parker’s second thesis is that some of the emphasis on the epistemological importance of materiality has been misplaced. I examine both of these claims. First, I inquire as to whether viewing computer and traditional experiments as ontologically similar in the way she does implies that there is no proper distinction between abstract experiments (such as ‘thought experiments’ as well as computer experiments) and traditional ‘concrete’ ones. Second, I examine the notion of materiality (i.e., the material commonality between

  7. Hybrid Monte Carlo methods in computational finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leitao Rodriguez, A.

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are highly appreciated and intensively employed in computational finance in the context of financial derivatives valuation or risk management. The method offers valuable advantages like flexibility, easy interpretation and straightforward implementation. Furthermore, the

  8. Spacelab experiment computer study. Volume 1: Executive summary (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. L.; Hodges, B. C.; Christy, J. O.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative cost for various Spacelab flight hardware configurations is provided along with varied software development options. A cost analysis of Spacelab computer hardware and software is presented. The cost study is discussed based on utilization of a central experiment computer with optional auxillary equipment. Groundrules and assumptions used in deriving the costing methods for all options in the Spacelab experiment study are presented. The groundrules and assumptions, are analysed and the options along with their cost considerations, are discussed. It is concluded that Spacelab program cost for software development and maintenance is independent of experimental hardware and software options, that distributed standard computer concept simplifies software integration without a significant increase in cost, and that decisions on flight computer hardware configurations should not be made until payload selection for a given mission and a detailed analysis of the mission requirements are completed.

  9. Advanced computational electromagnetic methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wenxing; Elsherbeni, Atef; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    This new resource covers the latest developments in computational electromagnetic methods, with emphasis on cutting-edge applications. This book is designed to extend existing literature to the latest development in computational electromagnetic methods, which are of interest to readers in both academic and industrial areas. The topics include advanced techniques in MoM, FEM and FDTD, spectral domain method, GPU and Phi hardware acceleration, metamaterials, frequency and time domain integral equations, and statistics methods in bio-electromagnetics.

  10. Computational Methods for Biomolecular Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Olsen, Brett; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of intermolecular interactions is essential for insight into how cells develop, operate, communicate and control their activities. Such interactions include several components: contributions from linear, angular, and torsional forces in covalent bonds, van der Waals forces, as well as electrostatics. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long range and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, and amino or nucleic acids, which are some of the primary components of living systems. Electrostatics, therefore, play important roles in determining the structure, motion and function of a wide range of biological molecules. This chapter presents a brief overview of electrostatic interactions in cellular systems with a particular focus on how computational tools can be used to investigate these types of interactions. PMID:17964951

  11. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  12. Computational methods in power system analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Idema, Reijer

    2014-01-01

    This book treats state-of-the-art computational methods for power flow studies and contingency analysis. In the first part the authors present the relevant computational methods and mathematical concepts. In the second part, power flow and contingency analysis are treated. Furthermore, traditional methods to solve such problems are compared to modern solvers, developed using the knowledge of the first part of the book. Finally, these solvers are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally, clearly showing the benefits of the modern approach.

  13. Generalized Bell-inequality experiments and computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoban, Matty J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QD (United Kingdom); Wallman, Joel J. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Browne, Dan E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    We consider general settings of Bell inequality experiments with many parties, where each party chooses from a finite number of measurement settings each with a finite number of outcomes. We investigate the constraints that Bell inequalities place upon the correlations possible in local hidden variable theories using a geometrical picture of correlations. We show that local hidden variable theories can be characterized in terms of limited computational expressiveness, which allows us to characterize families of Bell inequalities. The limited computational expressiveness for many settings (each with many outcomes) generalizes previous results about the many-party situation each with a choice of two possible measurements (each with two outcomes). Using this computational picture we present generalizations of the Popescu-Rohrlich nonlocal box for many parties and nonbinary inputs and outputs at each site. Finally, we comment on the effect of preprocessing on measurement data in our generalized setting and show that it becomes problematic outside of the binary setting, in that it allows local hidden variable theories to simulate maximally nonlocal correlations such as those of these generalized Popescu-Rohrlich nonlocal boxes.

  14. Generalized Bell-inequality experiments and computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoban, Matty J.; Wallman, Joel J.; Browne, Dan E.

    2011-01-01

    We consider general settings of Bell inequality experiments with many parties, where each party chooses from a finite number of measurement settings each with a finite number of outcomes. We investigate the constraints that Bell inequalities place upon the correlations possible in local hidden variable theories using a geometrical picture of correlations. We show that local hidden variable theories can be characterized in terms of limited computational expressiveness, which allows us to characterize families of Bell inequalities. The limited computational expressiveness for many settings (each with many outcomes) generalizes previous results about the many-party situation each with a choice of two possible measurements (each with two outcomes). Using this computational picture we present generalizations of the Popescu-Rohrlich nonlocal box for many parties and nonbinary inputs and outputs at each site. Finally, we comment on the effect of preprocessing on measurement data in our generalized setting and show that it becomes problematic outside of the binary setting, in that it allows local hidden variable theories to simulate maximally nonlocal correlations such as those of these generalized Popescu-Rohrlich nonlocal boxes.

  15. Distributed computing grid experiences in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, Julia; Barrass, T; Bonacorsi, D; Bunn, Julian; Capiluppi, P; Corvo, M; Darmenov, N; De Filippis, N; Donno, F; Donvito, G; Eulisse, G; Fanfani, A; Fanzago, F; Filine, A; Grandi, C; Hernández, J M; Innocente, V; Jan, A; Lacaprara, S; Legrand, I; Metson, S; Newbold, D; Newman, H; Pierro, A; Silvestris, L; Steenberg, C; Stockinger, H; Taylor, Lucas; Thomas, M; Tuura, L; Van Lingen, F; Wildish, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The CMS experiment is currently developing a computing system capable of serving, processing and archiving the large number of events that will be generated when the CMS detector starts taking data. During 2004 CMS undertook a large scale data challenge to demonstrate the ability of the CMS computing system to cope with a sustained data- taking rate equivalent to 25% of startup rate. Its goals were: to run CMS event reconstruction at CERN for a sustained period at 25 Hz input rate; to distribute the data to several regional centers; and enable data access at those centers for analysis. Grid middleware was utilized to help complete all aspects of the challenge. To continue to provide scalable access from anywhere in the world to the data, CMS is developing a layer of software that uses Grid tools to gain access to data and resources, and that aims to provide physicists with a user friendly interface for submitting their analysis jobs. This paper describes the data challenge experience with Grid infrastructure ...

  16. Numerical analysis of resonances induced by s wave neutrons in transmission time-of-flight experiments with a computer IBM 7094 II; Methodes d'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons s dans les experiences de transmission par temps de vol et automatisation de ces methodes sur ordinateur IBM 7094 II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corge, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-01-01

    Numerical analysis of transmission resonances induced by s wave neutrons in time-of-flight experiments can be achieved in a fairly automatic way on an IBM 7094/II computer. The involved computations are carried out following a four step scheme: 1 - experimental raw data are processed to obtain the resonant transmissions, 2 - values of experimental quantities for each resonance are derived from the above transmissions, 3 - resonance parameters are determined using a least square method to solve the over determined system obtained by equalling theoretical functions to the correspondent experimental values. Four analysis methods are gathered in the same code, 4 - graphical control of the results is performed. (author) [French] L'automatisation, sur ordinateur IBM 7094/II, de l'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons s dans les experiences de transmission par temps de vol a ete accomplie en la decomposant selon un schema articule en quatre phases: 1 - le traitement des donnees experimentales brutes pour obtenir les transmissions interfero-resonnantes, 2 - la determination des grandeurs d'analyse a partir des transmissions precedentes, 3 - l'analyse proprement dite des resonances dont les parametres sont obtenus par la resolution d'un systeme surabondant. Quatre methodes d'analyse sont groupees en un meme programme, 4 - la procedure de verification graphique. (auteur)

  17. Numerical analysis of resonances induced by s wave neutrons in transmission time-of-flight experiments with a computer IBM 7094 II; Methodes d'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons s dans les experiences de transmission par temps de vol et automatisation de ces methodes sur ordinateur IBM 7094 II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corge, Ch. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-01-01

    Numerical analysis of transmission resonances induced by s wave neutrons in time-of-flight experiments can be achieved in a fairly automatic way on an IBM 7094/II computer. The involved computations are carried out following a four step scheme: 1 - experimental raw data are processed to obtain the resonant transmissions, 2 - values of experimental quantities for each resonance are derived from the above transmissions, 3 - resonance parameters are determined using a least square method to solve the over determined system obtained by equalling theoretical functions to the correspondent experimental values. Four analysis methods are gathered in the same code, 4 - graphical control of the results is performed. (author) [French] L'automatisation, sur ordinateur IBM 7094/II, de l'analyse des resonances induites par les neutrons s dans les experiences de transmission par temps de vol a ete accomplie en la decomposant selon un schema articule en quatre phases: 1 - le traitement des donnees experimentales brutes pour obtenir les transmissions interfero-resonnantes, 2 - la determination des grandeurs d'analyse a partir des transmissions precedentes, 3 - l'analyse proprement dite des resonances dont les parametres sont obtenus par la resolution d'un systeme surabondant. Quatre methodes d'analyse sont groupees en un meme programme, 4 - la procedure de verification graphique. (auteur)

  18. Electromagnetic field computation by network methods

    CERN Document Server

    Felsen, Leopold B; Russer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This monograph proposes a systematic and rigorous treatment of electromagnetic field representations in complex structures. The book presents new strong models by combining important computational methods. This is the last book of the late Leopold Felsen.

  19. Methods in computed angiotomography of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Asari, Shoji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko.

    1985-01-01

    Authors introduce the methods in computed angiotomography of the brain. Setting of the scan planes and levels and the minimum dose bolus (MinDB) injection of contrast medium are described in detail. These methods are easily and safely employed with the use of already propagated CT scanners. Computed angiotomography is expected for clinical applications in many institutions because of its diagnostic value in screening of cerebrovascular lesions and in demonstrating the relationship between pathological lesions and cerebral vessels. (author)

  20. Using sobol sequences for planning computer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statnikov, I. N.; Firsov, G. I.

    2017-12-01

    Discusses the use for research of problems of multicriteria synthesis of dynamic systems method of Planning LP-search (PLP-search), which not only allows on the basis of the simulation model experiments to revise the parameter space within specified ranges of their change, but also through special randomized nature of the planning of these experiments is to apply a quantitative statistical evaluation of influence of change of varied parameters and their pairwise combinations to analyze properties of the dynamic system.Start your abstract here...

  1. Computational techniques of the simplex method

    CERN Document Server

    Maros, István

    2003-01-01

    Computational Techniques of the Simplex Method is a systematic treatment focused on the computational issues of the simplex method. It provides a comprehensive coverage of the most important and successful algorithmic and implementation techniques of the simplex method. It is a unique source of essential, never discussed details of algorithmic elements and their implementation. On the basis of the book the reader will be able to create a highly advanced implementation of the simplex method which, in turn, can be used directly or as a building block in other solution algorithms.

  2. Computer controls for the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, M; Van Gorp, S; Friedag, P; De Leebeeck, V; Beck, D; Brand, H; Weinheimer, C; Breitenfeldt, M; Traykov, E; Mader, J; Roccia, S; Severijns, N; Herlert, A; Wauters, F; Zakoucky, D; Kozlov, V; Soti, G

    2011-01-01

    The WITCH experiment is a medium-scale experimental set-up located at ISOLDE/CERN. It combines a double Penning trap system with,a retardation spectrometer for energy measurements of recoil ions from beta decay. For a correct operation of such a set-up a whole range of different devices is required. Along with the installation and optimization of the set-up a computer control system was developed to control these devices. The CS-Framework that is developed and maintained at GSI, was chosen as a basis for this control system as it is perfectly suited to handle the distributed nature of a control system.We report here on the required hardware for WITCH, along with the basis of this CS-Framework and the add-ons that were implemented for WITCH. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical Methods for Stochastic Computations A Spectral Method Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Xiu, Dongbin

    2010-01-01

    The first graduate-level textbook to focus on fundamental aspects of numerical methods for stochastic computations, this book describes the class of numerical methods based on generalized polynomial chaos (gPC). These fast, efficient, and accurate methods are an extension of the classical spectral methods of high-dimensional random spaces. Designed to simulate complex systems subject to random inputs, these methods are widely used in many areas of computer science and engineering. The book introduces polynomial approximation theory and probability theory; describes the basic theory of gPC meth

  4. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roenby, Johan; Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volu...

  5. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  6. Computational efficiency for the surface renewal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jason; Higgins, Chad

    2018-04-01

    Measuring surface fluxes using the surface renewal (SR) method requires programmatic algorithms for tabulation, algebraic calculation, and data quality control. A number of different methods have been published describing automated calibration of SR parameters. Because the SR method utilizes high-frequency (10 Hz+) measurements, some steps in the flux calculation are computationally expensive, especially when automating SR to perform many iterations of these calculations. Several new algorithms were written that perform the required calculations more efficiently and rapidly, and that tested for sensitivity to length of flux averaging period, ability to measure over a large range of lag timescales, and overall computational efficiency. These algorithms utilize signal processing techniques and algebraic simplifications that demonstrate simple modifications that dramatically improve computational efficiency. The results here complement efforts by other authors to standardize a robust and accurate computational SR method. Increased speed of computation time grants flexibility to implementing the SR method, opening new avenues for SR to be used in research, for applied monitoring, and in novel field deployments.

  7. Computational methods in molecular imaging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gunjan, Vinit Kumar; Venkatesh, C; Amarnath, M

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the experimental investigations that have been carried out on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (MRI & CT) images using state-of-the-art Computational Image processing techniques, and tabulates the statistical values wherever necessary. In a very simple and straightforward way, it explains how image processing methods are used to improve the quality of medical images and facilitate analysis. It offers a valuable resource for researchers, engineers, medical doctors and bioinformatics experts alike.

  8. Digital image processing mathematical and computational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Blackledge, J M

    2005-01-01

    This authoritative text (the second part of a complete MSc course) provides mathematical methods required to describe images, image formation and different imaging systems, coupled with the principle techniques used for processing digital images. It is based on a course for postgraduates reading physics, electronic engineering, telecommunications engineering, information technology and computer science. This book relates the methods of processing and interpreting digital images to the 'physics' of imaging systems. Case studies reinforce the methods discussed, with examples of current research

  9. Short-term electric load forecasting using computational intelligence methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado, Sergio; Peralta, J.; Nebot, Àngela; Mugica, Francisco; Cortez, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Accurate time series forecasting is a key issue to support individual and organizational decision making. In this paper, we introduce several methods for short-term electric load forecasting. All the presented methods stem from computational intelligence techniques: Random Forest, Nonlinear Autoregressive Neural Networks, Evolutionary Support Vector Machines and Fuzzy Inductive Reasoning. The performance of the suggested methods is experimentally justified with several experiments carried out...

  10. Zonal methods and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in developing numerical algorithms for solving fluid flow problems, and the continuing improvement in the speed and storage of large scale computers have made it feasible to compute the flow field about complex and realistic configurations. Current solution methods involve the use of a hierarchy of mathematical models ranging from the linearized potential equation to the Navier Stokes equations. Because of the increasing complexity of both the geometries and flowfields encountered in practical fluid flow simulation, there is a growing emphasis in computational fluid dynamics on the use of zonal methods. A zonal method is one that subdivides the total flow region into interconnected smaller regions or zones. The flow solutions in these zones are then patched together to establish the global flow field solution. Zonal methods are primarily used either to limit the complexity of the governing flow equations to a localized region or to alleviate the grid generation problems about geometrically complex and multicomponent configurations. This paper surveys the application of zonal methods for solving the flow field about two and three-dimensional configurations. Various factors affecting their accuracy and ease of implementation are also discussed. From the presented review it is concluded that zonal methods promise to be very effective for computing complex flowfields and configurations. Currently there are increasing efforts to improve their efficiency, versatility, and accuracy

  11. Computational Studies of Protein Hydration Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozenko, Aleksandr

    It is widely appreciated that water plays a vital role in proteins' functions. The long-range proton transfer inside proteins is usually carried out by the Grotthuss mechanism and requires a chain of hydrogen bonds that is composed of internal water molecules and amino acid residues of the protein. In other cases, water molecules can facilitate the enzymes catalytic reactions by becoming a temporary proton donor/acceptor. Yet a reliable way of predicting water protein interior is still not available to the biophysics community. This thesis presents computational studies that have been performed to gain insights into the problems of fast and accurate prediction of potential water sites inside internal cavities of protein. Specifically, we focus on the task of attainment of correspondence between results obtained from computational experiments and experimental data available from X-ray structures. An overview of existing methods of predicting water molecules in the interior of a protein along with a discussion of the trustworthiness of these predictions is a second major subject of this thesis. A description of differences of water molecules in various media, particularly, gas, liquid and protein interior, and theoretical aspects of designing an adequate model of water for the protein environment are widely discussed in chapters 3 and 4. In chapter 5, we discuss recently developed methods of placement of water molecules into internal cavities of a protein. We propose a new methodology based on the principle of docking water molecules to a protein body which allows to achieve a higher degree of matching experimental data reported in protein crystal structures than other techniques available in the world of biophysical software. The new methodology is tested on a set of high-resolution crystal structures of oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) containing a large number of resolved internal water molecules and applied to bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase in the fully

  12. Computational and instrumental methods in EPR

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Computational and Instrumental Methods in EPR Prof. Bender, Fordham University Prof. Lawrence J. Berliner, University of Denver Electron magnetic resonance has been greatly facilitated by the introduction of advances in instrumentation and better computational tools, such as the increasingly widespread use of the density matrix formalism. This volume is devoted to both instrumentation and computation aspects of EPR, while addressing applications such as spin relaxation time measurements, the measurement of hyperfine interaction parameters, and the recovery of Mn(II) spin Hamiltonian parameters via spectral simulation. Key features: Microwave Amplitude Modulation Technique to Measure Spin-Lattice (T1) and Spin-Spin (T2) Relaxation Times Improvement in the Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Quantitative Measurement of Magnetic Hyperfine Parameters and the Physical Organic Chemistry of Supramolecular Systems New Methods of Simulation of Mn(II) EPR Spectra: Single Cryst...

  13. Proceedings of computational methods in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.E. Glicksman, M.E.; Marsh, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Symposium on which this volume is based was conceived as a timely expression of some of the fast-paced developments occurring throughout materials science and engineering. It focuses particularly on those involving modern computational methods applied to model and predict the response of materials under a diverse range of physico-chemical conditions. The current easy access of many materials scientists in industry, government laboratories, and academe to high-performance computers has opened many new vistas for predicting the behavior of complex materials under realistic conditions. Some have even argued that modern computational methods in materials science and engineering are literally redefining the bounds of our knowledge from which we predict structure-property relationships, perhaps forever changing the historically descriptive character of the science and much of the engineering

  14. Computational botany methods for automated species identification

    CERN Document Server

    Remagnino, Paolo; Wilkin, Paul; Cope, James; Kirkup, Don

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses innovative methods for mining information from images of plants, especially leaves, and highlights the diagnostic features that can be implemented in fully automatic systems for identifying plant species. Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, it explores the problem of plant species identification, covering both the concepts of taxonomy and morphology. It then provides an overview of morphometrics, including the historical background and the main steps in the morphometric analysis of leaves together with a number of applications. The core of the book focuses on novel diagnostic methods for plant species identification developed from a computer scientist’s perspective. It then concludes with a chapter on the characterization of botanists' visions, which highlights important cognitive aspects that can be implemented in a computer system to more accurately replicate the human expert’s fixation process. The book not only represents an authoritative guide to advanced computational tools fo...

  15. Computer-Aided Modelling Methods and Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    The development of models for a range of applications requires methods and tools. In many cases a reference model is required that allows the generation of application specific models that are fit for purpose. There are a range of computer aided modelling tools available that help to define the m...

  16. Applying Human Computation Methods to Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Human Computation methods such as crowdsourcing and games with a purpose (GWAP) have each recently drawn considerable attention for their ability to synergize the strengths of people and technology to accomplish tasks that are challenging for either to do well alone. Despite this increased attention, much of this transformation has been focused on…

  17. The asymptotic expansion method via symbolic computation

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro, Juan F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an algorithm for implementing a perturbation method based on an asymptotic expansion of the solution to a second-order differential equation. We also introduce a new symbolic computation system which works with the so-called modified quasipolynomials, as well as an implementation of the algorithm on it.

  18. The Asymptotic Expansion Method via Symbolic Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Navarro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an algorithm for implementing a perturbation method based on an asymptotic expansion of the solution to a second-order differential equation. We also introduce a new symbolic computation system which works with the so-called modified quasipolynomials, as well as an implementation of the algorithm on it.

  19. Computationally efficient methods for digital control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerreiro Tome Antunes, D.J.; Hespanha, J.P.; Silvestre, C.J.; Kataria, N.; Brewer, F.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of designing a digital controller is considered with the novelty of explicitly taking into account the computation cost of the controller implementation. A class of controller emulation methods inspired by numerical analysis is proposed. Through various examples it is shown that these

  20. Advances of evolutionary computation methods and operators

    CERN Document Server

    Cuevas, Erik; Oliva Navarro, Diego Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this book is to present advances that discuss alternative Evolutionary Computation (EC) developments and non-conventional operators which have proved to be effective in the solution of several complex problems. The book has been structured so that each chapter can be read independently from the others. The book contains nine chapters with the following themes: 1) Introduction, 2) the Social Spider Optimization (SSO), 3) the States of Matter Search (SMS), 4) the collective animal behavior (CAB) algorithm, 5) the Allostatic Optimization (AO) method, 6) the Locust Search (LS) algorithm, 7) the Adaptive Population with Reduced Evaluations (APRE) method, 8) the multimodal CAB, 9) the constrained SSO method.

  1. Computational Methods in Stochastic Dynamics Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanou, George; Papadopoulos, Vissarion

    2013-01-01

    The considerable influence of inherent uncertainties on structural behavior has led the engineering community to recognize the importance of a stochastic approach to structural problems. Issues related to uncertainty quantification and its influence on the reliability of the computational models are continuously gaining in significance. In particular, the problems of dynamic response analysis and reliability assessment of structures with uncertain system and excitation parameters have been the subject of continuous research over the last two decades as a result of the increasing availability of powerful computing resources and technology.   This book is a follow up of a previous book with the same subject (ISBN 978-90-481-9986-0) and focuses on advanced computational methods and software tools which can highly assist in tackling complex problems in stochastic dynamic/seismic analysis and design of structures. The selected chapters are authored by some of the most active scholars in their respective areas and...

  2. Computation for LHC experiments: a worldwide computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairouz, Malek

    2010-01-01

    In normal operating conditions the LHC detectors are expected to record about 10 10 collisions each year. The processing of all the consequent experimental data is a real computing challenge in terms of equipment, software and organization: it requires sustaining data flows of a few 10 9 octets per second and recording capacity of a few tens of 10 15 octets each year. In order to meet this challenge a computing network implying the dispatch and share of tasks, has been set. The W-LCG grid (World wide LHC computing grid) is made up of 4 tiers. Tiers 0 is the computer center in CERN, it is responsible for collecting and recording the raw data from the LHC detectors and to dispatch it to the 11 tiers 1. The tiers 1 is typically a national center, it is responsible for making a copy of the raw data and for processing it in order to recover relevant data with a physical meaning and to transfer the results to the 150 tiers 2. The tiers 2 is at the level of the Institute or laboratory, it is in charge of the final analysis of the data and of the production of the simulations. Tiers 3 are at the level of the laboratories, they provide a complementary and local resource to tiers 2 in terms of data analysis. (A.C.)

  3. Trojan Horse Method: Recent Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R.; Rolfs, C.; Typel, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method allows for the measurements of cross sections in nuclear reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. The basic features of the method are discussed and recent applications are presented

  4. Computational methods for protein identification from mass spectrometry data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo McHugh

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein identification using mass spectrometry is an indispensable computational tool in the life sciences. A dramatic increase in the use of proteomic strategies to understand the biology of living systems generates an ongoing need for more effective, efficient, and accurate computational methods for protein identification. A wide range of computational methods, each with various implementations, are available to complement different proteomic approaches. A solid knowledge of the range of algorithms available and, more critically, the accuracy and effectiveness of these techniques is essential to ensure as many of the proteins as possible, within any particular experiment, are correctly identified. Here, we undertake a systematic review of the currently available methods and algorithms for interpreting, managing, and analyzing biological data associated with protein identification. We summarize the advances in computational solutions as they have responded to corresponding advances in mass spectrometry hardware. The evolution of scoring algorithms and metrics for automated protein identification are also discussed with a focus on the relative performance of different techniques. We also consider the relative advantages and limitations of different techniques in particular biological contexts. Finally, we present our perspective on future developments in the area of computational protein identification by considering the most recent literature on new and promising approaches to the problem as well as identifying areas yet to be explored and the potential application of methods from other areas of computational biology.

  5. Computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.P.; Guo, P.; Ao, Q.

    1996-01-01

    Computational methods have been used with considerable success to complement radiation measurements in solving a wide range of industrial problems. The almost exponential growth of computer capability and applications in the last few years leads to a open-quotes black boxclose quotes mentality for radiation measurement applications. If a black box is defined as any radiation measurement device that is capable of measuring the parameters of interest when a wide range of operating and sample conditions may occur, then the development of computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications should now be focused on the black box approach and the deduction of properties of interest from the response with acceptable accuracy and reasonable efficiency. Nowadays, increasingly better understanding of radiation physical processes, more accurate and complete fundamental physical data, and more advanced modeling and software/hardware techniques have made it possible to make giant strides in that direction with new ideas implemented with computer software. The Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR) at North Carolina State University has been working on a variety of projects in the area of radiation analyzers and gauges for accomplishing this for quite some time, and they are discussed here with emphasis on current accomplishments

  6. BLUES function method in computational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, Joseph O.; Müller-Nedebock, Kristian K.

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a computational method in physics that goes ‘beyond linear use of equation superposition’ (BLUES). A BLUES function is defined as a solution of a nonlinear differential equation (DE) with a delta source that is at the same time a Green’s function for a related linear DE. For an arbitrary source, the BLUES function can be used to construct an exact solution to the nonlinear DE with a different, but related source. Alternatively, the BLUES function can be used to construct an approximate piecewise analytical solution to the nonlinear DE with an arbitrary source. For this alternative use the related linear DE need not be known. The method is illustrated in a few examples using analytical calculations and numerical computations. Areas for further applications are suggested.

  7. Spatial analysis statistics, visualization, and computational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Oyana, Tonny J

    2015-01-01

    An introductory text for the next generation of geospatial analysts and data scientists, Spatial Analysis: Statistics, Visualization, and Computational Methods focuses on the fundamentals of spatial analysis using traditional, contemporary, and computational methods. Outlining both non-spatial and spatial statistical concepts, the authors present practical applications of geospatial data tools, techniques, and strategies in geographic studies. They offer a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to spatial analysis-containing hands-on problem-sets that can be worked out in MS Excel or ArcGIS-as well as detailed illustrations and numerous case studies. The book enables readers to: Identify types and characterize non-spatial and spatial data Demonstrate their competence to explore, visualize, summarize, analyze, optimize, and clearly present statistical data and results Construct testable hypotheses that require inferential statistical analysis Process spatial data, extract explanatory variables, conduct statisti...

  8. Computer Animation Based on Particle Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Wcislo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main issues of a computer animation of a set of elastic macroscopic objects based on the particle method. The main assumption of the generated animations is to achieve very realistic movements in a scene observed on the computer display. The objects (solid bodies interact mechanically with each other, The movements and deformations of solids are calculated using the particle method. Phenomena connected with the behaviour of solids in the gravitational field, their defomtations caused by collisions and interactions with the optional liquid medium are simulated. The simulation ofthe liquid is performed using the cellular automata method. The paper presents both simulation schemes (particle method and cellular automata rules an the method of combining them in the single animation program. ln order to speed up the execution of the program the parallel version based on the network of workstation was developed. The paper describes the methods of the parallelization and it considers problems of load-balancing, collision detection, process synchronization and distributed control of the animation.

  9. Computational methods of electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of computational methods simulating the non-plasma transport of electrons and their attendant cascades is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linearized formalisms at electron energies above 1 keV. The effectiveness of various metods is discussed including moments, point-kernel, invariant imbedding, discrete-ordinates, and Monte Carlo. Future research directions and the potential impact on various aspects of science and engineering are indicated

  10. Mathematical optics classical, quantum, and computational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2012-01-01

    Going beyond standard introductory texts, Mathematical Optics: Classical, Quantum, and Computational Methods brings together many new mathematical techniques from optical science and engineering research. Profusely illustrated, the book makes the material accessible to students and newcomers to the field. Divided into six parts, the text presents state-of-the-art mathematical methods and applications in classical optics, quantum optics, and image processing. Part I describes the use of phase space concepts to characterize optical beams and the application of dynamic programming in optical wave

  11. Class of reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods in computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hong; Xia, Yidong; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A class of reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods is presented to solve compressible flow problems on arbitrary grids. The idea is to combine the efficiency of the reconstruction methods in finite volume methods and the accuracy of the DG methods to obtain a better numerical algorithm in computational fluid dynamics. The beauty of the resulting reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) methods is that they provide a unified formulation for both finite volume and DG methods, and contain both classical finite volume and standard DG methods as two special cases of the RDG methods, and thus allow for a direct efficiency comparison. Both Green-Gauss and least-squares reconstruction methods and a least-squares recovery method are presented to obtain a quadratic polynomial representation of the underlying linear discontinuous Galerkin solution on each cell via a so-called in-cell reconstruction process. The devised in-cell reconstruction is aimed to augment the accuracy of the discontinuous Galerkin method by increasing the order of the underlying polynomial solution. These three reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods are used to compute a variety of compressible flow problems on arbitrary meshes to assess their accuracy. The numerical experiments demonstrate that all three reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods can significantly improve the accuracy of the underlying second-order DG method, although the least-squares reconstructed DG method provides the best performance in terms of both accuracy, efficiency, and robustness. (author)

  12. Using Computer Games for Instruction: The Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Michael; Green, Richard; Nilsen, Trond; Thompson, David; Tomes, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Computer games are fun, exciting and motivational when used as leisure pursuits. But do they have similar attributes when utilized for educational purposes? This article investigates whether learning by computer game can improve student experiences compared with a more formal lecture approach and whether computer games have potential for improving…

  13. One Head Start Classroom's Experience: Computers and Young Children's Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Melissa Anne; Gillespie, Catherine Wilson

    2003-01-01

    Contends that early childhood educators need to understand how exposure to computers and constructive computer programs affects the development of children. Specifically examines: (1) research on children's technology experiences; (2) determining best practices; and (3) addressing educators' concerns about computers replacing other developmentally…

  14. Delamination detection using methods of computational intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihesiulor, Obinna K.; Shankar, Krishna; Zhang, Zhifang; Ray, Tapabrata

    2012-11-01

    Abstract Reliable delamination prediction scheme is indispensable in order to prevent potential risks of catastrophic failures in composite structures. The existence of delaminations changes the vibration characteristics of composite laminates and hence such indicators can be used to quantify the health characteristics of laminates. An approach for online health monitoring of in-service composite laminates is presented in this paper that relies on methods based on computational intelligence. Typical changes in the observed vibration characteristics (i.e. change in natural frequencies) are considered as inputs to identify the existence, location and magnitude of delaminations. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated using numerical models of composite laminates. Since this identification problem essentially involves the solution of an optimization problem, the use of finite element (FE) methods as the underlying tool for analysis turns out to be computationally expensive. A surrogate assisted optimization approach is hence introduced to contain the computational time within affordable limits. An artificial neural network (ANN) model with Bayesian regularization is used as the underlying approximation scheme while an improved rate of convergence is achieved using a memetic algorithm. However, building of ANN surrogate models usually requires large training datasets. K-means clustering is effectively employed to reduce the size of datasets. ANN is also used via inverse modeling to determine the position, size and location of delaminations using changes in measured natural frequencies. The results clearly highlight the efficiency and the robustness of the approach.

  15. Method of generating a computer readable model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A method of generating a computer readable model of a geometrical object constructed from a plurality of interconnectable construction elements, wherein each construction element has a number of connection elements for connecting the construction element with another construction element. The met......A method of generating a computer readable model of a geometrical object constructed from a plurality of interconnectable construction elements, wherein each construction element has a number of connection elements for connecting the construction element with another construction element....... The method comprises encoding a first and a second one of the construction elements as corresponding data structures, each representing the connection elements of the corresponding construction element, and each of the connection elements having associated with it a predetermined connection type. The method...... further comprises determining a first connection element of the first construction element and a second connection element of the second construction element located in a predetermined proximity of each other; and retrieving connectivity information of the corresponding connection types of the first...

  16. Computation for the analysis of designed experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Heiberger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Addresses the statistical, mathematical, and computational aspects of the construction of packages and analysis of variance (ANOVA) programs. Includes a disk at the back of the book that contains all program codes in four languages, APL, BASIC, C, and FORTRAN. Presents illustrations of the dual space geometry for all designs, including confounded designs.

  17. The Affective Experience of Novice Computer Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Nigel; D'Mello, Sidney

    2017-01-01

    Novice students (N = 99) participated in a lab study in which they learned the fundamentals of computer programming in Python using a self-paced computerized learning environment involving a 25-min scaffolded learning phase and a 10-min unscaffolded fadeout phase. Students provided affect judgments at approximately 100 points (every 15 s) over the…

  18. Electromagnetic Induction: A Computer-Assisted Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, J. E.; Moreland, L.

    1972-01-01

    By using minimal equipment it is possible to demonstrate Faraday's Law. An electronic desk calculator enables sophomore students to solve a difficult mathematical expression for the induced EMF. Polaroid pictures of the plot of induced EMF, together with the computer facility, enables students to make comparisons. (PS)

  19. Computing in support of experiments at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.F.; Amann, J.F.; Butler, H.S.

    1976-10-01

    This report documents the discussions and conclusions of a study, conducted in August 1976, of the requirements for computer support of the experimental program in medium-energy physics at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. 1 figure, 1 table

  20. Formal Methods: Practice and Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodcock, Jim; Larsen, Peter Gorm; Bicarregui, Juan

    2009-01-01

    . Based on this, we discuss the issues surrounding the industrial adoption of formal methods. Finally, we look to the future and describe the development of a Verified Software Repository, part of the worldwide Verified Software Initiative. We introduce the initial projects being used to populate...... the repository, and describe the challenges they address. © 2009 ACM. (146 refs.)...

  1. Efficient computation method of Jacobian matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shinobu

    1995-05-01

    As well known, the elements of the Jacobian matrix are complex trigonometric functions of the joint angles, resulting in a matrix of staggering complexity when we write it all out in one place. This article addresses that difficulties to this subject are overcome by using velocity representation. The main point is that its recursive algorithm and computer algebra technologies allow us to derive analytical formulation with no human intervention. Particularly, it is to be noted that as compared to previous results the elements are extremely simplified throughout the effective use of frame transformations. Furthermore, in case of a spherical wrist, it is shown that the present approach is computationally most efficient. Due to such advantages, the proposed method is useful in studying kinematically peculiar properties such as singularity problems. (author)

  2. Computational method for free surface hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirt, C.W.; Nichols, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    There are numerous flow phenomena in pressure vessel and piping systems that involve the dynamics of free fluid surfaces. For example, fluid interfaces must be considered during the draining or filling of tanks, in the formation and collapse of vapor bubbles, and in seismically shaken vessels that are partially filled. To aid in the analysis of these types of flow phenomena, a new technique has been developed for the computation of complicated free-surface motions. This technique is based on the concept of a local average volume of fluid (VOF) and is embodied in a computer program for two-dimensional, transient fluid flow called SOLA-VOF. The basic approach used in the VOF technique is briefly described, and compared to other free-surface methods. Specific capabilities of the SOLA-VOF program are illustrated by generic examples of bubble growth and collapse, flows of immiscible fluid mixtures, and the confinement of spilled liquids

  3. Soft Computing Methods for Disulfide Connectivity Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Chamorro, Alfonso E; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jesús S

    2015-01-01

    The problem of protein structure prediction (PSP) is one of the main challenges in structural bioinformatics. To tackle this problem, PSP can be divided into several subproblems. One of these subproblems is the prediction of disulfide bonds. The disulfide connectivity prediction problem consists in identifying which nonadjacent cysteines would be cross-linked from all possible candidates. Determining the disulfide bond connectivity between the cysteines of a protein is desirable as a previous step of the 3D PSP, as the protein conformational search space is highly reduced. The most representative soft computing approaches for the disulfide bonds connectivity prediction problem of the last decade are summarized in this paper. Certain aspects, such as the different methodologies based on soft computing approaches (artificial neural network or support vector machine) or features of the algorithms, are used for the classification of these methods.

  4. Experiment Dashboard for Monitoring of the LHC Distributed Computing Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, J; Campos, M Devesas; Cros, J Tarragon; Gaidioz, B; Karavakis, E; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Lanciotti, E; Maier, G; Ollivier, W; Nowotka, M; Rocha, R; Sadykov, T; Saiz, P; Sargsyan, L; Sidorova, I; Tuckett, D

    2011-01-01

    LHC experiments are currently taking collisions data. A distributed computing model chosen by the four main LHC experiments allows physicists to benefit from resources spread all over the world. The distributed model and the scale of LHC computing activities increase the level of complexity of middleware, and also the chances of possible failures or inefficiencies in involved components. In order to ensure the required performance and functionality of the LHC computing system, monitoring the status of the distributed sites and services as well as monitoring LHC computing activities are among the key factors. Over the last years, the Experiment Dashboard team has been working on a number of applications that facilitate the monitoring of different activities: including following up jobs, transfers, and also site and service availabilities. This presentation describes Experiment Dashboard applications used by the LHC experiments and experience gained during the first months of data taking.

