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Sample records for computed tomography three-dimensional

  1. Three-dimensional analysis of craniofacial bones using three-dimensional computer tomography

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    Ono, Ichiro; Ohura, Takehiko; Kimura, Chu (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1989-08-01

    Three-dimensional computer tomography (3DCT) was performed in patients with various diseases to visualize stereoscopically the deformity of the craniofacial bones. The data obtained were analyzed by the 3DCT analyzing system. A new coordinate system was established using the median sagittal plane of the face (a plane passing through sella, nasion and basion) on the three-dimensional image. Three-dimensional profilograms were prepared for detailed analysis of the deformation of craniofacial bones for cleft lip and palate, mandibular prognathia and hemifacial microsomia. For patients, asymmetry in the frontal view and twist-formed complicated deformities were observed, as well as deformity of profiles in the anteroposterior and up-and-down directions. A newly developed technique allows three-dimensional visualization of changes in craniofacial deformity. It would aid in determining surgical strategy, including crani-facial surgery and maxillo-facial surgery, and in evaluating surgical outcome. (N.K.).

  2. Three Dimensional Display Of Tumors Via Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, Ralph L.

    1985-09-01

    Computed tomography is widely utilized for the detection and staging of neoplasm. Typical chest, abdomen or pelvis CT scans may produce 10 to 20 transverse slices for each region. The mental reconstruction of the three dimensional anatomy from these transverse sections can be done by a physician who has had training in the analysis and interpretation of cross sectional anatomy and pathology. This mental reconstruction, however, may take years to develop into an efficient tool. With the 3-D reconstructions used in this study, diagnostic information concerning the location, shape and spread of tumor masses can be presented in a simple, intuitive 3-dimensional display. This technique has been found to be useful for improving communication between diagnostic radiologists and consulting physicians.

  3. Three-dimensional computed tomography of the acetabulum

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    Pozzi Mucelli, R.S.; Muner, G.; Pozzi Mucelli, F.; Pozzi Mucelli, M.; Marotti, F.; Dalla Palma, L.

    1986-08-01

    Acetabular fractures represent a complex variety that are classified in different types. Conventional radiology is often inadequate to demonstrate and classify the fractures. Computed tomography (CT) has already been shown to be superior in this field. A further advantage of CT is represented by the recent availability of three-dimensional (3D) images that are realized from axial CT scans by means of a new software. The Authors report the applications of this new software to the study of the normal acetabulum and in patients with fractures. 3D images allows an effective demonstration of the fracture, its irradiation and the dislocation of bone fragments. The information is contained in one or few images rather than many axial images. Therefore the role of 3D images may be considered complementary to axial CT scans.

  4. Three-dimensional optical computed-tomography microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamgoulov, Ravil; Lane, Pierre; MacAulay, Calum

    2005-03-01

    We present our recent results on the development of three-dimensional (3-D) optical computed- tomography microscope. The instrument is a novel imaging device for the 3-D visualization and quantitative analysis of absorption-stained biological samples. The first instrument developed by our group at the BC Cancer Research Centre used a digital micromirror device (DMD) as a spatial light modulator to control the angles of illumination. This new embodiment employs an optical scanner instead of the DMD. The optical scanner is placed in the illumination path of the microscope system, conjugate to the field plane. The optical system includes also two high numerical aperture objective lenses, a sample stage, a light source, and a CCD camera. Projections are acquired by illuminating a specimen at a number of selected angles within the numerical aperture of the objective (0 new reconstruction algorithm that employs both transform-based and iterative methods is developed to address the limited-angle reconstruction problem. A transform-based reconstruction is used as an initial starting point for the following iterative reconstruction. A feedback correction of the reconstructed image is made on each iteration step. The algorithm enables to incorporate previously known information about the object into the reconstruction process, and improves the reconstruction accuracy. Microscopic 3-D volume reconstructions of quantitatively absorption-stained cells have been generated. The system enables one to look at multiple optical levels of a specimen, and at more natural tissue architecture, including intact cells. Axial and lateral resolutions were measured to be better than 6 microns.

  5. Analysis of secondary coxarthrosis by three dimensional computed tomography

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    Hemmi, Osamu [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-11-01

    The majority of coxarthrosis in Japan is due to congenital dislocation of the hip and acetabular dysplasia. Until now coxarthrosis has been chiefly analyzed on the basis of anterior-posterior radiographs. By using three-dimensional (3D) CT, it was possible to analyze the morphological features of secondary coxarthrosis more accurately, and by using new computer graphics software, it was possible to display the contact area in the hip joint and observe changes associated with progression of the stages of the disease. There were 34 subjects (68 joints), and all of who were women. The CT data were read into a work station, and 3D reconstruction was achieved with hip surgery simulation software (SurgiPlan). Pelvic inclination, acetabular anteversion, seven parameters indicating the investment of the femoral head and two indicating the position of the hip joint in the pelvis were measured. The results showed that secondary coxarthrosis is characterized not only by lateral malposition of the hip joint according to the pelvic coordinates, but by anterior malposition as well. Many other measurements provided 3D information on the acetabular dysplasia. Many of them were correlated with the CE angle on plain radiographs. Furthermore, a strong correlation was not found between anterior and posterior acetabular coverage of the femoral head. In addition, SurgiPlan`s distance mapping function enabled 3D observation of the pattern of progression of arthrosis based on the pattern of progression of joint space narrowing. (author)

  6. Development of three-dimensional computed tomography system using TNRF2 of JRR-3M

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    Murata, Yutaka; Mochiki, Koh-ichi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Matsubayashi, Masahito

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional filtering engine, a convolution engine, and a back projection engine were developed for real-time signal processing of three-dimensional computed tomography. The performance of the system was measured and through-put of 0.5 second per one cross sectional data processing was attained. (author)

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of condylar hyperplasia with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Y; Ohashi, Y; Uchiyama, N; Terada, K; Hanada, K; Sasaki, F

    1991-02-01

    Three-dimensional surface reconstruction imaging from CT scans was used to study the deformity of the mandible in six patients with mandibular asymmetry. High-resolution axial CT scans of the mandible were obtained using Somatom-DR3 (Siemens). COSMOZONE-2SA (Nikon) with PC-9801VX21 (NEC) was used to reconstruct the three-dimensional images. The six patients were divided into two groups. One group was classified as unilateral hybrid forms and the other group was classified hemimandibular elongation on the diagnostic criteria of Obwegeser and Makek (1986). In the three-dimensional surface reconstruction, exact location and the degree of the deformity in the region from the ascending ramus to the condylar head and the lingual aspect from the ascending ramus to the mandibular body were accurately represented. In addition, the three-dimensional images could be easily rotated arbitrarily, precise evaluation could be done at every part of the mandible. On diagnosis, the mandibular morphology classified into the unilateral hybrid forms was presumed to vary from case to case even in the same classification.

  8. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography of coronary artery bypass graft with electron beam tomography

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    Hoshi, Toshiko; Yamauchi, Tatsuo; Kanauchi, Tetsu; Konno, Miyuki; Imai, Kamon; Suwa, Jiro; Onoguchi, Katsuhisa; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Horie, Toshinobu [Saitama Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center, Konan (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Assessment of coronary artery bypass graft patency by three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography angiography (3D-CTA) derived from electrocardiography-gated contrast-enhanced electron beam tomography (EBT) was evaluated. Thirty-nine patients with 99 grafts (45 arterial grafts and 54 venous grafts) underwent 3D-CTA and selective coronary angiography within a 3-week interval. 3D-CTA images of the coronary bypass grafts were compared with the coronary angiography images used as the control. 3D-CTA defined 42 of 44 arterial grafts as patent (sensitivity: 95%), all 47 venous grafts as patent (sensitivity: 100%) and all 7 venous grafts as occlusive (specificity: 100%). The overall sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 88%, respectively. 3D-CTA is an useful noninvasive technique with adequate sensitivity and specificity to assess coronary artery bypass graft patency. (author)

  9. X-ray computed tomography of packed bed chromatography columns for three dimensional imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T F; Levison, P R; Shearing, P R; Bracewell, D G

    2017-03-03

    Physical characteristics critical to chromatography including geometric porosity and tortuosity within the packed column were analysed based upon three dimensional reconstructions of bed structure in-situ. Image acquisition was performed using two X-ray computed tomography systems, with optimisation of column imaging performed for each sample in order to produce three dimensional representations of packed beds at 3μm resolution. Two bead materials, cellulose and ceramic, were studied using the same optimisation strategy but resulted in differing parameters required for X-ray computed tomography image generation. After image reconstruction and processing into a digital three dimensional format, physical characteristics of each packed bed were analysed, including geometric porosity, tortuosity, surface area to volume ratio as well as inter-bead void diameters. Average porosities of 34.0% and 36.1% were found for ceramic and cellulose samples and average tortuosity readings at 1.40 and 1.79 respectively, with greater porosity and reduced tortuosity overall values at the centre compared to the column edges found in each case. X-ray computed tomography is demonstrated to be a viable method for three dimensional imaging of packed bed chromatography systems, enabling geometry based analysis of column axial and radial heterogeneity that is not feasible using traditional techniques for packing quality which provide an ensemble measure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The possible usability of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography in dental research

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    Yavuz, I.; Rizal, M. F.; Kiswanjaya, B.

    2017-08-01

    The innovations and advantages of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography (3D CBCT) are continually growing for its potential use in dental research. Imaging techniques are important for planning research in dentistry. Newly improved 3D CBCT imaging systems and accessory computer programs have recently been proven effective for use in dental research. The aim of this study is to introduce 3D CBCT and open a window for future research possibilities that should be given attention in dental research.

  11. Root Canal Anatomy Visualization using Three-Dimensional Computed- Tomography and Transparent Preparation

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    Alexey V. Silin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional Computed Tomography (CT is used to analyze the topography of the root canal anatomy in order to make a decision in choosing root canal preparation method. There is a method that make extracted teeth transparent maintaining its anatomical shape and size. It is important to compare the accuracy of the two visualization methods. Objective: To compare the transmission accuracy of root canals anatomy by two visualization methods, three-dimensional CT and transparent tooth preparation. Methods: Mandibular third molar was used as sample. The three-dimensional CT scan was performed before extracting the teeth. Then teeth were extracted and placed in solutions that made them transparent. Results: Despite the fact that the character of dental origin in terms of the angle of the crown, the curvature of the crown, the deviation of the root showed in three-dimensional CT, other tooth anatomical parameters were equally well detected using a transparent tooth preparation. Overall, the curvature of the root canals is more clearly shown by transparent tooth preparation. Conclusion: Transparent tooth preparation provides superior visualization of real root canal anatomy compared to three-dimensional CT, however the later could give us more information about the relation of the tooth within the jaw.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.152

  12. Terahertz computed tomography in three-dimensional using a pyroelectric array detector

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    Li, Bin; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xun; Rong, Lu; Huang, Haochong; Wan, Min; Wang, Yunxin

    2017-05-01

    Terahertz frequency range spans from 0.1 to 10 THz. Terahertz radiation can penetrate nonpolar materials and nonmetallic materials, such as plastics, wood, and clothes. Then the feature makes the terahertz imaging have important research value. Terahertz computed tomography makes use of the penetrability of terahertz radiation and obtains three-dimensional object projection data. In the paper, continuous-wave terahertz computed tomography with a pyroelectric array detectoris presented. Compared with scanning terahertz computed tomography, a pyroelectric array detector can obtain a large number of projection data in a short time, as the acquisition mode of the array pyroelectric detector omit the projection process on the vertical and horizontal direction. With the two-dimensional cross-sectional images of the object are obtained by the filtered back projection algorithm. The two side distance of the straw wall account for 80 pixels, so it multiplied by the pixel size is equal to the diameter of the straw about 6.4 mm. Compared with the actual diameter of the straw, the relative error is 6%. In order to reconstruct the three-dimensional internal structure image of the straw, the y direction range from 70 to 150 are selected on the array pyroelectric detector and are reconstructed by the filtered back projection algorithm. As the pixel size is 80 μm, the height of three-dimensional internal structure image of the straw is 6.48 mm. The presented system can rapidly reconstruct the three-dimensional object by using a pyroelectric array detector and explores the feasibility of on non-destructive evaluation and security testing.

  13. High Speed Data Acquisition System for Three-Dimensional X-Ray and Neutron Computed Tomography

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    Davis, A.W.; Claytor, T.N.; Sheats, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    Computed tomography for nondestructive evaluation applications has been limited by system cost, resolution, and time requirements for three-dimensional data sets. FlashCT (Flat panel Amorphous Silicon High-Resolution Computed Tomography) is a system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to address these three problems. Developed around a flat panel amorphous silicon detector array, FlashCT is suitable for low to medium energy x-ray and neutron computed tomography at 127-micron resolution. Overall system size is small, allowing rapid transportation to a variety of radiographic sources. System control software was developed in LabVIEW for Windows NT to allow multithreading of data acquisition, data correction, and staging motor control. The system control software simplifies data collection and allows fully automated control of the data acquisition process, leading toward remote or unattended operation. The first generation of the FlashCT Data Acquisition System was completed in Au gust 1998, and since that time the system has been tested using x-ray sources ranging in energy from 60 kV to 20MV. The system has also been used to collect data for thermal neutron computed tomography at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). System improvements have been proposed to provide faster data collection and greater dynamic range during data collection.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography scan images for estimating skull damage in electrical burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Yan, Hong; Peng, Yizhi; Li, Xiaolu; Hu, Jianian; Wu, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Three cases of skull osteomyelitis due to electrical burn and delayed wound closure are presented. For better estimating skull damage before operation, 3-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography scan images were used. Three-dimensional computed tomography could provide superior and visible stereoscopic images and help clinicians "see" the damage before operation and make more detailed therapeutic planning.

  15. Three-dimensional morphology of heel fat pad: an in vivo computed tomography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Valentina; Fantini, Massimiliano; Faccioli, Niccolò; Cangemi, Alessio; Pozzo, Antonio; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Heel fat pad cushioning efficiency is the result of its structure, shape and thickness. However, while a number of studies have investigated heel fat pad (HFP) anatomy, structural behavior and material properties, no previous study has described its three-dimensional morphology in situ. The assessment of the healthy, unloaded, three-dimensional morphology of heel pad may contribute to deepen the understanding of its role and behavior during locomotion. It is the basis for the assessment of possible HFP morphological modifications due to changes in the amount or distribution of the loads normally sustained by the foot. It may also help in guiding the surgical reconstruction of the pad and in improving footwear design, as well as in developing a correct heel pad geometry for finite element models of the foot. Therefore the purpose of this study was to obtain a complete analysis of HFP three-dimensional morphology in situ. The right foot of nine healthy volunteers was scanned with computed tomography. A methodological approach that maximizes reliability and repeatability of the data was developed by building a device to lock the foot in a neutral position with respect to the scan planes during image acquisition. Scan data were used to reconstruct virtual three-dimensional models for both the calcaneus and HFP. A set of virtual coronal and axial sections were extracted from the three-dimensional model of each HFP and processed to extract a set of one- and two-dimensional morphometrical measurements for a detailed description of heel pad morphology. The tissue exhibited a consistent and sophisticated morphology that may reflect the biomechanics of the foot support. HFP was found to be have a crest on its anterior dorsal surface, flanges on the sides and posteriorly, and a thick portion that reached and covered the posterior surface of the calcaneus and the achilles tendon insertion. Its anterior internal portion was thinner and a lump of fat was consistently present in

  16. Three dimensional characterization of laser ablation craters using high resolution X-ray computed tomography

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    Galmed, A. H.; du Plessis, A.; le Roux, S. G.; Hartnick, E.; Von Bergmann, H.; Maaza, M.

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory X-ray computed tomography is an emerging technology for the 3D characterization and dimensional analysis of many types of materials. In this work we demonstrate the usefulness of this characterization method for the full three dimensional analysis of laser ablation craters, in the context of a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy setup. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy relies on laser ablation for sampling the material of interest. We demonstrate here qualitatively (in images) and quantitatively (in terms of crater cone angles, depths, diameters and volume) laser ablation crater analysis in 3D for metal (aluminum) and rock (false gold ore). We show the effect of a Gaussian beam profile on the resulting crater geometry, as well as the first visual evidence of undercutting in the rock sample, most likely due to ejection of relatively large grains. The method holds promise for optimization of laser ablation setups especially for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  17. Value of three-dimensional computed tomography in screening cerebral aneurysms

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    Yamaguchi, Tamaki; Sugiura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Atsushi; Yamagata, Yoshitaka [Hyogo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    We performed three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) in 6 patients of cerebral aneurysm. Prior cerebral angiography showed a total of 17 aneurysms. 3D-CT alone detected 10 cerebral aneurysm (59%). It was possible to identify aneurysms larger than 10 mm even when located near the circle of Willis. It was difficult to identify aneurysms when smaller than 7 mm regardless of their location. 3D-CT was of limited value in detecting cerebral aneurysms, particularly when located near the circle of Willis with complex vascular network. As cases of oculomotor palsy may be caused by lesions other than cerebral aneurysm, we advocate that 3D-CT be performed after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in screening cases of suspected cerebral aneurysm. (author)

  18. Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography as a Method for Finding Die Attach Voids in Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, E. N.; Rolin, T. D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA analyzes electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) parts used in space vehicles to understand failure modes of these components. The diode is an EEE part critical to NASA missions that can fail due to excessive voiding in the die attach. Metallography, one established method for studying the die attach, is a time-intensive, destructive, and equivocal process whereby mechanical grinding of the diodes is performed to reveal voiding in the die attach. Problems such as die attach pull-out tend to complicate results and can lead to erroneous conclusions. The objective of this study is to determine if three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT), a nondestructive technique, is a viable alternative to metallography for detecting die attach voiding. The die attach voiding in two- dimensional planes created from 3DCT scans was compared to several physical cross sections of the same diode to determine if the 3DCT scan accurately recreates die attach volumetric variability

  19. The role of three-dimensional computed tomography in the management of maxillofacial bone fractures

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    Ohkawa, Motoomi; Tanabe, Masatada [Kagawa Medical School Univ., Miki, Kagawa (Japan); Toyama, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Naruhide; Uematsu, Koji; Satoh, Gen

    1997-08-01

    The findings of three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and two-dimensional computed tomography (2DCT) with helical CT scanning were compared for 21 patients with maxillofacial bone fractures. The results of this study suggest that the 3DCT evaluation can be divided into 3 groups. The first group, in which 3DCT is superior to 2DCT, includes severe complicated mid-face fractures, for example, tripod fractures and complicated maxillary bone fractures. The second group, in which 3DCT is equal to 2DCT, includes simple fractures, for example, nasal bone fractures and isolated zygomatic fractures. In this group, patients and their families could easily understand the nature of the fracture and clinical course shown by 3DCT as compared with conventional X-ray and 2DCT. The third group, in which 3DCT is inferior to 2DCT, includes blowout fractures. Although 3DCT does not provide additional information in blowout fractures, helical scanning permits clear observation of multiplanar images without artifacts arising from metal prostheses by excluding lower slices during image reconstruction. We conclude that 3DCT provides useful information, especially in regard to the extent of complex fracture lines, as in tripod fractures. (author)

  20. Three-dimensional visualisation of soft biological structures by X-ray computed micro-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Tom; Bradley, Robert S; Hidalgo-Bastida, L Araida; Sherratt, Michael J; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2016-07-01

    Whereas the two-dimensional (2D) visualisation of biological samples is routine, three-dimensional (3D) imaging remains a time-consuming and relatively specialised pursuit. Current commonly adopted techniques for characterising the 3D structure of non-calcified tissues and biomaterials include optical and electron microscopy of serial sections and sectioned block faces, and the visualisation of intact samples by confocal microscopy or electron tomography. As an alternative to these approaches, X-ray computed micro-tomography (microCT) can both rapidly image the internal 3D structure of macroscopic volumes at sub-micron resolutions and visualise dynamic changes in living tissues at a microsecond scale. In this Commentary, we discuss the history and current capabilities of microCT. To that end, we present four case studies to illustrate the ability of microCT to visualise and quantify: (1) pressure-induced changes in the internal structure of unstained rat arteries, (2) the differential morphology of stained collagen fascicles in tendon and ligament, (3) the development of Vanessa cardui chrysalises, and (4) the distribution of cells within a tissue-engineering construct. Future developments in detector design and the use of synchrotron X-ray sources might enable real-time 3D imaging of dynamically remodelling biological samples. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Three-dimensional localization of implanted biomaterials in anatomical and histological specimens using combined X-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional surface reconstruction: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Vincent M J I; Walboomers, X Frank; Jansen, John A

    2010-02-01

    For adequate histological processing of implanted biomaterials or tissue-engineered constructs, it is sometimes essential to obtain insight into the localization of structures inside the tissue samples. Observation of three-dimensional (3D) surface reconstruction, including basic photorealistic texture characteristics as surface pattern and color combined with X-ray computed tomography 3D reconstruction at different levels, is a useful approach to localize anatomical or implanted structures within experimental tissue samples. Because of the possible observation of structures of interest in a 3D environment, fusion of these techniques can greatly facilitate histological processing.

  2. Three-dimensional grain fabric measurements using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcham, Richard A.

    2005-07-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) provides detailed imagery of the interiors of rocks up to hand-sample size, non-destructively and in three dimensions. New tools described here allow these data to be used for analysis of grain fabrics. Two separate sets of measurement techniques have been developed. The first concentrates on quantifying individual crystals (phenocrysts, porphyroblasts) or other discrete objects or void spaces within a sample. Quantifiable properties include location, size, shape, orientation, and contact relationships with adjacent objects. The second set of techniques performs a more general fabric analysis on any distinguishable component in a sample. A fabric tensor can be computed based on a number of metrics, including the star volume distribution (SVD), star length distribution (SLD), and mean intercept length (MIL) methods. The fabric tensors provide principal component directions and magnitudes, which in turn provide a measure of degree of anisotropy and shape indices. Because the SVD and SLD measure only the material of interest, whereas the MIL is also influenced by spatial distribution, results can be divergent for sparse phases. Also introduced is a three-dimensional rose diagram that can be viewed interactively and inspected to reveal further details about non-orthogonal directional components. These techniques are demonstrated through analysis of a garnet-kyanite schist from Mica Dam, British Columbia.

  3. A review of the issues surrounding three-dimensional computed tomography for medical modelling using rapid prototyping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, Richard [Department of Design and Technology, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.j.bibb@lboro.ac.uk; Winder, John [Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Research Institute, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rj.winder@ulster.ac.uk

    2010-02-15

    This technical note aims to raise awareness amongst radiographers of the application of Computed Tomography data in the production of models using Rapid Prototyping technologies. It also aims to provide radiographers with recommendations that will assist them in providing three-dimensional Computed Tomography data that can fulfil the requirements of medical modelling. Potential problem areas in data acquisition and transfer are discussed and suggestions are given for methods that aim to avoid these.

  4. Three Dimensional Digital Sieving of Asphalt Mixture Based on X-ray Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chichun Hu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform three-dimensional digital sieving based on X-ray computed tomography images, the definition of digital sieve size (DSS was proposed, which was defined as the minimum length of the minimum bounding squares of all possible orthographic projections of an aggregate. The corresponding program was developed to reconstruct aggregate structure and to obtain DSS. Laboratory experiments consisting of epoxy-filled aggregate specimens were conducted to investigate the difference between mechanical sieve analysis and the digital sieving technique. It was suggested that concave surface of aggregate was the possible reason for the disparity between DSS and mechanical sieve size. A comparison between DSS and equivalent diameter was also performed. Moreover, the digital sieving technique was adopted to evaluate the gradation of stone mastic asphalt mixtures. The results showed that the closest proximity of the laboratory gradation curve was achieved by calibrated DSS, among gradation curves based on calibrated DSS, un-calibrated DSS and equivalent diameter.

  5. Endocranial capacity in Sts 71 (Australopithecus africanus) by three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, G C; Falk, D; Guyer, J; Weber, G W; Seidler, H; Recheis, W

    2000-04-01

    In a recent report on early hominid endocranial capacity, it was predicted that future studies would show that: (1) "several key early hominid endocranial estimates may be inflated"; (2) "current views on the tempo and mode of early hominid brain evolution may need reevaluation"; and (3) endocranial capacity in one of these, Sts 71, was "probably closer to 370 cm(3), very near the mean value for female chimpanzees, and not the currently accepted 428 cm(3)" (Conroy et al., Science, 1998; 280: 1730-1731; Falk, Science 1998; 20:1714). Subsequent studies tend to support the first two predictions, but not the third (Culotta, Science, 1999; 284: 1109; Falk, Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. Suppl., 1999; 28: 126; Falk et al., J. Hum. Evol. [in press]). Here we detail the reasons for thinking the currently accepted endocranial value for Sts 71 is probably correct by providing the first quantitative details of endocranial reconstruction in Sts 71 using three-dimensional computed tomography. Relative brain expansion in the hominid lineage started some half-million years before the earliest appearance of the genus Homo, possibly coincident with enhanced tool-making skills and carnivory. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. The role of three-dimensional computed tomography in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavelu Kavin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT in the assessment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ ankylosis and its importance in treatment planning. The objectives of study were to measure and assess the mediolateral extent of ankylosis mass in 3D-CT and to compare the extent with intraoperative assessment. The study was also aimed to measure the coronoid process elongation in 3D-CT and its significance in treatment planning. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 3D-CT evaluation of 11 patients with TMJ ankylosis during the period of February 2006-October 2007. Results: The 3D-CT assessment provided the length of the coronoid process and the relation of vital structures including maxillary artery to the ankylosed mass. Measurement of ankylosed mass also aids in preoperative measurement of the graft required to reconstruct the defect following removal of the ankylosed mass. Conclusion: Our study concludes that 3D-CT is a useful tool in the diagnosis and treatment planning of TMJ ankylosis.

  7. Three-dimensional computed tomography in the assessment of congenital scoliosis

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    Bush, C.H. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Kalen, V. [Department of Orthopedics, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Objective. Patients with congenital vertebral anomalies frequently are afflicted with kyphoscoliosis, with the curvatures often being severe and progressive. Spinal fusion almost always is the treatment of choice in such patients. This report examines the use of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) in the preoperative investigation of patients with congenital scoliosis.Design and patients. Twelve spinal CT examinations on 11 pediatric patients with congenital scoliosis underwent image processing to produce 3D images. The 3D images were compared with both the axial sections from the CT examinations and multiplanar reformations with regard to the detection of malformations liable to cause progression of scoliosis (i. e., hemivertebrae and unsegmented bars).Results and conclusions. In six of the 12 cases, the 3D images provided improved depiction of the congenital anomalies and their interrelationships compared with planar CT images. This work suggests that 3D CT can be a useful tool in the assessment of patients with congenital scoliosis. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration for Three-Dimensional Temporal Subtraction of Chest Computed Tomography Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Kodera, Yoshie; Shimamoto, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    To perform lung image registration for reducing misregistration artifacts on three-dimensional (3D) temporal subtraction of chest computed tomography (CT) images, in order to enhance temporal changes in lung lesions and evaluate these changes after deformable image registration (DIR). In 10 cases, mutual information (MI) lung mask affine mapping combined with cross-correlation (CC) lung diffeomorphic mapping was used to implement lung volume registration. With advanced normalization tools (ANTs), we used greedy symmetric normalization (greedy SyN) as a transformation model, which involved MI-CC-SyN implementation. The resulting displacement fields were applied to warp the previous (moving) image, which was subsequently subtracted from the current (fixed) image to obtain the lung subtraction image. The average minimum and maximum log-Jacobians were 0.31 and 3.74, respectively. When considering 3D landmark distance, the root-mean-square error changed from an average of 20.82 mm for Pfixed to Pmoving to 0.5 mm for Pwarped to Pfixed. Clear shadows were observed as enhanced lung nodules and lesions in subtraction images. The lesion shadows showed lesion shrinkage changes over time. Lesion tissue morphology was maintained after DIR. DIR (greedy SyN) effectively and accurately enhanced temporal changes in chest CT images and decreased misregistration artifacts in temporal subtraction images.

  9. Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration for Three-Dimensional Temporal Subtraction of Chest Computed Tomography Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To perform lung image registration for reducing misregistration artifacts on three-dimensional (3D temporal subtraction of chest computed tomography (CT images, in order to enhance temporal changes in lung lesions and evaluate these changes after deformable image registration (DIR. Methods. In 10 cases, mutual information (MI lung mask affine mapping combined with cross-correlation (CC lung diffeomorphic mapping was used to implement lung volume registration. With advanced normalization tools (ANTs, we used greedy symmetric normalization (greedy SyN as a transformation model, which involved MI-CC-SyN implementation. The resulting displacement fields were applied to warp the previous (moving image, which was subsequently subtracted from the current (fixed image to obtain the lung subtraction image. Results. The average minimum and maximum log-Jacobians were 0.31 and 3.74, respectively. When considering 3D landmark distance, the root-mean-square error changed from an average of 20.82 mm for Pfixed to Pmoving to 0.5 mm for Pwarped to Pfixed. Clear shadows were observed as enhanced lung nodules and lesions in subtraction images. The lesion shadows showed lesion shrinkage changes over time. Lesion tissue morphology was maintained after DIR. Conclusions. DIR (greedy SyN effectively and accurately enhanced temporal changes in chest CT images and decreased misregistration artifacts in temporal subtraction images.

  10. Morphologic evaluation of remnant anterior cruciate ligament bundles after injury with three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Takazawa, Kobun; Ishifuro, Minoru; Deie, Masataka; Nakamae, Atsuo; Kamei, Goki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the morphological patterns of remnant anterior cruciate ligament bundles after injury (ACL remnant) on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and compare them with those on arthroscopy. Sixty-three patients (33 males and 30 females; mean age 25.2 ± 10.1 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction between March 2011 and December 2012 were included in this study. The average durations between traumas and 3DCT and between 3DCT and surgery were 101.7 ± 87.2 and 38.2 ± 38.7 days, respectively. ACL remnants were classified into four morphological patterns on 3DCT. 3DCT findings were compared with arthroscopic findings with and without probing. The morphological patterns of the ACL remnants on 3DCT were well matched with those on arthroscopy without probing (the concordance rate was 77.8%). However, the concordance rate was reduced to 49.2% when arthroscopic probing was used to confirm the femoral attachment of ACL remnants (p ≤ 0.05). This study demonstrates that the morphological patterns of ACL remnants on 3DCT were well matched with those on arthroscopy without probing. Therefore, the technique can be useful for preoperative planning of the ACL reconstruction or informed consent to the patients. However, for definitive diagnosis, arthroscopic probing is required. IV.

  11. Evaluation of decortication in patients with chronic tuberculous empyema by three-dimensional computed tomography densitometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Han, Jieun; Lee, Sung; Lee, Jung-moon; Cho, Sukki; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Won; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2013-03-01

    Decortication for chronic pleural empyema (CPE) is to restore lung volume by removing empyema sac and thickened pleura. Extent of lung volume restoration after decortication has been undefined. This study aims to evaluate lung volume restoration using densitometry with three-dimensional reconstruction computed tomography (CT). We studied 23 patients with CPE who underwent decortication and follow-up CT. CT and pulmonary function test (PFT) were evaluated at a median of 19.1 months postoperatively. The volumes of operated and nonoperated lung were measured by pre- and postoperative CT-densitometry. Preoperative and postoperative values of lung volumes, PFTs, and thoracic asymmetry rates were compared statistically. The mean preoperative volumes of operated and nonoperated lung were 1,239 and 2,094 mL, respectively and 1,848 and 2,311 mL postoperatively. The postoperative lung expansion rate was 71% on the operated side (p Decortication for CPE can improve re-expansion of diseased and healthy lung. Improvement of nonoperated lung may be due to the overall improvement of chest wall elasticity. Coincidentally, we discovered that the improvement of total lung volume was positively associated with the improvement of PFT after decortication. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Three-dimensional computed tomography analysis on bony birth canal after bilateral periacetabular osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimatsu, Tetsuro; Naito, Masatoshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Ishii, Satohiro; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-01

    Curved periacetabular osteotomy (CPO) is one of the joint preserving procedures for developmental dysplasia of the hip. CPO requires osteotomy of the medial wall of the acetabulum, which may cause narrowing of the bony birth canal and this step may result in increased risk of cesarean delivery. We analyzed the narrowest part of the bony birth canal using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) before and after bilateral CPO. Between February 2007 and March 2014, there were 29 cases of bilateral CPO in which both pre- and post-operative 3D-CT were available. Transverse diameters of the pelvic inlet, contraction, outlet, expansion, and teardrop were analyzed. Among them, the narrowest part of the bony birth canal was investigated, which being smaller than the normal lower threshold value for vaginal delivery (95 mm) was considered as a risk for cesarean delivery. The transverse diameters of both pelvic expansion and teardrop significantly decreased after CPO (both p CPO was the pelvic teardrop. In this study, 82.8% of the patients showed pelvic teardrop diameter greater than 95 mm, while that of the other patients (17.2%) were less than 95 mm. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Examination of craniofacial bones associated with auricular anomaly using three-dimensional computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Ichiro; Ohura, Takehiko; Iwao, Fumiya (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1989-07-01

    Three-dimensional computer tomography (3D-CT) was performed in 60 patients with auricular anomaly to determine the site and severity of deformity in the hemifacial microsomia. Auricular anomaly, underdevelopment and malposition of the cranium, temporo-mandibular joint, zygoma, maxilla and mandible were observed in almost all of the patients; however, the severity of these malformations varied from patient to patient. Regarding severest deformity, there were positional differences among patients. According to impairment sites, hemifacial microsomia fell into the following five types: (1) cranium type, (2) maxillary alveolar process type, (3) localized mandibular ramus type, (4) overall mandibular type, and (5) complex type (combination of the aforementioned types). Facial asymmetry accompanied by auricular anomaly was associated with various pathologic conditions. The temporomandibular joint was often deviated towards the anteromedial side for localized mandibular ramus type and overall mandibular type. Posterial deviation was predominant for cranium type. In patients with hemifacial microsomia of the cranium type associated with protrusion mainly in the occipital region on the affected side, deformity was considered attributable to underdevelopment of the temporal bone and delay in closure of the temporo-occipital suture. The deformity for cranium type may be defined as the second branchial syndrome. In conclusion, hemifacial microsomia have various deformities and may fall into five categories. Craniofacial microsomia and hemi-auriculo-temporo-mandibular dysplastic syndrome give a more precise concept for auricular anomaly. (N.K.).

  14. Cochlear implant-related three-dimensional characteristics determined by micro-computed tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yusu; Dai, Peidong; Dai, Chunfu; Li, Huawei

    2017-01-01

    To explore the structural characteristics of the cochlea in three-dimensional (3D) detail using 3D micro-computed tomography (mCT) image reconstruction of the osseous labyrinth, with the aim of improving the structural design of electrodes, the selection of stimulation sites, and the effectiveness of cochlear implantation. Three temporal bones were selected from among adult donors' temporal bone specimens. A micro-CT apparatus (GE eXplore) was used to scan three specimens with a voxel resolution of 45 μm. We obtained about 460 slices/specimen, which produced abundant data. The osseous labyrinth images of three specimens were reconstructed from mCT. The cochlea and its spiral characteristics were measured precisely using Able Software 3D-DOCTOR. The 3D images of the osseous labyrinth, including the cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals, were reconstructed. The 3D models of the cochlea showed the spatial relationships and surface structural characteristics. Quantitative data concerning the cochlea and its spiral structural characteristics were analyzed with regard to cochlear implantation. The 3D reconstruction of mCT images clearly displayed the detailed spiral structural characteristics of the osseous labyrinth. Quantitative data regarding the cochlea and its spiral structural characteristics could help to improve electrode structural design, signal processing, and the effectiveness of cochlear implantation. Clin. Anat. 30:39-43, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Utility of three-dimensional computed tomography in general thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Tadashi

    2013-12-01

    It is important for general thoracic surgeons to understand the relationship between tumors and surrounding organs during surgery; however, many anatomical variations are possible in the thorax, which can complicate this goal. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the latest technical breakthrough in CT imaging. MDCT permits rapid scanning of large areas of the body with multiple detectors, thereby allowing for simultaneous acquisition of an increased number of transaxial CT slices, which reduce motion artifacts. Three-dimensional (3D) rendering involves the creation of two-dimensional images that convey the 3D relationship of objects. The 3D reconstruction allows for enormous quantity of data to be utilized intuitively and effectively. The final images can reveal various lesions or organs of interest with high anatomical detail and accuracy to the general thoracic surgeon, which is helpful in performing safer surgeries. Surgeries for the following can benefit from this technology: lung lobectomy or segmentectomy, pulmonary sequestration, cardiovascular malformation, tracheobronchial tree, mediastinum, and chest wall. This article reviews the utility of 3D-MDCT imaging in the field of general thoracic surgery.

  16. Three-dimensional maximum principal strain using cardiac computed tomography for identification of myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Yuki; Kido, Teruhito; Kurata, Akira; Sawada, Shun; Suekuni, Hiroshi; Kido, Tomoyuki; Yokoi, Takahiro; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Toon City, Ehime (Japan); Uetani, Teruyoshi; Inoue, Katsuji [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Pulmonology, Hypertension and Nephrology, Toon City, Ehime (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D) maximum principal strain (MP-strain) derived from cardiac computed tomography (CT) for detecting myocardial infarction (MI). Forty-three patients who underwent cardiac CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were retrospectively selected. Using the voxel tracking of motion coherence algorithm, the peak CT MP-strain was measured using the 16-segment model. With the trans-mural extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and the distance from MI, all segments were classified into four groups (infarcted, border, adjacent, and remote segments); infarcted and border segments were defined as MI with LGE positive. Diagnostic performance of MP-strain for detecting MI was compared with per cent systolic wall thickening (%SWT) assessed by MRI using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis at a segment level. Of 672 segments excluding16 segments influenced by artefacts, 193 were diagnosed as MI. Sensitivity and specificity of peak MP-strain to identify MI were 81 % [95 % confidence interval (95 % CI): 74-88 %] and 86 % (81-92 %) compared with %SWT: 76 % (60-95 %) and 68 % (48-84 %), respectively. The area under the curve of peak MP-strain was superior to %SWT [0.90 (0.87-0.93) vs. 0.80 (0.76-0.83), p < 0.05]. CT MP-strain has a potential to provide incremental value to coronary CT angiography for detecting MI. (orig.)

  17. Radiologic study of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism by three-dimensional computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Moon, Cheol Hyun; Im, Jeong Soo; Seo, Hwa Jeong [Graduate School of Public Health and Social Welfare, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    This study is aimed to evaluate the position of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism patients using 3-dimensional CT images in order to reduce the chance of an anesthetic failure of the mandibular nerve and to prevent the damage to the inferior alveolar nerve during the orthognathic surgery. The control group consist of 30 patients with class I occlusion. The experimental group consist of 44 patients with class III malocclusion. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to evaluate the position of the mandibular foramina. The distance between mandibular plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 25.385 mm, class III was 23.628 mm. About the distance between occlusal plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 1.478 mm, class III was 5.144 mm. The distance between posterior border plan of mandibular ramus and mandibular foramen had not statistically significant. About the distance between sagittal plane of mandible and mandibular foramen did not also showed statistically significant. The result of this study could help the clinicians to apprehend more accurate anatomical locations of the foramina on the mandible with various facial skeletal types. Thereby to perform more accurate block anesthesia of the mandibular nerve and osteotomy with minimal nerve damage. In addition, this study could provide fundamental data for any related researches about the location of the mandibular foramina for other purposes.

  18. Three-Dimensional Printing of X-Ray Computed Tomography Datasets with Multiple Materials Using Open-Source Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Ian M.; McGoldrick, Matthew T.; Helms, My N.; Betts, Aislinn; van Avermaete, Anthony; Owers, Elizabeth; Doney, Evan; Liepert, Taimi; Niebur, Glen; Liepert, Douglas; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing allow for digital files to be turned into a "printed" physical product. For example, complex anatomical models derived from clinical or pre-clinical X-ray computed tomography (CT) data of patients or research specimens can be constructed using various printable materials. Although 3D printing…

  19. Comparative study of cranial anthropometric measurement by traditional calipers to computed tomography and three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Derick A; Naidoo, Sybill D; Skolnick, Gary; Skladman, Rachel; Woo, Albert S

    2013-07-01

    Craniofacial anthropometry by direct caliper measurements is a common method of quantifying the morphology of the cranial vault. New digital imaging modalities including computed tomography and three-dimensional photogrammetry are similarly being used to obtain craniofacial surface measurements. This study sought to compare the accuracy of anthropometric measurements obtained by calipers versus 2 methods of digital imaging.Standard anterior-posterior, biparietal, and cranial index measurements were directly obtained on 19 participants with an age range of 1 to 20 months. Computed tomographic scans and three-dimensional photographs were both obtained on each child within 2 weeks of the clinical examination. Two analysts measured the anterior-posterior and biparietal distances on the digital images. Measures of reliability and bias between the modalities were calculated and compared.Caliper measurements were found to underestimate the anterior-posterior and biparietal distances as compared with those of the computed tomography and the three-dimensional photogrammetry (P photogrammetry (P = 0.002). The coefficients of variation for repeated measures based on the computed tomography and the three-dimensional photogrammetry were 0.008 and 0.007, respectively.In conclusion, measurements based on digital modalities are generally reliable and interchangeable. Caliper measurements lead to underestimation of anterior-posterior and biparietal values compared with digital imaging.

  20. Fluoroscopy-Guided Sacroplasty: Special Focus on Preoperative Planning from Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjertsen, Oe.; Schellhorn, T.; Nakstad, P.H. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Division of Medical Services, Ullevl Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway))

    2008-11-15

    Background: Osteoporotic sacral insufficiency fractures are usually spontaneous or caused by discrete traumas. The fluoroscopic anatomy of the sacrum can be difficult to understand, and this is why sacroplasty is considered more challenging than ordinary vertebroplasties. Purpose: To demonstrate the planning of the procedure and the effectiveness of treatment with sacroplasty by means of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) by combining multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) and volume-rendering technique (VRT). Material and Methods: Five elderly, osteoporotic patients with intense pelvic and hip pain underwent weeks of inconclusive clinical and radiological diagnostic efforts. Correct diagnosis was finally attained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Plain radiographs rarely show fractures, and MR or CT examinations are necessary to demonstrate longitudinal fractures. The procedures were performed with digital biplane equipment using preoperative 3D CT planning procedures. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was injected to fill the fracture sites. Results: The fractures were successfully treated with sacroplasty using PMMA. A new technique, which involves placing the needles along the long axis of the sacrum, was optimized to the individual patients' fractures and sacral anatomy by meticulous planning on a workstation with 3D CT data sets. It was technically successful in all five cases. Four of the five patients had sustained pain relief. Conclusion: Sacral insufficiency fractures are not uncommon and should be considered in the elderly population with low back pain. Sacroplasty using the optimized 'long-axis technique' gave almost immediate pain relief for all five patients in our study material. No complications were observed.

  1. The availability of radiological measurement of tibial torsion: three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Yeop; Yoon, Chul Ho; Lee, Eun Shin; Oh, Min-Kyun; Kim, A Ram; Park, Jong Moon; Shin, Jun-Hwa; Shin, Hee Suk

    2011-10-01

    To assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for measuring tibial torsion measurements by a radiographic method using three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction (3D-CT) and to compare the physical measures to those of 3D-CT. The study included 33 children who presented with intoeing gait. Tibial torsion was measured by 3D-CT. Distal reference point was the bimalleolar axis. Proximal reference points were the transtibial axis and posterior condylar axis. Physical measurements included thigh-foot angle (TFA) and bimalleolar angle (BMA). 3D-CT measurement and physical measurement were performed twice at both lower extremities by each rater. The intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficiency (ICC). The relationship between radiological and physical examination was calculated by Spearman correlation coefficient. The 3D-CT measures for tibial torsion were reliable within individual raters and between different raters. However, physical measures for tibial torsion were reliable within an individual rater but not reliable between raters. The 3D-CT measures by any proximal reference axis were more reliable within a rater and between raters than physical measurements. There was no significant impact introduced by the selection of the proximal reference axis. The correlation coefficiency between 3D-CT and physical measurement methods was low. Because the 3D-CT measurements for tibial torsion are more reliable than physical measurements, we recommend that accurate diagnosis of internal tibial torsion should be detected by using 3D-CT measurements. Also, considering the disadvantages of radiological measurements, physical measurement may be used for short term follow-up by same raters, as intra-rater reliability is relatively good.

  2. The Availability of Radiological Measurement of Femoral Anteversion Angle: Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Ha Young; Shin, Heesuk; Lee, Eun Shin; Kong, Min Sik; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Chang Hee

    2016-04-01

    To assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for measuring femoral anteversion angle (FAA) by a radiographic method using three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction (3D-CT). The study included 82 children who presented with intoeing gait. 3D-CT data taken between 2006 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. FAA was measured by 3D-CT. FAA is defined as the angle between the long axis of the femur neck and condylar axis of the distal femur. FAA measurement was performed twice at both lower extremities by each rater. The intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). One hundred and sixty-four lower limbs of 82 children (31 boys and 51 girls, 6.3±3.2 years old) were included. The ICCs of intra-rater measurement for the angle of femoral neck axis (NA) were 0.89 for rater A and 0.96 for rater B, and those of condylar axis (CA) were 0.99 for rater A and 0.99 for rater B, respectively. The ICC of inter-rater measurement for the angle of NA was 0.89 and that of CA was 0.92. By each rater, the ICCs of the intrarater measurement for FAA were 0.97 for rater A and 0.95 for rater B, respectively and the ICC of the inter-rater measurement for FAA was 0.89. The 3D-CT measures for FAA are reliable within individual raters and between different raters. The 3D-CT measures of FAA can be a useful method for accurate diagnosis and follow-up of femoral anteversion.

  3. Measurement of Optimal Insertion Angle for Iliosacral Screw Fixation Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Jae; Jung, Chul-Young; Eastman, Jonathan G; Oh, Hyoung-Keun

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation can provide stable fixation with a minimally invasive surgical technique for unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. This surgical technique is not limited by cases of difficult fracture patterns, sacral dysplasia, and small sacral pedicles that can occur in Asians. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of the sacral dysplasia in the Korean population and determine the optimal direction of iliosacral screws by analyzing pelvic three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans. One hundred adult patients who had pelvic 3D-CT scans were evaluated. The upper sacral morphology was classified into three groups, i.e., normal, transitional, and dysplastic groups; the cross-sectional area of the safe zone was measured in each group. S1 pedicle with a short width of more than 11 mm was defined as safe pedicle. The incidences of safe pedicles at different angles ranging from 0° to 15° were investigated in order to determine optimal angle for screw direction. The incidence of normal, transitional, and dysplastic group was 46%, 32%, and 22%, respectively. There were significant increases of the cross-sectional area of the safe zones by increasing the angles from 0° to 15° in all groups. The incidence of safe pedicles increased similar to the changes in cross-sectional area. The overall incidence of safe pedicles was highest at the 10° tilt angle. The incidence of sacral dysplasia in Koreans was 54%, which is higher than previous studies for Western populations. The cross-sectional area of the safe zone can be increased by anteromedial direction of the iliosacral screw. Considering the diversity of sacral morphology present in the Korean population, a tilt angle of 10° may be the safest angle.

  4. Determining the Incidence of Gynecoid Pelvis Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography in Nonpregnant Multiparous Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Ismail; Cetin, Meral; Salk, Sultan; Cetin, Ali

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence of gynecoid pelvis by using classical criteria and measured parameters obtained from three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) pelvimetry in nonpregnant multiparous women who delivered vaginally. Our hospital's picture archiving and communication system was reviewed retrospectively. All adult women who had undergone CT examination with routine abdominal protocols were identified. In the pelvic inlet, midpelvis, and pelvic outlet, classical criteria and measured parameters, both alone and in combination, were used to determine the presence of gynecoid pelvis. 3D CT pelvimetry was performed on 226 women aged 23-65 years without any history of cephalopelvic disproportion and who had at least one delivery of an average fetal size (>2,500 g). The median parity was 4, and the mean (±SD) birth weight was 3,700 ± 498 g. Compared to the classical criteria, measured parameters and their combined use with the classical criteria significantly reduced the frequency of gynecoid pelvis (51.3 and 47.8%, respectively, vs. 71.6%; p = 0.001); however, there was no significant difference between the measured parameters and their combined use with classical criteria with regard to the frequencies of gynecoid pelvis (p > 0.05). With the use of measured parameters of 3D CT pelvimetry, the incidence of gynecoid pelvis reduces to a more acceptable level (51.3%) in accordance with obstetric knowledge. Since there is no considerable decrease with the addition of classical criteria, 3D CT pelvimetry alone has merit for determining a woman's pelvic capacity for obstetric needs after the improvement and standardization of measured parameters. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Three dimensional imaging of paraffin embedded human lung tissue samples by micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Scott

    Full Text Available Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data.FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4 were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging.The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15 mm x 7 mm. Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections.We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis.

  6. Three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of the left gastric vein in a pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebibo, Lionel; Chivot, Cyril; Fuks, David; Sabbagh, Charles; Yzet, Thierry; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background During a pancreatectomy, the left gastric vein (LGV) has an important role in the venous drainage of the stomach (total pancreatectomy, left splenopancreatectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy with venous resection and pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy). Pre-operative knowledge of the LGV's termination is necessary for adequate protection of this vein during dissection. The objective of the present study was to analyse the location of the LGV's termination in a patient population and facilitate its identification in at-risk situations. Materials and methods Abdominal computed tomography (CT) images of 86 pancreatic tumour patients (20 of whom underwent surgery), who were treated in our institution between October 2009 and October 2010, were reviewed. Arterial-phase and portal-phase helical CT with three-dimensional reconstruction was performed in all cases. The location of the termination of the LGV was determined and (when the LGV merged with the splenic vein or the splenomesenteric trunk) the distance between the termination and the origin of the portal vein (PV). The correlation between CT imaging data and intra-operative findings was studied. Results The LGV was identified on all CT images. In 65% of cases (n = 56), the LGV terminated in the PV (upstream of the liver in nine of these cases). The LGV terminated at the splenomesenteric trunk in 4.7% of cases (n = 4) and in the splenic vein in 30.3% of cases (n = 26). When the LGV terminated upstream of the origin of the PV, the distance between the two was always greater than 1 cm. The average distance between the termination of the LGV and the origin of the PV was 14.34 mm (10.2 to 21.1). The anatomical data from CT images agreed with the intra-operative findings in all cases. Conclusion Pre-operative analysis of the LGV is useful because the vein can be identified in all cases. Knowledge of the termination's anatomic location enables the subsequent resection to be initiated in a low-risk area. PMID

  7. A comparative study between data obtained from conventional lateral cephalometry and reconstructed three-dimensional computed tomography images

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Suseok; Kim, Ci-Young; Hong, Jongrak

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to verify the concordance of the measurement values when the same cephalometric analysis method was used for two-dimensional (2D) cephalometric radiography and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT), and to identify which 3D Frankfort horizontal (FH) plane was the most concordant with FH plane used for cephalometric radiography. Materials and Methods Reference horizontal plane was FH plane. Palatal angle and occlusal plane angle was evaluated with F...

  8. Three-dimensional biplanar radiography as a new means of accessing femoral version: a comparitive study of EOS three-dimensional radiography versus computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, M.L. [University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Glaser, Diana [Aurora Spine, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Doan, Josh [Orthopedic Biomechanics Research Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Kumar, Sita [University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Edmonds, Eric W. [University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Rady Children' s Hospital San Diego, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-17

    To validate femoral version measurements made from biplanar radiography (BR), three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions (EOS imaging, France) were made in differing rotational positions against the gold standard of computed tomography (CT). Two cadaveric femurs were scanned with CT and BR in five different femoral versions creating ten total phantoms. The native version was modified by rotating through a mid-diaphyseal hinge twice into increasing anteversion and twice into increased retroversion. For each biplanar scan, the phantom itself was rotated -10, -5, 0, +5 and +10 . Three-dimensional CT reconstructions were designated the true value for femoral version. Two independent observers measured the femoral version on CT axial slices and BR 3D reconstructions twice. The mean error (upper bound of the 95 % confidence interval), inter- and intraobserver reliability, and the error compared to the true version were determined for both imaging techniques. Interobserver intraclass correlation for CT axial images ranged from 0.981 to 0.991, and the intraobserver intraclass correlation ranged from 0.994 to 0.996. For the BR 3D reconstructions these values ranged from 0.983 to 0.998 and 0.982 to 0.998, respectively. For the CT measurements the upper bound of error from the true value was 5.4-7.5 , whereas for BR 3D reconstructions it was 4.0-10.1 . There was no statistical difference in the mean error from the true values for any of the measurements done with axial CT or BR 3D reconstructions. BR 3D reconstructions accurately and reliably provide clinical data on femoral version compared to CT even with rotation of the patient of up to 10 from neutral. (orig.)