  5. Computational methods for nuclear criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maragni, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear criticality safety analyses require the utilization of methods which have been tested and verified against benchmarks results. In this work, criticality calculations based on the KENO-IV and MCNP codes are studied aiming the qualification of these methods at the IPEN-CNEN/SP and COPESP. The utilization of variance reduction techniques is important to reduce the computer execution time, and several of them are analysed. As practical example of the above methods, a criticality safety analysis for the storage tubes for irradiated fuel elements from the IEA-R1 research has been carried out. This analysis showed that the MCNP code is more adequate for problems with complex geometries, and the KENO-IV code shows conservative results when it is not used the generalized geometry option. (author)

  6. Evolutionary Computing Methods for Spectral Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, Richard; Fink, Wolfgang; Huntsberger, Terrance; Lee, Seugwon; Tisdale, Edwin; VonAllmen, Paul; Tinetti, Geivanna

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for processing spectral images to retrieve information on underlying physical, chemical, and/or biological phenomena is based on evolutionary and related computational methods implemented in software. In a typical case, the solution (the information that one seeks to retrieve) consists of parameters of a mathematical model that represents one or more of the phenomena of interest. The methodology was developed for the initial purpose of retrieving the desired information from spectral image data acquired by remote-sensing instruments aimed at planets (including the Earth). Examples of information desired in such applications include trace gas concentrations, temperature profiles, surface types, day/night fractions, cloud/aerosol fractions, seasons, and viewing angles. The methodology is also potentially useful for retrieving information on chemical and/or biological hazards in terrestrial settings. In this methodology, one utilizes an iterative process that minimizes a fitness function indicative of the degree of dissimilarity between observed and synthetic spectral and angular data. The evolutionary computing methods that lie at the heart of this process yield a population of solutions (sets of the desired parameters) within an accuracy represented by a fitness-function value specified by the user. The evolutionary computing methods (ECM) used in this methodology are Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing, both of which are well-established optimization techniques and have also been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. These are embedded in a conceptual framework, represented in the architecture of the implementing software, that enables automatic retrieval of spectral and angular data and analysis of the retrieved solutions for uniqueness.

  7. Computer modeling of active experiments in space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollens, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The understanding of space plasmas is expanding rapidly. This is, in large part, due to the ambitious efforts of scientists from around the world who are performing large scale active experiments in the space plasma surrounding the earth. One such effort was designated the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) and consisted of a series of plasma releases that were completed during 1984 and 1985. What makes the AMPTE experiments particularly interesting was the occurrence of a dramatic anomaly that was completely unpredicted. During the AMPTE experiment, three satellites traced the solar-wind flow into the earth's magnetosphere. One satellite, built by West Germany, released a series of barium and lithium canisters that were detonated and subsequently photo-ionized via solar radiation, thereby creating an artificial comet. Another satellite, built by Great Britain and in the vicinity during detonation, carried, as did the first satellite, a comprehensive set of magnetic field, particle and wave instruments. Upon detonation, what was observed by the satellites, as well as by aircraft and ground-based observers, was quite unexpected. The initial deflection of the ion clouds was not in the ambient solar wind's flow direction (rvec V) but rather in the direction transverse to the solar wind and the background magnetic field (rvec V x rvec B). This result was not predicted by any existing theories or simulation models; it is the main subject discussed in this dissertation. A large three dimensional computer simulation was produced to demonstrate that this transverse motion can be explained in terms of a rocket effect. Due to the extreme computer resources utilized in producing this work, the computer methods used to complete the calculation and the visualization techniques used to view the results are also discussed

  8. First Experiences with LHC Grid Computing and Distributed Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fisk, Ian

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation the experiences of the LHC experiments using grid computing were presented with a focus on experience with distributed analysis. After many years of development, preparation, exercises, and validation the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments are in operations. The computing infrastructure has been heavily utilized in the first 6 months of data collection. The general experience of exploiting the grid infrastructure for organized processing and preparation is described, as well as the successes employing the infrastructure for distributed analysis. At the end the expected evolution and future plans are outlined.

  9. Studies on defect evolution in steels: experiments and computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our on-going studies on steels that are being carried out with a view to develop radiation resistant steels. The focus is on the use of nano-dispersoids in alloys towards the suppression of void formation and eventual swelling under irradiation. Results on the nucleation and growth of TiC precipitates in Ti modified austenitic steels and investigations on nano Yttria particles in Fe - a model oxide dispersion ferritic steel will be presented. The experimental methods of ion beam irradiation and positron annihilation spectroscopy have been used to elucidate the role of minor alloying elements on swelling behaviour. Computer simulation of defect processes have been carried out using ab-initio methods, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Our perspectives on addressing the multi-scale phenomena of defect processes leading to radiation damage, through a judicious combination of experiments and simulations, would be presented. (author)

  10. Geometric computations with interval and new robust methods applications in computer graphics, GIS and computational geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschek, H

    2003-01-01

    This undergraduate and postgraduate text will familiarise readers with interval arithmetic and related tools to gain reliable and validated results and logically correct decisions for a variety of geometric computations plus the means for alleviating the effects of the errors. It also considers computations on geometric point-sets, which are neither robust nor reliable in processing with standard methods. The authors provide two effective tools for obtaining correct results: (a) interval arithmetic, and (b) ESSA the new powerful algorithm which improves many geometric computations and makes th

  11. Tactile Radar: experimenting a computer game with visually disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrup, Virgínia; Cassinelli, Alvaro; Quérette, Paulo; Bergstrom, Niklas; Sampaio, Eliana

    2017-09-18

    Visually disabled people increasingly use computers in everyday life, thanks to novel assistive technologies better tailored to their cognitive functioning. Like sighted people, many are interested in computer games - videogames and audio-games. Tactile-games are beginning to emerge. The Tactile Radar is a device through which a visually disabled person is able to detect distal obstacles. In this study, it is connected to a computer running a tactile-game. The game consists in finding and collecting randomly arranged coins in a virtual room. The study was conducted with nine congenital blind people including both sexes, aged 20-64 years old. Complementary methods of first and third person were used: the debriefing interview and the quasi-experimental design. The results indicate that the Tactile Radar is suitable for the creation of computer games specifically tailored for visually disabled people. Furthermore, the device seems capable of eliciting a powerful immersive experience. Methodologically speaking, this research contributes to the consolidation and development of first and third person complementary methods, particularly useful in disabled people research field, including the evaluation by users of the Tactile Radar effectiveness in a virtual reality context. Implications for rehabilitation Despite the growing interest in virtual games for visually disabled people, they still find barriers to access such games. Through the development of assistive technologies such as the Tactile Radar, applied in virtual games, we can create new opportunities for leisure, socialization and education for visually disabled people. The results of our study indicate that the Tactile Radar is adapted to the creation of video games for visually disabled people, providing a playful interaction with the players.

  12. Evolutionary Computation Methods and their applications in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Battaglia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A brief discussion of the genesis of evolutionary computation methods, their relationship to artificial intelligence, and the contribution of genetics and Darwin’s theory of natural evolution is provided. Then, the main evolutionary computation methods are illustrated: evolution strategies, genetic algorithms, estimation of distribution algorithms, differential evolution, and a brief description of some evolutionary behavior methods such as ant colony and particle swarm optimization. We also discuss the role of the genetic algorithm for multivariate probability distribution random generation, rather than as a function optimizer. Finally, some relevant applications of genetic algorithm to statistical problems are reviewed: selection of variables in regression, time series model building, outlier identification, cluster analysis, design of experiments.

  13. Instrument design optimization with computational methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael H. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Using Finite Element Analysis to approximate the solution of differential equations, two different instruments in experimental Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are analyzed. The time dependence of density uctuations from the liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak experiment (2011-2012) are studied with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and the simulation results compared to data from the experiment. The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen target was the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. The first complete magnetic field simulation of the Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is presented with a focus on primary electron beam deflection downstream of the target. The SHMS consists of a superconducting horizontal bending magnet (HB) and three superconducting quadrupole magnets. The HB allows particles scattered at an angle of 5:5 deg to the beam line to be steered into the quadrupole magnets which make up the optics of the spectrometer. Without mitigation, remnant fields from the SHMS may steer the unscattered beam outside of the acceptable envelope on the beam dump and limit beam operations at small scattering angles. A solution is proposed using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  14. The experience sampling method: Investigating students' affective experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jayson M.; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Improving non-cognitive outcomes such as attitudes, efficacy, and persistence in physics courses is an important goal of physics education. This investigation implemented an in-the-moment surveying technique called the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) [1] to measure students' affective experience in physics. Measurements included: self-efficacy, cognitive efficiency, activation, intrinsic motivation, and affect. Data are presented that show contrasts in students' experiences (e.g., in physics vs. non-physics courses).

  15. A computational method for sharp interface advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face–interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM® extension and is published as open source. PMID:28018619

  16. A computational method for sharp interface advection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenby, Johan; Bredmose, Henrik; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2016-11-01

    We devise a numerical method for passive advection of a surface, such as the interface between two incompressible fluids, across a computational mesh. The method is called isoAdvector, and is developed for general meshes consisting of arbitrary polyhedral cells. The algorithm is based on the volume of fluid (VOF) idea of calculating the volume of one of the fluids transported across the mesh faces during a time step. The novelty of the isoAdvector concept consists of two parts. First, we exploit an isosurface concept for modelling the interface inside cells in a geometric surface reconstruction step. Second, from the reconstructed surface, we model the motion of the face-interface intersection line for a general polygonal face to obtain the time evolution within a time step of the submerged face area. Integrating this submerged area over the time step leads to an accurate estimate for the total volume of fluid transported across the face. The method was tested on simple two-dimensional and three-dimensional interface advection problems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The results are very satisfactory in terms of volume conservation, boundedness, surface sharpness and efficiency. The isoAdvector method was implemented as an OpenFOAM ® extension and is published as open source.

  17. Method of Computer-aided Instruction in Situation Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy O. Kargin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of computer-aided instruction in context-chain motivated situation control system of the complex technical system behavior. The conceptual and formal models of situation control with practical instruction are considered. Acquisition of new behavior knowledge is presented as structural changes in system memory in the form of situational agent set. Model and method of computer-aided instruction represent formalization, based on the nondistinct theories by physiologists and cognitive psychologists.The formal instruction model describes situation and reaction formation and dependence on different parameters, effecting education, such as the reinforcement value, time between the stimulus, action and the reinforcement. The change of the contextual link between situational elements when using is formalized.The examples and results of computer instruction experiments of the robot device “LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT”, equipped with ultrasonic distance, touch, light sensors.

  18. Computational electromagnetic methods for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Luis J.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used both as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience and as a FDA approved treatment for depression. During TMS, coils positioned near the scalp generate electric fields and activate targeted brain regions. In this thesis, several computational electromagnetics methods that improve the analysis, design, and uncertainty quantification of TMS systems were developed. Analysis: A new fast direct technique for solving the large and sparse linear system of equations (LSEs) arising from the finite difference (FD) discretization of Maxwell's quasi-static equations was developed. Following a factorization step, the solver permits computation of TMS fields inside realistic brain models in seconds, allowing for patient-specific real-time usage during TMS. The solver is an alternative to iterative methods for solving FD LSEs, often requiring run-times of minutes. A new integral equation (IE) method for analyzing TMS fields was developed. The human head is highly-heterogeneous and characterized by high-relative permittivities (107). IE techniques for analyzing electromagnetic interactions with such media suffer from high-contrast and low-frequency breakdowns. The novel high-permittivity and low-frequency stable internally combined volume-surface IE method developed. The method not only applies to the analysis of high-permittivity objects, but it is also the first IE tool that is stable when analyzing highly-inhomogeneous negative permittivity plasmas. Design: TMS applications call for electric fields to be sharply focused on regions that lie deep inside the brain. Unfortunately, fields generated by present-day Figure-8 coils stimulate relatively large regions near the brain surface. An optimization method for designing single feed TMS coil-arrays capable of producing more localized and deeper stimulation was developed. Results show that the coil-arrays stimulate 2.4 cm into the head while stimulating 3

  19. Computational predictive methods for fracture and fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J.; Chang, A. T.; Nelson, N.; Kim, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The damage-tolerant design philosophy as used by aircraft industries enables aircraft components and aircraft structures to operate safely with minor damage, small cracks, and flaws. Maintenance and inspection procedures insure that damages developed during service remain below design values. When damage is found, repairs or design modifications are implemented and flight is resumed. Design and redesign guidelines, such as military specifications MIL-A-83444, have successfully reduced the incidence of damage and cracks. However, fatigue cracks continue to appear in aircraft well before the design life has expired. The F16 airplane, for instance, developed small cracks in the engine mount, wing support, bulk heads, the fuselage upper skin, the fuel shelf joints, and along the upper wings. Some cracks were found after 600 hours of the 8000 hour design service life and design modifications were required. Tests on the F16 plane showed that the design loading conditions were close to the predicted loading conditions. Improvements to analytic methods for predicting fatigue crack growth adjacent to holes, when multiple damage sites are present, and in corrosive environments would result in more cost-effective designs, fewer repairs, and fewer redesigns. The overall objective of the research described in this paper is to develop, verify, and extend the computational efficiency of analysis procedures necessary for damage tolerant design. This paper describes an elastic/plastic fracture method and an associated fatigue analysis method for damage tolerant design. Both methods are unique in that material parameters such as fracture toughness, R-curve data, and fatigue constants are not required. The methods are implemented with a general-purpose finite element package. Several proof-of-concept examples are given. With further development, the methods could be extended for analysis of multi-site damage, creep-fatigue, and corrosion fatigue problems.

  20. Model and Computing Experiment for Research and Aerosols Usage Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daler K. Sharipov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a math model for research and management of aerosols released into the atmosphere as well as numerical algorithm used as hardware and software systems for conducting computing experiment.

  1. Computing for Lattice QCD: new developments from the APE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammendola, R [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Biagioni, A; De Luca, S [INFN, Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    As the Lattice QCD develops improved techniques to shed light on new physics, it demands increasing computing power. The aim of the current APE (Array Processor Experiment) project is to provide the reference computing platform to the Lattice QCD community for the period 2009-2011. We present the project proposal for a peta flops range super-computing center with high performance and low maintenance costs, to be delivered starting from 2010.

  2. Computing for Lattice QCD: new developments from the APE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; De Luca, S.

    2008-01-01

    As the Lattice QCD develops improved techniques to shed light on new physics, it demands increasing computing power. The aim of the current APE (Array Processor Experiment) project is to provide the reference computing platform to the Lattice QCD community for the period 2009-2011. We present the project proposal for a peta flops range super-computing center with high performance and low maintenance costs, to be delivered starting from 2010.

  3. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  4. Modules and methods for all photonic computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David R.; Ma, Chao Hung

    2001-01-01

    A method for all photonic computing, comprising the steps of: encoding a first optical/electro-optical element with a two dimensional mathematical function representing input data; illuminating the first optical/electro-optical element with a collimated beam of light; illuminating a second optical/electro-optical element with light from the first optical/electro-optical element, the second optical/electro-optical element having a characteristic response corresponding to an iterative algorithm useful for solving a partial differential equation; iteratively recirculating the signal through the second optical/electro-optical element with light from the second optical/electro-optical element for a predetermined number of iterations; and, after the predetermined number of iterations, optically and/or electro-optically collecting output data representing an iterative optical solution from the second optical/electro-optical element.

  5. Optical design teaching by computing graphic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Molini, D.; Muñoz-Luna, J.; Fernandez-Balbuena, A. A.; Garcia-Botella, A.; Belloni, P.; Alda, J.

    2012-10-01

    One of the key challenges in the teaching of Optics is that students need to know not only the math of the optical design, but also, and more important, to grasp and understand the optics in a three-dimensional space. Having a clear image of the problem to solve is the first step in order to begin to solve that problem. Therefore to achieve that the students not only must know the equation of refraction law but they have also to understand how the main parameters of this law are interacting among them. This should be a major goal in the teaching course. Optical graphic methods are a valuable tool in this way since they have the advantage of visual information and the accuracy of a computer calculation.

  6. Homomorphic encryption experiments on IBM's cloud quantum computing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, You-Wei; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Du, Yu-Tao; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Xiang; Bao, Wan-Su

    2017-02-01

    Quantum computing has undergone rapid development in recent years. Owing to limitations on scalability, personal quantum computers still seem slightly unrealistic in the near future. The first practical quantum computer for ordinary users is likely to be on the cloud. However, the adoption of cloud computing is possible only if security is ensured. Homomorphic encryption is a cryptographic protocol that allows computation to be performed on encrypted data without decrypting them, so it is well suited to cloud computing. Here, we first applied homomorphic encryption on IBM's cloud quantum computer platform. In our experiments, we successfully implemented a quantum algorithm for linear equations while protecting our privacy. This demonstration opens a feasible path to the next stage of development of cloud quantum information technology.

  7. The Information Science Experiment System - The computer for science experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foudriat, Edwin C.; Husson, Charles

    1989-01-01

    The concept of the Information Science Experiment System (ISES), potential experiments, and system requirements are reviewed. The ISES is conceived as a computer resource in space whose aim is to assist computer, earth, and space science experiments, to develop and demonstrate new information processing concepts, and to provide an experiment base for developing new information technology for use in space systems. The discussion covers system hardware and architecture, operating system software, the user interface, and the ground communication link.

  8. An Adaptive Reordered Method for Computing PageRank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Bu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an adaptive reordered method to deal with the PageRank problem. It has been shown that one can reorder the hyperlink matrix of PageRank problem to calculate a reduced system and get the full PageRank vector through forward substitutions. This method can provide a speedup for calculating the PageRank vector. We observe that in the existing reordered method, the cost of the recursively reordering procedure could offset the computational reduction brought by minimizing the dimension of linear system. With this observation, we introduce an adaptive reordered method to accelerate the total calculation, in which we terminate the reordering procedure appropriately instead of reordering to the end. Numerical experiments show the effectiveness of this adaptive reordered method.

  9. Computer-generated ovaries to assist follicle counting experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos Skodras

    Full Text Available Precise estimation of the number of follicles in ovaries is of key importance in the field of reproductive biology, both from a developmental point of view, where follicle numbers are determined at specific time points, as well as from a therapeutic perspective, determining the adverse effects of environmental toxins and cancer chemotherapeutics on the reproductive system. The two main factors affecting follicle number estimates are the sampling method and the variation in follicle numbers within animals of the same strain, due to biological variability. This study aims at assessing the effect of these two factors, when estimating ovarian follicle numbers of neonatal mice. We developed computer algorithms, which generate models of neonatal mouse ovaries (simulated ovaries, with characteristics derived from experimental measurements already available in the published literature. The simulated ovaries are used to reproduce in-silico counting experiments based on unbiased stereological techniques; the proposed approach provides the necessary number of ovaries and sampling frequency to be used in the experiments given a specific biological variability and a desirable degree of accuracy. The simulated ovary is a novel, versatile tool which can be used in the planning phase of experiments to estimate the expected number of animals and workload, ensuring appropriate statistical power of the resulting measurements. Moreover, the idea of the simulated ovary can be applied to other organs made up of large numbers of individual functional units.

  10. Constructive modelling of structural turbulence: computational experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotserkovskii, O M; Oparin, A M; Troshkin, O V [Institute for Computer Aided Design, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vtoraya Brestskaya st., 19/18, Moscow, 123056 (Russian Federation); Chechetkin, V M [Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miusskaya sq., 4, Moscow, 125047 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: o.bel@icad.org.ru, E-mail: a.oparin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: troshkin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: chech@gin@keldysh.ru

    2008-12-15

    Constructively, the analysis of the phenomenon of turbulence must and can be performed through direct numerical simulations of mechanics supposed to be inherent to secondary flows. This one reveals itself through such instances as large vortices, structural instabilities, vortex cascades and principal modes discussed in this paper. Like fragments of a puzzle, they speak of a motion ordered with its own nuts and bolts, however chaotic it appears at first sight. This opens an opportunity for a multi-oriented approach of which a prime ideology seems to be a rational combination of grid, spectral and statistical methods. An attempt is made to bring together the above instances and produce an alternative point of view on the phenomenon in question when based on the main laws of conservation.

  11. Computed tomography shielding methods: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica Ryann

    2010-01-01

    To investigate available shielding methods in an effort to further awareness and understanding of existing preventive measures related to patient exposure in computed tomography (CT) scanning. Searches were conducted to locate literature discussing the effectiveness of commercially available shields. Literature containing information regarding breast, gonad, eye and thyroid shielding was identified. Because of rapidly advancing technology, the selection of articles was limited to those published within the past 5 years. The selected studies were examined using the following topics as guidelines: the effectiveness of the shield (percentage of dose reduction), the shield's effect on image quality, arguments for or against its use (including practicality) and overall recommendation for its use in clinical practice. Only a limited number of studies have been performed on the use of shields for the eyes, thyroid and gonads, but the evidence shows an overall benefit to their use. Breast shielding has been the most studied shielding method, with consistent agreement throughout the literature on its effectiveness at reducing radiation dose. The effect of shielding on image quality was not remarkable in a majority of studies. Although it is noted that more studies need to be conducted regarding the impact on image quality, the currently published literature stresses the importance of shielding in reducing dose. Commercially available shields for the breast, thyroid, eyes and gonads should be implemented in clinical practice. Further research is needed to ascertain the prevalence of shielding in the clinical setting.

  12. Methodological Potential of Computer Experiment in Teaching Mathematics at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kequan; Sokolova, Anna Nikolaevna; Vlasova, Vera K.

    2017-01-01

    The study is relevant due to the opportunity of increasing efficiency of teaching mathematics at university through integration of students of computer experiment conducted with the use of IT in this process. The problem of there search is defined by a contradiction between great potential opportunities of mathematics experiment for motivating and…

  13. Remote Viewing and Computer Communications--An Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallee, Jacques

    1988-01-01

    A series of remote viewing experiments were run with 12 participants who communicated through a computer conferencing network. The correct target sample was identified in 8 out of 33 cases. This represented more than double the pure chance expectation. Appendices present protocol, instructions, and results of the experiments. (Author/YP)

  14. Computer simulation of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment with photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.; Yuan, S.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    We present a computer simulation model of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment that is a one-to-one copy of an experiment reported recently (Jacques V. et al., Science, 315 (2007) 966). The model is solely based on experimental facts, satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not

  15. Computational methods in calculating superconducting current problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David John, II

    Various computational problems in treating superconducting currents are examined. First, field inversion in spatial Fourier transform space is reviewed to obtain both one-dimensional transport currents flowing down a long thin tape, and a localized two-dimensional current. The problems associated with spatial high-frequency noise, created by finite resolution and experimental equipment, are presented, and resolved with a smooth Gaussian cutoff in spatial frequency space. Convergence of the Green's functions for the one-dimensional transport current densities is discussed, and particular attention is devoted to the negative effects of performing discrete Fourier transforms alone on fields asymptotically dropping like 1/r. Results of imaging simulated current densities are favorably compared to the original distributions after the resulting magnetic fields undergo the imaging procedure. The behavior of high-frequency spatial noise, and the behavior of the fields with a 1/r asymptote in the imaging procedure in our simulations is analyzed, and compared to the treatment of these phenomena in the published literature. Next, we examine calculation of Mathieu and spheroidal wave functions, solutions to the wave equation in elliptical cylindrical and oblate and prolate spheroidal coordinates, respectively. These functions are also solutions to Schrodinger's equations with certain potential wells, and are useful in solving time-varying superconducting problems. The Mathieu functions are Fourier expanded, and the spheroidal functions expanded in associated Legendre polynomials to convert the defining differential equations to recursion relations. The infinite number of linear recursion equations is converted to an infinite matrix, multiplied by a vector of expansion coefficients, thus becoming an eigenvalue problem. The eigenvalue problem is solved with root solvers, and the eigenvector problem is solved using a Jacobi-type iteration method, after preconditioning the

  16. Predictive modeling of liquid-sodium thermal–hydraulics experiments and computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, Erkan; Cacuci, Dan G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied the predictive modeling method of Cacuci and Ionescu-Bujor (2010). • We assimilated data from sodium flow experiments. • We used computational fluid dynamics simulations of sodium experiments. • The predictive modeling method greatly reduced uncertainties in predicted results. - Abstract: This work applies the predictive modeling procedure formulated by Cacuci and Ionescu-Bujor (2010) to assimilate data from liquid-sodium thermal–hydraulics experiments in order to reduce systematically the uncertainties in the predictions of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The predicted CFD-results for the best-estimate model parameters and results describing sodium-flow velocities and temperature distributions are shown to be significantly more precise than the original computations and experiments, in that the predicted uncertainties for the best-estimate results and model parameters are significantly smaller than both the originally computed and the experimental uncertainties

  17. Brookhaven Reactor Experiment Control Facility, a distributed function computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.; Greenlaw, N.; Kelley, M.A.; Potter, D.W.; Rankowitz, S.; Stubblefield, F.W.

    1975-11-01

    A computer network for real-time data acquisition, monitoring and control of a series of experiments at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor has been developed and has been set into routine operation. This reactor experiment control facility presently services nine neutron spectrometers and one x-ray diffractometer. Several additional experiment connections are in progress. The architecture of the facility is based on a distributed function network concept. A statement of implementation and results is presented

  18. Computer based workstation for development of software for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanchenko, I.M.; Sedykh, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    Methodical principles and results of a successful attempt to create on the base of IBM-PC/AT personal computer of effective means for development of programs for high energy physics experiments are analysed. The obtained results permit to combine the best properties and a positive materialized experience accumulated on the existing time sharing collective systems with a high quality of data representation, reliability and convenience of personal computer applications

  19. Computational Simulations and the Scientific Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleb, Bil; Wood, Bill

    2005-01-01

    As scientific simulation software becomes more complicated, the scientific-software implementor's need for component tests from new model developers becomes more crucial. The community's ability to follow the basic premise of the Scientific Method requires independently repeatable experiments, and model innovators are in the best position to create these test fixtures. Scientific software developers also need to quickly judge the value of the new model, i.e., its cost-to-benefit ratio in terms of gains provided by the new model and implementation risks such as cost, time, and quality. This paper asks two questions. The first is whether other scientific software developers would find published component tests useful, and the second is whether model innovators think publishing test fixtures is a feasible approach.

  20. Locative media and data-driven computing experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yueh Perng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades urban social life has undergone a rapid and pervasive geocoding, becoming mediated, augmented and anticipated by location-sensitive technologies and services that generate and utilise big, personal, locative data. The production of these data has prompted the development of exploratory data-driven computing experiments that seek to find ways to extract value and insight from them. These projects often start from the data, rather than from a question or theory, and try to imagine and identify their potential utility. In this paper, we explore the desires and mechanics of data-driven computing experiments. We demonstrate how both locative media data and computing experiments are ‘staged’ to create new values and computing techniques, which in turn are used to try and derive possible futures that are ridden with unintended consequences. We argue that using computing experiments to imagine potential urban futures produces effects that often have little to do with creating new urban practices. Instead, these experiments promote Big Data science and the prospect that data produced for one purpose can be recast for another and act as alternative mechanisms of envisioning urban futures.

  1. Experience of computed tomographic myelography and discography in cervical problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Uratsuji, Masaaki; Suzuki, Kunio; Matsui, Eigo [Hyogo Prefectural Awaji Hospital, Sumoto, Hyogo (Japan); Kurihara, Akira

    1983-06-01

    CTM (computed tomographic myelography) was performed on 15 cases of cervical lesions, and on 5 of them, CTD (computed tomographic discography) was also made. CTM revealed the intervertebral state, and in combination with CTD, providing more accurate information. The combined method of CTM and CTD was useful for soft disc herniation.

  2. Computer-Aided Experiment Planning toward Causal Discovery in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiasz, Nicholas J; Wood, Justin; Wang, Wei; Silva, Alcino J; Hsu, William

    2017-01-01

    Computers help neuroscientists to analyze experimental results by automating the application of statistics; however, computer-aided experiment planning is far less common, due to a lack of similar quantitative formalisms for systematically assessing evidence and uncertainty. While ontologies and other Semantic Web resources help neuroscientists to assimilate required domain knowledge, experiment planning requires not only ontological but also epistemological (e.g., methodological) information regarding how knowledge was obtained. Here, we outline how epistemological principles and graphical representations of causality can be used to formalize experiment planning toward causal discovery. We outline two complementary approaches to experiment planning: one that quantifies evidence per the principles of convergence and consistency, and another that quantifies uncertainty using logical representations of constraints on causal structure. These approaches operationalize experiment planning as the search for an experiment that either maximizes evidence or minimizes uncertainty. Despite work in laboratory automation, humans must still plan experiments and will likely continue to do so for some time. There is thus a great need for experiment-planning frameworks that are not only amenable to machine computation but also useful as aids in human reasoning.

  3. Laboratory Sequence in Computational Methods for Introductory Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jason A.; Wiser, Dawn C.

    2003-07-01

    A four-exercise laboratory sequence for introductory chemistry integrating hands-on, student-centered experience with computer modeling has been designed and implemented. The progression builds from exploration of molecular shapes to intermolecular forces and the impact of those forces on chemical separations made with gas chromatography and distillation. The sequence ends with an exploration of molecular orbitals. The students use the computers as a tool; they build the molecules, submit the calculations, and interpret the results. Because of the construction of the sequence and its placement spanning the semester break, good laboratory notebook practices are reinforced and the continuity of course content and methods between semesters is emphasized. The inclusion of these techniques in the first year of chemistry has had a positive impact on student perceptions and student learning.

  4. Computational experiment approach to advanced secondary mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Abramovich, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    This book promotes the experimental mathematics approach in the context of secondary mathematics curriculum by exploring mathematical models depending on parameters that were typically considered advanced in the pre-digital education era. This approach, by drawing on the power of computers to perform numerical computations and graphical constructions, stimulates formal learning of mathematics through making sense of a computational experiment. It allows one (in the spirit of Freudenthal) to bridge serious mathematical content and contemporary teaching practice. In other words, the notion of teaching experiment can be extended to include a true mathematical experiment. When used appropriately, the approach creates conditions for collateral learning (in the spirit of Dewey) to occur including the development of skills important for engineering applications of mathematics. In the context of a mathematics teacher education program, this book addresses a call for the preparation of teachers capable of utilizing mo...

  5. Computing and physical methods to calculate Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Ashraf Elsayed Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Main limitations due to the enhancement of the plutonium content are related to the coolant void effect as the spectrum becomes faster, the neutron flux in the thermal region tends towards zero and is concentrated in the region from 10 Ke to 1 MeV. Thus, all captures by 240 Pu and 242 Pu in the thermal and epithermal resonance disappear and the 240 Pu and 242 Pu contributions to the void effect became positive. The higher the Pu content and the poorer the Pu quality, the larger the void effect. The core control in nominal or transient conditions Pu enrichment leads to a decrease in (B eff.), the efficiency of soluble boron and control rods. Also, the Doppler effect tends to decrease when Pu replaces U, so, that in case of transients the core could diverge again if the control is not effective enough. As for the voiding effect, the plutonium degradation and the 240 Pu and 242 Pu accumulation after multiple recycling lead to spectrum hardening and to a decrease in control. One solution would be to use enriched boron in soluble boron and shutdown rods. In this paper, I discuss and show the advanced computing and physical methods to calculate Pu inside the nuclear reactors and glovebox and the different solutions to be used to overcome the difficulties that effect, on safety parameters and on reactor performance, and analysis the consequences of plutonium management on the whole fuel cycle like Raw materials savings, fraction of nuclear electric power involved in the Pu management. All through two types of scenario, one involving a low fraction of the nuclear park dedicated to plutonium management, the other involving a dilution of the plutonium in all the nuclear park. (author)

  6. Computational methods in sequence and structure prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Caiyi

    This dissertation is organized into two parts. In the first part, we will discuss three computational methods for cis-regulatory element recognition in three different gene regulatory networks as the following: (a) Using a comprehensive "Phylogenetic Footprinting Comparison" method, we will investigate the promoter sequence structures of three enzymes (PAL, CHS and DFR) that catalyze sequential steps in the pathway from phenylalanine to anthocyanins in plants. Our result shows there exists a putative cis-regulatory element "AC(C/G)TAC(C)" in the upstream of these enzyme genes. We propose this cis-regulatory element to be responsible for the genetic regulation of these three enzymes and this element, might also be the binding site for MYB class transcription factor PAP1. (b) We will investigate the role of the Arabidopsis gene glutamate receptor 1.1 (AtGLR1.1) in C and N metabolism by utilizing the microarray data we obtained from AtGLR1.1 deficient lines (antiAtGLR1.1). We focus our investigation on the putatively co-regulated transcript profile of 876 genes we have collected in antiAtGLR1.1 lines. By (a) scanning the occurrence of several groups of known abscisic acid (ABA) related cisregulatory elements in the upstream regions of 876 Arabidopsis genes; and (b) exhaustive scanning of all possible 6-10 bps motif occurrence in the upstream regions of the same set of genes, we are able to make a quantative estimation on the enrichment level of each of the cis-regulatory element candidates. We finally conclude that one specific cis-regulatory element group, called "ABRE" elements, are statistically highly enriched within the 876-gene group as compared to their occurrence within the genome. (c) We will introduce a new general purpose algorithm, called "fuzzy REDUCE1", which we have developed recently for automated cis-regulatory element identification. In the second part, we will discuss our newly devised protein design framework. With this framework we have developed

  7. Computational methods for corpus annotation and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews computational tools for lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic and discourse analysis, with instructions on how to obtain, install and use each tool. Covers studies using Natural Language Processing, and offers ideas for better integration.

  8. Cloud computing methods and practical approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmood, Zaigham

    2013-01-01

    This book presents both state-of-the-art research developments and practical guidance on approaches, technologies and frameworks for the emerging cloud paradigm. Topics and features: presents the state of the art in cloud technologies, infrastructures, and service delivery and deployment models; discusses relevant theoretical frameworks, practical approaches and suggested methodologies; offers guidance and best practices for the development of cloud-based services and infrastructures, and examines management aspects of cloud computing; reviews consumer perspectives on mobile cloud computing an

  9. Advanced Computational Methods in Bio-Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qahtani, Waleed M S; El-Anwar, Mohamed I

    2018-04-15

    A novel partnership between surgeons and machines, made possible by advances in computing and engineering technology, could overcome many of the limitations of traditional surgery. By extending surgeons' ability to plan and carry out surgical interventions more accurately and with fewer traumas, computer-integrated surgery (CIS) systems could help to improve clinical outcomes and the efficiency of healthcare delivery. CIS systems could have a similar impact on surgery to that long since realised in computer-integrated manufacturing. Mathematical modelling and computer simulation have proved tremendously successful in engineering. Computational mechanics has enabled technological developments in virtually every area of our lives. One of the greatest challenges for mechanists is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. Biomechanics has significant potential for applications in orthopaedic industry, and the performance arts since skills needed for these activities are visibly related to the human musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Although biomechanics is widely used nowadays in the orthopaedic industry to design orthopaedic implants for human joints, dental parts, external fixations and other medical purposes, numerous researches funded by billions of dollars are still running to build a new future for sports and human healthcare in what is called biomechanics era.

  10. Fluid history computation methods for reactor safeguards problems using MNODE computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.S.; Savery, C.W.

    1976-10-01

    A method for predicting the pressure-temperature histories of air, water liquid, and vapor flowing in a zoned containment as a result of high energy pipe rupture is described. The computer code, MNODE, has been developed for 12 connected control volumes and 24 inertia flow paths. Predictions by the code are compared with the results of an analytical gas dynamic problem, semiscale blowdown experiments, full scale MARVIKEN test results, Battelle-Frankfurt model PWR containment test data. The MNODE solutions to NRC/AEC subcompartment benchmark problems are also compared with results predicted by other computer codes such as RELAP-3, FLASH-2, CONTEMPT-PS. The analytical consideration is consistent with Section 6.2.1.2 of the Standard Format (Rev. 2) issued by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in September 1975

  11. Numerical experiment on finite element method for matching data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Shinji; Kumakura, Toshimasa; Yoshimura, Koichi.

    1993-03-01

    Numerical experiments are presented on the finite element method by Pletzer-Dewar for matching data of an ordinary differential equation with regular singular points by using model equation. Matching data play an important role in nonideal MHD stability analysis of a magnetically confined plasma. In the Pletzer-Dewar method, the Frobenius series for the 'big solution', the fundamental solution which is not square-integrable at the regular singular point, is prescribed. The experiments include studies of the convergence rate of the matching data obtained by the finite element method and of the effect on the results of computation by truncating the Frobenius series at finite terms. It is shown from the present study that the finite element method is an effective method for obtaining the matching data with high accuracy. (author)

  12. Introducing a method for mapping recreational experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Dempsey, Nicola; Burton, Mel

    2013-01-01

    spaces provide and support a range of recreational experiences. The exploration reported here is based on a short review of the methods background and an application in two test sites in Sheffield, South Yorkshire in early summer 2010. This paper critically appraises the application of rec......-mapping’, an innovative method of analysing and mapping positive recreational experiences in urban green spaces is explored and piloted within the UK planning context. Originating in the Nordic countries, this on-site method can provide urban planners and designers with data about the extent to which specific green......-mapping at smaller spatial scales and recommends further explorations within the UK planning context, as the method adds to existing open space assessment by providing a unique layer of information to analyse more fully the recreational qualities of urban green spaces....

  13. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  14. The Design and Evaluation of Teaching Experiments in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcheri, Paola; Molfino, Maria Teresa

    1992-01-01

    Describes a relational model that was developed to provide a framework for the design and evaluation of teaching experiments for the introduction of computer science in secondary schools in Italy. Teacher training is discussed, instructional materials are considered, and use of the model for the evaluation process is described. (eight references)…

  15. Instructional Styles, Attitudes and Experiences of Seniors in Computer Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eileen; Lanuza, Catherine; Baciu, Iuliana; MacKenzie, Meagan; Nosko, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Sixty-four seniors were introduced to computers through a series of five weekly workshops. Participants were given instruction followed by hands-on experience for topics related to social communication, information seeking, games, and word processing and were observed to determine their preferences for instructional support. Observations of…

  16. New or improved computational methods and advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Takeda, Toshikazu; Ushio, Tadashi

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear computational method has been studied continuously up to date, as a fundamental technology supporting the nuclear development. At present, research on computational method according to new theory and the calculating method thought to be difficult to practise are also continued actively to find new development due to splendid improvement of features of computer. In Japan, many light water type reactors are now in operations, new computational methods are induced for nuclear design, and a lot of efforts are concentrated for intending to more improvement of economics and safety. In this paper, some new research results on the nuclear computational methods and their application to nuclear design of the reactor were described for introducing recent trend of the nuclear design of the reactor. 1) Advancement of the computational method, 2) Reactor core design and management of the light water reactor, and 3) Nuclear design of the fast reactor. (G.K.)

  17. A computer method for spectral classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appenzeller, I.; Zekl, H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe the start of an attempt to improve the accuracy of spectroscopic parallaxes by evaluating spectroscopic temperature and luminosity criteria such as those of the MK classification spectrograms which were analyzed automatically by means of a suitable computer program. (Auth.)

  18. Computational structural biology: methods and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwede, Torsten; Peitsch, Manuel Claude

    2008-01-01

    ... sequencing reinforced the observation that structural information is needed to understand the detailed function and mechanism of biological molecules such as enzyme reactions and molecular recognition events. Furthermore, structures are obviously key to the design of molecules with new or improved functions. In this context, computational structural biology...

  19. Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

    2005-08-01

    With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

  20. Experience with the Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, E M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, N.B., (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport provides a powerful research and design tool that resembles in many aspects laboratory experiments. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations can provide an insight not attainable in the laboratory. However, the Monte Carlo method has its limitations, which if not taken into account can result in misleading conclusions. This paper will present the experience of this author, over almost three decades, in the use of the Monte Carlo method for a variety of applications. Examples will be shown on how the method was used to explore new ideas, as a parametric study and design optimization tool, and to analyze experimental data. The consequences of not accounting in detail for detector response and the scattering of radiation by surrounding structures are two of the examples that will be presented to demonstrate the pitfall of condensed.

  1. Experience with the Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport provides a powerful research and design tool that resembles in many aspects laboratory experiments. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations can provide an insight not attainable in the laboratory. However, the Monte Carlo method has its limitations, which if not taken into account can result in misleading conclusions. This paper will present the experience of this author, over almost three decades, in the use of the Monte Carlo method for a variety of applications. Examples will be shown on how the method was used to explore new ideas, as a parametric study and design optimization tool, and to analyze experimental data. The consequences of not accounting in detail for detector response and the scattering of radiation by surrounding structures are two of the examples that will be presented to demonstrate the pitfall of condensed

  2. Soft computing methods for geoidal height transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyilmaz, O.; Özlüdemir, M. T.; Ayan, T.; Çelik, R. N.

    2009-07-01

    Soft computing techniques, such as fuzzy logic and artificial neural network (ANN) approaches, have enabled researchers to create precise models for use in many scientific and engineering applications. Applications that can be employed in geodetic studies include the estimation of earth rotation parameters and the determination of mean sea level changes. Another important field of geodesy in which these computing techniques can be applied is geoidal height transformation. We report here our use of a conventional polynomial model, the Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy (or in some publications, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy) Inference System (ANFIS), an ANN and a modified ANN approach to approximate geoid heights. These approximation models have been tested on a number of test points. The results obtained through the transformation processes from ellipsoidal heights into local levelling heights have also been compared.

  3. Soft Computing Methods in Design of Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, K. J.; Berke, L.; Vary, A.; Sharma, S.

    1996-01-01

    Soft computing techniques of neural networks and genetic algorithms are used in the design of superalloys. The cyclic oxidation attack parameter K(sub a), generated from tests at NASA Lewis Research Center, is modelled as a function of the superalloy chemistry and test temperature using a neural network. This model is then used in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain an optimized superalloy composition resulting in low K(sub a) values.

  4. Statistical methods and computing for big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Chen, Ming-Hui; Schifano, Elizabeth; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Big data are data on a massive scale in terms of volume, intensity, and complexity that exceed the capacity of standard analytic tools. They present opportunities as well as challenges to statisticians. The role of computational statisticians in scientific discovery from big data analyses has been under-recognized even by peer statisticians. This article summarizes recent methodological and software developments in statistics that address the big data challenges. Methodologies are grouped into three classes: subsampling-based, divide and conquer, and online updating for stream data. As a new contribution, the online updating approach is extended to variable selection with commonly used criteria, and their performances are assessed in a simulation study with stream data. Software packages are summarized with focuses on the open source R and R packages, covering recent tools that help break the barriers of computer memory and computing power. Some of the tools are illustrated in a case study with a logistic regression for the chance of airline delay. PMID:27695593

  5. Statistical methods and computing for big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Chen, Ming-Hui; Schifano, Elizabeth; Wu, Jing; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Big data are data on a massive scale in terms of volume, intensity, and complexity that exceed the capacity of standard analytic tools. They present opportunities as well as challenges to statisticians. The role of computational statisticians in scientific discovery from big data analyses has been under-recognized even by peer statisticians. This article summarizes recent methodological and software developments in statistics that address the big data challenges. Methodologies are grouped into three classes: subsampling-based, divide and conquer, and online updating for stream data. As a new contribution, the online updating approach is extended to variable selection with commonly used criteria, and their performances are assessed in a simulation study with stream data. Software packages are summarized with focuses on the open source R and R packages, covering recent tools that help break the barriers of computer memory and computing power. Some of the tools are illustrated in a case study with a logistic regression for the chance of airline delay.

  6. Doctors' experience with handheld computers in clinical practice: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Schweikhart, Sharon B; Medow, Mitchell A

    2004-05-15

    To examine doctors' perspectives about their experiences with handheld computers in clinical practice. Qualitative study of eight focus groups consisting of doctors with diverse training and practice patterns. Six practice settings across the United States and two additional focus group sessions held at a national meeting of general internists. 54 doctors who did or did not use handheld computers. Doctors who used handheld computers in clinical practice seemed generally satisfied with them and reported diverse patterns of use. Users perceived that the devices helped them increase productivity and improve patient care. Barriers to use concerned the device itself and personal and perceptual constraints, with perceptual factors such as comfort with technology, preference for paper, and the impression that the devices are not easy to use somewhat difficult to overcome. Participants suggested that organisations can help promote handheld computers by providing advice on purchase, usage, training, and user support. Participants expressed concern about reliability and security of the device but were particularly concerned about dependency on the device and over-reliance as a substitute for clinical thinking. Doctors expect handheld computers to become more useful, and most seem interested in leveraging (getting the most value from) their use. Key opportunities with handheld computers included their use as a stepping stone to build doctors' comfort with other information technology and ehealth initiatives and providing point of care support that helps improve patient care.

  7. Estimation of subcriticality with the computed values analysis using MCNP of experiment on coupled cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Arakawa, Takuya; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on coupled cores performed at TCA were analysed using continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP 4A. Errors of neutron multiplication factors are evaluated using Indirect Bias Estimation Method proposed by authors. Calculation for simulation of pulsed neutron method was performed for 17 X 17 + 5G + 17 x 17 core system and its of exponential experiment method was also performed for 16 x 9 + 3G + 16 x 9 and 16 x 9 + 5G + 16 x 9 core systems. Errors of neutron multiplication factors are estimated to be (-1.5) - (-0.6)% evaluated by Indirect Bias Estimation Method. Its errors evaluated by conventional pulsed neutron method and exponential experiment method are estimated to be 7%, but it is below 1% for estimation of subcriticality with the computed values by applying Indirect Bias Estimation Method. Feasibility of subcriticality management is higher by application of the method to full scale fuel strage facility. (author)

  8. Tensor network method for reversible classical computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Cheng; Kourtis, Stefanos; Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Ruckenstein, Andrei E.

    2018-03-01

    We develop a tensor network technique that can solve universal reversible classical computational problems, formulated as vertex models on a square lattice [Nat. Commun. 8, 15303 (2017), 10.1038/ncomms15303]. By encoding the truth table of each vertex constraint in a tensor, the total number of solutions compatible with partial inputs and outputs at the boundary can be represented as the full contraction of a tensor network. We introduce an iterative compression-decimation (ICD) scheme that performs this contraction efficiently. The ICD algorithm first propagates local constraints to longer ranges via repeated contraction-decomposition sweeps over all lattice bonds, thus achieving compression on a given length scale. It then decimates the lattice via coarse-graining tensor contractions. Repeated iterations of these two steps gradually collapse the tensor network and ultimately yield the exact tensor trace for large systems, without the need for manual control of tensor dimensions. Our protocol allows us to obtain the exact number of solutions for computations where a naive enumeration would take astronomically long times.

  9. Advanced Computational Methods for Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-12

    This course is intended for graduate students who already have a basic understanding of Monte Carlo methods. It focuses on advanced topics that may be needed for thesis research, for developing new state-of-the-art methods, or for working with modern production Monte Carlo codes.

  10. Computational methods for two-phase flow and particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Wen Ho

    2013-01-01

    This book describes mathematical formulations and computational methods for solving two-phase flow problems with a computer code that calculates thermal hydraulic problems related to light water and fast breeder reactors. The physical model also handles the particle and gas flow problems that arise from coal gasification and fluidized beds. The second part of this book deals with the computational methods for particle transport.

  11. Reference depth for geostrophic computation - A new method

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.; Sastry, J.S.

    Various methods are available for the determination of reference depth for geostrophic computation. A new method based on the vertical profiles of mean and variance of the differences of mean specific volume anomaly (delta x 10) for different layers...

  12. Lattice Boltzmann method fundamentals and engineering applications with computer codes

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamad, A A

    2014-01-01

    Introducing the Lattice Boltzmann Method in a readable manner, this book provides detailed examples with complete computer codes. It avoids the most complicated mathematics and physics without scarifying the basic fundamentals of the method.

  13. An Augmented Fast Marching Method for Computing Skeletons and Centerlines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple and robust method for computing skeletons for arbitrary planar objects and centerlines for 3D objects. We augment the Fast Marching Method (FMM) widely used in level set applications by computing the paramterized boundary location every pixel came from during the boundary

  14. Classical versus Computer Algebra Methods in Elementary Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Computer algebra methods based on results of commutative algebra like Groebner bases of ideals and elimination of variables make it possible to solve complex, elementary and non elementary problems of geometry, which are difficult to solve using a classical approach. Computer algebra methods permit the proof of geometric theorems, automatic…

  15. Methods for teaching geometric modelling and computer graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotkov, S.I.; Faitel`son, Yu. Ts.

    1992-05-01

    This paper considers methods for teaching the methods and algorithms of geometric modelling and computer graphics to programmers, designers and users of CAD and computer-aided research systems. There is a bibliography that can be used to prepare lectures and practical classes. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Depth-Averaged Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamic Model Using a New Multithreading Parallel Computing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Kang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the hydrostatic hydrodynamic model, the non-hydrostatic hydrodynamic model can accurately simulate flows that feature vertical accelerations. The model’s low computational efficiency severely restricts its wider application. This paper proposes a non-hydrostatic hydrodynamic model based on a multithreading parallel computing method. The horizontal momentum equation is obtained by integrating the Navier–Stokes equations from the bottom to the free surface. The vertical momentum equation is approximated by the Keller-box scheme. A two-step method is used to solve the model equations. A parallel strategy based on block decomposition computation is utilized. The original computational domain is subdivided into two subdomains that are physically connected via a virtual boundary technique. Two sub-threads are created and tasked with the computation of the two subdomains. The producer–consumer model and the thread lock technique are used to achieve synchronous communication between sub-threads. The validity of the model was verified by solitary wave propagation experiments over a flat bottom and slope, followed by two sinusoidal wave propagation experiments over submerged breakwater. The parallel computing method proposed here was found to effectively enhance computational efficiency and save 20%–40% computation time compared to serial computing. The parallel acceleration rate and acceleration efficiency are approximately 1.45% and 72%, respectively. The parallel computing method makes a contribution to the popularization of non-hydrostatic models.

  17. Framework for emotional mobile computation for creating entertainment experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugmayr, Artur R.

    2007-02-01

    Ambient media are media, which are manifesting in the natural environment of the consumer. The perceivable borders between the media and the context, where the media is used are getting more and more blurred. The consumer is moving through a digital space of services throughout his daily life. As we are developing towards an experience society, the central point in the development of services is the creation of a consumer experience. This paper reviews possibilities and potentials of the creation of entertainment experiences with mobile phone platforms. It reviews sensor network capable of acquiring consumer behavior data, interactivity strategies, psychological models for emotional computation on mobile phones, and lays the foundations of a nomadic experience society. The paper rounds up with a presentation of several different possible service scenarios in the field of entertainment and leisure computation on mobiles. The goal of this paper is to present a framework and evaluation of possibilities of applying sensor technology on mobile platforms to create an increasing consumer entertainment experience.

  18. SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; St. Denis, R.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.

    2004-01-01

    SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid

  19. Multilink manipulator computer control: experience in development and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.E.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes development which has been carried out on the multilink manipulator computer control system. The system allows the manipulator to be driven using only two joysticks. The leading link is controlled and the other links follow its path into the reactor, thus avoiding any potential obstacles. The system has been fully commissioned and used with the Sizewell ''A'' reactor 2 Multilink T.V. manipulator. Experience of the use of the system is presented, together with recommendations for future improvements. (author)

  20. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  1. Computational Methods for Conformational Sampling of Biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottaro, Sandro

    mathematical approach to a classic geometrical problem in protein simulations, and demonstrated its superiority compared to existing approaches. Secondly, we have constructed a more accurate implicit model of the aqueous environment, which is of fundamental importance in protein chemistry. This model......Proteins play a fundamental role in virtually every process within living organisms. For example, some proteins act as enzymes, catalyzing a wide range of reactions necessary for life, others mediate the cell interaction with the surrounding environment and still others have regulatory functions...... is computationally much faster than models where water molecules are represented explicitly. Finally, in collaboration with the group of structural bioinformatics at the Department of Biology (KU), we have applied these techniques in the context of modeling of protein structure and flexibility from low...

  2. Computational Method for Atomistic-Continuum Homogenization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The homogenization method is used as a framework for developing a multiscale system of equations involving atoms at zero temperature at the small scale and continuum mechanics at the very large scale...

  3. Computational Methods for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in Criticality Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Rearden, B.T.

    1999-01-01

    Interest in the sensitivity methods that were developed and widely used in the 1970s (the FORSS methodology at ORNL among others) has increased recently as a result of potential use in the area of criticality safety data validation procedures to define computational bias, uncertainties and area(s) of applicability. Functional forms of the resulting sensitivity coefficients can be used as formal parameters in the determination of applicability of benchmark experiments to their corresponding industrial application areas. In order for these techniques to be generally useful to the criticality safety practitioner, the procedures governing their use had to be updated and simplified. This paper will describe the resulting sensitivity analysis tools that have been generated for potential use by the criticality safety community

  4. Expertik: Experience with Artificial Intelligence and Mobile Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Edward Beltrán Lozano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the experience in the development of services based in Artificial Intelligence, Service Oriented Architecture, mobile computing. It aims to combine technology offered by mobile computing provides techniques and artificial intelligence through a service provide diagnostic solutions to problems in industrial maintenance. It aims to combine technology offered by mobile computing and the techniques artificial intelligence through a service to provide diagnostic solutions to problems in industrial maintenance. For service creation are identified the elements of an expert system, the knowledge base, the inference engine and knowledge acquisition interfaces and their consultation. The applications were developed in ASP.NET under architecture three layers. The data layer was developed conjunction in SQL Server with data management classes; business layer in VB.NET and the presentation layer in ASP.NET with XHTML. Web interfaces for knowledge acquisition and query developed in Web and Mobile Web. The inference engine was conducted in web service developed for the fuzzy logic model to resolve requests from applications consulting knowledge (initially an exact rule-based logic within this experience to resolve requests from applications consulting knowledge. This experience seeks to strengthen a technology-based company to offer services based on AI for service companies Colombia.

  5. Solution of the Schrodinger Equation for a Diatomic Oscillator Using Linear Algebra: An Undergraduate Computational Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.

    2008-01-01

    Computational experiment is proposed in which a linear algebra method is applied to the solution of the Schrodinger equation for a diatomic oscillator. Calculations of the vibration-rotation spectrum for the HCl molecule are presented and the results show excellent agreement with experimental data. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  6. Computer methods in physics 250 problems with guided solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Rubin H

    2018-01-01

    Our future scientists and professionals must be conversant in computational techniques. In order to facilitate integration of computer methods into existing physics courses, this textbook offers a large number of worked examples and problems with fully guided solutions in Python as well as other languages (Mathematica, Java, C, Fortran, and Maple). It’s also intended as a self-study guide for learning how to use computer methods in physics. The authors include an introductory chapter on numerical tools and indication of computational and physics difficulty level for each problem.

  7. Social Experiments and Participatory Research as Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2007-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research with stakeholders and users challenge the research methodologies to be used. These have to provide a shared language for all the participants, to build up trust, and to offer insights into the diverse perspectives of the participants. Further more it challenge ways to d...... practice-based methods where "social experiments with technology" and "dialogue research" are the key-words. ...... to discuss and validate contributions from each others - across different criteria for each discipline, and crosswise different agendas for stakeholders, politicians, practitioners and researchers. Participatory research and social experiments are methodologies which have been developed to cope......Interdisciplinary research with stakeholders and users challenge the research methodologies to be used. These have to provide a shared language for all the participants, to build up trust, and to offer insights into the diverse perspectives of the participants. Further more it challenge ways...

  8. Electromagnetic computation methods for lightning surge protection studies

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    This book is the first to consolidate current research and to examine the theories of electromagnetic computation methods in relation to lightning surge protection. The authors introduce and compare existing electromagnetic computation methods such as the method of moments (MOM), the partial element equivalent circuit (PEEC), the finite element method (FEM), the transmission-line modeling (TLM) method, and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The application of FDTD method to lightning protection studies is a topic that has matured through many practical applications in the past decade, and the authors explain the derivation of Maxwell's equations required by the FDTD, and modeling of various electrical components needed in computing lightning electromagnetic fields and surges with the FDTD method. The book describes the application of FDTD method to current and emerging problems of lightning surge protection of continuously more complex installations, particularly in critical infrastructures of e...

  9. Three-dimensional protein structure prediction: Methods and computational strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Márcio; E Silva, Mariel Barbachan; Buriol, Luciana S; Lamb, Luis C

    2014-10-12

    A long standing problem in structural bioinformatics is to determine the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a protein when only a sequence of amino acid residues is given. Many computational methodologies and algorithms have been proposed as a solution to the 3-D Protein Structure Prediction (3-D-PSP) problem. These methods can be divided in four main classes: (a) first principle methods without database information; (b) first principle methods with database information; (c) fold recognition and threading methods; and (d) comparative modeling methods and sequence alignment strategies. Deterministic computational techniques, optimization techniques, data mining and machine learning approaches are typically used in the construction of computational solutions for the PSP problem. Our main goal with this work is to review the methods and computational strategies that are currently used in 3-D protein prediction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational methods in wind power meteorology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann Joergensen, B.; Ott, S.; Mann, J.; Badger, J.

    2006-06-15

    Subsets of measured wind data from the Hjardemael field experiment are extracted in order to produce test cases representing nearly stationary, neutral conditions with well defined upstream flow. Model solutions of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are obtained by utilizing the numerical flow solver EllipSys3D. When utilizing the well-knowh k - e model as a turbulence closure, the result is a nearly complete agreement between the measurements and the model solution - not only for the forward flow but also for the separating backward flow over the Hjardemael escarpment. Smal1 deviations can be understood from analyzing the conditions of the field experiment. It is of vital importance to understand the conditions under which the flow solver yields accurate solutions, in particular with respect to the grid generation, which was performed with the hyperbolic grid generator HypGrid2D/3D. The grid must allow the model to represent the underlying physics of the flow problem and the grid resolution must be sufficient to produce grid independent solutions. This fields not only the correct mean velocity but also the correct Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE). Devitations of the TKE in the zone very close to onset of separation can be understood by addressing the assumptions of a zero horizontal pressure gradient in the momentum balance near the surface. It is argued on basis of the obtained results that the model can be extended to non-neutral conditions and more complex terrain. The difficulties in using existing measurement data from a sparsely instrumented site, Porto, in complex terrain in Portugal for evaluating the model is demonstrated. Suggestions are offered to assist future field work incorporating wind measurements for complex terrain and non-neutral conditions in order to evaluate numerical flow models. (au)

  11. Comparison of Five Computational Methods for Computing Q Factors in Photonic Crystal Membrane Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2017-01-01

    Five state-of-the-art computational methods are benchmarked by computing quality factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane L5 and L9 line defect cavities. The convergence of the methods with respect to resolution, degrees of freedom and number of modes is investigated. Specia...

  12. On the computer simulation of the EPR-Bohm experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGoveran, D.O.; Noyes, H.P.; Manthey, M.J.

    1988-12-01

    We argue that supraluminal correlation without supraluminal signaling is a necessary consequence of any finite and discrete model for physics. Every day, the commercial and military practice of using encrypted communication based on correlated, pseudo-random signals illustrates this possibility. All that is needed are two levels of computational complexity which preclude using a smaller system to detect departures from ''randomness'' in the larger system. Hence the experimental realizations of the EPR-Bohm experiment leave open the question of whether the world of experience is ''random'' or pseudo-random. The latter possibility could be demonstrated experimentally if a complexity parameter related to the arm length and switching time in an Aspect-type realization of the EPR-Bohm experiment is sufficiently small compared to the number of reliable total counts which can be obtained in practice. 6 refs

  13. Topographic evolution of sandbars: Flume experiment and computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Logan, Brandy L.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of sandbar formation and evolution were carried out in a laboratory flume and the topographic characteristics of these barforms were compared to predictions from a computational flow and sediment transport model with bed evolution. The flume experiment produced sandbars with approximate mode 2, whereas numerical simulations produced a bed morphology better approximated as alternate bars, mode 1. In addition, bar formation occurred more rapidly in the laboratory channel than for the model channel. This paper focuses on a steady-flow laboratory experiment without upstream sediment supply. Future experiments will examine the effects of unsteady flow and sediment supply and the use of numerical models to simulate the response of barform topography to these influences.

  14. Computational Methods for Physicists Compendium for Students

    CERN Document Server

    Sirca, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This book helps advanced undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students in their daily work by offering them a compendium of numerical methods. The choice of methods pays  significant attention to error estimates, stability and convergence issues as well as to the ways to optimize program execution speeds. Many examples are given throughout the chapters, and each chapter is followed by at least a handful of more comprehensive problems which may be dealt with, for example, on a weekly basis in a one- or two-semester course. In these end-of-chapter problems the physics background is pronounced, and the main text preceding them is intended as an introduction or as a later reference. Less stress is given to the explanation of individual algorithms. It is tried to induce in the reader an own independent thinking and a certain amount of scepticism and scrutiny instead of blindly following readily available commercial tools.

  15. Measurement method of cardiac computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yumura, Yasuo; Yoshida, Hideo; Morooka, Nobuhiro

    1980-01-01

    The CT was carried out in 126 cases consisting of 31 normals, 17 cases of mitral stenosis (MS), 8 cases of mitral regurgitation (MR), 11 cases of aortic stenosis (AS), 9 cases of aortic regurgitation (AR), 20 cases of myocardial infarction (MI), 8 cases of atrial septal defect (ASD) and 22 hypertensives. The 20-second scans were performed every 1.5 cm from the 2nd intercostal space to the 5th or 6th intercostal space. The computed tomograms obtained were classified into 8 levels by cross-sectional anatomy; levels of (1) the aortic arch, (2) just beneath the aortic arch, (3) the pulmonary artery bifurcation, (4) the right atrial appendage or the upper right atrium, (5) the aortic root, (6) the upper left ventricle, (7) the mid left ventricle, and (8) the lower left ventricle. The diameter (anteroposterior and transverse) and cross-sectional area were measured about ascending aorta (Ao), descending aorta (AoD), superior vena cava (SVC), inferoir vena cava (IVC), pulmonary artery branch (PA), main pulmonary artery (mPA), left atrium (LA), right atrium (RA), and right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) on each level where they were clearly distinguished. However, it was difficult to separate cardiac wall from cardiac cavity because there was little difference of X-ray attenuation coefficient between the myocardium and blood. Therefore, on mid ventricular level, diameter and area about total cardiac shadow were measured, and then cardiac ratios to the thorax were respectively calculated. The normal range of their values was shown in table, and abnormal characteristics in cardiac disease were exhibited in comparison with normal values. In MS, diameter and area in LA were significantly larger than normal. In MS and ASD, all the right cardiac system were larger than normal, especially, RA and SVC in MS, PA and RVOT in ASD. The diameter and area of the aortic root was larger in the order of AR, AS and HT than normal. (author)

  16. Three numerical methods for the computation of the electrostatic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Galeriu, D.

    1975-01-01

    The FORTRAN programs for computation of the electrostatic energy of a body with axial symmetry by Lawrence, Hill-Wheeler and Beringer methods are presented in detail. The accuracy, time of computation and the required memory of these methods are tested at various deformations for two simple parametrisations: two overlapping identical spheres and a spheroid. On this basis the field of application of each method is recomended

  17. Application of Computational Methods in Planaria Research: A Current Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Shyamasree

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Planaria is a member of the Phylum Platyhelminthes including flatworms. Planarians possess the unique ability of regeneration from adult stem cells or neoblasts and finds importance as a model organism for regeneration and developmental studies. Although research is being actively carried out globally through conventional methods to understand the process of regeneration from neoblasts, biology of development, neurobiology and immunology of Planaria, there are many thought provoking questions related to stem cell plasticity, and uniqueness of regenerative potential in Planarians amongst other members of Phylum Platyhelminthes. The complexity of receptors and signalling mechanisms, immune system network, biology of repair, responses to injury are yet to be understood in Planaria. Genomic and transcriptomic studies have generated a vast repository of data, but their availability and analysis is a challenging task. Data mining, computational approaches of gene curation, bioinformatics tools for analysis of transcriptomic data, designing of databases, application of algorithms in deciphering changes of morphology by RNA interference (RNAi approaches, understanding regeneration experiments is a new venture in Planaria research that is helping researchers across the globe in understanding the biology. We highlight the applications of Hidden Markov models (HMMs in designing of computational tools and their applications in Planaria decoding their complex biology.

  18. Distributing the computation in combinatorial optimization experiments over the cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Brcic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial optimization is an area of great importance since many of the real-world problems have discrete parameters which are part of the objective function to be optimized. Development of combinatorial optimization algorithms is guided by the empirical study of the candidate ideas and their performance over a wide range of settings or scenarios to infer general conclusions. Number of scenarios can be overwhelming, especially when modeling uncertainty in some of the problem’s parameters. Since the process is also iterative and many ideas and hypotheses may be tested, execution time of each experiment has an important role in the efficiency and successfulness. Structure of such experiments allows for significant execution time improvement by distributing the computation. We focus on the cloud computing as a cost-efficient solution in these circumstances. In this paper we present a system for validating and comparing stochastic combinatorial optimization algorithms. The system also deals with selection of the optimal settings for computational nodes and number of nodes in terms of performance-cost tradeoff. We present applications of the system on a new class of project scheduling problem. We show that we can optimize the selection over cloud service providers as one of the settings and, according to the model, it resulted in a substantial cost-savings while meeting the deadline.

  19. Reduced order methods for modeling and computational reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rozza, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    This monograph addresses the state of the art of reduced order methods for modeling and computational reduction of complex parametrized systems, governed by ordinary and/or partial differential equations, with a special emphasis on real time computing techniques and applications in computational mechanics, bioengineering and computer graphics.  Several topics are covered, including: design, optimization, and control theory in real-time with applications in engineering; data assimilation, geometry registration, and parameter estimation with special attention to real-time computing in biomedical engineering and computational physics; real-time visualization of physics-based simulations in computer science; the treatment of high-dimensional problems in state space, physical space, or parameter space; the interactions between different model reduction and dimensionality reduction approaches; the development of general error estimation frameworks which take into account both model and discretization effects. This...

  20. Testing and Validation of Computational Methods for Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Laurent; Hansen, Kasper D; Hoopmann, Michael R; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Beyer, Andreas

    2016-03-04

    High-throughput methods based on mass spectrometry (proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, etc.) produce a wealth of data that cannot be analyzed without computational methods. The impact of the choice of method on the overall result of a biological study is often underappreciated, but different methods can result in very different biological findings. It is thus essential to evaluate and compare the correctness and relative performance of computational methods. The volume of the data as well as the complexity of the algorithms render unbiased comparisons challenging. This paper discusses some problems and challenges in testing and validation of computational methods. We discuss the different types of data (simulated and experimental validation data) as well as different metrics to compare methods. We also introduce a new public repository for mass spectrometric reference data sets ( http://compms.org/RefData ) that contains a collection of publicly available data sets for performance evaluation for a wide range of different methods.

  1. Methods and computer codes for probabilistic sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and applications experience with two computer codes that are now available from the National Energy Software Center at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of the SCREEN code is to identify a group of most important input variables of a code that has many (tens, hundreds) input variables with uncertainties, and do this without relying on judgment or exhaustive sensitivity studies. Purpose of the PROSA-2 code is to propagate uncertainties and calculate the distributions of interesting output variable(s) of a safety analysis code using response surface techniques, based on the same runs used for screening. Several applications are discussed, but the codes are generic, not tailored to any specific safety application code. They are compatible in terms of input/output requirements but also independent of each other, e.g., PROSA-2 can be used without first using SCREEN if a set of important input variables has first been selected by other methods. Also, although SCREEN can select cases to be run (by random sampling), a user can select cases by other methods if he so prefers, and still use the rest of SCREEN for identifying important input variables

  2. Developing a multimodal biometric authentication system using soft computing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcangi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Robust personal authentication is becoming ever more important in computer-based applications. Among a variety of methods, biometric offers several advantages, mainly in embedded system applications. Hard and soft multi-biometric, combined with hard and soft computing methods, can be applied to improve the personal authentication process and to generalize the applicability. This chapter describes the embedded implementation of a multi-biometric (voiceprint and fingerprint) multimodal identification system based on hard computing methods (DSP) for feature extraction and matching, an artificial neural network (ANN) for soft feature pattern matching, and a fuzzy logic engine (FLE) for data fusion and decision.

  3. Computer systems and methods for visualizing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, Chris; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2013-01-29

    A method for forming a visual plot using a hierarchical structure of a dataset. The dataset comprises a measure and a dimension. The dimension consists of a plurality of levels. The plurality of levels form a dimension hierarchy. The visual plot is constructed based on a specification. A first level from the plurality of levels is represented by a first component of the visual plot. A second level from the plurality of levels is represented by a second component of the visual plot. The dataset is queried to retrieve data in accordance with the specification. The data includes all or a portion of the dimension and all or a portion of the measure. The visual plot is populated with the retrieved data in accordance with the specification.

  4. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML--the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Adams, Richard; Bergmann, Frank T; Hucka, Michael; Kolpakov, Fedor; Miller, Andrew K; Moraru, Ion I; Nickerson, David; Sahle, Sven; Snoep, Jacky L; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from different fields of research

  5. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML - The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. Results In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. Conclusions With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from

  6. Experience building and operating the CMS Tier-1 computing centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, M.; Bakken, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Brew, C.; Charlot, C.; Huang, Chih-Hao; Colling, D.; Dumitrescu, C.; Fagan, D.; Fassi, F.; Fisk, I.; Flix, J.; Giacchetti, L.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gowdy, S.; Grandi, C.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, K.; Holzman, B.; Jackson, J.; Kreuzer, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Mason, D.; Pukhaeva, N.; Qin, G.; Quast, G.; Rossman, P.; Sartirana, A.; Scheurer, A.; Schott, G.; Shih, J.; Tader, P.; Thompson, R.; Tiradani, A.; Trunov, A.

    2010-04-01

    The CMS Collaboration relies on 7 globally distributed Tier-1 computing centres located at large universities and national laboratories for a second custodial copy of the CMS RAW data and primary copy of the simulated data, data serving capacity to Tier-2 centres for analysis, and the bulk of the reprocessing and event selection capacity in the experiment. The Tier-1 sites have a challenging role in CMS because they are expected to ingest and archive data from both CERN and regional Tier-2 centres, while they export data to a global mesh of Tier-2s at rates comparable to the raw export data rate from CERN. The combined capacity of the Tier-1 centres is more than twice the resources located at CERN and efficiently utilizing this large distributed resources represents a challenge. In this article we will discuss the experience building, operating, and utilizing the CMS Tier-1 computing centres. We will summarize the facility challenges at the Tier-1s including the stable operations of CMS services, the ability to scale to large numbers of processing requests and large volumes of data, and the ability to provide custodial storage and high performance data serving. We will also present the operations experience utilizing the distributed Tier-1 centres from a distance: transferring data, submitting data serving requests, and submitting batch processing requests.

  7. Experience building and operating the CMS Tier-1 computing centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M; Bakken, J; Huang, Chih-Hao; Dumitrescu, C; Fagan, D; Fisk, I; Giacchetti, L; Gutsche, O; Holzman, B; Bonacorsi, D; Grandi, C; Brew, C; Jackson, J; Charlot, C; Colling, D; Fassi, F; Flix, J; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Hahn, K; Gowdy, S

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Collaboration relies on 7 globally distributed Tier-1 computing centres located at large universities and national laboratories for a second custodial copy of the CMS RAW data and primary copy of the simulated data, data serving capacity to Tier-2 centres for analysis, and the bulk of the reprocessing and event selection capacity in the experiment. The Tier-1 sites have a challenging role in CMS because they are expected to ingest and archive data from both CERN and regional Tier-2 centres, while they export data to a global mesh of Tier-2s at rates comparable to the raw export data rate from CERN. The combined capacity of the Tier-1 centres is more than twice the resources located at CERN and efficiently utilizing this large distributed resources represents a challenge. In this article we will discuss the experience building, operating, and utilizing the CMS Tier-1 computing centres. We will summarize the facility challenges at the Tier-1s including the stable operations of CMS services, the ability to scale to large numbers of processing requests and large volumes of data, and the ability to provide custodial storage and high performance data serving. We will also present the operations experience utilizing the distributed Tier-1 centres from a distance: transferring data, submitting data serving requests, and submitting batch processing requests.

  8. The BaBar experiment's distributed computing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutigny, D.

    2001-01-01

    In order to face the expected increase in statistics between now and 2005, the BaBar experiment at SLAC is evolving its computing model toward a distributed multitier system. It is foreseen that data will be spread among Tier-A centers and deleted from the SLAC center. A uniform computing environment is being deployed in the centers, the network bandwidth is continuously increased and data distribution tools has been designed in order to reach a transfer rate of ∼100 TB of data per year. In parallel, smaller Tier-B and C sites receive subsets of data, presently in Kanga-ROOT format and later in Objectivity format. GRID tools will be used for remote job submission

  9. The BaBar Experiment's Distributed Computing Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowdy, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    In order to face the expected increase in statistics between now and 2005, the BaBar experiment at SLAC is evolving its computing model toward a distributed multi-tier system. It is foreseen that data will be spread among Tier-A centers and deleted from the SLAC center. A uniform computing environment is being deployed in the centers, the network bandwidth is continuously increased and data distribution tools has been designed in order to reach a transfer rate of ∼100 TB of data per year. In parallel, smaller Tier-B and C sites receive subsets of data, presently in Kanga-ROOT[1] format and later in Objectivity[2] format. GRID tools will be used for remote job submission

  10. Depth compensating calculation method of computer-generated holograms using symmetry and similarity of zone plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Gong, Guanghong; Li, Ni

    2017-10-01

    Computer-generated hologram (CGH) is a promising 3D display technology while it is challenged by heavy computation load and vast memory requirement. To solve these problems, a depth compensating CGH calculation method based on symmetry and similarity of zone plates is proposed and implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU). An improved LUT method is put forward to compute the distances between object points and hologram pixels in the XY direction. The concept of depth compensating factor is defined and used for calculating the holograms of points with different depth positions instead of layer-based methods. The proposed method is suitable for arbitrary sampling objects with lower memory usage and higher computational efficiency compared to other CGH methods. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by numerical and optical experiments.

  11. Control rod computer code IAMCOS: general theory and numerical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    1982-11-01

    IAMCOS is a computer code for the description of mechanical and thermal behavior of cylindrical control rods for fast breeders. This code version was applied, tested and modified from 1979 to 1981. In this report are described the basic model (02 version), theoretical definitions and computation methods [fr

  12. Computation of saddle-type slow manifolds using iterative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall

    2015-01-01

    with respect to , appropriate estimates are directly attainable using the method of this paper. The method is applied to several examples, including a model for a pair of neurons coupled by reciprocal inhibition with two slow and two fast variables, and the computation of homoclinic connections in the Fitz......This paper presents an alternative approach for the computation of trajectory segments on slow manifolds of saddle type. This approach is based on iterative methods rather than collocation-type methods. Compared to collocation methods, which require mesh refinements to ensure uniform convergence...

  13. Application of heterogeneous method for the interpretation of exponential experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhoff, G.; Bondar, L.