  9. Measurement of cardiac ventricular volumes using multidetector row computed tomography: comparison of two- and three-dimensional methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaudon, M. [Hopital Haut-Leveque, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France); Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire d' Anatomie Medico-Chirurgicale Appliquee, Bordeaux (France); Laffon, E. [Hopital Haut-Leveque, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Pessac (France); Berger, P. [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Respiratoire C.R.I. INSERM 9806, Bordeaux (France); Corneloup, O.; Latrabe, V. [Hopital Haut-Leveque, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France); Laurent, F. [Hopital Haut-Leveque, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France); Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Departement de Radiologie, Bordeaux (France)

    2006-10-15

    This study compared a three-dimensional volumetric threshold-based method to a two-dimensional Simpson's rule based short-axis multiplanar method for measuring right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) volumes, stroke volumes, and ejection fraction using electrocardiography-gated multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) data sets. End-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) of RV and LV were measured independently and blindly by two observers from contrast-enhanced MDCT images using commercial software in 18 patients. For RV and LV the three-dimensionally calculated EDV and ESV values were smaller than those provided by two-dimensional short axis (10%, 5%, 15% and 26% differences respectively). Agreement between the two methods was found for LV (EDV/ESV: r=0.974/0.910, ICC=0.905/0.890) but not for RV (r=0.882/0.930, ICC=0.663/0.544). Measurement errors were significant only for EDV of LV using the two-dimensional method. Similar reproducibility was found for LV measurements, but the three-dimensional method provided greater reproducibility for RV measurements than the two-dimensional. The threshold value supported three-dimensional method provides reproducible cardiac ventricular volume measurements, comparable to those obtained using the short-axis Simpson based method. (orig.)

  10. Three-Dimensional Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Constructs by Contrast-Enhanced Nanofocus Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Papantoniou, Ioannis; Sonnaert, Maarten; Geris, Liesbet; Luyten, Frank P.; Schrooten, Jan; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-01-01

    To successfully implement tissue-engineered (TE) constructs as part of a clinical therapy, it is necessary to develop quality control tools that will ensure accurate and consistent TE construct release specifications. Hence, advanced methods to monitor TE construct properties need to be further developed. In this study, we showed proof of concept for contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography (CE-nano-CT) as a whole-construct imaging technique with a noninvasive potential that enables th...

  11. Respiratory impedance is correlated with airway narrowing in asthma using three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayama, M; Inui, N; Mori, K; Kono, M; Hozumi, H; Suzuki, Y; Furuhashi, K; Hashimoto, D; Enomoto, N; Fujisawa, T; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, H; Suda, T

    2018-01-06

    Respiratory impedance comprises the resistance and reactance of the respiratory system and can provide detailed information on respiratory function. However, details of the relationship between impedance and morphological airway changes in asthma are unknown. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between imaging-based airway changes and respiratory impedance in patients with asthma. Respiratory impedance and spirometric data were evaluated in 72 patients with asthma and 29 reference subjects. We measured the intraluminal area (Ai) and wall thickness (WT) of third- to sixth-generation bronchi using three-dimensional computed tomographic analyses, and values were adjusted by body surface area (BSA, Ai/BSA, and WT/the square root (√) of BSA). Asthma patients had significantly increased respiratory impedance, decreased Ai/BSA, and increased WT/√BSA, as was the case in those without airflow limitation as assessed by spirometry. Ai/BSA was inversely correlated with respiratory resistance at 5 Hz (R5) and 20 Hz (R20). R20 had a stronger correlation with Ai/BSA than did R5. Ai/BSA was positively correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio, percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and percentage predicted mid-expiratory flow. WT/√BSA had no significant correlation with spirometry or respiratory impedance. Respiratory resistance is associated with airway narrowing. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Micro-computed tomography assessment of human alveolar bone: bone density and three-dimensional micro-architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jeong; Henkin, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a valuable means to evaluate and secure information related to bone density and quality in human necropsy samples and small live animals. The aim of this study was to assess the bone density of the alveolar jaw bones in human cadaver, using micro-CT. The correlation between bone density and three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was evaluated. Thirty-four human cadaver jaw bone specimens were harvested. Each specimen was scanned with micro-CT at resolution of 10.5 μm. The bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and the bone mineral density (BMD) value within a volume of interest were measured. The three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was assessed. All the parameters in the maxilla and the mandible were subject to comparison. The variables for the bone density and the three-dimensional micro architecture were analyzed for nonparametric correlation using Spearman's rho at the significance level of p architecture parameters were consistently higher in the mandible, up to 3.3 times greater than those in the maxilla. The most linear correlation was observed between BV/TV and BMD, with Spearman's rho = 0.99 (p = .01). Both BV/TV and BMD were highly correlated with all micro architecture parameters with Spearman's rho above 0.74 (p = .01). Two aspects of bone density using micro-CT, the BV/TV and BMD, are highly correlated with three-dimensional micro architecture parameters, which represent the quality of trabecular bone. This noninvasive method may adequately enhance evaluation of the alveolar bone. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Quantitative three-dimensional evaluation of myocardial perfusion during regadenoson stress using multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor-Avi, Victor; Lodato, Joseph A; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Chandra, Sonal; Freed, Benjamin H; Newby, Barbara; Lang, Roberto M; Patel, Amit R

    2012-01-01

    The ability of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to detect stress-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities is of great clinical interest as a potential tool for the combined evaluation of coronary stenosis and its hemodynamic significance. We tested the hypothesis that quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) analysis of myocardial perfusion from MDCT images obtained during regadenoson stress would more accurately detect the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) than identical analysis when performed on resting MDCT images. We prospectively studied 50 consecutive patients referred for CT coronary angiography (CTCA) who agreed to undergo additional imaging with regadenoson (0.4 mg; Astellas). Images were acquired using prospective gating (256-channel; Philips). Custom analysis software was used to define 3D myocardial segments, and calculate for each segment an index of severity and extent of perfusion abnormality, Qh, which was compared with perfusion defects predicted by the presence and severity of coronary stenosis on CTCA. Three patients were excluded because of image artifacts. In the remaining 47 patients, CTCA depicted stenosis more than 50% in 23 patients in 37 of 141 coronary arteries. In segments supplied by the obstructed arteries, myocardial attenuation was slightly reduced compared with normally perfused segments at rest (mean [SD], 91 [21] vs 93 [26] Hounsfield units, not significant) and, to a larger extent, at peak stress (102 [21] vs 112 [20] Hounsfield units, P regadenoson improved the diagnosis of CAD, as reflected by an increase in sensitivity (from 0.57 to 0.91) and improvement in accuracy (from 0.65 to 0.77). Quantitative 3D analysis of MDCT images allows objective detection of CAD, the accuracy of which is improved by regadenoson stress.

  14. Three-dimensional computed tomography measurement accuracy of varying Hill-Sachs lesion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anthony; Kurdziel, Michael D; Koueiter, Denise M; Wiater, J Michael

    2018-02-01

    The glenoid track concept has been proposed to correlate shoulder stability with bone loss. Accurate assessment of Hill-Sachs lesion size preoperatively may affect surgical planning and postoperative outcomes; however, no measurement method has been universally accepted. This study aimed to assess the accuracy and reliability of measuring Hill-Sachs lesion sizes using 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). Nine polyurethane humerus bone substitutes were used to create Hill-Sachs lesions of varying sizes with a combination of lesion depth (shallow, intermediate, and deep) and width (small, medium, and large). Specimens were scanned with a clinical CT scanner for size measurements and a micro-CT scanner for measurement of true lesion size. Six evaluators repeated measurements twice in a 2-week interval. Scans were measured by use of 3D CT reconstructions for length, width, and Hill-Sachs interval and with use of 2D CT for depth. The interclass correlation coefficient evaluated interobserver and intraobserver variability and percentage error, and Student t-tests assessed measurement accuracy. Interclass correlation coefficient reliability demonstrated strong agreement for all variables measured (0.856-0.975). Percentage error between measured length and measured depth and the true measurement significantly varied with respect to both lesion depth (P = .003 and P = .005, respectively) and lesion size (P = .049 and P = .004, respectively). The 3D CT imaging is effective and reproducible in determining lesion size. Determination of Hill-Sachs interval width is also reliable when it is applied to the glenoid track concept. Measured values on 3D and 2-dimensional imaging using a conventional CT scanner may slightly underestimate true measurements. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Usefulness of the evaluation of preoperative sternal shape for reconstruction of pectus excavatum using three-dimensional computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Masahiko; Kondoh, Shohji; Kondoh, Yoshiaki; Akabane, Genichiroh [Nagano Children`s Hospital (Japan); Matsuo, Kiyoshi

    1997-04-01

    In the reconstruction of the pectus excavatum deformity, when sternal growth must be considered, it is desirable that osteotomy of the sternum be performed if necessary. From this standpoint, we evaluate the preoperative sternal shape using three-dimensional computed tomography. The sternum is outlined on the mid-sagittal plane, and the curved portions are examined. Preoperatively, the sternums are classified into 3 groups based on the number of curved portions. On the basis of these observations, we determine the position and degree of the sternal osteotomy and, if necessary, combined sternal osteotomy and augmentation using resected cartilage. We think that this method is useful not only for reconstruction of pectus excavatum but also in evaluating the postoperative shape of the thorax. (author)

  16. Cadaveric and three-dimensional computed tomography study of the morphology of the scapula with reference to reversed shoulder prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solano Alberto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The purpose of this study is to analyze the morphology of the scapula with reference to the glenoid component implantation in reversed shoulder prosthesis, in order to improve primary fixation of the component. Methods Seventy-three 3-dimensional computed tomography of the scapula and 108 scapular dry specimens were analyzed to determine the anterior and posterior length of the glenoid neck, the angle between the glenoid surface and the upper posterior column of the scapula and the angle between the major craneo-caudal glenoid axis and the base of the coracoid process and the upper posterior column. Results The anterior and posterior length of glenoid neck was classified into two groups named "short-neck" and "long-neck" with significant differences between them. The angle between the glenoid surface and the upper posterior column of the scapula was also classified into two different types: type I (mean 50°–52° and type II (mean 62,50°–64°, with significant differences between them (p Conclusion Scapular morphological variability advices for individual adjustments of glenoid component implantation in reversed total shoulder prosthesis. Three-dimensional computed tomography of the scapula constitutes an important tool when planning reversed prostheses implantation.

  17. Cadaveric and three-dimensional computed tomography study of the morphology of the scapula with reference to reversed shoulder prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Carlos; Corrales, Monica; Gonzalez, Gemma; Solano, Alberto; Cáceres, Enrique

    2008-10-10

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the morphology of the scapula with reference to the glenoid component implantation in reversed shoulder prosthesis, in order to improve primary fixation of the component. Seventy-three 3-dimensional computed tomography of the scapula and 108 scapular dry specimens were analyzed to determine the anterior and posterior length of the glenoid neck, the angle between the glenoid surface and the upper posterior column of the scapula and the angle between the major craneo-caudal glenoid axis and the base of the coracoid process and the upper posterior column. The anterior and posterior length of glenoid neck was classified into two groups named "short-neck" and "long-neck" with significant differences between them. The angle between the glenoid surface and the upper posterior column of the scapula was also classified into two different types: type I (mean 50 degrees-52 degrees ) and type II (mean 62.50 degrees-64 degrees ), with significant differences between them (p craneo-caudal glenoid axis and the base of the coracoid process averaged 18,25 degrees while the angle with the upper posterior column of the scapula averaged 8 degrees . Scapular morphological variability advices for individual adjustments of glenoid component implantation in reversed total shoulder prosthesis. Three-dimensional computed tomography of the scapula constitutes an important tool when planning reversed prostheses implantation.

  18. Three-dimensional anatomic analysis of the lingula and mandibular foramen: a cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findik, Yavuz; Yildirim, Derya; Baykul, Timuçin

    2014-03-01

    The authors analyzed the anatomic location differences of the mandibular foramen (MF) and lingula in a cone beam computed tomography study, aiming to obtain information that could be used when performing mandibular osteotomies and the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). Three-dimensional mandibular computed tomography images were reconstructed from data for 139 patients (278 sides) aged between 9 and 18 years (growth group, 27 patients) and aged 19 to 71 years (adult group, 112 patients). In the adult group, positive correlations were seen between right and left measurements. In the growth group, there are significant differences in lingula-anterior and MF-posterior ramus measurements. In the adult group, there are significant differences between man and woman MF-gonion distance measurements. Differences were seen in edentulous and asymmetry patients. The MF is an important anatomic landmark for ramus surgery and IANB. When applied to ramus operations and IANB, the anatomic data provided by this study may help surgeons gain more understanding of nerve position during surgery.

  19. Three-dimensional localization of implanted biomaterials in anatomical and histological specimens using combined X-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional surface reconstruction: a technical note.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    For adequate histological processing of implanted biomaterials or tissue-engineered constructs, it is sometimes essential to obtain insight into the localization of structures inside the tissue samples. Observation of three-dimensional (3D) surface reconstruction, including basic photorealistic

  20. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Voids in AM60B Magnesium Tensile Bars Using Computed Tomography Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, A M

    2001-05-01

    In an effort to increase automobile fuel efficiency as well as decrease the output of harmful greenhouse gases, the automotive industry has recently shown increased interest in cast light metals such as magnesium alloys in an effort to increase weight savings. Currently several magnesium alloys such as AZ91 and AM60B are being used in structural applications for automobiles. However, these magnesium alloys are not as well characterized as other commonly used structural metals such as aluminum. This dissertation presents a methodology to nondestructively quantify damage accumulation due to void behavior in three dimensions in die-cast magnesium AM60B tensile bars as a function of mechanical load. Computed tomography data was acquired after tensile bars were loaded up to and including failure, and analyzed to characterize void behavior as it relates to damage accumulation. Signal and image processing techniques were used along with a cluster labeling routine to nondestructively quantify damage parameters in three dimensions. Void analyses were performed including void volume distribution characterization, nearest neighbor distance calculations, shape parameters, and volumetric renderings of voids in the alloy. The processed CT data was used to generate input files for use in finite element simulations, both two- and three-dimensional. The void analyses revealed that the overwhelming source of failure in each tensile bar was a ring of porosity within each bar, possibly due to a solidification front inherent to the casting process. The measured damage parameters related to void nucleation, growth, and coalescence were shown to contribute significantly to total damage accumulation. Void volume distributions were characterized using a Weibull function, and the spatial distributions of voids were shown to be clustered. Two-dimensional finite element analyses of the tensile bars were used to fine-tune material damage models and a three-dimensional mesh of an extracted

  1. Coregistration of preoperative computed tomography and intraoperative three-dimensional rotational x-ray images for cochlear implant surgical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Paul C; van Deurzen, Martinus H W; Pluim, Josien P W; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-12-01

    A registration procedure of intraoperative three-dimensional rotational x-ray (3DRX) imaging and preoperative computed tomography (CT) imaging so that intraoperative CT quality imaging is available during cochlear implant surgery, providing detailed information concerning electrode position in the cochlea and its relation to surrounding bony structures. Retrospective case series Tertiary referral center The imaging of five patients who had undergone cochlear implant surgery is used to develop a semiautomatic registration procedure to integrate intraoperative 3DRX and preoperative CT. The method is implemented in advanced medical imaging software to compute the transformations. The electrode is segmented from the registered 3DRX images using a semiautomated approach. The segmented electrode is superimposed onto the CT data. The methods are quantitatively validated based on expert-labeled anatomical landmarks. These landmarks are identified in the CT and 3DRX images by an expert. Mean error of the registration procedure for five anatomical landmarks in millimeters. Quantitative analysis showed a mean error of between 0.5 and 1 mm for all anatomical landmarks, suggesting that the results are trustworthy. We developed a reliable procedure for the registration of intraoperative 3DRX imaging and preoperative CT imaging for cochlear implant surgery. This registration procedure provides the ENT surgeon intraoperative high-quality CT imaging during cochlear implant surgery.

  2. The accuracy of matching three-dimensional photographs with skin surfaces derived from cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maal, T J J; Plooij, J M; Rangel, F A; Mollemans, W; Schutyser, F A C; Bergé, S J

    2008-07-01

    The state-of-the-art diagnostic tools in oral and maxillofacial surgery and preoperative orthodontic treatment are mainly two-dimensional, and consequently reveal limitations in describing the three-dimensional (3D) structures of a patient's face. New 3D imaging techniques, such as 3D stereophotogrammetry (3D photograph) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), have been introduced. Image fusion, i.e. registration of a 3D photograph upon a CBCT, results in an accurate and photorealistic digital 3D data set of a patient's face. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of three different matching procedures. For 15 individuals the textured skin surface (3D photograph) and untextured skin surface (CBCT) were matched by two observers using three different methods to determine the accuracy of registration. The registration error was computed as the difference (mm) between all points of both surfaces. The registration errors were relatively large at the lateral neck, mouth and around the eyes. After exclusion of artefact regions from the matching process, 90% of the error was within+/-1.5 mm. The remaining error was probably caused by differences in head positioning, different facial expressions and artefacts during image acquisition. In conclusion, the 3D data set provides an accurate and photorealistic digital 3D representation of a patient's face.

  3. Construction of three-dimensional tooth model by micro-computed tomography and application for data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, A; Ohno, N

    2009-03-01

    The study of dental morphology is essential in terms of phylogeny. Advances in three-dimensional (3D) measurement devices have enabled us to make 3D images of teeth without destruction of samples. However, raw fundamental data on tooth shape requires complex equipment and techniques. An online database of 3D teeth models is therefore indispensable. We aimed to explore the basic methodology for constructing 3D teeth models, with application for data sharing. Geometric information on the human permanent upper left incisor was obtained using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Enamel, dentine, and pulp were segmented by thresholding of different gray-scale intensities. Segmented data were separately exported in STereo-Lithography Interface Format (STL). STL data were converted to Wavefront OBJ (OBJect), as many 3D computer graphics programs support the Wavefront OBJ format. Data were also applied to Quick Time Virtual Reality (QTVR) format, which allows the image to be viewed from any direction. In addition to Wavefront OBJ and QTVR data, the original CT series were provided as 16-bit Tag Image File Format (TIFF) images on the website. In conclusion, 3D teeth models were constructed in general-purpose data formats, using micro-CT and commercially available programs. Teeth models that can be used widely would benefit all those who study dental morphology.

  4. Evaluation of the three-dimensional deformities in scoliosis surgery with computed tomography: efficacy and relationship with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jae-Young; Suh, Seung-Woo; Easwar, T R; Modi, Hitesh N; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Park, Jung-Ho

    2011-09-01

    Prospective radiological and clinical study with scoliosis patients. To determine the pre- and postoperative differences in the three-dimensional (3D) parameters and relationships with the outcome in scoliosis surgery. Despite a proven important role of the 3D deformities in scoliosis, it is warranted to confirm the efficacy of these measurements, which carry a cost burden and radiation hazard. Fifty adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients who underwent correction surgery were enrolled in this study. Pre- and postoperative whole spine radiographs and computed tomography were performed. The vertebral rotation (VR), rib hump index (RH), sternal shift (SS) on computed tomography were measured at the level of the apex in each patient. In addition, the patients described the SRS 30 (scoliosis research society 30) and ODI (owestry disability index) score. And, the differences in the parameter and the relationships between the radiological and clinical outcomes were analyzed. There was significant decrease in the coronal curvature, RH, and SS after surgery (P < 0.0001). In addition, the VR decreased postoperatively but that was not significant (P = 0.236). There were significant relationships between the parameters in the coronal curvature, VR, RH, and SS, pre- and postoperatively (P < 0.05). However, regarding the pre- and postoperative differences, only the changes in the SS were related to changes in the coronal curvature (P = 0.006). In addition, there were significant relationships between the parameters and outcomes. The changes in ODI were related to changes in the coronal curvature, VR, RH, and SS (P < 0.0001, P = 0.039, P < 0.0001, P = 0.019, respectively). However, the changes in the SRS was only related to the changes in SS (P < 0.0001). There were significant correlations between the VR, RH, and SS with the coronal curvature, pre- and postoperatively. In addition, there were significant correlations between the 3D deformities and outcomes. Computed tomography

  5. Influence of scanning and reconstruction parameters on quality of three-dimensional surface models of the dental arches from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; Souza, P.C.; Jacobs, R.; Berti, S.D.; van der Stelt, P.

    2010-01-01

    The study aim is to investigate the influence of scan field, mouth opening, voxel size, and segmentation threshold selections on the quality of the three-dimensional (3D) surface models of the dental arches from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). 3D models of 25 patients scanned with one image

  6. A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.; Mollemans, W.; Clercq, C. De; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Lamoral, P.; Lippens, F.R.C.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new approach to acquire a three-dimensional virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning without the use of plaster dental models and without deformation of the facial soft-tissue mask. A "triple" cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of the spine using the EOS system: is it reliable? A comparative study using computed tomography imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Aubaidi, Z.; Lebel, D.; Oudjhane, K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision of three-dimensional geometry compared with computed tomography (CT) images. This retrospective study included patients who had undergone both imaging of the spine using the EOS imaging system and CT scanning of the spine. The apical vertebral o...

  8. The dental cavities of equine cheek teeth: three-dimensional reconstructions based on high resolution micro-computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopke Susan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies reported on the very complex morphology of the pulp system in equine cheek teeth. The continuous production of secondary dentine leads to distinct age-related changes of the endodontic cavity. Detailed anatomical knowledge of the dental cavities in all ages is required to explain the aetiopathology of typical equine endodontic diseases. Furthermore, data on mandibular and maxillary pulp systems is in high demand to provide a basis for the development of endodontic therapies. However, until now examination of the pulp cavity has been based on either sectioned teeth or clinical computed tomography. More precise results were expected by using micro-computed tomography with a resolution of about 0.1 mm and three-dimensional reconstructions based on previous greyscale analyses and histological verification. The aim of the present study was to describe the physiological configurations of the pulp system within a wide spectrum of tooth ages. Results Maxillary teeth: All morphological constituents of the endodontic cavity were present in teeth between 4 and 16 years: Triadan 06s displayed six pulp horns and five root canals, Triadan 07-10s five pulp horns and four root canals and Triadan 11s seven pulp horns and four to six root canals. A common pulp chamber was most frequent in teeth ≤5 years, but was found even in a tooth of 9 years. A large variety of pulp configurations was observed within 2.5 and 16 years post eruption, but most commonly a separation into mesial and distal pulp compartments was seen. Maxillary cheek teeth showed up to four separate pulp compartments but the frequency of two, three and four pulp compartments was not related to tooth age (P > 0.05. In Triadan 06s, pulp horn 6 was always connected to pulp horns 1 and 3 and root canal I. In Triadan 11s, pulp horns 7 and 8 were present in variable constitutions. Mandibular teeth: A common pulp chamber was present in teeth up to 15 years, but most

  9. [Three-dimensional localization and assessment of maxillary palatal impacted canines with cone-beam computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian-Nan; Gu, Yue-Guang; Zhao, Chun-Yang; Liu, Ke; Mo, Shi-Cheng; Li, Hu; Pan, Cheng-Qiong; Wang, Lin

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the location of maxillary palatal impacted canines and resorption of neighboring incisors with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-two healthy adolescent patients who had received orthodontic treatments at Stomatological Hospital of Nanjing Medical University were selected and scanned by CBCT. Palatal impacted maxillary canines were reconstructed by Dolphin imaging 11.0 software. The impactions, spatial relationships and classification relative to adjacent structures and incisor resorption were assessed. Most of the maxillary palatal impacted canines inclinated mesially and palatally. Mesial malpositions were more significantly prevalent in Class I and IV, and the prevalence rates were 30.8% and 38.5% respectively. Mesial inclinations of the impacted canines to occlusal plane were mostly between 53.8° and 68.5°, and the distances from the impacted canines to median sagittal plane were between 5.4 and 8.4 mm. Older the patient was, further the impacted canines mesiopalatal displaced and mesial inclined. The roots of 84.6% of lateral incisors and 19.2% of central incisors contacted impacted canines; Root resorption occurred in 50% of lateral incisors and 15.4% of central incisors, which predominantly located in apical third of the lateral incisors and middle third of the central incisors. A inverse correlation was found between the resorption rates of adjacent incisors and minimum distances from impacted canines to adjacent incisors. CBCT allows three dimensional evaluation of impaction and spatial relationships relative to adjacent structures. In addition, 3 dimensional measurement contributes to more accurate exhibition of the adjacent root resorptions, inclinations and depths of the impacted canines, which leads to more efficient guidance of maxillary palatal impacted canines treatment.

  10. Analysis of morphological changes after facial massage by a novel approach using three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, H; Okuda, I; Kunizawa, N; Inoue, T; Nakajima, Y; Amano, S

    2017-08-01

    Photograph-based visual scoring has been used for evaluation of facial morphological changes. Here, we describe a three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) method for objective analysis of facial and intra-facial (subcutaneous) changes. The effects of facial massage were examined using both methods. Subjects were 12 healthy female volunteers without facial scars or deformation (age 30-54 years, mean 39.4 years). Photograph-based scoring of massage-induced morphological changes was done at the nasolabial folds, upper, lower and lateral cheeks and lower eyelids. For 3D-CT evaluation, the virtual center axis (VCA) was set as the cranio-caudal longitudinal line, and the VCA-skin surface distances (VSDs) were measured. Massage-induced changes of VSD were calculated (facial massage-induced change rate, FMCR). Intra-facial (subcutaneous) changes were also evaluated. Photograph-based scoring revealed marked morphological changes of the nasolabial folds after facial massage, and changes of the lower, upper and lateral cheeks and lower eyelid were also observed in more than half of the subjects. FMCR values were significantly changed in the paranasal area, nasolabial fold area and cranial part of the mandibular area. Photograph-based scores at the lower cheek and lower eyelid were well correlated with FMCR in the inferior part of the nasolabial fold and the mandibular area, respectively. Massage-induced changes of subcutaneous fat tissues and facial expression muscles were also apparent on CT images. 3D-CT imaging is useful for objective evaluation of the effects of facial massage, including anatomical changes in subcutaneous structures. © 2016 The Authors. Skin Research and Technology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A comparative study of the deviation of the menton on posteroanterior cephalograms and three dimensional computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Sun Gene; Lee, Eun Joo; Kang, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jae Seo; Lim, Hoi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ja [School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Song, In Ja [Dept. of Nursing, Kwangju Women' s University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Facial asymmetry has been measured by the severity of deviation of the menton (Me) on posteroanterior (PA) cephalograms and three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). This study aimed to compare PA cephalograms and 3D CT regarding the severity of Me deviation and the direction of the Me. PA cephalograms and 3D CT images of 35 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery (19 males and 16 females, with an average age of 22.1±3.3 years) were retrospectively reviewed in this study. By measuring the distance and direction of the Me from the midfacial reference line and the midsagittal plane in the cephalograms and 3D CT, respectively, the x-coordinates (x1 and x2) of the Me were obtained in each image. The difference between the x-coordinates was calculated and statistical analysis was performed to compare the severity of Me deviation and the direction of the Me in the two imaging modalities. A statistically significant difference in the severity of Me deviation was found between the two imaging modalities (Δx=2.45±2.03 mm, p<0.05) using the one-sample t-test. Statistically significant agreement was observed in the presence of deviation (k=0.64, p<0.05) and in the severity of Me deviation (k=0.27, p<0.05). A difference in the direction of the Me was detected in three patients (8.6%). The severity of the Me deviation was found to vary according to the imaging modality in 16 patients (45.7%). The measurement of Me deviation may be different between PA cephalograms and 3D CT in some patients.

  12. Thoracic Temporal Subtraction Three Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D-CT: Screening for Vertebral Metastases of Primary Lung Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Iwano

    Full Text Available We developed an original, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD software that subtracts the initial thoracic vertebral three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT image from the follow-up 3D-CT image. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this CAD software during screening for vertebral metastases on follow-up CT images of primary lung cancer patients.The interpretation experiment included 30 sets of follow-up CT scans in primary lung cancer patients and was performed by two readers (readers A and B, who each had 2.5 years' experience reading CT images. In 395 vertebrae from C6 to L3, 46 vertebral metastases were identified as follows: osteolytic metastases (n = 17, osteoblastic metastases (n = 14, combined osteolytic and osteoblastic metastases (n = 6, and pathological fractures (n = 9. Thirty-six lesions were in the anterior component (vertebral body, and 10 lesions were in the posterior component (vertebral arch, transverse process, and spinous process. The area under the curve (AUC by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis and the sensitivity and specificity for detecting vertebral metastases were compared with and without CAD for each observer.Reader A detected 47 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 33 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader A detected 57 abnormalities, and 38 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.717 to 0.826, and on ROC curve analysis, AUC with CAD was significantly higher than that without CAD (0.849 vs. 0.902, p = 0.021. Reader B detected 40 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 36 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader B detected 44 abnormalities, and 39 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.783 to 0.848, and AUC with CAD was nonsignificantly higher than that without CAD (0.889 vs. 0.910, p = 0.341. Both readers detected more osteolytic and osteoblastic metastases with CAD than without CAD

  13. Kidney lower pole pelvicaliceal anatomy: comparative analysis between intravenous urogram and three-dimensional helical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid Filho, Daibes; Favorito, Luciano A; Costa, Waldemar S; Sampaio, Francisco J B

    2009-12-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate if there is any advantage of three-dimensional helical computed tomography (3D-HCT) over intravenous urogram (IVU) in the morphometric and morphological analysis of lower pole spatial anatomy of the kidney. We analyzed 52 renal collecting systems in 30 patients, ranging in age from 23 to 80 years. The study compared the following features: (1) the angle formed between the lower infundibulum and the renal pelvis (i.e., lower infundibulum-pelvic angle [IPA]), (2) the lower infundibulum diameter (ID), and (3) the spatial distribution and number of lower pole calices (i.e., caliceal distribution [CD]). The study started with the 3D-HCT images obtained for posterior reconstruction and analysis. Afterward, we obtained anteroposterior and oblique IVU images. For IPA (in degrees) we found a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) value of 75.79 +/- 15.3 with 3D-HCT and 77.4 +/- 17.17 with IVU, which were not statistically significant. For ID (in mm) we found a mean +/- SD value of 7.5 +/- 2.92 with 3D-HCT and 8.15 +/- 3.27 with IVU. For CD we found a mean +/- SD value of 2.37 +/- 0.75 calices with 3D-HCT and 2.43 +/- 0.67 calices with IVU. On analyzing the difference between 3D-HCT and IVU, we found a mean +/- SD value of 0.06 +/- 0.51, and we verified that 74.5% of the examinations compared did not present statistically significant difference, with a Wilcoxon p-value of 0.405. Although 3D-HCT is more precise to study calculus location, tumors, and vessels, IVU was also demonstrated to be as precise as 3D-HCT for studying the lower pole spatial anatomy. We did not observe any statistically significant difference in the measurements of IPA, ID, and CD obtained using 3D-HCT when compared with those obtained using IVU. Therefore, 3D-HCT does not present any advantage over IVU in the evaluation of lower pole caliceal anatomy.

  14. Three-dimensional micro computed tomography analysis of the lung vasculature and differential adipose proteomics in the Sugen/hypoxia rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Shields, Kelly J.; Verdelis, Kostas; Passineau, Michael J.; Faight, Erin M.; Zourelias, Lee; Wu, Changgong; Chong, Rong; Raymond L. Benza

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease characterized by significant vascular remodeling. The obesity epidemic has produced great interest in the relationship between small visceral adipose tissue depots producing localized inflammatory conditions, which may link metabolism, innate immunity, and vascular remodeling. This study used novel micro computed tomography (microCT) three-dimensional modeling to investigate the degree of remodeling of the lung vasculature and differenti...

  15. Dental application of novel finite element analysis software for three-dimensional finite element modeling of a dentulous mandible from its computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keiko; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ker-Kong; Nagamatsu, Yuki; Kakigawa, Hiroshi; Masumi, Shin-ich

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on the application of novel finite-element analysis software for constructing a finite-element model from the computed tomography data of a human dentulous mandible. The finite-element model is necessary for evaluating the mechanical response of the alveolar part of the mandible, resulting from occlusal force applied to the teeth during biting. Commercially available patient-specific general computed tomography-based finite-element analysis software was solely applied to the finite-element analysis for the extraction of computed tomography data. The mandibular bone with teeth was extracted from the original images. Both the enamel and the dentin were extracted after image processing, and the periodontal ligament was created from the segmented dentin. The constructed finite-element model was reasonably accurate using a total of 234,644 nodes and 1,268,784 tetrahedral and 40,665 shell elements. The elastic moduli of the heterogeneous mandibular bone were determined from the bone density data of the computed tomography images. The results suggested that the software applied in this study is both useful and powerful for creating a more accurate three-dimensional finite-element model of a dentulous mandible from the computed tomography data without the need for any other software.

  16. Three-dimensional computer graphics-based ankle morphometry with computerized tomography for total ankle replacement design and positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Chung; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Leardini, Alberto; Lu, Tung-Wu; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2014-05-01

    Morphometry of the bones of the ankle joint is important for the design of joint replacements and their surgical implantations. However, very little three-dimensional (3D) data are available and not a single study has addressed the Chinese population. Fifty-eight fresh frozen Chinese cadaveric ankle specimens, 26 females, and 32 males, were CT-scanned in the neutral position and their 3D computer graphics-based models were reconstructed. The 3D morphology of the distal tibia/fibula segment and the full talus was analyzed by measuring 31 parameters, defining the relevant dimensions, areas, and volumes from the models. The measurements were compared statistically between sexes and with previously reported data from Caucasian subjects. The results showed that, within a general similarity of ankle morphology between the current Chinese and previous Caucasian subjects groups, there were significant differences in 9 out of the 31 parameters analyzed. From a quantitative comparison with available prostheses designed for the Caucasian population, few of these designs have both tibial and talar components suitable in dimension for the Chinese population. The current data will be helpful for the sizing, design, and surgical positioning of ankle replacements and for surgical instruments, especially for the Chinese population. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The value of three-dimensional helical computed tomography for the retrograde flexible ureteronephroscopy in the treatment of lower pole calyx stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Lyu, Jian-Lin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study was to determine if there is any advantage of three-dimensional helical computed tomography (3D-HCT) over intravenous urogram (IVU) for the retrograde flexible ureteronephroscopy in the treatment of lower pole calyx stones. From June 2012 to January 2014, a total of 52 cases of lower pole renal stones underwent retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) in our center. All patients underwent a preoperative IVU and three-dimensional helical computed tomography urography (3D-CTU) program to define the collecting system anatomy, manly concerning the following lower pole features; infundibu-lopelvic angle (IPA), infundibular length (IL), and infundibular width (IW). The examinations were performed in the same center of reference with a standardized method and with 3D-HCT Siemens Somaton Plus equipment. The measurements were performed by the same researcher, using a ruler and a square. Based on clinical threshold difference of the anatomic factors on an IVU image to compare the difference between an IVU image and a 3D-CT image of 52 patients, the IPA was IVU when analyzing the morphometric and the morphological features of kidney lower pole spatial anatomy for the retrograde flexible ureteronephroscopy in the treatment of lower pole calyx stones.

  18. The accuracy of matching three-dimensional photographs with skin surfaces derived from cone-beam computed tomography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maal, T.J.J.; Plooij, J.M.; Rangel, F.A.; Mollemans, W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Berge, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    The state-of-the-art diagnostic tools in oral and maxillofacial surgery and preoperative orthodontic treatment are mainly two-dimensional, and consequently reveal limitations in describing the three-dimensional (3D) structures of a patient's face. New 3D imaging techniques, such as 3D

  19. Three-dimensional longitudinal changes in craniofacial growth in untreated hemifacial microsomia patients with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibazaki-Yorozuya, Reiko; Yamada, Akira; Nagata, Satoru; Ueda, Kouichi; Miller, Arthur J; Maki, Koutaro

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concept that the affected and contralateral sides do not grow at the same rate in patients with hemifacial microsomia. Changes in the cranial base, maxilla, mandible, and occlusal plane were evaluated on 3-dimensional images from cone-beam computed tomography data in untreated patients. Six patients were classified as having mandibular Pruzansky/Kaban type I, IIA, or IIB hemifacial microsomia. Cone-beam computed tomography (MercuRay; Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan) scans were taken before orthodontic treatment during both growth and postpuberty periods. The cranial base as defined by the position of the mastoid process was in a different position between the affected and contralateral control sides. The nasomaxillary length or height was shorter on the affected side for all 6 patients with hemifacial microsomia regardless of its severity, and it grew less than on the contralateral control side in 5 of the 6 patients. The occlusal plane angle became more inclined in 4 of the 6 patients. The mandibular ramus was shorter on the affected side in all patients and grew less on the affected side in 5 of the 6 patients. The mandibular body grew slower, the same, or faster than on the control side. The cranial base, position of the condyle, lengths of the condyle and ramus, and positions of the gonial angle and condyle can vary between the affected and contralateral control sides of patients with hemifacial microsomia, with the ramus and nasomaxillary length usually growing slower than they grow on the control side. These results suggest that many factors affect the growth rate of the craniofacial region and, specifically, the mandible in patients with hemifacial microsomia. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The value of three-dimensional helical computed tomography for the retrograde flexible ureteronephroscopy in the treatment of lower pole calyx stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to determine if there is any advantage of three-dimensional helical computed tomography (3D-HCT over intravenous urogram (IVU for the retrograde flexible ureteronephroscopy in the treatment of lower pole calyx stones. Methods: From June 2012 to January 2014, a total of 52 cases of lower pole renal stones underwent retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS in our center. All patients underwent a preoperative IVU and three-dimensional helical computed tomography urography (3D-CTU program to define the collecting system anatomy, manly concerning the following lower pole features; infundibu-lopelvic angle (IPA, infundibular length (IL, and infundibular width (IW. The examinations were performed in the same center of reference with a standardized method and with 3D-HCT Siemens Somaton Plus equipment. The measurements were performed by the same researcher, using a ruler and a square. Results: Based on clinical threshold difference of the anatomic factors on an IVU image to compare the difference between an IVU image and a 3D-CT image of 52 patients, the IPA was <30° when measured on intravenous pyelography (IVP for 21 patients. We found that with the IPA of <30° measured with IVP only 19% (4/21 were correctly classified in the same size category using 3D-HCT, whereas 81% (17/21 were upgraded to 40–50° on 3D-CT. This difference was significant between IVP and 3D-HCT. Conclusions: 3D-HCT has advantages over IVU when analyzing the morphometric and the morphological features of kidney lower pole spatial anatomy for the retrograde flexible ureteronephroscopy in the treatment of lower pole calyx stones. Keywords: Intravenous urogram, Computed tomography urography, Flexible ureterorenoscopy, Lower pole, Renal stones

  1. Automated quantification of three-dimensional subject motion to monitor image quality in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, Yves; Ayres, Fábio J.; Boyd, Steven K.

    2011-10-01

    Subject motion during acquisition of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) results in image artifacts and interferes with quantification of bone architecture used to study bone-related diseases such as osteoporosis. We propose an automatic method to measure physical subject motion that frequently takes place during acquisition. Three measures derived from projection data are proposed to quantify motion artifacts: in-plane translation (εT) and in-plane rotation (εR) utilizing projection moments and longitudinal translation (εz) based on tracking projection profiles. Validation was performed using a phantom containing sections of distal human cadaver radii attached to a mechanical device to precisely control in-plane rotation and longitudinal translation that was intentionally performed during HR-pQCT data acquisition. Motion measured by the new automated technique was compared to the known applied motion, and related to percent errors in morphological parameters quantifying bone properties. It was determined that of the three proposed measures, εT best captured a quantified representation of image quality. εT linearly relates to true physical in-plane translational motion (r2 = 0.95, pmovements and combines well with εT to fully characterize physical motion artifacts. The magnitude of εT corresponds to morphological parameter error and is an excellent basis to select high-quality images. Morphological parameter errors from these experiments confirmed our earlier computer simulations which showed that increased subject motion resulted in artificially higher trabecular number, and artificially lower bone mineral density and cortical thickness. The magnitude and, notably, the uncertainty of the morphological errors increased with increased physical motion, and this impedes a direct linear compensation of parameter errors. The automated method presented provides a basis for consistent and objective quality assurance for HR

  2. Three-dimensional in vivo imaging of the murine liver: a micro-computed tomography-based anatomical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Fiebig

    Full Text Available Various murine models are currently used to study acute and chronic pathological processes of the liver, and the efficacy of novel therapeutic regimens. The increasing availability of high-resolution small animal imaging modalities presents researchers with the opportunity to precisely identify and describe pathological processes of the liver. To meet the demands, the objective of this study was to provide a three-dimensional illustration of the macroscopic anatomical location of the murine liver lobes and hepatic vessels using small animal imaging modalities. We analysed micro-CT images of the murine liver by integrating additional information from the published literature to develop comprehensive illustrations of the macroscopic anatomical features of the murine liver and hepatic vasculature. As a result, we provide updated three-dimensional illustrations of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver and hepatic vessels using micro-CT. The information presented here provides researchers working in the field of experimental liver disease with a comprehensive, easily accessable overview of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver.

  3. Generation of realistic virtual nodules based on three-dimensional spatial resolution in lung computed tomography: A pilot phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Akihiro; Ohkubo, Masaki; Murao, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toru; Wada, Shinichi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this feasibility study using phantoms was to propose a novel method for obtaining computer-generated realistic virtual nodules in lung computed tomography (CT). In the proposed methodology, pulmonary nodule images obtained with a CT scanner are deconvolved with the point spread function (PSF) in the scan plane and slice sensitivity profile (SSP) measured for the scanner; the resultant images are referred to as nodule-like object functions. Next, by convolving the nodule-like object function with the PSF and SSP of another (target) scanner, the virtual nodule can be generated so that it has the characteristics of the spatial resolution of the target scanner. To validate the methodology, the authors applied physical nodules of 5-, 7- and 10-mm-diameter (uniform spheres) included in a commercial CT test phantom. The nodule-like object functions were calculated from the sphere images obtained with two scanners (Scanner A and Scanner B); these functions were referred to as nodule-like object functions A and B, respectively. From these, virtual nodules were generated based on the spatial resolution of another scanner (Scanner C). By investigating the agreement of the virtual nodules generated from the nodule-like object functions A and B, the equivalence of the nodule-like object functions obtained from different scanners could be assessed. In addition, these virtual nodules were compared with the real (true) sphere images obtained with Scanner C. As a practical validation, five types of laboratory-made physical nodules with various complicated shapes and heterogeneous densities, similar to real lesions, were used. The nodule-like object functions were calculated from the images of these laboratory-made nodules obtained with Scanner A. From them, virtual nodules were generated based on the spatial resolution of Scanner C and compared with the real images of laboratory-made nodules obtained with Scanner C. Good agreement of the virtual nodules generated from

  4. Technical note: Three-dimensional imaging of rumen tissue for morphometric analysis using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, M A; Garcia, F; Lowerison, M; Gordon, K; Metcalf, J A; Hurtig, M

    2014-12-01

    Rumen development in calves has been evaluated by measuring papillae length, width, and density using microscopy for over 50 yr. Although common in the literature, disadvantages to this method exist, such as large variations in rumen papillae size and shape, small numbers of total papillae being measured, and the time required. The objective of this study was to develop a more effective technique for assessing rumen papillae using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and to compare this technique with microscopy. Rumen tissue was collected from the ventral sac of 20 postweaned bull calves at 55 d of age, immediately fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin for 48 h, and stored in 70% ethanol at 4°C before the contrast enhancement. After evaluation of contrast-enhancement protocols, it was determined that mercury chloride provided the most pronounced contrast for accurate micro-CT imaging based on relative density of the papillae. A 1-cm(2) tissue section from the ventral sac of all bull calves was tensioned on a rapid prototyped curved plastic holder and imaged at 4 5 μm resolution for 56 min using a GE Locus Explore micro-CT (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI). MicroView V2.2 software (General Electric) was used to create a 3-dimensional virtual model of the entire sample. The length and width of papillae were measured 3-dimensionally and compared with measurements of papillae under the light microscope taken from the same region. The length and width measurements using micro-CT (2.47 ± 0.12 and 0.55 ± 0.01 mm) compared with light microscope (2.96 ± 0.03 and 0.86 ± 0.01 mm) were significantly smaller. The difference may reflect a more accurate determination in the base of the rumen tissue with micro-CT or the specificity of mercury chloride to bind only to intact rumen tissue. The mean number of papillae per centimeter squared viewed using micro-CT was 128.5 ± 33.9 with a total surface area of 681.8 ± 112.4 mm(2) and volume of 156 mm(3) per sample. Micro

  5. Two- and three-dimensional reformatted computed tomography imaging analysis of the lumbosacropelvic structure in degenerative anterolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergun, T., E-mail: tarkanergun@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Alanya Teaching and Medical Research Center, Alanya (Turkey); Sahin, M.S. [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Baskent University, Alanya Teaching and Medical Research Center, Alanya (Turkey); Lakadamyali, H. [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Alanya Teaching and Medical Research Center, Alanya (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: To evaluate the differences in the lumbosacropelvic structure between normal individuals and those with pseudospondylolisthesis. Materials and methods: The renal stone protocol abdominal CT images of 452 patients were retrospectively analysed. Twenty individuals who had degenerative anterolisthesis at the L5-S1 level were included in the study. Moreover, a control group of individuals was formed, similar in age and gender to the study group. A number of linear and angular lumbosacral morphological parameters were evaluated using two- and three-dimensionally reformatted CT images. The data of the two groups were compared using the t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: There was an association between spondylolisthesis and decreased thickness of the transverse process (p = 0.01), the height of the iliac crest (p = 0.028), lumbar angle (p = 0.041), sacral table angle (p = 0.033), sacral table index (p = 0.0001), sacral kyphosis (p = 0.025), sacral slope (p = 0.007), and width of the transverse process (p = 0.038), and increased transverse articular dimension of the facet joint (p = 0.003), axial angle of the facet joint (p = 0.002), sagittal angle of the facet joint (p = 0.012), S1 vertebra interfacet index (p = 0.003), the distance between the L5 vertebral transverse process and the iliac crest (p = 0.003), pelvic incidence (p = 0.016), L5 vertebra posterior angle (p = 0.001), and intersacroiliac joint angle (p = 0.024). Conclusion: The lumbosacropelvic morphology in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis is quite different from that of normal individuals. These abnormalities should be revealed using imaging methods as they can be defining for pseudospondylolisthesis development and have important effects on therapy planning.

  6. Two- and three-dimensional reformatted computed tomography imaging analysis of the lumbosacropelvic structure in degenerative anterolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, T; Sahin, M S; Lakadamyali, H

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the differences in the lumbosacropelvic structure between normal individuals and those with pseudospondylolisthesis. The renal stone protocol abdominal CT images of 452 patients were retrospectively analysed. Twenty individuals who had degenerative anterolisthesis at the L5-S1 level were included in the study. Moreover, a control group of individuals was formed, similar in age and gender to the study group. A number of linear and angular lumbosacral morphological parameters were evaluated using two- and three-dimensionally reformatted CT images. The data of the two groups were compared using the t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. There was an association between spondylolisthesis and decreased thickness of the transverse process (p=0.01), the height of the iliac crest (p=0.028), lumbar angle (p=0.041), sacral table angle (p=0.033), sacral table index (p=0.0001), sacral kyphosis (p=0.025), sacral slope (p=0.007), and width of the transverse process (p=0.038), and increased transverse articular dimension of the facet joint (p=0.003), axial angle of the facet joint (p=0.002), sagittal angle of the facet joint (p=0.012), S1 vertebra interfacet index (p=0.003), the distance between the L5 vertebral transverse process and the iliac crest (p=0.003), pelvic incidence (p=0.016), L5 vertebra posterior angle (p=0.001), and intersacroiliac joint angle (p=0.024). The lumbosacropelvic morphology in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis is quite different from that of normal individuals. These abnormalities should be revealed using imaging methods as they can be defining for pseudospondylolisthesis development and have important effects on therapy planning. Copyright © 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Computational methods for three-dimensional microscopy reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Approaches to the recovery of three-dimensional information on a biological object, which are often formulated or implemented initially in an intuitive way, are concisely described here based on physical models of the object and the image-formation process. Both three-dimensional electron microscopy and X-ray tomography can be captured in the same mathematical framework, leading to closely-related computational approaches, but the methodologies differ in detail and hence pose different challenges. The editors of this volume, Gabor T. Herman and Joachim Frank, are experts in the respective methodologies and present research at the forefront of biological imaging and structural biology.   Computational Methods for Three-Dimensional Microscopy Reconstruction will serve as a useful resource for scholars interested in the development of computational methods for structural biology and cell biology, particularly in the area of 3D imaging and modeling.

  8. [Three-dimensional survey of the whole mandibular canal and mandibular morphology by cone beam computed tomography in normal young people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lanlan; Qu, Weiguo; Li, Yang; Qu, Zhenyu; Wang, Ji

    2016-04-01

    This research aimed to analyze the three-dimensional position of mandibular canal (MC) and man of MC and its relationship with the surrounding structures dibular morphology of normal young males and females by using data from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), as well as to provide an anatomical basis for clinical surgery of the mandible. Normal occlusion and CBCT scans of 29 normal young people were conducted. InVivo 5 software was used to reconstruct the mandible, anchor the points, and measure the jaw shape and three-dimensional course of MC. All measurements were analyzed with SSPS 17.0 software. The MC lingual bone cortex was thinner than the MC buccal bone cortex, and the distance of the MC to the buccal bone cortex gradually increased. However, the distance of the MC to the tongue bone cortex and alveolar crest gradually decreased from proximal to distal. In addition, the distance of the MC to the mandibular lower margin was minimal at the first molar and reached the maximum at the second premolar. No significant difference was observed among the heights, widths, and thicknesses of the left and right sides of the cortical bone of the mandibular body cross sections. From the midline to the farthest point, the height and lower one-third thickness of the lingual cortical bone of the mandibular body cross sections gradually decreased, whereas the width of the upper cross section and upper one-third thickness of the buccal cortical bone gradually increased. Significant difference was observed in some measured values. After MC enter into the mandibular foramen, it moved away from the lingual to the buccal bone but gradually returned to the lingual bone; its general course is closer to the lingual bone. The mandibles of males are thicker than those of females. CBCT can accurately display the course of MC and its relationship with the surrounding structures.

  9. On-line use of three-dimensional marker trajectory estimation from cone-beam computed tomography projections for precise setup in radiotherapy for targets with respiratory motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Esben S; Høyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walther; Nielsen, Jens E; Larsen, Lars P; Poulsen, Per R

    2012-05-01

    To develop and evaluate accurate and objective on-line patient setup based on a novel semiautomatic technique in which three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated from two-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections. Seven treatment courses of stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors were delivered in 21 fractions in total to 6 patients by a linear accelerator. Each patient had two to three gold markers implanted close to the tumors. Before treatment, a CBCT scan with approximately 675 two-dimensional projections was acquired during a full gantry rotation. The marker positions were segmented in each projection. From this, the three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated using a probability based method. The required couch shifts for patient setup were calculated from the mean marker positions along the trajectories. A motion phantom moving with known tumor trajectories was used to examine the accuracy of the method. Trajectory-based setup was retrospectively used off-line for the first five treatment courses (15 fractions) and on-line for the last two treatment courses (6 fractions). Automatic marker segmentation was compared with manual segmentation. The trajectory-based setup was compared with setup based on conventional CBCT guidance on the markers (first 15 fractions). Phantom measurements showed that trajectory-based estimation of the mean marker position was accurate within 0.3 mm. The on-line trajectory-based patient setup was performed within approximately 5 minutes. The automatic marker segmentation agreed with manual segmentation within 0.36 ± 0.50 pixels (mean ± SD; pixel size, 0.26 mm in isocenter). The accuracy of conventional volumetric CBCT guidance was compromised by motion smearing (≤21 mm) that induced an absolute three-dimensional setup error of 1.6 ± 0.9 mm (maximum, 3.2) relative to trajectory-based setup. The first on-line clinical use of trajectory estimation from CBCT projections for precise

  10. Three dimensional time reversal optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Cai, W.; Alrubaiee, M.; Xu, M.; Gayen, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT) approach is used to detect and locate absorptive targets embedded in a highly scattering turbid medium to assess its potential in breast cancer detection. TROT experimental arrangement uses multi-source probing and multi-detector signal acquisition and Multiple-Signal-Classification (MUSIC) algorithm for target location retrieval. Light transport from multiple sources through the intervening medium with embedded targets to the detectors is represented by a response matrix constructed using experimental data. A TR matrix is formed by multiplying the response matrix by its transpose. The eigenvectors with leading non-zero eigenvalues of the TR matrix correspond to embedded objects. The approach was used to: (a) obtain the location and spatial resolution of an absorptive target as a function of its axial position between the source and detector planes; and (b) study variation in spatial resolution of two targets at the same axial position but different lateral positions. The target(s) were glass sphere(s) of diameter ~9 mm filled with ink (absorber) embedded in a 60 mm-thick slab of Intralipid-20% suspension in water with an absorption coefficient μa ~ 0.003 mm-1 and a transport mean free path lt ~ 1 mm at 790 nm, which emulate the average values of those parameters for human breast tissue. The spatial resolution and accuracy of target location depended on axial position, and target contrast relative to the background. Both the targets could be resolved and located even when they were only 4-mm apart. The TROT approach is fast, accurate, and has the potential to be useful in breast cancer detection and localization.

  11. Volumetric stability of autogenous bone graft with mandibular body bone: cone-beam computed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong-Geun; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the volumetric change of augmented autobone harvested from mandibular body cortical bone, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and three-dimensional reconstruction. In addition, the clinical success of dental implants placed 4 to 6 months after bone grafting was also evaluated. Ninety-five patients (48 men and 47 women) aged 19 to 72 years were included in this study. A total of 128 graft sites were evaluated. The graft sites were divided into three parts: anterior and both posterior regions of one jaw. All patients included in the study were scheduled for an onlay graft and implantation using a two-stage procedure. The dental implants were inserted 4 to 6 months after the bone graft. Volumetric stability was evaluated by serial CBCT images. No major complications were observed for the donor sites. A total of 128 block bones were used to augment severely resorbed alveolar bone. Only 1 of the 128 bone grafts was resorbed by more than half, and that was due to infection. In total, the average amount of residual grafted bone after resorption at the recipient sites was 74.6%±8.4%. Volumetric stability of mandibular body autogenous block grafts is predictable. The procedure is satisfactory for patients who want dental implants regardless of atrophic alveolar bone.