    1977-01-01

    The present paper gives a brief review of a work which was executed mainly during 1967 and 1968 in the field of the application of heterogeneous methods for the interpretation of exponential experiments with ORGEL type lattices (lattices of natural uranium cluster elements with organic coolants moderated by heavy water). In the frame of this work a heterogeneous computer program, in (r,γ) geometry was written which is based on the NORDHEIM method using a uniform moderator, three energy groups and monopol and dipol sources. This code is especially adapted for regular square lattices in a cylindrical tank. Full use of lattice symmetry was made for reducing the numerical job of the theory. A further reduction was obtained by introducing a group averaged extrapolation distance at the external boundary. Channel parameters were evaluated by the PINOCCHIO code. Comparisons of calculated and measured thermal neutron flux showed good agreement. Equivalence of heterogeneous and homogeneous theory was found in cases of lattices comprising a minimum of 32, 24 and 16 fuel elements for respectively under-, well-, and over-moderated lattices. Heterogeneous calculations of high leakage lattices suffered the lack of good methods for the computation of axial and radial streaming parameters. Interpretation of buckling measurements in the subcritical facility EXPO requires already more accurate evaluation of the streaming effects than we made. The potential of heterogeneous theory in the field of exponential experiments is thought to be limited by the precision by which the streaming parameters can be calculated

  14. Fisher information in the design of computer simulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    StehlIk, Milan; Mueller, Werner G [Department of Applied Statistics, Johannes-Kepler-University Linz Freistaedter Strasse 315, A-4040 Linz (Austria)], E-mail: Milan.Stehlik@jku.at, E-mail: Werner.Mueller@jku.at

    2008-11-01

    The concept of Fisher information is conveniently used as a basis for designing efficient experiments. However, if the output stems from computer simulations they are often approximated as realizations of correlated random fields. Consequently, the conditions under which Fisher information may be suitable must be restated. In the paper we intend to give some simple but illuminating examples for these cases. 'Random phenomena have increasing importance in Engineering and Physics, therefore theoretical results are strongly needed. But there is a gap between the probability theory used by mathematicians and practitioners. Two very different languages have been generated in this way...' (Paul Kree, Paris 1995)

  15. Fisher information in the design of computer simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    StehlIk, Milan; Mueller, Werner G

    2008-01-01

    The concept of Fisher information is conveniently used as a basis for designing efficient experiments. However, if the output stems from computer simulations they are often approximated as realizations of correlated random fields. Consequently, the conditions under which Fisher information may be suitable must be restated. In the paper we intend to give some simple but illuminating examples for these cases. 'Random phenomena have increasing importance in Engineering and Physics, therefore theoretical results are strongly needed. But there is a gap between the probability theory used by mathematicians and practitioners. Two very different languages have been generated in this way...' (Paul Kree, Paris 1995)

  16. Discrete linear canonical transform computation by adaptive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Tao, Ran; Wang, Yue

    2013-07-29

    The linear canonical transform (LCT) describes the effect of quadratic phase systems on a wavefield and generalizes many optical transforms. In this paper, the computation method for the discrete LCT using the adaptive least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm is presented. The computation approaches of the block-based discrete LCT and the stream-based discrete LCT using the LMS algorithm are derived, and the implementation structures of these approaches by the adaptive filter system are considered. The proposed computation approaches have the inherent parallel structures which make them suitable for efficient VLSI implementations, and are robust to the propagation of possible errors in the computation process.

  17. Platform-independent method for computer aided schematic drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vell, Jeffrey L [Slingerlands, NY; Siganporia, Darius M [Clifton Park, NY; Levy, Arthur J [Fort Lauderdale, FL

    2012-02-14

    A CAD/CAM method is disclosed for a computer system to capture and interchange schematic drawing and associated design information. The schematic drawing and design information are stored in an extensible, platform-independent format.

  18. Simulating elastic light scattering using high performance computing methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Verbraeck, A.; Kerckhoffs, E.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Coupled Dipole method, as originally formulated byPurcell and Pennypacker, is a very powerful method tosimulate the Elastic Light Scattering from arbitraryparticles. This method, which is a particle simulationmodel for Computational Electromagnetics, has one majordrawback: if the size of the

  19. Computational and experimental methods for enclosed natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.W.; Gartling, D.K.; Schimmel, W.P. Jr.

    1977-10-01

    Two computational procedures and one optical experimental procedure for studying enclosed natural convection are described. The finite-difference and finite-element numerical methods are developed and several sample problems are solved. Results obtained from the two computational approaches are compared. A temperature-visualization scheme using laser holographic interferometry is described, and results from this experimental procedure are compared with results from both numerical methods

  20. Perspectives on distributed computing : thirty people, four user types, and the distributed computing user experience.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childers, L.; Liming, L.; Foster, I.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-10-15

    This report summarizes the methodology and results of a user perspectives study conducted by the Community Driven Improvement of Globus Software (CDIGS) project. The purpose of the study was to document the work-related goals and challenges facing today's scientific technology users, to record their perspectives on Globus software and the distributed-computing ecosystem, and to provide recommendations to the Globus community based on the observations. Globus is a set of open source software components intended to provide a framework for collaborative computational science activities. Rather than attempting to characterize all users or potential users of Globus software, our strategy has been to speak in detail with a small group of individuals in the scientific community whose work appears to be the kind that could benefit from Globus software, learn as much as possible about their work goals and the challenges they face, and describe what we found. The result is a set of statements about specific individuals experiences. We do not claim that these are representative of a potential user community, but we do claim to have found commonalities and differences among the interviewees that may be reflected in the user community as a whole. We present these as a series of hypotheses that can be tested by subsequent studies, and we offer recommendations to Globus developers based on the assumption that these hypotheses are representative. Specifically, we conducted interviews with thirty technology users in the scientific community. We included both people who have used Globus software and those who have not. We made a point of including individuals who represent a variety of roles in scientific projects, for example, scientists, software developers, engineers, and infrastructure providers. The following material is included in this report: (1) A summary of the reported work-related goals, significant issues, and points of satisfaction with the use of Globus software

  1. Method and computer program product for maintenance and modernization backlogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattimore, Bernard G; Reynolds, Paul E; Farrell, Jill M

    2013-02-19

    According to one embodiment, a computer program product for determining future facility conditions includes a computer readable medium having computer readable program code stored therein. The computer readable program code includes computer readable program code for calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, for calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and for calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. In another embodiment, a computer-implemented method for calculating future facility conditions includes calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. Other embodiments are also presented.

  2. Computer Anti-forensics Methods and their Impact on Computer Forensic Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Pajek, Przemyslaw; Pimenidis, Elias

    2009-01-01

    Electronic crime is very difficult to investigate and prosecute, mainly\\ud due to the fact that investigators have to build their cases based on artefacts left\\ud on computer systems. Nowadays, computer criminals are aware of computer forensics\\ud methods and techniques and try to use countermeasure techniques to efficiently\\ud impede the investigation processes. In many cases investigation with\\ud such countermeasure techniques in place appears to be too expensive, or too\\ud time consuming t...

  3. Fibonacci’s Computation Methods vs Modern Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Burattini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss some computational procedures given by Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci in his famous Liber Abaci book, and we propose their translation into a modern language for computers (C ++. Among the other we describe the method of “cross” multiplication, we evaluate its computational complexity in algorithmic terms and we show the output of a C ++ code that describes the development of the method applied to the product of two integers. In a similar way we show the operations performed on fractions introduced by Fibonacci. Thanks to the possibility to reproduce on a computer, the Fibonacci’s different computational procedures, it was possible to identify some calculation errors present in the different versions of the original text.

  4. SmartShadow models and methods for pervasive computing

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    SmartShadow: Models and Methods for Pervasive Computing offers a new perspective on pervasive computing with SmartShadow, which is designed to model a user as a personality ""shadow"" and to model pervasive computing environments as user-centric dynamic virtual personal spaces. Just like human beings' shadows in the physical world, it follows people wherever they go, providing them with pervasive services. The model, methods, and software infrastructure for SmartShadow are presented and an application for smart cars is also introduced.  The book can serve as a valuable reference work for resea

  5. Improved look-up table method of computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Gong, Guanghong; Li, Ni

    2016-11-10

    Heavy computation load and vast memory requirements are major bottlenecks of computer-generated holograms (CGHs), which are promising and challenging in three-dimensional displays. To solve these problems, an improved look-up table (LUT) method suitable for arbitrarily sampled object points is proposed and implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU) whose reconstructed object quality is consistent with that of the coherent ray-trace (CRT) method. The concept of distance factor is defined, and the distance factors are pre-computed off-line and stored in a look-up table. The results show that while reconstruction quality close to that of the CRT method is obtained, the on-line computation time is dramatically reduced compared with the LUT method on the GPU and the memory usage is lower than that of the novel-LUT considerably. Optical experiments are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Computer-Assisted Experiments with a Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    A laser diode from an inexpensive laser pen (laser pointer) is used in simple experiments. The radiant output power and efficiency of the laser are measured, and polarization of the light beam is shown. The "h/e" ratio is available from the threshold of spontaneous emission. The lasing threshold is found using several methods. With a…

  7. Computational techniques for inelastic analysis and numerical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    A number of formulations have been proposed for inelastic analysis, particularly for the thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis of nuclear reactor components. In the elastic-plastic regime, which principally concerns with the time independent behavior, the numerical techniques based on the finite element method have been well exploited and computations have become a routine work. With respect to the problems in which the time dependent behavior is significant, it is desirable to incorporate a procedure which is workable on the mechanical model formulation as well as the method of equation of state proposed so far. A computer program should also take into account the strain-dependent and/or time-dependent micro-structural changes which often occur during the operation of structural components at the increasingly high temperature for a long period of time. Special considerations are crucial if the analysis is to be extended to large strain regime where geometric nonlinearities predominate. The present paper introduces a rational updated formulation and a computer program under development by taking into account the various requisites stated above. (Auth.)

  8. National Fusion Collaboratory: Grid Computing for Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2004-05-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory Project is creating a computational grid designed to advance scientific understanding and innovation in magnetic fusion research by facilitating collaborations, enabling more effective integration of experiments, theory and modeling and allowing more efficient use of experimental facilities. The philosophy of FusionGrid is that data, codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and communication tools should be thought of as network available services, easily used by the fusion scientist. In such an environment, access to services is stressed rather than portability. By building on a foundation of established computer science toolkits, deployment time can be minimized. These services all share the same basic infrastructure that allows for secure authentication and resource authorization which allows stakeholders to control their own resources such as computers, data and experiments. Code developers can control intellectual property, and fair use of shared resources can be demonstrated and controlled. A key goal is to shield scientific users from the implementation details such that transparency and ease-of-use are maximized. The first FusionGrid service deployed was the TRANSP code, a widely used tool for transport analysis. Tools for run preparation, submission, monitoring and management have been developed and shared among a wide user base. This approach saves user sites from the laborious effort of maintaining such a large and complex code while at the same time reducing the burden on the development team by avoiding the need to support a large number of heterogeneous installations. Shared visualization and A/V tools are being developed and deployed to enhance long-distance collaborations. These include desktop versions of the Access Grid, a highly capable multi-point remote conferencing tool and capabilities for sharing displays and analysis tools over local and wide-area networks.

  9. Computer science handbook. Vol. 13.3. Environmental computer science. Computer science methods for environmental protection and environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, B.; Hilty, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental computer science is a new partial discipline of applied computer science, which makes use of methods and techniques of information processing in environmental protection. Thanks to the inter-disciplinary nature of environmental problems, computer science acts as a mediator between numerous disciplines and institutions in this sector. The handbook reflects the broad spectrum of state-of-the art environmental computer science. The following important subjects are dealt with: Environmental databases and information systems, environmental monitoring, modelling and simulation, visualization of environmental data and knowledge-based systems in the environmental sector. (orig.) [de

  10. A benchmark on computational simulation of a CT fracture experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, C.; Brochard, J.; Ignaccolo, S.; Eripret, C.

    1992-01-01

    For a better understanding of the fracture behavior of cracked welds in piping, FRAMATOME, EDF and CEA have launched an important analytical research program. This program is mainly based on the analysis of the effects of the geometrical parameters (the crack size and the welded joint dimensions) and the yield strength ratio on the fracture behavior of several cracked configurations. Two approaches have been selected for the fracture analyses: on one hand, the global approach based on the concept of crack driving force J and on the other hand, a local approach of ductile fracture. In this approach the crack initiation and growth are modelized by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of cavities in front of the crack tip. The model selected in this study estimates only the growth of the cavities using the RICE and TRACEY relationship. The present study deals with a benchmark on computational simulation of CT fracture experiments using three computer codes : ALIBABA developed by EDF the CEA's code CASTEM 2000 and the FRAMATOME's code SYSTUS. The paper is split into three parts. At first, the authors present the experimental procedure for high temperature toughness testing of two CT specimens taken from a welded pipe, characteristic of pressurized water reactor primary piping. Secondly, considerations are outlined about the Finite Element analysis and the application procedure. A detailed description is given on boundary and loading conditions, on the mesh characteristics, on the numerical scheme involved and on the void growth computation. Finally, the comparisons between numerical and experimental results are presented up to the crack initiation, the tearing process being not taken into account in the present study. The variations of J and of the local variables used to estimate the damage around the crack tip (triaxiality and hydrostatic stresses, plastic deformations, void growth ...) are computed as a function of the increasing load

  11. Mass Spectrometry Coupled Experiments and Protein Structure Modeling Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sael

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the accumulation of next generation sequencing data, there is increasing interest in the study of intra-species difference in molecular biology, especially in relation to disease analysis. Furthermore, the dynamics of the protein is being identified as a critical factor in its function. Although accuracy of protein structure prediction methods is high, provided there are structural templates, most methods are still insensitive to amino-acid differences at critical points that may change the overall structure. Also, predicted structures are inherently static and do not provide information about structural change over time. It is challenging to address the sensitivity and the dynamics by computational structure predictions alone. However, with the fast development of diverse mass spectrometry coupled experiments, low-resolution but fast and sensitive structural information can be obtained. This information can then be integrated into the structure prediction process to further improve the sensitivity and address the dynamics of the protein structures. For this purpose, this article focuses on reviewing two aspects: the types of mass spectrometry coupled experiments and structural data that are obtainable through those experiments; and the structure prediction methods that can utilize these data as constraints. Also, short review of current efforts in integrating experimental data in the structural modeling is provided.

  12. Computer-assisted experiments with a laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov, E-mail: krafty@mail.biu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2011-05-15

    A laser diode from an inexpensive laser pen (laser pointer) is used in simple experiments. The radiant output power and efficiency of the laser are measured, and polarization of the light beam is shown. The h/e ratio is available from the threshold of spontaneous emission. The lasing threshold is found using several methods. With a data-acquisition system, the measurements are possible in a short time. The frequency response of the laser diode is determined in the range 10-10{sup 7} Hz. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and for classroom demonstrations on semiconductors.

  13. Computer-assisted experiments with a laser diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    A laser diode from an inexpensive laser pen (laser pointer) is used in simple experiments. The radiant output power and efficiency of the laser are measured, and polarization of the light beam is shown. The h/e ratio is available from the threshold of spontaneous emission. The lasing threshold is found using several methods. With a data-acquisition system, the measurements are possible in a short time. The frequency response of the laser diode is determined in the range 10-10 7 Hz. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and for classroom demonstrations on semiconductors.

  14. Developments of multibody system dynamics: computer simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Wan-Suk; Kim, Kee-Nam; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Sohn, Jeong-Hyun

    2007-01-01

    It is an exceptional success when multibody dynamics researchers Multibody System Dynamics journal one of the most highly ranked journals in the last 10 years. In the inaugural issue, Professor Schiehlen wrote an interesting article explaining the roots and perspectives of multibody system dynamics. Professor Shabana also wrote an interesting article to review developments in flexible multibody dynamics. The application possibilities of multibody system dynamics have grown wider and deeper, with many application examples being introduced with multibody techniques in the past 10 years. In this paper, the development of multibody dynamics is briefly reviewed and several applications of multibody dynamics are described according to the author's research results. Simulation examples are compared to physical experiments, which show reasonableness and accuracy of the multibody formulation applied to real problems. Computer simulations using the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) were also compared to physical experiments; therefore, the validity of ANCF for large-displacement and large-deformation problems was shown. Physical experiments for large deformation problems include beam, plate, chain, and strip. Other research topics currently being carried out in the author's laboratory are also briefly explained

  15. Experiments and computation of onshore breaking solitary waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A.; Mayer, Stefan; Pedersen, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    This is a combined experimental and computational study of solitary waves that break on-shore. Velocities and accelerations are measured by a two-camera PIV technique and compared to theoretical values from an Euler model with a VOF method for the free surface. In particular, the dynamics of a so......-called collapsing breaker is scrutinized and the closure between the breaker and the beach is found to be akin to slamming. To the knowledge of the authors, no velocity measurements for this kind of breaker have been previously reported....

  16. Big data mining analysis method based on cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing Qiu; Cui, Hong Gang; Tang, Hao

    2017-08-01

    Information explosion era, large data super-large, discrete and non-(semi) structured features have gone far beyond the traditional data management can carry the scope of the way. With the arrival of the cloud computing era, cloud computing provides a new technical way to analyze the massive data mining, which can effectively solve the problem that the traditional data mining method cannot adapt to massive data mining. This paper introduces the meaning and characteristics of cloud computing, analyzes the advantages of using cloud computing technology to realize data mining, designs the mining algorithm of association rules based on MapReduce parallel processing architecture, and carries out the experimental verification. The algorithm of parallel association rule mining based on cloud computing platform can greatly improve the execution speed of data mining.

  17. A Krylov Subspace Method for Unstructured Mesh SN Transport Computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Han Jong; Cho, Nam Zin; Kim, Jong Woon; Hong, Ser Gi; Lee, Young Ouk

    2010-01-01

    Hong, et al., have developed a computer code MUST (Multi-group Unstructured geometry S N Transport) for the neutral particle transport calculations in three-dimensional unstructured geometry. In this code, the discrete ordinates transport equation is solved by using the discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) or the subcell balance methods with linear discontinuous expansion. In this paper, the conventional source iteration in the MUST code is replaced by the Krylov subspace method to reduce computing time and the numerical test results are given

  18. Computational methods for high-energy source shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.W.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.

    1983-01-01

    The computational methods for high-energy radiation transport related to shielding of the SNQ-spallation source are outlined. The basic approach is to couple radiation-transport computer codes which use Monte Carlo methods and discrete ordinates methods. A code system is suggested that incorporates state-of-the-art radiation-transport techniques. The stepwise verification of that system is briefly summarized. The complexity of the resulting code system suggests a more straightforward code specially tailored for thick shield calculations. A short guide line to future development of such a Monte Carlo code is given

  19. Monte Carlo methods of PageRank computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvak, Nelli

    2004-01-01

    We describe and analyze an on-line Monte Carlo method of PageRank computation. The PageRank is being estimated basing on results of a large number of short independent simulation runs initiated from each page that contains outgoing hyperlinks. The method does not require any storage of the hyperlink

  20. Geometric optical transfer function and tis computation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qi

    1992-01-01

    Geometric Optical Transfer Function formula is derived after expound some content to be easily ignored, and the computation method is given with Bessel function of order zero and numerical integration and Spline interpolation. The method is of advantage to ensure accuracy and to save calculation

  1. Efficient Numerical Methods for Stochastic Differential Equations in Computational Finance

    KAUST Repository

    Happola, Juho

    2017-09-19

    Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) offer a rich framework to model the probabilistic evolution of the state of a system. Numerical approximation methods are typically needed in evaluating relevant Quantities of Interest arising from such models. In this dissertation, we present novel effective methods for evaluating Quantities of Interest relevant to computational finance when the state of the system is described by an SDE.

  2. Fully consistent CFD methods for incompressible flow computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmogorov, Dmitry; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays collocated grid based CFD methods are one of the most e_cient tools for computations of the ows past wind turbines. To ensure the robustness of the methods they require special attention to the well-known problem of pressure-velocity coupling. Many commercial codes to ensure the pressure...

  3. Efficient Numerical Methods for Stochastic Differential Equations in Computational Finance

    KAUST Repository

    Happola, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) offer a rich framework to model the probabilistic evolution of the state of a system. Numerical approximation methods are typically needed in evaluating relevant Quantities of Interest arising from such models. In this dissertation, we present novel effective methods for evaluating Quantities of Interest relevant to computational finance when the state of the system is described by an SDE.

  4. Computational methods for structural load and resistance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, B. H.; Millwater, H. R.; Harren, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    An automated capability for computing structural reliability considering uncertainties in both load and resistance variables is presented. The computations are carried out using an automated Advanced Mean Value iteration algorithm (AMV +) with performance functions involving load and resistance variables obtained by both explicit and implicit methods. A complete description of the procedures used is given as well as several illustrative examples, verified by Monte Carlo Analysis. In particular, the computational methods described in the paper are shown to be quite accurate and efficient for a material nonlinear structure considering material damage as a function of several primitive random variables. The results show clearly the effectiveness of the algorithms for computing the reliability of large-scale structural systems with a maximum number of resolutions.

  5. Computational mathematics models, methods, and analysis with Matlab and MPI

    CERN Document Server

    White, Robert E

    2004-01-01

    Computational Mathematics: Models, Methods, and Analysis with MATLAB and MPI explores and illustrates this process. Each section of the first six chapters is motivated by a specific application. The author applies a model, selects a numerical method, implements computer simulations, and assesses the ensuing results. These chapters include an abundance of MATLAB code. By studying the code instead of using it as a "black box, " you take the first step toward more sophisticated numerical modeling. The last four chapters focus on multiprocessing algorithms implemented using message passing interface (MPI). These chapters include Fortran 9x codes that illustrate the basic MPI subroutines and revisit the applications of the previous chapters from a parallel implementation perspective. All of the codes are available for download from www4.ncsu.edu./~white.This book is not just about math, not just about computing, and not just about applications, but about all three--in other words, computational science. Whether us...

  6. Use of Tablet Computers to Promote Physical Therapy Students' Engagement in Knowledge Translation During Clinical Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Kathryn; Barbosa, Sabrina; Jiang, Fei; Lee, Karin T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Physical therapists strive to integrate research into daily practice. The tablet computer is a potentially transformational tool for accessing information within the clinical practice environment. The purpose of this study was to measure and describe patterns of tablet computer use among physical therapy students during clinical rotation experiences. Methods: Doctor of physical therapy students (n = 13 users) tracked their use of tablet computers (iPad), loaded with commercially available apps, during 16 clinical experiences (6-16 weeks in duration). Results: The tablets were used on 70% of 691 clinic days, averaging 1.3 uses per day. Information seeking represented 48% of uses; 33% of those were foreground searches for research articles and syntheses and 66% were for background medical information. Other common uses included patient education (19%), medical record documentation (13%), and professional communication (9%). The most frequently used app was Safari, the preloaded web browser (representing 281 [36.5%] incidents of use). Users accessed 56 total apps to support clinical practice. Discussion and Conclusions: Physical therapy students successfully integrated use of a tablet computer into their clinical experiences including regular activities of information seeking. Our findings suggest that the tablet computer represents a potentially transformational tool for promoting knowledge translation in the clinical practice environment. Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A127). PMID:26945431

  7. FATAL, General Experiment Fitting Program by Nonlinear Regression Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.; Budd, T.; Marshall, M.

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: A generalized fitting program with a free-format keyword interface to the user. It permits experimental data to be fitted by non-linear regression methods to any function describable by the user. The user requires the minimum of computer experience but needs to provide a subroutine to define his function. Some statistical output is included as well as 'best' estimates of the function's parameters. 2 - Method of solution: The regression method used is based on a minimization technique devised by Powell (Harwell Subroutine Library VA05A, 1972) which does not require the use of analytical derivatives. The method employs a quasi-Newton procedure balanced with a steepest descent correction. Experience shows this to be efficient for a very wide range of application. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The current version of the program permits functions to be defined with up to 20 parameters. The function may be fitted to a maximum of 400 points, preferably with estimated values of weight given

  8. Assessing computer skills in Tanzanian medical students: an elective experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Rob

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One estimate suggests that by 2010 more than 30% of a physician's time will be spent using information technology tools. The aim of this study is to assess the information and communication technologies (ICT skills of medical students in Tanzania. We also report a pilot intervention of peer mentoring training in ICT by medical students from the UK tutoring students in Tanzania. Methods Design: Cross sectional study and pilot intervention study. Participants: Fourth year medical students (n = 92 attending Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Main outcome measures: Self-reported assessment of competence on ICT-related topics and ability to perform specific ICT tasks. Further information related to frequency of computer use (hours per week, years of computer use, reasons for use and access to computers. Skills at specific tasks were reassessed for 12 students following 4 to 6 hours of peer mentoring training. Results The highest levels of competence in generic ICT areas were for email, Internet and file management. For other skills such as word processing most respondents reported low levels of competence. The abilities to perform specific ICT skills were low – less than 60% of the participants were able to perform the core specific skills assessed. A period of approximately 5 hours of peer mentoring training produced an approximate doubling of competence scores for these skills. Conclusion Our study has found a low level of ability to use ICT facilities among medical students in a leading university in sub-Saharan Africa. A pilot scheme utilising UK elective students to tutor basic skills showed potential. Attention is required to develop interventions that can improve ICT skills, as well as computer access, in order to bridge the digital divide.

  9. Advanced scientific computational methods and their applications to nuclear technologies. (4) Overview of scientific computational methods, introduction of continuum simulation methods and their applications (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Okita, Taira

    2006-01-01

    Scientific computational methods have advanced remarkably with the progress of nuclear development. They have played the role of weft connecting each realm of nuclear engineering and then an introductory course of advanced scientific computational methods and their applications to nuclear technologies were prepared in serial form. This is the fourth issue showing the overview of scientific computational methods with the introduction of continuum simulation methods and their applications. Simulation methods on physical radiation effects on materials are reviewed based on the process such as binary collision approximation, molecular dynamics, kinematic Monte Carlo method, reaction rate method and dislocation dynamics. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Data analysis through interactive computer animation method (DATICAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, J.N.; Schwieder, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    DATICAM is an interactive computer animation method designed to aid in the analysis of nuclear research data. DATICAM was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EG and G Idaho, Inc. INEL analysts use DATICAM to produce computer codes that are better able to predict the behavior of nuclear power reactors. In addition to increased code accuracy, DATICAM has saved manpower and computer costs. DATICAM has been generalized to assist in the data analysis of virtually any data-producing dynamic process

  11. Multigrid methods for the computation of propagators in gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkreuter, T.

    1992-11-01

    In the present work generalizations of multigrid methods for propagators in gauge fields are investigated. We discuss proper averaging operations for bosons and for staggered fermions. An efficient algorithm for computing C numerically is presented. The averaging kernels C can be used not only in deterministic multigrid computations, but also in multigrid Monte Carlo simulations, and for the definition of block spins and blocked gauge fields in Monte Carlo renormalization group studies of gauge theories. Actual numerical computations of kernels and propagators are performed in compact four-dimensional SU(2) gauge fields. (orig./HSI)

  12. Experience with the WIMS computer code at Skoda Plzen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, J.; Mikolas, P.

    1991-01-01

    Validation of the program for neutronics analysis is described. Computational results are compared with results of experiments on critical assemblies and with results of other codes for different types of lattices. Included are the results for lattices containing Gd as burnable absorber. With minor exceptions, the results of benchmarking were quite satisfactory and justified the inclusion of WIMS in the production system of codes for WWER analysis. The first practical application was the adjustment of the WWER-440 few-group diffusion constants library of the three-dimensional diffusion code MOBY-DICK, which led to a remarkable improvement of results for operational states. Then a new library for the analysis of WWER-440 start-up was generated and tested and at present a new library for the analysis of WWER-440 operational states is being tested. Preparation of the library for WWER-1000 is in progress. (author). 19 refs

  13. Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultra-reliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

  14. A Rural South African Experience of an ESL Computer Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Dieperink

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a case study that explored the effect of an English-as-Second Language (ESL computer program at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT, South Africa. The case study explored participants’ perceptions, attitudes and beliefs regarding the ESL reading enhancement program, Reading Excellence™. The study found that participants experienced the program in a positive light. They experienced improved ESL reading as well as listening and writing proficiency. In addition, they experienced improved affective well-being in the sense that they generally felt more comfortable using ESL. This included feeling more self-confident in their experience of their academic environment. Interviews as well as document review resulted in dissonance, however: data pointed towards poor class attendance as well as a perturbing lack of progress in terms of reading comprehension and speed.

  15. Alkali Rydberg states in electromagnetic fields: computational physics meets experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, A.

    2001-11-01

    We study highly excited hydrogen and alkali atoms ('Rydberg states') under the influence of a strong microwave field. As the external frequency is comparable to the highly excited electron's classical Kepler frequency, the external field induces a strong coupling of many different quantum mechanical energy levels and finally leads to the ionization of the outer electron. While periodically driven atomic hydrogen can be seen as a paradigm of quantum chaotic motion in an open (decaying) quantum system, the presence of the non-hydrogenic atomic core - which unavoidably has to be treated quantum mechanically - entails some complications. Indeed, laboratory experiments show clear differences in the ionization dynamics of microwave driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg states. In the first part of this thesis, a machinery is developed that allows for numerical experiments on alkali and hydrogen atoms under precisely identical laboratory conditions. Due to the high density of states in the parameter regime typically explored in laboratory experiments, such simulations are only possible with the most advanced parallel computing facilities, in combination with an efficient parallel implementation of the numerical approach. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the results of the numerical experiment. We identify and describe significant differences and surprising similarities in the ionization dynamics of atomic hydrogen as compared to alkali atoms, and give account of the relevant frequency scales that distinguish hydrogenic from non-hydrogenic ionization behavior. Our results necessitate a reinterpretation of the experimental results so far available, and solve the puzzle of a distinct ionization behavior of periodically driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg atoms - an unresolved question for about one decade. Finally, microwave-driven Rydberg states will be considered as prototypes of open, complex quantum systems that exhibit a complicated temporal decay

  16. Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching Experience for a Computer and Nuclear Energy Course for Electrical and Computer Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charles; Jackson, Deborah; Keiller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A new, interdisciplinary, team-taught course has been designed to educate students in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) so that they can respond to global and urgent issues concerning computer control systems in nuclear power plants. This paper discusses our experience and assessment of the interdisciplinary computer and nuclear energy…

  17. Cross-cultural human-computer interaction and user experience design a semiotic perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brejcha, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes patterns of language and culture in human-computer interaction (HCI). Through numerous examples, it shows why these patterns matter and how to exploit them to design a better user experience (UX) with computer systems. It provides scientific information on the theoretical and practical areas of the interaction and communication design for research experts and industry practitioners and covers the latest research in semiotics and cultural studies, bringing a set of tools and methods to benefit the process of designing with the cultural background in mind.

  18. Water demand forecasting: review of soft computing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalehkhondabi, Iman; Ardjmand, Ehsan; Young, William A; Weckman, Gary R

    2017-07-01

    Demand forecasting plays a vital role in resource management for governments and private companies. Considering the scarcity of water and its inherent constraints, demand management and forecasting in this domain are critically important. Several soft computing techniques have been developed over the last few decades for water demand forecasting. This study focuses on soft computing methods of water consumption forecasting published between 2005 and 2015. These methods include artificial neural networks (ANNs), fuzzy and neuro-fuzzy models, support vector machines, metaheuristics, and system dynamics. Furthermore, it was discussed that while in short-term forecasting, ANNs have been superior in many cases, but it is still very difficult to pick a single method as the overall best. According to the literature, various methods and their hybrids are applied to water demand forecasting. However, it seems soft computing has a lot more to contribute to water demand forecasting. These contribution areas include, but are not limited, to various ANN architectures, unsupervised methods, deep learning, various metaheuristics, and ensemble methods. Moreover, it is found that soft computing methods are mainly used for short-term demand forecasting.

  19. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrou, Constantia [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computational-based Science and Technology Research Center; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Jansen, Karl [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Renner, Dru B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2013-02-15

    We present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon three-point functions that is more versatile compared to the typically used sequential method. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated three-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal-to-noise ratio suggesting that our stochastic method can be used efficiently at large volumes to compute hadronic matrix elements.

  20. The Direct Lighting Computation in Global Illumination Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyaw Allen

    1994-01-01

    Creating realistic images is a computationally expensive process, but it is very important for applications such as interior design, product design, education, virtual reality, and movie special effects. To generate realistic images, state-of-art rendering techniques are employed to simulate global illumination, which accounts for the interreflection of light among objects. In this document, we formalize the global illumination problem into a eight -dimensional integral and discuss various methods that can accelerate the process of approximating this integral. We focus on the direct lighting computation, which accounts for the light reaching the viewer from the emitting sources after exactly one reflection, Monte Carlo sampling methods, and light source simplification. Results include a new sample generation method, a framework for the prediction of the total number of samples used in a solution, and a generalized Monte Carlo approach for computing the direct lighting from an environment which for the first time makes ray tracing feasible for highly complex environments.

  1. Numerical methods design, analysis, and computer implementation of algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Greenbaum, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Numerical Methods provides a clear and concise exploration of standard numerical analysis topics, as well as nontraditional ones, including mathematical modeling, Monte Carlo methods, Markov chains, and fractals. Filled with appealing examples that will motivate students, the textbook considers modern application areas, such as information retrieval and animation, and classical topics from physics and engineering. Exercises use MATLAB and promote understanding of computational results. The book gives instructors the flexibility to emphasize different aspects--design, analysis, or computer implementation--of numerical algorithms, depending on the background and interests of students. Designed for upper-division undergraduates in mathematics or computer science classes, the textbook assumes that students have prior knowledge of linear algebra and calculus, although these topics are reviewed in the text. Short discussions of the history of numerical methods are interspersed throughout the chapters. The book a...

  2. Integrating computational methods to retrofit enzymes to synthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunk, Elizabeth; Neri, Marilisa; Tavernelli, Ivano; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2012-02-01

    Microbial production of desired compounds provides an efficient framework for the development of renewable energy resources. To be competitive to traditional chemistry, one requirement is to utilize the full capacity of the microorganism to produce target compounds with high yields and turnover rates. We use integrated computational methods to generate and quantify the performance of novel biosynthetic routes that contain highly optimized catalysts. Engineering a novel reaction pathway entails addressing feasibility on multiple levels, which involves handling the complexity of large-scale biochemical networks while respecting the critical chemical phenomena at the atomistic scale. To pursue this multi-layer challenge, our strategy merges knowledge-based metabolic engineering methods with computational chemistry methods. By bridging multiple disciplines, we provide an integral computational framework that could accelerate the discovery and implementation of novel biosynthetic production routes. Using this approach, we have identified and optimized a novel biosynthetic route for the production of 3HP from pyruvate. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. USING COMPUTER-BASED TESTING AS ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT METHOD OF STUDENT LEARNING IN DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia SAPRIATI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the use of computer-based testing in distance education, based on the experience of Universitas Terbuka (UT, Indonesia. Computer-based testing has been developed at UT for reasons of meeting the specific needs of distance students as the following: Ø students’ inability to sit for the scheduled test, Ø conflicting test schedules, and Ø students’ flexibility to take examination to improve their grades. In 2004, UT initiated a pilot project in the development of system and program for computer-based testing method. Then in 2005 and 2006 tryouts in the use of computer-based testing methods were conducted in 7 Regional Offices that were considered as having sufficient supporting recourses. The results of the tryouts revealed that students were enthusiastic in taking computer-based tests and they expected that the test method would be provided by UT as alternative to the traditional paper and pencil test method. UT then implemented computer-based testing method in 6 and 12 Regional Offices in 2007 and 2008 respectively. The computer-based testing was administered in the city of the designated Regional Office and was supervised by the Regional Office staff. The development of the computer-based testing was initiated with conducting tests using computers in networked configuration. The system has been continually improved, and it currently uses devices linked to the internet or the World Wide Web. The construction of the test involves the generation and selection of the test items from the item bank collection of the UT Examination Center. Thus the combination of the selected items compromises the test specification. Currently UT has offered 250 courses involving the use of computer-based testing. Students expect that more courses are offered with computer-based testing in Regional Offices within easy access by students.

  4. Gravitational Acceleration Effects on Macrosegregation: Experiment and Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Torres, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Sen, S.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were performed under terrestrial gravity (1g) and during parabolic flights (10-2 g) to study the solidification and macrosegregation patterns of Al-Cu alloys. Alloys having 2% and 5% Cu were solidified against a chill at two different cooling rates. Microscopic and Electron Microprobe characterization was used to produce microstructural and macrosegregation maps. In all cases positive segregation occurred next to the chill because shrinkage flow, as expected. This positive segregation was higher in the low-g samples, apparently because of the higher heat transfer coefficient. A 2-D computational model was used to explain the experimental results. The continuum formulation was employed to describe the macroscopic transports of mass, energy, and momentum, associated with the solidification phenomena, for a two-phase system. The model considers that liquid flow is driven by thermal and solutal buoyancy, and by solidification shrinkage. The solidification event was divided into two stages. In the first one, the liquid containing freely moving equiaxed grains was described through the relative viscosity concept. In the second stage, when a fixed dendritic network was formed after dendritic coherency, the mushy zone was treated as a porous medium. The macrosegregation maps and the cooling curves obtained during experiments were used for validation of the solidification and segregation model. The model can explain the solidification and macrosegregation patterns and the differences between low- and high-gravity results.

  5. Computational simulation in architectural and environmental acoustics methods and applications of wave-based computation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Shinichi; Otsuru, Toru

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews a variety of methods for wave-based acoustic simulation and recent applications to architectural and environmental acoustic problems. Following an introduction providing an overview of computational simulation of sound environment, the book is in two parts: four chapters on methods and four chapters on applications. The first part explains the fundamentals and advanced techniques for three popular methods, namely, the finite-difference time-domain method, the finite element method, and the boundary element method, as well as alternative time-domain methods. The second part demonstrates various applications to room acoustics simulation, noise propagation simulation, acoustic property simulation for building components, and auralization. This book is a valuable reference that covers the state of the art in computational simulation for architectural and environmental acoustics.  

  6. Hamiltonian lattice field theory: Computer calculations using variational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zako, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    I develop a variational method for systematic numerical computation of physical quantities -- bound state energies and scattering amplitudes -- in quantum field theory. An infinite-volume, continuum theory is approximated by a theory on a finite spatial lattice, which is amenable to numerical computation. I present an algorithm for computing approximate energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory and for bounding the resulting errors. I also show how to select basis states and choose variational parameters in order to minimize errors. The algorithm is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz principle and Kato's generalizations of Temple's formula. The algorithm could be adapted to systems such as atoms and molecules. I show how to compute Green's functions from energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory, and relate these to physical (renormalized) coupling constants, bound state energies and Green's functions. Thus one can compute approximate physical quantities in a lattice theory that approximates a quantum field theory with specified physical coupling constants. I discuss the errors in both approximations. In principle, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the size of the lattice, decreasing the lattice spacing and computing sufficiently long. Unfortunately, I do not understand the infinite-volume and continuum limits well enough to quantify errors due to the lattice approximation. Thus the method is currently incomplete. I apply the method to real scalar field theories using a Fock basis of free particle states. All needed quantities can be calculated efficiently with this basis. The generalization to more complicated theories is straightforward. I describe a computer implementation of the method and present numerical results for simple quantum mechanical systems

  7. Hamiltonian lattice field theory: Computer calculations using variational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zako, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A variational method is developed for systematic numerical computation of physical quantities-bound state energies and scattering amplitudes-in quantum field theory. An infinite-volume, continuum theory is approximated by a theory on a finite spatial lattice, which is amenable to numerical computation. An algorithm is presented for computing approximate energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory and for bounding the resulting errors. It is shown how to select basis states and choose variational parameters in order to minimize errors. The algorithm is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz principle and Kato's generalizations of Temple's formula. The algorithm could be adapted to systems such as atoms and molecules. It is shown how to compute Green's functions from energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory, and relate these to physical (renormalized) coupling constants, bound state energies and Green's functions. Thus one can compute approximate physical quantities in a lattice theory that approximates a quantum field theory with specified physical coupling constants. The author discusses the errors in both approximations. In principle, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the size of the lattice, decreasing the lattice spacing and computing sufficiently long. Unfortunately, the author does not understand the infinite-volume and continuum limits well enough to quantify errors due to the lattice approximation. Thus the method is currently incomplete. The method is applied to real scalar field theories using a Fock basis of free particle states. All needed quantities can be calculated efficiently with this basis. The generalization to more complicated theories is straightforward. The author describes a computer implementation of the method and present numerical results for simple quantum mechanical systems

  8. Computationally mediated experiments: the next frontier in microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: It's reasonably safe to say that most of the simple experimental techniques that can be employed in microscopy have been well documented and exploited over the last 20 years. Thus, if we are interested in extending the range and diversity of problems that we will be dealing with in the next decade then we will have to takeup challenges which here-to-for were considered beyond the realm of routine work. Given the ever growing tendency to add computational resources to our instruments it is clear that the next breakthrough will be directly tied to how well we can effectively tie these two realms together. In the past we have used computers to simply speed up our experiments, but in the up coming decade the key will be to realize that once an effective interface of instrumentation and computational tools is developed we must change the way in which we design our experiments. This means re-examining how we do experiments so that measurements are done not just quickly, but precisely and to maximize the information measured so that the data therein can be 'mined' for content which might have been missed in the past. As example of this consider the experimental technique of Position Resolved Diffraction which is currently being developed for the study of nanoscale magnetic structures using ANL's Advanced Analytical Electron Microscope. Here a focused electron probe is sequentially scanned across a two dimensional field of view of a thin specimen and at each point on the specimen a two dimensional electron diffraction pattern is acquired and stored. Analysis of the spatial variation in the electron diffraction pattern allows a researcher to study the subtle changes resulting from microstructural differences such as ferro and electro magnetic domain formation and motion. There is, however, a severe limitation in this technique-namely its need to store and dynamically process large data sets preferably in near real time. A minimal scoping measurement would involve

  9. Application of statistical method for FBR plant transient computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Norihiro; Mochizuki, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A statistical method with a large trial number up to 10,000 is applied to the plant system analysis. • A turbine trip test conducted at the “Monju” reactor is selected as a plant transient. • A reduction method of trial numbers is discussed. • The result with reduced trial number can express the base regions of the computed distribution. -- Abstract: It is obvious that design tolerances, errors included in operation, and statistical errors in empirical correlations effect on the transient behavior. The purpose of the present study is to apply above mentioned statistical errors to a plant system computation in order to evaluate the statistical distribution contained in the transient evolution. A selected computation case is the turbine trip test conducted at 40% electric power of the prototype fast reactor “Monju”. All of the heat transport systems of “Monju” are modeled with the NETFLOW++ system code which has been validated using the plant transient tests of the experimental fast reactor Joyo, and “Monju”. The effects of parameters on upper plenum temperature are confirmed by sensitivity analyses, and dominant parameters are chosen. The statistical errors are applied to each computation deck by using a pseudorandom number and the Monte-Carlo method. The dSFMT (Double precision SIMD-oriented Fast Mersenne Twister) that is developed version of Mersenne Twister (MT), is adopted as the pseudorandom number generator. In the present study, uniform random numbers are generated by dSFMT, and these random numbers are transformed to the normal distribution by the Box–Muller method. Ten thousands of different computations are performed at once. In every computation case, the steady calculation is performed for 12,000 s, and transient calculation is performed for 4000 s. In the purpose of the present statistical computation, it is important that the base regions of distribution functions should be calculated precisely. A large number of

  10. Electron beam treatment planning: A review of dose computation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.; Riley, R.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of dose computations are reviewed. The equivalent path length methods used to account for body curvature and internal structure are not adequate because they ignore the lateral diffusion of electrons. The Monte Carlo method for the broad field three-dimensional situation in treatment planning is impractical because of the enormous computer time required. The pencil beam technique may represent a suitable compromise. The behavior of a pencil beam may be described by the multiple scattering theory or, alternatively, generated using the Monte Carlo method. Although nearly two orders of magnitude slower than the equivalent path length technique, the pencil beam method improves accuracy sufficiently to justify its use. It applies very well when accounting for the effect of surface irregularities; the formulation for handling inhomogeneous internal structure is yet to be developed

  11. From experiment to design -- Fault characterization and detection in parallel computer systems using computational accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Keun Soo

    This dissertation summarizes experimental validation and co-design studies conducted to optimize the fault detection capabilities and overheads in hybrid computer systems (e.g., using CPUs and Graphics Processing Units, or GPUs), and consequently to improve the scalability of parallel computer systems using computational accelerators. The experimental validation studies were conducted to help us understand the failure characteristics of CPU-GPU hybrid computer systems under various types of hardware faults. The main characterization targets were faults that are difficult to detect and/or recover from, e.g., faults that cause long latency failures (Ch. 3), faults in dynamically allocated resources (Ch. 4), faults in GPUs (Ch. 5), faults in MPI programs (Ch. 6), and microarchitecture-level faults with specific timing features (Ch. 7). The co-design studies were based on the characterization results. One of the co-designed systems has a set of source-to-source translators that customize and strategically place error detectors in the source code of target GPU programs (Ch. 5). Another co-designed system uses an extension card to learn the normal behavioral and semantic execution patterns of message-passing processes executing on CPUs, and to detect abnormal behaviors of those parallel processes (Ch. 6). The third co-designed system is a co-processor that has a set of new instructions in order to support software-implemented fault detection techniques (Ch. 7). The work described in this dissertation gains more importance because heterogeneous processors have become an essential component of state-of-the-art supercomputers. GPUs were used in three of the five fastest supercomputers that were operating in 2011. Our work included comprehensive fault characterization studies in CPU-GPU hybrid computers. In CPUs, we monitored the target systems for a long period of time after injecting faults (a temporally comprehensive experiment), and injected faults into various types of

  12. USING RESEARCH METHODS IN HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION TO DESIGN TECHNOLOGY FOR RESILIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Arminda Guerra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Research in human computer interaction (HCI) covers both technological and human behavioural concerns. As a consequence, the contributions made in HCI research tend to be aware to either engineering or the social sciences. In HCI the purpose of practical research contributions is to reveal unknown insights about human behaviour and its relationship to technology. Practical research methods normally used in HCI include formal experiments, field experiments, field studies, interviews, ...

  13. Method of mobile robot indoor navigation by artificial landmarks with use of computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glibin, E. S.; Shevtsov, A. A.; Enik, O. A.

    2018-05-01

    The article describes an algorithm of the mobile robot indoor navigation based on the use of visual odometry. The results of the experiment identifying calculation errors in the distance traveled on a slip are presented. It is shown that the use of computer vision allows one to correct erroneous coordinates of the robot with the help of artificial landmarks. The control system utilizing the proposed method has been realized on the basis of Arduino Mego 2560 controller and a single-board computer Raspberry Pi 3. The results of the experiment on the mobile robot navigation with the use of this control system are presented.

  14. Computational methods for three-dimensional microscopy reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Approaches to the recovery of three-dimensional information on a biological object, which are often formulated or implemented initially in an intuitive way, are concisely described here based on physical models of the object and the image-formation process. Both three-dimensional electron microscopy and X-ray tomography can be captured in the same mathematical framework, leading to closely-related computational approaches, but the methodologies differ in detail and hence pose different challenges. The editors of this volume, Gabor T. Herman and Joachim Frank, are experts in the respective methodologies and present research at the forefront of biological imaging and structural biology.   Computational Methods for Three-Dimensional Microscopy Reconstruction will serve as a useful resource for scholars interested in the development of computational methods for structural biology and cell biology, particularly in the area of 3D imaging and modeling.

  15. Multi-fidelity Gaussian process regression for computer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Gratiet, Loic

    2013-01-01

    This work is on Gaussian-process based approximation of a code which can be run at different levels of accuracy. The goal is to improve the predictions of a surrogate model of a complex computer code using fast approximations of it. A new formulation of a co-kriging based method has been proposed. In particular this formulation allows for fast implementation and for closed-form expressions for the predictive mean and variance for universal co-kriging in the multi-fidelity framework, which is a breakthrough as it really allows for the practical application of such a method in real cases. Furthermore, fast cross validation, sequential experimental design and sensitivity analysis methods have been extended to the multi-fidelity co-kriging framework. This thesis also deals with a conjecture about the dependence of the learning curve (i.e. the decay rate of the mean square error) with respect to the smoothness of the underlying function. A proof in a fairly general situation (which includes the classical models of Gaussian-process based meta-models with stationary covariance functions) has been obtained while the previous proofs hold only for degenerate kernels (i.e. when the process is in fact finite- dimensional). This result allows for addressing rigorously practical questions such as the optimal allocation of the budget between different levels of codes in the multi-fidelity framework. (author) [fr

  16. Computer navigation experience in hip resurfacing improves femoral component alignment using a conventional jig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Morison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:The use of computer navigation has been shown to improve the accuracy of femoral component placement compared to conventional instrumentation in hip resurfacing. Whether exposure to computer navigation improves accuracy when the procedure is subsequently performed with conventional instrumentation without navigation has not been explored. We examined whether femoral component alignment utilizing a conventional jig improves following experience with the use of imageless computer navigation for hip resurfacing. Materials and Methods:Between December 2004 and December 2008, 213 consecutive hip resurfacings were performed by a single surgeon. The first 17 (Cohort 1 and the last 9 (Cohort 2 hip resurfacings were performed using a conventional guidewire alignment jig. In 187 cases, the femoral component was implanted using the imageless computer navigation. Cohorts 1 and 2 were compared for femoral component alignment accuracy. Results:All components in Cohort 2 achieved the position determined by the preoperative plan. The mean deviation of the stem-shaft angle (SSA from the preoperatively planned target position was 2.2° in Cohort 2 and 5.6° in Cohort 1 ( P = 0.01. Four implants in Cohort 1 were positioned at least 10° varus compared to the target SSA position and another four were retroverted. Conclusions: Femoral component placement utilizing conventional instrumentation may be more accurate following experience using imageless computer navigation.

  17. Reconstruction method for fluorescent X-ray computed tomography by least-squares method using singular value decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, T.; Akiba, M.; Takeda, T.; Kazama, M.; Hoshino, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Akatsuka, T.; Itai, Y.

    1997-02-01

    We describe a new attenuation correction method for fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) applied to image nonradioactive contrast materials in vivo. The principle of the FXCT imaging is that of computed tomography of the first generation. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation from the BLNE-5A bending-magnet beam line of Tristan Accumulation Ring in KEK, Japan, we studied phantoms with the FXCT method, and we succeeded in delineating a 4-mm-diameter channel filled with a 500 /spl mu/g I/ml iodine solution in a 20-mm-diameter acrylic cylindrical phantom. However, to detect smaller iodine concentrations, attenuation correction is needed. We present a correction method based on the equation representing the measurement process. The discretized equation system is solved by the least-squares method using the singular value decomposition. The attenuation correction method is applied to the projections by the Monte Carlo simulation and the experiment to confirm its effectiveness.

  18. Computations of finite temperature QCD with the pseudofermion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucito, F.; Solomon, S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors discuss the phase diagram of finite temperature QCD as it is obtained including the effects of dynamical quarks by the pseudofermion method. They compare their results with the results obtained by other groups and comment on the actual state of the art for these kind of computations

  19. Multiscale methods in computational fluid and solid mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, de R.; Hulshoff, S.J.; Lenz, S.; Munts, E.A.; Brummelen, van E.H.; Wall, W.; Wesseling, P.; Onate, E.; Periaux, J.

    2006-01-01

    First, an attempt is made towards gaining a more systematic understanding of recent progress in multiscale modelling in computational solid and fluid mechanics. Sub- sequently, the discussion is focused on variational multiscale methods for the compressible and incompressible Navier-Stokes

  20. Advanced scientific computational methods and their applications of nuclear technologies. (1) Overview of scientific computational methods, introduction of continuum simulation methods and their applications (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Okuda, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Scientific computational methods have advanced remarkably with the progress of nuclear development. They have played the role of weft connecting each realm of nuclear engineering and then an introductory course of advanced scientific computational methods and their applications to nuclear technologies were prepared in serial form. This is the first issue showing their overview and introduction of continuum simulation methods. Finite element method as their applications is also reviewed. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Regression modeling methods, theory, and computation with SAS

    CERN Document Server

    Panik, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Regression Modeling: Methods, Theory, and Computation with SAS provides an introduction to a diverse assortment of regression techniques using SAS to solve a wide variety of regression problems. The author fully documents the SAS programs and thoroughly explains the output produced by the programs.The text presents the popular ordinary least squares (OLS) approach before introducing many alternative regression methods. It covers nonparametric regression, logistic regression (including Poisson regression), Bayesian regression, robust regression, fuzzy regression, random coefficients regression,

  2. Recent Development in Rigorous Computational Methods in Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Zin; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Pilarczyk, Paweł

    2009-01-01

    We highlight selected results of recent development in the area of rigorous computations which use interval arithmetic to analyse dynamical systems. We describe general ideas and selected details of different ways of approach and we provide specific sample applications to illustrate the effectiveness of these methods. The emphasis is put on a topological approach, which combined with rigorous calculations provides a broad range of new methods that yield mathematically rel...

  3. Method and system for environmentally adaptive fault tolerant computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Jason L. (Inventor); Jeremy, Ramos (Inventor); Wolfe, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Brenner, Dean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for adapting fault tolerant computing. The method includes the steps of measuring an environmental condition representative of an environment. An on-board processing system's sensitivity to the measured environmental condition is measured. It is determined whether to reconfigure a fault tolerance of the on-board processing system based in part on the measured environmental condition. The fault tolerance of the on-board processing system may be reconfigured based in part on the measured environmental condition.

  4. Numerical evaluation of methods for computing tomographic projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, W.; Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods for computing forward/back projections of 2-D images can be viewed as numerical integration techniques. The accuracy of any ray-driven projection method can be improved by increasing the number of ray-paths that are traced per projection bin. The accuracy of pixel-driven projection methods can be increased by dividing each pixel into a number of smaller sub-pixels and projecting each sub-pixel. The authors compared four competing methods of computing forward/back projections: bilinear interpolation, ray-tracing, pixel-driven projection based upon sub-pixels, and pixel-driven projection based upon circular, rather than square, pixels. This latter method is equivalent to a fast, bi-nonlinear interpolation. These methods and the choice of the number of ray-paths per projection bin or the number of sub-pixels per pixel present a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy. To solve the problem of assessing backprojection accuracy, the analytical inverse Fourier transform of the ramp filtered forward projection of the Shepp and Logan head phantom is derived

  5. High-integrity software, computation and the scientific method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, L.

    2012-01-01

    Computation rightly occupies a central role in modern science. Datasets are enormous and the processing implications of some algorithms are equally staggering. With the continuing difficulties in quantifying the results of complex computations, it is of increasing importance to understand its role in the essentially Popperian scientific method. In this paper, some of the problems with computation, for example the long-term unquantifiable presence of undiscovered defect, problems with programming languages and process issues will be explored with numerous examples. One of the aims of the paper is to understand the implications of trying to produce high-integrity software and the limitations which still exist. Unfortunately Computer Science itself suffers from an inability to be suitably critical of its practices and has operated in a largely measurement-free vacuum since its earliest days. Within computer science itself, this has not been so damaging in that it simply leads to unconstrained creativity and a rapid turnover of new technologies. In the applied sciences however which have to depend on computational results, such unquantifiability significantly undermines trust. It is time this particular demon was put to rest. (author)

  6. Computational biology in the cloud: methods and new insights from computing at scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasson, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The past few years have seen both explosions in the size of biological data sets and the proliferation of new, highly flexible on-demand computing capabilities. The sheer amount of information available from genomic and metagenomic sequencing, high-throughput proteomics, experimental and simulation datasets on molecular structure and dynamics affords an opportunity for greatly expanded insight, but it creates new challenges of scale for computation, storage, and interpretation of petascale data. Cloud computing resources have the potential to help solve these problems by offering a utility model of computing and storage: near-unlimited capacity, the ability to burst usage, and cheap and flexible payment models. Effective use of cloud computing on large biological datasets requires dealing with non-trivial problems of scale and robustness, since performance-limiting factors can change substantially when a dataset grows by a factor of 10,000 or more. New computing paradigms are thus often needed. The use of cloud platforms also creates new opportunities to share data, reduce duplication, and to provide easy reproducibility by making the datasets and computational methods easily available.

  7. POBE: A Computer Program for Optimal Design of Multi-Subject Blocked fMRI Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Maus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, researchers can use multi-subject blocked designs to identify active brain regions for a certain stimulus type of interest. Before performing such an experiment, careful planning is necessary to obtain efficient stimulus effect estimators within the available financial resources. The optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for a multi-subject blocked design with fixed experimental costs can be determined using optimal design methods. In this paper, the user-friendly computer program POBE 1.2 (program for optimal design of blocked experiments, version 1.2 is presented. POBE provides a graphical user interface for fMRI researchers to easily and efficiently design their experiments. The computer program POBE calculates the optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for user specified experimental factors and model parameters so that the statistical efficiency is maximised for a given study budget. POBE can also be used to determine the minimum budget for a given power. Furthermore, a maximin design can be determined as efficient design for a possible range of values for the unknown model parameters. In this paper, the computer program is described and illustrated with typical experimental factors for a blocked fMRI experiment.

  8. Interactive Quantum Mechanics Quantum Experiments on the Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, S; Dahmen, H.D

    2011-01-01

    Extra Materials available on extras.springer.com INTERACTIVE QUANTUM MECHANICS allows students to perform their own quantum-physics experiments on their computer, in vivid 3D color graphics. Topics covered include: •        harmonic waves and wave packets, •        free particles as well as bound states and scattering in various potentials in one and three dimensions (both stationary and time dependent), •        two-particle systems, coupled harmonic oscillators, •        distinguishable and indistinguishable particles, •        coherent and squeezed states in time-dependent motion, •        quantized angular momentum, •        spin and magnetic resonance, •        hybridization. For the present edition the physics scope has been widened appreciably. Moreover, INTERQUANTA can now produce user-defined movies of quantum-mechanical situations. Movies can be viewed directly and also be saved to be shown later in any browser. Sections on spec...

  9. Computational Methods for Modeling Aptamers and Designing Riboswitches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Gong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Riboswitches, which are located within certain noncoding RNA region perform functions as genetic “switches”, regulating when and where genes are expressed in response to certain ligands. Understanding the numerous functions of riboswitches requires computation models to predict structures and structural changes of the aptamer domains. Although aptamers often form a complex structure, computational approaches, such as RNAComposer and Rosetta, have already been applied to model the tertiary (three-dimensional (3D structure for several aptamers. As structural changes in aptamers must be achieved within the certain time window for effective regulation, kinetics is another key point for understanding aptamer function in riboswitch-mediated gene regulation. The coarse-grained self-organized polymer (SOP model using Langevin dynamics simulation has been successfully developed to investigate folding kinetics of aptamers, while their co-transcriptional folding kinetics can be modeled by the helix-based computational method and BarMap approach. Based on the known aptamers, the web server Riboswitch Calculator and other theoretical methods provide a new tool to design synthetic riboswitches. This review will represent an overview of these computational methods for modeling structure and kinetics of riboswitch aptamers and for designing riboswitches.

  10. Slepian modeling as a computational method in random vibration analysis of hysteretic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Tarp-Johansen, Niels Jacob

    1999-01-01

    white noise. The computation time for obtaining estimates of relevant statistics on a given accuracy level is decreased by factors of one ormore orders of size as compared to the computation time needed for direct elasto-plastic displacementresponse simulations by vectorial Markov sequence techniques....... Moreover the Slepian method gives valuablephysical insight about the details of the plastic displacement development by time.The paper gives a general self-contained mathematical description of the Slepian method based plasticdisplacement analysis of Gaussian white noise excited EPOs. Experiences...

  11. Computational electrodynamics the finite-difference time-domain method

    CERN Document Server

    Taflove, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This extensively revised and expanded third edition of the Artech House bestseller, Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method, offers engineers the most up-to-date and definitive resource on this critical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The method helps practitioners design antennas, wireless communications devices, high-speed digital and microwave circuits, and integrated optical devices with unsurpassed efficiency. There has been considerable advancement in FDTD computational technology over the past few years, and the third edition brings professionals the very latest details with entirely new chapters on important techniques, major updates on key topics, and new discussions on emerging areas such as nanophotonics. What's more, to supplement the third edition, the authors have created a Web site with solutions to problems, downloadable graphics and videos, and updates, making this new edition the ideal textbook on the subject as well.

  12. A Computationally Efficient Method for Polyphonic Pitch Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohua Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computationally efficient method for polyphonic pitch estimation. The method employs the Fast Resonator Time-Frequency Image (RTFI as the basic time-frequency analysis tool. The approach is composed of two main stages. First, a preliminary pitch estimation is obtained by means of a simple peak-picking procedure in the pitch energy spectrum. Such spectrum is calculated from the original RTFI energy spectrum according to harmonic grouping principles. Then the incorrect estimations are removed according to spectral irregularity and knowledge of the harmonic structures of the music notes played on commonly used music instruments. The new approach is compared with a variety of other frame-based polyphonic pitch estimation methods, and results demonstrate the high performance and computational efficiency of the approach.

  13. Variational-moment method for computing magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lao, L.L.

    1983-08-01

    A fast yet accurate method to compute magnetohydrodynamic equilibria is provided by the variational-moment method, which is similar to the classical Rayleigh-Ritz-Galerkin approximation. The equilibrium solution sought is decomposed into a spectral representation. The partial differential equations describing the equilibrium are then recast into their equivalent variational form and systematically reduced to an optimum finite set of coupled ordinary differential equations. An appropriate spectral decomposition can make the series representing the solution coverge rapidly and hence substantially reduces the amount of computational time involved. The moment method was developed first to compute fixed-boundary inverse equilibria in axisymmetric toroidal geometry, and was demonstrated to be both efficient and accurate. The method since has been generalized to calculate free-boundary axisymmetric equilibria, to include toroidal plasma rotation and pressure anisotropy, and to treat three-dimensional toroidal geometry. In all these formulations, the flux surfaces are assumed to be smooth and nested so that the solutions can be decomposed in Fourier series in inverse coordinates. These recent developments and the advantages and limitations of the moment method are reviewed. The use of alternate coordinates for decomposition is discussed

  14. Authentic Teaching Experiences in Secondary Mathematics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickles, Paula R.

    2015-01-01

    Often secondary mathematics methods courses include classroom peer teaching, but many pre-service teachers find it challenging to teach their classmate peers as there are no discipline issues and little mathematical discourse as the "students" know the content. We will share a recent change in our methods course where pre-service…

  15. The Guided Autobiography Method: A Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, James E.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the proposition that learning is an unexplored feature of the guided autobiography method and its developmental exchange. Learning, conceptualized and explored as the embedded and embodied processes, is essential in narrative activities of the guided autobiography method leading to psychosocial development and growth in…

  16. Computing for ongoing experiments on high energy physics in LPP, JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belosludtsev, D.A.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.; Zinchenko, A.I.; Kekelidze, V.D.; Madigozhin, D.T.; Potrebenikov, Yu.K.; Khabarov, S.V.; Shkarovskij, S.N.; Shchinov, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    The computer infrastructure made at the Laboratory of Particle Physics, JINR, purposed for active participation of JINR experts in ongoing experiments on particle and nuclear physics is presented. The principles of design and construction of the personal computer farm have been given and the used computer and informational services for effective application of distributed computer resources have been described

  17. Computer-aided methods of determining thyristor thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, E.; Bronner, G.

    1988-08-01

    An accurate tracing of the thyristor thermal response is investigated. This paper offers several alternatives for thermal modeling and analysis by using an electrical circuit analog: topological method, convolution integral method, etc. These methods are adaptable to numerical solutions and well suited to the use of the digital computer. The thermal analysis of thyristors was performed for the 1000 MVA converter system at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Transient thermal impedance curves for individual thyristors in a given cooling arrangement were known from measurements and from manufacturer's data. The analysis pertains to almost any loading case, and the results are obtained in a numerical or a graphical format. 6 refs., 9 figs

  18. Computational methods for coupling microstructural and micromechanical materials response simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLM,ELIZABETH A.; BATTAILE,CORBETT C.; BUCHHEIT,THOMAS E.; FANG,HUEI ELIOT; RINTOUL,MARK DANIEL; VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; KNOROVSKY,GERALD A.; NEILSEN,MICHAEL K.; WELLMAN,GERALD W.; SULSKY,DEBORAH; SHEN,YU-LIN; SCHREYER,H. BUCK

    2000-04-01

    Computational materials simulations have traditionally focused on individual phenomena: grain growth, crack propagation, plastic flow, etc. However, real materials behavior results from a complex interplay between phenomena. In this project, the authors explored methods for coupling mesoscale simulations of microstructural evolution and micromechanical response. In one case, massively parallel (MP) simulations for grain evolution and microcracking in alumina stronglink materials were dynamically coupled. In the other, codes for domain coarsening and plastic deformation in CuSi braze alloys were iteratively linked. this program provided the first comparison of two promising ways to integrate mesoscale computer codes. Coupled microstructural/micromechanical codes were applied to experimentally observed microstructures for the first time. In addition to the coupled codes, this project developed a suite of new computational capabilities (PARGRAIN, GLAD, OOF, MPM, polycrystal plasticity, front tracking). The problem of plasticity length scale in continuum calculations was recognized and a solution strategy was developed. The simulations were experimentally validated on stockpile materials.

  19. Fast calculation method for computer-generated cylindrical holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Fujii, Tomohiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    Since a general flat hologram has a limited viewable area, we usually cannot see the other side of a reconstructed object. There are some holograms that can solve this problem. A cylindrical hologram is well known to be viewable in 360 deg. Most cylindrical holograms are optical holograms, but there are few reports of computer-generated cylindrical holograms. The lack of computer-generated cylindrical holograms is because the spatial resolution of output devices is not great enough; therefore, we have to make a large hologram or use a small object to fulfill the sampling theorem. In addition, in calculating the large fringe, the calculation amount increases in proportion to the hologram size. Therefore, we propose what we believe to be a new calculation method for fast calculation. Then, we print these fringes with our prototype fringe printer. As a result, we obtain a good reconstructed image from a computer-generated cylindrical hologram.

  20. Computational methods in metabolic engineering for strain design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Matthew R; Ong, Wai Kit; Reed, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic engineering uses genetic approaches to control microbial metabolism to produce desired compounds. Computational tools can identify new biological routes to chemicals and the changes needed in host metabolism to improve chemical production. Recent computational efforts have focused on exploring what compounds can be made biologically using native, heterologous, and/or enzymes with broad specificity. Additionally, computational methods have been developed to suggest different types of genetic modifications (e.g. gene deletion/addition or up/down regulation), as well as suggest strategies meeting different criteria (e.g. high yield, high productivity, or substrate co-utilization). Strategies to improve the runtime performances have also been developed, which allow for more complex metabolic engineering strategies to be identified. Future incorporation of kinetic considerations will further improve strain design algorithms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A new fault detection method for computer networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Lu; Xu, Zhengguo; Wang, Wenhai; Sun, Youxian

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few years, fault detection for computer networks has attracted extensive attentions for its importance in network management. Most existing fault detection methods are based on active probing techniques which can detect the occurrence of faults fast and precisely. But these methods suffer from the limitation of traffic overhead, especially in large scale networks. To relieve traffic overhead induced by active probing based methods, a new fault detection method, whose key is to divide the detection process into multiple stages, is proposed in this paper. During each stage, only a small region of the network is detected by using a small set of probes. Meanwhile, it also ensures that the entire network can be covered after multiple detection stages. This method can guarantee that the traffic used by probes during each detection stage is small sufficiently so that the network can operate without severe disturbance from probes. Several simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method

  2. Interpretation of substitution experiments by homogenisation two-group method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.

    1970-02-01

    This paper describes methods for interpretation of progressive substitution experiments for determining material buckling in homogeneous two-group approximation. These methods were applied for experiments on the zero power RB reactor in Vinca. Experiments were done on the reflected heavy water reactor core, the lattice pitch had unisotropy properties

  3. Using a computer simulation for teaching communication skills: A blinded multisite mixed methods randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W.; Fetters, Michael D.; Scerbo, Mark W.; White, Casey B.; Lypson, Monica L.; Padilla, Miguel A.; Gliva-McConvey, Gayle A.; Belfore, Lee A.; West, Temple; Wallace, Amelia M.; Guetterman, Timothy C.; Schleicher, Lauren S.; Kennedy, Rebecca A.; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.; Cleary, James F.; Marsella, Stacy C.; Becker, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess advanced communication skills among second-year medical students exposed either to a computer simulation (MPathic-VR) featuring virtual humans, or to a multimedia computer-based learning module, and to understand each group’s experiences and learning preferences. Methods A single-blinded, mixed methods, randomized, multisite trial compared MPathic-VR (N=210) to computer-based learning (N=211). Primary outcomes: communication scores during repeat interactions with MPathic-VR’s intercultural and interprofessional communication scenarios and scores on a subsequent advanced communication skills objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare outcomes. Secondary outcomes: student attitude surveys and qualitative assessments of their experiences with MPathic-VR or computer-based learning. Results MPathic-VR-trained students improved their intercultural and interprofessional communication performance between their first and second interactions with each scenario. They also achieved significantly higher composite scores on the OSCE than computer-based learning-trained students. Attitudes and experiences were more positive among students trained with MPathic-VR, who valued its providing immediate feedback, teaching nonverbal communication skills, and preparing them for emotion-charged patient encounters. Conclusions MPathic-VR was effective in training advanced communication skills and in enabling knowledge transfer into a more realistic clinical situation. Practice Implications MPathic-VR’s virtual human simulation offers an effective and engaging means of advanced communication training. PMID:27939846

  4. On-Line Digital Computer Applications in Gas Chromatography, An Undergraduate Analytical Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, S. P.; Eagleston, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Presented are some descriptive background materials and the directions for an experiment which provides an introduction to on-line computer instrumentation. Assumes students are familiar with the Purdue Real-Time Basic (PRTB) laboratory computer system. (PR)

  5. Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewiyanti, Silvia; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Dewiyanti, S., Brand-Gruwel, S., Jochems, W., & Broers, N. (2007). Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 496-514.

  6. Practical methods to improve the development of computational software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, A. G.; Harding, D. W.; Deinert, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    The use of computation has become ubiquitous in science and engineering. As the complexity of computer codes has increased, so has the need for robust methods to minimize errors. Past work has show that the number of functional errors is related the number of commands that a code executes. Since the late 1960's, major participants in the field of computation have encouraged the development of best practices for programming to help reduce coder induced error, and this has lead to the emergence of 'software engineering' as a field of study. Best practices for coding and software production have now evolved and become common in the development of commercial software. These same techniques, however, are largely absent from the development of computational codes by research groups. Many of the best practice techniques from the professional software community would be easy for research groups in nuclear science and engineering to adopt. This paper outlines the history of software engineering, as well as issues in modern scientific computation, and recommends practices that should be adopted by individual scientific programmers and university research groups. (authors)

  7. Computing homography with RANSAC algorithm: a novel method of registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian; Yan, Dayuan

    2005-02-01

    An AR (Augmented Reality) system can integrate computer-generated objects with the image sequences of real world scenes in either an off-line or a real-time way. Registration, or camera pose estimation, is one of the key techniques to determine its performance. The registration methods can be classified as model-based and move-matching. The former approach can accomplish relatively accurate registration results, but it requires the precise model of the scene, which is hard to be obtained. The latter approach carries out registration by computing the ego-motion of the camera. Because it does not require the prior-knowledge of the scene, its registration results sometimes turn out to be less accurate. When the model defined is as simple as a plane, a mixed method is introduced to take advantages of the virtues of the two methods mentioned above. Although unexpected objects often occlude this plane in an AR system, one can still try to detect corresponding points with a contract-expand method, while this will import erroneous correspondences. Computing homography with RANSAC algorithm is used to overcome such shortcomings. Using the robustly estimated homography resulted from RANSAC, the camera projective matrix can be recovered and thus registration is accomplished even when the markers are lost in the scene.

  8. Pair Programming as a Modern Method of Teaching Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Nančovska Šerbec

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available At the Faculty of Education, University of Ljubljana we educate future computer science teachers. Beside didactical, pedagogical, mathematical and other interdisciplinary knowledge, students gain knowledge and skills of programming that are crucial for computer science teachers. For all courses, the main emphasis is the absorption of professional competences, related to the teaching profession and the programming profile. The latter are selected according to the well-known document, the ACM Computing Curricula. The professional knowledge is therefore associated and combined with the teaching knowledge and skills. In the paper we present how to achieve competences related to programming by using different didactical models (semiotic ladder, cognitive objectives taxonomy, problem solving and modern teaching method “pair programming”. Pair programming differs from standard methods (individual work, seminars, projects etc.. It belongs to the extreme programming as a discipline of software development and is known to have positive effects on teaching first programming language. We have experimentally observed pair programming in the introductory programming course. The paper presents and analyzes the results of using this method: the aspects of satisfaction during programming and the level of gained knowledge. The results are in general positive and demonstrate the promising usage of this teaching method.