  12. The location of midfacial landmarks according to the method of establishing the midsagittal reference plane in three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of facial asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheock; Yoon, Suk Ja [Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Song, In Ja [Dept. of Nursing, Kwangju Women' s University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of methods of establishing the midsagittal reference plane (MRP) on the locations of midfacial landmarks in the three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis of facial asymmetry. A total of 24 patients (12 male and 12 female; mean age, 22.5 years; age range, 18.2-29.7 years) with facial asymmetry were included in this study. The MRP was established using two different methods on each patient's CT image. The x-coordinates of four midfacial landmarks (the menton, nasion, upper incisor, and lower incisor) were obtained by measuring the distance and direction of the landmarks from the MRP, and the two methods were compared statistically. The direction of deviation and the severity of asymmetry found using each method were also compared. The x-coordinates of the four anatomic landmarks all showed a statistically significant difference between the two methods of establishing the MRP. For the nasion and lower incisor, six patients (25.0%) showed a change in the direction of deviation. The severity of asymmetry also changed in 16 patients (66.7%). The results of this study suggest that the locations of midfacial landmarks change significantly according to the method used to establish the MRP.

  13. The use of cone beam computed tomography to predetermine root canal lengths in molar teeth: a comparison between two-dimensional and three-dimensional measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchorz, J P; Poxleitner, P J; Stampf, S; Patzelt, S B M; Rottke, D; Hellwig, E; Altenburger, M J

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) root canal length measurements in molar teeth using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Root canal lengths of twenty molar teeth were measured with two different CBCT approaches. After adjusting the CBCT images, 2D measurements were performed within the sagittal plane between the apical foramen and the coronal reference (cusp). The 3D approach measured centrically in axial planes. A linear mixed model with random intercepts was fitted to compare differences between methods (2D and 3D). The correlation between CBCT measurements and the actual root canal length was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Differences between 3D measurements and the actual root canal lengths were significantly smaller compared to the 2D approach (p < 0.001). Mean differences were 0.32 and 0.58 mm, respectively. A high correlation was found between the actual root canal length and 3D measurements (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.97). Compared to the actual root canal length, 80 % of the 3D measurements were within the limits of ±0.5 mm. 3D measurements of root canals in molar teeth are more accurate than simple 2D measurements and show a high correlation to the actual lengths. In cases where a CBCT is already available, root canal lengths in molar teeth can be accurately predetermined using a standardized 3D approach.

  14. Use of cone-beam computed tomography and three-dimensional modeling for assessment of anomalous pulp canal configuration: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Sinanoglu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT scans appears to be a valuable method for assessing pulp canal configuration. The aim of this report is to describe endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with aberrant pulp canal morphology detected by CBCT and confirmed by 3D modeling. An accessory canal was suspected during endodontic treatment of the mandibular left second premolar in a 21 year old woman with a chief complaint of pulsating pain. Axial cross-sectional CBCT scans revealed that the pulp canal divided into mesiobuccal, lingual, and buccal canals in the middle third and ended as four separate foramina. 3D modeling confirmed the anomalous configuration of the fused root with a deep lingual groove. Endodontic treatment of the tooth was completed in two appointments. The root canals were obturated using lateral compaction of gutta-percha and root canal sealer. The tooth remained asymptomatic and did not develop periapical pathology until 12 months postoperatively. CBCT and 3D modeling enable preoperative evaluation of aberrant root canal systems and facilitate endodontic treatment.

  15. Three-dimensional visualization of the microvasculature of bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats by x-ray phase-contrast imaging computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Ruijiao; Zhao, Xinyan; Hu, Doudou; Jian, Jianbo; Wang, Tailing; Hu, Chunhong

    2015-07-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) can substantially enhance contrast, and is particularly useful in differentiating biological soft tissues with small density differences. Combined with computed tomography (CT), PCI-CT enables the acquisition of accurate microstructures inside biological samples. In this study, liver microvasculature was visualized without contrast agents in vitro with PCI-CT using liver fibrosis samples induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) in rats. The histological section examination confirmed the correspondence of CT images with the microvascular morphology of the samples. By means of the PCI-CT and three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique, 3D microvascular structures in samples from different stages of liver fibrosis were clearly revealed. Different types of blood vessels, including portal veins and hepatic veins, in addition to ductular proliferation and bile ducts, could be distinguished with good sensitivity, excellent specificity and excellent accuracy. The study showed that PCI-CT could assess the morphological changes in liver microvasculature that result from fibrosis and allow characterization of the anatomical and pathological features of the microvasculature. With further development of PCI-CT technique, it may become a novel noninvasive imaging technique for the auxiliary analysis of liver fibrosis.

  16. Anatomical study of the course of the inferior alveolar nerve in craniofacial microsomia using three-dimensional computed tomography: correlation with the Pruzansky classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, C; Dakpe, S; Davrou, J; Dîner, P-A; Devauchelle, B; Vazquez, M-P; Picard, A; Kadlub, N

    2015-05-01

    Dysmorphogenesis of the mandible complicates assessment of the course of the inferior alveolar nerve in patients with craniofacial microsomia. Our aim in the present study was to correlate the anatomical description of the course with the Pruzansky classification (which indicates the severity of hemifacial microsomia), in the mandibles of 22 affected patients using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT). We measured the distance between fixed landmarks on the normal and the microsomic sides. The normal sides served as controls. In the group of five patients with type I disease, we found no significant differences between the unaffected and the microsomic side. In the nine patients with Pruzansky type II disease morphological views of the course showed a between-side difference in the length of the bony canal and the height of the mandibular ramus. In the five patients with Pruzansky type III disease, there was no bony canal. Three-dimensional CT analysis may be of value in plotting the course of the inferior alveolar nerve and assisting the surgeon in mandibular osteotomy or distraction osteogenesis. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental image replacement on cone beam computed tomography with three-dimensional optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, or bite tray impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S-H; Lee, J-W; Lim, S-H; Kim, Y-H; Kim, M-K

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the accuracy of dental image replacement on a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image using digital image data from three-dimensional (3D) optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression. A Bracket Typodont dental model was used. CBCT of the dental model was performed and the data were converted to stereolithography (STL) format. Three experimental materials, a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression, were optically scanned in 3D. STL files converted from the CBCT of the Typodont model and the 3D optical-scanned STL files of the study materials were image-registered. The error range of each methodology was measured and compared with a 3D optical scan of the Typodont. For the three materials, the smallest error observed was 0.099±0.114mm (mean error±standard deviation) for registering the 3D optical scan image of the dental cast onto the CBCT dental image. Although producing a dental cast can be laborious, the study results indicate that it is the preferred method. In addition, an occlusal bite is recommended when bite impression materials are used. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of the high-pitch mode in dual-source computed tomography on the accuracy of three-dimensional volumetry of solid pulmonary nodules: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Ho; Oh, Yu Whan; Ham, Soo Youn [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Eun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Yeol [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the influence of high-pitch mode (HPM) in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) volumetry for solid pulmonary nodules. A lung phantom implanted with 45 solid pulmonary nodules (n = 15 for each of 4-mm, 6-mm, and 8-mm in diameter) was scanned twice, first in conventional pitch mode (CPM) and then in HPM using DSCT. The relative percentage volume errors (RPEs) of 3D volumetry were compared between the HPM and CPM. In addition, the intermode volume variability (IVV) of 3D volumetry was calculated. In the measurement of the 6-mm and 8-mm nodules, there was no significant difference in RPE (p > 0.05, respectively) between the CPM and HPM (IVVs of 1.2 +/- 0.9%, and 1.7 +/- 1.5%, respectively). In the measurement of the 4-mm nodules, the mean RPE in the HPM (35.1 +/- 7.4%) was significantly greater (p < 0.01) than that in the CPM (18.4 +/- 5.3%), with an IVV of 13.1 +/- 6.6%. However, the IVVs were in an acceptable range (< 25%), regardless of nodule size. The accuracy of 3D volumetry with HPM for solid pulmonary nodule is comparable to that with CPM. However, the use of HPM may adversely affect the accuracy of 3D volumetry for smaller (< 5 mm in diameter) nodule.

  19. Expert consensus workshop report: Guideline for three-dimensional printing template-assisted computed tomography-guided 125I seeds interstitial implantation brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive 125I seeds (RIS interstitial implantation brachytherapy has been a first-line treatment for early-stage cancer of the prostate gland. However, its poor accuracy and homogeneity has limited its indication and hampered its popularization for a long time. Intriguingly, scholars based in China introduced computed tomography (CT-guided technology to improve the accuracy and homogeneity of RIS implantation and broadened the indications. Then, they creatively designed and introduced three-dimensional printing coplanar template (3D-PCT and 3D printing noncoplanar template (3D-PNCT into the practice of RIS implantation. Use of such templates makes RIS implantation more precise and efficacious and aids preoperative planning, real-time dose optimization, and postoperative planning. However, studies on the standard workflow for 3D-PT-assisted CT-guided RIS implantation have not been published. Therefore, the China Northern Radioactive Seeds Brachytherapy Group organized multidisciplinary experts to formulate the guideline for this emerging treatment modality. This guideline aims at standardizing 3D-PT-assisted CT-guided RIS implantation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes and for preventing and managing postoperative complications.

  20. Three-dimensional micro computed tomography analysis of the lung vasculature and differential adipose proteomics in the Sugen/hypoxia rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Kelly J; Verdelis, Kostas; Passineau, Michael J; Faight, Erin M; Zourelias, Lee; Wu, Changgong; Chong, Rong; Benza, Raymond L

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease characterized by significant vascular remodeling. The obesity epidemic has produced great interest in the relationship between small visceral adipose tissue depots producing localized inflammatory conditions, which may link metabolism, innate immunity, and vascular remodeling. This study used novel micro computed tomography (microCT) three-dimensional modeling to investigate the degree of remodeling of the lung vasculature and differential proteomics to determine small visceral adipose dysfunction in rats with severe PAH. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a subcutaneous injection of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor blocker (Sugen 5416) with subsequent hypoxia exposure for 3 weeks (SU/hyp). At 12 weeks after hypoxia, microCT analysis showed a decrease in the ratio of vascular to total tissue volume within the SU/hyp group (mean ± standard deviation: 0.27 ± 0.066; P = 0.02) with increased vascular separation (0.37 ± 0.062 mm; P = 0.02) when compared with the control (0.34 ± 0.084 and 0.30 ± 0.072 mm). Differential proteomics detected an up-regulation of complement protein 3 (C3; SU/hyp∶control ratio = 2.86) and the adipose tissue-specific fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4, 2.66) in the heart adipose of the SU/hyp. Significant remodeling of the lung vasculature validates the efficacy of the SU/hyp rat for modeling human PAH. The upregulation of C3 and FABP4 within the heart adipose implicates small visceral adipose dysfunction. C3 has been associated with vascular stiffness, and FABP4 suppresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, which is a major regulator of adipose function and known to be downregulated in PAH. These findings reveal that small visceral adipose tissue within the SU/hyp model provides mechanistic links for vascular remodeling and adipose dysfunction in the pathophysiology of PAH.

  1. Stature estimation based on radial and ulnar lengths using three-dimensional images from multidetector computed tomography in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-07-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate correlations between cadaver stature (CS) and radial and ulnar lengths based on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, and to develop modern regression equations for estimating CS in a Japanese population. Measurements were performed on 245 Japanese subjects (123 males and 122 females) who underwent postmortem CT between May 2011 and December 2013. A 3D reconstructed image was used for assessment. The linear distances of the left radial (LR) and right radial (RR) lengths were measured as a straight-line distance from the most anteroproximal point of the head to the most distal end of the styloid process. The linear distances of the left ulnar (LU) and right ulnar (RU) lengths were measured as a straight-line distance from the most posteroproximal point of the olecranon to the most distal end of the styloid process. The correlation between CS and each parameter (LR, LU, RR, and RU) was assessed using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and regression analysis was performed for stature estimation. There were significant correlations between CS and each parameter regardless of sex, indicating that the radial and ulnar lengths measured on 3D CT images can be predictive of stature estimation. Simple regression equations for stature estimation calculated from LR provided the lowest standard error of estimation (SEE) (all subjects, SEE=4.18 cm; males, SEE=4.09 cm; females, SEE=4.21 cm). In addition, multiple regression equations were more accurate and reliable than the single linear regression equations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurement of porto-systemic shunting in mice by novel three-dimensional micro-single photon emission computed tomography imaging enabling longitudinal follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Staelens, Steven; Deleye, Steven; De Vos, Filip; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Geerts, Anja; Van de Wiele, Christophe; De Vos, Martine; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    2010-09-01

    The reference method for diagnosing porto-systemic shunting (PSS) in experimental portal hypertension involves measuring (51)Chrome ((51)Cr)-labelled microspheres. Unfortunately, this technique necessitates the sacrifice of animals. Alternatively, (99m)technetium-macroaggregated albumin ((99m)Tc-MAA) has been used; however, planar scintigraphy imaging techniques are not quantitatively accurate and adequate spatial information is not attained. Here, we describe a reliable, minimally invasive and rapid in vivo imaging technique, using three-dimensional single photon emission computed tomography (3D SPECT) modus, that allows more accurate quantification, serial measurements and spatial discrimination. Partial portal vein ligation, common bile duct ligation and sham were induced in male mice. A mixture of (51)Cr microspheres and (99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin particles was injected into the splenic pulpa. All mice were scanned in vivo with microSPECT (1 mm spatial resolution) and, when mandatory for localisation, a microSPECT-CT was acquired. A relative quantitative analysis was performed based on the 3D reconstructed datasets. Additionally, (51)Cr was measured in the same animals to calculate the correlation coefficient between the (99m)Tc detection and the gold standard (51)Cr. In each measuring modality, the PSS fraction was calculated using the formula: [(lung counts)/(lung counts+liver counts)] x 100. A significant correlation between the (99m)Tc detection and (51)Cr was demonstrated in partial portal vein ligation, common bile duct ligation and sham mice and there was a good agreement between the two modalities. MicroSPECT scanning delivers high spatial resolution and 3D image reconstructions. We have demonstrated that quantitative high-resolution microSPECT imaging with (99m)Tc-MAA is useful for detecting the extent of PSS in a non-sacrificing set-up. This technology permits serial measurements and high-throughput screening to detect baseline PSS, which is

  3. Three-dimensional echocardiography in various types of heart disease: a comparison study of magnetic resonance imaging and 64-slice computed tomography in a real-world population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeri, Angelo; Censi, Stefano; Reverberi, Claudio; Gaibazzi, Nicola; Baldelli, Marco; Binno, Simone Maurizio; Properzi, Enrico; Bosi, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Accurate quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes [end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV)] and ejection fraction (EF) is of critical importance. The development of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) has shown better correlation than two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. The aim of our study was to assess the accuracy of RT3DE and 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of LV volumes and function using MRI as the reference standard in a real-world population with various types of heart disease with different chamber geometry. The study population consisted of 66 patients referred for cardiac MRI for various pathologies. All patients underwent cardiac MRI, and RT3DE and 64 slices CT were then performed on a subsequent day. The study population was then divided into 5 clinical groups depending on the underlying heart disease. RT3DE volumes correlated well with MRI values (R 2 values: 0.90 for EDV and 0.94 for ESV). RT3DE measurements of EF correlated well with MRI values (R 2 = 0.86). RT3DE measurements resulted in slightly underestimated values of both EDV and ESV, as reflected by biases of -9.18 and -4.50 mL, respectively. Comparison of RT3DE and MRI in various types of cardiomyopathies showed no statistical difference between different LV geometrical patterns. These results confirm that RT3DE has good accuracy in everyday clinical practice and can be of clinical utility in all types of cardiomyopathy independently of LV geometric pattern, LV diameter or wall thickness, taking into account a slight underestimation of LV volumes and EF compared to MRI.

  4. The first rib hypoplasia and the aberrant pulmonary artery branch detected by three-dimensional computed tomography in a surgical case with apical lung cancer, a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yasoo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Naruke, Masao; Hashizume, Toshinori; Kaseda, Shizuka; Nemoto, Etsuo

    2017-01-11

    The complete resection is one of the most crucial requirements to achieve favorable outcomes in oncologic surgery. The apex of the lung is surrounded complicatedly by the clavicle, the first rib, the subclavian artery and vein, and the brachial plexus. Therefore, the image information especially about the infiltration of adjacent anatomic structures, facilitates the surgery in the apical lung cancer. A 70-year-old man presented at our hospital with a computed tomography (CT) scan showing a tumor at the left lung apex that infiltrated the chest wall. Two anatomical anomalies were found, which were the first rib hypoplasia and the aberrant pulmonary artery branch. The three-dimensional (3D) CT enhanced with using bolus tracking method, simultaneously revealed that the subclavian vessels existed between the clavicle and the second rib, and the left lingual pulmonary artery and the ventrobasal pulmonary artery diverged from the left main pulmonary artery as the first branch. We diagnosed the tumor as a primary lung squamous cell carcinoma that infiltrated the second rib, because sputum cytology suggested squamous cell carcinoma. Left lung upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection and chest wall resection (the second and third ribs) were performed with caution for the anatomical anomalies. The pathological diagnosis was pleomorphic carcinoma (5.0 × 3.0 × 1.9 cm) that invaded the second costal bone, and the pathological stage was confirmed to be pT3N0M0. Pathologically curative resection was accomplished. The patient was discharged from the hospital on 10 days after surgery. The 3D-CT precisely detected the anomalous structure consisted with the clavicle, the second rib, the subclavian artery and vein, the aberrant pulmonary artery branch. In the present case with the apical lung cancer, the evaluation of the anatomical structure via 3D-CT facilitated to achieve a pathological complete resection.

  5. Accuracy of measuring acetabular cup position after total hip arthroplasty: comparison between a radiographic planning software and three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Vahdettin; Weber, Markus; von Kunow, Frederik; Zeman, Florian; Craiovan, Benjamin; Renkawitz, Tobias; Grifka, Joachim; Woerner, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Various methods are available for measuring acetabular cup position after total hip arthroplasty (THA) on standard anterior-posterior (AP) radiographs. We compared the accuracy of a commercial radiographic planning software program with that of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans. We obtained plain AP radiographs and 3D-CTs from 65 patients after THA. In addition to calculating cup anteversion and inclination with 3D-CT, we determined the cup position using the radiographic planning software program mediCAD® 2.5 (Hectec, Niederviehbach, Germany). Furthermore, we compared the measurements using the inter-teardrop and bi-ischial lines as pelvic landmarks. The mean difference in anteversion between 3D-CT and mediCAD® software was 0.1° using the inter-teardrop line (standard deviation [SD], 8.8°; range, -21° to 23°; p = 0.97) and 0.4° using the bi-ischial line (SD, 8.8°; range, -23° to 21°; p = 0.72). Inclination showed a mean difference of 0.6° using the inter-teardrop line (SD, 4.4°; range, -9° to 21°; p = 0.24) and 0.5° using bi-ischial line (SD, 4.6°; range, -9° to 22°; p = 0.35). The means for absolute differences were 7.2° for anteversion and 3.1° for inclination. With regard to using the bi-ischial or inter-teardrop line, no significant difference was found between the two pelvic landmarks. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was analysed for anteversion and inclination using either the inter-teardrop line or the bi-ischial line as radiographic baseline. A radiographic planning software program (mediCAD®) is a helpful tool for measuring cup inclination on AP radiographs. With respect to anteversion, measurements are rather susceptible to mistakes with mean inaccuracies of over 7°. Thus, 3D-CT remains the "gold standard" if a lower tolerance limit (±3°) is required for more complex biomechanical evaluations. As a pelvic landmark, the interteardrop line is preferential to the bi-ischial line because

  6. [A method for rapid extracting three-dimensional root model of vivo tooth from cone beam computed tomography data based on the anatomical characteristics of periodontal ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y J; Wang, S W; Liu, Y; Wang, Y

    2017-02-18

    To explore a new method for rapid extracting and rebuilding three-dimensional (3D) digital root model of vivo tooth from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data based on the anatomical characteristics of periodontal ligament, and to evaluate the extraction accuracy of the method. In the study, 15 extracted teeth (11 with single root, 4 with double roots) were collected from oral clinic and 3D digital root models of each tooth were obtained by 3D dental scanner with a high accuracy 0.02 mm in STL format. CBCT data for each patient were acquired before tooth extraction, DICOM data with a voxel size 0.3 mm were input to Mimics 18.0 software. Segmentation, Morphology operations, Boolean operations and Smart expanded function in Mimics software were used to edit teeth, bone and periodontal ligament threshold mask, and root threshold mask were automatically acquired after a series of mask operations. 3D digital root models were extracted in STL format finally. 3D morphology deviation between the extracted root models and corresponding vivo root models were compared in Geomagic Studio 2012 software. The 3D size errors in long axis, bucco-lingual direction and mesio-distal direction were also calculated. The average value of the 3D morphology deviation for 15 roots by calculating Root Mean Square (RMS) value was 0.22 mm, the average size errors in the mesio-distal direction, the bucco-lingual direction and the long axis were 0.46 mm, 0.36 mm and -0.68 mm separately. The average time of this new method for extracting single root was about 2-3 min. It could meet the accuracy requirement of the root 3D reconstruction fororal clinical use. This study established a new method for rapid extracting 3D root model of vivo tooth from CBCT data. It could simplify the traditional manual operation and improve the efficiency and automation of single root extraction. The strategy of this method for complete dentition extraction needs further research.

  7. Computed Tomography Based Three-dimensional Measurements of Spine Shortening Distance After Posterior Three-column Osteotomies for the Treatment of Severe and Stiff Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Shi; Huang, Zi-Fang; Deng, Yao-Long; Fan, Heng-Wei; Sui, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Chong-Wen; Yang, Jun-Lin

    2017-07-15

    Retrospective study. This study is to measure and analyze the changes of three-dimensional (3D) distances of spinal column and spinal canal at the three-column osteotomy sites and address their clinical and neurologic significance. Three-column osteotomies were developed to treat severe and stiff spine deformities with insufficient understanding on the safe limit of spine shortening and the relationship between the shortening distance of the spinal column and that of the spinal canal. Records of 52 continuous patients with severe and stiff scoliosis treated with three-column spine osteotomies at our institution from July 2013 to June 2015 were reviewed. The preoperative spinal cord function classification were type A in 31 cases, type B in 10 cases, and type C in 11 cases. The types of osteotomies carried out were extended pedicle subtraction osteotomy in nine patients and posterior vertebral column resection in 43 patients. Multimodality neuromonitoring strategies were adopted intraoperatively. 3D pre- and postoperative spine models were reconstructed from the computed tomography (CT) scans. The distances of convex and concave spinal column and the spinal canal shortening were measured and analyzed. The spinal column shortening distance (SCSD) measured on the 3D models (27.8 mm) were statistically shorter than those measured intraoperatively (32.8 mm) (P < 0.05); however, they were strongly correlated statistically (r = 0.82). The central spinal canal shortening distance (CCSD) was significantly shorter than the convex SCSD (P < 0.05). The convex SCSD and CCSD were significantly shorter in cases with anterior column strut graft than in those with bone-on-bone fusion (P < 0.05). The shortening distance of the convex spinal column cannot represent that of the central spinal canal in patients with severe scoliosis. The spinal column shortening procedure in appropriately selected patient groups with bone-on-bone fusion is a viable option with the

  8. Imaging the Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathway in Human Eyes by Three-dimensional Micro-computed Tomography (3D micro-CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Hann; M Bentley; A Vercnocke; E Ritman; M Fautsch

    2011-12-31

    The site of outflow resistance leading to elevated intraocular pressure in primary open-angle glaucoma is believed to be located in the region of Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelium, its basement membrane and the adjacent juxtacanalicular tissue. Evidence also suggests collector channels and intrascleral vessels may have a role in intraocular pressure in both normal and glaucoma eyes. Traditional imaging modalities limit the ability to view both proximal and distal portions of the trabecular outflow pathway as a single unit. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (3D micro-CT) as a potential method to view the trabecular outflow pathway. Two normal human eyes were used: one immersion fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and one with anterior chamber perfusion at 10 mmHg followed by perfusion fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde/2% glutaraldehyde. Both eyes were postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and scanned with 3D micro-CT at 2 {mu}m or 5 {mu}m voxel resolution. In the immersion fixed eye, 24 collector channels were identified with an average orifice size of 27.5 {+-} 5 {mu}m. In comparison, the perfusion fixed eye had 29 collector channels with a mean orifice size of 40.5 {+-} 13 {mu}m. Collector channels were not evenly dispersed around the circumference of the eye. There was no significant difference in the length of Schlemm's canal in the immersed versus the perfused eye (33.2 versus 35.1 mm). Structures, locations and size measurements identified by 3D micro-CT were confirmed by correlative light microscopy. These findings confirm 3D micro-CT can be used effectively for the non-invasive examination of the trabecular meshwork, Schlemm's canal, collector channels and intrascleral vasculature that comprise the distal outflow pathway. This imaging modality will be useful for non-invasive study of the role of the trabecular outflow pathway as a whole unit.

  9. Three-dimensional visualisation of the internal anatomy of the sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus forelimb using contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bribiesca-Contreras

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Gross dissection is a widespread method for studying animal anatomy, despite being highly destructive and time-consuming. X-ray computed tomography (CT has been shown to be a non-destructive alternative for studying anatomical structures. However, in the past it has been limited to only being able to visualise mineralised tissues. In recent years, morphologists have started to use traditional X-ray contrast agents to allow the visualisation of soft tissue elements in the CT context. The aim of this project is to assess the ability of contrast-enhanced micro-CT (μCT to construct a three-dimensional (3D model of the musculoskeletal system of the bird wing and to quantify muscle geometry and any systematic changes due to shrinkage. We expect that this reconstruction can be used as an anatomical guide to the sparrowhawk wing musculature and form the basis of further biomechanical analysis of flight. Methods A 3% iodine-buffered formalin solution with a 25-day staining period was used to visualise the wing myology of the sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus. μCT scans of the wing were taken over the staining period until full penetration of the forelimb musculature by iodine was reached. A 3D model was reconstructed by manually segmenting out the individual elements of the avian wing using 3D visualisation software. Results Different patterns of contrast were observed over the duration of the staining treatment with the best results occurring after 25 days of staining. Staining made it possible to visualise and identify different elements of the soft tissue of the wing. Finally, a 3D reconstruction of the musculoskeletal system of the sparrowhawk wing is presented and numerical data of muscle geometry is compared to values obtained by dissection. Discussion Contrast-enhanced μCT allows the visualisation and identification of the wing myology of birds, including the smaller muscles in the hand, and provides a non-destructive way for quantifying

  10. Computed tomography-based three-dimensional visualisation of bone corridors and trajectories for screws in open reduction and internal fixation of symphysis diastasis: a retrospective radiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelitsch, Christian; Nguyen-Kim, Thi Dan Linh; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Werner, Clément M L

    2016-12-01

    Typical stabilisation of pelvic open book injuries consists of plate fixation of the symphysis. No previous literature has been published about the evaluation of screw placement and their trajectory with four oblique 4.5 mm screws using a four-hole plate in symphysis diastasis. The aim of this study was to define insertion points and angles of trajectory for crossed screw placement regardless of any plate design based on an analysis of three-dimensional computed tomography data sets. One hundred human pelvic CT data sets were collected. Unilateral and bilateral placements of crossed 4.5 mm screws were simulated. Primary outcome measure was successful simulated screw placement without cortical breach. Secondary outcome measures included the anatomical measurements of the screw positions. Simulated screw placement of two oblique screws on each side of the pubic symphysis without cortical breach was achieved in all (100 %) cases. There were a total of 400 screw simulations. Medial screws were longer, lateral screws had higher coronal angles, and the distance between both screws was higher on the right side (p < 0.001 each). The lengths of the right lateral, right medial, left lateral, and left medial screws were 44.9, 65.8, 45.4, and 67.4 mm, respectively. The sagittal angles to the dorsal surface area of the pubic rami were 10.5°, 11.1°, 9.0°, and 11.0°. The coronal angles to the vertical axis of the symphysis measured 39.5°, 16.0°, 33.8°, and 16.8°. The distances between these screws and the medial edge of the pubic crest were 33.5, 8.6, 29.5, and 7.3 mm. Furthermore, certain sex- and side-related differences were noted. This series provides results about the feasibility and a detailed anatomical description of crossed screw placement. This is of special interest in pelvic surgery for choosing the entry points, safe screw channel parameters, and trajectories.

  11. Three-dimensional visualisation of the internal anatomy of the sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) forelimb using contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bribiesca-Contreras, Fernanda; Sellers, William I

    2017-01-01

    Gross dissection is a widespread method for studying animal anatomy, despite being highly destructive and time-consuming. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been shown to be a non-destructive alternative for studying anatomical structures. However, in the past it has been limited to only being able to visualise mineralised tissues. In recent years, morphologists have started to use traditional X-ray contrast agents to allow the visualisation of soft tissue elements in the CT context. The aim of this project is to assess the ability of contrast-enhanced micro-CT (μCT) to construct a three-dimensional (3D) model of the musculoskeletal system of the bird wing and to quantify muscle geometry and any systematic changes due to shrinkage. We expect that this reconstruction can be used as an anatomical guide to the sparrowhawk wing musculature and form the basis of further biomechanical analysis of flight. A 3% iodine-buffered formalin solution with a 25-day staining period was used to visualise the wing myology of the sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus). μCT scans of the wing were taken over the staining period until full penetration of the forelimb musculature by iodine was reached. A 3D model was reconstructed by manually segmenting out the individual elements of the avian wing using 3D visualisation software. Different patterns of contrast were observed over the duration of the staining treatment with the best results occurring after 25 days of staining. Staining made it possible to visualise and identify different elements of the soft tissue of the wing. Finally, a 3D reconstruction of the musculoskeletal system of the sparrowhawk wing is presented and numerical data of muscle geometry is compared to values obtained by dissection. Contrast-enhanced μCT allows the visualisation and identification of the wing myology of birds, including the smaller muscles in the hand, and provides a non-destructive way for quantifying muscle volume with an accuracy of 96.2%. By combining

  12. A Unique Recombinant Fluoroprobe Targeting Activated Platelets Allows In Vivo Detection of Arterial Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Using a Novel Three-Dimensional Fluorescence Emission Computed Tomography (FLECT) Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Bock; Yao, Yu; Huang, Alex Lin-i; Yap, May Lin; Flierl, Ulrike; Palasubramaniam, Jathushan; Zaldivia, Maria T.K.; Wang, Xiaowei; Peter, Karlheinz

    2017-01-01

    Progress in pharmaceutical development is highly-dependent on preclinical in vivo animal studies. Small animal imaging is invaluable for the identification of new disease markers and the evaluation of drug efficacy. Here, we report for the first time the use of a three-dimensional fluorescence bioimager called FLuorescence Emission Computed Tomography (FLECT) for the detection of a novel recombinant fluoroprobe that is safe, easily prepared on a large scale and stably stored prior to scan. Th...

  13. Measurement of three-dimensional temperature fields with interferometric tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D; He, A

    1999-06-01

    Optical computerized tomography (OCT) technology is used to reconstruct the asymmetric three-dimensional temperature field generated by radiators and electronic chips. First, the OCT method is described. Second, the reconstructed results are tested by a double-cylinder radiator model. Finally, OCT is applied to reconstruction of the temperature field above the surface of a CPU. The air-temperature field above a CPU circuit can be imaged with an OCT system that reflects whether the heat production from different parts of the CPU is even; therefore possibly the technique can be used to determine whether the integrated-circuit design in the CPU is smart.

  14. A comparative study of three dimensional reconstructive images using computed tomograms of facial bone injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Suk; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the spatial relationship in presurgical examination and to aid surgical planning and postoperative evaluation of patients with facial bone injury. For this study, three-dimensional images of facial bone fracture were reconstructed by computed image analysis system and three-dimensional reconstructive program integrated in computed tomography. The obtained results were as follows: 1. Serial conventional computed tomograms were value in accurately depicting the facial bone injuries and three-dimensional reconstructive images demonstrated an overall look. 2. The degree of deterioration of spatial resolution was proportional to the thickness of the slice. 3. Facial bone fractures were the most distinctly demonstrated on inferoanterior views of three dimensional reconstructive images. 4. Although three-dimensional reconstructive images made diagnosis of fracture lines, it was difficult to identify maxillary fractures. 5. The diagnosis of zygomatic fractures could be made equally well with computed image analysis system and three-dimensional reconstructive program integrated in computed tomography. 6. The diagnosis of mandibular fractures could be made equally well with computed image analysis system and three-dimensional reconstructive program integrated in computed tomography.

  15. Three-Dimensional Endo-Cardiovascular Volume-Rendered Cine Computed Tomography of Isolated Left Ventricular Apical Hypoplasia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun Hwa; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Hyun Jong

    2016-01-01

    We report multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings of a 34-year-old female with isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia. The MDCT and CMR scans displayed a spherical left ventricle (LV) with extensive fatty infiltration within the myocardium at the apex, interventricular septum and inferior wall, anteroapical origin of the papillary muscle, right ventricle wrapping around the deficient LV apex, and impaired systolic function. MDCT visualized morphologic and also functional findings of this unique cardiomyopathy.

  16. Three dimensional endo-cardiovascular volume-rendered cine computed tomography of isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia; A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sun Hwa; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Hyun Jong [Sejong General Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We report multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings of a 34-year-old female with isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia. The MDCT and CMR scans displayed a spherical left ventricle (LV) with extensive fatty infiltration within the myocardium at the apex, interventricular septum and inferior wall, anteroapical origin of the papillary muscle, right ventricle wrapping around the deficient LV apex, and impaired systolic function. MDCT visualized morphologic and also functional findings of this unique cardiomyopathy.

  17. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, D.C.; O' Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  18. Prospective study comparing three-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in potential living renal donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Aftab A; Chugtai, Aamir; Haslam, Philip; Talbot, David; Rix, David A; Soomro, Naeem A

    2005-11-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in potential living renal donors. Thirty-one donors underwent multislice spiral CTA and gadolinium-enhanced MRA. In addition to axial images, multiplanar reconstruction and maximum intensity projections were used to display the renal vascular anatomy. Twenty-four donors had a left laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN), whereas seven had right open donor nephrectomy (ODN); LDN was only considered if the renal vascular anatomy was favourable on the left. CTA and MRA images were analysed by two radiologists independently. The radiological and surgical findings were correlated after the surgery. CTA showed 33 arteries and 32 veins (100% sensitivity) whereas MRA showed 32 arteries and 31 veins (97% sensitivity). CTA detected all five accessory renal arteries whereas MRA only detected one. CTA also identified all three accessory renal veins whereas MRA identified two. CTA had a sensitivity of 97% and 47% for left lumbar and left gonadal veins, whereas MRA had a sensitivity of 74% and 46%, respectively. Multislice spiral CTA with three-dimensional reconstruction was more accurate than MRA for both renal arterial and venous anatomy.

  19. Three-dimensional imaging cone bean computer tomography technology: an update and case report of an impacted incisor in a mixed dentition patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurko, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The current 3-dimensional (3-D) technology termed "cone beam computer tomography" (CBCT) provides accurate 3-D anatomical image data similar to medical computerized tomography but at a lower cost and dose. CBCT has been suggested to be used in cases of supernumeraries because it yields accurate 3-D information relative to the orientation, sagittal position, local disorders, and neighboring anatomic structures. The purposes of this article were to: present the available 3-D imaging technology; and report the case of a patient in the late mixed dentition with a maxillary supernumerary tooth and an impacted central incisor. The use of a CBCT appears to be favorable as a diagnostic and communication tool for cases of impacted teeth in the mixed dentition that are candidates for orthodontic resolution.

  20. Assessment of the feeding arteries by three-dimensional computed tomography angiography prior to multi-arterial infusion chemotherapy for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    YE, XIAO-DAN; YUAN, ZHENG; YE, JIAN-DING; XIAO, XIANG-SHENG

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multi-detector row helical computed tomography (MDCT) angiography in the detection of feeding arteries prior to multi-arterial infusion for lung cancer. A total of 59 consecutive patients (44 males and 15 females; age range, 27–86 years; median age, 62 years) with non-small cell lung cancer underwent MDCT angiography of the thorax prior to multi-arterial infusion for lung cancer. Findings on CT angiograms, including CT scans, maximum inten...

  1. Three-dimensional analysis of the pulp cavity on surface models of molar teeth, using X-ray micro-computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, Merete; Bjørndal, Lars; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2012-01-01

    . In summary, three-dimensional surface models were made with a high precision; an increased accumulation of mineral deposits was noted in molars with small pulp chambers and combined with the consistent pattern of intra-radicular connections, the potential endodontic treatment complexity is underlined...

  2. Visualization of Three-Dimensional Nephron Structure With Microcomputed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley,M.; Jorgensen, S.; Lerman, L.; Ritman, E.; Romero, J.

    2007-01-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of nephrons in situ and their interrelationship with other nephrons are difficult to visualize by microscopic methods. The present study uses microcomputed X-ray tomography (micro-CT) to visualize intact nephrons in situ. Rat kidneys were perfusion-fixed with buffered formalin and their vasculature was subsequently perfused with radiopaque silicone. Cortical tissue was stained en bloc with osmium tetroxide, embedded in plastic, scanned, and reconstructed at voxel resolutions of 6, 2, and 1 {mu}m. At 6 {mu}m resolution, large blood vessels and glomeruli could be visualized but nephrons and their lumens were small and difficult to visualize. Optimal images were obtained using a synchrotron radiation source at 2 {mu}m resolution where nephron components could be identified, correlated with histological sections, and traced. Proximal tubules had large diameters and opaque walls, whereas distal tubules, connecting tubules, and collecting ducts had smaller diameters and less opaque walls. Blood vessels could be distinguished from nephrons by the luminal presence of radiopaque silicone. Proximal tubules were three times longer than distal tubules. Proximal and distal tubules were tightly coiled in the outer cortex but were loosely coiled in the middle and inner cortex. The connecting tubules had the narrowest diameters of the tubules and converged to form arcades that paralleled the radial vessels as they extended to the outer cortex. These results illustrate a potential use of micro-CT to obtain three-dimensional information about nephron architecture and nephron interrelationships, which could be useful in evaluating experimental tubular hypertrophy, atrophy, and necrosis.

  3. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography based comparison of condylar position and morphology according to the vertical skeletal pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Young; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Park, Yang-Ho

    2015-03-01

    To compare condylar position and morphology among different vertical skeletal patterns. Diagnostic cone-beam computed tomography images of 60 adult patients (120 temporomandibular joints) who visited the orthodontic clinic of Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital were reviewed. The subjects were divided into three equal groups according to the mandibular plane angle: hypodivergent, normodivergent, and hyperdivergent groups. Morphology of the condyle and mandibular fossa and condylar position were compared among the groups. The hypodivergent and hyperdivergent groups showed significant differences in superior joint spaces, antero-posterior condyle width, medio-lateral condyle width, condyle head angle, and condylar shapes. Condylar position and morphology vary according to vertical facial morphology. This relationship should be considered for predicting and establishing a proper treatment plan for temporomandibular diseases during orthodontic treatment.

  4. Extracting Metrics for Three-dimensional Root Systems: Volume and Surface Analysis from In-soil X-ray Computed Tomography Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A.; Adams, Lexor; Beck, Anthon NR; McKinney, Adriana L.; Varga, Tamas

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots play a critical role in plant-soil-microbe interactions that occur in the rhizosphere, as well as processes with important implications to climate change and forest management. Quantitative size information on roots in their native environment is invaluable for studying root growth and environmental processes involving the plant. X ray computed tomography (XCT) has been demonstrated to be an effective tool for in situ root scanning and analysis. Our group at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) has developed an XCT-based tool to image and quantitatively analyze plant root structures in their native soil environment. XCT data collected on a Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) specimen was used to visualize its root structure. A combination of open-source software RooTrak and DDV were employed to segment the root from the soil, and calculate its isosurface, respectively. Our own computer script named 3DRoot-SV was developed and used to calculate root volume and surface area from a triangular mesh. The process utilizing a unique combination of tools, from imaging to quantitative root analysis, including the 3DRoot-SV computer script, is described.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of a Four-Implant-Supported Polyetherketoneketone Framework Prosthesis: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Computer-Aided Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Sun; Shin, Sang-Wan; Lee, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Yol

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate and compare polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) with different framework materials for implant-supported prostheses by means of a three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA) based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computer-aided design (CAD) data. A geometric model that consisted of four maxillary implants supporting a prosthesis framework was constructed from CBCT and CAD data of a treated patient. Three different materials (zirconia, titanium, and PEKK) were selected, and their material properties were simulated using FEA software in the generated geometric model. In the PEKK framework (ie, low elastic modulus) group, the stress transferred to the implant and simulated adjacent tissue was reduced when compressive stress was dominant, but increased when tensile stress was dominant. This study suggests that the shock-absorbing effects of a resilient implant-supported framework are limited in some areas and that rigid framework material shows a favorable stress distribution and safety of overall components of the prosthesis.

  6. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography: a topology optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Luís Augusto Motta; de Lima, Cícero Ribeiro; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Lima, Raul Gonzalez; Silva, Emílio Carlos Nelli

    2008-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is a technique to estimate the impedance distribution within a domain, based on measurements on its boundary. In other words, given the mathematical model of the domain, its geometry and boundary conditions, a nonlinear inverse problem of estimating the electric impedance distribution can be solved. Several impedance estimation algorithms have been proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional algorithm, based on the topology optimization method, as an alternative. A sequence of linear programming problems, allowing for constraints, is solved utilizing this method. In each iteration, the finite element method provides the electric potential field within the model of the domain. An electrode model is also proposed (thus, increasing the accuracy of the finite element results). The algorithm is tested using numerically simulated data and also experimental data, and absolute resistivity values are obtained. These results, corresponding to phantoms with two different conductive materials, exhibit relatively well-defined boundaries between them, and show that this is a practical and potentially useful technique to be applied to monitor lung aeration, including the possibility of imaging a pneumothorax.

  7. Three-dimensional computer modeling of slag cement hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos; Shui, Z.H.

    2007-01-01

    A newly developed version of a three-dimensional computer model for simulating the hydration and microstructure development of slag cement pastes is presented in this study. It is based on a 3-D computer model for Portland cement hydration (CEMHYD3D) which was originally developed at NIST, taken

  8. Adult Sex Identification Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D-CT of the Pelvis: A Study Among a Sample of the Egyptian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas M. A. Mostafa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sex identification of unknown human skeletal remains is of great importance in establishing identity and individuality. In adults, the hip bone is the most reliable sex indicator because of its sexual dimorphism. Each population should have its own specific standards of identification. The objective of this study is to develop a logistic regression formula for adult sex identification using threedimensional computed tomography (3D-CT of the pelvis and to perform an assessment of its validity in sex determination among a sample of the Egyptian population in the Suez Canal region. 141 pelvic-abdominal CT images (free of any pelvic orthopaedic disorder were included; they were reconstructed to produce 3D-CT pelvic images which were divided into a calibration group (47 male and 47 female and a test group (47 CT images the sex of which was unknown to the observers. Twenty radiometric variables were measured for the calibration group. A logit response formula for sex prediction was developed and applied on the test group for sex prediction. The logit response formula for the test sample showed sensitivity, specificity, and an overall accuracy of 100%. The proposed method represents a quick and reliable metric method in establishing sex from a CT image of the pelvis bone.

  9. Diagnostic Value of Ex-Vivo Three-Dimensional Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Primary Nonhematopoietic Human Bone Tumors: Osteosarcoma versus Chondrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langheinrich, A. C.; Stolle, C.; Kampschulte, M.; Lommel, D.; Rau, W. S.; Bassaly, B. (Depts. of Radiology and Pathology, Univ. of Giessen, Giessen (Germany))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma are the most common nonhematopoietic primary malignancies of bone. However, unusual radiographic appearances can lead to delay in diagnosis and confusion with benign diseases. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of micro-computed tomography (CT) for the analysis of primary, nonhematopoietic human bone tumors ex vivo. Material and Methods: Samples from 12 human bone specimens (osteosarcoma, n=6; chondrosarcoma, n=6) obtained for diagnostic purposes were scanned using industrial X-ray film without amplifier foil and scanned with micro-CT (7- and 12-mum-cubic voxels). Trabecular bone CT 'density' and tumor matrix CT 'density' were determined, and results were compared with those obtained from a detailed conventional histopathologic analysis of corresponding cross-sections. The significance of differences in grayscale measurements was tested with analysis of variance. Results: Micro-CT provided quantitative information on bone morphology equivalent to histopathological analysis. We established grayscale measurements by which tumor matrices of chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma could be radiographically categorized following histological classifications (P<0.001). Conclusion: Micro-CT is feasible for the analysis and differentiation of human osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma

  10. Impact of Preoperative Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Cholangiography on Postoperative Resection Margin Status in Patients Operated due to Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Andert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to analyse the value of 3-dimensional computed tomography cholangiography (3D-ERC compared to conventional retrograde cholangiography in the preoperative diagnosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC with special regard to the resection margin status (R0/R1. Patients and Methods. All hepatic resections performed between January 2011 and November 2013 in patients with HC at the Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery of the RWTH Aachen University Hospital were analysed. All patients underwent an ERC and contrast-enhanced multiphase CT scan or a 3D-ERC. Results. The patient collective was divided into two groups (group ERC: n=17 and group 3D-ERC: n=16. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with regard to patient characteristics or intraoperative data. Curative liver resection with R0 status was reached in 88% of patients in group ERC and 87% of patients in group 3D-ERC (p=1.00. We could not observe any differences with regard to postoperative complications, hospital stay, and mortality rate between both groups. Conclusion. Based on our findings, preoperative imaging with 3D-ERC has no benefit for operative planning and R0 resection status. It cannot replace the exploration by an experienced surgeon in a centre for hepatobiliary surgery.

  11. Contrast-Enhanced Nanofocus X-Ray Computed Tomography Allows Virtual Three-Dimensional Histopathology and Morphometric Analysis of Osteoarthritis in Small Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhofs, Greet; Sainz, Julie; Maréchal, Marina; Wevers, Martine; Van de Putte, Tom; Geris, Liesbet; Schrooten, Jan

    2014-01-01

    One of the early hallmarks of osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degeneration of the articular cartilage. Early diagnosis of OA-associated cartilage alterations would be beneficial for disease prevention and control, and for the development of disease-modifying treatments. However, early diagnosis is still hampered by a lack of quantifiable readouts in preclinical models. In this study, we have shown the potency of contrast-enhanced nanofocus x-ray computed tomography (CE-nanoCT) to be used for virtual 3-dimensional (3D) histopathology in established mouse models for OA, and we compared with standard histopathology. We showed the equivalence of CE-nanoCT images to histopathology for the modified Mankin scoring of the cartilage structure and quality. Additionally, a limited set of 3D cartilage characteristics measured by CE-nanoCT image analysis in a user-independent and semiautomatic manner, that is, average and maximum of the noncalcified cartilage thickness distribution and loss in glycosaminoglycans, was shown to be predictive for the cartilage quality and structure as can be evaluated by histopathological scoring through the use of an empirical model. We have shown that CE-nanoCT is a tool that allows virtual histopathology and 3D morphological quantification of multitissue systems, such as the chondro-osseous junction. It provides faster and more quantitative data on cartilage structure and quality compared with standard histopathology while eliminating user bias. CE-nanoCT thus should allow capturing subtle differences in cartilage characteristics, carefully mapping OA progression and, ultimately, asses the beneficial changes when testing a candidate disease-modifying treatment.

  12. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quantification of Glenoid Bone Loss Is Equivalent to 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography Quantification: Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanke, Adam B; Shin, Jason J; Pearson, Ian; Bach, Bernard R; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-04-01

    To assess the ability of 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 1.5 and 3 tesla [T]) to quantify glenoid bone loss in a cadaveric model compared with the current gold standard, 3D computed tomography (CT). Six cadaveric shoulders were used to create a bone loss model, leaving the surrounding soft tissues intact. The anteroposterior (AP) dimension of the glenoid was measured at the glenoid equator and after soft tissue layer closure the specimen underwent scanning (CT, 1.5-T MRI, and 3-T MRI) with the following methods (0%, 10%, and 25% defect by area). Raw axial data from the scans were segmented using manual mask manipulation for bone and reconstructed using Mimics software to obtain a 3D en face glenoid view. Using calibrated Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images, the diameter of the glenoid at the equator and the area of the glenoid defect was measured on all imaging modalities. In specimens with 10% or 25% defects, no difference was detected between imaging modalities when comparing the measured defect size (10% defect P = .27, 25% defect P = .73). All 3 modalities demonstrated a strong correlation with the actual defect size (CT, ρ = .97; 1.5-T MRI, ρ = .93; 3-T MRI, ρ = .92, P MRI increased with increasing defect size (P = .02). Both 1.5- and 3-T-based 3D MRI reconstructions of glenoid bone loss correlate with measurements from 3D CT scan data and actual defect size in a cadaveric model. Regardless of imaging modality, the error in bone loss measurement tends to increase with increased defect size. Use of 3D MRI in the setting of shoulder instability could obviate the need for CT scans. The goal of our work was to develop a reproducible method of determining glenoid bone loss from 3D MRI data and hence eliminate the need for CT scans in this setting. This will lead to decreased cost of care as well as decreased radiation exposure to patients. The long-term goal is a fully automated system that is as approachable for

  13. No correlation between two-dimensional measurements and three-dimensional configuration of the pharyngeal upper airway space in cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abé-Nickler, Marie Dorothée; Pörtner, Samira; Sieg, Peter; Hakim, Samer George

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate both the 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) configuration of the posterior airway space (PAS) in healthy 239 patients using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In particular, we investigated the correlation between the 2D and 3D measurements in view of the potential impact on diagnosis of upper airway obstruction. The pharyngeal airway of each patient was studied at five levels: the level of the posterior nasal spine (PNS), the level of half-height of the PNS and the tip of the soft palate, the level of the tip of the soft palate, the level of the anterior-inferior point of the second vertebra, and at least the level of the top of the epiglottis. At each of these levels, the anterior-posterior dimension as well as the corresponding cross-sectional area was measured. Furthermore we measured the volume of the whole PAS between the first and the last level and compared it with the corresponding 2D values. Differences between genders and age effects were estimated in an analysis of covariance. P values measured distances. Limits of agreement were calculated as 2 ± residual standard deviations. We generated normal 2D and 3D values of the PAS for a normal population. In regard to age, no significant differences were observed. Significant differences were assessed between healthy males and females; however no correlation was observed between the obtained measurements in 2D axial view and the corresponding cross-sectional areas and mean volume in 3D view. In summary, radiologic imaging is a helpful tool to evaluate the airway space in patients with OSAS. However, drawing conclusions from 2D PAS imaging to assess 3D PAS configuration is not reliable, since there is no sufficient correlation between posterior-anterior distances and the corresponding cross-sectional areas. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Refinement of treatment setup and target localization accuracy using three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography for stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiheng; Nelson, John W; Yoo, Sua; Wu, Q Jackie; Kirkpatrick, John P; Marks, Lawrence B; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2009-02-01

    To quantitatively compare two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal kV with three-dimensional (3D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) for target localization; and to assess intrafraction motion with kV images in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). A total of 50 patients with 58 lesions received 178 fractions of SBRT. After clinical setup using in-room lasers and skin/cradle marks placed at simulation, patients were imaged and repositioned according to orthogonal kV/MV registration of bony landmarks to digitally reconstructed radiographs from the planning CT. A subsequent CBCT was registered to the planning CT using soft tissue information, and the resultant "residual error" was measured and corrected before treatment. Posttreatment 2D kV and/or 3D CBCT images were compared with pretreatment images to determine any intrafractional position changes. Absolute averages, statistical means, standard deviations, and root mean square (RMS) values of observed setup error were calculated. After initial setup to external marks with laser guidance, 2D kV images revealed vector mean setup deviations of 0.67 cm (RMS). Cone-beam CT detected residual setup deviations of 0.41 cm (RMS). Posttreatment imaging demonstrated intrafractional variations of 0.15 cm (RMS). The individual shifts in three standard orthogonal planes showed no obvious directional biases. After localization based on superficial markings in patients undergoing SBRT, orthogonal kV imaging detects setup variations of approximately 3 to 4 mm in each direction. Cone-beam CT detects residual setup variations of approximately 2 to 3 mm.