  9. Applications of meshless methods for damage computations with finite strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiaofei; Yuan Huang

    2009-01-01

    Material defects such as cavities have great effects on the damage process in ductile materials. Computations based on finite element methods (FEMs) often suffer from instability due to material failure as well as large distortions. To improve computational efficiency and robustness the element-free Galerkin (EFG) method is applied in the micro-mechanical constitute damage model proposed by Gurson and modified by Tvergaard and Needleman (the GTN damage model). The EFG algorithm is implemented in the general purpose finite element code ABAQUS via the user interface UEL. With the help of the EFG method, damage processes in uniaxial tension specimens and notched specimens are analyzed and verified with experimental data. Computational results reveal that the damage which takes place in the interior of specimens will extend to the exterior and cause fracture of specimens; the damage is a fast procedure relative to the whole tensing process. The EFG method provides more stable and robust numerical solution in comparing with the FEM analysis

  10. Improved computation method in residual life estimation of structural components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Stevan M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the numerical computation methods and procedures for the fatigue crack growth predicting of cracked notched structural components. Computation method is based on fatigue life prediction using the strain energy density approach. Based on the strain energy density (SED theory, a fatigue crack growth model is developed to predict the lifetime of fatigue crack growth for single or mixed mode cracks. The model is based on an equation expressed in terms of low cycle fatigue parameters. Attention is focused on crack growth analysis of structural components under variable amplitude loads. Crack growth is largely influenced by the effect of the plastic zone at the front of the crack. To obtain efficient computation model plasticity-induced crack closure phenomenon is considered during fatigue crack growth. The use of the strain energy density method is efficient for fatigue crack growth prediction under cyclic loading in damaged structural components. Strain energy density method is easy for engineering applications since it does not require any additional determination of fatigue parameters (those would need to be separately determined for fatigue crack propagation phase, and low cyclic fatigue parameters are used instead. Accurate determination of fatigue crack closure has been a complex task for years. The influence of this phenomenon can be considered by means of experimental and numerical methods. Both of these models are considered. Finite element analysis (FEA has been shown to be a powerful and useful tool1,6 to analyze crack growth and crack closure effects. Computation results are compared with available experimental results. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 174001

  11. An Experiment Support Computer for Externally-Based ISS Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, S. W.; Chen, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Experiment Support Facility - External (ESF-X) is a computer designed for general experiment use aboard the International Space Station (ISS) Truss Site locations. The ESF-X design is highly modular and uses commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components wherever possible to allow for maximum reconfigurability to meet the needs of almost any payload. The ESF-X design has been developed with the EXPRESS Pallet as the target location and the University of Colorado's Micron Accuracy Deployment Experiment (MADE) as the anticipated first payload and capability driver. Thus the design presented here is configured for structural dynamics and control as well as optics experiments. The ESF-X is a small (58.4 x 48.3 x 17.8") steel and copper enclosure which houses a 14 slot VME card chassis and power supply. All power and data connections are made through a single panel on the enclosure so that only one side of the enclosure must be accessed for nominal operation and servicing activities. This feature also allows convenient access during integration and checkout activities. Because it utilizes a standard VME backplane, ESF-X can make use of the many commercial boards already in production for this standard. Since the VME standard is also heavily used in industrial and military applications, many ruggedized components are readily available. The baseline design includes commercial processors, Ethernet, MIL-STD-1553, and mass storage devices. The main processor board contains four TI 6701 DSPs with a PowerPC based controller. Other standard functions, such as analog-to-digital, digital-to-analog, motor driver, temperature readings, etc., are handled on industry-standard IP modules. Carrier cards, which hold 4 IP modules each, are placed in slots in the VME backplane. A unique, custom IP carrier board with radiation event detectors allows non RAD-hard components to be used in an extended exposure environment. Thermal control is maintained by conductive cooling through the copper

  12. The TESS [Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies] computer code user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procassini, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    TESS (Tandem Experiment Simulation Studies) is a one-dimensional, bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code designed to investigate the confinement and transport of plasma in a magnetic mirror device, including tandem mirror configurations. Mirror plasmas may be modeled in a system which includes an applied magnetic field and/or a self-consistent or applied electrostatic potential. The PIC code TESS is similar to the PIC code DIPSI (Direct Implicit Plasma Surface Interactions) which is designed to study plasma transport to and interaction with a solid surface. The codes TESS and DIPSI are direct descendants of the PIC code ES1 that was created by A. B. Langdon. This document provides the user with a brief description of the methods used in the code and a tutorial on the use of the code. 10 refs., 2 tabs

  13. A virtual component method in numerical computation of cascades for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Shi; Cheng Lu

    2014-01-01

    The analysis, optimization, design and operation of cascades for isotope separation involve computations of cascades. In analytical analysis of cascades, using virtual components is a very useful analysis method. For complicated cases of cascades, numerical analysis has to be employed. However, bound up to the conventional idea that the concentration of a virtual component should be vanishingly small, virtual component is not yet applied to numerical computations. Here a method of introducing the method of using virtual components to numerical computations is elucidated, and its application to a few types of cascades is explained and tested by means of numerical experiments. The results show that the concentration of a virtual component is not restrained at all by the 'vanishingly small' idea. For the same requirements on cascades, the cascades obtained do not depend on the concentrations of virtual components. (authors)

  14. Multislice computed tomographic coronary angiography: experience in a UK centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan-Hughes, G.J.; Marshall, A.J.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the technique of coronary angiography with retrospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated four-slice helical computed tomography (CT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Within 1 month of undergoing routine day-case diagnostic coronary angiography, 30 consecutive patients also underwent retrospectively ECG-gated multislice CT coronary angiography. This enabled direct comparison of seven segments of proximal and mid-coronary artery for each patient by two blinded assessors. Each segment of coronary artery from the multislice CT image was evaluated initially for 'assessability' and those segments deemed assessable were subsequently investigated for the presence or absence of a significantly (n=70%) stenotic lesion. RESULTS: Overall 68% of proximal and mid-coronary artery segments were assessable. The sensitivity and specificity of four-slice CT coronary angiography in assessable segments for detecting the presence or absence (n=70%) of stenoses were 72 and 86%, respectively. These results correspond to a positive predictive value of 53% and a 93% negative predictive value. If the 32% of non-assessable segments are added into the calculation then the sensitivity and specificity fall to 49 and 66%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Although multislice CT coronary angiography is a promising technique, the overall assessability and diagnostic accuracy of four-slice CT acquisition is not sufficient to justify routine clinical use. Further, evaluation should investigate the benefit of the reduction in temporal and spatial resolution offered by 16 and 32 slice acquisition

  15. An introduction to computer simulation methods applications to physical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Harvey; Christian, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Now in its third edition, this book teaches physical concepts using computer simulations. The text incorporates object-oriented programming techniques and encourages readers to develop good programming habits in the context of doing physics. Designed for readers at all levels , An Introduction to Computer Simulation Methods uses Java, currently the most popular programming language. Introduction, Tools for Doing Simulations, Simulating Particle Motion, Oscillatory Systems, Few-Body Problems: The Motion of the Planets, The Chaotic Motion of Dynamical Systems, Random Processes, The Dynamics of Many Particle Systems, Normal Modes and Waves, Electrodynamics, Numerical and Monte Carlo Methods, Percolation, Fractals and Kinetic Growth Models, Complex Systems, Monte Carlo Simulations of Thermal Systems, Quantum Systems, Visualization and Rigid Body Dynamics, Seeing in Special and General Relativity, Epilogue: The Unity of Physics For all readers interested in developing programming habits in the context of doing phy...

  16. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Methods in Computational Molecular Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Diercksen, Geerd

    1992-01-01

    This volume records the lectures given at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Methods in Computational Molecular Physics held in Bad Windsheim, Germany, from 22nd July until 2nd. August, 1991. This NATO Advanced Study Institute sought to bridge the quite considerable gap which exist between the presentation of molecular electronic structure theory found in contemporary monographs such as, for example, McWeeny's Methods 0/ Molecular Quantum Mechanics (Academic Press, London, 1989) or Wilson's Electron correlation in moleeules (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1984) and the realization of the sophisticated computational algorithms required for their practical application. It sought to underline the relation between the electronic structure problem and the study of nuc1ear motion. Software for performing molecular electronic structure calculations is now being applied in an increasingly wide range of fields in both the academic and the commercial sectors. Numerous applications are reported in areas as diverse as catalysi...

  17. Interval sampling methods and measurement error: a computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Oliver; Slaven, James; Taylor, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to provide a more thorough account of measurement error associated with interval sampling methods. A computer program simulated the application of momentary time sampling, partial-interval recording, and whole-interval recording methods on target events randomly distributed across an observation period. The simulation yielded measures of error for multiple combinations of observation period, interval duration, event duration, and cumulative event duration. The simulations were conducted up to 100 times to yield measures of error variability. Although the present simulation confirmed some previously reported characteristics of interval sampling methods, it also revealed many new findings that pertain to each method's inherent strengths and weaknesses. The analysis and resulting error tables can help guide the selection of the most appropriate sampling method for observation-based behavioral assessments. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  18. A method of non-contact reading code based on computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunsen; Zong, Xiaoyu; Guo, Bingxuan

    2018-03-01

    With the purpose of guarantee the computer information exchange security between internal and external network (trusted network and un-trusted network), A non-contact Reading code method based on machine vision has been proposed. Which is different from the existing network physical isolation method. By using the computer monitors, camera and other equipment. Deal with the information which will be on exchanged, Include image coding ,Generate the standard image , Display and get the actual image , Calculate homography matrix, Image distort correction and decoding in calibration, To achieve the computer information security, Non-contact, One-way transmission between the internal and external network , The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by experiments on real computer text data, The speed of data transfer can be achieved 24kb/s. The experiment shows that this algorithm has the characteristics of high security, fast velocity and less loss of information. Which can meet the daily needs of the confidentiality department to update the data effectively and reliably, Solved the difficulty of computer information exchange between Secret network and non-secret network, With distinctive originality, practicability, and practical research value.

  19. Advanced soft computing diagnosis method for tumour grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, E I; Spyridonos, P P; Stylios, C D; Ravazoula, P; Groumpos, P P; Nikiforidis, G N

    2006-01-01

    To develop an advanced diagnostic method for urinary bladder tumour grading. A novel soft computing modelling methodology based on the augmentation of fuzzy cognitive maps (FCMs) with the unsupervised active Hebbian learning (AHL) algorithm is applied. One hundred and twenty-eight cases of urinary bladder cancer were retrieved from the archives of the Department of Histopathology, University Hospital of Patras, Greece. All tumours had been characterized according to the classical World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. To design the FCM model for tumour grading, three experts histopathologists defined the main histopathological features (concepts) and their impact on grade characterization. The resulted FCM model consisted of nine concepts. Eight concepts represented the main histopathological features for tumour grading. The ninth concept represented the tumour grade. To increase the classification ability of the FCM model, the AHL algorithm was applied to adjust the weights of the FCM. The proposed FCM grading model achieved a classification accuracy of 72.5%, 74.42% and 95.55% for tumours of grades I, II and III, respectively. An advanced computerized method to support tumour grade diagnosis decision was proposed and developed. The novelty of the method is based on employing the soft computing method of FCMs to represent specialized knowledge on histopathology and on augmenting FCMs ability using an unsupervised learning algorithm, the AHL. The proposed method performs with reasonably high accuracy compared to other existing methods and at the same time meets the physicians' requirements for transparency and explicability.

  20. Industrial applications of formal methods to model, design and analyze computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Craigen, Dan

    1995-01-01

    Formal methods are mathematically-based techniques, often supported by reasoning tools, that can offer a rigorous and effective way to model, design and analyze computer systems. The purpose of this study is to evaluate international industrial experience in using formal methods. The cases selected are representative of industrial-grade projects and span a variety of application domains. The study had three main objectives: · To better inform deliberations within industry and government on standards and regulations; · To provide an authoritative record on the practical experience of formal m

  1. Effects of Learning Style and Training Method on Computer Attitude and Performance in World Wide Web Page Design Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Huey-Wen; Wang, Yu-Fang

    1999-01-01

    Compares the effects of two training methods on computer attitude and performance in a World Wide Web page design program in a field experiment with high school students in Taiwan. Discusses individual differences, Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory and Learning Style Inventory, Computer Attitude Scale, and results of statistical analyses.…

  2. Comparison of two methods to determine fan performance curves using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onma, Patinya; Chantrasmi, Tonkid

    2018-01-01

    This work investigates a systematic numerical approach that employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to obtain performance curves of a backward-curved centrifugal fan. Generating the performance curves requires a number of three-dimensional simulations with varying system loads at a fixed rotational speed. Two methods were used and their results compared to experimental data. The first method incrementally changes the mass flow late through the inlet boundary condition while the second method utilizes a series of meshes representing the physical damper blade at various angles. The generated performance curves from both methods are compared with an experiment setup in accordance with the AMCA fan performance testing standard.

  3. Experience with a distributed computing system for magnetic field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.J.

    1978-08-01

    The development of a general purpose computer system, THESEUS, is described the initial use for which has been magnetic field analysis. The system involves several computers connected by data links. Some are small computers with interactive graphics facilities and limited analysis capabilities, and others are large computers for batch execution of analysis programs with heavy processor demands. The system is highly modular for easy extension and highly portable for transfer to different computers. It can easily be adapted for a completely different application. It provides a highly efficient and flexible interface between magnet designers and specialised analysis programs. Both the advantages and problems experienced are highlighted, together with a mention of possible future developments. (U.K.)

  4. The adaptation method in the Monte Carlo simulation for computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyoung Gun; Yoon, Chang Yeon; Lee, Won Ho [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seung Ryong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The patient dose incurred from diagnostic procedures during advanced radiotherapy has become an important issue. Many researchers in medical physics are using computational simulations to calculate complex parameters in experiments. However, extended computation times make it difficult for personal computers to run the conventional Monte Carlo method to simulate radiological images with high-flux photons such as images produced by computed tomography (CT). To minimize the computation time without degrading imaging quality, we applied a deterministic adaptation to the Monte Carlo calculation and verified its effectiveness by simulating CT image reconstruction for an image evaluation phantom (Catphan; Phantom Laboratory, New York NY, USA) and a human-like voxel phantom (KTMAN-2) (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA). For the deterministic adaptation, the relationship between iteration numbers and the simulations was estimated and the option to simulate scattered radiation was evaluated. The processing times of simulations using the adaptive method were at least 500 times faster than those using a conventional statistical process. In addition, compared with the conventional statistical method, the adaptive method provided images that were more similar to the experimental images, which proved that the adaptive method was highly effective for a simulation that requires a large number of iterations-assuming no radiation scattering in the vicinity of detectors minimized artifacts in the reconstructed image.

  5. Splitting method for computing coupled hydrodynamic and structural response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for application to unsteady fluid dynamics problems, in particular to the mechanics following a sudden release of high energy. Solution of the initial compressible flow phase provides input to a power-series method for the incompressible fluid motions. The system is split into spatial and time domains leading to the convergent computation of a sequence of elliptic equations. Two sample problems are solved, the first involving an underwater explosion and the second the response of a nuclear reactor containment shell structure to a hypothetical core accident. The solutions are correlated with experimental data

  6. Complex Data Modeling and Computationally Intensive Statistical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovan, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The last years have seen the advent and development of many devices able to record and store an always increasing amount of complex and high dimensional data; 3D images generated by medical scanners or satellite remote sensing, DNA microarrays, real time financial data, system control datasets. The analysis of this data poses new challenging problems and requires the development of novel statistical models and computational methods, fueling many fascinating and fast growing research areas of modern statistics. The book offers a wide variety of statistical methods and is addressed to statistici

  7. Computational methods for planning and evaluating geothermal energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goumas, M.G.; Lygerou, V.A.; Papayannakis, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    In planning, designing and evaluating a geothermal energy project, a number of technical, economic, social and environmental parameters should be considered. The use of computational methods provides a rigorous analysis improving the decision-making process. This article demonstrates the application of decision-making methods developed in operational research for the optimum exploitation of geothermal resources. Two characteristic problems are considered: (1) the economic evaluation of a geothermal energy project under uncertain conditions using a stochastic analysis approach and (2) the evaluation of alternative exploitation schemes for optimum development of a low enthalpy geothermal field using a multicriteria decision-making procedure. (Author)

  8. Projected role of advanced computational aerodynamic methods at the Lockheed-Georgia company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lores, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Experience with advanced computational methods being used at the Lockheed-Georgia Company to aid in the evaluation and design of new and modified aircraft indicates that large and specialized computers will be needed to make advanced three-dimensional viscous aerodynamic computations practical. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility should be used to provide a tool for designing better aerospace vehicles while at the same time reducing development costs by performing computations using Navier-Stokes equations solution algorithms and permitting less sophisticated but nevertheless complex calculations to be made efficiently. Configuration definition procedures and data output formats can probably best be defined in cooperation with industry, therefore, the computer should handle many remote terminals efficiently. The capability of transferring data to and from other computers needs to be provided. Because of the significant amount of input and output associated with 3-D viscous flow calculations and because of the exceedingly fast computation speed envisioned for the computer, special attention should be paid to providing rapid, diversified, and efficient input and output.

  9. Tundish Cover Flux Thickness Measurement Method and Instrumentation Based on Computer Vision in Continuous Casting Tundish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thickness of tundish cover flux (TCF plays an important role in continuous casting (CC steelmaking process. Traditional measurement method of TCF thickness is single/double wire methods, which have several problems such as personal security, easily affected by operators, and poor repeatability. To solve all these problems, in this paper, we specifically designed and built an instrumentation and presented a novel method to measure the TCF thickness. The instrumentation was composed of a measurement bar, a mechanical device, a high-definition industrial camera, a Siemens S7-200 programmable logic controller (PLC, and a computer. Our measurement method was based on the computer vision algorithms, including image denoising method, monocular range measurement method, scale invariant feature transform (SIFT, and image gray gradient detection method. Using the present instrumentation and method, images in the CC tundish can be collected by camera and transferred to computer to do imaging processing. Experiments showed that our instrumentation and method worked well at scene of steel plants, can accurately measure the thickness of TCF, and overcome the disadvantages of traditional measurement methods, or even replace the traditional ones.

  10. Automated uncertainty analysis methods in the FRAP computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.O.

    1980-01-01

    A user oriented, automated uncertainty analysis capability has been incorporated in the Fuel Rod Analysis Program (FRAP) computer codes. The FRAP codes have been developed for the analysis of Light Water Reactor fuel rod behavior during steady state (FRAPCON) and transient (FRAP-T) conditions as part of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Program. The objective of uncertainty analysis of these codes is to obtain estimates of the uncertainty in computed outputs of the codes is to obtain estimates of the uncertainty in computed outputs of the codes as a function of known uncertainties in input variables. This paper presents the methods used to generate an uncertainty analysis of a large computer code, discusses the assumptions that are made, and shows techniques for testing them. An uncertainty analysis of FRAP-T calculated fuel rod behavior during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant transient is presented as an example and carried through the discussion to illustrate the various concepts

  11. Comparison of different methods for shielding design in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to compare different methods for shielding calculation in computed tomography (CT). The BIR-IPEM (British Inst. of Radiology and Inst. of Physics in Engineering in Medicine) and NCRP (National Council on Radiation Protection) method were used for shielding thickness calculation. Scattered dose levels and calculated barrier thickness were also compared with those obtained by scatter dose measurements in the vicinity of a dedicated CT unit. Minimal requirement for protective barriers based on BIR-IPEM method ranged between 1.1 and 1.4 mm of lead demonstrating underestimation of up to 20 % and overestimation of up to 30 % when compared with thicknesses based on measured dose levels. For NCRP method, calculated thicknesses were 33 % higher (27-42 %). BIR-IPEM methodology-based results were comparable with values based on scattered dose measurements, while results obtained using NCRP methodology demonstrated an overestimation of the minimal required barrier thickness. (authors)

  12. Monte Carlo in radiotherapy: experience in a distributed computational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, B.; Mattia, M.; Amati, G.; Andenna, C.; Benassi, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Frustagli, G.; Iaccarino, G.; Occhigrossi, A.; Valentini, S.

    2007-06-01

    New technologies in cancer radiotherapy need a more accurate computation of the dose delivered in the radiotherapeutical treatment plan, and it is important to integrate sophisticated mathematical models and advanced computing knowledge into the treatment planning (TP) process. We present some results about using Monte Carlo (MC) codes in dose calculation for treatment planning. A distributed computing resource located in the Technologies and Health Department of the Italian National Institute of Health (ISS) along with other computer facilities (CASPUR - Inter-University Consortium for the Application of Super-Computing for Universities and Research) has been used to perform a fully complete MC simulation to compute dose distribution on phantoms irradiated with a radiotherapy accelerator. Using BEAMnrc and GEANT4 MC based codes we calculated dose distributions on a plain water phantom and air/water phantom. Experimental and calculated dose values below ±2% (for depth between 5 mm and 130 mm) were in agreement both in PDD (Percentage Depth Dose) and transversal sections of the phantom. We consider these results a first step towards a system suitable for medical physics departments to simulate a complete treatment plan using remote computing facilities for MC simulations.

  13. A Comparison of Sequential and GPU Implementations of Iterative Methods to Compute Reachability Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Cormie-Bowins

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of computing reachability probabilities: given a Markov chain, an initial state of the Markov chain, and a set of goal states of the Markov chain, what is the probability of reaching any of the goal states from the initial state? This problem can be reduced to solving a linear equation Ax = b for x, where A is a matrix and b is a vector. We consider two iterative methods to solve the linear equation: the Jacobi method and the biconjugate gradient stabilized (BiCGStab method. For both methods, a sequential and a parallel version have been implemented. The parallel versions have been implemented on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA so that they can be run on a NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU. From our experiments we conclude that as the size of the matrix increases, the CUDA implementations outperform the sequential implementations. Furthermore, the BiCGStab method performs better than the Jacobi method for dense matrices, whereas the Jacobi method does better for sparse ones. Since the reachability probabilities problem plays a key role in probabilistic model checking, we also compared the implementations for matrices obtained from a probabilistic model checker. Our experiments support the conjecture by Bosnacki et al. that the Jacobi method is superior to Krylov subspace methods, a class to which the BiCGStab method belongs, for probabilistic model checking.

  14. Using a computer simulation for teaching communication skills: A blinded multisite mixed methods randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W; Fetters, Michael D; Scerbo, Mark W; White, Casey B; Lypson, Monica L; Padilla, Miguel A; Gliva-McConvey, Gayle A; Belfore, Lee A; West, Temple; Wallace, Amelia M; Guetterman, Timothy C; Schleicher, Lauren S; Kennedy, Rebecca A; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S; Cleary, James F; Marsella, Stacy C; Becker, Daniel M

    2017-04-01

    To assess advanced communication skills among second-year medical students exposed either to a computer simulation (MPathic-VR) featuring virtual humans, or to a multimedia computer-based learning module, and to understand each group's experiences and learning preferences. A single-blinded, mixed methods, randomized, multisite trial compared MPathic-VR (N=210) to computer-based learning (N=211). Primary outcomes: communication scores during repeat interactions with MPathic-VR's intercultural and interprofessional communication scenarios and scores on a subsequent advanced communication skills objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare outcomes. student attitude surveys and qualitative assessments of their experiences with MPathic-VR or computer-based learning. MPathic-VR-trained students improved their intercultural and interprofessional communication performance between their first and second interactions with each scenario. They also achieved significantly higher composite scores on the OSCE than computer-based learning-trained students. Attitudes and experiences were more positive among students trained with MPathic-VR, who valued its providing immediate feedback, teaching nonverbal communication skills, and preparing them for emotion-charged patient encounters. MPathic-VR was effective in training advanced communication skills and in enabling knowledge transfer into a more realistic clinical situation. MPathic-VR's virtual human simulation offers an effective and engaging means of advanced communication training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiscale methods in turbulent combustion: strategies and computational challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echekki, Tarek

    2009-01-01

    A principal challenge in modeling turbulent combustion flows is associated with their complex, multiscale nature. Traditional paradigms in the modeling of these flows have attempted to address this nature through different strategies, including exploiting the separation of turbulence and combustion scales and a reduced description of the composition space. The resulting moment-based methods often yield reasonable predictions of flow and reactive scalars' statistics under certain conditions. However, these methods must constantly evolve to address combustion at different regimes, modes or with dominant chemistries. In recent years, alternative multiscale strategies have emerged, which although in part inspired by the traditional approaches, also draw upon basic tools from computational science, applied mathematics and the increasing availability of powerful computational resources. This review presents a general overview of different strategies adopted for multiscale solutions of turbulent combustion flows. Within these strategies, some specific models are discussed or outlined to illustrate their capabilities and underlying assumptions. These strategies may be classified under four different classes, including (i) closure models for atomistic processes, (ii) multigrid and multiresolution strategies, (iii) flame-embedding strategies and (iv) hybrid large-eddy simulation-low-dimensional strategies. A combination of these strategies and models can potentially represent a robust alternative strategy to moment-based models; but a significant challenge remains in the development of computational frameworks for these approaches as well as their underlying theories. (topical review)

  16. Mathematical modellings and computational methods for structural analysis of LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.K.; Lam, D.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, two aspects of nuclear reactor problems are discussed, modelling techniques and computational methods for large scale linear and nonlinear analyses of LMFBRs. For nonlinear fluid-structure interaction problem with large deformation, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian description is applicable. For certain linear fluid-structure interaction problem, the structural response spectrum can be found via 'added mass' approach. In a sense, the fluid inertia is accounted by a mass matrix added to the structural mass. The fluid/structural modes of certain fluid-structure problem can be uncoupled to get the reduced added mass. The advantage of this approach is that it can account for the many repeated structures of nuclear reactor. In regard to nonlinear dynamic problem, the coupled nonlinear fluid-structure equations usually have to be solved by direct time integration. The computation can be very expensive and time consuming for nonlinear problems. Thus, it is desirable to optimize the accuracy and computation effort by using implicit-explicit mixed time integration method. (orig.)

  17. A numerical method to compute interior transmission eigenvalues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeld, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the numerical calculation of eigenvalues of the interior transmission problem arising in acoustic scattering for constant contrast in three dimensions is considered. From the computational point of view existing methods are very expensive, and are only able to show the existence of such transmission eigenvalues. Furthermore, they have trouble finding them if two or more eigenvalues are situated closely together. We present a new method based on complex-valued contour integrals and the boundary integral equation method which is able to calculate highly accurate transmission eigenvalues. So far, this is the first paper providing such accurate values for various surfaces different from a sphere in three dimensions. Additionally, the computational cost is even lower than those of existing methods. Furthermore, the algorithm is capable of finding complex-valued eigenvalues for which no numerical results have been reported yet. Until now, the proof of existence of such eigenvalues is still open. Finally, highly accurate eigenvalues of the interior Dirichlet problem are provided and might serve as test cases to check newly derived Faber–Krahn type inequalities for larger transmission eigenvalues that are not yet available. (paper)

  18. VHTRC experiment for verification test of H∞ reactivity estimation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yoshio; Suzuki, Katsuo; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Yamane, Tsuyoshi; Fujisaki, Shingo; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Ono, Toshihiko

    1996-02-01

    This experiment was performed at VHTRC to acquire the data for verifying the H∞ reactivity estimation method. In this report, the experimental method, the measuring circuits and data processing softwares are described in details. (author)

  19. What role for qualitative methods in randomized experiments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin; Camfield, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The vibrant debate on randomized experiments within international development has been slow to accept a role for qualitative methods within research designs. Whilst there are examples of how 'field visits' or descriptive analyses of context can play a complementary, but secondary, role...... history interviews have advantages over other qualitative methods, and offers one alternative to the conventional survey tool....... to quantitative methods, little attention has been paid to the possibility of randomized experiments that allow a primary role to qualitative methods. This paper assesses whether a range of qualitative methods compromise the internal and external validity criteria of randomized experiments. It suggests that life...

  20. An analytical method for computing atomic contact areas in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-15

    We propose a new analytical method for detecting and computing contacts between atoms in biomolecules. It is based on the alpha shape theory and proceeds in three steps. First, we compute the weighted Delaunay triangulation of the union of spheres representing the molecule. In the second step, the Delaunay complex is filtered to derive the dual complex. Finally, contacts between spheres are collected. In this approach, two atoms i and j are defined to be in contact if their centers are connected by an edge in the dual complex. The contact areas between atom i and its neighbors are computed based on the caps formed by these neighbors on the surface of i; the total area of all these caps is partitioned according to their spherical Laguerre Voronoi diagram on the surface of i. This method is analytical and its implementation in a new program BallContact is fast and robust. We have used BallContact to study contacts in a database of 1551 high resolution protein structures. We show that with this new definition of atomic contacts, we generate realistic representations of the environments of atoms and residues within a protein. In particular, we establish the importance of nonpolar contact areas that complement the information represented by the accessible surface areas. This new method bears similarity to the tessellation methods used to quantify atomic volumes and contacts, with the advantage that it does not require the presence of explicit solvent molecules if the surface of the protein is to be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A Novel Resource Management Method of Providing Operating System as a Service for Mobile Transparent Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework for mobile transparent computing. It extends the PC transparent computing to mobile terminals. Since resources contain different kinds of operating systems and user data that are stored in a remote server, how to manage the network resources is essential. In this paper, we apply the technologies of quick emulator (QEMU virtualization and mobile agent for mobile transparent computing (MTC to devise a method of managing shared resources and services management (SRSM. It has three layers: a user layer, a manage layer, and a resource layer. A mobile virtual terminal in the user layer and virtual resource management in the manage layer cooperate to maintain the SRSM function accurately according to the user’s requirements. An example of SRSM is used to validate this method. Experiment results show that the strategy is effective and stable.

  2. A novel resource management method of providing operating system as a service for mobile transparent computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yonghua; Huang, Suzhen; Wu, Min; Zhang, Yaoxue; She, Jinhua

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for mobile transparent computing. It extends the PC transparent computing to mobile terminals. Since resources contain different kinds of operating systems and user data that are stored in a remote server, how to manage the network resources is essential. In this paper, we apply the technologies of quick emulator (QEMU) virtualization and mobile agent for mobile transparent computing (MTC) to devise a method of managing shared resources and services management (SRSM). It has three layers: a user layer, a manage layer, and a resource layer. A mobile virtual terminal in the user layer and virtual resource management in the manage layer cooperate to maintain the SRSM function accurately according to the user's requirements. An example of SRSM is used to validate this method. Experiment results show that the strategy is effective and stable.

  3. Computer-aided head film analysis: the University of California San Francisco method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Miller, D M

    1980-07-01

    Computer technology is already assuming an important role in the management of orthodontic practices. The next 10 years are likely to see expansion in computer usage into the areas of diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment-record keeping. In the areas of diagnosis and treatment planning, one of the first problems to be attacked will be the automation of head film analysis. The problems of constructing computer-aided systems for this purpose are considered herein in the light of the authors' 10 years of experience in developing a similar system for research purposes. The need for building in methods for automatic detection and correction of gross errors is discussed and the authors' method for doing so is presented. The construction of a rudimentary machine-readable data base for research and clinical purposes is described.

  4. An Accurate liver segmentation method using parallel computing algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbasher, Eiman Mohammed Khalied

    2014-12-01

    Computed Tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones muscles, fat and organs CT scans are more detailed than standard x-rays. CT scans may be done with or without "contrast Contrast refers to a substance taken by mouth and/ or injected into an intravenous (IV) line that causes the particular organ or tissue under study to be seen more clearly. CT scan of the liver and biliary tract are used in the diagnosis of many diseases in the abdomen structures, particularly when another type of examination, such as X-rays, physical examination, and ultra sound is not conclusive. Unfortunately, the presence of noise and artifact in the edges and fine details in the CT images limit the contrast resolution and make diagnostic procedure more difficult. This experimental study was conducted at the College of Medical Radiological Science, Sudan University of Science and Technology and Fidel Specialist Hospital. The sample of study was included 50 patients. The main objective of this research was to study an accurate liver segmentation method using a parallel computing algorithm, and to segment liver and adjacent organs using image processing technique. The main technique of segmentation used in this study was watershed transform. The scope of image processing and analysis applied to medical application is to improve the quality of the acquired image and extract quantitative information from medical image data in an efficient and accurate way. The results of this technique agreed wit the results of Jarritt et al, (2010), Kratchwil et al, (2010), Jover et al, (2011), Yomamoto et al, (1996), Cai et al (1999), Saudha and Jayashree (2010) who used different segmentation filtering based on the methods of enhancing the computed tomography images. Anther

  5. COMPUTER-BASED SYSTEMS OF PHYSICAL EXPERIMENT IN INDEPENDENT WORK OF STUDENTS OF TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Slipukhina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The self-study activity of students is an important form of educational process under the conditions of rapid changes of technologies. Ability and readiness of future engineers for independent education is one of their key competences. Investigation of modern methods of planning, organization and control of independent cognitive activity of students while studying physics as effective means of complex forming of their professional qualities is the object of the research. Methods: We analyse the curricula of some engineering specialities in leading technical universities, existent methods and forms of organization of students’ self-study, and own pedagogical experience. Results: Based on the theoretical analysis of existing methods of students’ self-study, it was found that a systematizing factor of appropriate educational technology is the problem focused cognitive tasks. They have to be implemented by application of the modern technological devices integrated with a computer-based experiment. We define the aim of individual or group laboratory works; the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge and skills of students are rationalized; timing and form of presentation of the results are clarified after individual and group consulting. The details of preparatory, searching-organizational, operational, and control stages in organization of students’ self-study with the use of computer oriented physical experiment are specified, these details differ depending on the didactic purpose, form of organization and students’ individuality. Discussion: The research theoretical aspect confirms the determining role of subject-subject cooperation in forming of competences of independent learning of the future engineers. Basic practical achievements of the research consist of improving methods of using of digital learning systems, creation of textbooks that promote consultative and guiding role for the educational process, working-out of

  6. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W → μν; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  7. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-12-14

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W {yields} {mu}{nu}; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  8. Intravenous catheter training system: computer-based education versus traditional learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engum, Scott A; Jeffries, Pamela; Fisher, Lisa

    2003-07-01

    Virtual reality simulators allow trainees to practice techniques without consequences, reduce potential risk associated with training, minimize animal use, and help to develop standards and optimize procedures. Current intravenous (IV) catheter placement training methods utilize plastic arms, however, the lack of variability can diminish the educational stimulus for the student. This study compares the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia, virtual reality computer IV catheter simulator with a traditional laboratory experience of teaching IV venipuncture skills to both nursing and medical students. A randomized, pretest-posttest experimental design was employed. A total of 163 participants, 70 baccalaureate nursing students and 93 third-year medical students beginning their fundamental skills training were recruited. The students ranged in age from 20 to 55 years (mean 25). Fifty-eight percent were female and 68% percent perceived themselves as having average computer skills (25% declaring excellence). The methods of IV catheter education compared included a traditional method of instruction involving a scripted self-study module which involved a 10-minute videotape, instructor demonstration, and hands-on-experience using plastic mannequin arms. The second method involved an interactive multimedia, commercially made computer catheter simulator program utilizing virtual reality (CathSim). The pretest scores were similar between the computer and the traditional laboratory group. There was a significant improvement in cognitive gains, student satisfaction, and documentation of the procedure with the traditional laboratory group compared with the computer catheter simulator group. Both groups were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly. CONCLUSIONS; This evaluation and assessment was an initial effort to assess new teaching methodologies related to intravenous catheter placement and their effects on student learning outcomes and behaviors

  9. FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC EXPERIENCE OF INTEGRATING CLOUD COMPUTING INTO PEDAGOGICAL PROCESS OF HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia A. Khmil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present article foreign and domestic experience of integrating cloud computing into pedagogical process of higher educational establishments (H.E.E. has been generalized. It has been stated that nowadays a lot of educational services are hosted in the cloud, e.g. infrastructure as a service (IaaS, platform as a service (PaaS and software as a service (SaaS. The peculiarities of implementing cloud technologies by H.E.E. in Ukraine and abroad have been singled out; the products developed by the leading IT companies for using cloud computing in higher education system, such as Microsoft for Education, Google Apps for Education and Amazon AWS Educate have been reviewed. The examples of concrete types, methods and forms of learning and research work based on cloud services have been provided.

  10. Experiments for the validation of computer codes uses to assess the protection factors afforded by dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Grand, J.; Roux, Y.; Kerlau, G.

    1988-09-01

    Two experimental campaigns were carried out to verify: 1) the method of assessing the mean kerma in a household used in the computer code BILL calculating the protection factor afforded by dwellings; 2) in what conditions the kerma calculated in cubic meshes of a given size (code PIECE) agreed with TLD measurements. To that purpose, a house was built near the caesium 137 source of the Ecosystem irradiator located at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Center. During the first campaign, four experiments with different house characteristics were conducted. Some 50 TLSs locations describing the inhabitable volume were defined in order to obtain the mean kerma. 16 locations were considered outside the house. During the second campaign a cobalt 60 source was installed on the side. Only five measurement locations were defined, each with 6 TLDs. The results of dosimetric measurements are presented and compared with the calculations of the two computer codes. The effects of wall heterogeneity were also studied [fr

  11. A result-driven minimum blocking method for PageRank parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wan; Liu, Tao; Yu, Wei; Huang, Gan

    2017-01-01

    Matrix blocking is a common method for improving computational efficiency of PageRank, but the blocking rules are hard to be determined, and the following calculation is complicated. In tackling these problems, we propose a minimum blocking method driven by result needs to accomplish a parallel implementation of PageRank algorithm. The minimum blocking just stores the element which is necessary for the result matrix. In return, the following calculation becomes simple and the consumption of the I/O transmission is cut down. We do experiments on several matrixes of different data size and different sparsity degree. The results show that the proposed method has better computational efficiency than traditional blocking methods.

  12. Fast calculation method of computer-generated hologram using a depth camera with point cloud gridding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Shi, Chen-Xiao; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Piao, Yan-Ling; Piao, Mei-Lan; Kim, Nam

    2018-03-01

    We propose a fast calculation method for a computer-generated hologram (CGH) of real objects that uses a point cloud gridding method. The depth information of the scene is acquired using a depth camera and the point cloud model is reconstructed virtually. Because each point of the point cloud is distributed precisely to the exact coordinates of each layer, each point of the point cloud can be classified into grids according to its depth. A diffraction calculation is performed on the grids using a fast Fourier transform (FFT) to obtain a CGH. The computational complexity is reduced dramatically in comparison with conventional methods. The feasibility of the proposed method was confirmed by numerical and optical experiments.

  13. A discrete ordinate response matrix method for massively parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanebutte, U.R.; Lewis, E.E.

    1991-01-01

    A discrete ordinate response matrix method is formulated for the solution of neutron transport problems on massively parallel computers. The response matrix formulation eliminates iteration on the scattering source. The nodal matrices which result from the diamond-differenced equations are utilized in a factored form which minimizes memory requirements and significantly reduces the required number of algorithm utilizes massive parallelism by assigning each spatial node to a processor. The algorithm is accelerated effectively by a synthetic method in which the low-order diffusion equations are also solved by massively parallel red/black iterations. The method has been implemented on a 16k Connection Machine-2, and S 8 and S 16 solutions have been obtained for fixed-source benchmark problems in X--Y geometry

  14. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamat, Nurwahidah; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik; Mahmud, Rozi

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan

  15. A computer method for simulating the decay of radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The analytical equations representing the decay of a series of radioactive atoms through a number of daughter products are well known. These equations are for an idealized case in which the expectation value of the number of atoms which decay in a certain time can be represented by a smooth curve. The real curve of the total number of disintegrations from a radioactive species consists of a series of Heaviside step functions, with the steps occurring at the time of the disintegration. The disintegration of radioactive atoms is said to be random but this random behaviour is such that a single species forms an ensemble of which the times of disintegration give a geometric distribution. Numbers which have a geometric distribution can be generated by computer and can be used to simulate the decay of one or more radioactive species. A computer method is described for simulating such decay of radioactive atoms and this method is applied specifically to the decay of the short half life daughters of radon 222 and the emission of alpha particles from polonium 218 and polonium 214. Repeating the simulation of the decay a number of times provides a method for investigating the statistical uncertainty inherent in methods for measurement of exposure to radon daughters. This statistical uncertainty is difficult to investigate analytically since the time of decay of an atom of polonium 218 is not independent of the time of decay of subsequent polonium 214. The method is currently being used to investigate the statistical uncertainties of a number of commonly used methods for the counting of alpha particles from radon daughters and the calculations of exposure

  16. Assessing Pre-Service Teachers' Computer Phobia Levels in Terms of Gender and Experience, Turkish Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursavas, Omer Faruk; Karal, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    In this study it is aimed to determine the level of pre-service teachers' computer phobia. Whether or not computer phobia meaningfully varies statistically according to gender and computer experience has been tested in the study. The study was performed on 430 pre-service teachers at the Education Faculty in Rize/Turkey. Data in the study were…

  17. Educational Computer Use in Leisure Contexts: A Phenomenological Study of Adolescents' Experiences at Internet Cafes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2009-01-01

    Computer use is a widespread leisure activity for adolescents. Leisure contexts, such as Internet cafes, constitute specific social environments for computer use and may hold significant educational potential. This article reports a phenomenological study of adolescents' experiences of educational computer use at Internet cafes in Turkey. The…

  18. Multiscale Methods, Parallel Computation, and Neural Networks for Real-Time Computer Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiti, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents new algorithms for low and intermediate level computer vision. The guiding ideas in the presented approach are those of hierarchical and adaptive processing, concurrent computation, and supervised learning. Processing of the visual data at different resolutions is used not only to reduce the amount of computation necessary to reach the fixed point, but also to produce a more accurate estimation of the desired parameters. The presented adaptive multiple scale technique is applied to the problem of motion field estimation. Different parts of the image are analyzed at a resolution that is chosen in order to minimize the error in the coefficients of the differential equations to be solved. Tests with video-acquired images show that velocity estimation is more accurate over a wide range of motion with respect to the homogeneous scheme. In some cases introduction of explicit discontinuities coupled to the continuous variables can be used to avoid propagation of visual information from areas corresponding to objects with different physical and/or kinematic properties. The human visual system uses concurrent computation in order to process the vast amount of visual data in "real -time." Although with different technological constraints, parallel computation can be used efficiently for computer vision. All the presented algorithms have been implemented on medium grain distributed memory multicomputers with a speed-up approximately proportional to the number of processors used. A simple two-dimensional domain decomposition assigns regions of the multiresolution pyramid to the different processors. The inter-processor communication needed during the solution process is proportional to the linear dimension of the assigned domain, so that efficiency is close to 100% if a large region is assigned to each processor. Finally, learning algorithms are shown to be a viable technique to engineer computer vision systems for different applications starting from

  19. A new computational method for reactive power market clearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Elkasrawy, A.; Venkatesh, B.