  15. [Research on the Angle and Effective Depth of Deep Acupuncture at Baliao Points by Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Computed Tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xun; Ding, Shu-Qing; Shi, Fei-Yue; Wang, Ling-Ling; Wu, Zheng-Can; Ren, Jun

    2017-12-25

    To explore the needle insertion parameters of deep acupuncture at Baliao points for clinic and teaching. A retrospective analysis of 100 cases of prone pelvic CT from January to June 2016 in Nanjing Hospital was carried out. The 3 D images were scanned with continuous 5 mm slice thickness. The optimum needle angle is defined as the angle of the needle along the central axis of sacral anterior and posterior hole, and the angle between the needle body and the skin surface and the center line of the body was observed. The effect needle depth is defined as the thickness of the sacral back soft tissue plus 1/2 sacral depth, to observe the best needle angle of deep acupuncture parameters of Baliao points. For deep acupuncture at Baliao, the oblique thorn method should be used with the needle-point toward the inner bottom. The best insertion angle between needle body and skin surface is: Shangliao(BL 31) (61.04±12.15)°, Ciliao(BL 32) (57.57±10.01)°, Zhongliao(BL 33) (58.25±8.69)°, Xialiao(BL 34) (54.39±10.94)°. The optimum angle of insertion between the needle body and the posterior midline of the human body is: BL 31 (24.54±6.21)°, BL 32 (18.58±7.76)°, BL 33 (17.36±7.90)°, BL 34 (30.73±9.45)°. The effective insertion depth show a decreasing trend: BL 31 (58.16±12.43) mm, BL 32 (44.57±11.55) mm, BL 33 (33.96±10.74) mm, BL 34 (31.13±10.94) mm. The effective depth is positively correlated with BMI, and has no correlation with gender and weight. The study of the parameters of needle insertion should be taken into account both clinical efficacy and safety, and CT three-dimensional reconstruction can accurately, rationally and scientifically perform acupoint anatomical measurements.

  16. Three-dimensional radiation thermometer combining near-infrared passband thermometry with optical fiber bundle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiong; Zhang, Zhimin; Chen, Qi

    2013-09-01

    We report an implementation of a three-dimensional (3D) middle-temperature (500-1500 kelvin) radiation thermometer, which combines a near-infrared passband (1-3 micron) thermometry with an optical fiber bundle tomography (OFBT). To improve the probe precision, we calibrate the digital output of each OFB unit vs. the passband radiant intensity of the blackbody. Furthermore a digital signal processor (DSP) based system is built to accomplish the emission signal processing and the tomographic computation with which the calculation speed can be improved. A temperature probe experiment of the flame of a candle has testified the feasibility of the OFBT-based 3D thermometer.

  17. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of unilateral mastication in malocclusion cases using cone-beam computed tomography and a motion capture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stress distribution and mandible distortion during lateral movements are known to be closely linked to bruxism, dental implant placement, and temporomandibular joint disorder. The present study was performed to determine stress distribution and distortion patterns of the mandible during lateral movements in Class I, II, and III relationships. Methods Five Korean volunteers (one normal, two Class II, and two Class III occlusion cases) were selected. Finite element (FE) modeling was performed using information from cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans of the subjects’ skulls, scanned images of dental casts, and incisor movement captured by an optical motion-capture system. Results In the Class I and II cases, maximum stress load occurred at the condyle of the balancing side, but, in the Class III cases, the maximum stress was loaded on the condyle of the working side. Maximum distortion was observed on the menton at the midline in every case, regardless of loading force. The distortion was greatest in Class III cases and smallest in Class II cases. Conclusions The stress distribution along and accompanying distortion of a mandible seems to be affected by the anteroposterior position of the mandible. Additionally, 3-D modeling of the craniofacial skeleton using CBCT and an optical laser scanner and reproduction of mandibular movement by way of the optical motion-capture technique used in this study are reliable techniques for investigating the masticatory system. PMID:27127690

  18. Three-dimensional structure of olefinic thermoplastic elastomer blends using electron tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, P.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present communication reports the first use of electron tomography in reconstructing the three-dimensional morphology in thermoplastic elastomer blends. The blends investigated were dynamically vulcanized blends of ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) rubber/poly(propylene)/oil and

  19. CATIA Core Tools Computer Aided Three-Dimensional Interactive Application

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Michel

    2012-01-01

    CATIA Core Tools: Computer-Aided Three-Dimensional Interactive Application explains how to use the essential features of this cutting-edge solution for product design and innovation. The book begins with the basics, such as launching the software, configuring the settings, and managing files. Next, you'll learn about sketching, modeling, drafting, and visualization tools and techniques. Easy-to-follow instructions along with detailed illustrations and screenshots help you get started using several CATIA workbenches right away. Reverse engineering--a valuable product development skill--is also covered in this practical resource.

  20. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography (3D OCT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Applied Science Innovations, Inc. proposes a new tool of 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cellular level imaging at video frame rates and dramatically...

  1. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography (3D OCT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Applied Science Innovations, Inc. proposes to develop a new tool of 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cellular level imaging at video frame rates and...

  2. Semiautomatic Landmark-Based Two-Dimensional—Three-Dimensional Image Fusion in Living Mice: Correlation of Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Cy5.5-Labeled Antibodies with Flat-Panel Volume Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dullin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Connecting fluorescence signals with anatomic structures enhances our ability to monitor biologic processes in mice. Here, we present a semiautomated approach to correlate two-dimensional (2D noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF imaging with three-dimensional (3D, high-resolution, flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT. We developed an algorithm to colocalize fluorescence signals of NIRF-labeled antibodies directed against matriptase and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR to orthotopic carcinomas in mice visualized by fpVCT. For this purpose, mice were anesthetized and fixed on a multimodality animal bed containing fiducial markers filled with iodine-containing contrast agent and fluorescent dye. After intravenous administration of contrast agent and Cy5.5-labeled antibodies, NIRF and fpVCT images were obtained, without repositioning the mice. Binding of Cy5.5-labeled matriptase-specific antibody to pancreatic tumors and Cy5.5-labeled uPAR-specific antibody to mammary carcinomas was assessed by time-domain NIRF imaging measuring the location of fluorescence intensity and its lifetime. In summary, we developed a novel 2D-3D registration technique for image fusion with NIRF imaging and fpVCT to provide complementary information in tumor models on the in vivo association of functional information with anatomic structures. The combination of fpVCT with NIRF imaging will now allow targeted and effective monitoring of preclinical tumor therapies.

  3. Automated Defect Recognition as a Critical Element of a Three Dimensional X-ray Computed Tomography Imaging-Based Smart Non-Destructive Testing Technique in Additive Manufacturing of Near Net-Shape Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Szabo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a state of the art automated defect recognition (ADR system is presented that was developed specifically for Non-Destructive Testing (NDT of powder metallurgy (PM parts using three dimensional X-ray Computed Tomography (CT imaging, towards enabling online quality assurance and enhanced integrity confidence. PM parts exhibit typical defects such as microscopic cracks, porosity, and voids, internal to components that without an effective detection system, limit the growth of industrial applications. Compared to typical testing methods (e.g., destructive such as metallography that is based on sampling, cutting, and polishing of parts, CT provides full coverage of defect detection. This paper establishes the importance and advantages of an automated NDT system for the PM industry applications with particular emphasis on image processing procedures for defect recognition. Moreover, the article describes how to establish a reference library based on real 3D X-ray CT images of net-shape parts. The paper follows the development of the ADR system from processing 2D image slices of a measured 3D X-ray image to processing the complete 3D X-ray image as a whole. The introduced technique is successfully integrated into an automated in-line quality control system highly sought by major industry sectors in Oil and Gas, Automotive, and Aerospace.

  4. Evaluation of the dentoskeletal characteristics of an Egyptian mummy with three-dimensional computer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelo, Sandro; Correra, Pasquale; Danza, Francesco Maria; Amenta, Alessia; Gasparini, Giulio; Marianetti, Tito M; Moro, Alessandro

    2012-07-01

    Since the introduction of Roentgen rays in medical diagnostics, mummies have been subjected to radiographic and cephalometric studies. These have, among others, the advantage of providing details that are not directly visible for inspection without the need to tamper with the relics. The acquisition of three-dimensional imaging techniques has also extended the possibility of noninvasive investigation, so that many famous mummies, such as those of Tutankhamun and Ramses II, underwent three-dimensional computed tomography (CT). Computed tomography scan of Egyptian mummy of a 20- to 30-year-old woman found in Fayum and dating from the second century B.C. has been performed. DICOM data of the CT scan have been processed by means of a software for three-dimensional CT imaging processing. The purpose of this report was to present the somatic and skeletal characteristics of the mummy. Thanks to the image processing, a "virtual reconstruction" of the original facial features of the mummy has been obtained, and a reliable cephalometric tracing could be performed. The data derived from cephalometric tracings were similar to those published on other studies on a group of Egyptian mummies and on a sample of Iowa adult males. In our opinion, three-dimensional image processing of CT scan is useful to perform noninvasive morphologic investigations on archeological find, to allow virtual correction of postmortem artifact and to perform reliable cephalometric tracings.

  5. The computation of three-dimensional flows using unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Peiro, J.; Hassan, O.

    1991-01-01

    A general method is described for automatically discretizing, into unstructured assemblies of tetrahedra, the three-dimensional solution domains of complex shape which are of interest in practical computational aerodynamics. An algorithm for the solution of the compressible Euler equations which can be implemented on such general unstructured tetrahedral grids is described. This is an explicit cell-vertex scheme which follows a general Taylor-Galerkin philosophy. The approach is employed to compute a transonic inviscid flow over a standard wing and the results are shown to compare favorably with experimental observations. As a more practical demonstration, the method is then applied to the analysis of inviscid flow over a complete modern fighter configuration. The effect of using mesh adaptivity is illustrated when the method is applied to the solution of high speed flow in an engine inlet.

  6. Three-dimensional cardiac computational modelling: methods, features and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Perez, Alejandro; Sebastian, Rafael; Ferrero, Jose M

    2015-04-17

    The combination of computational models and biophysical simulations can help to interpret an array of experimental data and contribute to the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of complex diseases such as cardiac arrhythmias. For this reason, three-dimensional (3D) cardiac computational modelling is currently a rising field of research. The advance of medical imaging technology over the last decades has allowed the evolution from generic to patient-specific 3D cardiac models that faithfully represent the anatomy and different cardiac features of a given alive subject. Here we analyse sixty representative 3D cardiac computational models developed and published during the last fifty years, describing their information sources, features, development methods and online availability. This paper also reviews the necessary components to build a 3D computational model of the heart aimed at biophysical simulation, paying especial attention to cardiac electrophysiology (EP), and the existing approaches to incorporate those components. We assess the challenges associated to the different steps of the building process, from the processing of raw clinical or biological data to the final application, including image segmentation, inclusion of substructures and meshing among others. We briefly outline the personalisation approaches that are currently available in 3D cardiac computational modelling. Finally, we present examples of several specific applications, mainly related to cardiac EP simulation and model-based image analysis, showing the potential usefulness of 3D cardiac computational modelling into clinical environments as a tool to aid in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cardiac diseases.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of `mobile pixels`, which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs.

  8. Three-dimensional STIM tomography and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Prawer, S.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Stuart, S.A. [CSIRO, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Forest Product Div.; Howard, J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Plasma Research Lab.

    1993-12-31

    Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) tomography was used to characterize bulk density variation in CVD diamonds. To maintain submicron resolution in the tomographic data, several factors need to be considered: (a) precise sample manipulation, (b) control of the quality of a detector, (c) beam spreading while traversing the sample and (d) change of stopping power with the energy. The influence of these factors would be addressed in this paper. It is also shown that the method was capable of coping with large and small density variations within the one specimen. These density variations have been shown to vary between disordered carbon ({approx} 2 g/cm{sup 3}), diamond ({approx} 3.2 g/cm{sup 3}) and tungsten ({approx} 19.6 g/cm{sup 3}), all in one specimen. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  9. A Three-Dimensional Computational Model of Collagen Network Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Weaver, Alissa M.; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions. PMID:25386649

  10. High-definition three-dimensional television disparity map computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chammem, Afef; Mitrea, Mihai; Prêteux, Françoise

    2012-10-01

    By reconsidering some two-dimensional video inherited approaches and by adapting them to the stereoscopic video content and to the human visual system peculiarities, a new disparity map is designed. First, the inner relation between the left and the right views is modeled by some weights discriminating between the horizontal and vertical disparities. Second, the block matching operation is achieved by considering a visual related measure (normalized cross correlation) instead of the traditional pixel differences (mean squared error or sum of absolute differences). The advanced three-dimensional (3-D) video-new three step search (3DV-NTSS) disparity map (3-D Video-New Three Step Search) is benchmarked against two state-of-the-art algorithms, namely NTSS and full-search MPEG (FS-MPEG), by successively considering two corpora. The first corpus was organized during the 3DLive French national project and regroups 20 min of stereoscopic video sequences. The second one, with similar size, is provided by the MPEG community. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of 3DV-NTSS in both reconstructed image quality (average gains between 3% and 7% in both PSNR and structural similarity, with a singular exception) and computational cost (search operation number reduced by average factors between 1.3 and 13). The 3DV-NTSS was finally validated by designing a watermarking method for high definition 3-D TV content protection.

  11. Meta-analysis of diagnostic significance of sixty-four-row multi-section computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography in patients with cerebral artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Xi-Feng; Qian, Dong-Xiang; Yan, Jian-Quan; Bu, De-Lin; Duan, Chuan-Zhi

    2014-11-15

    Imaging methods are essential in evaluating cerebral artery aneurysms and they have evolved with recent technical advances. Sixty-four-row multi-section computed tomography (64-MSCT) angiography and three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography (3D-DSA) are two of the most popular methods. We sought to systematically explore and find out which one would be better in imaging cerebral artery aneurysm, and try to investigate the potential use and value of 64-MSCT angiography and 3D-DSA in cerebral artery aneurysm. Followed by a predefined comprehensive literature search, we carefully searched both English and Chinese electronic databases for potentially relevant studies following our meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of the included eligible trials based on quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS). Pooled summary statistics for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios (positive LR and negative LR), and diagnostic odds ratio (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were utilized. Final meta-analysis of 923 cerebral artery aneurysm cases were incorporated from eight cohort studies and selected for statistical analysis. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of 64-MSCT angiography in the diagnosis of cerebral artery aneurysm were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.96-0.98) and 0.91 (0.88-0.94), respectively. The pooled positive LR was 7.68 (95% CI, 3.34-17.67); and the pooled negative LR was 0.04 (95% CI, 0.03-0.05). The pooled diagnostic OR was 263.69 (95% CI, 121.19-573.77). The area under the SROC curve was 0.9934 (standard error [SE] = 0.0031). No significant evidence of publication bias was detected (P > 0.05). The main finding of our meta-analysis revealed that 64-MSCT angiography relative to the 3D-DSA may have a high diagnostic accuracy for the cerebral artery aneurysm. Thus, 64-MSCT angiography may be an effective tool for the early detection of cerebral artery aneurysm

  12. A Unique Recombinant Fluoroprobe Targeting Activated Platelets Allows In Vivo Detection of Arterial Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Using a Novel Three-Dimensional Fluorescence Emission Computed Tomography (FLECT) Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bock; Yao, Yu; Huang, Alex Lin-I; Yap, May Lin; Flierl, Ulrike; Palasubramaniam, Jathushan; Zaldivia, Maria T K; Wang, Xiaowei; Peter, Karlheinz

    2017-01-01

    Progress in pharmaceutical development is highly-dependent on preclinical in vivo animal studies. Small animal imaging is invaluable for the identification of new disease markers and the evaluation of drug efficacy. Here, we report for the first time the use of a three-dimensional fluorescence bioimager called FLuorescence Emission Computed Tomography (FLECT) for the detection of a novel recombinant fluoroprobe that is safe, easily prepared on a large scale and stably stored prior to scan. This novel fluoroprobe (Targ-Cy7) comprises a single-chain antibody-fragment (scFvTarg), which binds exclusively to activated-platelets, conjugated to a near-infrared (NIR) dye, Cy7, for detection. Upon mouse carotid artery injury, the injected fluoroprobe circulates and binds within the platelet-rich thrombus. This specific in vivo binding of the fluoroprobe to the thrombus, compared to its non-targeting control-fluoroprobe, is detected by the FLECT imager. The analyzed FLECT image quantifies the NIR signal and localizes it to the site of vascular injury. The detected fluorescence is further verified using a two-dimensional IVIS® Lumina scanner, where significant NIR fluorescence is detected in vivo at the thrombotic site, and ex vivo, at the injured carotid artery. Furthermore, fluorescence levels in various organs have also been quantified for biodistribution, with the highest fluoroprobe uptake shown to be in the injured artery. Subsequently, this live animal imaging technique is successfully employed to monitor the response of the induced thrombus to treatment over time. This demonstrates the potential of using longitudinal FLECT scanning to examine the efficacy of candidate drugs in preclinical settings. Besides intravascular thrombosis, we have shown that this non-invasive FLECT-imaging can also detect in vivo pulmonary embolism. Overall, this report describes a novel fluorescence-based preclinical imaging modality that uses an easy-to-prepare and non

  13. Algorithms for three-dimensional chemical analysis via multi-energy synchrotron X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Kyungmin; Butler, Leslie G.

    2007-08-01

    The conversion of X-ray tomography images into three-dimensional chemical composition requires accurate mass absorption values, high-quality images, and a robust fitting algorithm. The least-squares fits of the images to a three-dimensional chemical composition can proceed with several different options such as minimal vs. over-determined and/or constrained parameters. This project has investigated the impact of XAFS features and a limited CCD dynamic range. These simulated results are compared to a recent experimental project in which synchrotron X-ray tomography was used to image a polymer blend, and from those images, calculated three-dimensional chemical composition maps of the two-component flame retardant, a brominated phthalimide dimer, Saytex ™ BT-93 and a synergist, antimony(III) oxide (Sb 2O 3).

  14. Algorithms for three-dimensional chemical analysis via multi-energy synchrotron X-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Kyungmin [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, 232 Choppin Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Butler, Leslie G. [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, 232 Choppin Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)]. E-mail: lbutler@lsu.edu

    2007-08-15

    The conversion of X-ray tomography images into three-dimensional chemical composition requires accurate mass absorption values, high-quality images, and a robust fitting algorithm. The least-squares fits of the images to a three-dimensional chemical composition can proceed with several different options such as minimal vs. over-determined and/or constrained parameters. This project has investigated the impact of XAFS features and a limited CCD dynamic range. These simulated results are compared to a recent experimental project in which synchrotron X-ray tomography was used to image a polymer blend, and from those images, calculated three-dimensional chemical composition maps of the two-component flame retardant, a brominated phthalimide dimer, Saytex{sup {sup }}T{sup M} BT-93 and a synergist, antimony(III) oxide (Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3})

  15. A method for computing three-dimensional turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, P. S.; Berger, B. S.

    1982-06-01

    The MVC (mean vorticity and covariance) turbulence closure is derived for three-dimensional turbulent flows. The derivation utilizes Lagrangian time expansion techniques applied to the unclosed terms of the mean vorticity and covariance equations. The closed mean vorticity equation is applied to the numerical solution of fully developed three-dimensional channel flow. Anisotropies in the wall region are modelled by pairs of counterrotating streamwise vortices. The numerical results are in close agreement with experimental data. Analysis of the contributions of the terms in the mean vorticity equation gives insight into the dynamics of the turbulent boundary layer.

  16. Three-dimensional computer models of electrospinning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smółka Krzysztof

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a very interesting method that allows the fabrication of continuous fibers with diameters down to a few nanometers. This paper presents an overview of electrospinning systems as well as their comparison using proposed three-dimensional parameterized numerical models. The presented solutions allow an analysis of the electric field distribution.

  17. Three-dimensional, computer simulated navigation in endoscopic neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta K. Sefcik, BHA

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Three-dimensional, frameless neuronavigation systems are useful in endoscopic neurosurgery to assist in the pre-operative planning of potential trajectories and to help localize the pathology of interest. Neuronavigation appears to be accurate to <1–2 mm without issues related to brain shift. Further work is necessary in the investigation of the effect of neuronavigation on operative time, cost, and patient-centered outcomes.

  18. Assessment of three-dimensional set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Upasani, Maheshkumar; Master, Zubin; Patil, Anita; Phurailatpam, Reena; Nojin, Siji; Kannan, Sadhana; Godasastri, Jayant; Jalali, Rakesh

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess three-dimensional (3D) set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for supine craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients were immobilized in a customized 4-clamp thermoplastic head mask with or without whole-body vacuum cradle. Set-up was based primarily on a set of cranial fiducial markers. MVCT scans were acquired and co-registered with planning scan separately at three different levels (brain, upper, and lower spine) at every fraction. Only translational displacements were analysed, wherein positive sign denotes deviation in anterior, left, and superior direction; while negative sign denotes deviation in posterior, right, and inferior direction. Mean displacements, systematic, and random errors of the study population were calculated at all three levels separately. Local residual uncertainty of the upper and lower spine was also derived assuming perfect co-registration of the skull. Set-up margins for clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) were derived at these three levels separately using published margin recipes. Data from 1868 co-registrations in 674 fractions on 33 patients was included. The mean displacements in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions were -1.21, -1.36, and 1.38 mm; -1.25, -0.34, and 0.65 mm; and -1.47, -2.78, and 0.22 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lumbar spine respectively. The corresponding 3D vector of displacement was 2.28; 1.45; and 3.15 mm respectively. There was a distinct systematic trend towards increasing inaccuracy from the brain towards the lower spine. Using Stroom's formula, the minimum recommended CTV to PTV margins in absence of daily image-guidance were 6.5; 7.0; and 9.5 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lower spine respectively. This increased to 7.5; 8.5; and 11.5 mm using van Herk's formula. Subset and sensitivity analyses

  19. Three-dimensional observation of TiO2 nanostructures by electron tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Suh, Young Joon

    2013-03-01

    Three-dimensional nanostructures of TiO2 related materials including nanotubes, electron acceptor materials in hybrid polymer solar cells, and working electrodes of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were visualized by electron tomography as well as TEM micrographs. The regions on the wall of TiO2 nanotubes where the streptavidins were attached were elucidated by electron tomogram analysis. The coverage of TiO2 nanotubes by streptavidin was also investigated. The TiO2 nanostructures in hybrid polymer solar cells made by sol-gel and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods and the morphologies of pores between TiO2 particles in DSSCs were also observed by reconstructed three-dimensional images made by electron tomography. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The internal architecture of leukocyte lipid body organelles captured by three-dimensional electron microscopy tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana C N Melo

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies (LBs, also known as lipid droplets, are complex organelles of all eukaryotic cells linked to a variety of biological functions as well as to the development of human diseases. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, neutrophils and macrophages, LBs are rapidly formed in the cytoplasm in response to inflammatory and infectious diseases and are sites of synthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators. However, little is known about the structural organization of these organelles. It is unclear whether leukocyte LBs contain a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids as found in lipid droplets from adipocytes and how diverse proteins, including enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs. Here, leukocyte LB ultrastructure was studied in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM, immunogold EM and electron tomography. By careful analysis of the two-dimensional ultrastructure of LBs from human blood eosinophils under different conditions, we identified membranous structures within LBs in both resting and activated cells. Cyclooxygenase, a membrane inserted protein that catalyzes the first step in prostaglandin synthesis, was localized throughout the internum of LBs. We used fully automated dual-axis electron tomography to study the three-dimensional architecture of LBs in high resolution. By tracking 4 nm-thick serial digital sections we found that leukocyte LBs enclose an intricate system of membranes within their "cores". After computational reconstruction, we showed that these membranes are organized as a network of tubules which resemble the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Our findings explain how membrane-bound proteins interact and are spatially arranged within LB "cores" and support a model for LB formation by incorporating cytoplasmic membranes of the ER, instead of the conventional view that LBs emerge from the ER leaflets. This is important to understand the functional capabilities of leukocyte

  1. In vivo images of the epidural space with two- and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Kao, Meng-Chun; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2017-01-01

    No reports exist concerning in vivo optical coherence tomography visualization of the epidural space and the blood patch process in the epidural space. In this study, we produced real-time two-dimensional and reconstructed three-dimensional images of the epidural space by using optical coherence tomography in a porcine model. We also aimed to produce three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images of the dura puncture and blood patch process. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images were obtained using a swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system. Four laboratory pigs were intubated and ventilated after the induction of general anesthesia. An 18-gauge Tuohy needle was used as a tunnel for the optical coherence tomography probe to the epidural space. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstruction optical coherence tomography images of the epidural space were acquired in four stages. In stage 1, real-time two-dimensional and reconstructed three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of the lumbar and thoracic epidural space were successfully acquired. In stage 2, the epidural catheter in the epidural space was successfully traced in the 3D optical coherence tomography images. In stage 3, water injection and lumbar puncture were successfully monitored in all study animals. In stage 4, 10 mL of fresh blood was injected into the epidural space and two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images were successfully acquired. These animal experiments suggest the potential capability of using an optical coherence tomography-based imaging needle in the directed two-dimensional and three-dimensional visualization of the epidural space. More investigations involving humans are required before optical coherence tomography can be recommended for routine use. However, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography may provide a novel, minimally invasive, and safe way to observe the spinal

  2. Assessment of three-dimensional setup errors in image-guided pelvic radiotherapy for uterine and cervical cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography and its effect on planning target volume margins

    OpenAIRE

    Nidhi Patni; Nagarjuna Burela; Rajesh Pasricha; Jaishree Goyal; Tej Prakash Soni; T Senthil Kumar; T. Natarajan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve the best possible therapeutic ratio using high-precision techniques (image-guided radiation therapy/volumetric modulated arc therapy [IGRT/VMAT]) of external beam radiation therapy in cases of carcinoma cervix using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). Materials and Methods: One hundred and five patients of gynecological malignancies who were treated with IGRT (IGRT/VMAT) were included in the study. CBCT was done once a week for intensity-modulated radia...

  3. Three-dimensional structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by electron cryo-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, Khanh Huy; Pigino, Gaia; Ishikawa, Takashi, E-mail: takashi.ishikawa@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the molecular architecture revealed by electron cryo-tomography, the mechanism of the bending motion of eukaryotic flagella/cilia is discussed. Electron cryo-tomography is a potential approach to analyzing the three-dimensional conformation of frozen hydrated biological macromolecules using electron microscopy. Since projections of each individual object illuminated from different orientations are merged, electron tomography is capable of structural analysis of such heterogeneous environments as in vivo or with polymorphism, although radiation damage and the missing wedge are severe problems. Here, recent results on the structure of eukaryotic flagella, which is an ATP-driven bending organelle, from green algae Chlamydomonas are presented. Tomographic analysis reveals asymmetric molecular arrangements, especially that of the dynein motor proteins, in flagella, giving insight into the mechanism of planar asymmetric bending motion. Methodological challenges to obtaining higher-resolution structures from this technique are also discussed.

  4. Three-dimensional visualization of forming Hepatitis C virus-like particles by electron-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badia-Martinez, Daniel; Peralta, Bibiana [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); Andres, German; Guerra, Milagros [Electron Microscopy Unit, Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa, CSIC-UAM, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gil-Carton, David [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); Abrescia, Nicola G.A., E-mail: nabrescia@cicbiogune.es [Structural Biology Unit, CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, 48160 Derio (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus infects almost 170 million people per year but its assembly pathway, architecture and the structures of its envelope proteins are poorly understood. Using electron tomography of plastic-embedded sections of insect cells, we have visualized the morphogenesis of recombinant Hepatitis C virus-like particles. Our data provide a three-dimensional sketch of viral assembly at the endoplasmic reticulum showing different budding stages and contiguity of buds. This latter phenomenon could play an important role during the assembly of wt-HCV and explain the size-heterogeneity of its particles.

  5. Three-dimensional structure of helical and zigzagged nanowires using electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sung; Hwang, Seon Oh; Myung, Yoon; Park, Jeunghee; Bae, Seung Yong; Ahn, Jae Pyoung

    2008-02-01

    Electron tomography and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the unique three-dimensional structures of helical or zigzagged GaN, ZnGa2O4, and Zn2SnO4 nanowires. The GaN nanowires adopt a helical structure that consists of six equivalent growth directions with the axial [0001] direction. We also confirmed that the ZnGa2O4 nanosprings have four equivalent growth directions with the [001] axial direction. The zigzagged Zn2SnO4 nanowires consisted of linked rhombohedrons having the side edges matched to the direction and the [111] axial direction.

  6. Three-dimensional computer graphics for surgical procedure learning: Web three-dimensional application for cleft lip repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Tatsuo; Mori, Ayako; Tanaka, Daigo; Fujino, Toyomi; Chiyokura, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    .... They must understand the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the lips. However, they may have difficulty learning the surgical procedures precisely from normal textbooks with two-dimensional illustrations...

  7. An Anatomical Study of Maxillary-Zygomatic Complex Using Three-Dimensional Computerized Tomography-Based Zygomatic Implantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To obtain anatomical data of maxillary-zygomatic complex based on simulating the zygomatic implantation using cadaver heads and three-dimensional computerized tomography (3D-CT). Methods...

  8. Improved three-dimensional nonlinear computer simulation for TWTs

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Lin; Mo Yuan Long

    1999-01-01

    The paper covers 3D nonlinear analysis for TWTs. Based on a macro- particle model, the electron beam can be subdivided into 3D macro- particles to calculate space-charge forces using Green's function methods, and 3D large-signal $9 working equations are obtained. The numerical results for a uniform magnetic focusing field indicate that, in 3D numerical analysis, 3D space-charge forces can be substituted by 2D forces with little influence on the numerical $9 results, which greatly decreases computing time so that a 3D computer program can be easily used. (7 refs).

  9. Three dimensional quantification of left ventricular wall motion by ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, S.R.; Walton, S.; Laming, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Ell, P.J.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1985-05-01

    ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography is a relatively new technique, and this study establishes a simple method for displaying the three dimensional data obtained, determines a normal range for ejection fraction in all regions of the left ventricle, and compares wall motion in abnormal subjects with that determined by X-ray contrast ventriculography. The short axis sections dividing the ventricle in slices from apex to base, were used to calculate ejection fraction for all parts of the ventricle and the results were plotted on a single colour coded circular image. The apex was represented in the centre, the base around the circumference, and all other parts of the ventricle were represented in between. The image was divided into 15 segments, and normal segmental ejection fraction was defined as within two standard deviations of the mean in a group of 10 normal subjects. In 25 subjects with coronary artery disease, motion of the anterior, apical, and inferior walls agreed in every case with the right anterior oblique contrast ventriculogram, but in 12 of these, the three dimensional ejection fraction image showed abnormal septal motion, and in a further 3, abnormal lateral wall motion in addition. In the 12 subjects there was disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and in the further 3 there was left circumflex disease. ECG-gated blood pool emission tomography thus provides an accurate quantitative assessment of left ventricular wall motion in three dimensions, and has significant advantages over conventional planar techniques.

  10. Color in Three-Dimensional Shaded Computer Graphics and Animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collery, Michael T.

    Directed primarily toward the person familiar with computer technology rather than the traditional art educator, this master's thesis addresses new approaches to color theory and its impact on electronic art media. Technical considerations related to color coming from electronic sources, i.e., radiant light, and differences between radiant and…

  11. Single-Frame Cinema. Three Dimensional Computer-Generated Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Edward Joseph, II

    This master's thesis provides a description of the proposed art form called single-frame cinema, which is a category of computer imagery that takes the temporal polarities of photography and cinema and unites them into a single visual vignette of time. Following introductory comments, individual chapters discuss (1) the essential physical…

  12. Three-Dimensional Field-Scale Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Modeling: Parallel Computing Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Vardon, Philip James; Cleall, Peter John; Thomas, Hywel Rhys; Philp, Roger Norman; Banicescu, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    An approach for the simulation of three-dimensional field-scale coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical problems is presented, including the implementation of parallel computation algorithms. The approach is designed to allow three-dimensional large-scale coupled simulations to be undertaken in reduced time. Owing to progress in computer technology, existing parallel implementations have been found to be ineffective, with the time taken for communication dominating any reduction in time gained by spl...

  13. Numerical procedures for three-dimensional computational surface thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Models and equations for surface thermochemistry and near-surface thermophysics of aerodynamically-heated thermal protection materials are reviewed, with particular emphasis on computational boundary conditions for surface mass and energy transfer. The surface energy and mass balances, coupled with an appropriate ablation or surface catalysis model, provide complete thermochemical boundary conditions for a true multidisciplinary solution of the fully coupled fluid-dynamics/solid mechanics problem. Practical approximate solutions can be obtained by using a detailed model with full thermophysics for either the solid or fluid phase amd a semianalytic method for the other half of the problem. A significant increase in the state-of-the-art in aerothermal computational fluid dynamics is possible by uniting CFD methodology with surface thermochemistry boundary conditions and the heat-balance-integral method.

  14. Water velocity at water-air interface is not zero: Comment on "Three-dimensional quantification of soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and image-based modeling" by Saoirse R. Tracy et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. X.; Fan, X. Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Tracy et al. (2015, doi: 10.1002/2014WR016020) assumed in their recent paper that water velocity at the water-air interface is zero in their pore-scale simulations of water flow in 3-D soil images acquired using X-ray computed tomography. We comment that such a treatment is physically wrong, and explain that it is the water-velocity gradient in the direction normal to the water-air interface, rather than the water velocity, that should be assumed to be zero at the water-air interface if one needs to decouple the water flow and the air flow. We analyze the potential errors caused by incorrectly taking water velocity at the water-air interface zero based on two simple examples, and conclude that it is not physically sound to make such a presumption because its associated errors are unpredictable.

  15. Three Dimensional Computer Graphics Federates for the 2012 Smackdown Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, Crystal; Govindaiah, Swetha; Muratet, Sean; O'Neil, Daniel A.; Schricker, Bradley C.

    2012-01-01

    The Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO) Smackdown is a two-year old annual event held at the 2012 Spring Simulation Interoperability Workshop (SIW). A primary objective of the Smackdown event is to provide college students with hands-on experience in developing distributed simulations using High Level Architecture (HLA). Participating for the second time, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) deployed four federates, two federates simulated a communications server and a lunar communications satellite with a radio. The other two federates generated 3D computer graphics displays for the communication satellite constellation and for the surface based lunar resupply mission. Using the Light-Weight Java Graphics Library, the satellite display federate presented a lunar-texture mapped sphere of the moon and four Telemetry Data Relay Satellites (TDRS), which received object attributes from the lunar communications satellite federate to drive their motion. The surface mission display federate was an enhanced version of the federate developed by ForwardSim, Inc. for the 2011 Smackdown simulation. Enhancements included a dead-reckoning algorithm and a visual indication of which communication satellite was in line of sight of Hadley Rille. This paper concentrates on these two federates by describing the functions, algorithms, HLA object attributes received from other federates, development experiences and recommendations for future, participating Smackdown teams.

  16. Three-dimensional identification of stem cells by computational holographic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Inkyu; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-01-01

    We present an optical imaging system and mathematical algorithms for three-dimensional sensing and identification of stem cells. Data acquisition of stem cells is based on holographic microscopy in the Fresnel domain by illuminating the cells with a laser. In this technique, the holograms of stem cells are optically recorded with an image sensor array interfaced with a computer and three-dimensional images of the stem cells are reconstructed from the Gabor-filtered digital holograms. The Gabo...

  17. Three-dimensional architecture of hair-cell linkages as revealedby electron-microscopic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Manfred; Koster, Bram; Ziese, Ulrike; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Volkmann, Niels; Wang, Da Neng; Hudspeth, A. James

    2006-07-28

    The senses of hearing and balance rest upon mechanoelectrical transduction by the hair bundles of hair cells in the inner ear. Located at the apical cellular surface, each hair bundle comprises several tens of stereocilia and a single kinocilium that are interconnected by extracellular proteinaceous links. Using electron-microscopic tomography of bullfrog saccular sensory epithelia, we examined the three-dimensional structures of ankle or basal links, kinociliary links, and tip links. We observed clear differences in the dimensions and appearances of the three links. We found two distinct populations of tip links suggestive of the involvement of two proteins or splice variants. We noted auxiliary links connecting the upper portions of tip links to the taller stereocilia. Tip links and auxiliary links show a tendency to adopt a globular conformation when disconnected from the membrane surface.

  18. Three-dimensional ground penetrating radar imaging using multi-frequency diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    In this talk we present results from a three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm for impulse radar operating in monostatic pule-echo mode. The application of interest to us is the nondestructive evaluation of civil structures such as bridge decks. We use a multi-frequency diffraction tomography imaging technique in which coherent backward propagations of the received reflected wavefield form a spatial image of the scattering interfaces within the region of interest. This imaging technique provides high-resolution range and azimuthal visualization of the subsurface region. We incorporate the ability to image in planarly layered conductive media and apply the algorithm to experimental data from an offset radar system in which the radar antenna is not directly coupled to the surface of the region. We present a rendering in three-dimensions of the resulting image data which provides high-detail visualization.

  19. Three dimensional ray tracing technique for tropospheric water vapor tomography using GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Aghajany, Saeid; Amerian, Yazdan

    2017-11-01

    Tropospheric water vapor has a key role in tropospheric processes and it is an important parameter in meteorology studies. Because of its non-uniform spatiotemporal distribution, modeling the spatiotemporal variations of water vapor is a challenging subject in meteorology. The GNSS tomography of the troposphere is a promising method to assess the spatiotemporal distribution of water vapor parameter in this layer. The tomography method efficiency is dependent on the ray tracing technique and GPS derived tropospheric slant wet delays. Implementing constraints and regularization methods are necessary in order to achieve the regularized solution in troposphere tomography. In this paper, the three dimensional (3D) ray tracing technique based on Eikonal equations and ERA-I data are used to perform the reconstruction the signal path, Iranian Permanent GPS Network (IPGN) measurements are used to calculate slant wet delays and the LSQR regularization technique is used to obtain a regularized tomographic solution for tropospheric water vapor. The modeled water vapor profiles are validated using radiosonde observations.

  20. Three-dimensional rendering of otolith growth using phase contrast synchrotron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapp, J J I; Fisher, M H; Atwood, R C; Bell, G D; Greco, M K; Songer, S; Hunter, E

    2016-05-01

    A three-dimensional computer reconstruction of a plaice Pleuronectes platessa otolith is presented from data acquired by the Diamond Light synchrotron, beamline I12, X-ray source, a high energy (53-150 keV) source particularly well suited to the study of dense objects. The data allowed non-destructive rendering of otolith structure, and for the first time allows otolith annuli (internal ring structures) to be analysed in X-ray tomographic images. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Assessment of three-dimensional setup errors in image-guided pelvic radiotherapy for uterine and cervical cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography and its effect on planning target volume margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patni, Nidhi; Burela, Nagarjuna; Pasricha, Rajesh; Goyal, Jaishree; Soni, Tej Prakash; Kumar, T Senthil; Natarajan, T

    2017-01-01

    To achieve the best possible therapeutic ratio using high-precision techniques (image-guided radiation therapy/volumetric modulated arc therapy [IGRT/VMAT]) of external beam radiation therapy in cases of carcinoma cervix using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). One hundred and five patients of gynecological malignancies who were treated with IGRT (IGRT/VMAT) were included in the study. CBCT was done once a week for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and daily in IGRT/VMAT. These images were registered with the planning CT scan images and translational errors were applied and recorded. In all, 2078 CBCT images were studied. The margins of planning target volume were calculated from the variations in the setup. The setup variation was 5.8, 10.3, and 5.6 mm in anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mediolateral direction. This allowed adequate dose delivery to the clinical target volume and the sparing of organ at risks. Daily kV-CBCT is a satisfactory method of accurate patient positioning in treating gynecological cancers with high-precision techniques. This resulted in avoiding geographic miss.

  2. Design of a three-dimensional hand/forearm model to apply computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Almeida Marinho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional digital model of a human hand and forearm to apply Computational Fluid Dynamics to propulsion analysis in swimming. Computer tomography scans of the hand and forearm of an Olympic swimmer were applied. The data were converted, using image processing techniques, into relevant coordinate input, which could be used in Computational Fluid Dynamics software. From that analysis, it was possible to verify an almost perfect agreement between the true human segment and the digital model. This technique could be used as a means to overcome the difficulties in developing a true three-dimensional model of a specific segment of the human body. Additionally, it could be used to improve the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics generally in sports and specifically in swimming studies, decreasing the gap between the experimental and the computational data.O objetivo do presente estudo foi desenvolver um modelo digital tridimensional de uma mão e um antebraço humano para aplicar a Dinâmica Computacional de Fluidos ao estudo da propulsão em natação. Foram aplicados procedimentos computorizados de tomografia axial na mão e antebraço de um nadador Olímpico. Através de técnicas de processamento de imagem, os dados foram convertidos em coordenadas tridimensionais, que podem ser utilizadas em programas de simulação computacional. Através dos resultados encontrados, foi possível verificar uma semelhança quase perfeita entre o segmento humano e o modelo digital. Esta técnica pode ser utilizada como uma forma de ultrapassar as dificuldades em desenvolver um modelo digital tridimensional de um segmento específico do corpo humano. Complementarmente, pode ser bastante útil na melhoria da utilização da Dinâmica Computacional de Fluidos no Desporto, de uma forma geral, e, mais especificamente, nos estudos em natação, diminuindo a diferença entre a investigação experimental e a investiga

  3. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Willner

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science.

  4. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science.

  5. Developments of three-dimensional computer-aided engineering simulation for injection moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents the state-of-the-art technology and developments of three-dimensional computer-aided engineering (CAE) simulation for injection moulding. It is aimed at providing insights into the emerging three-dimensional CAE tools to facilitate judicious application and further developments of these tools for design and manufacturing of complex injection moulded parts. It begins with background information on the evolution of CAE for injection moulding, followed by a discussion of advantages and limitations inherent with the widely adopted 2.5-dimensional Hele-Shaw flow approximation. After that, the mathematical formulations and numerical methods used in three-dimensional simulation are presented. This paper also discusses some special issues related to three-dimensional simulation, such as intensive CPU requirement and solution resolution in the gap-wise direction. A number of illustrative examples are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of three-dimensional simulation and the difference between predictions from the 2.5-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses.

  6. Computer program to calculate three-dimensional boundary layer flows over wings with wall mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclean, J. D.; Randall, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    A system of computer programs for calculating three dimensional transonic flow over wings, including details of the three dimensional viscous boundary layer flow, was developed. The flow is calculated in two overlapping regions: an outer potential flow region, and a boundary layer region in which the first order, three dimensional boundary layer equations are numerically solved. A consistent matching of the two solutions is achieved iteratively, thus taking into account viscous-inviscid interaction. For the inviscid outer flow calculations, the Jameson-Caughey transonic wing program FLO 27 is used, and the boundary layer calculations are performed by a finite difference boundary layer prediction program. Interface programs provide communication between the two basic flow analysis programs. Computed results are presented for the NASA F8 research wing, both with and without distributed surface suction.

  7. Non-contrast MR angiography using three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession imaging for evaluation of stenosis in the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery: a preliminary comparative study with computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardia, Patricia P; Penachim, Thiago J; Prando, Adilson; Torres, Ulysses S; D'Ippólito, Giuseppe

    2017-07-01

    Although non-contrast MR angiography (NC-MRA) is well established for the evaluation of renal artery stenosis, its usefulness in the evaluation of other abdominal aortic branches remains to be studied. This study aimed at evaluating the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of NC-MRA using a three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession sequence in identifying stenosis in the celiac trunk (CTR) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) as compared with CT angiography (CTA) as the reference standard. 41 patients underwent both NC-MRA and CTA of the abdominal aorta. Two radiologists analyzed the quality of the images (diagnostic vs non-diagnostic) and the performance (accuracy, sensitivity and specificity) of NC-MRA for the identification of arterial stenosis. Kappa tests were used to determine the interobserver agreement and the intermethod agreement between NC-MRA and CTA. NC-MRA provided diagnostic quality images of the CTR and SMA in 87.8% and 90.2% of cases, respectively, with high interobserver agreement (kappa 0.95 and 0.80, respectively). For stenosis assessment, NC-MRA had a sensitivity of 100%, a positive-predictive value of 50% and a negative-predictive value of 100% for both segments, with accuracies of 88.8% for the CTR and 94.5% for the SMA. NC-MRA is an accurate method for detecting stenosis in the CTR and SMA. Advances in knowledge: Data from this study suggest that MR angiography with balanced steady-state free-precession sequence is a viable non-contrast alternative for stenosis evaluation of these branches in patients for whom a contrast-enhanced examination is contraindicated.

  8. Influence of knee flexion angle and transverse drill angle on creation of femoral tunnels in double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the transportal technique: Three-dimensional computed tomography simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chong Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Jae; Chun, Yong-Min; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Su-Keon; Eom, Nam-Kyu; Jung, Min

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find appropriate flexion angle and transverse drill angle for optimal femoral tunnels of anteromedial (AM) bundle and posterolateral (PL) bundle in double-bundle ACL reconstruction using transportal technique. Thirty three-dimensional knee models were reconstructed. Knee flexion angles were altered from 100° to 130° at intervals of 10°. Maximum transverse drill angle (MTA), MTA minus 10° and 20° were set up. Twelve different tunnels were determined by four flexion angles and three transverse drill angles for each bundle. Tunnel length, wall breakage, inter-tunnel communication and graft-bending angle were assessed. Mean tunnel length of AM bundle was >30mm at 120° and 130° of flexion in all transverse drill angles. Mean tunnel length of PL bundle was >30mm during every condition. There were ≥1 cases of wall breakage except at 120° and 130° of flexion with MTA for AM bundle. There was no case of wall breakage for PL bundle. Considering inter-tunnel gap of >2mm without communication and obtuse graft-bending angle, 120° of flexion and MTA could be recommended as optimal condition for femoral tunnels of AM and PL bundles. Flexion angle and transverse drill angle had combined effect on femoral tunnel in double-bundle ACL reconstruction using transportal technique. Achieving flexion angle of 120° and transverse drill angle close to the medial femoral condyle could be recommended as optimal condition for femoral tunnels of AM and PL bundles to avoid insufficient tunnel length, wall breakage, inter-tunnel communication and acute graft-bending angle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Computation of the string tension in three dimensional Yang-Mills theory using large N reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kiskis, Joe; Narayanan, Rajamani

    2008-01-01

    We numerically compute the string tension in the large N limit of three dimensional Yang-Mills theory using Wilson loops. Space-time loops are formed as products of smeared space-like links and unsmeared time-like links. We use continuum reduction and both unfolded and folded Wilson loops in the analysis.

  10. Three-Dimensional Nanobiocomputing Architectures with aleph-Hypercells: Revolutionary Super-High-Performance Computing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    the switching power is not only a function of devices/gates/switches (bipolar junction transistors and field-effect transistors , BJTs and FETs, for...Acronyms 2D - Two-dimensional 3D - Three-dimensional ALU - Arithmetic logic unit BJT - Bipolar junction transistor CAD - Computer...14 3. 4. DNA Derivative Transistor for ℵ-Hypercells

  11. Determination of greenhouse-specific aspects of ventilation using three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.B.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2003-01-01

    The ventilation of a Spanish `parral¿ greenhouse was studied using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The calculations were verified by experimental results from tracer gas measurements. Two types of roof openings have been considered; the rollup window configuration and the flap

  12. An Exploration of Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment for Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Baichang; Wang, Qiyun; Chen, Jie; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) is a fundamental skill for students, and assessment is a critical factor in education. However, there is a lack of effective approaches to CT assessment. Therefore, we designed the Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment (TDIA) framework in this article. The TDIA has two aims: one was to integrate three dimensions…

  13. Electron Tomography: A Three-Dimensional Analytic Tool for Hard and Soft Materials Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercius, Peter; Alaidi, Osama; Rames, Matthew J; Ren, Gang

    2015-10-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis is essential to understand the relationship between the structure and function of an object. Many analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, neutron spectroscopy, and electron microscopy imaging, are used to provide structural information. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), one of the most popular analytic tools, has been widely used for structural analysis in both physical and biological sciences for many decades, in which 3D objects are projected into two-dimensional (2D) images. In many cases, 2D-projection images are insufficient to understand the relationship between the 3D structure and the function of nanoscale objects. Electron tomography (ET) is a technique that retrieves 3D structural information from a tilt series of 2D projections, and is gradually becoming a mature technology with sub-nanometer resolution. Distinct methods to overcome sample-based limitations have been separately developed in both physical and biological science, although they share some basic concepts of ET. This review discusses the common basis for 3D characterization, and specifies difficulties and solutions regarding both hard and soft materials research. It is hoped that novel solutions based on current state-of-the-art techniques for advanced applications in hybrid matter systems can be motivated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparison of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and high resolution photography for art conservation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Desmond C; Stenger, Jens; Gorczynska, Iwona; Lie, Henry; Hensick, Teri; Spronk, Ron; Wolohojian, Stephan; Khandekar, Narayan; Jiang, James Y; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E; Huber, Robert; Fujimoto, James G

    2007-11-26

    Gold punchwork and underdrawing in Renaissance panel paintings are analyzed using both three-dimensional swept source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) and high resolution digital photography. 3D-OCT can generate en face images with micrometer-scale resolutions at arbitrary sectioning depths, rejecting out-of-plane light by coherence gating. Therefore 3D-OCT is well suited for analyzing artwork where a surface layer obscures details of interest. 3D-OCT also enables cross-sectional imaging and quantitative measurement of 3D features such as punch depth, which is beneficial for analyzing the tools and techniques used to create works of art. High volumetric imaging speeds are enabled by the use of a Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser as the 3D-OCT light source. High resolution infrared (IR) digital photography is shown to be particularly useful for the analysis of underdrawing, where the materials used for the underdrawing and paint layers have significantly different IR absrption properties. In general, 3D-OCT provides a more flexible and comprehensive analysis of artwork than high resolution photography, but also requires more complex instrumentation and data analysis.

  15. Automated quantitative assessment of three-dimensional bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Mingen; Zhang, LieLie; Zhou, QingQing; Luo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing and quantitatively assessing the internal architecture of opaque three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds is difficult but vital to the improvement of 3D bioprinting techniques and to the fabrication of functional engineered tissues. In this study, swept-source optical coherence tomography was applied to acquire high-resolution images of hydrogel scaffolds. Novel 3D gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds with six different representative architectures were fabricated using our 3D bioprinting system. Both the scaffold material networks and the interconnected flow channel networks were reconstructed through volume rendering and binarisation processing to provide a 3D volumetric view. An image analysis algorithm was developed based on the automatic selection of the spatially-isolated region-of–interest. Via this algorithm, the spatially-resolved morphological parameters including pore size, pore shape, strut size, surface area, porosity, and interconnectivity were quantified precisely. Fabrication defects and differences between the designed and as-produced scaffolds were clearly identified in both 2D and 3D; the locations and dimensions of each of the fabrication defects were also defined. It concludes that this method will be a key tool for non-destructive and quantitative characterization, design optimisation and fabrication refinement of 3D bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds. Furthermore, this method enables investigation into the quantitative relationship between scaffold structure and biological outcome. PMID:27231597

  16. Three-dimensional ionospheric tomography reconstruction using the model function approach in Tikhonov regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sicheng; Huang, Sixun; Xiang, Jie; Fang, Hanxian; Feng, Jian; Wang, Yu

    2016-12-01

    Ionospheric tomography is based on the observed slant total electron content (sTEC) along different satellite-receiver rays to reconstruct the three-dimensional electron density distributions. Due to incomplete measurements provided by the satellite-receiver geometry, it is a typical ill-posed problem, and how to overcome the ill-posedness is still a crucial content of research. In this paper, Tikhonov regularization method is used and the model function approach is applied to determine the optimal regularization parameter. This algorithm not only balances the weights between sTEC observations and background electron density field but also converges globally and rapidly. The background error covariance is given by multiplying background model variance and location-dependent spatial correlation, and the correlation model is developed by using sample statistics from an ensemble of the International Reference Ionosphere 2012 (IRI2012) model outputs. The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations in China are used to present the reconstruction results, and measurements from two ionosondes are used to make independent validations. Both the test cases using artificial sTEC observations and actual GNSS sTEC measurements show that the regularization method can effectively improve the background model outputs.

  17. Three dimensional accurate morphology measurements of polystyrene standard particles on silicon substrate by electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Misa; Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Malac, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticle (NP) sample is one of the most widely used standard materials. It is used for calibration of particle counters and particle size measurement tools. It has been reported that the measured NP sizes by various methods, such as Differential Mobility Analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), differ from each other. Deformation of PSL NPs on mica substrate has been reported in AFM measurements: the lateral width of PSL NPs is smaller than their vertical height. To provide a reliable calibration standard, the deformation must be measured by a method that can reliably visualize the entire three dimensional (3D) shape of the PSL NPs. Here we present a method for detailed measurement of PSL NP 3D shape by means of electron tomography in a transmission electron microscope. The observed shape of the PSL NPs with 100 nm and 50 nm diameter were not spherical, but squished in direction perpendicular to the support substrate by about 7.4% and 12.1%, respectively. The high difference in surface energy of the PSL NPs and that of substrate together with their low Young modulus appear to explain the squishing of the NPs without presence of water film. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of the foundations of a Byzantine church by three-dimensional seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymenakos, L.; Papamarinopoulos, S.; Miltiadou, A.; Charkiolakis, N.

    2005-02-01

    Byzantine public buildings are of high historical and cultural value. Churches, in particular, are of high architectural and artistic value because they are built using various materials and construction techniques and may contain significant frescoes and mosaics. The knowledge of the state of foundations and ground material conditions is important for their proper restoration and preservation. Seismic tomography is employed to investigate the foundation structure and ground material of a Byzantine church. Energy sources are placed across the floor of the church and surrounding courts, while recorders are placed in a subterranean crypt. Travel time data are analyzed and processed with a three-dimensional (3D) tomographic inversion software in order to construct seismic velocity images at the foundation and below foundation level. Velocity variations are known to correlate well with the lithological character of the earth materials, thus providing important structural and lithological information. A case study from a Byzantine church of 11th c. A.D. in the suburbs of Athens, Greece, is presented. The objective of this research is the nondestructive investigation of unknown underground structures or void spaces, mainly under the floor of the building. The results are interpreted in terms of the foundation elements as well as of significant variations in the earth material character.

  19. Three dimensional distribution of surfactant in microspheres revealed by synchrotron radiation X-ray microcomputed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the formulation mechanism of microspheres via internal surfactant distribution. Eudragit L100 based microspheres loaded with bovine serum albumin were prepared by solid in oil in oil emulsion solvent evaporation method using acetone and liquid paraffin system containing sucrose stearate as a surfactant. The fabricated microspheres were evaluated for encapsulation efficiency, particle size, production yield, and in vitro release characteristics. The internal structures of microspheres were characterized using synchrotron radiation X-ray microcomputed tomography (SR-µCT. The enhanced contrast made the sucrose stearate distinguished from Eudragit to have its three dimensional (3D distribution. Results indicated that the content and concentration determined the state of sucrose stearate and had significant influences on the release kinetics of protein. The dispersity of sucrose stearate was the primary factor that controlled the structure of the microspheres and further affected the encapsulation efficiency, effective drug loading, as well as in vitro release behavior. In conclusion, the 3D internal distribution of surfactant in microspheres and its effects on protein release behaviors have been revealed for the first time. The highly resolved 3D architecture provides new evidence for the deep understanding of the microsphere formation mechanism.

  20. The characteristics of three-dimensional skin imaging system by full-colored optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Chan, Li-Ming; Wang, Kai-Cheng

    2009-05-01

    In the present cosmetic market, the skin image obtained from a hand-held camera is two-dimensional (2-D). Due to insufficient penetration, only the skin surface can be detected, and thus phenomena in the dermis cannot be observed. To take the place of the conventional 2D camera, a new hand-held imaging system is proposed for three-dimensional (3-D) skin imaging. Featuring non-invasiveness, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become one of the popular medical imaging techniques. The dermal images shown in OCT-related reports were mainly single-colored because of the use of a monotonic light source. With three original-colored beams applied in OCT, a full-colored image can be derived for dermatology. The penetration depth of the system ranges from 0.43 to 0.78 mm, sufficient for imaging of main tissues in the dermis. Colorful and non-invasive perspectives of deep dermal structure help to advance skin science, dermatology and cosmetology.

  1. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Ureter with Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Zhu, Hui; MacLennan, Gregory; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To verify the ability to identify the layered structures of ureteral wall and to image a segment of ureter in three dimensions with a high speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT). METHODS We imaged a porcine ureter ex vivo using a spectral domain EOCT with an specially designed circumferential scanning fiber catheter. The images were correlated with the histology to identify corresponding structures. Three-dimensional images and en face images at different depths from the luminal surface were reconstructed from the multiple cross-sectional images to visualize the layered structure of a segment of the ureter from different perspectives. RESULTS EOCT images can clearly reveal all layers of the ureteral wall as shown in the histological images. Especially, with the specially designed fiber catheter, the light beam was well centered during the rotation and pull back, which allowed constant acquisition of high fidelity images and unambiguous identification of the smooth muscle layers in all images. With high speed EOCT, a segment of ureter (20 mm) can be imaged in less than 90 seconds at a high resolution. CONCLUSIONS With its ability to visualize all layers of the ureteral wall, EOCT imaging offers the potential to stage urothelial cancers that have infiltrated the muscular wall (stage T2). This information will be complimentary to the diagnostic information obtained through ureteroscopic biopsy and CT urogram. PMID:21256548

  2. The assessment of orthodontic bonding defects: optical coherence tomography followed by three-dimensional reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominu, R.; Sinescu, C.; Rominu, M.; Negrutiu, M.; Petrescu, E.; Pop, D.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2011-10-01

    Orthodontic bonding is a simple yet important procedure that can influence the outcome of treatment in case it is performed incorrectly. An orthodontic treatment shadowed by repeated bonding failures can become unduly long and will decrease patient trust and compliance. Optical coherence tomography has been widely used in ophtalmology but is relatively new to dentistry. Using OCT one can detect aerial inclusions within the orthodontic adhesive or even identify incongruence between the bracket base and the tooth surface. The aim of our study was to identify bonding defects and reconstruct them three-dimensionally in order to be able to characterize them more accurately. We bonded 30 sound human permanent teeth with ceramic orthodontic brackets using a no-mix self-curing orthodontic adhesive. Prior to bonding all teeth were stored in tap water at 4°C and then professionally cleaned with rotary brushes and pumice. The samples were processed by the same person and the rotary brushes were changed after every fifth tooth. All interfaces were investigated by means of OCT and 4 defects were found. Subsequently, the defects were reconstructed threedimensionally using an open-source program. By identifying and reconstructing bonding defects we could assess the quality of the bonding procedure. Since bonding tends to be more accurate in vitro where the environmental conditions are close to ideal, it is probable that defects found in vivo be even greater in number, which leads to the conclusion that this type of investigation is potentially valuable.

  3. Imaging pathways in fractured rock using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Judith; Slater, Lee; Johnson, Timothy B.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Ntlargiannis, Dimitrios; Johnson, Carole D.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Lacombe, Pierre; Imbrigiotta, Thomas; Lane, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Major challenges exist in delineating bedrock fracture zones because these cause abrupt changes in geological and hydrogeological properties over small distances. Borehole observations cannot sufficiently capture heterogeneity in these systems. Geophysical techniques offer the potential to image properties and processes in between boreholes. We used three-dimensional cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a 9 m (diameter) × 15 m well field to capture high-resolution flow and transport processes in a fractured mudstone contaminated by chlorinated solvents, primarily trichloroethylene. Conductive (sodium bromide) and resistive (deionized water) injections were monitored in seven boreholes. Electrode arrays with isolation packers and fluid sampling ports were designed to enable acquisition of ERT measurements during pulsed tracer injections. Fracture zone locations and hydraulic pathways inferred from hydraulic head drawdown data were compared with electrical conductivity distributions from ERT measurements. Static ERT imaging has limited resolution to decipher individual fractures; however, these images showed alternating conductive and resistive zones, consistent with alternating laminated and massive mudstone units at the site. Tracer evolution and migration was clearly revealed in time-lapse ERT images and supported by in situ borehole vertical apparent conductivity profiles collected during the pulsed tracer test. While water samples provided important local information at the extraction borehole, ERT delineated tracer migration over spatial scales capturing the primary hydrogeological heterogeneity controlling flow and transport. The fate of these tracer injections at this scale could not have been quantified using borehole logging and/or borehole sampling methods alone.

  4. Three-dimensional grain structure of sintered bulk strontium titanate from X-ray diffraction contrast tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syha, M.; Rheinheimer, W.; Bäurer, M.

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional grain boundary network of sintered bulk strontium titanate is reconstructed using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography, a non-destructive technique for determining the grain shape and crystallographic orientation in polycrystals that is ideally suited for detailed studies...

  5. Three-dimensional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography data analysis for glaucoma detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available To develop a new three-dimensional (3D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT data analysis method using a machine learning technique based on variable-size super pixel segmentation that efficiently utilizes full 3D dataset to improve the discrimination between early glaucomatous and healthy eyes.192 eyes of 96 subjects (44 healthy, 59 glaucoma suspect and 89 glaucomatous eyes were scanned with SD-OCT. Each SD-OCT cube dataset was first converted into 2D feature map based on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL segmentation and then divided into various number of super pixels. Unlike the conventional super pixel having a fixed number of points, this newly developed variable-size super pixel is defined as a cluster of homogeneous adjacent pixels with variable size, shape and number. Features of super pixel map were extracted and used as inputs to machine classifier (LogitBoost adaptive boosting to automatically identify diseased eyes. For discriminating performance assessment, area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristics of the machine classifier outputs were compared with the conventional circumpapillary RNFL (cpRNFL thickness measurements.The super pixel analysis showed statistically significantly higher AUC than the cpRNFL (0.855 vs. 0.707, respectively, p = 0.031, Jackknife test when glaucoma suspects were discriminated from healthy, while no significant difference was found when confirmed glaucoma eyes were discriminated from healthy eyes.A novel 3D OCT analysis technique performed at least as well as the cpRNFL in glaucoma discrimination and even better at glaucoma suspect discrimination. This new method has the potential to improve early detection of glaucomatous damage.

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  7. High-performance blob-based iterative three-dimensional reconstruction in electron tomography using multi-GPUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaohua; Zhang, Fa; Chu, Qi; Liu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction in electron tomography (ET) has emerged as a leading technique to elucidate the molecular structures of complex biological specimens. Blob-based iterative methods are advantageous reconstruction methods for 3D reconstruction in ET, but demand huge computational costs. Multiple graphic processing units (multi-GPUs) offer an affordable platform to meet these demands. However, a synchronous communication scheme between multi-GPUs leads to idle GPU time, and a weighted matrix involved in iterative methods cannot be loaded into GPUs especially for large images due to the limited available memory of GPUs. In this paper we propose a multilevel parallel strategy combined with an asynchronous communication scheme and a blob-ELLR data structure to efficiently perform blob-based iterative reconstructions on multi-GPUs. The asynchronous communication scheme is used to minimize the idle GPU time so as to asynchronously overlap communications with computations. The blob-ELLR data structure only needs nearly 1/16 of the storage space in comparison with ELLPACK-R (ELLR) data structure and yields significant acceleration. Experimental results indicate that the multilevel parallel scheme combined with the asynchronous communication scheme and the blob-ELLR data structure allows efficient implementations of 3D reconstruction in ET on multi-GPUs.

  8. Computation of three-dimensional, rotational flow through turbomachinery blade rows for improved aerodynamic design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S. V.; Bozzola, R.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of a three dimensional computer code developed for predicting the flowfield in stationary and rotating turbomachinery blade rows is described in this study. The four stage Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme is used for solving the governing flow equations and yields solution to the full, three dimensional, unsteady Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates. This method is fully explicit and uses the finite volume, time marching procedure. In order to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the code, steady solutions were obtained for several cascade geometries under widely varying flow conditions. Computed flowfield results are presented for a fully subsonic turbine stator and a low aspect ratio, transonic compressor rotor blade under maximum flow and peak efficiency design conditions. Comparisons with Laser Anemometer measurements and other numerical predictions are also provided to illustrate that the present method predicts important flow features with good accuracy and can be used for cost effective aerodynamic design studies.

  9. Interactive computer graphic surface modeling of three-dimensional solid domains for boundary element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucchio, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the boundary element method (BEM) as a valid tool for solving problems in structural mechanics and in other fields of applied physics is discussed. The development of an integrated interactive computer graphic system for the application of the BEM to three dimensional problems in elastostatics is described. The integration of interactive computer graphic techniques and the BEM takes place at the preprocessing and postprocessing stages of the analysis process, when, respectively, the data base is generated and the results are interpreted. The interactive computer graphic modeling techniques used for generating and discretizing the boundary surfaces of a solid domain are outlined.

  10. Three-dimensional computer-aided surgical workflow to aid in reconstruction: from diagnosis to surgical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandór, G.K.; Butjár, P.; Wolff, J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of three-dimensional computer-aided surgical workfl ow has simplifi ed the planning of complex reconstruction cases. It can also be helpful in planning distraction osteogenesis cases. This article examines the evolving role of three-dimensional computer-aided surgical workfl ow in

  11. Development of a computational three-dimensional breast lesion phantom model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sisternes, Luis; Zysk, Adam M.; Brankov, Jovan G.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a realistic three-dimensional breast lesion phantom that can be computationally embedded in physically-acquired background images of normal breast tissue. In order to develop new imaging techniques aimed at the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions, a large number of lesions with varying physical characteristics must be tested, especially if physical characteristics must be correlated with observed image features. The new tool presented here, which incorporates three-dimensional tumor features, is potentially useful for testing imaging techniques such as CT, tomosynthesis, and phase-sensitive X-ray imaging, as these require three-dimensional tissue models. The simulated lesions improve significantly upon current methods, which lack the complexity and physical attributes of real tumors, by incorporating a stochastic Gaussian random sphere model to simulate the central tumor mass and calcifications, and an iterative fractal branching algorithm to model the complex spicula present in many tumors. Results show that userdefined lesions with realistic features can be computationally embedded in mammographic background images and that a wide range of physical properties can be modeled.

  12. High performance computing for three-dimensional agent-based molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, G; Pérez-Pérez, M; Fdez-Riverola, F; Lourenço, A

    2016-07-01

    Agent-based simulations are increasingly popular in exploring and understanding cellular systems, but the natural complexity of these systems and the desire to grasp different modelling levels demand cost-effective simulation strategies and tools. In this context, the present paper introduces novel sequential and distributed approaches for the three-dimensional agent-based simulation of individual molecules in cellular events. These approaches are able to describe the dimensions and position of the molecules with high accuracy and thus, study the critical effect of spatial distribution on cellular events. Moreover, two of the approaches allow multi-thread high performance simulations, distributing the three-dimensional model in a platform independent and computationally efficient way. Evaluation addressed the reproduction of molecular scenarios and different scalability aspects of agent creation and agent interaction. The three approaches simulate common biophysical and biochemical laws faithfully. The distributed approaches show improved performance when dealing with large agent populations while the sequential approach is better suited for small to medium size agent populations. Overall, the main new contribution of the approaches is the ability to simulate three-dimensional agent-based models at the molecular level with reduced implementation effort and moderate-level computational capacity. Since these approaches have a generic design, they have the major potential of being used in any event-driven agent-based tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Anatomical Study of Maxillary-Zygomatic Complex Using Three-Dimensional Computerized Tomography-Based Zygomatic Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiangliang; Zhao, Shijie; Liu, Hui; Sun, Zhipeng; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Weiguang

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To obtain anatomical data of maxillary-zygomatic complex based on simulating the zygomatic implantation using cadaver heads and three-dimensional computerized tomography (3D-CT). Methods. Simulating zygomatic implantation was performed using seven cadaver heads and 3D-CT images from forty-eight adults. After measuring the maxillary-zygomatic complex, we analyzed the position between the implantation path and the maxillary sinus cavity as well as the distance between the implantatio...

  14. Use of three-dimensional computer graphic animation to illustrate cleft lip and palate surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, C; Oliker, A; Haring, J; Dayan, J; Smith, D

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer animation is not commonly used to illustrate surgical techniques. This article describes the surgery-specific processes that were required to produce animations to teach cleft lip and palate surgery. Three-dimensional models were created using CT scans of two Chinese children with unrepaired clefts (one unilateral and one bilateral). We programmed several custom software tools, including an incision tool, a forceps tool, and a fat tool. Three-dimensional animation was found to be particularly useful for illustrating surgical concepts. Positioning the virtual "camera" made it possible to view the anatomy from angles that are impossible to obtain with a real camera. Transparency allows the underlying anatomy to be seen during surgical repair while maintaining a view of the overlaying tissue relationships. Finally, the representation of motion allows modeling of anatomical mechanics that cannot be done with static illustrations. The animations presented in this article can be viewed on-line at http://www.smiletrain.org/programs/virtual_surgery2.htm. Sophisticated surgical procedures are clarified with the use of 3D animation software and customized software tools. The next step in the development of this technology is the creation of interactive simulators that recreate the experience of surgery in a safe, digital environment. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Optical distortion correction in optical coherence tomography for quantitative ocular anterior segment by three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Sergio; Siedlecki, Damian; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Remon, Laura; Pascual, Daniel; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Marcos, Susana

    2010-02-01

    A method for three-dimensional 3-D optical distortion (refraction) correction on anterior segment Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images has been developed. The method consists of 3-D ray tracing through the different surfaces, following denoising, segmentation of the surfaces, Delaunay representation of the surfaces, and application of fan distortion correction. The correction has been applied theoretically to realistic computer eye models, and experimentally to OCT images of: an artificial eye with a Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) cornea and an intraocular lens (IOL), an enucleated porcine eye, and a human eye in vivo obtained from two OCT laboratory set-ups (time domain and spectral). Data are analyzed in terms of surface radii of curvature and asphericity. Comparisons are established between the reference values for the surfaces (nominal values in the computer model; non-contact profilometric measurements for the artificial eye; Scheimpflug imaging for the real eyes in vivo and vitro). The results from the OCT data were analyzed following the conventional approach of dividing the optical path by the refractive index, after application of 2-D optical correction, and 3-D optical correction (in all cases after fan distortion correction). The application of 3-D optical distortion correction increased significantly both the accuracy of the radius of curvature estimates and particularly asphericity of the surfaces, with respect to conventional methods of OCT image analysis. We found that the discrepancies of the radii of curvature estimates from 3-D optical distortion corrected OCT images are less than 1% with respect to nominal values. Optical distortion correction in 3-D is critical for quantitative analysis of OCT anterior segment imaging, and allows accurate topography of the internal surfaces of the eye.

  16. Three dimensional computations of the flow around a LM19 rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambraeus, T. [FFA, Bromma (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    To achieve insight in the flow phenomenon occurring in wind power engineering modeling of the flow through the basic governing equations, Navier-Stokes and Euler, can be a great complement to experiments and other computational methods such as the BEM (Blade Element Momentum). Navier-Stokes methods is regularly used in prediction of air-foil flows but then mostly under attached flow conditions. One of the main differences between air-foil computations for aircraft industry and computations for wind turbine applications is that the former is not very interested in separated flow while for the latter case this is part of the operating conditions. It has been noted that separated flow poses problems since the most popular turbulence models such as Baldwin-Lomax and the {kappa}-{epsilon} model seems to over estimate the amount of turbulent viscosity produced and thus suppressing the separation. The work with finding better turbulence models is presently an area with large amount of research offering improved models. However, in the present report only the two mentioned turbulence models have been used. The present report shows computational results obtained with the Navier-Stokes solver EU-RANUS. First the results from a two-dimensional verification cases are shown to verify that the solver produces results comparable with other solvers. The flow computed is attached flow and slightly separated flow over the so called Profile-A. Secondly three dimensional computations of the flow over a full three dimensional rotor at attached and stalled conditions is shown. The computed results are compared with measured power data from field experiments. (EG)

  17. Three-dimensional atomic models from a single projection using Z-contrast imaging: verification by electron tomography and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; Jones, L; Lobato, I; Altantzis, T; Goris, B; Nellist, P D; Bals, S; Van Aert, S

    2017-06-29

    In order to fully exploit structure-property relations of nanomaterials, three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale is often required. In recent years, the resolution of electron tomography has reached the atomic scale. However, such tomography typically requires several projection images demanding substantial electron dose. A newly developed alternative circumvents this by counting the number of atoms across a single projection. These atom counts can be used to create an initial atomic model with which an energy minimization can be applied to obtain a relaxed 3D reconstruction of the nanoparticle. Here, we compare, at the atomic scale, this single projection reconstruction approach with tomography and find an excellent agreement. This new approach allows for the characterization of beam-sensitive materials or where the acquisition of a tilt series is impossible. As an example, the utility is illustrated by the 3D atomic scale characterization of a nanodumbbell on an in situ heating holder of limited tilt range.

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a ... the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  19. Three-dimensional arrangement of β-tricalcium phosphate granules evaluated by microcomputed tomography and fractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Mambaye; Terranova, Lisa; Mallet, Romain; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Chappard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The macrophysical properties of granular biomaterials used to fill bone defects have rarely been considered. Granules of a given biomaterial occupy three-dimensional (3-D) space when packed together and create a macroporosity suitable for the invasion of vascular and bone cells. Granules of β-tricalcium phosphate were prepared using polyurethane foam technology and increasing the amount of material powder in the slurry (10, 11, 15, 18, 21 and 25 g). After sintering, granules of 1000-2000 μm were prepared by sieving. They were analyzed morphologically by scanning electron microscopy and placed in polyethylene test tubes to produce 3-D scaffolds. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) was used to image the scaffolds and to determine porosity and fractal dimension in three dimensions. Two-dimensional sections of the microCT models were binarized and used to compute classical morphometric parameters describing porosity (interconnectivity index, strut analysis and star volumes) and fractal dimensions. In addition, two newly important fractal parameters (lacunarity and succolarity) were measured. Compression analysis of the stacks of granules was done. Porosity decreased as the amount of material in the slurry increased but non-linear relationships were observed between microarchitectural parameters describing the pores and porosity. Lacunarity increased in the series of granules but succolarity (reflecting the penetration of a fluid) was maximal in the 15-18 g groups and decreased noticeably in the 25 g group. The 3-D arrangement of biomaterial granules studied by these new fractal techniques allows the optimal formulation to be derived based on the lowest amount of material, suitable mechanical resistance during crushing and the creation of large interconnected pores. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography through coherent-weighted focal-line-based image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Depeng; Wang, Yuehang; Zhou, Yang; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Xia, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Here, we introduce a new image reconstruction algorithm that combines coherent weighting with focal-line-based three-dimensional image reconstruction. The new algorithm addresses the major limitation of a linear ultrasound transducer array, i.e., the poor elevation resolution, and does not require any modification to the imaging system or the scanning geometry. We first numerically validated our approach through simulation and then experimentally tested it in phantom and in vivo. Both simulation and experimental results proved that the method can significantly improve the elevation resolution (up to 3.4 times in our experiment) and enhance object contrast.

  1. Computed Tomography evaluation of maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Natraj Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The maxillofacial region, a complex anatomical structure, can be evaluated by conventional (plain films, Tomography, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography, Orthopantomogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The study was conducted with objective of describing various forms of maxillofacial injuries, imaging features of different types of maxillofacial fractures and the advantage of using Three- Dimensional Computed Tomography reconstructed image. Materials & Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients during April 2014 to September 2016 using Toshiba Aquilion Prime 160 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography scanner.Results: The maxillofacial fractures were significantly higher in male population (88% than female population (12 %. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury others being physical assault and fall from height. It was most common in 31-40 years (26% and 21-30 (24% years age group. Maxillary sinus was the commonest fracture (36% followed by nasal bone and zygomatic bone (30%, mandible and orbital bones (28%. Soft tissue swelling was the commonest associated finding. Three dimensional images (3 D compared to the axial scans missed some fractures. However, the extension of the complex fracture lines and degree of displacement were more accurately assessed. Complex fractures found were Le fort (6% and naso-orbito-ethmoid (4% fractures.Conclusion: The proper evaluation of complex anatomy of the facial bones requires Multidetector Computed Tomography which offers excellent spatial resolution enabling multiplanar reformations and three dimensional reconstructions for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning.

  2. Three-dimensional display on computer screen free from accommodation-convergence conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Deen; Wang, Chenxu; Teng, Dongdong; Liu, Lilin

    2017-05-01

    Existing commercial three dimensional (3D) display technologies for computer screens, such as stereoscopic and auto-stereoscopic methods, are based on binocular parallax theory. Due to the inherent accommodation-convergence conflict, (auto-) stereoscopic displays are always suffering the visual fatigue problem. Through sequentially gating two different segments of each eye's aperture of the viewer and refreshing the display contents simultaneously, a 3D display based on Super Multi-view technology for the computer screen is proposed in this paper, which is free from the accommodation-convergence conflict. Employing custom liquid-crystal-valve array for each eye, a proof-of-concept prototype is set up and a 3D display free from accommodation-convergence conflict gets demonstrated.

  3. Three-dimensional range data compression using computer graphics rendering pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song

    2012-06-20

    This paper presents the idea of naturally encoding three-dimensional (3D) range data into regular two-dimensional (2D) images utilizing computer graphics rendering pipeline. The computer graphics pipeline provides a means to sample 3D geometry data into regular 2D images, and also to retrieve the depth information for each sampled pixel. The depth information for each pixel is further encoded into red, green, and blue color channels of regular 2D images. The 2D images can further be compressed with existing 2D image compression techniques. By this novel means, 3D geometry data obtained by 3D range scanners can be instantaneously compressed into 2D images, providing a novel way of storing 3D range data into its 2D counterparts. We will present experimental results to verify the performance of this proposed technique.

  4. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code. [two and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. Proteus solves the Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. Turbulence is modeled using a Baldwin-Lomax based algebraic eddy viscosity model. In addition, options are available to solve thin layer or Euler equations, and to eliminate the energy equation by assuming constant stagnation enthalpy. An extensive series of validation cases have been run, primarily using the two dimensional planar/axisymmetric version of the code. Several flows were computed that have exact solution such as: fully developed channel and pipe flow; Couette flow with and without pressure gradients; unsteady Couette flow formation; flow near a suddenly accelerated flat plate; flow between concentric rotating cylinders; and flow near a rotating disk. The two dimensional version of the Proteus code has been released, and the three dimensional code is scheduled for release in late 1991.

  5. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics in three dimensional angiography: Preliminary hemodynamic results of various proximal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ha Youn; Park, Sung Tae; Bae, Won Kyoung; Goo, Dong Erk [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We studied the influence of proximal geometry on the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). We made five models of different proximal geometry from three dimensional angiography of 63-year-old women with intracranial aneurysm. CFD results were analyzed as peak systolic velocity (PSV) at inlet and outlet as well as flow velocity profile at proximal level of internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm. Modified model of cavernous one with proximal tubing showed faster PSV at outlet than that at inlet. The PSV of outlets of other models were slower than that of inlets. The flow velocity profiles at immediate proximal to ICA aneurysm showed similar patterns in all models, suggesting that proximal vessel geometries could affect CFD results.

  7. Three-Dimensional Object Motion and Velocity Estimation Using a Single Computational RGB-D Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D object moving direction and velocity estimation method is presented using a dual off-axis color-filtered aperture (DCA-based computational camera. Conventional object tracking methods provided only two-dimensional (2D states of an object in the image for the target representation. The proposed method estimates depth information in the object region from a single DCA camera that transforms 2D spatial information into 3D model parameters of the object. We also present a calibration method of the DCA camera to estimate the entire set of camera parameters for a practical implementation. Experimental results show that the proposed DCA-based color and depth (RGB-D camera can calculate the 3D object moving direction and velocity of a randomly moving object in a single-camera framework.

  8. Three-dimensional viscous-inviscid coupling method for wind turbine computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a computational model for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbine wakes and blades subjected to unsteady motions and viscous effects is presented. The model is based on a three-dimensional panel method using a surface distribution of quadrilateral sources and doublets...... suitable for the design of wind turbines. A free-wake model has been employed to simulate the wake behind a wind turbine by using vortex filaments that carry the vorticity shed by the trailing edge of the blades. Viscous and rotational effects inside the boundary layer are taken into account via...... the transpiration velocity concept, applied using strip theory with the cross sectional angle of attack as coupling parameter. The transpiration velocity is obtained from the solution of the integral boundary layer equations with extension for rotational effects. It is found that viscosity plays a very important...

  9. Three-dimensional scene encryption and display based on computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dezhao; Cao, Liangcai; Jin, Guofan; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-10-10

    An optical encryption and display method for a three-dimensional (3D) scene is proposed based on computer-generated holograms (CGHs) using a single phase-only spatial light modulator. The 3D scene is encoded as one complex Fourier CGH. The Fourier CGH is then decomposed into two phase-only CGHs with random distributions by the vector stochastic decomposition algorithm. Two CGHs are interleaved as one final phase-only CGH for optical encryption and reconstruction. The proposed method can support high-level nonlinear optical 3D scene security and complex amplitude modulation of the optical field. The exclusive phase key offers strong resistances of decryption attacks. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of the novel method.

  10. Overview of 3D-TRACE, a NASA Initiative in Three-Dimensional Tomography of the Aerosol-Cloud Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony; Diner, David; Yanovsky, Igor; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Bal, Guillaume; Schechner, Yoav; Aides, Amit; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Remote sensing is a key tool for sorting cloud ensembles by dynamical state, aerosol environments by source region, and establishing causal relationships between aerosol amounts, type, and cloud microphysics-the so-called indirect aerosol climate impacts, and one of the main sources of uncertainty in current climate models. Current satellite imagers use data processing approaches that invariably start with cloud detection/masking to isolate aerosol air-masses from clouds, and then rely on one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer (RT) to interpret the aerosol and cloud measurements in isolation. Not only does this lead to well-documented biases for the estimates of aerosol radiative forcing and cloud optical depths in current missions, but it is fundamentally inadequate for future missions such as EarthCARE where capturing the complex, three-dimensional (3D) interactions between clouds and aerosols is a primary objective. In order to advance the state of the art, the next generation of satellite information processing systems must incorporate technologies that will enable the treatment of the atmosphere as a fully 3D environment, represented more realistically as a continuum. At one end, there is an optically thin background dominated by aerosols and molecular scattering that is strongly stratified and relatively homogeneous in the horizontal. At the other end, there are optically thick embedded elements, clouds and aerosol plumes, which can be more or less uniform and quasi-planar or else highly 3D with boundaries in all directions; in both cases, strong internal variability may be present. To make this paradigm shift possible, we propose to combine the standard models for satellite signal prediction physically grounded in 1D and 3D RT, both scalar and vector, with technologies adapted from biomedical imaging, digital image processing, and computer vision. This will enable us to demonstrate how the 3D distribution of atmospheric constituents, and their associated

  11. Turning intractable counting into sampling: Computing the configurational entropy of three-dimensional jammed packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniani, Stefano; Schrenk, K. Julian; Stevenson, Jacob D.; Wales, David J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical calculation of the total number of disordered jammed configurations Ω of N repulsive, three-dimensional spheres in a fixed volume V . To make these calculations tractable, we increase the computational efficiency of the approach of Xu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 245502 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.245502] and Asenjo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098002] and we extend the method to allow computation of the configurational entropy as a function of pressure. The approach that we use computes the configurational entropy by sampling the absolute volume of basins of attraction of the stable packings in the potential energy landscape. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the pressure of a configuration and the volume of its basin of attraction in the potential energy landscape. This relation is well described by a power law. Our methodology to compute the number of minima in the potential energy landscape should be applicable to a wide range of other enumeration problems in statistical physics, string theory, cosmology, and machine learning that aim to find the distribution of the extrema of a scalar cost function that depends on many degrees of freedom.

  12. Three dimensional mapping of Fe dopants in ceria nanocrystals using direct spectroscopic electron tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Goris (Bart); M. Meledina (Maria); S. Turner (Stuart); Z. Zhong (Zhichao); K.J. Batenburg (Joost); S. Bals (Sara)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractElectron tomography is a powerful technique for the 3D characterization of the morphology of nanostructures. Nevertheless, resolving the chemical composition of complex nanostructures in 3D remains challenging and the number of studies in which electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is

  13. Three dimensional mapping of Fe dopants in ceria nanocrystals using direct spectroscopic electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goris, Bart; Meledina, Maria; Turner, Stuart [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Zhong, Zhichao [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Batenburg, K. Joost [Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, P.O. Box 94079, 1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mathematical Institute, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 1, 2333CA Leiden (Netherlands); Bals, Sara [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-12-15

    Electron tomography is a powerful technique for the 3D characterization of the morphology of nanostructures. Nevertheless, resolving the chemical composition of complex nanostructures in 3D remains challenging and the number of studies in which electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is combined with tomography is limited. During the last decade, dedicated reconstruction algorithms have been developed for HAADF-STEM tomography using prior knowledge about the investigated sample. Here, we will use the prior knowledge that the experimental spectrum of each reconstructed voxel is a linear combination of a well-known set of references spectra in a so-called direct spectroscopic tomography technique. Based on a simulation experiment, it is shown that this technique provides superior results in comparison to conventional reconstruction methods for spectroscopic data, especially for spectrum images containing a relatively low signal to noise ratio. Next, this technique is used to investigate the spatial distribution of Fe dopants in Fe:Ceria nanoparticles in 3D. It is shown that the presence of the Fe{sup 2+} dopants is correlated with a reduction of the Ce atoms from Ce{sup 4+} towards Ce{sup 3+}. In addition, it is demonstrated that most of the Fe dopants are located near the voids inside the nanoparticle. - Highlights: • A direct tomographic reconstruction technique is proposed for spectroscopic data. • Spectrum fitting is combined with a tomography reconstruction in a single step. • The technique yields superior results for data with a low signal to noise ratio. • The technique is applied to map Fe dopants in ceria nanoparticles.

  14. Three-dimensional computer-generated head model reconstructed from cephalograms, facial photographs, and dental cast models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasima, Akihiko; Terajima, Masahiko; Mori, Noriko; Hoshino, Yoshihiro; Tokumori, Kenji; Aoki, Yoshimitu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2005-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer models of the human craniofacial structure have been constructed with computed tomography (CT). However, the high cost of CT and the radiation exposure are drawbacks to this method. Attempts to create a 3D reconstruction from lateral and frontal cephalograms have failed because of problems with magnification, distortion, and limitations of landmark identification, among others. We introduce a new method that creates a standard head model for a patient from anatomic measurement points extracted from x-ray images, facial stereo photographs, and dental casts. To obtain precise 3D coordinates from cephalograms, several equations were introduced to compensate for radiographic image magnification and distortion. By comparing the constructed model and 3D-CT images, this method proved to be accurate. It is possible to produce a 3D head model on a personal computer and to view it from any desired angle; this will provide easy-to-understand information for patients and establish a diagnostic or therapeutic method for communication with other health care providers.

  15. Three-dimensional computational modeling of subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid flow in the subarachnoid space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Soellinger, Michaela; Boesiger, Peter; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2009-02-01

    This study aims at investigating three-dimensional subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the inferior cranial space, the superior spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), and the fourth cerebral ventricle using a combination of a finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. An anatomically accurate 3D model of the entire SAS of a healthy volunteer was reconstructed from high resolution T2 weighted MRI data. Subject-specific pulsatile velocity boundary conditions were imposed at planes in the pontine cistern, cerebellomedullary cistern, and in the spinal subarachnoid space. Velocimetric MRI was used to measure the velocity field at these boundaries. A constant pressure boundary condition was imposed at the interface between the aqueduct of Sylvius and the fourth ventricle. The morphology of the SAS with its complex trabecula structures was taken into account through a novel porous media model with anisotropic permeability. The governing equations were solved using finite-volume CFD. We observed a total pressure variation from -42 Pa to 40 Pa within one cardiac cycle in the investigated domain. Maximum CSF velocities of about 15 cms occurred in the inferior section of the aqueduct, 14 cms in the left foramen of Luschka, and 9 cms in the foramen of Magendie. Flow velocities in the right foramen of Luschka were found to be significantly lower than in the left, indicating three-dimensional brain asymmetries. The flow in the cerebellomedullary cistern was found to be relatively diffusive with a peak Reynolds number (Re)=72, while the flow in the pontine cistern was primarily convective with a peak Re=386. The net volumetric flow rate in the spinal canal was found to be negligible despite CSF oscillation with substantial amplitude with a maximum volumetric flow rate of 109 mlmin. The observed transient flow patterns indicate a compliant behavior of the cranial subarachnoid space. Still, the estimated

  16. Three-dimensional full-wavefield seismic tomography on field data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.; Stekl, I.; Guasch, L.

    2010-12-01

    In contrast to conventional seismic tomography, where we minimise the mismatch between observed and calculated seismic travel times, in full-wavefield tomography we seek a model that is able to match the entire observed wavefield, wiggle-for-wiggle. Wavefield tomography has a long history, but it is only recently that advances in algorithms and in hardware have made the technique feasible on realistic-sized datasets in three dimensions. With sponsorship from the petroleum industry, we have developed full 3D codes for anisotropic acoustic, and isotropic elastic, wavefield tomography in the time-domain, and for visco-acoustic tomography in the frequency domain. In both domains, we solve the wave equation using finite differences on a regular mesh; we use explicit time-stepping in the time domain, and use an implicit iterative solver in the frequency domain. The codes are parallelised to run on a cluster of multi-core nodes, and they are able to deal with large irregular 3D datasets efficiently. We report here the results of applying these codes to a 3D ocean-bottom seismic dataset acquired over the Tommeliten oil field in the North Sea. The field data are composed of 1920 four-component ocean-bottom receivers, recording about 30,000 air-gun sources over an area of 12 x 9 km. A low-velocity, high-attenuation gas cloud is located at a depth of 1 to 2 km; this gas cloud partially obscures the geology of the underlying oil field. There is significant anisotropy within the section; vertical and horizontal p-wave velocities can differ by more than 15%. Wavefield tomography is successful in imaging the complex velocity structure in 3D within this gas cloud with a lateral resolution of about 25 m. This resolution is much better than that obtained using reflection travel-time tomography or migration velocity analysis. Subsequent pre-stack reverse-time depth migration of the underlying reflection data demonstrates that the recovered velocity structure is real. It is necessary

  17. Fast polygon-based method for calculating computer-generated holograms in three-dimensional display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yijie; Wang, Yongtian; Liu, Juan; Li, Xin; Jia, Jia

    2013-01-01

    In the holographic three-dimensional (3D) display, the numerical synthesis of the computer-generated holograms needs tremendous calculation. To solve the problem, a fast polygon-based method based on two-dimensional Fourier analysis of 3D affine transformation is proposed. From one primitive polygon, the proposed method calculates the diffracted optical field of each arbitrary polygon in the 3D model, where the pseudo-inverse matrix, the interpolation, and the compensation of the power spectral density are employed. The proposed method could save the computation time in the hologram synthesis since it does not need the fast Fourier transform for each polygonal surface and the additional diffusion computation. The numerical simulation and the optical experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The results reveal the proposed method could reconstruct the 3D scene with the solid effect and without the depth limitation. The factors that influence the image quality are discussed, and the thresholds are proposed to ensure the reconstruction quality.

  18. Improved depth perception with three-dimensional auxiliary display and computer generated three-dimensional panoramic overviews in robot-assisted laparoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Fokko P.; Bouma, Henri; Eendebak, Pieter T.; van Basten, Jean-Paul A.; Beerlage, Harrie P.; Smits, Geert A. H. J.; Bos, Jelte E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In comparison to open surgery, endoscopic surgery offers impaired depth perception and narrower field-of-view. To improve depth perception, the Da Vinci robot offers three-dimensional (3-D) video on the console for the surgeon but not for assistants, although both must collaborate. We improved the shared perception of the whole surgical team by connecting live 3-D monitors to all three available Da Vinci generations, probed user experience after two years by questionnaire, and compared time measurements of a predefined complex interaction task performed with a 3-D monitor versus two-dimensional. Additionally, we investigated whether the complex mental task of reconstructing a 3-D overview from an endoscopic video can be performed by a computer and shared among users. During the study, 925 robot-assisted laparoscopic procedures were performed in three hospitals, including prostatectomies, cystectomies, and nephrectomies. Thirty-one users participated in our questionnaire. Eighty-four percent preferred 3-D monitors and 100% reported spatial-perception improvement. All participating urologists indicated quicker performance of tasks requiring delicate collaboration (e.g., clip placement) when assistants used 3-D monitors. Eighteen users participated in a timing experiment during a delicate cooperation task in vitro. Teamwork was significantly (40%) faster with the 3-D monitor. Computer-generated 3-D reconstructions from recordings offered very wide interactive panoramas with educational value, although the present embodiment is vulnerable to movement artifacts. PMID:26158026

  19. Application of Simulated Three Dimensional CT Image in Orthognathic Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Don; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Sun Kook; Lee, Kyoung Sang [Dept. of Medical Engineering, College of Medicine, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    In orthodontics and orthognathic surgery, cephalogram has been routine practice in diagnosis and treatment evaluation of craniofacial deformity. But its inherent distortion of actual length and angles during projecting three dimensional object to two dimensional plane might cause errors in quantitative analysis of shape and size. Therefore, it is desirable that three dimensional object is diagnosed and evaluated three dimensionally and three dimensional CT image is best for three dimensional analysis. Development of clinic necessitates evaluation of result of treatment and comparison before and after surgery. It is desirable that patient that was diagnosed and planned by three dimensional computed tomography before surgery is evaluated by three dimensional computed tomography after surgery, too. But Because there is no standardized normal values in three dimension now and three dimensional Computed Tomography needs expensive equipment and because of its expenses and amount of exposure to radiation, limitations still remain to be solved in its application to routine practice. If postoperative three dimensional image is constructed by pre and postoperative lateral and postero-anterior cephalograms and preoperative three dimensional computed tomogram, pre and postoperative image will be compared and evaluated three dimensionally without three dimensional computed tomography after surgery and that will contribute to standardize normal values in three dimension. This study introduced new method that computer-simulated three dimensional image was constructed by preoperative three dimensional computed tomogram and pre and postoperative lateral and postero-anterior cephalograms, and for validation of new method, in four cases of dry skull that position of mandible was displaced and four patients of orthognathic surgery, computer-simulated three dimensional image and actual postoperative three dimensional image were compared. The results were as follows. 1. In four cases of

  20. Tomography of reaction-diffusion microemulsions reveals three-dimensional Turing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánsági, Tamás; Vanag, Vladimir K; Epstein, Irving R

    2011-03-11

    Spatially periodic, temporally stationary patterns that emerge from instability of a homogeneous steady state were proposed by Alan Turing in 1952 as a mechanism for morphogenesis in living systems and have attracted increasing attention in biology, chemistry, and physics. Patterns found to date have been confined to one or two spatial dimensions. We used tomography to study the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in a microemulsion in which the polar reactants are confined to aqueous nanodroplets much smaller than the scale of the stationary patterns. We demonstrate the existence of Turing patterns that can exist only in three dimensions, including curved surfaces, hexagonally packed cylinders, spots, and labyrinthine and lamellar patterns.

  1. Three-dimensional integration of nanotechnologies for computing and data storage on a single chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M.; Hills, Gage; Park, Rebecca S.; Howe, Roger T.; Saraswat, Krishna; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2017-07-01

    The computing demands of future data-intensive applications will greatly exceed the capabilities of current electronics, and are unlikely to be met by isolated improvements in transistors, data storage technologies or integrated circuit architectures alone. Instead, transformative nanosystems, which use new nanotechnologies to simultaneously realize improved devices and new integrated circuit architectures, are required. Here we present a prototype of such a transformative nanosystem. It consists of more than one million resistive random-access memory cells and more than two million carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors—promising new nanotechnologies for use in energy-efficient digital logic circuits and for dense data storage—fabricated on vertically stacked layers in a single chip. Unlike conventional integrated circuit architectures, the layered fabrication realizes a three-dimensional integrated circuit architecture with fine-grained and dense vertical connectivity between layers of computing, data storage, and input and output (in this instance, sensing). As a result, our nanosystem can capture massive amounts of data every second, store it directly on-chip, perform in situ processing of the captured data, and produce ‘highly processed’ information. As a working prototype, our nanosystem senses and classifies ambient gases. Furthermore, because the layers are fabricated on top of silicon logic circuitry, our nanosystem is compatible with existing infrastructure for silicon-based technologies. Such complex nano-electronic systems will be essential for future high-performance and highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray computed laminography of the three-dimensional anatomy of tomato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboven, Pieter; Herremans, Els; Helfen, Lukas; Ho, Quang T; Abera, Metadel; Baumbach, Tilo; Wevers, Martine; Nicolaï, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation computed laminography (SR-CL) is presented as an imaging method for analyzing the three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of leaves. The SR-CL method was used to provide 3D images of 1-mm² samples of intact leaves at a pixel resolution of 750 nm. The method allowed visualization and quantitative analysis of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells, and showed local venation patterns, aspects of xylem vascular structure and stomata. The method failed to image subcellular organelles such as chloroplasts. We constructed 3D computer models of leaves that can provide a basis for calculating gas exchange, light penetration and water and solute transport. The leaf anatomy of two different tomato genotypes grown in saturating light conditions was compared by 3D analysis. Differences were found in calculated values of tissue porosity, cell number density, cell area to volume ratio and cell volume and cell shape distributions of palisade and spongy cell layers. In contrast, the exposed cell area to leaf area ratio in mesophyll, a descriptor that correlates to the maximum rate of photosynthesis in saturated light conditions, was no different between spongy and palisade cells or between genotypes. The use of 3D image processing avoids many of the limitations of anatomical analysis with two-dimensional sections. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Computational methodology to determine fluid related parameters of non regular three-dimensional scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Santamaría, Víctor Andrés; Malvè, M; Duizabo, A; Mena Tobar, A; Gallego Ferrer, G; García Aznar, J M; Doblaré, M; Ochoa, I

    2013-11-01

    The application of three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to facilitate the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of cells has been widely studied for tissue engineering purposes. The fabrication methods used to improve the mechanical response of the scaffold produce complex and non regular structures. Apart from the mechanical aspect, the fluid behavior in the inner part of the scaffold should also be considered. Parameters such as permeability (k) or wall shear stress (WSS) are important aspects in the provision of nutrients, the removal of metabolic waste products or the mechanically-induced differentiation of cells attached in the trabecular network of the scaffolds. Experimental measurements of these parameters are not available in all labs. However, fluid parameters should be known prior to other types of experiments. The present work compares an experimental study with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to determine the related fluid parameters (k and WSS) of complex non regular poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds based only on the treatment of microphotographic images obtained with a microCT (μCT). The CFD analysis shows similar tendencies and results with low relative difference compared to those of the experimental study, for high flow rates. For low flow rates the accuracy of this prediction reduces. The correlation between the computational and experimental results validates the robustness of the proposed methodology.

  4. Virtual cerebral ventricular system: an MR-based three-dimensional computer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christina M; Wilson, Timothy D

    2011-01-01

    The inherent spatial complexity of the human cerebral ventricular system, coupled with its deep position within the brain, poses a problem for conceptualizing its anatomy. Cadaveric dissection, while considered the gold standard of anatomical learning, may be inadequate for learning the anatomy of the cerebral ventricular system; even with intricate dissection, ventricular structures remain difficult to observe. Three-dimensional (3D) computer reconstruction of the ventricular system offers a solution to this problem. This study aims to create an accurate 3D computer reconstruction of the ventricular system with surrounding structures, including the brain and cerebellum, using commercially available 3D rendering software. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a male cadaver were segmented using both semiautomatic and manual tools. Segmentation involves separating voxels of different grayscale values to highlight specific neural structures. User controls enable adding or removing of structures, altering their opacity, and making cross-sectional slices through the model to highlight inner structures. Complex physiologic concepts, such as the flow of cerebrospinal fluid, are also shown using the 3D model of the ventricular system through a video animation. The model can be projected stereoscopically, to increase depth perception and to emphasize spatial relationships between anatomical structures. This model is suited for both self-directed learning and classroom teaching of the 3D anatomical structure and spatial orientation of the ventricles, their connections, and their relation to adjacent neural and skeletal structures. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualize...

  6. Two- and three-dimensional optical tomography of finger joints for diagnostics of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Hanson, Kenneth M.; Beuthan, Juergen

    1998-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common diseases of human joints. This progressive disease is characterized by an inflammation process that originates in the inner membrane (synovalis) of the capsule and spreads to other parts of the joint. In early stages the synovalis thickness and the permeability of this membrane changes. This leads to changes in the optical parameters of the synovalis and the synovial fluid (synovia), which occupies the space between the bones. The synovia changes from a clear yellowish fluid to a turbid grayish substance. In this work we present 2 and 3-dimensional reconstruction schemes for optical tomography of the finger joints. Our reconstruction algorithm is based on the diffusion approximation and employs adjoint differentiation techniques for the gradient calculation of the objective function with respect to the spatial distribution of optical properties. In this way, the spatial distribution of optical properties within the joints is reconstructed with high efficiency and precision. Volume information concerning the synovial space and the capsula are provided. Furthermore, it is shown that small changes of the scattering coefficients can be monitored. Therefore, optical tomography has the potential of becoming a useful tool for the early diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression in RA.

  7. Three-dimensional correction of conduction velocity in the embryonic heart using integrated optical mapping and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical mapping (OM) of cardiac electrical activity conventionally collects information from a three-dimensional (3-D) surface as a two-dimensional (2-D) projection map. When applied to measurements of the embryonic heart, this method ignores the substantial and complex curvature of the heart surface, resulting in significant errors when calculating conduction velocity, an important electrophysiological parameter. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of imaging the 3-D structure of the embryonic heart and accurately characterizing the surface topology. We demonstrate an integrated OCT/OM imaging system capable of simultaneous conduction mapping and 3-D structural imaging. From these multimodal data, we obtained 3-D activation maps and corrected conduction velocity maps of early embryonic quail hearts. 3-D correction eliminates underestimation bias in 2-D conduction velocity measurements, therefore enabling more accurate measurements with less experimental variability. The integrated system will also open the door to correlate the structure and electrophysiology, thereby improving our understanding of heart development.

  8. Miniature optical coherence tomography-ultrasound probe for automatically coregistered three-dimensional intracoronary imaging with real-time display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Patel, Pranav M; Kirk Shung, K; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-10-01

    We have developed a novel miniature integrated optical coherence tomography (OCT)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probe, with a 1.5-mm-long rigid part and 0.9-mm outer diameter, for real-time intracoronary imaging of atherosclerotic plaques and guiding of interventional procedures. By placing the OCT ball lens and IVUS transducer back-to-back at the same axial position, this probe can provide automatically coregistered, coaxial OCT-IVUS imaging. To demonstrate its real-time capability, three-dimensional OCT-IVUS imaging of a pig's coronary artery displaying in polar coordinates, as well as images of three major types of atherosclerotic plaques in human cadaver coronary segments, were obtained using this probe and our upgraded system. Histology validation is also presented.

  9. Lung nodule detection performance in five observers on computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three-dimensional processing (AIDR 3D) in a Japanese multicenter study: Comparison between ultra-low-dose CT and low-dose CT by receiver-operating characteristic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro, E-mail: yatsushi@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673, Aichi (Japan); Yamashiro, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Miyara, Tetsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Department of Radiology, Okinawa Prefectural Yaeyama Hospital, Ishigaki 907-0022, Okinawa (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki 569-8686, Osaka (Japan); Sato, Yukihisa [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center of Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Moriya, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Noma, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Tenri Hospital, Tenri 632-8552, Nara (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Using AIDR 3D, ULDCT showed comparable LND of solid nodules to LDCT. • Using AIDR 3D, LND of smaller GGN in ULDCT was inferior to that in LDCT. • Effective dose in ULDCT was about only twice of that in chest X-ray. • BMI values in study population were mostly in the normal range body habitus. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare lung nodule detection performance (LNDP) in computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three dimensional processing (AIDR3D) between ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) and low dose CT (LDCT). Materials and methods: This was part of the Area-detector Computed Tomography for the Investigation of Thoracic Diseases (ACTIve) Study, a multicenter research project being conducted in Japan. Institutional Review Board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-three subjects (body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.2) underwent chest CT at 6 institutions using identical scanners and protocols. In a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120 and 20 mA (3.52, 1.74 and 0.29 mSv, respectively). Axial CT images with 2-mm thickness/increment were reconstructed using AIDR3D. Standard of reference (SOR) was determined based on CT images at 240 mA by consensus reading of 2 board-certificated radiologists as to the presence of lung nodules with the longest diameter (LD) of more than 3 mm. Another 5 radiologists independently assessed and recorded presence/absence of lung nodules and their locations by continuously-distributed rating in CT images at 20 mA (ULDCT) and 120 mA (LDCT). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate LNDP of both methods in total and also in subgroups classified by LD (>4, 6 and 8 mm) and nodular characteristics (solid and ground glass nodules). Results: For SOR, 161 solid and 60 ground glass nodules were identified. No significant difference in LNDP for entire solid nodules was demonstrated between both methods, as area under ROC

  10. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of Three-Dimensional Ice Shapes on a NACA 23012 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, GaRam; Oliden, Daniel; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The present study identifies a process for performing computational fluid dynamic calculations of the flow over full three-dimensional (3D) representations of complex ice shapes deposited on aircraft surfaces. Rime and glaze icing geometries formed on a NACA23012 airfoil were obtained during testing in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The ice shape geometries were scanned as a cloud of data points using a 3D laser scanner. The data point clouds were meshed using Geomagic software to create highly accurate models of the ice surface. The surface data was imported into Pointwise grid generation software to create the CFD surface and volume grids. It was determined that generating grids in Pointwise for complex 3D icing geometries was possible using various techniques that depended on the ice shape. Computations of the flow fields over these ice shapes were performed using the NASA National Combustion Code (NCC). Results for a rime ice shape for angle of attack conditions ranging from 0 to 10 degrees and for freestream Mach numbers of 0.10 and 0.18 are presented. For validation of the computational results, comparisons were made to test results from rapid-prototype models of the selected ice accretion shapes, obtained from a separate study in a subsonic wind tunnel at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The computational and experimental results were compared for values of pressure coefficient and lift. Initial results show fairly good agreement for rime ice accretion simulations across the range of conditions examined. The glaze ice results are promising but require some further examination.

  11. Real-time three-dimensional temperature mapping in photothermal therapy with optoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyaga Landa, Francisco Javier; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís.; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Ablation and photothermal therapy are widely employed medical protocols where the selective destruction of tissue is a necessity as in cancerous tissue removal or vascular and brain abnormalities. Tissue denaturation takes place when the temperature reaches a threshold value while the time of exposure determines the lesion size. Therefore, the spatio-temporal distribution of temperature plays a crucial role in the outcome of these clinical interventions. We demonstrate fast volumetric temperature mapping with optoacoustic tomography based on real-time optoacoustic readings from the treated region. The performance of the method was investigated in tissue-mimicking phantom experiments. The new ability to non-invasively measure temperature volumetrically in an entire treated region with high spatial and temporal resolutions holds potential for improving safety and efficacy of thermal ablation and to advance the general applicability of laser-based therapy.