    2009-01-01

    After deregulation of electricity markets, ancillary services such as reactive power supply are priced separately. However, unlike real power supply, procedures for costing and pricing reactive power supply are still evolving and spot markets for reactive power do not exist as of now. Further, traditional formulations proposed for clearing reactive power markets use a non-linear mixed integer programming formulation that are difficult to solve. This paper proposes a new reactive power supply market clearing scheme. Novelty of this formulation lies in the pricing scheme that rewards transformers for tap shifting while participating in this market. The proposed model is a non-linear mixed integer challenge. A significant portion of the manuscript is devoted towards the development of a new successive mixed integer linear programming (MILP) technique to solve this formulation. The successive MILP method is computationally robust and fast. The IEEE 6-bus and 300-bus systems are used to test the proposed method. These tests serve to demonstrate computational speed and rigor of the proposed method. (author)

  20. Empirical method for simulation of water tables by digital computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.; Fenske, P.R.

    1975-09-01

    An empirical method is described for computing a matrix of water-table elevations from a matrix of topographic elevations and a set of observed water-elevation control points which may be distributed randomly over the area of interest. The method is applicable to regions, such as the Great Basin, where the water table can be assumed to conform to a subdued image of overlying topography. A first approximation to the water table is computed by smoothing a matrix of topographic elevations and adjusting each node of the smoothed matrix according to a linear regression between observed water elevations and smoothed topographic elevations. Each observed control point is assumed to exert a radially decreasing influence on the first approximation surface. The first approximation is then adjusted further to conform to observed water-table elevations near control points. Outside the domain of control, the first approximation is assumed to represent the most probable configuration of the water table. The method has been applied to the Nevada Test Site and the Hot Creek Valley areas in Nevada

  1. A Novel Automated Method for Analyzing Cylindrical Computed Tomography Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D. J.; Burke, E. R.; Rauser, R. W.; Martin, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    A novel software method is presented that is applicable for analyzing cylindrical and partially cylindrical objects inspected using computed tomography. This method involves unwrapping and re-slicing data so that the CT data from the cylindrical object can be viewed as a series of 2-D sheets in the vertical direction in addition to volume rendering and normal plane views provided by traditional CT software. The method is based on interior and exterior surface edge detection and under proper conditions, is FULLY AUTOMATED and requires no input from the user except the correct voxel dimension from the CT scan. The software is available from NASA in 32- and 64-bit versions that can be applied to gigabyte-sized data sets, processing data either in random access memory or primarily on the computer hard drive. Please inquire with the presenting author if further interested. This software differentiates itself in total from other possible re-slicing software solutions due to complete automation and advanced processing and analysis capabilities.

  2. Computer codes and methods for simulating accelerator driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, E.; Byung Chan Na

    2003-01-01

    A large set of computer codes and associated data libraries have been developed by nuclear research and industry over the past half century. A large number of them are in the public domain and can be obtained under agreed conditions from different Information Centres. The areas covered comprise: basic nuclear data and models, reactor spectra and cell calculations, static and dynamic reactor analysis, criticality, radiation shielding, dosimetry and material damage, fuel behaviour, safety and hazard analysis, heat conduction and fluid flow in reactor systems, spent fuel and waste management (handling, transportation, and storage), economics of fuel cycles, impact on the environment of nuclear activities etc. These codes and models have been developed mostly for critical systems used for research or power generation and other technological applications. Many of them have not been designed for accelerator driven systems (ADS), but with competent use, they can be used for studying such systems or can form the basis for adapting existing methods to the specific needs of ADS's. The present paper describes the types of methods, codes and associated data available and their role in the applications. It provides Web addresses for facilitating searches for such tools. Some indications are given on the effect of non appropriate or 'blind' use of existing tools to ADS. Reference is made to available experimental data that can be used for validating the methods use. Finally, some international activities linked to the different computational aspects are described briefly. (author)

  3. Application verification research of cloud computing technology in the field of real time aerospace experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Junwei; Chen, Hongyan; Zhao, Jing

    2017-08-01

    According to the requirements of real-time, reliability and safety for aerospace experiment, the single center cloud computing technology application verification platform is constructed. At the IAAS level, the feasibility of the cloud computing technology be applied to the field of aerospace experiment is tested and verified. Based on the analysis of the test results, a preliminary conclusion is obtained: Cloud computing platform can be applied to the aerospace experiment computing intensive business. For I/O intensive business, it is recommended to use the traditional physical machine.

  4. Comparing Computer Game and Traditional Lecture Using Experience Ratings from High and Low Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Michael; Green, Richard; Nilsen, Trond; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Computer games are purported to be effective instructional tools that enhance motivation and improve engagement. The aim of this study was to investigate how tertiary student experiences change when instruction was computer game based compared to lecture based, and whether experiences differed between high and low achieving students. Participants…

  5. Methodics of computing the results of monitoring the exploratory gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krúpa Víazoslav

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available At building site of motorway tunnel Višòové-Dubná skala , the priority is given to driving of exploration galley that secures in detail: geologic, engineering geology, hydrogeology and geotechnics research. This research is based on gathering information for a supposed use of the full profile driving machine that would drive the motorway tunnel. From a part of the exploration gallery which is driven by the TBM method, a fulfilling information is gathered about the parameters of the driving process , those are gathered by a computer monitoring system. The system is mounted on a driving machine. This monitoring system is based on the industrial computer PC 104. It records 4 basic values of the driving process: the electromotor performance of the driving machine Voest-Alpine ATB 35HA, the speed of driving advance, the rotation speed of the disintegrating head TBM and the total head pressure. The pressure force is evaluated from the pressure in the hydraulic cylinders of the machine. Out of these values, the strength of rock mass, the angle of inner friction, etc. are mathematically calculated. These values characterize rock mass properties as their changes. To define the effectivity of the driving process, the value of specific energy and the working ability of driving head is used. The article defines the methodics of computing the gathered monitoring information, that is prepared for the driving machine Voest – Alpine ATB 35H at the Institute of Geotechnics SAS. It describes the input forms (protocols of the developed method created by an EXCEL program and shows selected samples of the graphical elaboration of the first monitoring results obtained from exploratory gallery driving process in the Višòové – Dubná skala motorway tunnel.

  6. A fast point-cloud computing method based on spatial symmetry of Fresnel field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Kai; Shen, Chuan; Zhu, Wenliang; Wei, Sui

    2017-10-01

    Aiming at the great challenge for Computer Generated Hologram (CGH) duo to the production of high spatial-bandwidth product (SBP) is required in the real-time holographic video display systems. The paper is based on point-cloud method and it takes advantage of the propagating reversibility of Fresnel diffraction in the propagating direction and the fringe pattern of a point source, known as Gabor zone plate has spatial symmetry, so it can be used as a basis for fast calculation of diffraction field in CGH. A fast Fresnel CGH method based on the novel look-up table (N-LUT) method is proposed, the principle fringe patterns (PFPs) at the virtual plane is pre-calculated by the acceleration algorithm and be stored. Secondly, the Fresnel diffraction fringe pattern at dummy plane can be obtained. Finally, the Fresnel propagation from dummy plan to hologram plane. The simulation experiments and optical experiments based on Liquid Crystal On Silicon (LCOS) is setup to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method under the premise of ensuring the quality of 3D reconstruction the method proposed in the paper can be applied to shorten the computational time and improve computational efficiency.

  7. Computations, Complexity, Experiments, and the World Outside Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadanoff, L.P

    2009-01-01

    Computer Models in the Sciences and Social Sciences. 1. Simulation and Prediction in Complex Systems: the Good the Bad and the Awful. This lecture deals with the history of large-scale computer modeling mostly in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's sponsorship of modeling for weapons development and innovation in energy sources. 2. Complexity: Making a Splash-Breaking a Neck - The Making of Complexity in Physical System. For ages thinkers have been asking how complexity arise. The laws of physics are very simple. How come we are so complex? This lecture tries to approach this question by asking how complexity arises in physical fluids. 3. Forrester, et. al. Social and Biological Model-Making The partial collapse of the world's economy has raised the question of whether we could improve the performance of economic and social systems by a major effort on creating understanding via large-scale computer models. (author)

  8. Description of a method for computing fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.

    1982-02-01

    A general formulation allowing computation of structure vibrations in a dense fluid is described. It is based on fluid modelisation by fluid finite elements. For each fluid node are associated two variables: the pressure p and a variable π defined as p=d 2 π/dt 2 . Coupling between structure and fluid is introduced by surface elements. This method is easy to introduce in a general finite element code. Validation was obtained by analytical calculus and tests. It is widely used for vibrational and seismic studies of pipes and internals of nuclear reactors some applications are presented [fr

  9. Computer Aided Flowsheet Design using Group Contribution Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bommareddy, Susilpa; Eden, Mario R.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a systematic group contribution based framework is presented for synthesis of process flowsheets from a given set of input and output specifications. Analogous to the group contribution methods developed for molecular design, the framework employs process groups to represent...... information of each flowsheet to minimize the computational load and information storage. The design variables for the selected flowsheet(s) are identified through a reverse simulation approach and are used as initial estimates for rigorous simulation to verify the feasibility and performance of the design....

  10. COMPUTER-IMPLEMENTED METHOD OF PERFORMING A SEARCH USING SIGNATURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of processing a query vector and a data vector), comprising: generating a set of masks and a first set of multiple signatures and a second set of multiple signatures by applying the set of masks to the query vector and the data vector, respectively, and generating...... candidate pairs, of a first signature and a second signature, by identifying matches of a first signature and a second signature. The set of masks comprises a configuration of the elements that is a Hadamard code; a permutation of a Hadamard code; or a code that deviates from a Hadamard code...

  11. Method and apparatus for managing transactions with connected computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.; Phillips, Laurence R.; Spires, Shannon V.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus that make use of existing computer and communication resources and that reduce the errors and delays common to complex transactions such as international shipping. The present invention comprises an agent-based collaborative work environment that assists geographically distributed commercial and government users in the management of complex transactions such as the transshipment of goods across the U.S.-Mexico border. Software agents can mediate the creation, validation and secure sharing of shipment information and regulatory documentation over the Internet, using the World-Wide Web to interface with human users.

  12. Numerical methods and computers used in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Tripp, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the methods of obtaining approximate numerical solutions to boundary value problems that arise in elastohydrodynamic lubrication are reviewed. The highlights of four general approaches (direct, inverse, quasi-inverse, and Newton-Raphson) are sketched. Advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are presented along with a flow chart showing some of the details of each. The basic question of numerical stability of the elastohydrodynamic lubrication solutions, especially in the pressure spike region, is considered. Computers used to solve this important class of lubrication problems are briefly described, with emphasis on supercomputers.

  13. Robust flow stability: Theory, computations and experiments in near wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Kumar Manoj

    Helmholtz established the field of hydrodynamic stability with his pioneering work in 1868. From then on, hydrodynamic stability became an important tool in understanding various fundamental fluid flow phenomena in engineering (mechanical, aeronautics, chemical, materials, civil, etc.) and science (astrophysics, geophysics, biophysics, etc.), and turbulence in particular. However, there are many discrepancies between classical hydrodynamic stability theory and experiments. In this thesis, the limitations of traditional hydrodynamic stability theory are shown and a framework for robust flow stability theory is formulated. A host of new techniques like gramians, singular values, operator norms, etc. are introduced to understand the role of various kinds of uncertainty. An interesting feature of this framework is the close interplay between theory and computations. It is shown that a subset of Navier-Stokes equations are globally, non-nonlinearly stable for all Reynolds number. Yet, invoking this new theory, it is shown that these equations produce structures (vortices and streaks) as seen in the experiments. The experiments are done in zero pressure gradient transiting boundary layer on a flat plate in free surface tunnel. Digital particle image velocimetry, and MEMS based laser Doppler velocimeter and shear stress sensors have been used to make quantitative measurements of the flow. Various theoretical and computational predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. A closely related topic of modeling, simulation and complexity reduction of large mechanics problems with multiple spatial and temporal scales is also studied. A nice method that rigorously quantifies the important scales and automatically gives models of the problem to various levels of accuracy is introduced. Computations done using spectral methods are presented.

  14. A hybrid method for the parallel computation of Green's functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Dan Erik; Li Song; Stokbro, Kurt; Sorensen, Hans Henrik B.; Hansen, Per Christian; Skelboe, Stig; Darve, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Quantum transport models for nanodevices using the non-equilibrium Green's function method require the repeated calculation of the block tridiagonal part of the Green's and lesser Green's function matrices. This problem is related to the calculation of the inverse of a sparse matrix. Because of the large number of times this calculation needs to be performed, this is computationally very expensive even on supercomputers. The classical approach is based on recurrence formulas which cannot be efficiently parallelized. This practically prevents the solution of large problems with hundreds of thousands of atoms. We propose new recurrences for a general class of sparse matrices to calculate Green's and lesser Green's function matrices which extend formulas derived by Takahashi and others. We show that these recurrences may lead to a dramatically reduced computational cost because they only require computing a small number of entries of the inverse matrix. Then, we propose a parallelization strategy for block tridiagonal matrices which involves a combination of Schur complement calculations and cyclic reduction. It achieves good scalability even on problems of modest size.

  15. Investigation of the computer experiences and attitudes of pre-service mathematics teachers: new evidence from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgin, Osman; Catlioğlu, Hakan; Gürbüz, Ramazan; Aydin, Serhat

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the experiences of pre-service mathematics (PSM) teachers with computers and their attitudes toward them. The Computer Attitude Scale, Computer Competency Survey, and Computer Use Information Form were administered to 180 Turkish PSM teachers. Results revealed that most PSM teachers used computers at home and at Internet cafes, and that their competency was generally intermediate and upper level. The study concludes that PSM teachers' attitudes about computers differ according to their years of study, computer ownership, level of computer competency, frequency of computer use, computer experience, and whether they had attended a computer-aided instruction course. However, computer attitudes were not affected by gender.

  16. Status of the Grid Computing for the ALICE Experiment in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamova, D; Hampl, J; Chudoba, J; Kouba, T; Svec, J; Mendez, Lorenzo P; Saiz, P

    2010-01-01

    The Czech Republic (CR) has been participating in the LHC Computing Grid project (LCG) ever since 2003 and gradually, a middle-sized Tier-2 center has been built in Prague, delivering computing services for national HEP experiments groups including the ALICE project at the LHC. We present a brief overview of the computing activities and services being performed in the CR for the ALICE experiment.

  17. Multigrid Methods for the Computation of Propagators in Gauge Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkreuter, Thomas

    Multigrid methods were invented for the solution of discretized partial differential equations in order to overcome the slowness of traditional algorithms by updates on various length scales. In the present work generalizations of multigrid methods for propagators in gauge fields are investigated. Gauge fields are incorporated in algorithms in a covariant way. The kernel C of the restriction operator which averages from one grid to the next coarser grid is defined by projection on the ground-state of a local Hamiltonian. The idea behind this definition is that the appropriate notion of smoothness depends on the dynamics. The ground-state projection choice of C can be used in arbitrary dimension and for arbitrary gauge group. We discuss proper averaging operations for bosons and for staggered fermions. The kernels C can also be used in multigrid Monte Carlo simulations, and for the definition of block spins and blocked gauge fields in Monte Carlo renormalization group studies. Actual numerical computations are performed in four-dimensional SU(2) gauge fields. We prove that our proposals for block spins are “good”, using renormalization group arguments. A central result is that the multigrid method works in arbitrarily disordered gauge fields, in principle. It is proved that computations of propagators in gauge fields without critical slowing down are possible when one uses an ideal interpolation kernel. Unfortunately, the idealized algorithm is not practical, but it was important to answer questions of principle. Practical methods are able to outperform the conjugate gradient algorithm in case of bosons. The case of staggered fermions is harder. Multigrid methods give considerable speed-ups compared to conventional relaxation algorithms, but on lattices up to 184 conjugate gradient is superior.

  18. Computing Activities for the PANDA Experiment at FAIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, Johan; Gruntorad, J; Lokajicek, M

    2010-01-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future facility FAIR will provide valuable data for our present understanding of the strong interaction. In preparation for the experiments, large-scale simulations for design and feasibility studies are performed exploiting a new software framework, PandaROOT, which is

  19. Computer Simulation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    We review an event-based simulation approach which reproduces the statistical distributions of quantum physics experiments by generating detection events one-by-one according to an unknown distribution and without solving a wave equation. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm laboratory experiments are used

  20. Computer control and monitoring of neutral beam injectors on the 2XIIB CTR experiment at LLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    The original manual control system for the 12 neutral beam injectors on the 2XIIB Machine is being integrated with a computer control system. This, in turn, is a part of a multiple computer network comprised of the three computers which are involved in the operation and instrumentation of the 2XIIB experiment. The computer control system simplifies neutral beam operation and centralizes it to a single operating position. A special purpose console utilizes computer generated graphics and interactive function entry buttons to optimize the human/machine interface. Through the facilities of the computer network, a high level control function will be implemented for the use of the experimenter in a remotely located experiment diagnositcs area. In addition to controlling the injectors in normal operation, the computer system provides automatic conditioning of the injectors, bringing rebuilt units back to full energy output with minimum loss of useful life. The computer system also provides detail archive data recording

  1. Analysis of Computer Experiments with Multiple Noise Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Kulahci, Murat; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a modeling framework for analyzing computer models with two types of variations. The paper is based on a case study of an orthopedic surgical unit, which has both controllable and uncontrollable factors. Our results show that this structure of variation can be modeled...

  2. Power-Efficient Computing: Experiences from the COSA Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cesini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption is today one of the most relevant issues in operating HPC systems for scientific applications. The use of unconventional computing systems is therefore of great interest for several scientific communities looking for a better tradeoff between time-to-solution and energy-to-solution. In this context, the performance assessment of processors with a high ratio of performance per watt is necessary to understand how to realize energy-efficient computing systems for scientific applications, using this class of processors. Computing On SOC Architecture (COSA is a three-year project (2015–2017 funded by the Scientific Commission V of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN, which aims to investigate the performance and the total cost of ownership offered by computing systems based on commodity low-power Systems on Chip (SoCs and high energy-efficient systems based on GP-GPUs. In this work, we present the results of the project analyzing the performance of several scientific applications on several GPU- and SoC-based systems. We also describe the methodology we have used to measure energy performance and the tools we have implemented to monitor the power drained by applications while running.

  3. Trainee Teachers' e-Learning Experiences of Computer Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Pam Wright highlights the role of technology in providing situated learning opportunities for preservice teachers to explore the role commercial computer games may have in primary education. In a study designed to assess the effectiveness of an online unit on gaming incorporated into a course on learning technologies, Wright found that thoughtful…

  4. COMPUTER-AIDED DATA ACQUISITION FOR COMBUSTION EXPERIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The article describes the use of computer-aided data acquisition techniques to aid the research program of the Combustion Research Branch (CRB) of the U.S. EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) in Research Triangle Park, NC, in particular on CRB's bench-sca...

  5. Music Teachers' Experiences in One-to-One Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing scenarios such as the one-to-one model, in which every student is issued a device that is to be used across all subjects, have increased in popularity and have shown both positive and negative influences on education. Music teachers in schools that adopt one-to-one models may be inadequately equipped to integrate this kind of…

  6. Manganese Catalyzed Regioselective C–H Alkylation: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chengming

    2018-05-08

    A new efficient manganese-catalyzed selective C2-alkylation of indoles via carbenoid insertion has been achieved. The newly developed C-H functionalization protocol provides access to diverse products and shows good functional group tolerance. Mechanistic and computational studies support the formation of a Mn(CO)3 acetate complex as the catalytically active species.

  7. Manganese Catalyzed Regioselective C–H Alkylation: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chengming; Maity, Bholanath; Cavallo, Luigi; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    A new efficient manganese-catalyzed selective C2-alkylation of indoles via carbenoid insertion has been achieved. The newly developed C-H functionalization protocol provides access to diverse products and shows good functional group tolerance. Mechanistic and computational studies support the formation of a Mn(CO)3 acetate complex as the catalytically active species.

  8. Techniques involving extreme environment, nondestructive techniques, computer methods in metals research, and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunshah, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A number of different techniques which range over several different aspects of materials research are covered in this volume. They are concerned with property evaluation of 4 0 K and below, surface characterization, coating techniques, techniques for the fabrication of composite materials, computer methods, data evaluation and analysis, statistical design of experiments and non-destructive test techniques. Topics covered in this part include internal friction measurements; nondestructive testing techniques; statistical design of experiments and regression analysis in metallurgical research; and measurement of surfaces of engineering materials

  9. Increasing the computational efficient of digital cross correlation by a vectorization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Yuan; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a vectorization method for use in MATLAB programming aimed at increasing the computational efficiency of digital cross correlation in sound and images, resulting in a speedup of 6.387 and 36.044 times compared with performance values obtained from looped expression. This work bridges the gap between matrix operations and loop iteration, preserving flexibility and efficiency in program testing. This paper uses numerical simulation to verify the speedup of the proposed vectorization method as well as experiments to measure the quantitative transient displacement response subjected to dynamic impact loading. The experiment involved the use of a high speed camera as well as a fiber optic system to measure the transient displacement in a cantilever beam under impact from a steel ball. Experimental measurement data obtained from the two methods are in excellent agreement in both the time and frequency domain, with discrepancies of only 0.68%. Numerical and experiment results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed vectorization method with regard to computational speed in signal processing and high precision in the correlation algorithm. We also present the source code with which to build MATLAB-executable functions on Windows as well as Linux platforms, and provide a series of examples to demonstrate the application of the proposed vectorization method.

  10. Oligomerization of G protein-coupled receptors: computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selent, J; Kaczor, A A

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has unveiled the complexity of mechanisms involved in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) functioning in which receptor dimerization/oligomerization may play an important role. Although the first high-resolution X-ray structure for a likely functional chemokine receptor dimer has been deposited in the Protein Data Bank, the interactions and mechanisms of dimer formation are not yet fully understood. In this respect, computational methods play a key role for predicting accurate GPCR complexes. This review outlines computational approaches focusing on sequence- and structure-based methodologies as well as discusses their advantages and limitations. Sequence-based approaches that search for possible protein-protein interfaces in GPCR complexes have been applied with success in several studies, but did not yield always consistent results. Structure-based methodologies are a potent complement to sequence-based approaches. For instance, protein-protein docking is a valuable method especially when guided by experimental constraints. Some disadvantages like limited receptor flexibility and non-consideration of the membrane environment have to be taken into account. Molecular dynamics simulation can overcome these drawbacks giving a detailed description of conformational changes in a native-like membrane. Successful prediction of GPCR complexes using computational approaches combined with experimental efforts may help to understand the role of dimeric/oligomeric GPCR complexes for fine-tuning receptor signaling. Moreover, since such GPCR complexes have attracted interest as potential drug target for diverse diseases, unveiling molecular determinants of dimerization/oligomerization can provide important implications for drug discovery.

  11. Computing thermal Wigner densities with the phase integration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutier, J.; Borgis, D.; Vuilleumier, R.; Bonella, S.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss how the Phase Integration Method (PIM), recently developed to compute symmetrized time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011)], can be adapted to sampling/generating the thermal Wigner density, a key ingredient, for example, in many approximate schemes for simulating quantum time dependent properties. PIM combines a path integral representation of the density with a cumulant expansion to represent the Wigner function in a form calculable via existing Monte Carlo algorithms for sampling noisy probability densities. The method is able to capture highly non-classical effects such as correlation among the momenta and coordinates parts of the density, or correlations among the momenta themselves. By using alternatives to cumulants, it can also indicate the presence of negative parts of the Wigner density. Both properties are demonstrated by comparing PIM results to those of reference quantum calculations on a set of model problems

  12. Computing thermal Wigner densities with the phase integration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutier, J; Borgis, D; Vuilleumier, R; Bonella, S

    2014-08-28

    We discuss how the Phase Integration Method (PIM), recently developed to compute symmetrized time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011)], can be adapted to sampling/generating the thermal Wigner density, a key ingredient, for example, in many approximate schemes for simulating quantum time dependent properties. PIM combines a path integral representation of the density with a cumulant expansion to represent the Wigner function in a form calculable via existing Monte Carlo algorithms for sampling noisy probability densities. The method is able to capture highly non-classical effects such as correlation among the momenta and coordinates parts of the density, or correlations among the momenta themselves. By using alternatives to cumulants, it can also indicate the presence of negative parts of the Wigner density. Both properties are demonstrated by comparing PIM results to those of reference quantum calculations on a set of model problems.

  13. Computational methods for ab initio detection of microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik eYousef

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small RNA sequences of 18-24 nucleotides in length, which serve as templates to drive post transcriptional gene silencing. The canonical microRNA pathway starts with transcription from DNA and is followed by processing via the Microprocessor complex, yielding a hairpin structure. Which is then exported into the cytosol where it is processed by Dicer and then incorporated into the RNA induced silencing complex. All of these biogenesis steps add to the overall specificity of miRNA production and effect. Unfortunately, their modes of action are just beginning to be elucidated and therefore computational prediction algorithms cannot model the process but are usually forced to employ machine learning approaches. This work focuses on ab initio prediction methods throughout; and therefore homology-based miRNA detection methods are not discussed. Current ab initio prediction algorithms, their ties to data mining, and their prediction accuracy are detailed.

  14. Data graphing methods, articles of manufacture, and computing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Pak Chung; Mackey, Patrick S.; Cook, Kristin A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Whiting, Mark A.

    2016-12-13

    Data graphing methods, articles of manufacture, and computing devices are described. In one aspect, a method includes accessing a data set, displaying a graphical representation including data of the data set which is arranged according to a first of different hierarchical levels, wherein the first hierarchical level represents the data at a first of a plurality of different resolutions which respectively correspond to respective ones of the hierarchical levels, selecting a portion of the graphical representation wherein the data of the portion is arranged according to the first hierarchical level at the first resolution, modifying the graphical representation by arranging the data of the portion according to a second of the hierarchal levels at a second of the resolutions, and after the modifying, displaying the graphical representation wherein the data of the portion is arranged according to the second hierarchal level at the second resolution.

  15. A finite element solution method for quadrics parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchini, A.

    1996-08-01

    A distributed preconditioned conjugate gradient method for finite element analysis has been developed and implemented on a parallel SIMD Quadrics computer. The main characteristic of the method is that it does not require any actual assembling of all element equations in a global system. The physical domain of the problem is partitioned in cells of n p finite elements and each cell element is assigned to a different node of an n p -processors machine. Element stiffness matrices are stored in the data memory of the assigned processing node and the solution process is completely executed in parallel at element level. Inter-element and therefore inter-processor communications are required once per iteration to perform local sums of vector quantities between neighbouring elements. A prototype implementation has been tested on an 8-nodes Quadrics machine in a simple 2D benchmark problem

  16. A novel dual energy method for enhanced quantitative computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, A.; Ghadiri, H.; Rahmim, A.; Ay, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate assessment of bone mineral density (BMD) is critically important in clinical practice, and conveniently enabled via quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Meanwhile, dual-energy QCT (DEQCT) enables enhanced detection of small changes in BMD relative to single-energy QCT (SEQCT). In the present study, we aimed to investigate the accuracy of QCT methods, with particular emphasis on a new dual-energy approach, in comparison to single-energy and conventional dual-energy techniques. We used a sinogram-based analytical CT simulator to model the complete chain of CT data acquisitions, and assessed performance of SEQCT and different DEQCT techniques in quantification of BMD. We demonstrate a 120% reduction in error when using a proposed dual-energy Simultaneous Equation by Constrained Least-squares method, enabling more accurate bone mineral measurements.

  17. The Evolution of Computer Based Learning Software Design: Computer Assisted Teaching Unit Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, A. E.; Smith, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the style of design of computer simulations developed by Computer Assisted Teaching Unit at Queen Mary College with reference to user interface, input and initialization, input data vetting, effective display screen use, graphical results presentation, and need for hard copy. Procedures and problems relating to academic involvement are…

  18. Comparison of four computational methods for computing Q factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Burger, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We benchmark four state-of-the-art computational methods by computing quality factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane L5 and L9 line defect cavities.The convergence of the methods with respect to resolution, degrees of freedom and number ofmodes is investigated. Special att...... attention is paid to the influence of the size of the computational domain. Convergence is not obtained for some of the methods, indicating that some are moresuitable than others for analyzing line defect cavities....

  19. Computer prediction of subsurface radionuclide transport: an adaptive numerical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide transport in the subsurface is often modeled with the aid of the advection-dispersion equation. A review of existing computer methods for the solution of this equation shows that there is need for improvement. To answer this need, a new adaptive numerical method is proposed based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation. The method is based on a decomposition of the concentration field into two parts, one advective and one dispersive, in a rigorous manner that does not leave room for ambiguity. The advective component of steep concentration fronts is tracked forward with the aid of moving particles clustered around each front. Away from such fronts the advection problem is handled by an efficient modified method of characteristics called single-step reverse particle tracking. When a front dissipates with time, its forward tracking stops automatically and the corresponding cloud of particles is eliminated. The dispersion problem is solved by an unconventional Lagrangian finite element formulation on a fixed grid which involves only symmetric and diagonal matrices. Preliminary tests against analytical solutions of ne- and two-dimensional dispersion in a uniform steady state velocity field suggest that the proposed adaptive method can handle the entire range of Peclet numbers from 0 to infinity, with Courant numbers well in excess of 1

  20. Parallel computation of multigroup reactivity coefficient using iterative method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Dewayatna, Winter

    2013-09-01

    One of the research activities to support the commercial radioisotope production program is a safety research target irradiation FPM (Fission Product Molybdenum). FPM targets form a tube made of stainless steel in which the nuclear degrees of superimposed high-enriched uranium. FPM irradiation tube is intended to obtain fission. The fission material widely used in the form of kits in the world of nuclear medicine. Irradiation FPM tube reactor core would interfere with performance. One of the disorders comes from changes in flux or reactivity. It is necessary to study a method for calculating safety terrace ongoing configuration changes during the life of the reactor, making the code faster became an absolute necessity. Neutron safety margin for the research reactor can be reused without modification to the calculation of the reactivity of the reactor, so that is an advantage of using perturbation method. The criticality and flux in multigroup diffusion model was calculate at various irradiation positions in some uranium content. This model has a complex computation. Several parallel algorithms with iterative method have been developed for the sparse and big matrix solution. The Black-Red Gauss Seidel Iteration and the power iteration parallel method can be used to solve multigroup diffusion equation system and calculated the criticality and reactivity coeficient. This research was developed code for reactivity calculation which used one of safety analysis with parallel processing. It can be done more quickly and efficiently by utilizing the parallel processing in the multicore computer. This code was applied for the safety limits calculation of irradiated targets FPM with increment Uranium.

  1. First experience with a mobile computed tomograph in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoj, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Utilization experience of mobile computerized tomograph mounted in the bus is presented. Problems concerning staff, selection of medical base institutes etc are considered. Efficiency of mobile computerized tomographes in revealing different diseases is pointed out

  2. Experience of public procurement of Open Compute servers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärring, Olof; Guerri, Marco; Bonfillou, Eric; Valsan, Liviu; Grigore, Alexandru; Dore, Vincent; Gentit, Alain; Clement, Benoît; Grossir, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    The Open Compute Project. OCP (http://www.opencompute.org/). was launched by Facebook in 2011 with the objective of building efficient computing infrastructures at the lowest possible cost. The technologies are released as open hardware. with the goal to develop servers and data centres following the model traditionally associated with open source software projects. In 2013 CERN acquired a few OCP servers in order to compare performance and power consumption with standard hardware. The conclusions were that there are sufficient savings to motivate an attempt to procure a large scale installation. One objective is to evaluate if the OCP market is sufficiently mature and broad enough to meet the constraints of a public procurement. This paper summarizes this procurement. which started in September 2014 and involved the Request for information (RFI) to qualify bidders and Request for Tender (RFT).

  3. Ioversol 350: clinical experience in cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, J.; Paugam, J.P.; Courtheoux, P.

    1991-01-01

    A single, open trial was conducted in 40 patients to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy and safety, in cranial computed tomography, of ioversol (350 mgl/ml), a new nonionic, monomeric, low-osmolality contrast medium. Ioversol is characterized by a hydrophilicity which is not only the highest of all nonionic agents available to date, but also evenly distributed among the various sides of the benzene ring. Diagnosis was possible in 100 % of cases with a mean degree of certainty of 90.8 %. Six minor adverse reactions requiring no treatment we recorded, of which two were observed by the investigator and four reported by the patients. No pain sensation was found and heat sensations were of minor intensity. Ioversol 350, which showed good diagnostic efficacy and proved to be well tolerated, is therefore suitable for cranial computed tomography at a mean dose of 1 ml/kg

  4. D0 experiment: its trigger, data acquisition, and computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutts, D.; Zeller, R.; Schamberger, D.; Van Berg, R.

    1984-05-01

    The new collider facility to be built at Fermilab's Tevatron-I D0 region is described. The data acquisition requirements are discussed, as well as the hardware and software triggers designed to meet these needs. An array of MicroVAX computers running VAXELN will filter in parallel (a complete event in each microcomputer) and transmit accepted events via Ethernet to a host. This system, together with its subsequent offline needs, is briefly presented

  5. Simulation in computer forensics teaching: the student experience

    OpenAIRE

    Crellin, Jonathan; Adda, Mo; Duke-Williams, Emma; Chandler, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The use of simulation in teaching computing is well established, with digital forensic investigation being a subject area where the range of simulation required is both wide and varied demanding a corresponding breadth of fidelity. Each type of simulation can be complex and expensive to set up resulting in students having only limited opportunities to participate and learn from the simulation. For example students' participation in mock trials in the University mock courtroom or in simulation...

  6. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  7. TRANSFORMING RURAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN ZIMBABWE THROUGH TECHNOLOGY: LIVED EXPERIENCES OF STUDENT COMPUTER USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomba Clifford

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A technological divide exists in Zimbabwe between urban and rural schools that puts rural based students at a disadvantage. In Zimbabwe, the government, through the president donated computers to most rural schools in a bid to bridge the digital divide between rural and urban schools. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the experiences of Advanced Level students using computers at two rural boarding Catholic High Schools in Zimbabwe. The study was guided by two research questions: (1 How do Advanced level students in the rural areas use computers at their school? and (2 What is the experience of using computers for Advanced Level students in the rural areas of Zimbabwe? By performing this study, it was possible to understand from the students’ experiences whether computer usage was for educational learning or not. The results of the phenomenological study showed that students’ experiences can be broadly classified into five themes, namely worthwhile (interesting experience, accessibility issues, teachers’ monopoly, research and social use, and Internet availability. The participants proposed teachers use computers, but not monopolize computer usage. The solution to the computer shortage may be solved by having donors and government help in the acquisitioning of more computers.