  12. Clinical application of a novel computer-aided detection system based on three-dimensional CT images on pulmonary nodule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jian-Ye; Ye, Hai-Hong; Yang, Shi-Xiong; Jin, Ren-Chao; Huang, Qi-Liang; Wei, Yong-Chu; Huang, Si-Guang; Wang, Bin-Qiang; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Qin, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical application effects of a novel computer-aided detection (CAD) system based on three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) images on pulmonary nodule. 98 cases with pulmonary nodule (PN) in our hospital from Jun, 2009 to Jun, 2013 were analysed in this study. All cases underwent PN detection both by the simple spiral CT scan and by the computer-aided system based on 3D CT images, respectively. Postoperative pathological results were considered as the "gold standard", for both two checking methods, the diagnostic accuracies for determining benign and malignant PN were calculated. Under simple spiral CT scan method, 63 cases is malignant, including 50 true positive cases and 13 false positive cases from the "gold standard"; 35 cases is benign, 16 true negative case and 19 false negative cases, the Sensitivity 1 (Se1)=0.725, Specificity1 (Sp1)=0.448, Agreement rate1 (Kappa 1)=0.673, J1 (Youden's index 1)=0.173, LR(+)1=1.616, LR(-)1=0.499. Kappa 1=0.673 between the 0.4 and 0.75, has a moderate consistency. Underwent computer-aided detection (CAD) based on 3D CT method, 67cases is malignant, including 62 true positive cases and 7 false positive cases; 31 cases is benign, 24 true negative case and 7 false negative cases, Sensitivity 2 (Se2)=0.899, Specificity2 (Sp2)=0.828, Agreement rate (Kappa 2)=0.877, J2 (Youden's index 2)=0.727, LR(+)2=5.212, LR(-)2=0.123. Kappa 2=0.877 >0.75, has a good consistency. Computer-aided PN detecting system based on 3D CT images has better clinical application value, and can help doctor carry out early diagnosis of lung disease (such as cancer, etc.) through CT images.

  13. A computational model to generate simulated three-dimensional breast masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisternes, Luis de; Brankov, Jovan G.; Zysk, Adam M.; Wernick, Miles N., E-mail: wernick@iit.edu [Medical Imaging Research Center, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Schmidt, Robert A. [Kurt Rossmann Laboratories for Radiologic Image Research, Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Nishikawa, Robert M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop algorithms for creating realistic three-dimensional (3D) simulated breast masses and embedding them within actual clinical mammograms. The proposed techniques yield high-resolution simulated breast masses having randomized shapes, with user-defined mass type, size, location, and shape characteristics. Methods: The authors describe a method of producing 3D digital simulations of breast masses and a technique for embedding these simulated masses within actual digitized mammograms. Simulated 3D breast masses were generated by using a modified stochastic Gaussian random sphere model to generate a central tumor mass, and an iterative fractal branching algorithm to add complex spicule structures. The simulated masses were embedded within actual digitized mammograms. The authors evaluated the realism of the resulting hybrid phantoms by generating corresponding left- and right-breast image pairs, consisting of one breast image containing a real mass, and the opposite breast image of the same patient containing a similar simulated mass. The authors then used computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) methods and expert radiologist readers to determine whether significant differences can be observed between the real and hybrid images. Results: The authors found no statistically significant difference between the CAD features obtained from the real and simulated images of masses with either spiculated or nonspiculated margins. Likewise, the authors found that expert human readers performed very poorly in discriminating their hybrid images from real mammograms. Conclusions: The authors’ proposed method permits the realistic simulation of 3D breast masses having user-defined characteristics, enabling the creation of a large set of hybrid breast images containing a well-characterized mass, embedded within real breast background. The computational nature of the model makes it suitable for detectability studies, evaluation of computer aided diagnosis algorithms, and

  14. Three-Dimensional Computer Simulation as an Important Competence Based Aspect of a Modern Mining Professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksenova Olesya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of necessity of educational process transformation to meet the requirements of modern miming industry; cooperative developing of new educational programs and implementation of educational process taking into account modern manufacturability. The paper proves the idea of introduction into mining professionals learning process studying of three-dimensional models of surface technological complex, ore reserves and underground digging complex as well as creating these models in different graphic editors and working with the information analysis model obtained on the basis of these three-dimensional models. The technological process of manless coal mining at the premises of the mine Polysaevskaya controlled by the information analysis models built on the basis of three-dimensional models of individual objects and technological process as a whole, and at the same time requiring the staff able to use the programs of three-dimensional positioning in the miners and equipment global frame of reference is covered.

  15. Three-Dimensional Computer Simulation as an Important Competence Based Aspect of a Modern Mining Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenova, Olesya; Pachkina, Anna

    2017-11-01

    The article deals with the problem of necessity of educational process transformation to meet the requirements of modern miming industry; cooperative developing of new educational programs and implementation of educational process taking into account modern manufacturability. The paper proves the idea of introduction into mining professionals learning process studying of three-dimensional models of surface technological complex, ore reserves and underground digging complex as well as creating these models in different graphic editors and working with the information analysis model obtained on the basis of these three-dimensional models. The technological process of manless coal mining at the premises of the mine Polysaevskaya controlled by the information analysis models built on the basis of three-dimensional models of individual objects and technological process as a whole, and at the same time requiring the staff able to use the programs of three-dimensional positioning in the miners and equipment global frame of reference is covered.

  16. Three-Dimensional Computer-Aided Detection of Microcalcification Clusters in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-wook Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose computer-aided detection (CADe algorithm for microcalcification (MC clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT images. The algorithm consists of prescreening, MC detection, clustering, and false-positive (FP reduction steps. The DBT images containing the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale Hessian-based three-dimensional (3D objectness response function and a connected-component segmentation method was applied to extract the cluster seed objects as potential clustering centers of MCs. Secondly, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR enhanced image was also generated to detect the individual MC candidates and prescreen the MC-like objects. Each cluster seed candidate was prescreened by counting neighboring individual MC candidates nearby the cluster seed object according to several microcalcification clustering criteria. As a second step, we introduced bounding boxes for the accepted seed candidate, clustered all the overlapping cubes, and examined. After the FP reduction step, the average number of FPs per case was estimated to be 2.47 per DBT volume with a sensitivity of 83.3%.

  17. Affective three-dimensional brain-computer interface created using a prism array-based display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-12-01

    To avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we applied a prism array-based display when presenting three-dimensional (3-D) objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli to increase the signal-to-noise ratios of steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs) because involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanisms can enhance SSVEP amplitudes, thus producing increased interaction efficiency. Ten male and nine female participants voluntarily participated in our experiments. Participants were asked to control objects under three viewing conditions: two-dimension (2-D), stereoscopic 3-D, and prism. The participants performed each condition in a counter-balanced order. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed significant increases in the positive predictive values in the prism condition compared to the 2-D and 3-D conditions. Participants' subjective ratings of realness and engagement were also significantly greater in the prism condition than in the 2-D and 3-D conditions, while the ratings for visual fatigue were significantly reduced in the prism condition than in the 3-D condition. The proposed methods are expected to enhance the sense of reality in 3-D space without causing critical visual fatigue. In addition, people who are especially susceptible to stereoscopic 3-D may be able to use the affective brain-computer interface.

  18. Configuration of the Moho discontinuity beneath the Japanese Islands derived from three-dimensional seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Makoto; Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Van Horne, Anne

    2017-07-01

    The Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) is defined on the basis of an abrupt increase in seismic velocity in the lithosphere which has been observed using seismic refraction and receiver function analysis methods worldwide. Moho depth varies regionally and remains a fundamental parameter of crustal structure. We present a new method of mapping the Moho using a 3D seismic tomography model. Since the tomographic method cannot locate discontinuities, we treat the Moho as a zone of high velocity gradient. Maximum lower crust/minimum upper mantle P-wave velocities in Japan are known to be 7.0 km/s and 7.5 km/s, respectively. We map the residual between isovelocity surfaces of 7.0 km/s and 7.5 km/s to find areas where the residual is small, the separation between the surfaces is narrow, and the velocity gradient is high. The Moho is best constrained where the isovelocity surfaces are close together, and under much of Japan, they are 10 km apart. We chose an isovelocity surface of 7.2 km/s as a representative Moho 'proxy' in these areas. Our resulting 'Moho' map under Japan compares favorably with existing regional Moho models that were obtained from controlled-source seismic investigations. The 'Moho' varies from shallow (25-30 km) to deep (> 30 km), and this variability relates to the structural evolution of the Japanese islands: the opening of the Sea of Japan back-arc, ongoing arc-arc collisions at the Hidaka and Izu collision zones, ongoing back-arc extension in Kyushu, and a possible failed back-arc extensional event of Mesozoic age. It is apparent that the Moho is less well-constrained in areas where the crustal structure has been modified by magmatic activity or thickened due to arc-arc collision.

  19. Saline tracer visualized with three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography: Field-scale spatial moment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor the migration of a saline tracer in a two-well pumping-injection experiment conducted at the Massachusetts Military Reservation in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. After injecting 2200 mg/L of sodium chloride for 9 hours, ERT data sets were collected from four wells every 6 hours for 20 days. More than 180,000 resistance measurements were collected during the tracer test. Each ERT data set was inverted to produce a sequence of 3-D snapshot maps that track the plume. In addition to the ERT experiment a pumping test and an infiltration test were conducted to estimate horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity values. Using modified moment analysis of the electrical conductivity tomograms, the mass, center of mass, and spatial variance of the imaged tracer plume were estimated. Although the tomograms provide valuable insights into field-scale tracer migration behavior and aquifer heterogeneity, standard tomographic inversion and application of Archie's law to convert electrical conductivities to solute concentration results in underestimation of tracer mass. Such underestimation is attributed to (1) reduced measurement sensitivity to electrical conductivity values with distance from the electrodes and (2) spatial smoothing (regularization) from tomographic inversion. The center of mass estimated from the ERT inversions coincided with that given by migration of the tracer plume using 3-D advective-dispersion simulation. The 3-D plumes seen using ERT exhibit greater apparent dispersion than the simulated plumes and greater temporal spreading than observed in field data of concentration breakthrough at the pumping well.

  20. Stature estimation in Japanese cadavers based on pelvic measurements in three-dimensional multidetector computed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of stature estimation by measuring the pelvic bones of Japanese cadavers using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). We assessed 3D reconstructed images of 210 Japanese subjects (108 males, 102 females) who had undergone postmortem CT between May 2011 and November 2013. We defined the linear distance from the anterosuperior margin of the left and right anterior superior iliac spines (ASIS) to the posterior margin of the left and right ischial spines as the LSS and RSS, respectively. We also defined the linear distance from the anterosuperior margin of the left and right ASIS to the anteroinferior margin of the left and right ischial tuberosities as the LST and RST, respectively. The correlation between the cadaver stature (CS) and each parameter (LSS, LST, RSS, and RST) was evaluated using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and regression analysis was performed for stature estimation. All four parameters correlated significantly with stature independent of sex, suggesting that they can be used as a tool for stature estimation. The LST had the closest correlation with stature in both sexes.

  1. A Systematic Review of Protocols for the Three-Dimensional Morphologic Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Computed Tomographic Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatwary, Tamer M. H.; Patterson, Benjamin O.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M. [St. George' s Vascular Institute, St. George' s Hospital, Department of Outcomes Research (United Kingdom); Morgan, Robert [St. George' s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Thompson, Matt M.; Holt, Peter J. E., E-mail: pholt@sgul.ac.uk [St. George' s Vascular Institute, St. George' s Hospital, Department of Outcomes Research (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The morphology of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) directly influences the perioperative outcome and long-term durability of endovascular aneurysm repair. A variety of methods have been proposed for the characterization of AAA morphology using reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images. At present, there is lack of consensus as to which of these methods is most applicable to clinical practice or research. The purpose of this review was to evaluate existing protocols that used 3D CT images in the assessment of various aspects of AAA morphology. An electronic search was performed, from January 1996 to the end of October 2010, using the Embase and Medline databases. The literature review conformed to PRISMA statement standards. The literature search identified 604 articles, of which 31 studies met inclusion criteria. Only 15 of 31 studies objectively assessed reproducibility. Existing published protocols were insufficient to define a single evidence-based methodology for preoperative assessment of AAA morphology. Further development and expert consensus are required to establish a standardized and validated protocol to determine precisely how morphology relates to outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair.

  2. Construction and assessment of hierarchical edge elements for three-dimensional computations of eddy currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midtgaard, Ole-Morten

    1997-12-31

    This thesis considers the feasibility of doing calculations to optimize electrical machines without the need to build expensive prototypes. It deals with the construction and assessment of new, hierarchical, hexahedral edge elements for three-dimensional computations of eddy currents with the electric vector potential formulation. The new elements, five in all, gave up to second-order approximations for both the magnetic field and the current density. Theoretical arguments showed these elements to be more economical for a given polynomial order of the approximated fields than the serendipity family of nodal elements. Further it was pointed out how the support of a source field computed by using edge elements could be made very small provided that a proper spanning tree was used in the edge element mesh. This was exploited for the voltage forcing technique, where source fields were used as basis functions, with unknown total currents in voltage forced conductors as degrees of freedom. The practical assessment of the edge elements proved the accuracy to improve with increasing polynomial order, both for local and global quantities. The most economical element was, however, one giving only complete first-order approximations for both fields. Further, the edge elements turned out to be better than the nodal elements also in practice. For the voltage forcing technique, source field basis functions which had small support, resulted in large reduction of the CPU-time for solving the main equation system, compared to source fields which had large support. The new elements can be used in a p-type adaptive scheme, and they should also be applicable for other tangentially continuous field problems. 67 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Local three-dimensional earthquake tomography by trans-dimensional Monte Carlo sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Giacomuzzi, Genny; Malinverno, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Local earthquake tomography is a non-linear and non-unique inverse problem that uses event arrival times to solve for the spatial distribution of elastic properties. The typical approach is to apply iterative linearization and derive a preferred solution, but such solutions are biased by a number of subjective choices: the starting model that is iteratively adjusted, the degree of regularization used to obtain a smooth solution, and the assumed noise level in the arrival time data. These subjective choices also affect the estimation of the uncertainties in the inverted parameters. The method presented here is developed in a Bayesian framework where a priori information and measurements are combined to define a posterior probability density of the parameters of interest: elastic properties in a subsurface 3-D model, hypocentre coordinates and noise level in the data. We apply a trans-dimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that asymptotically samples the posterior distribution of the investigated parameters. This approach allows us to overcome the issues raised above. First, starting a number of sampling chains from random samples of the prior probability distribution lessens the dependence of the solution from the starting point. Secondly, the number of elastic parameters in the 3-D subsurface model is one of the unknowns in the inversion, and the parsimony of Bayesian inference ensures that the degree of detail in the solution is controlled by the information in the data, given realistic assumptions for the error statistics. Finally, the noise level in the data, which controls the uncertainties of the solution, is also one of the inverted parameters, providing a first-order estimate of the data errors. We apply our method to both synthetic and field arrival time data. The synthetic data inversion successfully recovers velocity anomalies, hypocentre coordinates and the level of noise in the data. The Bayesian inversion of field measurements gives results

  4. Three-dimensional monitoring of soil water content in a maize field using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Beff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A good understanding of the soil water content (SWC distribution at the field scale is essential to improve the management of water, soil and crops. Recent studies proved that Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT opens interesting perspectives in the determination of the SWC distribution in 3 dimensions (3-D. This study was conducted (i to check and validate how ERT is able to monitor SWC distribution in a maize field during the late growing season; and (ii to investigate how maize plants and rainfall affect the dynamics of SWC distribution. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR measurements were used to validate ERT-inverted SWC values. Evolution of water mass balance was also calculated to check whether ERT was capable of giving a reliable estimate of soil water stock evolution. It is observed that ERT was able to give the same average SWC as TDR (R2 = 0.98. In addition, ERT gives better estimates of the water stock than TDR thanks to its higher spatial resolution. The high resolution of ERT measurements also allows for the discrimination of SWC heterogeneities. The SWC distribution showed that alternation of maize rows and inter-rows was the main influencing factor of the SWC distribution. The drying patterns were linked to the root profiles, with drier zones under the maize rows. During short periods, with negligible rainfall, the SWC decrease took place mainly in the two upper soil horizons and in the inter-row area. In contrast, rainfall increased the SWC mostly under the maize rows and in the upper soil layer. Nevertheless, the total amount of rainfall during the growing season was not sufficient to modify the SWC patterns induced by the maize rows. During the experimental time, there was hardly any SWC redistribution from maize rows to inter-rows. Yet, lateral redistribution from inter-rows to maize rows induced by potential gradient generates SWC decrease in the inter-row area and in the deeper soil horizons.

  5. Three-dimensional mapping of peripapillary retinal layers using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashmani N

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nauman Hashmani, Sharif Hashmani Department of Ophthalmology, Hashmanis Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan Purpose: To map and view the effects of age, gender, and axial length on seven individual retinal layers around the optic nerve head (ONH.Methods: We scanned 242 healthy patients using the Spectralis spectral domain optical coherence tomography in an outpatient setting. The layers were observed on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study sectors using the standard Spectralis Family Acquisition Module 6.0.11.0. The center was the ONH, the inner circle (IC was 1–3 mm away, and the outer circle (OC was 3–6 mm away. The seven layers were retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, ganglion cell layer (GCL, inner plexiform layer (IPL, inner nuclear layer (INL, outer plexiform layer (OPL, outer nuclear layer (ONL, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Additionally, we calculated the mean thickness of two combined layers: inner retinal layer (IRL and photoreceptor layer (PL. Finally, we measured the mean of the total retinal thickness (TRT.Results: The TRT was highest at the inferior end in the IC and at the nasal end in the OC. The RPE (p<0.001 and PL (p<0.001 were thicker in males; however, the IRL (p=0.015 was thicker in females. We found that the RNFL (p<0.001, r=0.139, GCL (p<0.001, r=0.116, IPL (p=0.016, r=0.059, INL (p<0.001, r=0.104, OPL (p=0.009, r=0.064, ONL (p<0.001, r=0.157, RPE (p=0.001, r=0.079, IRL (p<0.001, r=0.190, PL (p=0.030, r=0.053, and TRT (p<0.001, r=0.191 correlated negatively with age. The axial length significantly and negatively correlated at the GCL (p=0.003, r=0.093, IPL (p=0.020, r=0.072, INL (p=0.018, r=0.073, ONL (p<0.001, r=0.110, IRL (p=0.003, r=0.092, and TRT (p=0.003, r=0.094. We found poor reproducibility in the IC; however, this was excellent in the OC.Conclusion: We found significant differences in layers according to age, gender, and axial length. Additionally, reproducibility can be improved by altering the

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  7. Three-dimensional organization of pKi-67: a comparative fluorescence and electron tomography study using FluoroNanogold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheutin, Thierry; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Beorchia, Adrien; Klein, Christophe; Kaplan, Hervé; Ploton, Dominique

    2003-11-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) Ki-67 is routinely used in clinical studies to estimate the growth fraction of tumors. However, the role of pKi-67, the protein detected by the Ki-67 MAb, remains elusive, although some biochemical data strongly suggest that it might organize chromatin. To better understand the functional organization of pKi-67, we studied its three-dimensional distribution in interphase cells by confocal microscopy and electron tomography. FluoroNanogold, a single probe combining a dense marker with a fluorescent dye, was used to investigate pKi-67 organization at the optical and ultrastructural levels. Observation by confocal microscopy followed by 3D reconstruction showed that pKi-67 forms a shell around the nucleoli. Double labeling experiments revealed that pKi-67 co-localizes with perinucleolar heterochromatin. Electron microscopy studies confirmed this close association and demonstrated that pKi-67 is located neither in the fibrillar nor in the granular components of the nucleolus. Finally, spatial analyses by electron tomography showed that pKi-67 forms cords 250-300 nm in diameter, which are themselves composed of 30-50-nm-thick fibers. These detailed comparative in situ analyses strongly suggest the involvement of pKi-67 in the higher-order organization of perinucleolar chromatin.

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  9. Three dimensional computer simulation for NO{sub x} emission in Oestrand recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Lixin [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Metallurgy

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the results achieved in a research project (no. 663021) financed by NUTEK and AAFORSK. The objective of this project is to develop and validate a proper NO{sub x} model for black liquor recovery boilers. The project has been carried out through a close co-operation between the division of Heat and Furnace Technology at KTH, the combustion chemistry research group at Aabo Akademi University in Finland and AaF Energikonsult Stockholm AB. As a result from this project, a NO{sub x} model is developed as a new component in the general framework of the recovery boiler model: STAR-RBM. STAR-RBM is a fundamental three-dimensional computer model for the simulation of the flow, heat transfer, combustion and NO{sub x} emission in a black liquor recovery boiler. It is constructed around a general-purpose Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package: STAR-CD. In this report, a three-dimensional numerical simulation for NO{sub x} emission in Oestrand recovery boiler is described and discussed. The NO{sub x} model developed in this project considers the NO formation from fuel-NO and thermal-NO mechanisms. The fuel-NO mechanism is proposed by Aabo Akademi University. It is assumed that the fuel nitrogen in black liquor is released via either devolatilization or char combustion. It has been found by laboratory studies that approximately 70% of the fuel nitrogen is released during devolatilization, mainly as NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}. The overall gas phase reactions for fuel-NO chemistry is based on that of Mitchell and Tarbell. It has been found in this work that the kinetic rates of the fuel-NO reactions are generally higher than the rate of turbulence mixing. Thus, the eddy dissipation concept proposed by Magnussen and Hjertager is applied to calculate the rate of fuel-NO formation. The thermal-NO mechanism is based on an extended Zeldovich mechanism. Invoking a steady-state approximation for N-atom and assuming that the O-atom concentration may be calculated from

  10. Heterogeneous slip and rupture models of the San Andreas fault zone based upon three-dimensional earthquake tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxall, William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Crystal fault zones exhibit spatially heterogeneous slip behavior at all scales, slip being partitioned between stable frictional sliding, or fault creep, and unstable earthquake rupture. An understanding the mechanisms underlying slip segmentation is fundamental to research into fault dynamics and the physics of earthquake generation. This thesis investigates the influence that large-scale along-strike heterogeneity in fault zone lithology has on slip segmentation. Large-scale transitions from the stable block sliding of the Central 4D Creeping Section of the San Andreas, fault to the locked 1906 and 1857 earthquake segments takes place along the Loma Prieta and Parkfield sections of the fault, respectively, the transitions being accomplished in part by the generation of earthquakes in the magnitude range 6 (Parkfield) to 7 (Loma Prieta). Information on sub-surface lithology interpreted from the Loma Prieta and Parkfield three-dimensional crustal velocity models computed by Michelini (1991) is integrated with information on slip behavior provided by the distributions of earthquakes located using, the three-dimensional models and by surface creep data to study the relationships between large-scale lithological heterogeneity and slip segmentation along these two sections of the fault zone.

  11. Three-dimensional imaging of trabecular bone using the computer numerically controlled milling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, J D; Canfield, B L; Haddock, S M; Chen, T J; Kothari, M; Keaveny, T M

    1997-09-01

    Although various techniques exist for high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of trabecular bone, a common limitation is that resolution depends on specimen size. Most techniques also have limited availability due to their expense and complexity. We therefore developed a simple, accurate technique that has a resolution that is independent of specimen size. Thin layers are serially removed from an embedded bone specimen using a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling machine, and each exposed cross section is imaged using a low-magnification digital camera. Precise positioning of the specimen under the camera is achieved using the programmable feature of the CNC milling machine. Large specimens are imaged without loss of resolution by moving the specimen under the camera such that an array of field-of-views spans the full cross section. The images from each field-of-view are easily assembled and registered in the postprocessing. High-contrast sections are achieved by staining the bone black with silver nitrate and embedding it in whitened methylmethacrylate. Due to the high contrast nature and high resolution of the images, thresholding at a single value yielded excellent predictions of morphological parameters such as bone volume fraction (mean +/- SD percent error = 0.70 +/- 4.28%). The main limitations of this fully automated "CNC milling technique" are that the specimen is destroyed and the process is relatively slow. However, because of its accuracy, independence of image resolution from specimen size, and ease of implementation, this new technique is an excellent method for ex situ imaging of trabecular architecture, particularly when high resolution is required.

  12. Three-dimensional computational modeling of multiple deformable cells flowing in microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doddi, Sai K; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2009-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computational modeling and simulation are presented on the motion of a large number of deformable cells in microchannels. The methodology is based on an immersed boundary method, and the cells are modeled as liquid-filled elastic capsules. The model retains two important features of the blood flow in the microcirculation, that is, the particulate nature of blood and deformation of the erythrocytes. The tank-treading and tumbling motion and the lateral migration, as observed for erythrocytes in dilute suspension, are briefly discussed. We then present results on the motion of multiple cells in semidense suspension and study how their collective dynamics leads to various physiologically relevant processes such as the development of the cell-free layer and the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect. We analyze the 3D trajectory and velocity fluctuations of individual cell in the suspension and the plug-flow velocity profile as functions of the cell deformability, hematocrit, and vessel size. The numerical results allow us to directly obtain various microrheological data, such as the width of the cell-free layer, and the variation in the apparent blood viscosity and hematocrit over the vessel cross section. We then use these results to calculate the core and plasma-layer viscosity and show that the two-phase (or core-annular) model of blood flow in microvessels underpredicts the blood velocity obtained in the simulations by as much as 40%. Based on a posteriori analysis of the simulation data, we develop a three-layer model of blood flow by taking into consideration the smooth variation in viscosity and hematocrit across the interface of the cell-free layer and the core. We then show that the blood velocity predicted by the three-layer model agrees very well with that obtained from the simulations.

  13. High-immersion three-dimensional display of the numerical computer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shujun; Yu, Xunbo; Zhao, Tianqi; Cai, Yuanfa; Chen, Duo; Chen, Zhidong; Sang, Xinzhu

    2013-08-01

    High-immersion three-dimensional (3D) displays making them valuable tools for many applications, such as designing and constructing desired building houses, industrial architecture design, aeronautics, scientific research, entertainment, media advertisement, military areas and so on. However, most technologies provide 3D display in the front of screens which are in parallel with the walls, and the sense of immersion is decreased. To get the right multi-view stereo ground image, cameras' photosensitive surface should be parallax to the public focus plane and the cameras' optical axes should be offset to the center of public focus plane both atvertical direction and horizontal direction. It is very common to use virtual cameras, which is an ideal pinhole camera to display 3D model in computer system. We can use virtual cameras to simulate the shooting method of multi-view ground based stereo image. Here, two virtual shooting methods for ground based high-immersion 3D display are presented. The position of virtual camera is determined by the people's eye position in the real world. When the observer stand in the circumcircle of 3D ground display, offset perspective projection virtual cameras is used. If the observer stands out the circumcircle of 3D ground display, offset perspective projection virtual cameras and the orthogonal projection virtual cameras are adopted. In this paper, we mainly discussed the parameter setting of virtual cameras. The Near Clip Plane parameter setting is the main point in the first method, while the rotation angle of virtual cameras is the main point in the second method. In order to validate the results, we use the D3D and OpenGL to render scenes of different viewpoints and generate a stereoscopic image. A realistic visualization system for 3D models is constructed and demonstrated for viewing horizontally, which provides high-immersion 3D visualization. The displayed 3D scenes are compared with the real objects in the real world.

  14. Improved depth perception with three-dimensional auxiliary display and computer generated three-dimensional panoramic overviews in robot-assisted laparoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.P.; Bouma, H.; Eendebak, P.T.; Basten, J.P.A. van; Beerlage, H.P.; Smits, G.A.H.J.; Bos, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In comparison to open surgery, endoscopic surgery offers impaired depth perception and narrower field-of-view. To improve depth perception, the Da Vinci robot offers three-dimensional (3-D) video on the console for the surgeon but not for assistants, although both must collaborate. We improved the

  15. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Tan, T.; Zelst, J. van; Mann, R.; Karssemeijer, N.; Platel, B.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing

  16. Advances in three-dimensional coronary imaging and computational fluid dynamics: is virtual fractional flow reserve more than just a pretty picture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric K W; Hayat, Umair; Thondapu, Vikas; Ooi, Andrew S H; Ul Haq, Muhammad Asrar; Moore, Stephen; Foin, Nicolas; Tu, Shengxian; Chin, Cheng; Monty, Jason P; Marusic, Ivan; Barlis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has shown a high success rate in the treatment of coronary artery disease. The decision to perform PCI often relies on the cardiologist's visual interpretation of coronary lesions during angiography. This has inherent limitations, particularly due to the low resolution and two-dimensional nature of angiography. State-of-the-art modalities such as three-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography, optical coherence tomography and invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) may improve clinicians' understanding of both the anatomical and physiological importance of coronary lesions. While invasive FFR is the gold standard technique for assessment of the haemodynamic significance of coronary lesions, recent studies have explored a surrogate for FFR derived solely from three-dimensional reconstruction of the invasive angiogram, and therefore eliminating need for a pressure wire. Utilizing advanced computational fluid dynamics research, this virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR) has demonstrated reasonable correlation with invasive measurements and remains an intense area of ongoing study. However, at present, several limitations and computational fluid dynamic assumptions may preclude vFFR from widespread clinical use. This review demonstrates the tight integration of advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques and vFFR in assessing coronary artery disease, reviews the advantages and disadvantages of such techniques and attempts to provide a glimpse of how such advances may benefit future clinical decision-making during PCI.

  17. Locomotion in ornithischian dinosaurs: an assessment using three-dimensional computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, Susannah C R; Bates, Karl T; Falkingham, Peter L; VanBuren, Collin; Arbour, Victoria; Barrett, Paul M

    2014-08-01

    Ornithischian dinosaurs were primitively bipedal with forelimbs modified for grasping, but quadrupedalism evolved in the clade on at least three occasions independently. Outside of Ornithischia, quadrupedality from bipedal ancestors has only evolved on two other occasions, making this one of the rarest locomotory transitions in tetrapod evolutionary history. The osteological and myological changes associated with these transitions have only recently been documented, and the biomechanical consequences of these changes remain to be examined. Here, we review previous approaches to understanding locomotion in extinct animals, which can be broadly split into form-function approaches using analogy based on extant animals, limb-bone scaling, and computational approaches. We then carry out the first systematic attempt to quantify changes in locomotor muscle function in bipedal and quadrupedal ornithischian dinosaurs. Using three-dimensional computational modelling of the major pelvic locomotor muscle moment arms, we examine similarities and differences among individual taxa, between quadrupedal and bipedal taxa, and among taxa representing the three major ornithischian lineages (Thyreophora, Ornithopoda, Marginocephalia). Our results suggest that the ceratopsid Chasmosaurus and the ornithopod Hypsilophodon have relatively low moment arms for most muscles and most functions, perhaps suggesting poor locomotor performance in these taxa. Quadrupeds have higher abductor moment arms than bipeds, which we suggest is due to the overall wider bodies of the quadrupeds modelled. A peak in extensor moment arms at more extended hip angles and lower medial rotator moment arms in quadrupeds than in bipeds may be due to a more columnar hindlimb and loss of medial rotation as a form of lateral limb support in quadrupeds. We are not able to identify trends in moment arm evolution across Ornithischia as a whole, suggesting that the bipedal ancestry of ornithischians did not constrain the

  18. Crossed Pulmonary Arteries: Report of Two Cases with Emphasis on Three-dimensional Helical Computed Tomographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang-Bin Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Crossed pulmonary arteries are due to an anomalous origin of both pulmonary arteries from the main pulmonary trunk. This anatomy is often associated with other congenital cardiac and extracardiac diseases. We report two neonates with complex congenital heart disease who had this disorder, which was detected during cardiac computed tomography (CT with three-dimensional reconstruction but not during echocardiography or angiography. The first patient was a 3-day-old male neonate who had tachypnea and feeding problems since birth. Cardiac CT showed crossed pulmonary arteries, type B interruption of the aortic arch, a ventricular septal defect, and a large patent ductus arteriosus. He received an emergency T-colostomy at 3 days of age because of severe bowel distention. Low-type imperforated anus was diagnosed. His post-operative course was complicated with fluctuated saturation, seizure, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and sepsis. Also found were cardiac defects, abnormal facies, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, hypocalcemia, and a variable deletion on chromosome 22q11 (CATCH 22 disorder. Because of his poor prognosis, the patient was transferred to another hospital on day 16 for further care, at the family's request. The other patient was a 5-day-old female neonate who had a heart murmur since birth. Cardiac CT showed crossed pulmonary arteries, truncus arteriosus, type A interruption of the aortic arch, a ventricular septal defect, an atrial septal defect, and a large patent ductus arteriosus. She received complete surgical correction, including division of the patent ductus arteriosus and repair of the other defects. Intermittent respiratory distress and decreased blood pressure complicated her postoperative course, and she died on the eighth day after surgery. Crossed pulmonary arteries complicated accurate interpretation of two-dimensional echocardiographs of the great vessels, as well as the course and location of catheters during cardiac

  19. Characterization of flowing blood cells using a novel OCT technique: rigorous three-dimensional computational study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossowski, Pawel; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Munro, Peter R. T.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a highly realistic, Maxwell-based, model of an existing experimental optical coherence tomography based approach for characterizing blood cells flowing through a microfluidic channel. The characterization technique is indirect as it relies upon the perturbation, by blood cells, of light back-scattered by specially designed highly scattering substrate. This is in contrast with characterization techniques which directly sense light back-scattered by the cells. Up until now, our hypothesis for distinguishing between different blood cell types has been based upon experimental measurements and knowledge of cell morphology. The absence of a mathematical model capable of modelling image formation, when the wave nature of light is integral, has impeded our ability to validate and optimize the characterization method. Recently, such a model has been developed and we have adapted it to simulate our experimental system and blood cells. The model has the following features: the field back scattered by the sample, for broadband and arbitrary profile beams, is calculated according to Maxwell's equations; the sample is a deterministic refractive index distribution; the scattered and reference electric fields are explicitly interfered; single and multiple scattering are implicitly modeled; most system parameters of practical significance (e.g. numerical aperture or wavefront aberration) are included the model. This model has been highly successful in replicating and allowing for interpretation of experimental results. We will present the key elements of the three-dimensional computational model, based upon Maxwell's equations, as well as the key findings of the computational study. We shall also provide comparison with experimental results.

  20. Three-Dimensional Deformable Grid Electromagnetic Particle-in-cell for Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Kondrashov, D.; Liewer, P. C.; Karmesin, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new parallel, non-orthogonal grid, three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EMPIC) code based on a finite-volume formulation. This code uses a logically Cartesian grid of deformable hexahedral cells, a discrete surface integral (DSI) algorithm to calculate the electromagnetic field, and a hybrid logical-physical space algorithm to push particles.

  1. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan P. Dandois; Erle C. Ellis

    2013-01-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing...

  2. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on

  3. An Anatomical Study of Maxillary-Zygomatic Complex Using Three-Dimensional Computerized Tomography-Based Zygomatic Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangliang Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To obtain anatomical data of maxillary-zygomatic complex based on simulating the zygomatic implantation using cadaver heads and three-dimensional computerized tomography (3D-CT. Methods. Simulating zygomatic implantation was performed using seven cadaver heads and 3D-CT images from forty-eight adults. After measuring the maxillary-zygomatic complex, we analyzed the position between the implantation path and the maxillary sinus cavity as well as the distance between the implantation path and the zygomatic nerve. Results. The distance from the starting point to the endpoint of the implant was 56.85 ± 5.35 mm in cadaver heads and 58.15 ± 7.37 mm in 3D-CT images. For the most common implantation path (80.20%, the implant went through the maxillary sinus cavity completely. The projecting points of the implant axis (IA on the surface of zygoma were mainly located in the region of frontal process of zygomatic bone close to the lateral orbital wall. The distances between IA and zygomatic nerve in 53 sides were shorter than 2 mm. Conclusion. The simulating zygomatic implantation on cadaver skulls and 3D-CT imaging provided useful anatomical data of the maxillary-zygomatic complex. It is necessary to take care to avoid the zygomatic nerve injury during implantation, because it frequently appears on the route of implantation.

  4. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction, by TEM Tomography, of the Ultrastructural Modifications Occurring in Cucumis sativus L. Mitochondria under Fe Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianpiero Vigani

    Full Text Available Mitochondria, as recently suggested, might be involved in iron sensing and signalling pathways in plant cells. For a better understanding of the role of these organelles in mediating the Fe deficiency responses in plant cells, it is crucial to provide a full overview of their modifications occurring under Fe-limited conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize the ultrastructural as well as the biochemical changes occurring in leaf mitochondria of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. plants grown under Fe deficiency.Mitochondrial ultrastructure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and electron tomography techniques, which allowed a three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of cellular structures. These analyses reveal that mitochondria isolated from cucumber leaves appear in the cristae junction model conformation and that Fe deficiency strongly alters both the number and the volume of cristae. The ultrastructural changes observed in mitochondria isolated from Fe-deficient leaves reflect a metabolic status characterized by a respiratory chain operating at a lower rate (orthodox-like conformation with respect to mitochondria from control leaves.To our knowledge, this is the first report showing a 3D reconstruction of plant mitochondria. Furthermore, these results suggest that a detailed characterization of the link between changes in the ultrastructure and functionality of mitochondria during different nutritional conditions, can provide a successful approach to understand the role of these organelles in the plant response to Fe deficiency.

  5. Comparing three-dimensional serial optical coherence tomography histology to MRI imaging in the entire mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    An automated serial histology setup combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with vibratome sectioning was used to image eight wild type mouse brains. The datasets resulted in thousands of volumetric tiles resolved at a voxel size of (4.9×4.9×6.5) μm3 stitched back together to give a three-dimensional map of the brain from which a template OCT brain was obtained. To assess deformation caused by tissue sectioning, reconstruction algorithms, and fixation, OCT datasets were compared to both in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging. The OCT brain template yielded a highly detailed map of the brain structure, with a high contrast in white matter fiber bundles and was highly resemblant to the in vivo MRI template. Brain labeling using the Allen brain framework showed little variation in regional brain volume among imaging modalities with no statistical differences. The high correspondence between the OCT template brain and its in vivo counterpart demonstrates the potential of whole brain histology to validate in vivo imaging.

  6. Three-dimensional registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Brandt, Eric; Wen, Di; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Alian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G; Wilson, David L

    2016-04-01

    Evidence suggests high-resolution, high-contrast, [Formula: see text] intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and three-dimensional (3-D) registration methods to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, color, and fluorescent cryo-image volumes with optional registered cryo-histology. A specialized registration method matched IVOCT pullback images acquired in the catheter reference frame to a true 3-D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter registration model including a polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Multiple assessments suggested that the registration error was better than the [Formula: see text] spacing between IVOCT image frames. Tests on a digital synthetic phantom gave a registration error of only [Formula: see text] (signed distance). Visual assessment of randomly presented nearby frames suggested registration accuracy within 1 IVOCT frame interval ([Formula: see text]). This would eliminate potential misinterpretations confronted by the typical histological approaches to validation, with estimated 1-mm errors. The method can be used to create annotated datasets and automated plaque classification methods and can be extended to other intravascular imaging modalities.

  7. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Three-Dimensional Positron Emission Mammography versus Whole Body Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D positron emission mammography (PEM versus whole body positron emission tomography (WBPET for breast cancer. Methods. A total of 410 women with normal breast or benign or highly suspicious malignant tumors were randomized at 1 : 1 ratio to undergo 3D-PEM followed by WBPET or WBPET followed by 3D-PEM. Lumpectomy or mastectomy was performed on eligible participants after the scanning. Results. The sensitivity and specificity of 3D-PEM were 92.8% and 54.5%, respectively. WBPET showed a sensitivity of 95.7% and specificity of 56.8%. After exclusion of the patients with lesions beyond the detecting range of the 3D-PEM instrument, 3D-PEM showed higher sensitivity than WBPET (97.0% versus 95.5%, P = 0.913, particularly for small lesions (<1 cm (72.0% versus 60.0%, P = 0.685. Conclusions. The 3D-PEM appears more sensitive to small lesions than WBPET but may fail to detect lesions that are beyond the detecting range. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee (E2012052 at the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital (Tianjin, China. The instrument positron emission mammography (PEMi was approved by China State Food and Drug Administration under the registration number 20153331166.

  8. An Anatomical Study of Maxillary-Zygomatic Complex Using Three-Dimensional Computerized Tomography-Based Zygomatic Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangliang; Zhao, Shijie; Liu, Hui; Sun, Zhipeng; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Weiguang

    2017-01-01

    To obtain anatomical data of maxillary-zygomatic complex based on simulating the zygomatic implantation using cadaver heads and three-dimensional computerized tomography (3D-CT). Simulating zygomatic implantation was performed using seven cadaver heads and 3D-CT images from forty-eight adults. After measuring the maxillary-zygomatic complex, we analyzed the position between the implantation path and the maxillary sinus cavity as well as the distance between the implantation path and the zygomatic nerve. The distance from the starting point to the endpoint of the implant was 56.85 ± 5.35 mm in cadaver heads and 58.15 ± 7.37 mm in 3D-CT images. For the most common implantation path (80.20%), the implant went through the maxillary sinus cavity completely. The projecting points of the implant axis (IA) on the surface of zygoma were mainly located in the region of frontal process of zygomatic bone close to the lateral orbital wall. The distances between IA and zygomatic nerve in 53 sides were shorter than 2 mm. The simulating zygomatic implantation on cadaver skulls and 3D-CT imaging provided useful anatomical data of the maxillary-zygomatic complex. It is necessary to take care to avoid the zygomatic nerve injury during implantation, because it frequently appears on the route of implantation.

  9. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... Abbreviations: 3DCRT, three dimensional conformal radiotherapy;. OARs, organs at risk; DVPs, dose volume parameters; PTV, planning target volume; RT, radiation therapy; ACOD, Alexandria Clinical. Oncology Department; CT, computed tomography; ICRU, Interna- tional Commission on Radiation Units; ...

  10. Three-dimensional viscous flow computations of high area ratio nozzles for hypersonic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D. R.; Harloff, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The PARC3D code was selected by the authors to analyze a variety of complex and high-speed flow configurations. Geometries considered for code validation include ramps and corner flows, which are characteristic of inlets and nozzles. Flows with Mach numbers of 3-14 were studied. Both two- and three-dimensional experimental data for shock-boundary-layer interaction were considered to validate the code. A detailed comparison of various flow parameters with available experimental data is presented; agreement between the solutions and the experimental data in terms of pitot pressure profiles, yaw-angle distributions, static pressures, and skin friction is found to be very good. In addition, two- and three-dimensional flow calculations were performed for a hypersonic nozzle. Comparison of the wall pressure results with the published solutions is made for the two-dimensional case.

  11. Computing the Surface Area of Three-Dimensional Scanned Human Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hyun Yoon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An efficient surface area evaluation method is introduced by using smooth surface reconstruction for three-dimensional scanned human body data. Surface area evaluations for various body parts are compared with the results from the traditional alginate-based method, and quite high similarity between the two results is obtained. We expect that our surface area evaluation method can be an alternative to measuring surface area by the cumbersome alginate method.

  12. Sensing and three-dimensional imaging of cochlea and surrounding temporal bone using swept source high-speed optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingtao; Chien, Wade W.; Taylor, Russ; Iordachita, Iulian; Huang, Yong; Niparko, John; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    We describe a novel dual-functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with both a fiber probe using a sapphire ball lens for cross-sectional imaging and sensing, and a 3-D bulk scanner for 3-D OCT imaging. A theoretical sensitivity model for Common Path (CP)-OCT was proposed to assess its optimal performance based on an unbalanced photodetector configuration. A probe design with working distances (WD) 415μm and lateral resolution 11 μm was implemented with sensitivity up to 88dB. To achieve high-speed data processing and real-time three-dimensional visualization, we use graphics processing unit (GPU) based real-time signal processing and visualization to boost the computing performance of swept source optical coherence tomography. Both the basal turn and facial nerve bundles inside the cadaveric human cochlea temporal bone can be clearly identified and 3D images can be rendered with the OCT system, which was integrated with a flexible robotic arm for robotically assisted microsurgery.

  13. Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography: a potentially useful tool for safer free tissue transfer to complicated regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Cifci, Mehmet; Kelahmetoglu, Osman

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer to compli......Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer...... be kept in mind, especially inthe patients with peripheral vascular disease. 3D-MSCTA has the potential to replace digital subtraction angiography for planning of microvascular reconstructions and newer devices with higher resolutions will probably increase the reliability of this technique. (c) 2009...

  14. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor mass in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Boag, Graham S.

    2004-05-01

    Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, fibrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Rather than attempt to separate these tissue types into distinct regions, we propose to explore methods to delineate the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images, remove them from further consideration, and examine the remaining parts of the images for the tumor mass. We explore the use of fuzzy connectivity for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by the radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are also incorporated in the segmentation algorithm. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to chemotherapy and in the planning of delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated using cases acquired from the Alberta Children's Hospital.

  15. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ayres, Fábio J; Boag, Graham S; Zuffo, Marcelo K

    2007-09-01

    Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to therapy and in the planning of the delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. We propose methods to achieve 3-dimensional segmentation of the neuroblastic tumor. In our scheme, some of the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images are delineated and removed from further consideration; the remaining parts of the image volume are then examined for tumor mass. Mathematical morphology, fuzzy connectivity, and other image processing tools are deployed for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by a radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are incorporated into the segmentation algorithm. In this preliminary study, the methods were tested with 10 CT exams of four cases from the Alberta Children's Hospital. False-negative error rates of less than 12% were obtained in eight of 10 exams; however, seven of the exams had false-positive error rates of more than 20% with respect to manual segmentation of the tumor by a radiologist.

  16. Risedronate preserves bone architecture in early postmenopausal women in 1 year as measured by three-dimensional microcomputed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, T E; Chmielewski, P A; Manhart, M D; Johnson, T D; Borah, B

    2003-11-01

    Risedronate reduces the risk of vertebral fractures by up to 70% within the first year of treatment. Increases in bone mineral density or decreases in bone turnover markers explain only a portion of the anti-fracture effect, suggesting that other factors, such as changes in trabecular bone architecture, also play a role. Our objective was to determine the effects of risedronate on bone architecture by analyzing iliac crest bone biopsy specimens using three-dimensional microcomputed tomography (3-D micro CT). Biopsy specimens were obtained at baseline and after 1 year of treatment from women enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of risedronate 5 mg daily for the prevention of early postmenopausal bone loss. Trabecular architecture deteriorated in the placebo group (n = 12), as indicated by a 20.3% decrease in bone volume (25.1% vs. 20.0%, P = 0.034), a 13.5% decrease in trabecular number (1.649 vs. 1.426 mm(-1), P = 0.052), a 13.1% increase in trabecular separation (605 vs. 684 microm, P = 0.056), and an 86.2% increase in marrow star volume (3.251 vs. 6.053 mm(3), P = 0.040) compared with baseline values. These changes in architectural parameters occurred in the presence of a concomitant decrease from baseline in lumbar spine bone mineral density (-3.3%, P = 0.002), as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. There was no statistically significant ( P architecture deteriorated significantly in this cohort of early postmenopausal women, and that this deterioration was prevented by risedronate. Although there is no direct link in this study between fracture and preservation of architecture, it is reasonable to infer that the preservation of bone architecture may play a role in risedronate's anti-fracture efficacy.

  17. Small-angle X-ray scattering tensor tomography: model of the three-dimensional reciprocal-space map, reconstruction algorithm and angular sampling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Holler, Mirko; Raabe, Jörg; Usov, Ivan; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering tensor tomography, which allows reconstruction of the local three-dimensional reciprocal-space map within a three-dimensional sample as introduced by Liebi et al. [Nature (2015), 527, 349-352], is described in more detail with regard to the mathematical framework and the optimization algorithm. For the case of trabecular bone samples from vertebrae it is shown that the model of the three-dimensional reciprocal-space map using spherical harmonics can adequately describe the measured data. The method enables the determination of nanostructure orientation and degree of orientation as demonstrated previously in a single momentum transfer q range. This article presents a reconstruction of the complete reciprocal-space map for the case of bone over extended ranges of q. In addition, it is shown that uniform angular sampling and advanced regularization strategies help to reduce the amount of data required.

  18. Dual-modal three-dimensional imaging of single cells with isometric high resolution using an optical projection tomography microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qin; Rahn, J Richard; Tourovskaia, Anna; Meyer, Michael G; Neumann, Thomas; Nelson, Alan C; Seibel, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    The practice of clinical cytology relies on bright-field microscopy using absorption dyes like hematoxylin and eosin in the transmission mode, while the practice of research microscopy relies on fluorescence microscopy in the epi-illumination mode. The optical projection tomography microscope is an optical microscope that can generate 3-D images of single cells with isometric high resolution both in absorption and fluorescence mode. Although the depth of field of the microscope objective is in the submicron range, it can be extended by scanning the objective's focal plane. The extended depth of field image is similar to a projection in a conventional x-ray computed tomography. Cells suspended in optical gel flow through a custom-designed microcapillary. Multiple pseudoprojection images are taken by rotating the microcapillary. After these pseudoprojection images are further aligned, computed tomography methods are applied to create 3-D reconstruction. 3-D reconstructed images of single cells are shown in both absorption and fluorescence mode. Fluorescence spatial resolution is measured at 0.35 microm in both axial and lateral dimensions. Since fluorescence and absorption images are taken in two different rotations, mechanical error may cause misalignment of 3-D images. This mechanical error is estimated to be within the resolution of the system.

  19. Application of Mathematical and Three-Dimensional Computer Modeling Tools in the Planning of Processes of Fuel and Energy Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenova, Olesya; Nikolaeva, Evgenia; Cehlár, Michal

    2017-11-01

    This work aims to investigate the effectiveness of mathematical and three-dimensional computer modeling tools in the planning of processes of fuel and energy complexes at the planning and design phase of a thermal power plant (TPP). A solution for purification of gas emissions at the design development phase of waste treatment systems is proposed employing mathematical and three-dimensional computer modeling - using the E-nets apparatus and the development of a 3D model of the future gas emission purification system. Which allows to visualize the designed result, to select and scientifically prove economically feasible technology, as well as to ensure the high environmental and social effect of the developed waste treatment system. The authors present results of a treatment of planned technological processes and the system for purifying gas emissions in terms of E-nets. using mathematical modeling in the Simulink application. What allowed to create a model of a device from the library of standard blocks and to perform calculations. A three-dimensional model of a system for purifying gas emissions has been constructed. It allows to visualize technological processes and compare them with the theoretical calculations at the design phase of a TPP and. if necessary, make adjustments.

  20. Computer Simulation Study of Human Locomotion with a Three-Dimensional Entire-Body Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Kazunori; Yokoi, Takashi

    In the present study, the computer simulation technique to autonomously generate running motion from walking was developed using a three-dimensional entire-body neuro-musculo-skeletal model. When maximizing locomotive speed was employed as the evaluative criterion, the initial walking pattern could not transition to a valid running motion. When minimizing the period of foot-ground contact was added to this evaluative criterion, the simulation model autonomously produced appropriate three-dimensional running. Changes in the neuronal system showed the fatigue coefficient of the neural oscillators to reduce as locomotion patterns transitioned from walking to running. Then, when the running speed increased, the amplitude of the non-specific stimulus from the higher center increased. These two changes indicate mean that the improvement in responsiveness of the neuronal system is important for the transition process from walking to running, and that the comprehensive activation level of the neuronal system is essential in the process of increasing running speed.

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of ... content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography ( ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of ...

  6. An efficient three-dimensional Poisson solver for SIMD high-performance-computing architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohl, H.

    1994-01-01

    We present an algorithm that solves the three-dimensional Poisson equation on a cylindrical grid. The technique uses a finite-difference scheme with operator splitting. This splitting maps the banded structure of the operator matrix into a two-dimensional set of tridiagonal matrices, which are then solved in parallel. Our algorithm couples FFT techniques with the well-known ADI (Alternating Direction Implicit) method for solving Elliptic PDE's, and the implementation is extremely well suited for a massively parallel environment like the SIMD architecture of the MasPar MP-1. Due to the highly recursive nature of our problem, we believe that our method is highly efficient, as it avoids excessive interprocessor communication.

  7. Three-dimensional digital-computer model of the principal ground-water reservoir of the Sevier Desert, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    The principal ground-water reservoir in part of the Sevier Desert, Utah was modeled using a three-dimensional finite-difference model. The model was calibrated by comparing computed and observed water-level measurements in 1952, simulating results of aquifer tests, and simulating ground-water withdrawals during 1952-81 and comparing computed water-level changes during 1952-82 to observed changes. The results indicate the model is capable of predicting future water-level changes. The report includes a complete listing of the model data for the 1952-82 simulation. (USGS)

  8. Cryo-soft X-ray tomography as a quantitative three-dimensional tool to model nanoparticle:cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappi, Michele; Conesa, José Javier; Pereiro, Eva; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar Sánchez; Rodríguez, María Josefa; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Carrascosa, José L

    2016-03-03

    Recent advances in nanoparticle design have generated new possibilities for nano-biotechnology and nano-medicine. Here we used cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) to collect comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) data to characterise the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with a breast cancer cell line. We incubated MCF-7 (a human breast cancer cell line) from 0 to 24 h with SPION (15 nm average diameter, coated with dimercaptosuccinic acid), a system that has been studied previously using various microscopy and bulk techniques. This system facilitates the validation and contextualization of the new 3D data acquired using the cryo-SXT-based approach. After vitrification, samples tested by correlative cryo-epifluorescent microscopy showed SPION accumulation in acidic vesicles related to the endocytic pathway. Microscopy grids bearing MCF-7 cells were then analysed by cryo-SXT to generate whole cell volume 3D maps. Cryo-SXT is an emerging technique that benefits from high X-ray penetration into the biological material to image close-to-native vitrified cells at nanometric resolution with no chemical fixation or staining agents. This unique possibility of obtaining 3D information from whole cells allows quantitative statistical analysis of SPION-containing vesicle (SCV) accumulation inside cells, including vesicle number and size, distances between vesicles, and their distance from the nucleus. Correlation between fluorescent microscopy, cryo-SXT and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to identify SCV and to generate 3D data for statistical analysis of SPION:cell interaction. This study supports continuous transfer of the internalized SPION from the plasma membrane to an accumulation area near the cell nucleus. Statistical analysis showed SCV increase in number and size concomitant with longer incubation times, and therefore an increase in their accumulated volume within the cell. This cumulative effect expands the accumulation

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  10. Computation of three-dimensional multiphase flow dynamics by Fully-Coupled Immersed Flow (FCIF) solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Sha; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming

    2017-12-01

    This work presents a Fully-Coupled Immersed Flow (FCIF) solver for the three-dimensional simulation of fluid-fluid interaction by coupling two distinct flow solvers using an Immersed Boundary (IB) method. The FCIF solver captures dynamic interactions between two fluids with disparate flow properties, while retaining the desirable simplicity of non-boundary-conforming grids. For illustration, we couple an IB-based unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (uRANS) simulator with a depth-integrated (long-wave) solver for the application of slug development with turbulent gas and laminar liquid. We perform a series of validations including turbulent/laminar flows over prescribed wavy boundaries and freely-evolving viscous fluids. These confirm the effectiveness and accuracy of both one-way and two-way coupling in the FCIF solver. Finally, we present a simulation example of the evolution from a stratified turbulent/laminar flow through the initiation of a slug that nearly bridges the channel. The results show both the interfacial wave dynamics excited by the turbulent gas forcing and the influence of the liquid on the gas turbulence. These results demonstrate that the FCIF solver effectively captures the essential physics of gas-liquid interaction and can serve as a useful tool for the mechanistic study of slug generation in two-phase gas/liquid flows in channels and pipes.

  11. Three-dimensional interpretation of MT data in volcanic environments (computer simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Spichak

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed, first, to find components of MT-fields and their transforms, which facilitate the imaging of the internal structure of volcanoes and, second, to study the detectability of conductivity variations in a magma chamber due to alterations of other physical parameters. The resolving power of MT data with respect to the electric structure of volcanic zones is studied using software developed by the author for three-dimensional (3D numerical modeling, analysis and imaging. A set of 3D volcano models are constructed and synthetic MT data on the relief Earth's surface are analysed. It is found that impedance phases as well as in-phase and quadrature parts of the electric field type transforms enable the best imaging of the volcanic interior. The impedance determinant is, however, the most suitable for adequate interpretation of measurements carried out for the purpose of monitoring conductivity variations in a magma chamber. The way of removing the geological noise from the MT data by means of its upward analytical continuation to the artificial reference plane is discussed. Interpretation methodologies are suggested aimed at 3D imaging and monitoring volcanic interiors by MT data.

  12. Computation and visualization of three-dimensional soft tissue motion in the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael D; Viergever, Max A

    2002-04-01

    This work presents a method to measure the soft tissue motion in three dimensions in the orbit during gaze. It has been shown that two-dimensional (2-D) quantification of soft tissue motion in the orbit is effective in the study of orbital anatomy and motion disorders. However, soft tissue motion is a three-dimensional (3-D) phenomenon and part of the kinematics is lost in any 2-D measurement. Therefore, T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging volume sequences are acquired during gaze and soft tissue motion is quantified using a generalization of the Lucas and Kanade optical flow algorithm to three dimensions. New techniques have been developed for visualizing the 3-D flow field as a series of color-texture mapped 2-D slices or as a combination of volume rendering for display of the anatomy and scintillation rendering for the display of the motion field. We have studied the performance of the algorithm on four-dimensional volume sequences of synthetic motion, simulated motion of a static object imaged by MR, an MR-imaged rotating object and MR-imaged motion in the human orbit during gaze. The accuracy of the analysis is sufficient to characterize motion in the orbit and scintillation rendering is an effective visualization technique for 3-D motion in the orbit.

  13. Three-dimensional multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics models for proton exchange membrane fuel cell: A theoretical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Kone

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of published three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics models for proton exchange membrane fuel cells that accounts for multiphase flow is presented. The models can be categorized as models for transport phenomena, geometry or operating condition effects, and thermal effects. The influences of heat and water management on the fuel cell performance have been repeatedly addressed, and these still remain two central issues in proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology. The strengths and weaknesses of the models, the modelling assumptions, and the model validation are discussed. The salient numerical features of the models are examined, and an overview of the most commonly used computational fluid dynamic codes for the numerical modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is given. Comprehensive three-dimensional multiphase flow computational fluid dynamic models accounting for the major transport phenomena inside a complete cell have been developed. However, it has been noted that more research is required to develop models that include among other things, the detailed composition and structure of the catalyst layers, the effects of water droplets movement in the gas flow channels, the consideration of phase change in both the anode and the cathode sides of the fuel cell, and dissolved water transport.

  14. Continuous three-dimensional control of a virtual helicopter using a motor imagery based brain-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Doud

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs allow a user to interact with a computer system using thought. However, only recently have devices capable of providing sophisticated multi-dimensional control been achieved non-invasively. A major goal for non-invasive BCI systems has been to provide continuous, intuitive, and accurate control, while retaining a high level of user autonomy. By employing electroencephalography (EEG to record and decode sensorimotor rhythms (SMRs induced from motor imaginations, a consistent, user-specific control signal may be characterized. Utilizing a novel method of interactive and continuous control, we trained three normal subjects to modulate their SMRs to achieve three-dimensional movement of a virtual helicopter that is fast, accurate, and continuous. In this system, the virtual helicopter's forward-backward translation and elevation controls were actuated through the modulation of sensorimotor rhythms that were converted to forces applied to the virtual helicopter at every simulation time step, and the helicopter's angle of left or right rotation was linearly mapped, with higher resolution, from sensorimotor rhythms associated with other motor imaginations. These different resolutions of control allow for interplay between general intent actuation and fine control as is seen in the gross and fine movements of the arm and hand. Subjects controlled the helicopter with the goal of flying through rings (targets randomly positioned and oriented in a three-dimensional space. The subjects flew through rings continuously, acquiring as many as 11 consecutive rings within a five-minute period. In total, the study group successfully acquired over 85% of presented targets. These results affirm the effective, three-dimensional control of our motor imagery based BCI system, and suggest its potential applications in biological navigation, neuroprosthetics, and other applications.

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  5. Use of Multiple GPUs to Speedup the Execution of a Three-Dimensional Computational Model of the Innate Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, M. P.; do Nascimento, T. M.; dos Santos, R. W.; Lobosco, M.

    2014-03-01

    The development of computational systems that mimics the physiological response of organs or even the entire body is a complex task. One of the issues that makes this task extremely complex is the huge computational resources needed to execute the simulations. For this reason, the use of parallel computing is mandatory. In this work, we focus on the simulation of temporal and spatial behaviour of some human innate immune system cells and molecules in a small three-dimensional section of a tissue. To perform this simulation, we use multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) in a shared-memory environment. Despite of high initialization and communication costs imposed by the use of GPUs, the techniques used to implement the HIS simulator have shown to be very effective to achieve this purpose.

  6. On the effects of grid ill-conditioning in three dimensional finite element vector potential magnetostatic field computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of finite element grid geometries and associated ill-conditioning were studied in single medium and multi-media (air-iron) three dimensional magnetostatic field computation problems. The sensitivities of these 3D field computations to finite element grid geometries were investigated. It was found that in single medium applications the unconstrained magnetic vector potential curl-curl formulation in conjunction with first order finite elements produce global results which are almost totally insensitive to grid geometries. However, it was found that in multi-media (air-iron) applications first order finite element results are sensitive to grid geometries and consequent elemental shape ill-conditioning. These sensitivities were almost totally eliminated by means of the use of second order finite elements in the field computation algorithms. Practical examples are given in this paper to demonstrate these aspects mentioned above.

  7. COMMIX-PPC: A three-dimensional transient multicomponent computer program for analyzing performance of power plant condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, T.H.; Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-02-01

    The COMMIX-PPC computer program is an extended and improved version of earlier COMMIX codes and is specifically designed for evaluating the thermal performance of power plant condensers. The COMMIX codes are general-purpose computer programs for the analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex industrial systems. In COMMIX-PPC, two major features have been added to previously published COMMIX codes. One feature is the incorporation of one-dimensional conservation of mass. momentum, and energy equations on the tube side, and the proper accounting for the thermal interaction between shell and tube side through the porous medium approach. The other added feature is the extension of the three-dimensional conservation equations for shell-side flow to treat the flow of a multicomponent medium. COMMIX-PPC is designed to perform steady-state and transient three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer in a power plant condenser. However, the code is designed in a generalized fashion so that, with some modification. it can be used to analyze processes in any heat exchanger or other single-phase engineering applications.

  8. COMMIX-PPC: A three-dimensional transient multicomponent computer program for analyzing performance of power plant condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, T.H.; Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-02-01

    The COMMIX-PPC computer pregrain is an extended and improved version of earlier COMMIX codes and is specifically designed for evaluating the thermal performance of power plant condensers. The COMMIX codes are general-purpose computer programs for the analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex Industrial systems. In COMMIX-PPC, two major features have been added to previously published COMMIX codes. One feature is the incorporation of one-dimensional equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy on the tube stile and the proper accounting for the thermal interaction between shell and tube side through the porous-medium approach. The other added feature is the extension of the three-dimensional conservation equations for shell-side flow to treat the flow of a multicomponent medium. COMMIX-PPC is designed to perform steady-state and transient. Three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer tn a power plant condenser. However, the code is designed in a generalized fashion so that, with some modification, it can be used to analyze processes in any heat exchanger or other single-phase engineering applications. Volume I (Equations and Numerics) of this report describes in detail the basic equations, formulation, solution procedures, and models for a phenomena. Volume II (User's Guide and Manual) contains the input instruction, flow charts, sample problems, and descriptions of available options and boundary conditions.

  9. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes assessment: comparison with cardiac computed tomography; Comparacao entre a afericao da fracao de ejecao e dos volumes do ventriculo esquerdo, medidos com ecocardiografia tridimensional em tempo real e com tomografia computadorizada ultra-rapida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Marcelo L.C.; Nomura, Cesar H.; Tranchesi Junior, Bernardino; Oliveira, Wercules A. de; Naccarato, Gustavo; Serpa, Bruna S.; Cury, Alexandre; Passos, Rodrigo B.D.; Nobrega, Marcel V. da; Funari, Marcelo B.G.; Pfefermam, Abhaham; Makdisse, Marcia; Fischer, Claudio H.; Morhy, Samira S., E-mail: luiz766@terra.com.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    Background and objective: Few studies addressed the comparison between real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) concerning left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes assessment. We sought to compare both techniques regarding left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction function and volumes analysis. Methods: we studied by RT3DE (Philips IE 33, And, MA, USA) and by CCT (Toshiba, 64-slice, Otawara, Japan) 41 consecutive patients (29 males, 58 ± 11 yrs). We analysed by both techniques LVEF, LVEDV, LVESV. RT3DE and CCT data were compared by coefficients of determination (r: Pearson), Bland and Altman test and linear regression, 95% CI. Results: RT3DE data: LVEF ranged from 56.7 to 78.9 % (65.3 + 5.7 ); LVEDV ranged from 49.6 to 178.2 (88 + 27.5) mL; LVESV from 11.4 to 78 ( 33.9 + 13.7) mL. CCT data: LVEF ranged from 53 to 86 % (67.3 + 7.9 ); LVEDV ranged from 51 to 186 (106.4 + 30.7) mL; LVESV from 7 to 72 ( 35.1 + 13.8) mL. Correlations relative to RT3DE and CCT were: LVEF (r: 0. 7877, p<0.0001, 95 % CI 0.6327 to 0.8853 ); LVEDV (r:0.7671, p<0.0001, 95 % CI 0.5974 to 0.8745); LVESV (r: 0.8121, p<0.0001, 95 % CI 0.6659 to 0.8957). Conclusions: it was observed adequate correlation between real-time 3D echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography concerning ejection fraction and volumes assessment. (author)

  10. Application of computer-assisted three-dimensional quantitative assessment and a surgical planning tool for living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Zhu, Zhi-Jun; Lü, Yi; Jiang, Wen-Tao; Gao, Wei; Zeng, Zhi-Gui; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2013-04-01

    Precise evaluation of the live donor's liver is the most important factor for the donor's safety and the recipient's prognosis in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Our study assessed the clinical value of computer-assisted three-dimensional quantitative assessment and a surgical planning tool for donor evaluation in LDLT. Computer-assisted three-dimensional (3D) quantitative assessment was used to prospectively provide quantitative assessment of the graft volume for 123 consecutive donors of LDLT and its accuracy and efficiency were compared with that of the standard manual-traced method. A case of reduced monosegmental LDLT was also assessed and a surgical planning tool displayed the precise surgical plan to avoid large-for-size syndrome. There was no statistically significant difference between the detected graft volumes with computer-assisted 3D quantitative assessment and manual-traced approaches ((856.76 ± 162.18) cm(3) vs. (870.64 ± 172.54) cm(3), P = 0.796). Estimated volumes by either method had good correlation with the actual graft weight (r-manual-traced method: 0.921, r-3D quantitative assessment method: 0.896, both P computer-assisted 3D quantitative assessment approach was significantly more efficient taking half the time of the manual-traced method ((16.91 ± 1.375) minutes vs. (39.27 ± 2.102) minutes, P Computer-assisted 3D quantitative assessment provided precise evaluation of the graft volume. It also assisted surgeons with a better understanding of the hepatic 3D anatomy and was useful for the individual surgical planning tool.

  11. Characterizing the Three-Dimensional Structure of Block Copolymers via Sequential Infiltration Synthesis and Scanning Transmission Electron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal-Peretz, Tamar [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Winterstein, Jonathan [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, United States; Doxastakis, Manolis [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Biswas, Mahua; Ren, Jiaxing [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Suh, Hyo Seon [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Darling, Seth B. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Liddle, J. Alexander [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, United States; Elam, Jeffrey W.; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Nealey, Paul F. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States

    2015-05-12

    Understanding and controlling the three-dimensional structure of block copolymer (BCP) thin films is critical for utilizing these materials for sub-20 nm nanopatterning in semiconductor devices, as well as in membranes and solar cell applications. Combining an atomic layer deposition (ALD) based technique for enhancing the contrast of BCPs in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) together with scanning TEM (STEM) tomography reveals and characterizes the three-dimensional structures of poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) thin films with great clarity. Sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS), a block-selective technique for growing inorganic materials in BCPs films in ALD, and an emerging tool for enhancing the etch contrast of BCPs, was harnessed to significantly enhance the high-angle scattering from the polar domains of BCP films in the TEM. The power of combining SIS and STEM tomography for three dimensional (3D) characterization of BCPs films was demonstrated with the following cases: self-assembled cylindrical, lamellar, and spherical PS-PMMA thin films. In all cases, STEM tomography has revealed 3D structures that were hidden underneath the surface, including: 1) the 3D structure of defects in cylindrical and lamellar phases, 2) non-perpendicular 3D surface of grain boundaries in the cylindrical phase, and 3) the 3D arrangement of spheres in body centered cubic (BCC) and hexagonal closed pack (HCP) morphologies in the spherical phase. The 3D data of the spherical morphologies was compared to coarse-grained simulations and assisted in validating the simulations’ parameters. STEM tomography of SIS-treated BCP films enables the characterization of the exact structure used for pattern transfer, and can lead to better understating of the physics which is utilized in BCP lithography.

  12. A new coupled computational method in conjunction with three-dimensional finite volume schemes for nonlinear coupled constitutive relations

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhongzheng; Zhao, Wenwen

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium effects play a vital role in high-speed and rarefied gas flows and the accurate simulation of these flow regimes are far beyond the capability of near-local-equilibrium Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations. Eu proposed generalized hydrodynamic equations which are consistent with the laws of irreversible thermodynamics to solve this problem. Based on Eu's generalized hydrodynamics equations, a computational model, namely the nonlinear coupled constitutive relations(NCCR),was developed by R.S.Myong and applied successfully to one-dimensional shock wave structure and two-dimensional rarefied flows. In this paper, finite volume schemes, including LU-SGS time advance scheme, MUSCL interpolation and AUSMPW+ scheme, are fistly adopted to investigate NCCR model's validity and potential in three-dimensional complex hypersonic rarefied gas flows. Moreover, in order to solve the computational stability problems in 3D complex flows,a modified solution is developed for the NCCR model. Finally, the modified solu...

  13. Computational methods for a three-dimensional model of the petroleum-discovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemeyer, J.H.; Bawiec, W.J.; Drew, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    A discovery-process model devised by Drew, Schuenemeyer, and Root can be used to predict the amount of petroleum to be discovered in a basin from some future level of exploratory effort: the predictions are based on historical drilling and discovery data. Because marginal costs of discovery and production are a function of field size, the model can be used to make estimates of future discoveries within deposit size classes. The modeling approach is a geometric one in which the area searched is a function of the size and shape of the targets being sought. A high correlation is assumed between the surface-projection area of the fields and the volume of petroleum. To predict how much oil remains to be found, the area searched must be computed, and the basin size and discovery efficiency must be estimated. The basin is assumed to be explored randomly rather than by pattern drilling. The model may be used to compute independent estimates of future oil at different depth intervals for a play involving multiple producing horizons. We have written FORTRAN computer programs that are used with Drew, Schuenemeyer, and Root's model to merge the discovery and drilling information and perform the necessary computations to estimate undiscovered petroleum. These program may be modified easily for the estimation of remaining quantities of commodities other than petroleum. ?? 1980.

  14. Innovative procedure for computer-assisted genioplasty: three-dimensional cephalometry, rapid-prototyping model and surgical splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, R; Tranduy, K; Reychler, H

    2010-07-01

    The authors present a new procedure of computer-assisted genioplasty. They determined the anterior, posterior and inferior limits of the chin in relation to the skull and face with the newly developed and validated three-dimensional cephalometric planar analysis (ACRO 3D). Virtual planning of the osteotomy lines was carried out with Mimics (Materialize) software. The authors built a three-dimensional rapid-prototyping multi-position model of the chin area from a medical low-dose CT scan. The transfer of virtual information to the operating room consisted of two elements. First, the titanium plates on the 3D RP model were pre-bent. Second, a surgical guide for the transfer of the osteotomy lines and the positions of the screws to the operating room was manufactured. The authors present the first case of the use of this model on a patient. The postoperative results are promising, and the technique is fast and easy-to-use. More patients are needed for a definitive clinical validation of this procedure. Copyright 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Computer analysis of three-dimensional morphological characteristics of the bile duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinyuan; Chen, Houjin; Peng, Yahui; Shang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a computer image-processing algorithm for analyzing the morphological characteristics of bile ducts in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images was proposed. The algorithm consisted of mathematical morphology methods including erosion, closing and skeletonization, and a spline curve fitting method to obtain the length and curvature of the center line of the bile duct. Of 10 cases, the average length of the bile duct was 14.56 cm. The maximum curvature was in the range of 0.111 2.339. These experimental results show that using the computer image-processing algorithm to assess the morphological characteristics of the bile duct is feasible and further research is needed to evaluate its potential clinical values.

  16. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack three-dimensional model and computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed distributed mathematical model of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack have been developed, with the FORTRAN computer program, for analyzing the temperature distribution in the stack and the associated current density distribution on the cell plates. Energy, mass, and electrochemical analyses in the stack were combined to develop the model. Several reasonable assumptions were made to solve this mathematical model by means of the finite differences numerical method.

  17. User’s Guide: Computer Program for Three-Dimensional Analysis of Building Systems (CTABS80).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    computer program TABS (1,2,3) was the direct " feedback " from the profession in the use of these programs. The first of these programs, FRMSTC, is a static...II. ~ gil a gilt eig gggg go gte *,0 glee 10 eeC ’MO * eel a 10 III. * il - C a iii - - egg’ a *. - let 4 0 a gill tel 4 C - - tie 10 lii

  18. Three-dimensional simulation of hydrodynamics in a rotating disc contactor using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, N.; Kazemzadeh, M. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran); Ziyari, A.; Shafiee, M. [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Ghaniyari-Benis, S.

    2009-01-15

    The 3D simulation of the hydrodynamic behavior of a rotating disc contactor (RDC) by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was investigated for the n-butanol-succinic acid-water (BSW) system. For the two-phase liquid-liquid flow, the velocity distribution of the continuous phase and drop size distributions were determined using the k-{omega} turbulence model in conjunction with the Eulerian-Eulerian approach and MUSIG model. In this system in which the holdup of the dispersed phase is low, the continuous phase velocity was computed by simultaneously solving the Navier-Stokes equations beside the different models of turbulence. The motions of the dispersed phase was calculated while considering buoyancy, drag and inertia forces, and equations related to the continuous and dispersed phases were coupled to each other by considering the momentum transfer on the interface and the effect of drop motions in turbulence. In this simulation, by considering drops' breakage, their path, the velocity profile, and also the velocity contour plot of the dispersed phase were obtained. A comparison of the holdup experimental values with the results predicted by CFD showed that the k-{omega} model is the best descriptive model for the computation of holdup in a RDC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Three-dimensional computer simulation of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) in distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanat, Rami; Moritz, Niko; Aro, Hannu T

    2007-01-01

    Physical phantom models have conventionally been used to determine the accuracy and precision of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) in various orthopaedic applications. Using a phantom model of a fracture of the distal radius it has previously been shown that RSA is a highly accurate and precise method for measuring both translation and rotation in three-dimensions (3-D). The main shortcoming of a physical phantom model is its inability to mimic complex 3-D motion. The goal of this study was to create a realistic computer model for preoperative planning of RSA studies and to test the accuracy of RSA in measuring complex movements in fractures of the distal radius using this new model. The 3-D computer model was created from a set of tomographic scans. The simulation of the radiographic imaging was performed using ray-tracing software (POV-Ray). RSA measurements were performed according to standard protocol. Using a two-part fracture model (AO/ASIF type A2), it was found that for simple movements in one axis, translations in the range of 25microm-2mm could be measured with an accuracy of +/-2microm. Rotations ranging from 16 degrees to 2 degrees could be measured with an accuracy of +/-0.015 degrees . Using a three-part fracture model the corresponding values of accuracy were found to be +/-4microm and +/-0.031 degrees for translation and rotation, respectively. For complex 3-D motion in a three-part fracture model (AO/ASIF type C1) the accuracy was +/-6microm for translation and +/-0.120 degrees for rotation. The use of 3-D computer modelling can provide a method for preoperative planning of RSA studies in complex fractures of the distal radius and in other clinical situations in which the RSA method is applicable.

  1. Fully automatic three-dimensional visualization of intravascular optical coherence tomography images: methods and feasibility in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ughi, Giovanni J; Adriaenssens, Tom; Desmet, Walter; D'hooge, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) is an imaging modality that can be used for the assessment of intracoronary stents. Recent publications pointed to the fact that 3D visualizations have potential advantages compared to conventional 2D representations. However, 3D imaging still requires a time consuming manual procedure not suitable for on-line application during coronary interventions. We propose an algorithm for a rapid and fully automatic 3D visualization of IV-OCT pullbacks. IV-OCT images are first processed for the segmentation of the different structures. This also allows for automatic pullback calibration. Then, according to the segmentation results, different structures are depicted with different colors to visualize the vessel wall, the stent and the guide-wire in details. Final 3D rendering results are obtained through the use of a commercial 3D DICOM viewer. Manual analysis was used as ground-truth for the validation of the segmentation algorithms. A correlation value of 0.99 and good limits of agreement (Bland Altman statistics) were found over 250 images randomly extracted from 25 in vivo pullbacks. Moreover, 3D rendering was compared to angiography, pictures of deployed stents made available by the manufacturers and to conventional 2D imaging corroborating visualization results. Computational time for the visualization of an entire data sets resulted to be ~74 sec. The proposed method allows for the on-line use of 3D IV-OCT during percutaneous coronary interventions, potentially allowing treatments optimization.

  2. Level set discrete element method for three-dimensional computations with triaxial case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Reid; Andò, Edward; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Andrade, José E.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we outline the level set discrete element method (LS-DEM) which is a discrete element method variant able to simulate systems of particles with arbitrary shape using level set functions as a geometric basis. This unique formulation allows seamless interfacing with level set-based characterization methods as well as computational ease in contact calculations. We then apply LS-DEM to simulate two virtual triaxial specimens generated from XRCT images of experiments and demonstrate LS-DEM's ability to quantitatively capture and predict stress-strain and volume-strain behavior observed in the experiments.

  3. Three-dimensional computer-assisted surgical simulation and intraoperative navigation in orthognathic surgery: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-04-01

    By incorporating three-dimensional (3D) imaging and computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques, 3D computer-assisted technology has been applied widely to provide accurate guidance for assessment and treatment planning in clinical practice. This technology has recently been used in orthognathic surgery to improve surgical planning and outcome. The modality will gradually become popular. This study reviewed the literature concerning the use of computer-assisted techniques in orthognathic surgery including surgical planning, simulation, intraoperative translation of the virtual surgery, and postoperative evaluation. A Medline, PubMed, ProQuest, and ScienceDirect search was performed to find relevant articles with regard to 3D computer-assisted orthognathic surgery in the past 10 years. A total of 460 articles were revealed, out of which 174 were publications addressed the topic of this study. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the state-of-art methods for 3D computer-assisted technology in orthognathic surgery. From the review we can conclude that the use of computer-assisted technique in orthognathic surgery provides the benefit of optimal functional and aesthetic results, patient satisfaction, precise translation of the treatment plan, and facilitating intraoperative manipulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Effect of ski binding parameters on knee biomechanics: a three-dimensional computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Nancy; Chevalier, Yan; Hagemeister, Nicola; Van De Putte, Maxime; De Guise, Jacques

    2004-07-01

    Downhill skiing is a relatively safe sport, but many potentially avoidable injuries do occur. Whereas tibia and ankle injuries have been declining, severe knee sprains usually involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) have increased from the 1970s to the 1990s. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the position of the binding pivot point and binding release characteristics on ACL strain during a phantom-foot fall. We computed ACL strain using a biomechanical computer knee model to simulate the phantom-foot ACL-injury mechanism. This mechanism, which is one of the most common mechanisms of ACL injury in downhill skiing, occurs when the weight of the skier is on the inner edge of the ski during a backward fall, resulting in a sharp uncontrolled inward turn of the ski. The model predicts, that under simulated phantom-foot conditions, a binding with fast-release characteristics with a pivot positioned in front of the center of the boot produces less strain on the ACL. Current bindings have their pivot point approximately at the center of the heel radius. A pivot positioned at the back of the binding is more effective for sensing loads that occur at the tip of the ski. However, it is less effective for sensing loads that occur at the tail of the ski and, therefore, offers less protection during a phantom-foot fall. A binding with two pivot points, one positioned in front and the other at the back, could sense twist loads applied to the ski both at the front and at the back, and might, therefore, be a solution to reduce the occurrence of ACL injuries.

  5. Computer algorithms for three-dimensional measurement of humeral anatomy: analysis of 140 paired humeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulos, Lazaros; Dünner, Celestine; Gass, Tobias; Graf, Matthias; Goksel, Orcun; Gerber, Christian; Székely, Gábor; Fürnstahl, Philipp

    2016-02-01

    In the presence of severe osteoarthritis, osteonecrosis, or proximal humeral fracture, the contralateral humerus may serve as a template for the 3-dimensional (3D) preoperative planning of reconstructive surgery. The purpose of this study was to develop algorithms for performing 3D measurements of the humeral anatomy and further to assess side-to-side (bilateral) differences in humeral head retrotorsion, humeral head inclination, humeral length, and humeral head radius and height. The 3D models of 140 paired humeri (70 cadavers) were extracted from computed tomographic data. Geometric characteristics quantifying the humeral anatomy in 3D were determined in a semiautomatic fashion using the developed computer algorithms. The results between the sides were compared for evaluating bilateral differences. The mean bilateral difference of the humeral retrotorsion angle was 6.7° (standard deviation [SD], 5.7°; range, -15.1° to 24.0°; P = .063); the mean side difference of the humeral head inclination angle was 2.3° (SD, 1.8°; range, -5.1° to 8.4°; P = .12). The side difference in humeral length (mean, 2.9 mm; SD, 2.5 mm; range, -8.7 mm to 10.1 mm; P = .04) was significant. The mean side difference in the head sphere radius was 0.5 mm (SD, 0.6 mm; range, -3.2 mm to 2.2 mm; P = .76), and the mean side difference in humeral head height was 0.8 mm (SD, 0.6 mm; range, -2.4 mm to 2.4 mm; P = .44). The contralateral anatomy may serve as a reliable reconstruction template for humeral length, humeral head radius, and humeral head height if it is analyzed with 3D algorithms. In contrast, determining humeral head retrotorsion and humeral head inclination from the contralateral anatomy may be more prone to error. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of an aeroelastic code based on three-dimensional viscous–inviscid method for wind turbine computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sessarego, Matias; Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic and structural dynamic performance analysis of modern wind turbines are routinely estimated in the wind energy field using computational tools known as aeroelastic codes. Most aeroelastic codes use the blade element momentum (BEM) technique to model the rotor aerodynamics and a modal...... Code Comparison Collaboration Project. Simulation tests consist of steady wind inflow conditions with different combinations of yaw error, wind shear, tower shadow and turbine-elastic modeling. Turbulent inflow created by using a Mann box is also considered. MIRAS-FLEX results, such as blade tip......, multi-body or the finite-element approach to model the turbine structural dynamics. The present work describes the development of a novel aeroelastic code that combines a three-dimensional viscous–inviscid interactive method, method for interactive rotor aerodynamic simulations (MIRAS...

  7. Consequences of fiducial marker error on three-dimensional computer animation of the temporomandibular joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, J. Ken, III; Boston, J. Robert; Rudy, Thomas E.; Greco, Carol M.; Zaki, Hussein S.

    2001-05-01

    Jaw motion has been used to diagnose jaw pain patients, and we have developed a 3D computer animation technique to study jaw motion. A customized dental clutch was worn during motion, and its consistent and rigid placement was a concern. The experimental protocol involved mandibular movements (vertical opening) and MR imaging. The clutch contained three motion markers used to collect kinematic data and four MR markers used as fiducial markers in the MR images. Fiducial marker misplacement was mimicked by analytically perturbing the position of the MR markers +/- 2, +/- 4, and +/- 6 degrees in the three anatomical planes. The percent difference between the original and perturbed MR marker position was calculated for kinematic parameters. The maximum difference across all perturbations for axial rotation, coronal rotation, sagittal rotation, axial translation, coronal translation, and sagittal translation were 176.85%, 191.84%, 0.64%, 9.76%, 80.75%, and 8.30%, respectively, for perturbing all MR markers, and 86.47%, 93.44%, 0.23%, 7.08%, 42.64%, and 13.64%, respectively, for perturbing one MR marker. The parameters representing movement in the sagittal plane, the dominant plane in vertical opening, were determined to be reasonably robust, while secondary movements in the axial and coronal planes were not considered robust.

  8. Three-dimensional computer-aided human factors engineering analysis of a grafting robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y C; Chen, S; Wu, G J; Lin, Y H

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this research was to conduct a human factors engineering analysis of a grafting robot design using computer-aided 3D simulation technology. A prototype tubing-type grafting robot for fruits and vegetables was the subject of a series of case studies. To facilitate the incorporation of human models into the operating environment of the grafting robot, I-DEAS graphic software was applied to establish individual models of the grafting robot in line with Jack ergonomic analysis. Six human models (95th percentile, 50th percentile, and 5th percentile by height for both males and females) were employed to simulate the operating conditions and working postures in a real operating environment. The lower back and upper limb stresses of the operators were analyzed using the lower back analysis (LBA) and rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) functions in Jack. The experimental results showed that if a leg space is introduced under the robot, the operator can sit closer to the robot, which reduces the operator's level of lower back and upper limbs stress. The proper environmental layout for Taiwanese operators for minimum levels of lower back and upper limb stress are to set the grafting operation at 23.2 cm away from the operator at a height of 85 cm and with 45 cm between the rootstock and scion units.

  9. Three-dimensional computer-controlled acoustic pressure scanning and quantification of focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joonho; Koizumi, Norihiro; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Sugita, Naohikoa; Nomiya, Akira; Homma, Yukio; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2010-04-01

    We propose an automated needle hydrophone-based scanning system to measure high-resolution 3-D acoustic pressure distributions generated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). The hardware consists of a host computer, subsystems for HIFU generation, and an oscilloscope to sample the pressure response from a sensor in a water tank. Software was developed to control the hardware subsystems, to search for the initial scan position, and to design the scanning path and volume. A preoperative scanning plan with three perpendicular planes is used to manipulate the position of the HIFU transducer and to automate the acquisition of the spatial acoustic pressure distribution. The post-processing process displays the scanning results, compensates time delays caused by continuous linear scans, and quantifies the focal region. A method to minimize the displacement error induced by the time delay improves the scanning speed of a conventional needle hydrophone-based scanning system. Moreover, a noise-robust, automatic-focus searching algorithm using Gaussian function fitting reduces the total number of iterations and prevents the initial scanning position search from diverging. Finally, the minimum-volume enclosing ellipsoid approximation is used to quantify the size and orientation of the 3-D focal region thresholded by the minimum pressure of interest for various input conditions and to test the reproducibility of the scanning system.

  10. Three-dimensional electromagnetic modeling and inversion on massively parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, G.A.; Alumbaugh, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysics Dept.

    1996-03-01

    This report has demonstrated techniques that can be used to construct solutions to the 3-D electromagnetic inverse problem using full wave equation modeling. To this point great progress has been made in developing an inverse solution using the method of conjugate gradients which employs a 3-D finite difference solver to construct model sensitivities and predicted data. The forward modeling code has been developed to incorporate absorbing boundary conditions for high frequency solutions (radar), as well as complex electrical properties, including electrical conductivity, dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability. In addition both forward and inverse codes have been ported to a massively parallel computer architecture which allows for more realistic solutions that can be achieved with serial machines. While the inversion code has been demonstrated on field data collected at the Richmond field site, techniques for appraising the quality of the reconstructions still need to be developed. Here it is suggested that rather than employing direct matrix inversion to construct the model covariance matrix which would be impossible because of the size of the problem, one can linearize about the 3-D model achieved in the inverse and use Monte-Carlo simulations to construct it. Using these appraisal and construction tools, it is now necessary to demonstrate 3-D inversion for a variety of EM data sets that span the frequency range from induction sounding to radar: below 100 kHz to 100 MHz. Appraised 3-D images of the earth`s electrical properties can provide researchers opportunities to infer the flow paths, flow rates and perhaps the chemistry of fluids in geologic mediums. It also offers a means to study the frequency dependence behavior of the properties in situ. This is of significant relevance to the Department of Energy, paramount to characterizing and monitoring of environmental waste sites and oil and gas exploration.

  11. Using a three-dimensional computer assisted stone volume estimates to evaluate extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy treatment of kidney stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigum, Lene Hyldgaard; Ulriksen, Peter Sommer; Omar, Omar Salah

    2016-01-01

    This study describes and evaluates the use of non-contrast enhanced computerized tomography (NCCT) before and after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). Computer measured stone volume was used as an exact measurement for treatment response. 81 patients received SWL of kidney stones at Herlev...

  12. Prediction of three-dimensional contact stress and ligament tension in the ankle during stance determined from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Naoki; Armiger, Robert S; Myerson, Mark S; Campbell, John T; Chao, Edmund Y S

    2009-02-01

    Our goal was to quantify and visualize the three-dimensional loading relationship between the ligaments and articular surfaces of the ankle to identify and determine the stabilizing roles of these anatomical structures during the stance phase of gait. We applied discrete element analysis to computationally model the three-dimensional contact characteristics and ligament loading of the ankle joint. Physiologic loads approximating those at five positions in the stance phase of a normal walk cycle were applied. We analyzed joint contact pressures and periankle ligament tension concurrently. Most ankle joint loading during the stance phase occurred across the articular surfaces of the joint, and the amount of ligament tension was small. The tibiotalar articulation showed full congruency throughout most of the stance phase, with peak pressure developing anteriorly toward the toe-off frame. Of the periankle ligaments, the deep deltoid ligament transferred the most force during the stance phase (57.2%); the superficial deltoid ligament transferred the second-most force (26.1%). The anterior talofibular ligament transferred force between the talus and fibula continuously, whereas the calcaneofibular ligament did not carry force during gait. The distal tibiofibular ligaments and the interosseous membrane were loaded throughout the stance phase. Force transmission through the ankle joint during the stance phase is predominantly through the articular surfaces, and the periankle ligaments do not play a major stabilizing role in constraining ankle motion. The medial ligaments have a more important role than do the lateral ligaments in stabilizing the ankle joint. In addition to ligament insufficiency, other factors, such as varus tilt of the tibial plafond, may be important in the development of recurrent instability. Continuous loading of syndesmosis ligaments provides a theoretical basis for evidence of syndesmosis screw breakage or loosening. The analysis method has

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  15. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed in the room ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed in the room ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  2. Real-time three-dimensional imaging of epidermal splitting and removal by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, Marc; Draye, Jean Pierre; Verween, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    While real-time 3-D evaluation of human skin constructs is needed, only 2-D non-invasive imaging techniques are available. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) for real-time 3-D assessment of the epidermal splitting...... and decellularization. Human skin samples were incubated with four different agents: Dispase II, NaCl 1 M, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100. Epidermal splitting, dermo-epidermal junction, acellularity and 3-D architecture of dermal matrices were evaluated by High-definition optical coherence tomography...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ... Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored ...

  5. Three Dimensional Characterization of Tin Crystallography and Cu6Sn5 Intermetallics in Solder Joints by Multiscale Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubanandham, A.; Lujan-Regalado, I.; Vallabhaneni, R.; Chawla, N.

    2016-11-01

    Decreasing pitch size in electronic packaging has resulted in a drastic decrease in solder volumes. The Sn grain crystallography and fraction of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in small-scale solder joints evolve much differently at the smaller length scales. A cross-sectional study limits the morphological analysis of microstructural features to two dimensions. This study utilizes serial sectioning technique in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction to investigate the crystallographic orientation of both Sn grains and Cu6Sn5 IMCs in Cu/Pure Sn/Cu solder joints in three dimensional (3D). Quantification of grain aspect ratio is affected by local cooling rate differences within the solder volume. Backscatter electron imaging and focused ion beam serial sectioning enabled the visualization of morphology of both nanosized Cu6Sn5 IMCs and the hollow hexagonal morphology type Cu6Sn5 IMCs in 3D. Quantification and visualization of microstructural features in 3D thus enable us to better understand the microstructure and deformation mechanics within these small scale solder joints.

  6. Structural interactions between collagen and proteoglycans are elucidated by three-dimensional electron tomography of bovine cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Philip N; Pinali, Christian; Young, Robert D; Meek, Keith M; Quantock, Andrew J; Knupp, Carlo

    2010-02-10

    Interactions between collagens and proteoglycans help define the structure and function of extracellular matrices. The cornea, which contains proteoglycans with keratan sulphate or chondroitin/dermatan sulphate glycosaminoglycan chains, is an excellent model system in which to study collagen-proteoglycan structures and interactions. Here, we present the first three-dimensional electron microscopic reconstructions of the cornea, and these include corneas from which glycosaminoglycans have been selectively removed by enzymatic digestion. Our reconstructions show that narrow collagen fibrils associate with sulphated proteoglycans that appear as extended, variable-length linear structures. The proteoglycan network appears to tether two or more collagen fibrils, and thus organize the matrix with enough spatial specificity to fulfill the requirements for corneal transparency. Based on the data, we propose that the characteristic pseudohexagonal fibril arrangement in cornea is controlled by the balance of a repulsive force arising from osmotic pressure and an attractive force due to the thermal motion of the proteoglycans. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D was developed to solve the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This User's Guide describes the program's features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  8. Incorporating texture features in a computer-aided breast lesion diagnosis system for automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixia; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the benefits of incorporating texture features into an existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for classifying benign and malignant lesions in automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound images. The existing system takes into account 11 different features, describing different lesion properties; however, it does not include texture features. In this work, we expand the system by including texture features based on local binary patterns, gray level co-occurrence matrices, and Gabor filters computed from each lesion to be diagnosed. To deal with the resulting large number of features, we proposed a combination of feature-oriented classifiers combining each group of texture features into a single likelihood, resulting in three additional features used for the final classification. The classification was performed using support vector machine classifiers, and the evaluation was done with 10-fold cross validation on a dataset containing 424 lesions (239 benign and 185 malignant lesions). We compared the classification performance of the CAD system with and without texture features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.90 to 0.91 after adding texture features ([Formula: see text]).

  9. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  11. Two- and three-dimensional topographic analysis of pathologically myopic eyes with dome-shaped macula and inferior staphyloma by spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ben, Antonio; Kamal-Salah, Radua; García-Basterra, Ignacio; Gonzalez Gómez, Ana; Morillo Sanchez, María José; García-Campos, Jose Manuel

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the posterior anatomical structure of pathologically myopic eyes with dome-shaped macula and inferior staphyloma using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Our database of 260 pathologically myopic eyes was analyzed retrospectively to identify patients with dome-shaped macula and inferior staphyloma. All patients underwent vertical and horizontal SD-OCT scans across the central fovea, with three-dimensional macular map reconstruction. Best-corrected visual acuity, axial length, and choroidal thickness measurements were recorded. The macular bulge height was also analyzed in eyes with dome-shaped macula. In the three-dimensional images, the symmetry and orientation of the main plane of the inward incurvation of the macula were examined. Twenty-eight (10.7%) of the 260 pathologically myopic eyes had dome-shaped macula of one of three different types: a round radially symmetrical dome (eight eyes, 28.5%), a horizontal axially symmetrical oval-shaped dome (15 eyes, 53.5%), or a vertical axially symmetrical oval-shaped dome (five eyes, 17.8%). The macular bulge height was significantly greater in horizontal oval-shaped dome eyes (p = 0.01, for each comparison). Inferior posterior staphylomas were observed in ten (3.8%) of the 260 pathologically myopic eyes with asymmetrical macular bends. Vertical and horizontal OCT sectional scanning in combination with three-dimensional macular map reconstruction provides important information for understanding the posterior anatomical structure of dome-shaped macula and inferior staphyloma in pathologically myopic eyes.

  12. Three-dimensional computations of the hydrodynamics and mass transfer during solution growth of KDP crystal with a planetary motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhitao; Li, Mingwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhou, Chuan; Yin, Huawei

    2017-09-01

    Computational analysis of the three-dimensional flow and mass transfer involved in the growth of KDP crystal with a planetary motion (PM) was conducted, in which the crystal executes an orbital revolution with a constant revolution rate during its self-rotation together with periodically changing the direction of crystal rotation. Compared with the conventional KDP growth method which conducts centric rotation (CR), this new configuration can avoid the sharp fluctuation of surface supersaturation during the phases of crystal spin down, stalling and spin up, and brings about an oscillatory fluid field during the steady self-rotation phase, all of that being able to promote the morphological stability of the growing crystal. By increasing the self-rotation rate, the frequency of the oscillatory fluid field will increase, and the morphological stability will be enhanced. The time-averaged supersaturation fields of the crystal surfaces are obtained, which are greatly affected by the orbital revolution rate and the orbital radius. For a higher orbital revolution rate or larger orbital radius, higher time-averaged value and better homogeneity of the surface supersaturation could be obtained.

  13. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 1: Analysis description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D has been developed to solve the three dimensional, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort has been to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation have been emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized non-orthogonal body-fitted coordinates by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the Analysis Description, and presents the equations and solution procedure. It describes in detail the governing equations, the turbulence model, the linearization of the equations and boundary conditions, the time and space differencing formulas, the ADI solution procedure, and the artificial viscosity models.

  14. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 3: Programmer's reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D was developed to solve the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. The Programmer's Reference contains detailed information useful when modifying the program. The program structure, the Fortran variables stored in common blocks, and the details of each subprogram are described.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Three-Dimensional Unsteady Turbulent Flow and Excitation Force in Partial Admission Air Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Air turbines are widely used to convert kinetic energy into power output in power engineering. The unsteady performance of air turbines with partial admission not only influences the aerodynamic performance and thermodynamic efficiency of turbine but also generates strong excitation force on blades to impair the turbine safely operating. Based on three-dimensional viscous compressible Navier-stokes equations, the present study employs RNG (Renormalization group k-ε turbulence model with finite volume discretization on air turbine with partial admission. Numerical models of four different admission rates with full annulus are built and analyzed via CFD (computational fluid dynamics modeling unsteady flows. Results indicate that the unsteady time-averaged isentropic efficiency is lower than the steady isentropic efficiency, and this difference rises as unsteady isentropic efficiency fluctuates stronger when the admission rate is reduced. The rotor axial and tangential forces with time are provided for all four admission rates. The low frequency excitation forces generated by partial admission are extraordinarily higher than the high frequency excitation forces by stator wakes.

  16. Assessment and virtual redesign of a manual handling workstation by computer-aided three-dimensional interactive application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Mansour; Ziaei, Hojjat; Hosseini, Seyed Younes; Gharagozlou, Faramarz; Keikhamoghaddam, Ali Akbar; Laybidi, Marzieh Izadi; Moradinazar, Mehdi

    2017-06-01

    Manual handling of bags which imposes frequent forces and stresses on body parts is a common task that many workers have to perform every day. The present study aimed to assess the postural risk and imposed forces due to manual handling and loading of sugar bags. This study was conducted on male warehouse workers of a sugar manufacturing plant. Rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) was used to assess the risks of awkward postures and computer-aided three-dimensional interactive application to estimate the forces and moments. RULA final scores were estimated to be 7 and 3 before and after the virtual redesign, respectively. Postures B and E obtained the highest compression forces and moments. The compression forces were higher than the action limit (AL) in all postures before the redesign and exceeded the maximum permissible limit (MPL) in posture E. After the redesign, these forces were reduced below the AL and MPL. Moreover, the shearing forces were lower than the AL and MPL in all postures. The main risk factors were heavy weight and poor control of sugar bags. Virtual redesign can diminish bending and twisting postures, and, therefore, some resulting forces and moments.

  17. Computed tomography status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  18. Measurement accuracy of foramen of vesalius for safe percutaneous techniques using computer-assisted three-dimensional landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Govsa, Figen

    2014-03-01

    The presence and description of anatomical findings about the foramen of Vesalius (FV) is important in the surgical procedure on the trigeminal nerve and/or trigeminal ganglion. This is an evaluation area for percutaneous techniques. A morphological analysis of the FVs was made in a total of 344 sides of the basis cranii of adult skulls by computerized photogrammetry using standardized digital photographs. The FV was identified in 60 specimens (34.8%). The FV was observed to be present bilaterally in 16 specimens (9.3%). The incidence of unilateral FV was 25.5% of the skulls, of which in 26 specimens (15.1%) it occurred on the left side, and in 18 specimens (10.4%) on the right side. The FV was observed to present a double opening in two specimens. The diameters of the FV were found to be 0.86 ± 0.21 (right) and 1.07 ± 0.37 mm (left). The incidence of openings with a diameter of FV 0.5 mm or more was found to be 45%. The area of the FV was calculated as 1.09 ± 0.51, and 1.4 ± 0.83 mm(2) on the right and the left, respectively. The mean distances of FV to the foramen ovale were measured as 2.30 ± 1.14 mm (right) and 2.46 ± 0.89 mm (left). The mean distances of FV to foramen spinosum were found to be 10.76 ± 1.26 mm (right) and 10.42 ± 1.29 mm (left). The findings suggest that the diameter of FV as <0.5 mm was safer to work with, while the opening types bigger than 0.5 mm opening types were highly risky for percutaneous techniques on the foramen ovale. In our study, a clear standardization has been achieved. The findings were the data obtained through computer-assisted three dimensional landmarks, appropriate for use in three dimensional planning.

  19. High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) for three dimensional tomographic imaging of the small animal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojević, Tanja; Varma, Hari M; Hollmann, Joseph L; Valdes, Claudia P; Culver, Joseph P; Justicia, Carles; Durduran, Turgut

    2017-06-01

    High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) utilizing tens of thousands of source-detector pairs, was developed for in vivo imaging of blood flow in small animals. The reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) due to local ischemic stroke in a mouse brain was transcanially imaged and reconstructed in three dimensions. The reconstructed volume was then compared with corresponding magnetic resonance images demonstrating that the volume of reduced CBF agrees with the infarct zone at twenty-four hours. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mathematics of Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, William Grant

    A review of the applications of the Radon transform is presented, with emphasis on emission computed tomography and transmission computed tomography. The theory of the 2D and 3D Radon transforms, and the effects of attenuation for emission computed tomography are presented. The algebraic iterative methods, their importance and limitations are reviewed. Analytic solutions of the 2D problem the convolution and frequency filtering methods based on linear shift invariant theory, and the solution of the circular harmonic decomposition by integral transform theory--are reviewed. The relation between the invisible kernels, the inverse circular harmonic transform, and the consistency conditions are demonstrated. The discussion and review are extended to the 3D problem-convolution, frequency filtering, spherical harmonic transform solutions, and consistency conditions. The Cormack algorithm based on reconstruction with Zernike polynomials is reviewed. An analogous algorithm and set of reconstruction polynomials is developed for the spherical harmonic transform. The relations between the consistency conditions, boundary conditions and orthogonal basis functions for the 2D projection harmonics are delineated and extended to the 3D case. The equivalence of the inverse circular harmonic transform, the inverse Radon transform, and the inverse Cormack transform is presented. The use of the number of nodes of a projection harmonic as a filter is discussed. Numerical methods for the efficient implementation of angular harmonic algorithms based on orthogonal functions and stable recursion are presented. The derivation of a lower bound for the signal-to-noise ratio of the Cormack algorithm is derived.

  1. Validation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional measurements of subpleural alveolar size parameters by optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglert, Carolin I; Warger, William C; Hostens, Jeroen; Namati, Eman; Birngruber, Reginald; Bouma, Brett E; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2012-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been increasingly used for imaging pulmonary alveoli. Only a few studies, however, have quantified individual alveolar areas, and the validity of alveolar volumes represented within OCT images has not been shown. To validate quantitative measurements of alveoli from OCT images, we compared the cross-sectional area, perimeter, volume, and surface area of matched subpleural alveoli from microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and OCT images of fixed air-filled swine samples. The relative change in size between different alveoli was extremely well correlated (r>0.9, P<0.0001), but OCT images underestimated absolute sizes compared to micro-CT by 27% (area), 7% (perimeter), 46% (volume), and 25% (surface area) on average. We hypothesized that the differences resulted from refraction at the tissue-air interfaces and developed a ray-tracing model that approximates the reconstructed alveolar size within OCT images. Using this model and OCT measurements of the refractive index for lung tissue (1.41 for fresh, 1.53 for fixed), we derived equations to obtain absolute size measurements of superellipse and circular alveoli with the use of predictive correction factors. These methods and results should enable the quantification of alveolar sizes from OCT images in vivo.

  2. High-resolution computer-generated reflection holograms with three-dimensional effects written directly on a silicon surface by a femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wædegaard, Kristian J; Balling, Peter

    2011-02-14

    An infrared femtosecond laser has been used to write computer-generated holograms directly on a silicon surface. The high resolution offered by short-pulse laser ablation is employed to write highly detailed holograms with resolution up to 111 kpixels/mm2. It is demonstrated how three-dimensional effects can be realized in computer-generated holograms. Three-dimensional effects are visualized as a relative motion between different parts of the holographic reconstruction, when the hologram is moved relative to the reconstructing laser beam. Potential security applications are briefly discussed.

  3. Three-dimensional spiral computed tomographic cysto-urethrography for post-traumatic complex posterior urethral strictures associated with urethral-rectal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Ying Long; Xu, Yue Min; Feng, Chao; Ye, Xu Xiao; Song, Lu Jie

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the value of three-dimensional spiral computed tomography/cysto-urethrography (CTCUG) in diagnosing posterior urethral strictures associated with urethrorectal fistulas (URF). Between June 2008 and March 2012, 38 patients with posterior urethral strictures associated with URFs were examined by CTCUG, retrograde urethrography (RUG) and cysto-urethrography (CUG). Urethral reconstruction was undertaken and URFs were surgically repaired in all patients. The length of the urethral defect, location and size of URFs were recorded. Data from radiological examinations were compared with surgical findings. No statistically significant difference was found in the length of stricture measured using CTCUG (4.31 ± 2.28 cm) or conventional urethrography (4.02 ± 3.12 cm; p > 0.05), However, the accuracy in determining the location of the stricture was higher with CTCUG (93.12%) than with conventional urethrography (70.59%; p < 0.05). CTCUG identified URFs in all 38 patients (100%), whereas URFs were only observed in 27 patients (71%) using conventional urethrography. In conclusion, CTCUG was more accurate, safer and provided more details of URFs and urethral defects than conventional urethrography in patients with posterior urethral strictures associated with URFs.