  8. Evaluation Methods for Assessing Users' Psychological Experiences of Web-Based Psychosocial Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, Jacqueline Susan; Howson, Moira; Ritchie, Linda; Carter, Philip D; Parry, David Tudor; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2016-06-30

    The use of Web-based interventions to deliver mental health and behavior change programs is increasingly popular. They are cost-effective, accessible, and generally effective. Often these interventions concern psychologically sensitive and challenging issues, such as depression or anxiety. The process by which a person receives and experiences therapy is important to understanding therapeutic process and outcomes. While the experience of the patient or client in traditional face-to-face therapy has been evaluated in a number of ways, there appeared to be a gap in the evaluation of patient experiences of therapeutic interventions delivered online. Evaluation of Web-based artifacts has focused either on evaluation of experience from a computer Web-design perspective through usability testing or on evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Neither of these methods focuses on the psychological experience of the person while engaged in the therapeutic process. This study aimed to investigate what methods, if any, have been used to evaluate the in situ psychological experience of users of Web-based self-help psychosocial interventions. A systematic literature review was undertaken of interdisciplinary databases with a focus on health and computer sciences. Studies that met a predetermined search protocol were included. Among 21 studies identified that examined psychological experience of the user, only 1 study collected user experience in situ. The most common method of understanding users' experience was through semistructured interviews conducted posttreatment or questionnaires administrated at the end of an intervention session. The questionnaires were usually based on standardized tools used to assess user experience with traditional face-to-face treatment. There is a lack of methods specified in the literature to evaluate the interface between Web-based mental health or behavior change artifacts and users. Main limitations in the research were the nascency of the topic

  9. File management for experiment control parameters within a distributed function computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1976-10-01

    An attempt to design and implement a computer system for control of and data collection from a set of laboratory experiments reveals that many of the experiments in the set require an extensive collection of parameters for their control. The operation of the experiments can be greatly simplified if a means can be found for storing these parameters between experiments and automatically accessing them as they are required. A subsystem for managing files of such experiment control parameters is discussed. 3 figures

  10. Computation for LHC experiments: a worldwide computing grid; Le calcul scientifique des experiences LHC: une grille de production mondiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairouz, Malek [Universite Joseph-Fourier, LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3, Grenoble I, 38 (France)

    2010-08-15

    In normal operating conditions the LHC detectors are expected to record about 10{sup 10} collisions each year. The processing of all the consequent experimental data is a real computing challenge in terms of equipment, software and organization: it requires sustaining data flows of a few 10{sup 9} octets per second and recording capacity of a few tens of 10{sup 15} octets each year. In order to meet this challenge a computing network implying the dispatch and share of tasks, has been set. The W-LCG grid (World wide LHC computing grid) is made up of 4 tiers. Tiers 0 is the computer center in CERN, it is responsible for collecting and recording the raw data from the LHC detectors and to dispatch it to the 11 tiers 1. The tiers 1 is typically a national center, it is responsible for making a copy of the raw data and for processing it in order to recover relevant data with a physical meaning and to transfer the results to the 150 tiers 2. The tiers 2 is at the level of the Institute or laboratory, it is in charge of the final analysis of the data and of the production of the simulations. Tiers 3 are at the level of the laboratories, they provide a complementary and local resource to tiers 2 in terms of data analysis. (A.C.)

  11. COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS WITH FINITE ELEMENTS OF HIGHER ORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khomchenko A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of constructing the basic functions of a quadrilateral finite element of the fifth order by the means of the computer algebra system Maple. The Lagrangian approximation of such a finite element contains 36 nodes: 20 nodes perimeter and 16 internal nodes. Alternative models with reduced number of internal nodes are considered. Graphs of basic functions and cognitive portraits of lines of zero level are presented. The work is aimed at studying the possibilities of using modern information technologies in the teaching of individual mathematical disciplines.

  12. Experience with computed transmission tomography of the heart in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, E.; Lipton, M.J.; Skioeldebrand, C.G.; Berninger, W.H.; Redington, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography in its present form provides useful information about the heart for clinical use in patients with heart disease and for investigative work in such patients and living animals. Its great reconstructive power and unmatched density resolution are particularly advantageous in the study of ischemic heart disease. Because of its non-invasive character cardiac computed tomography has the potential of becoming an effective screening tool for large numbers of patients with suspected or known coronary heart desiase. Other cardiac conditions such as valve disease and congenital lesions can also be examined with high diagnostic yield. However presently available scanners suffer from low repetion rate, long scan times and the fact that only one transverse cardiac level at a time can be obtained. The development which must be accomplished in order to eliminate these weaknesses is technically feasible. The availability of a dynamic cardiac scanner would greatly benefit the treatment of patients with heart disease and facilitate the inquiry into the pathophysiology of such diseases. (orig.) [de

  13. Software Defects, Scientific Computation and the Scientific Method

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Computation has rapidly grown in the last 50 years so that in many scientific areas it is the dominant partner in the practice of science. Unfortunately, unlike the experimental sciences, it does not adhere well to the principles of the scientific method as espoused by, for example, the philosopher Karl Popper. Such principles are built around the notions of deniability and reproducibility. Although much research effort has been spent on measuring the density of software defects, much less has been spent on the more difficult problem of measuring their effect on the output of a program. This talk explores these issues with numerous examples suggesting how this situation might be improved to match the demands of modern science. Finally it develops a theoretical model based on an amalgam of statistical mechanics and Hartley/Shannon information theory which suggests that software systems have strong implementation independent behaviour and supports the widely observed phenomenon that defects clust...

  14. Computation of Hemagglutinin Free Energy Difference by the Confinement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) mediates membrane fusion, a crucial step during influenza virus cell entry. How many HAs are needed for this process is still subject to debate. To aid in this discussion, the confinement free energy method was used to calculate the conformational free energy difference between the extended intermediate and postfusion state of HA. Special care was taken to comply with the general guidelines for free energy calculations, thereby obtaining convergence and demonstrating reliability of the results. The energy that one HA trimer contributes to fusion was found to be 34.2 ± 3.4kBT, similar to the known contributions from other fusion proteins. Although computationally expensive, the technique used is a promising tool for the further energetic characterization of fusion protein mechanisms. Knowledge of the energetic contributions per protein, and of conserved residues that are crucial for fusion, aids in the development of fusion inhibitors for antiviral drugs. PMID:29151344

  15. Conference on Boundary and Interior Layers : Computational and Asymptotic Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Stynes, Martin; Zhang, Zhimin

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects papers associated with lectures that were presented at the BAIL 2016 conference, which was held from 14 to 19 August 2016 at Beijing Computational Science Research Center and Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. It showcases the variety and quality of current research into numerical and asymptotic methods for theoretical and practical problems whose solutions involve layer phenomena. The BAIL (Boundary And Interior Layers) conferences, held usually in even-numbered years, bring together mathematicians and engineers/physicists whose research involves layer phenomena, with the aim of promoting interaction between these often-separate disciplines. These layers appear as solutions of singularly perturbed differential equations of various types, and are common in physical problems, most notably in fluid dynamics. This book is of interest for current researchers from mathematics, engineering and physics whose work involves the accurate app roximation of solutions of singularly perturbed diffe...

  16. Statistical physics and computational methods for evolutionary game theory

    CERN Document Server

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2018-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to Evolutionary Game Theory (EGT) which is an emerging field in the area of complex systems attracting the attention of researchers from disparate scientific communities. EGT allows one to represent and study several complex phenomena, such as the emergence of cooperation in social systems, the role of conformity in shaping the equilibrium of a population, and the dynamics in biological and ecological systems. Since EGT models belong to the area of complex systems, statistical physics constitutes a fundamental ingredient for investigating their behavior. At the same time, the complexity of some EGT models, such as those realized by means of agent-based methods, often require the implementation of numerical simulations. Therefore, beyond providing an introduction to EGT, this book gives a brief overview of the main statistical physics tools (such as phase transitions and the Ising model) and computational strategies for simulating evolutionary games (such as Monte Carlo algor...

  17. Activation method for measuring the neutron spectra parameters. Computer software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, B.V.; Ionov, V.S.; Konyaev, S.I.; Marin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    The description of mathematical statement of a task for definition the spectral characteristics of neutron fields with use developed in RRC KI unified activation detectors (UKD) is resulted. The method of processing of results offered by authors activation measurements and calculation of the parameters used for an estimation of the neutron spectra characteristics is discussed. Features of processing of the experimental data received at measurements of activation with using UKD are considered. Activation detectors UKD contain a little bit specially the picked up isotopes giving at irradiation peaks scale of activity in the common spectrum scale of activity. Computing processing of results of the measurements is applied on definition of spectrum parameters for nuclear reactor installations with thermal and close to such power spectrum of neutrons. The example of the data processing, the measurements received at carrying out at RRC KI research reactor F-1 is resulted [ru

  18. A computed microtomography method for understanding epiphyseal growth plate fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Katherine A.; Madi, Kamel; Javaheri, Behzad; Lee, Peter D.; Pitsillides, Andrew A.

    2017-12-01

    The epiphyseal growth plate is a developmental region responsible for linear bone growth, in which chondrocytes undertake a tightly regulated series of biological processes. Concomitant with the cessation of growth and sexual maturation, the human growth plate undergoes progressive narrowing, and ultimately disappears. Despite the crucial role of this growth plate fusion ‘bridging’ event, the precise mechanisms by which it is governed are complex and yet to be established. Progress is likely hindered by the current methods for growth plate visualisation; these are invasive and largely rely on histological procedures. Here we describe our non-invasive method utilising synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography for the examination of growth plate bridging, which ultimately leads to its closure coincident with termination of further longitudinal bone growth. We then apply this method to a dataset obtained from a benchtop microcomputed tomography scanner to highlight its potential for wide usage. Furthermore, we conduct finite element modelling at the micron-scale to reveal the effects of growth plate bridging on local tissue mechanics. Employment of these 3D analyses of growth plate bone bridging is likely to advance our understanding of the physiological mechanisms that control growth plate fusion.

  19. Emerging Computational Methods for the Rational Discovery of Allosteric Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Lee, Christopher T; Durrant, Jacob D; Malmstrom, Robert D; Feher, Victoria A; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-06-08

    Allosteric drug development holds promise for delivering medicines that are more selective and less toxic than those that target orthosteric sites. To date, the discovery of allosteric binding sites and lead compounds has been mostly serendipitous, achieved through high-throughput screening. Over the past decade, structural data has become more readily available for larger protein systems and more membrane protein classes (e.g., GPCRs and ion channels), which are common allosteric drug targets. In parallel, improved simulation methods now provide better atomistic understanding of the protein dynamics and cooperative motions that are critical to allosteric mechanisms. As a result of these advances, the field of predictive allosteric drug development is now on the cusp of a new era of rational structure-based computational methods. Here, we review algorithms that predict allosteric sites based on sequence data and molecular dynamics simulations, describe tools that assess the druggability of these pockets, and discuss how Markov state models and topology analyses provide insight into the relationship between protein dynamics and allosteric drug binding. In each section, we first provide an overview of the various method classes before describing relevant algorithms and software packages.

  20. Computation of rectangular source integral by rational parameter polynomial method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabha, Hem

    2001-01-01

    Hubbell et al. (J. Res. Nat Bureau Standards 64C, (1960) 121) have obtained a series expansion for the calculation of the radiation field generated by a plane isotropic rectangular source (plaque), in which leading term is the integral H(a,b). In this paper another integral I(a,b), which is related with the integral H(a,b) has been solved by the rational parameter polynomial method. From I(a,b), we compute H(a,b). Using this method the integral I(a,b) is expressed in the form of a polynomial of a rational parameter. Generally, a function f (x) is expressed in terms of x. In this method this is expressed in terms of x/(1+x). In this way, the accuracy of the expression is good over a wide range of x as compared to the earlier approach. The results for I(a,b) and H(a,b) are given for a sixth degree polynomial and are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained by numerically integrating the integral. Accuracy could be increased either by increasing the degree of the polynomial or by dividing the range of integration. The results of H(a,b) and I(a,b) are given for values of b and a up to 2.0 and 20.0, respectively

  1. Neural network and area method interpretation of pulsed experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulla, S.; Picca, P.; Ravetto, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Energetica, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino (Italy); Canepa, S. [Lab of Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour LRS, Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The determination of the subcriticality level is an important issue in accelerator-driven system technology. The area method, originally introduced by N. G. Sjoestrand, is a classical technique to interpret flux measurement for pulsed experiments in order to reconstruct the reactivity value. In recent times other methods have also been developed, to account for spatial and spectral effects, which were not included in the area method, since it is based on the point kinetic model. The artificial neural network approach can be an efficient technique to infer reactivities from pulsed experiments. In the present work, some comparisons between the two methods are carried out and discussed. (authors)

  2. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1985-01-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  3. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1984-12-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  4. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations

  5. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  6. Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.D.; Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories' Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment

  7. Results from the First Two Flights of the Static Computer Memory Integrity Testing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Thomas M., III

    1999-01-01

    This paper details the scientific objectives, experiment design, data collection method, and post flight analysis following the first two flights of the Static Computer Memory Integrity Testing (SCMIT) experiment. SCMIT is designed to detect soft-event upsets in passive magnetic memory. A soft-event upset is a change in the logic state of active or passive forms of magnetic memory, commonly referred to as a "Bitflip". In its mildest form a soft-event upset can cause software exceptions, unexpected events, start spacecraft safeing (ending data collection) or corrupted fault protection and error recovery capabilities. In it's most severe form loss of mission or spacecraft can occur. Analysis after the first flight (in 1991 during STS-40) identified possible soft-event upsets to 25% of the experiment detectors. Post flight analysis after the second flight (in 1997 on STS-87) failed to find any evidence of soft-event upsets. The SCMIT experiment is currently scheduled for a third flight in December 1999 on STS-101.

  8. A methodology for the design of experiments in computational intelligence with multiple regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Gestal, Marcos; Munteanu, Cristian R; Dorado, Julian; Pazos, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The design of experiments and the validation of the results achieved with them are vital in any research study. This paper focuses on the use of different Machine Learning approaches for regression tasks in the field of Computational Intelligence and especially on a correct comparison between the different results provided for different methods, as those techniques are complex systems that require further study to be fully understood. A methodology commonly accepted in Computational intelligence is implemented in an R package called RRegrs. This package includes ten simple and complex regression models to carry out predictive modeling using Machine Learning and well-known regression algorithms. The framework for experimental design presented herein is evaluated and validated against RRegrs. Our results are different for three out of five state-of-the-art simple datasets and it can be stated that the selection of the best model according to our proposal is statistically significant and relevant. It is of relevance to use a statistical approach to indicate whether the differences are statistically significant using this kind of algorithms. Furthermore, our results with three real complex datasets report different best models than with the previously published methodology. Our final goal is to provide a complete methodology for the use of different steps in order to compare the results obtained in Computational Intelligence problems, as well as from other fields, such as for bioinformatics, cheminformatics, etc., given that our proposal is open and modifiable.

  9. A methodology for the design of experiments in computational intelligence with multiple regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernandez-Lozano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The design of experiments and the validation of the results achieved with them are vital in any research study. This paper focuses on the use of different Machine Learning approaches for regression tasks in the field of Computational Intelligence and especially on a correct comparison between the different results provided for different methods, as those techniques are complex systems that require further study to be fully understood. A methodology commonly accepted in Computational intelligence is implemented in an R package called RRegrs. This package includes ten simple and complex regression models to carry out predictive modeling using Machine Learning and well-known regression algorithms. The framework for experimental design presented herein is evaluated and validated against RRegrs. Our results are different for three out of five state-of-the-art simple datasets and it can be stated that the selection of the best model according to our proposal is statistically significant and relevant. It is of relevance to use a statistical approach to indicate whether the differences are statistically significant using this kind of algorithms. Furthermore, our results with three real complex datasets report different best models than with the previously published methodology. Our final goal is to provide a complete methodology for the use of different steps in order to compare the results obtained in Computational Intelligence problems, as well as from other fields, such as for bioinformatics, cheminformatics, etc., given that our proposal is open and modifiable.

  10. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of lung lesions: an oncology center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: marcosduarte@yahoo.com.b [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz de [Hospital Alianca, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Gross, Jefferson Luiz [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Chest Surgery

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study is aimed at describing the experience of an oncology center with computed tomography guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 97 computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions performed in the period between 1996 and 2004 in a Brazilian reference oncology center (Hospital do Cancer - A.C. Camargo). Information regarding material appropriateness and the specific diagnoses were collected and analyzed. Results: Among 97 lung biopsies, 94 (96.9%) supplied appropriate specimens for histological analyses, with 71 (73.2%) cases being diagnosed as malignant lesions and 23 (23.7%) diagnosed as benign lesions. Specimens were inappropriate for analysis in three cases. The frequency of specific diagnosis was 83 (85.6%) cases, with high rates for both malignant lesions with 63 (88.7%) cases and benign lesions with 20 (86.7%). As regards complications, a total of 12 cases were observed as follows: 7 (7.2%) cases of hematoma, 3 (3.1%) cases of pneumothorax and 2 (2.1%) cases of hemoptysis. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of lung lesions demonstrated high rates of material appropriateness and diagnostic specificity, and low rates of complications in the present study. (author)

  11. EXPERIMENTS AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF PULVERIZED-COAL IGNITION; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel Owusu-Ofori; John C. Chen

    1999-01-01

    Under typical conditions of pulverized-coal combustion, which is characterized by fine particles heated at very high rates, there is currently a lack of certainty regarding the ignition mechanism of bituminous and lower rank coals as well as the ignition rate of reaction. furthermore, there have been no previous studies aimed at examining these factors under various experimental conditions, such as particle size, oxygen concentration, and heating rate. Finally, there is a need to improve current mathematical models of ignition to realistically and accurately depict the particle-to-particle variations that exist within a coal sample. Such a model is needed to extract useful reaction parameters from ignition studies, and to interpret ignition data in a more meaningful way. The authors propose to examine fundamental aspects of coal ignition through (1) experiments to determine the ignition temperature of various coals by direct measurement, and (2) modeling of the ignition process to derive rate constants and to provide a more insightful interpretation of data from ignition experiments. The authors propose to use a novel laser-based ignition experiment to achieve their first objective. Laser-ignition experiments offer the distinct advantage of easy optical access to the particles because of the absence of a furnace or radiating walls, and thus permit direct observation and particle temperature measurement. The ignition temperature of different coals under various experimental conditions can therefore be easily determined by direct measurement using two-color pyrometry. The ignition rate-constants, when the ignition occurs heterogeneously, and the particle heating rates will both be determined from analyses based on these measurements

  12. Computer simulation of FT-NMR multiple pulse experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouche, A.; Pouzard, G.

    1989-04-01

    Using the product operator formalism in its real form, SIMULDENS expands the density matrix of a scalar coupled nuclear spin system and simulates analytically a large variety of FT-NMR multiple pulse experiments. The observable transverse magnetizations are stored and can be combined to represent signal accumulation. The programming language is VAX PASCAL, but a MacIntosh Turbo Pascal Version is also available.

  13. Computer simulation of FT-NMR multiple pulse experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allouche, A.; Pouzard, G.

    1989-01-01

    Using the product operator formalism in its real form, SIMULDENS expands the density matrix of a scalar coupled nuclear spin system and simulates analytically a large variety of FT-NMR multiple pulse experiments. The observable transverse magnetizations are stored and can be combined to represent signal accumulation. The programming language is VAX PASCAL, but a MacIntosh Turbo Pascal Version is also available. (orig.)

  14. Operational experience with the Sizewell B integrated plant computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladner, J.E.J.; Alexander, N.C.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Westinghouse Integrated System for Centralised Operation (WISCO) is the primary plant control system at the Sizewell B Power Station. It comprises three subsystems; the High Integrity Control System (HICS), the Process Control System (PCS) and the Distributed Computer system (DCS). The HICS performs the control and data acquisition of nuclear safety significant plant systems. The PCS uses redundant data processing unit pairs. The workstations and servers of the DCS communicate with each other over a standard ethernet. The maintenance requirements for every plant system are covered by a Maintenance Strategy Report. The breakdown of these reports is listed. The WISCO system has performed exceptionally well. Due to the diagnostic information presented by the HICS, problems could normally be resolved within 24 hours. There have been some 200 outstanding modifications to the system. The procedure of modification is briefly described. (A.K.)

  15. A model ecosystem experiment and its computational simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, M.

    2002-01-01

    Simplified microbial model ecosystem and its computer simulation model are introduced as eco-toxicity test for the assessment of environmental responses from the effects of environmental impacts. To take the effects on the interactions between species and environment into account, one option is to select the keystone species on the basis of ecological knowledge, and to put it in the single-species toxicity test. Another option proposed is to put the eco-toxicity tests as experimental micro ecosystem study and a theoretical model ecosystem analysis. With these tests, the stressors which are more harmful to the ecosystems should be replace with less harmful ones on the basis of unified measures. Management of radioactive materials, chemicals, hyper-eutrophic, and other artificial disturbances of ecosystem should be discussed consistently from the unified view point of environmental protection. (N.C.)

  16. Computer experiments with a coarse-grid hydrodynamic climate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenchikov, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    A climate model is developed on the basis of the two-level Mintz-Arakawa general circulation model of the atmosphere and a bulk model of the upper layer of the ocean. A detailed model of the spectral transport of shortwave and longwave radiation is used to investigate the radiative effects of greenhouse gases. The radiative fluxes are calculated at the boundaries of five layers, each with a pressure thickness of about 200 mb. The results of the climate sensitivity calculations for mean-annual and perpetual seasonal regimes are discussed. The CCAS (Computer Center of the Academy of Sciences) climate model is used to investigate the climatic effects of anthropogenic changes of the optical properties of the atmosphere due to increasing CO 2 content and aerosol pollution, and to calculate the sensitivity to changes of land surface albedo and humidity

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  18. Computational Biology Methods for Characterization of Pluripotent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent cells are a powerful tool for regenerative medicine and drug discovery. Several techniques have been developed to induce pluripotency, or to extract pluripotent cells from different tissues and biological fluids. However, the characterization of pluripotency requires tedious, expensive, time-consuming, and not always reliable wet-lab experiments; thus, an easy, standard quality-control protocol of pluripotency assessment remains to be established. Here to help comes the use of high-throughput techniques, and in particular, the employment of gene expression microarrays, which has become a complementary technique for cellular characterization. Research has shown that the transcriptomics comparison with an Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC) of reference is a good approach to assess the pluripotency. Under the premise that the best protocol is a computer software source code, here I propose and explain line by line a software protocol coded in R-Bioconductor for pluripotency assessment based on the comparison of transcriptomics data of pluripotent cells with an ESC of reference. I provide advice for experimental design, warning about possible pitfalls, and guides for results interpretation.

  19. Computing strategy of Alpha-Magnetic Spectrometer experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choutko, V.; Klimentov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is an experiment to search in the space for dark matter, missing matter, and antimatter scheduled for being flown on the International Space Station in the fall of year 2005 for at least 3 consecutive years. This paper gives an overview of the AMS software with emphasis on the distributed production system based on client/server approach. We also describe our choice of hardware components to build a processing farm with TByte RAID arrays of IDE disks and highlight the strategies that make our system different from many other experimental systems

  20. A fast iterative method for computing particle beams penetrating matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergers, C.

    1997-01-01

    Beams of microscopic particles penetrating matter are important in several fields. The application motivating our parameter choices in this paper is electron beam cancer therapy. Mathematically, a steady particle beam penetrating matter, or a configuration of several such beams, is modeled by a boundary value problem for a Boltzmann equation. Grid-based discretization of this problem leads to a system of algebraic equations. This system is typically very large because of the large number of independent variables in the Boltzmann equation (six if time independence is the only dimension-reducing assumption). If grid-based methods are to be practical at all, it is therefore necessary to develop fast solvers for the discretized problems. This is the subject of the present paper. For two-dimensional, mono-energetic, linear particle beam problems, we describe an iterative domain decomposition algorithm based on overlapping decompositions of the set of particle directions and computationally demonstrate its rapid, grid independent convergence. There appears to be no fundamental obstacle to generalizing the method to three-dimensional, energy dependent problems. 34 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Global Seabed Materials and Habitats Mapped: The Computational Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    What the seabed is made of has proven difficult to map on the scale of whole ocean-basins. Direct sampling and observation can be augmented with proxy-parameter methods such as acoustics. Both avenues are essential to obtain enough detail and coverage, and also to validate the mapping methods. We focus on the direct observations such as samplings, photo and video, probes, diver and sub reports, and surveyed features. These are often in word-descriptive form: over 85% of the records for site materials are in this form, whether as sample/view descriptions or classifications, or described parameters such as consolidation, color, odor, structures and components. Descriptions are absolutely necessary for unusual materials and for processes - in other words, for research. This project dbSEABED not only has the largest collection of seafloor materials data worldwide, but it uses advanced computing math to obtain the best possible coverages and detail. Included in those techniques are linguistic text analysis (e.g., Natural Language Processing, NLP), fuzzy set theory (FST), and machine learning (ML, e.g., Random Forest). These techniques allow efficient and accurate import of huge datasets, thereby optimizing the data that exists. They merge quantitative and qualitative types of data for rich parameter sets, and extrapolate where the data are sparse for best map production. The dbSEABED data resources are now very widely used worldwide in oceanographic research, environmental management, the geosciences, engineering and survey.

  2. Semi-coarsening multigrid methods for parallel computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Standard multigrid methods are not well suited for problems with anisotropic coefficients which can occur, for example, on grids that are stretched to resolve a boundary layer. There are several different modifications of the standard multigrid algorithm that yield efficient methods for anisotropic problems. In the paper, we investigate the parallel performance of these multigrid algorithms. Multigrid algorithms which work well for anisotropic problems are based on line relaxation and/or semi-coarsening. In semi-coarsening multigrid algorithms a grid is coarsened in only one of the coordinate directions unlike standard or full-coarsening multigrid algorithms where a grid is coarsened in each of the coordinate directions. When both semi-coarsening and line relaxation are used, the resulting multigrid algorithm is robust and automatic in that it requires no knowledge of the nature of the anisotropy. This is the basic multigrid algorithm whose parallel performance we investigate in the paper. The algorithm is currently being implemented on an IBM SP2 and its performance is being analyzed. In addition to looking at the parallel performance of the basic semi-coarsening algorithm, we present algorithmic modifications with potentially better parallel efficiency. One modification reduces the amount of computational work done in relaxation at the expense of using multiple coarse grids. This modification is also being implemented with the aim of comparing its performance to that of the basic semi-coarsening algorithm.

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  4. Heterogeneous computation tests of both substitution and reactivity worth experiments in the RB-3 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broccoli, U.; Cambi, G.; Vanossi, A.; Zapellini, G.

    1977-01-01

    This report presents the results of several experiments carried out in the D 2 O-moderated RB-3 reactors at the CNEN's Laboratory of Montecuccolino, Bologna. The experiments referred to are either fuel-element substitution experiments or interstitial absorber experiments and were performed during the period 1972-1974. The results of measurements are compared with those obtained by means of computational procedure based on some ''cell'' codes coupled with heterogeneous codes. (authors)

  5. Particular application of methods of AdaBoost and LBP to the problems of computer vision

    OpenAIRE

    Волошин, Микола Володимирович

    2012-01-01

    The application of AdaBoost method and local binary pattern (LBP) method for different spheres of computer vision implementation, such as personality identification and computer iridology, is considered in the article. The goal of the research is to develop error-correcting methods and systems for implements of computer vision and computer iridology, in particular. This article considers the problem of colour spaces, which are used as a filter and as a pre-processing of images. Method of AdaB...

  6. The construction of optimal stated choice experiments theory and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Street, Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    The most comprehensive and applied discussion of stated choice experiment constructions available The Construction of Optimal Stated Choice Experiments provides an accessible introduction to the construction methods needed to create the best possible designs for use in modeling decision-making. Many aspects of the design of a generic stated choice experiment are independent of its area of application, and until now there has been no single book describing these constructions. This book begins with a brief description of the various areas where stated choice experiments are applicable, including marketing and health economics, transportation, environmental resource economics, and public welfare analysis. The authors focus on recent research results on the construction of optimal and near-optimal choice experiments and conclude with guidelines and insight on how to properly implement these results. Features of the book include: Construction of generic stated choice experiments for the estimation of main effects...

  7. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  8. Nuclear power reactor analysis, methods, algorithms and computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V

    1981-01-01

    Full text: For a developing country buying its first nuclear power plants from a foreign supplier, disregarding the type and scope of the contract, there is a certain number of activities which have to be performed by local stuff and domestic organizations. This particularly applies to the choice of the nuclear fuel cycle strategy and the choice of the type and size of the reactors, to bid parameters specification, bid evaluation and final safety analysis report evaluation, as well as to in-core fuel management activities. In the Nuclear Engineering Department of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences (NET IBK) the continual work is going on, related to the following topics: cross section and resonance integral calculations, spectrum calculations, generation of group constants, lattice and cell problems, criticality and global power distribution search, fuel burnup analysis, in-core fuel management procedures, cost analysis and power plant economics, safety and accident analysis, shielding problems and environmental impact studies, etc. The present paper gives the details of the methods developed and the results achieved, with the particular emphasis on the NET IBK computer program package for the needs of planning, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. The main problems encountered so far were related to small working team, lack of large and powerful computers, absence of reliable basic nuclear data and shortage of experimental and empirical results for testing theoretical models. Some of these difficulties have been overcome thanks to bilateral and multilateral cooperation with developed countries, mostly through IAEA. It is the authors opinion, however, that mutual cooperation of developing countries, having similar problems and similar goals, could lead to significant results. Some activities of this kind are suggested and discussed. (author)

  9. [Brain-Computer Interface: the First Clinical Experience in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokienko, O A; Lyukmanov, R Kh; Chernikova, L A; Suponeva, N A; Piradov, M A; Frolov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is suggested to stimulate the same plastic mechanisms in the brain as a real movement. The brain-computer interface (BCI) controls motor imagery by converting EEG during this process into the commands for an external device. This article presents the results of two-stage study of the clinical use of non-invasive BCI in the rehabilitation of patients with severe hemiparesis caused by focal brain damage. It was found that the ability to control BCI did not depend on the duration of a disease, brain lesion localization and the degree of neurological deficit. The first step of the study involved 36 patients; it showed that the efficacy of rehabilitation was higher in the group with the use of BCI (the score on the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) improved from 1 [0; 2] to 5 [0; 16] points, p = 0.012; no significant improvement was observed in control group). The second step of the study involved 19 patients; the complex BCI-exoskeleton (i.e. with the kinesthetic feedback) was used for motor imagery trainings. The improvement of the motor function of hands was proved by ARAT (the score improved from 2 [0; 37] to 4 [1; 45:5] points, p = 0.005) and Fugl-Meyer scale (from 72 [63; 110 ] to 79 [68; 115] points, p = 0.005).

  10. A review of experiments and computer analyses on RIAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, L.O.; Massih, A.R.; In de Betou, J.

    2010-01-01

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) are nuclear reactor accidents that involve an unwanted increase in fission rate and reactor power. Reactivity initiated accidents in power reactors may occur as a result of reactor control system failures, control element ejections or events caused by rapid changes in temperature or pressure of the coolant/moderator. our current understanding of reactivity initiated accidents and their consequences is based largely on three sources of information: 1) best-estimate computer analyses of the reactor response to postulated accident scenarios, 2) pulse-irradiation tests on instrumented fuel rodlets, carried out in research reactors, 3) out-of-pile separate effect tests, targeted to explore key phenomena under RIA conditions. In recent years, we have reviewed, compiled and analysed these 3 categories of data. The results is a state-of-the-art report on fuel behaviour under RIA conditions, which is currently being published by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief summary of this report

  11. Experiences of Using Automated Assessment in Computer Science Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John English

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the use of automated assessment in a variety of computer science courses that have been taught at Israel Academic College by the authors. The course assignments were assessed entirely automatically using Checkpoint, a web-based automated assessment framework. The assignments all used free-text questions (where the students type in their own answers. Students were allowed to correct errors based on feedback provided by the system and resubmit their answers. A total of 141 students were surveyed to assess their opinions of this approach, and we analysed their responses. Analysis of the questionnaire showed a low correlation between questions, indicating the statistical independence of the individual questions. As a whole, student feedback on using Checkpoint was very positive, emphasizing the benefits of multiple attempts, impartial marking, and a quick turnaround time for submissions. Many students said that Checkpoint gave them confidence in learning and motivation to practise. Students also said that the detailed feedback that Checkpoint generated when their programs failed helped them understand their mistakes and how to correct them.

  12. Computer-Adaptive Testing: Implications for Students' Achievement, Motivation, Engagement, and Subjective Test Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Lazendic, Goran

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigated the implications of computer-adaptive testing (operationalized by way of multistage adaptive testing; MAT) and "conventional" fixed order computer testing for various test-relevant outcomes in numeracy, including achievement, test-relevant motivation and engagement, and subjective test experience. It did so…

  13. Using Educational Computer Games in the Classroom: Science Teachers' Experiences, Attitudes, Perceptions, Concerns, and Support Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo; Haynes, Linda; D'Alba, Adriana; Chumney, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers' experiences, attitudes, perceptions, concerns, and support needs related to the use of educational computer games were investigated in this study. Data were collected from an online survey, which was completed by 111 science teachers. The results showed that 73% of participants had used computer games in teaching. Participants…

  14. Development of new HRA methods based upon operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, S.E.; Luckas, W.J.; Barriere, M.T.; Wreathall, J.

    2004-01-01

    Under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), previously unaddressed human reliability issues are being investigated in order to support the development of human reliability analysis (HRA) methods for both low power and shutdown (LP and S) and full-power conditions. Actual operational experience, such as that reported in Licensee Event Reports (LERs), have been used to gain insights and provide a basis for the requirements of new HRA methods. In particular, operational experience has shown that new HRA methods for LP and S must address human-induced initiators, errors of commission, mistakes (vs. slips), dependencies, and the effects of multiple performance shaping factors (PSFs). (author)

  15. Coupling between eddy currents and rigid body rotation: analysis, computation, and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, T.Q.; Turner, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Computation and experiment show that the coupling between eddy currents and the angular deflections resulting from those eddy currents can reduce electromagnetic effects such as forces, torques, and power dissipation to levels far less severe than would be predicted without regard for the coupling. This paper explores the coupling effects beyond the parameter range that has been explored experimentally, using analytical means and the eddy-current computer code EDDYNET. The paper also describes upcoming FELIX experiments with cantilevered beams

  16. Computer-assisted training experiment used in the field of thermal energy production (EDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felgines, R.

    1982-01-01

    In 1981, the EDF carried out an experiment with computer-assisted training (EAO). This new approach, which continued until June 1982, involved about 700 employees all of whom operated nuclear power stations. The different stages of this experiment and the lessons which can be drawn from it are given the lessons were of a positive nature and make it possible to envisage complete coverage of all nuclear power stations by computer-assisted training within a very short space of time [fr

  17. A strategy for improved computational efficiency of the method of anchored distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Matthew William; Yang, Yarong; Chen, Xingyuan; Rubin, Yoram

    2013-06-01

    This paper proposes a strategy for improving the computational efficiency of model inversion using the method of anchored distributions (MAD) by "bundling" similar model parametrizations in the likelihood function. Inferring the likelihood function typically requires a large number of forward model (FM) simulations for each possible model parametrization; as a result, the process is quite expensive. To ease this prohibitive cost, we present an approximation for the likelihood function called bundling that relaxes the requirement for high quantities of FM simulations. This approximation redefines the conditional statement of the likelihood function as the probability of a set of similar model parametrizations "bundle" replicating field measurements, which we show is neither a model reduction nor a sampling approach to improving the computational efficiency of model inversion. To evaluate the effectiveness of these modifications, we compare the quality of predictions and computational cost of bundling relative to a baseline MAD inversion of 3-D flow and transport model parameters. Additionally, to aid understanding of the implementation we provide a tutorial for bundling in the form of a sample data set and script for the R statistical computing language. For our synthetic experiment, bundling achieved a 35% reduction in overall computational cost and had a limited negative impact on predicted probability distributions of the model parameters. Strategies for minimizing error in the bundling approximation, for enforcing similarity among the sets of model parametrizations, and for identifying convergence of the likelihood function are also presented.

  18. Reliability of Lyapunov characteristic exponents computed by the two-particle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lijie; Huang, Li

    2018-03-01

    For highly complex problems, such as the post-Newtonian formulation of compact binaries, the two-particle method may be a better, or even the only, choice to compute the Lyapunov characteristic exponent (LCE). This method avoids the complex calculations of variational equations compared with the variational method. However, the two-particle method sometimes provides spurious estimates to LCEs. In this paper, we first analyze the equivalence in the definition of LCE between the variational and two-particle methods for Hamiltonian systems. Then, we develop a criterion to determine the reliability of LCEs computed by the two-particle method by considering the magnitude of the initial tangent (or separation) vector ξ0 (or δ0), renormalization time interval τ, machine precision ε, and global truncation error ɛT. The reliable Lyapunov characteristic indicators estimated by the two-particle method form a V-shaped region, which is restricted by d0, ε, and ɛT. Finally, the numerical experiments with the Hénon-Heiles system, the spinning compact binaries, and the post-Newtonian circular restricted three-body problem strongly support the theoretical results.

  19. An unfolding method for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    2002-06-01

    Finite detector resolution and limited acceptance require one to apply unfolding methods in high energy physics experiments. Information on the detector resolution is usually given by a set of Monte Carlo events. Based on the experience with a widely used unfolding program (RUN) a modified method has been developed. The first step of the method is a maximum likelihood fit of the Monte Carlo distributions to the measured distribution in one, two or three dimensions; the finite statistics of the Monte Carlo events is taken into account by the use of Barlow's method with a new method of solution. A clustering method is used before combining bins in sparsely populated areas. In the second step a regularization is applied to the solution, which introduces only a small bias. The regularization parameter is determined from the data after a diagonalization and rotation procedure. (orig.)

  20. Justification of computational methods to ensure information management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Chertov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Due to the diversity and complexity of organizational management tasks a large enterprise, the construction of an information management system requires the establishment of interconnected complexes of means, implementing the most efficient way collect, transfer, accumulation and processing of information necessary drivers handle different ranks in the governance process. The main trends of the construction of integrated logistics management information systems can be considered: the creation of integrated data processing systems by centralizing storage and processing of data arrays; organization of computer systems to realize the time-sharing; aggregate-block principle of the integrated logistics; Use a wide range of peripheral devices with the unification of information and hardware communication. Main attention is paid to the application of the system of research of complex technical support, in particular, the definition of quality criteria for the operation of technical complex, the development of information base analysis methods of management information systems and define the requirements for technical means, as well as methods of structural synthesis of the major subsystems of integrated logistics. Thus, the aim is to study on the basis of systematic approach of integrated logistics management information system and the development of a number of methods of analysis and synthesis of complex logistics that are suitable for use in the practice of engineering systems design. The objective function of the complex logistics management information systems is the task of gathering systems, transmission and processing of specified amounts of information in the regulated time intervals with the required degree of accuracy while minimizing the reduced costs for the establishment and operation of technical complex. Achieving the objective function of the complex logistics to carry out certain organization of interaction of information