  4. Three-dimensional micro-level computational study of Wolff's law via trabecular bone remodeling in the human proximal femur using design space topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Christopher; Kim, Il Yong

    2011-03-15

    The law of bone remodeling, commonly referred to as Wolff's Law, asserts that the internal trabecular bone adapts to external loadings, reorienting with the principal stress trajectories to maximize mechanical efficiency creating a naturally optimum structure. The goal of the current study was to utilize an advanced structural optimization algorithm, called design space optimization (DSO), to perform a micro-level three-dimensional finite element bone remodeling simulation on the human proximal femur and analyse the results to determine the validity of Wolff's hypothesis. DSO optimizes the layout of material by iteratively distributing it into the areas of highest loading, while simultaneously changing the design domain to increase computational efficiency. The result is a "fully stressed" structure with minimized compliance and increased stiffness. The large-scale computational simulation utilized a 175 μm mesh resolution and the routine daily loading activities of walking and stair climbing. The resulting anisotropic trabecular architecture was compared to both Wolff's trajectory hypothesis and natural femur samples from literature using a variety of visualization techniques, including radiography and computed tomography (CT). The results qualitatively revealed several anisotropic trabecular regions, that were comparable to the natural human femurs. Quantitatively, the various regional bone volume fractions from the computational results were consistent with quantitative CT analyses. The global strain energy proceeded to become more uniform during optimization; implying increased mechanical efficiency was achieved. The realistic simulated trabecular geometry suggests that the DSO method can accurately predict bone adaptation due to mechanical loading and that the proximal femur is an optimum structure as the Wolff hypothesized. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in three-dimensional brain positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H; Slosman, D O

    2003-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction represents an essential component of the long chain of modules required for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative brain positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this work we demonstrate the proof of principle of segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in 3D brain PET. We have developed a method for attenuation correction based on registered T1-weighted MRI, eliminating the need of an additional transmission (TX) scan. The MR images were realigned to preliminary reconstructions of PET data using an automatic algorithm and then segmented by means of a fuzzy clustering technique which identifies tissues of significantly different density and composition. The voxels belonging to different regions were classified into air, skull, brain tissue and nasal sinuses. These voxels were then assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients as reported in the ICRU 44 report followed by Gaussian smoothing and additio...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed ... been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed ... been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  9. SEISMIC SIMULATIONS USING PARALLEL COMPUTING AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL EARTH MODELS TO IMPROVE NUCLEAR EXPLOSION PHENOMENOLOGY AND MONITORING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A; Matzel, E; Pasyanos, M; Petersson, A; Sjogreen, B; Bono, C; Vorobiev, O; Antoun, T; Walter, W; Myers, S; Lomov, I

    2008-07-07

    The development of accurate numerical methods to simulate wave propagation in three-dimensional (3D) earth models and advances in computational power offer exciting possibilities for modeling the motions excited by underground nuclear explosions. This presentation will describe recent work to use new numerical techniques and parallel computing to model earthquakes and underground explosions to improve understanding of the wave excitation at the source and path-propagation effects. Firstly, we are using the spectral element method (SEM, SPECFEM3D code of Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002) to model earthquakes and explosions at regional distances using available 3D models. SPECFEM3D simulates anelastic wave propagation in fully 3D earth models in spherical geometry with the ability to account for free surface topography, anisotropy, ellipticity, rotation and gravity. Results show in many cases that 3D models are able to reproduce features of the observed seismograms that arise from path-propagation effects (e.g. enhanced surface wave dispersion, refraction, amplitude variations from focusing and defocusing, tangential component energy from isotropic sources). We are currently investigating the ability of different 3D models to predict path-specific seismograms as a function of frequency. A number of models developed using a variety of methodologies are available for testing. These include the WENA/Unified model of Eurasia (e.g. Pasyanos et al 2004), the global CUB 2.0 model (Shapiro and Ritzwoller, 2002), the partitioned waveform model for the Mediterranean (van der Lee et al., 2007) and stochastic models of the Yellow Sea Korean Peninsula region (Pasyanos et al., 2006). Secondly, we are extending our Cartesian anelastic finite difference code (WPP of Nilsson et al., 2007) to model the effects of free-surface topography. WPP models anelastic wave propagation in fully 3D earth models using mesh refinement to increase computational speed and improve memory efficiency. Thirdly

  10. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield

  11. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, Chennai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-09-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  13. Unscented Kalman filter approach to tracking a moving interfacial boundary in sedimentation processes using three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambampati, Anil Kumar; Rashid, Ahmar; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Kim, Sin; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Kim, Kyung Youn

    2009-08-13

    The monitoring of solid-fluid suspensions under the influence of gravity is widely used in industrial processes. By considering sedimentation layers with different electrical properties, non-invasive methods such as electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can be used to estimate the settling curves and velocities. In recent EIT studies, the problem of estimating the locations of phase interfaces and phase conductivities has been treated as a nonlinear state estimation problem and the extended Kalman filter (EKF) has been successfully applied. However, the EKF is based on a Gaussian assumption and requires a linearized measurement model. The linearization (or derivation of the Jacobian) is possible when there are no discontinuities in the system. Furthermore, having a complex phase interface representation makes derivation of the Jacobian a tedious task. Therefore, in this paper, we explore the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) as an alternative approach for estimating phase interfaces and conductivities in sedimentation processes. The UKF uses a nonlinear measurement model and is therefore more accurate. In order to justify the proposed approach, extensive numerical experiments have been performed and a comparative analysis with the EKF is provided.

  14. Three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the Bohemian Massif from Bayesian ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentová, Lubica; Gallovič, František; Maierová, Petra

    2017-10-01

    We perform two-step surface wave tomography of phase-velocity dispersion curves obtained by ambient noise cross-correlations in the Bohemian Massif. In the first step, the inter-station dispersion curves were inverted for each period (ranging between 4 and 20 s) separately into phase-velocity maps using 2D adjoint method. In the second step, we perform Bayesian inversion of the set of the phase-velocity maps into an S-wave velocity model. To sample the posterior probability density function, the parallel tempering algorithm is employed providing over 1 million models. From the model samples, not only mean model but also its uncertainty is determined to appraise the reliable features. The model is correlated with known main geologic structures of the Bohemian Massif. The uppermost low-velocity anomalies are in agreement with thick sedimentary basins. In deeper parts (4-20 km), the S-wave velocity anomalies correspond, in general, to main tectonic domains of the Bohemian Massif. The exception is a stable low-velocity body in the middle of the high-velocity Moldanubian domain and high-velocity body resembling a promontory of the Moldanubian into the Teplá-Barrandian domain. The most pronounced (high-velocity) anomaly is located beneath the Eger Rift that is a part of a Tertiary rift system across Europe.

  15. Three-dimensional, time-resolved profiling of ferroelectric domain wall dynamics by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haussmann, Alexander; Schmidt, Sebastian; Wehmeier, Lukas; Eng, Lukas M. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute of Applied Physics and Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed), Dresden (Germany); Kirsten, Lars; Cimalla, Peter; Koch, Edmund [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    We apply here spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for the precise detection and temporal tracking of ferroelectric domain walls (DWs) in magnesium-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (Mg:PPLN). We reproducibly map static DWs at an axial (depth) resolution down to ∝ 0.6 μm, being located up to 0.5 mm well inside the single crystalline Mg:PPLN sample. We show that a full 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the DW geometry is possible from the collected data, when applying a special algorithm that accounts for the nonlinear optical dispersion of the material. Our OCT investigation provides valuable reference information on the DWs' polarization charge distribution, which is known to be the key to the electrical conductivity of ferroelectric DWs in such systems. Hence, we carefully analyze the SD-OCT signal dependence both when varying the direction of incident polarization, and when applying electrical fields along the polar axis. Surprisingly, the large backreflection intensities recorded under extraordinary polarization are not affected by any electrical field, at least for field strengths below the switching threshold, while no significant signals above noise floor are detected under ordinary polarization. Finally, we employed the high-speed SD-OCT setup for the real-time DW tracking upon ferroelectric domain switching under high external fields. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Three-dimensional computer model of the right atrium including the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes predicts classical nodal behaviours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Li

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D anatomically-detailed model of the rabbit right atrium containing the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes to study the electrophysiology of the nodes. A model was generated based on 3D images of a rabbit heart (atria and part of ventricles, obtained using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Segmentation was carried out semi-manually. A 3D right atrium array model (∼3.16 million elements, including eighteen objects, was constructed. For description of cellular electrophysiology, the Rogers-modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model was further modified to allow control of the major characteristics of the action potential with relatively low computational resource requirements. Model parameters were chosen to simulate the action potentials in the sinoatrial node, atrial muscle, inferior nodal extension and penetrating bundle. The block zone was simulated as passive tissue. The sinoatrial node, crista terminalis, main branch and roof bundle were considered as anisotropic. We have simulated normal and abnormal electrophysiology of the two nodes. In accordance with experimental findings: (i during sinus rhythm, conduction occurs down the interatrial septum and into the atrioventricular node via the fast pathway (conduction down the crista terminalis and into the atrioventricular node via the slow pathway is slower; (ii during atrial fibrillation, the sinoatrial node is protected from overdrive by its long refractory period; and (iii during atrial fibrillation, the atrioventricular node reduces the frequency of action potentials reaching the ventricles. The model is able to simulate ventricular echo beats. In summary, a 3D anatomical model of the right atrium containing the cardiac conduction system is able to simulate a wide range of classical nodal behaviours.

  17. X-ray computed microtomography of three-dimensional microcracks and self-healing in engineered cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuai; Li, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Concrete cracking and deterioration can potentially be addressed by innovative self-healing cementitious materials, which can autogenously regain transport properties and mechanical characteristics after the damage self-healing process. For the development of such materials, it is crucial, but challenging, to precisely characterize the extent and quality of self-healing due to a variety of factors. This study adopted x-ray computed microtomography (μCT) to derive three-dimensional morphological data on microcracks before and after healing in engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were also used to morphologically and chemically analyze the healing products. This work showed that the evolution of the microcrack 3D structure due to self-healing in cementitious materials can be directly and quantitatively characterized by μCT. A detailed description of the μCT image analysis method applied to ECC self-healing was presented. The results revealed that the self-healing extent and rate strongly depended on initial surface crack width, with smaller crack width favoring fast and robust self-healing. We also found that the self-healing mechanism in cementitious materials is dependent on crack depth. The region of a crack close to the surface (from 0 to around 50-150 μm below the surface) can be sealed quickly with crystalline precipitates. However, at greater depths the healing process inside the crack takes a significantly longer time to occur, with healing products more likely resulting from continued hydration and pozzolanic reactions. Finally, the μCT method was compared with other self-healing characterization methods, with discussions on its importance in generating new scientific knowledge for the development of robust self-healing cementitious materials.

  18. Telehealth in Schools Using a Systematic Educational Model Based on Fiction Screenplays, Interactive Documentaries, and Three-Dimensional Computer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Diogo Julien; Wen, Chao Lung

    2017-07-18

    Preliminary studies suggest the need of a global vision in academic reform, leading to education re-invention. This would include problem-based education using transversal topics, developing of thinking skills, social interaction, and information-processing skills. We aimed to develop a new educational model in health with modular components to be broadcast and applied as a tele-education course. We developed a systematic model based on a "Skills and Goals Matrix" to adapt scientific contents on fictional screenplays, three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics of the human body, and interactive documentaries. We selected 13 topics based on youth vulnerabilities in Brazil to be disseminated through a television show with 15 episodes. We developed scientific content for each theme, naturally inserting it into screenplays, together with 3D sequences and interactive documentaries. The modular structure was then adapted to a distance-learning course. The television show was broadcast on national television for two consecutive years to an estimated audience of 30 million homes, and ever since on an Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) channel. It was also reorganized as a tele-education course for 2 years, reaching 1,180 subscriptions from all 27 Brazilian states, resulting in 240 graduates. Positive results indicate the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a model of modular entertainment audio-visual productions using health and education integrated concepts. This structure also allowed the model to be interconnected with other sources and applied as tele-education course, educating, informing, and stimulating the behavior change. Future works should reinforce this joint structure of telehealth, communication, and education.

  19. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  20. Toward computerized morphometric facilities: a review of 58 software packages for computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction, quantification, and picture generation from parallel serial sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijsmans, D. P.; Lamers, W. H.; Los, J. A.; Strackee, J.

    1986-01-01

    This review gives an inventory of 58 computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction applications in the domain of biomedical research. It is devoted to the formulation of a set of recommendations thought to be necessary for improved performance of software packages in this field. These

  1. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. [Computed tomography of pneumoconiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Kusaka, Y; Ishii, Y

    1995-09-01

    This review describes the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in image evaluation in pneumoconiosis. For pneumoconiosis, in the same way as for other diffuse lung diseases, conventional CT includes 10 mm collimation scans at 1 cm intervals from the apex to the base of the lung, whereas HRCT uses five to six 1.2 to 3 mm collimation scans at predetermined representative locations including the aortic arch, the tracheal carina, and 2 cm above the dome of the right hemidiaphragm. The CT scans are performed in the supine position in silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis, and both in the supine and prone position in asbestosis. In silicosis, CT is superior to chest radiography in detecting coalescence of nodules and early stage formation of large opacities. There are good correlations between HRCT findings and histological changes, especially in secondary pulmonary lobules. With HRCT, small nodules are found to be located in the center of the secondary pulmonary lobule in silicotic lungs. The mild emphysematous change associated with silicosis can also be found with HRCT. In coal workers' pneumoconiosis, the HRCT is useful in detecting nodules located in the subpleural and fissural subpleural areas. In asbestosis, the conventional CT can detect pleural plaques more sensitively than chest radiography. HRCT is also especially useful in detecting earlier fibrotic change in asbestosis in lung parenchyma, apparent as subpleural lines, parenchymal bands, subpleural curvilinear line shadows and so on.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Combining Coherent Hard X-Ray Tomographies with Phase Retrieval to Generate Three-Dimensional Models of Forming Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emely L. Bortel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Holotomography, a phase-sensitive synchrotron-based (µCT modality, is a quantitative 3D imaging method. By exploiting partial spatial X-ray coherence, bones can be imaged volumetrically with high resolution coupled with impressive density sensitivity. This tomographic method reveals the main characteristics of the important tissue compartments in forming bones, including the rapidly changing soft tissue and the partially or fully mineralized bone regions, while revealing subtle density differences in 3D. Here, we show typical results observed within the growing femur bone midshafts of healthy mice that are 1, 3, 7, 10, and 14 days old (postpartum. Our results make use of partially coherent synchrotron radiation employing inline Fresnel propagation in multiple tomographic datasets obtained in the imaging beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The exquisite detail creates maps of the juxtaposed soft, partially mineralized and highly mineralized bone revealing the environment in which bone cells create and shape the matrix. This high-resolution 3D data can be used to create detailed computational models to study the dynamic processes involved in bone tissue formation and adaptation. Such data can enhance our understanding of the important biomechanical interactions directing maturation and shaping of the bone micro- and macro-geometries.

  4. Computational solutions of three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation using fourth order time efficient alternating direction implicit scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Muhammad; Hasnain, Shahid; Mashat, Daoud Suleiman

    2017-08-01

    To develop an efficient numerical scheme for three-dimensional advection diffusion equation, higher order ADI method was proposed. 2nd and fourth order ADI schemes were used to handle such problem. Von Neumann stability analysis shows that Alternating Direction Implicit scheme is unconditionally stable. The accuracy and efficiency of such schemes was depicted by two test problems. Numerical results for two test problems were carried out to establish the performance of the given method and to compare it with the others Typical methods. Fourth order ADI method were found to be very efficient and stable for solving three dimensional Advection Diffusion Equation. The proposed methods can be implemented for solving non-linear problems arising in engineering and physics.

  5. Proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

  6. Metrizamide computed tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, T.; Tamakawa, Y.; Arii, H. (Akita Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, M.; Hirota, K.

    1981-11-01

    Serial computed tomography of the cervical cord was performed following metrizamide myelography in five cases of clinically suspected syringomyelia. The syrinx filled with refluxed metrizamide was demonstrated in all of the cases. The reflux of metrizamide into the syrinx was most marked several hours following intrathecal injection of metrizamide. Computed tomography combined with metrizamide myelography is essential in the diagnosis of communicating syringomyelia.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ...

  8. Three-dimensional characterization of Gd nanoparticles using STEM-in-SEM tomography in a dual-beam FIB-SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leer, Brandon; Bouchet-Marquis, Cedric; Cheng, Huikai

    2015-10-01

    Serial sectioning using the FIB and subsequent imaging of the same FIB-exposed surface by both FIB microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a DualBeam has proven especially useful to study the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of complex engineered materials systems. The technique was first introduced as an automated process in 2004 and since then has established itself as one of the primary applications for FIB and DualBeams. While state-of-the-art systems can produce datasets with a z-axis slice thickness of 3-5 nm, FIB nanotomography remains a destructive technique and is limited in resolution by the z-axis slice thickness. Electron tomography is another technique used to visualize 3D structures within a transmission electron microscope used in TEM or STEM mode. Using a thin sample focused on a region of interest, the electron beam passes through the specimen incrementally tilting around the center of the region of interest as images are acquired sequentially on a camera (TEM) or a Detector (STEM). The resulting images are reconstructed into a 3D volume using a variety of algorithms including Weighted Back Projection (WBP), or Serial Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). Low energy STEM in SEM is a routine analysis in SEMs and DualBeam FIB-SEM instrumentation for morphological characterization and ultra high-resolution imaging. With a DualBeam or SEM configured with a solid state silicon diode STEM detector and a stage with adequate tilt freedom, it is possible to acquire a sufficient number of images for 3D reconstruction using STEM tomography in SEMs and DualBeam instruments. A thin section sample of gadolinium nanoparticles ranging in size up to 50 nm mounted on an aluminum substrate was prepared using in-situ lift-out (INLO) by FIB. The sample was thinned using 30 kV Ga+ FIB to approximately 125 nm. Using an in-situ stage with 360 degree continuous tilt, the thin section was imaged every 1 degree with 30 keV SEM and the STEM detector through

  9. Evaluation of the usefulness of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Lee, Jang Woo; Cho, Jin-ho; Kim, Jeehyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advanced significantly over the past two decades and is currently used extensively to monitor the internal structures of organs, particularly in ophthalmology and dermatology. We used ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) to decalcify the bony walls of the cochlea and investigated the inner structures by deep penetration of light into the cochlear tissue using OCT on a guinea pig model of endolymphatic hydrops (EH), induced by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct. The structural and functional changes associated with EH were identified using OCT and auditory brainstem response tests, respectively. We also evaluated structural alterations in the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction of the OCT images, which clearly showed physical changes in the cochlear structures. Furthermore, we found significant anatomical variations in the EH model and conducted graphical analysis by strial atrophy for comparison. The physical changes included damage to and flattening of the organ of Corti-evidence of Reissner's membrane distention-and thinning of the lateral wall. These results indicate that observation of EDTA-decalcified cochlea using OCT is significant in examination of gradual changes in the cochlear structures that are otherwise not depicted by hematoxylin and eosin staining.

  10. Three-dimensional shapes and distribution of FePd nanoparticles observed by electron tomography using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhisa; Aoyagi, Kenta; Konno, Toyohiko J.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied three-dimensional shapes and distribution of FePd nanoparticles, prepared by electron beam deposition and postdeposition annealing, by means of single-axis tilt tomography using atomic number contrasts obtained by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Particle size, shape, and locations were reconstructed by weighted backprojection (WBP), as well as by simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). We have also estimated the particle size by simple extrapolation of tilt-series original data sets, which proved to be quite powerful. The results of the two algorithms for reconstruction have been compared quantitatively with those obtained by the extrapolation method and those independently reported by electron holography. It was found that the reconstructed intensity map by WBP contains a small amount of dotlike artifacts, which do not exist in the results by SIRT, and that the particle surface obtained by WBP is rougher than that by SIRT. We demonstrate, on the other hand, that WBP yields a better estimation of the particle size in the z direction than SIRT does, most likely due to the presence of a "missing wedge" in the original data set.

  11. Three-Dimensional Morphometric Analysis of the Iris by Swept-Source Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography in a Caucasian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Alessandro; Giardini, Piero; Cigada, Mario; Viola, Francesco; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed by swept-source anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SS-ASOCT) the three-dimensional iris morphology in a Caucasian population, and correlated the findings with iris color, iris sectors, subject age, and sex. One eye each from consecutive healthy emmetropic (refractive spherical equivalent ± 3 diopters) volunteers were selected for the study. The enrolled eye underwent standardized anterior segment photography to assess iris color. Iris images were assessed by SS-ASOCT for volume, thickness, width, and pupil size. Sectoral variations of morphometric data among the superior, nasal, inferior, and temporal sectors were recorded. A total of 135 eyes from 57 males and 78 females, age 49 ± 17 years, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All iris morphometric parameters varied significantly among the different sectors (all P pupil diameter was influenced by iris color. Age did not affect iris volume or thickness; iris width increased and pupil diameter decreased with age (rs = 0.52, rs = -0.58, respectively). There was no effect of sex on iris volume, thickness, or pupil diameter; iris width was significantly greater in males (P = 0.007). Morphology of the iris varied by iris sector, and iris color was associated with differences in iris volume and thickness. Morphological parameter variations associated with iris color, sector, age, and sex can be used to identify pathological changes in suspect eyes. To be effective in clinical settings, construction of iris morphological databases for different ethnic and racial populations is essential.

  12. Three-dimensional anterior segment imaging in patients with type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis with switchable full depth range swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortés, Dennis E.; Werner, John S.; Mannis, Mark J.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-08-01

    A high-speed (100 kHz A-scans/s) complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system using coherence revival of the light source is suitable for dense three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the anterior segment. The short acquisition time helps to minimize the influence of motion artifacts. The extended depth range of the SS-OCT system allows topographic analysis of clinically relevant images of the entire depth of the anterior segment of the eye. Patients with the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) require evaluation of the full anterior segment depth. Current commercially available OCT systems are not suitable for this application due to limited acquisition speed, resolution, and axial imaging range. Moreover, most commonly used research grade and some clinical OCT systems implement a commercially available SS (Axsun) that offers only 3.7 mm imaging range (in air) in its standard configuration. We describe implementation of a common swept laser with built-in k-clock to allow phase stable imaging in both low range and high range, 3.7 and 11.5 mm in air, respectively, without the need to build an external MZI k-clock. As a result, 3-D morphology of the KPro position with respect to the surrounding tissue could be investigated in vivo both at high resolution and with large depth range to achieve noninvasive and precise evaluation of success of the surgical procedure.

  13. Three-dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging and Treatment of Glaucomatous Optic Nerve Head Defects Associated with Schisis-like Maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztaş, Zafer; Menteş, Jale; Ateş, Halil; Nalçacı, Serhad

    2017-04-01

    We present the three-dimensional (3D) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings of schisis-like maculopathy associated with structural changes of the optic nerve (ON) head as well as the treatment outcomes of a case of advanced glaucoma. In addition to ophthalmological examination, B-scan and 3D-SD-OCT images of the ON head, peripapillary retina, and the macula were obtained. The B-scan images only detected typical retinoschisis findings. However, the 3D-SD-OCT images of the ON head revealed defects of various sizes, shapes, and depths at the outer wall of the prelaminar and laminar regions of the ON canal. The 3D images were able to establish that these defects were both adjacent to and interconnected with the retinal layers. The patient successfully received 3D-SD-OCT-guided thermal laser treatment that is used in congenital optic disc pits complicated with macular schisis. In brief, 3D-SD-OCT is very useful for demonstrating the ON head defects that can lead to schisis-like maculopathy in cases of advanced glaucoma.

  14. Three-dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging and Treatment of Glaucomatous Optic Nerve Head Defects Associated with Schisis-like Maculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Öztaş

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the three-dimensional (3D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings of schisis-like maculopathy associated with structural changes of the optic nerve (ON head as well as the treatment outcomes of a case of advanced glaucoma. In addition to ophthalmological examination, B-scan and 3D-SD-OCT images of the ON head, peripapillary retina, and the macula were obtained. The B-scan images only detected typical retinoschisis findings. However, the 3D-SD-OCT images of the ON head revealed defects of various sizes, shapes, and depths at the outer wall of the prelaminar and laminar regions of the ON canal. The 3D images were able to establish that these defects were both adjacent to and interconnected with the retinal layers. The patient successfully received 3D-SD-OCT-guided thermal laser treatment that is used in congenital optic disc pits complicated with macular schisis. In brief, 3D-SD-OCT is very useful for demonstrating the ON head defects that can lead to schisis-like maculopathy in cases of advanced glaucoma.

  15. Endodontic practice management with cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Priyank Sethi; Ritu Tiwari; Maneesha Das; Mahesh Pratap Singh; Manish Agarwal; Alfred Joseph Ravikumar

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, conventional periapical radiology formed the backbone of endodontics for diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. One of the major associated gripes being the technique created two-dimensional images of three-dimensional (3D) structures, suffered magnification, superimposition, and distortion, leading to compromised diagnostic information. The need to analyze the area of interest in all the possible planes led to the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), a...

  16. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  17. Evaluation of three-dimensional position change of the condylar head after orthognathic surgery using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-made condyle positioning jig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Mo; Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Tae-Yun; Choi, Jin-Young

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM/CAD)-made condyle positioning jig in orthognathic surgery. The sample consisted of 40 mandibular condyles of 20 patients with class III malocclusion who underwent bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy with semirigid fixation (6 men and 14 women; mean age, 25 y; mean amount of mandibular setback, 5.8 mm). Exclusion criteria were patients who needed surgical correction of the frontal ramal inclination and had signs and symptoms of the temporomandibular disorder before surgery. Three-dimensional computed tomograms were taken 1 month before the surgery (T1) and 1 day after the surgery (T2). The condylar position was evaluated at the T1 and T2 stages on the axial, frontal, and sagittal aspects in the three-dimensional coordinates. The linear change of the posterior border of the proximal segment of the ramus between T1 and T2 was also evaluated in 30 condyles (15 patients), with the exception of 10 condyles of 5 patients who received mandibular angle reduction surgery. There was no significant difference in the condylar position in the frontal and sagittal aspects (P > 0.05). Although there was a significant difference in the condylar position in the axial aspect (P change of the posterior border of the proximal segment of the ramus, the mean change was 1.4 mm and 60% of the samples showed a minimal change of less than 1 mm. The results of this study suggest that CAD/CAM-made condyle positioning jig is easy to install and reliable to use in orthognathic surgery.

  18. Pelvimetry by three-dimensional computed tomography in non-pregnant multiparous women who delivered vaginally

    OpenAIRE

    Salk, Ismail; Cetin, Ali; Salk, Sultan; CETIN, Meral

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We assessed retrospectively the reference values of pelvic dimensions by 3D CT performed for non-obstetrical indications in non-pregnant multiparous women with a successful vaginal delivery. We further aimed to evaluate the impact of maternal short stature on these parameters. Material/Methods The 3D CT pelvimetry was performed retrospectively in 203 non-pregnant women selected consecutively if they had at least one singleton term delivery with head presentation and if ther...

  19. Computer Simulation of Spatial Arrangement and Connectivity of Particles in Three-Dimensional Microstructure: Application to Model Electrical Conductivity of Polymer Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, P.; Gokhale, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Computer simulation is a powerful tool for analyzing the geometry of three-dimensional microstructure. A computer simulation model is developed to represent the three-dimensional microstructure of a two-phase particulate composite where particles may be in contact with one another but do not overlap significantly. The model is used to quantify the "connectedness" of the particulate phase of a polymer matrix composite containing hollow carbon particles in a dielectric polymer resin matrix. The simulations are utilized to estimate the morphological percolation volume fraction for electrical conduction, and the effective volume fraction of the particles that actually take part in the electrical conduction. The calculated values of the effective volume fraction are used as an input for a self-consistent physical model for electrical conductivity. The predicted values of electrical conductivity are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental data on a series of specimens having different particulate volume fraction.

  20. Three-dimensional stellarator codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, P R

    2002-08-06

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory.

  1. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  2. Intraoperative 3D Computed Tomography: Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczak, Stephanie E; Bova, Frank J; Hoh, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    Spinal instrumentation often involves placing implants without direct visualization of their trajectory or proximity to adjacent neurovascular structures. Two-dimensional fluoroscopy is commonly used to navigate implant placement, but with the advent of computed tomography, followed by the invention of a mobile scanner with an open gantry, three-dimensional (3D) navigation is now widely used. This article critically appraises the available literature to assess the influence of 3D navigation on radiation exposure, accuracy of instrumentation, operative time, and patient outcomes. Also explored is the latest technological advance in 3D neuronavigation: the manufacturing of, via 3D printers, patient-specific templates that direct implant placement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-dimensional diffusion of non-sorbing species in porous sandstone: computer simulation based on X-ray microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Koichi; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Ikeda, Susumu

    2004-10-01

    The diffusion pathways of porous sandstone were examined by a three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) using the SPring-8 (Super Photon ring-8 GeV, Hyogo, Japan) synchrotron radiation facility. The analysis was undertaken to develop better understanding of the diffusion pathways in natural rock as a key factor in clarifying the detailed mechanism of the diffusion of radionuclides and water molecules through the pore spaces of natural barriers in underground nuclear waste disposal facilities. A cylindrical sample (diameter 4 mm, length 6 mm) of sandstone (porosity 0.14) was imaged to obtain a 3-D image set of 450(3) voxels=2.62(3) mm(3). Through cluster-labeling analysis of the 3-D image set, it was revealed that 89% of the pore space forms a single large pore-cluster responsible for macroscopic diffusive transport, while only 11% of the pore space is made up of isolated pores that are not involved in long-range diffusive transport. Computer simulations of the 3-D diffusion of non-sorbing random walkers in the largest pore cluster were performed to calculate the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore, tortuosity (diffusion coefficient in free space divided by that in porous rock). The results showed that (i) the simulated surface-to-volume ratio is about 60% of the results obtained by conventional pulsed-field-gradient proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) laboratory experiments and (ii) the simulated tortuosity is five to seven times larger than the results of laboratory diffusion experiments using non-sorbing I(-) and Br(-). These discrepancies are probably attributed to the intrinsic sample heterogeneity and limited spatial resolution of the CT system. The permeability was also estimated based on the NMR diffusometry theory using the results of the random walk simulations via the Kozeny-Carman equation. The estimated permeability involved an error of about 20% compared with the permeability measured by the conventional

  4. Computational Approach for Improving Three-Dimensional Sub-Surface Earth Structure for Regional Earthquake Hazard Simulations in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-25

    In our Exascale Computing Project (ECP) we seek to simulate earthquake ground motions at much higher frequency than is currently possible. Previous simulations in the SFBA were limited to 0.5-1 Hz or lower (Aagaard et al. 2008, 2010), while we have recently simulated the response to 5 Hz. In order to improve confidence in simulated ground motions, we must accurately represent the three-dimensional (3D) sub-surface material properties that govern seismic wave propagation over a broad region. We are currently focusing on the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) with a Cartesian domain of size 120 x 80 x 35 km, but this area will be expanded to cover a larger domain. Currently, the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) has a 3D model of the SFBA for seismic simulations. However, this model suffers from two serious shortcomings relative to our application: 1) it does not fit most of the available low frequency (< 1 Hz) seismic waveforms from moderate (magnitude M 3.5-5.0) earthquakes; and 2) it is represented with much lower resolution than necessary for the high frequency simulations (> 5 Hz) we seek to perform. The current model will serve as a starting model for full waveform tomography based on 3D sensitivity kernels. This report serves as the deliverable for our ECP FY2017 Quarter 4 milestone to FY 2018 “Computational approach to developing model updates”. We summarize the current state of 3D seismic simulations in the SFBA and demonstrate the performance of the USGS 3D model for a few selected paths. We show the available open-source waveform data sets for model updates, based on moderate earthquakes recorded in the region. We present a plan for improving the 3D model utilizing the available data and further development of our SW4 application. We project how the model could be improved and present options for further improvements focused on the shallow geotechnical layers using dense passive recordings of ambient and human-induced noise.

  5. Three-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis and Microcomputed Tomography Evaluation of Microgap Formation in a Dental Implant Under Oblique Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörn, Daniela; Kohorst, Philipp; Besdo, Silke; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch, Meike

    2016-01-01

    Since bacterial leakage along the implant-abutment interface may be responsible for peri-implant infections, a realistic estimation of the interface gap width during function is important for risk assessment. The purpose of this study was to compare two methods for investigating microgap formation in a loaded dental implant, namely, microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA); additionally, stresses to be expected during loading were also evaluated by FEA. An implant-abutment complex was inspected for microgaps between the abutment and implant in a micro-CT scanner under an oblique load of 200 N. A numerical model of the situation was constructed; boundary conditions and external load were defined according to the experiment. The model was refined stepwise until its load-displacement behavior corresponded sufficiently to data from previous load experiments. FEA of the final, validated model was used to determine microgap widths. These were compared with the widths as measured in micro-CT inspection. Finally, stress distributions were evaluated in selected regions. No microgaps wider than 13 μm could be detected by micro-CT for the loaded implant. FEA revealed gap widths up to 10 μm between the implant and abutment at the side of load application. Furthermore, FEA predicted plastic deformation in a limited area at the implant collar. FEA proved to be an adequate method for studying microgap formation in dental implant-abutment complexes. FEA is not limited in gap width resolution as are radiologic techniques and can also provide insight into stress distributions within the loaded complex.

  6. Optical projection tomography can be used to investigate spatial distribution of chondrocytes in three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Elina; Muhonen, Virpi; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been used in autologous chondrocyte implantation to facilitate the repair of large lesions and to advance the formation of articular cartilage [Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood) 237(1) (2012), 10-17]. Biomaterial scaffolds are usually three-dimensional (3-D) porous structures consisting of biodegradable materials to support articular cartilage formation. Adequate porosity of the scaffold is necessary for uniform cell distribution and cell attachment, and the density of the cells in the scaffold should be appropriate for cartilage formation [Cartilage 3(2) (2012), 108-117]. There have been only a restricted number of studies on the spatial distribution of cells in scaffolds, and on the role of this to cartilage formation [J. Biotechnol. 129 (2007), 516-531; Biotechnol. Progr. 14 (1998), 193-202; Biotechnol. Bioeng. 84 (2003), 205-214]. This may be due to the limited availability of appropriate visualization methods. Acquiring 3-D images throughout the scaffold by histology or confocal methods are not applicable to all types of scaffolds, and moreover, they are time consuming, laborious and thus not very feasible for a large scale analysis. To make the visualization of the spatial distribution of the cells easier in biomaterial scaffolds we have applied optical projection tomography (OPT). OPT microscope produces high-resolution 3-D images of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent specimens [Science 296(5567) (2002), 541-545]. Here we demonstrate that the OPT method can be used for the evaluation and visualization of the cell seeding method, spatial distribution and density of cells in biomaterial scaffolds and thus establish the OPT as a valid tool for analysis of cell distribution in cartilage tissue engineering samples.

  7. Form and function of the teleost lateral line revealed using three-dimensional imaging and computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Hendrik; Klein, Birgit; Ziegler, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Fishes sense weak water motion using the lateral line. Among the thousands of described fish species, this organ may differ in size, shape and distribution of individual mechanoreceptors or lateral line canals. The reasons for this diversity remain unclear, but are very likely related to habitat preferences. To better understand the performance of the organ in natural hydrodynamic surroundings, various three-dimensional imaging datasets of the cephalic lateral line were gathered using Leuciscus idus as representative freshwater teleost. These data are employed to simulate hydrodynamic phenomena around the head and within lateral line canals. The results show that changes in canal dimensions alter the absolute stimulation amplitudes, but have little effect on the relation between bulk water flow and higher frequency signals. By contrast, depressions in the skin known as epidermal pits reduce bulk flow stimulation and increase the ratio between higher-frequency signals and the background flow stimulus. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Quantitative computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Judith E. [Royal Infirmary and University, Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: judith.adams@manchester.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) was introduced in the mid 1970s. The technique is most commonly applied to 2D slices in the lumbar spine to measure trabecular bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cm{sup 3}). Although not as widely utilized as dual-energy X-ray absortiometry (DXA) QCT has some advantages when studying the skeleton (separate measures of cortical and trabecular BMD; measurement of volumetric, as opposed to 'areal' DXA-BMDa, so not size dependent; geometric and structural parameters obtained which contribute to bone strength). A limitation is that the World Health Organisation (WHO) definition of osteoporosis in terms of bone densitometry (T score -2.5 or below using DXA) is not applicable. QCT can be performed on conventional body CT scanners, or at peripheral sites (radius, tibia) using smaller, less expensive dedicated peripheral CT scanners (pQCT). Although the ionising radiation dose of spinal QCT is higher than for DXA, the dose compares favorably with those of other radiographic procedures (spinal radiographs) performed in patients suspected of having osteoporosis. The radiation dose from peripheral QCT scanners is negligible. Technical developments in CT (spiral multi-detector CT; improved spatial resolution) allow rapid acquisition of 3D volume images which enable QCT to be applied to the clinically important site of the proximal femur, more sophisticated analysis of cortical and trabecular bone, the imaging of trabecular structure and the application of finite element analysis (FEA). Such research studies contribute importantly to the understanding of bone growth and development, the effect of disease and treatment on the skeleton and the biomechanics of bone strength and fracture.

  9. Odontoid Fracture: Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Peña

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 84-year-old male presented with left-sided posterior head, neck, and back pain after a ground level fall. Exam was notable for left parietal scalp laceration and midline cervical spine tenderness with no obvious deformities. He was neurovascularly intact, and placed in an Aspen Collar with strict spine precautions. Significant findings: Computed Tomography (CT of the cervical spine showed a stable, acute, non-displaced fracture of the odontoid process extending into the body of C2, consistent with a Type III Odontoid Fracture. He was evaluated by orthopedic spine service who recommended conservative, non-operative management. Discussion: The cervical spine is composed of seven vertebrae, with C1 and C2 commonly referred to as the Atlas and Axis, respectively. Unique to C2 is a bony prominence, the Odontoid Process (Dens. Hyperextension or hyperflexion injuries can induce significant stress causing fractures. Odontoid fractures comprise approximately 10% of vertebral fractures, and there are three types with varying stability.1 Type 1 is the rarest and is a fracture involving the superior segment of the Dens. It is considered a stable fracture. Type 2 is the most common and is a fracture involving the base of the odontoid process, below the transverse component of the cruciform ligament. This fracture is unstable and requires operative stabilization. 2 Type 3 odontoid fractures are classified by a fracture of the Odontoid process, as well as the lateral masses of the C2. Determining the stability of a Type III Odontoid fracture requires radiographic evaluation. Strict cervical spine precautions must be adhered to until adequate imaging and surgical consultation is obtained. CT of the of cervical spine fractures poses several advantages to plain film radiography due to the ability to view the anatomy in three planes. 3 However, if there is concern for ligamentous injury, MRI is the preferred modality.3

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT is used to help diagnose ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment to create ... your doctor and the technologist prior to the exam if your child has a known allergy to ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known ... newborns, infants and older children. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear ... or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... imaging provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  17. Application of an object-oriented programming paradigm in three-dimensional computer modeling of mechanically active gastrointestinal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashev, P Z; Mintchev, M P; Bowes, K L

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel three-dimensional (3-D) object-oriented modeling approach incorporating knowledge of the anatomy, electrophysiology, and mechanics of externally stimulated excitable gastrointestinal (GI) tissues and emphasizing the "stimulus-response" principle of extracting the modeling parameters. The modeling method used clusters of class hierarchies representing GI tissues from three perspectives: 1) anatomical; 2) electrophysiological; and 3) mechanical. We elaborated on the first four phases of the object-oriented system development life-cycle: 1) analysis; 2) design; 3) implementation; and 4) testing. Generalized cylinders were used for the implementation of 3-D tissue objects modeling the cecum, the descending colon, and the colonic circular smooth muscle tissue. The model was tested using external neural electrical tissue excitation of the descending colon with virtual implanted electrodes and the stimulating current density distributions over the modeled surfaces were calculated. Finally, the tissue deformations invoked by electrical stimulation were estimated and represented by a mesh-surface visualization technique.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed ... displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images when requested by ...

  19. The effect of a manual instrumentation technique on five types of premolar root canal geometry assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Together with diagnosis and treatment planning, a good knowledge of the root canal system and its frequent variations is a necessity for successful root canal therapy. The selection of instrumentation techniques for variants in internal anatomy of teeth has significant effects on the shaping ability and cleaning effectiveness. The aim of this study was to reveal the differences made by including variations in the internal anatomy of premolars into the study protocol for investigation of a single instrumentation technique (hand ProTaper instruments) assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction. Methods Five single-root premolars, whose root canal systems were classified into one of five types, were scanned with micro-CT before and after preparation with a hand ProTaper instrument. Instrumentation characteristics were measured quantitatively in 3-D using a customized application framework based on MeVisLab. Numeric values were obtained for canal surface area, volume, volume changes, percentage of untouched surface, dentin wall thickness, and the thickness of dentin removed. Preparation errors were also evaluated using a color-coded reconstruction. Results Canal volumes and surface areas were increased after instrumentation. Prepared canals of all five types were straightened, with transportation toward the inner aspects of S-shaped or multiple curves. However, a ledge was formed at the apical third curve of the type II canal system and a wide range in the percentage of unchanged canal surfaces (27.4-83.0%) was recorded. The dentin walls were more than 0.3 mm thick except in a 1 mm zone from the apical surface and the hazardous area of the type II canal system after preparation with an F3 instrument. Conclusions The 3-D color-coded images showed different morphological changes in the five types of root canal systems shaped with the same hand instrumentation technique. Premolars are among the most complex teeth for root canal

  20. The effect of a manual instrumentation technique on five types of premolar root canal geometry assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Tao

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Together with diagnosis and treatment planning, a good knowledge of the root canal system and its frequent variations is a necessity for successful root canal therapy. The selection of instrumentation techniques for variants in internal anatomy of teeth has significant effects on the shaping ability and cleaning effectiveness. The aim of this study was to reveal the differences made by including variations in the internal anatomy of premolars into the study protocol for investigation of a single instrumentation technique (hand ProTaper instruments assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction. Methods Five single-root premolars, whose root canal systems were classified into one of five types, were scanned with micro-CT before and after preparation with a hand ProTaper instrument. Instrumentation characteristics were measured quantitatively in 3-D using a customized application framework based on MeVisLab. Numeric values were obtained for canal surface area, volume, volume changes, percentage of untouched surface, dentin wall thickness, and the thickness of dentin removed. Preparation errors were also evaluated using a color-coded reconstruction. Results Canal volumes and surface areas were increased after instrumentation. Prepared canals of all five types were straightened, with transportation toward the inner aspects of S-shaped or multiple curves. However, a ledge was formed at the apical third curve of the type II canal system and a wide range in the percentage of unchanged canal surfaces (27.4-83.0% was recorded. The dentin walls were more than 0.3 mm thick except in a 1 mm zone from the apical surface and the hazardous area of the type II canal system after preparation with an F3 instrument. Conclusions The 3-D color-coded images showed different morphological changes in the five types of root canal systems shaped with the same hand instrumentation technique. Premolars are among the most

  1. Validation of admittance computed left ventricular volumes against real-time three-dimensional echocardiography in the porcine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, Shelby; Kottam, Anil T; Padiyath, Asif; Bidasee, Keshore R; Li, Ling; Gao, Shunji; Wu, Juefei; Lof, John; Danford, David A; Kuehne, Titus

    2013-06-01

    The admittance and Wei's equation is a new technique for ventricular volumetry to determine pressure-volume relations that addresses traditional conductance-related issues of parallel conductance and field correction factor. These issues with conductance have prevented researchers from obtaining real-time absolute ventricular volumes. Moreover, the time-consuming steps involved in processing conductance catheter data warrant the need for a better catheter-based technique for ventricular volumetry. We aimed to compare the accuracy of left ventricular (LV) volumetry between the new admittance catheterization technique and transoesophageal real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) in a large-animal model. Eight anaesthetized pigs were used. A 7 French admittance catheter was positioned in the LV via the right carotid artery. The catheter was connected to an admittance control unit (ADVantage; Transonic Scisense Inc.), and data were recorded on a four-channel acquisition system (FA404; iWorx Systems). Admittance catheterization data and transoesophageal RT3DE (X7-2; Philips) data were simultaneously obtained with the animal ventilated, under neuromuscular blockade and monitored in baseline conditions and during dobutamine infusion. Left ventricular volumes measured from admittance catheterization (Labscribe; iWorx Systems) and RT3DE (Qlab; Philips) were compared. In a subset of four animals, admittance volumes were compared with those obtained from traditional conductance catheterization (MPVS Ultra; Millar Instruments). Of 37 sets of measurements compared, admittance- and RT3DE-derived LV volumes and ejection fractions at baseline and in the presence of dobutamine exhibited general agreement, with mean percentage intermethod differences of 10% for end-diastolic volumes, 14% for end-systolic volumes and 9% for ejection fraction; the respective intermethod differences between admittance and conductance in eight data sets compared were 11, 11 and 12

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  6. COMMIX-PPC: A three-dimensional transient multicomponent computer program for analyzing performance of power plant condensers. Volume 2, User`s guide and manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, T.H.; Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-02-01

    The COMMIX-PPC computer program is an extended and improved version of earlier COMMIX codes and is specifically designed for evaluating the thermal performance of power plant condensers. The COMMIX codes are general-purpose computer programs for the analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex industrial systems. In COMMIX-PPC, two major features have been added to previously published COMMIX codes. One feature is the incorporation of one-dimensional conservation of mass. momentum, and energy equations on the tube side, and the proper accounting for the thermal interaction between shell and tube side through the porous medium approach. The other added feature is the extension of the three-dimensional conservation equations for shell-side flow to treat the flow of a multicomponent medium. COMMIX-PPC is designed to perform steady-state and transient three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer in a power plant condenser. However, the code is designed in a generalized fashion so that, with some modification. it can be used to analyze processes in any heat exchanger or other single-phase engineering applications.

  7. COMMIX-PPC: A three-dimensional transient multicomponent computer program for analyzing performance of power plant condensers. Volume 1, Equations and numerics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, T.H.; Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-02-01

    The COMMIX-PPC computer pregrain is an extended and improved version of earlier COMMIX codes and is specifically designed for evaluating the thermal performance of power plant condensers. The COMMIX codes are general-purpose computer programs for the analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex Industrial systems. In COMMIX-PPC, two major features have been added to previously published COMMIX codes. One feature is the incorporation of one-dimensional equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy on the tube stile and the proper accounting for the thermal interaction between shell and tube side through the porous-medium approach. The other added feature is the extension of the three-dimensional conservation equations for shell-side flow to treat the flow of a multicomponent medium. COMMIX-PPC is designed to perform steady-state and transient. Three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer tn a power plant condenser. However, the code is designed in a generalized fashion so that, with some modification, it can be used to analyze processes in any heat exchanger or other single-phase engineering applications. Volume I (Equations and Numerics) of this report describes in detail the basic equations, formulation, solution procedures, and models for a phenomena. Volume II (User`s Guide and Manual) contains the input instruction, flow charts, sample problems, and descriptions of available options and boundary conditions.

  8. Light microscopy and computer three-dimensional reconstruction of the blood capillaries of the enamel organ of rat molar tooth germs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Paulo Sérgio; de Faria, Flávio Paulo; Villa, Ricardo Gazoni; Katchburian, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    We performed a light microscope and a computer three-dimensional reconstruction study of serial sections of the molar enamel organ of 3- and 5-day-old rats perfused with Indian ink through the arterial system. The tooth germs were fixed in Bouin's solution, embedded in paraffin, sectioned and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. For the three-dimensional reconstruction, light micrographs of the serial sections were digitized, and aligned using the serial EM Align software downloaded from http://synapses.bu.edu/tools/. After alignment, the boundaries of the India-ink-filled blood vessels were manually traced with a mouse using the software IGL trace (version 1.26b), also downloaded from the above website. After tracing, a three-dimensional representation of the blood vessel contours was generated in a VRML format and visualized with the help of the software Cortona Web3D viewer (version 4.0) downloaded from http://www.parallelgraphics.com/products/cortona/. Our results showed that in regions where ameloblasts are polarized the capillaries are arranged in three distinct levels: (1) penetrating and leaving capillaries in relation to the outer enamel epithelium; (2) capillaries crossing and branching inside the stellate reticulum; and (3) capillaries branching and anastomosing profusely within the stratum intermedium, thereby forming an extensive capillary plexus intimately associated with the cells of the stratum intermedium. The existence of a conspicuous capillary plexus intermingled with cells of the stratum intermedium, as shown in our results, suggests that some molecules produced by cells of the stratum intermedium could be released into the capillary plexus and thereafter carried to the dental follicle. PMID:15032908

  9. Introductory Molecular Orbital Theory: An Honors General Chemistry Computational Lab as Implemented Using Three-Dimensional Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddick, Kristie R.; Parrill, Abby L.; Petersen, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computational molecular orbital theory experiment was implemented in a first-semester honors general chemistry course. Students used the GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) quantum mechanical software (as implemented in ChemBio3D) to optimize the geometry for various small molecules. Extended Huckel…

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or ... or blood vessels. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line into a small vein ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... slices. When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... slices. When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... speak with you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... speak with you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray beams and a set of electronic x-ray detectors ... during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray beams and a set of electronic x-ray detectors ... during the scan, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... If contrast material is used, depending on the type of exam, it will be swallowed, injected through ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... artifacts on the images. This loss of image quality can resemble the blurring seen on a photograph ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD ... room, where the technologist operates the scanner and monitors your examination in direct visual contact and usually ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD ... room, where the technologist operates the scanner and monitors your examination in direct visual contact and usually ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  15. Calculating nasoseptal flap dimensions : a cadaveric study using cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Dam, Ellen; Korsten-Meijer, Astrid G. W.; Schepers, Rutger H.; van der Meer, Wicher J.; Gerrits, Peter O.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Feijen, Robert A.

    We hypothesize that three-dimensional imaging using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is suitable for calculating nasoseptal flap (NSF) dimensions. To evaluate our hypothesis, we compared CBCT NSF dimensions with anatomical dissections. The NSF reach and vascularity were studied. In an anatomical

  16. Creation and application of three-dimensional computer-graphic animations for introduction to radiological physics and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Kojima, Haruna; Masu, Chisato; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Hironori; Konokawa, Kiminori; Isobe, Tomonori; Sato, Eisuke; Murayama, Hideo; Maruyama, Koichi; Umeda, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    Physics-related subjects are important in the educational fields of radiological physics and technology. However, conventional teaching tools, for example texts, equations, and two-dimensional figures, are not very effective in attracting the interest of students. Therefore, we have created several multimedia educational materials covering radiological physics and technology. Each educational presentation includes several segments of high-quality computer-graphic animations designed to attract students' interest. We used personal computers (PCs) and commercial software to create and compile these. Undergraduate and graduate students and teachers and related professionals contributed to the design and creation of the educational materials as part of student research. The educational materials can be displayed on a PC monitor and manipulated with popular free software. Opinion surveys conducted in undergraduate courses at Kitasato University support the effectiveness of our educational tools in helping students gain a better understanding of the subjects offered and in raising their interest.

  17. Computer-monitored radionuclide tracking of three-dimensional mandibular movements. Part II: experimental setup and preliminary results - Posselt diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon, J.A.; Waysenson, B.D.; Warshaw, B.D.

    1979-04-01

    This article described a new method to track mandibular movements using a computer-assisted radionuclide kinematics technique. The usefulness of various image-enhancement techniques is discussed, and the reproduction of physiologic displacements is shown. Vertical, lateral, and protrusive envelopes of motion of a point on a tooth of a complete denture mounted on a semiadjustable articulator were measured. A demonstrative example of the validity of this approach is reproducing the motion of the dental point, which clearly evidences the Posselt diagram.

  18. Description of a transmission X-ray computed tomography scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamideen, M.S., E-mail: mhamideen@fet.edu.jo [Department of Applied Science, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Al-Balqa' Applied University, Amman (Jordan); Sharaf, J.; Al-Saleh, K.A. [Department of Physics, University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Shaderma, M. [Department of Applied science, Faculty of Prince Abdullah bin Ghazi, Al-Balqa' Applied University, Amman (Jordan)

    2011-11-15

    A new prototype X-ray computed tomography scanner has been designed, constructed and tested locally. The major system employs an X-ray tube, a semiconductor detector, data logger and a three-dimensional sample position controller driven by three stepping motors, which allow two linear translations in addition to the rotational motion. The image resolution is determined by the step size and the diameter of the X-ray beam, which is controlled by the pinhole collimator. The scanner is designed to reconstruct two- and three-dimensional images mapping the internal structures of the object with the aid of the computer. This system, due to the semiconductor detector used, presents the novelty of being potentially able to acquire both in CT (transmission) mode and in SPECT (emission) mode. The imaging system performance is inspected for different phantoms, and some typical reconstructed images are presented. - Highlights: > A prototype X-ray transmission CT scanner system was designed and constructed successfully at the X-ray Laboratory in the University of Jordan. > X-ray CT scanner demonstrated its capability as a non-destructive tool for evaluating the internal atomic details of material objects. > Some general problems of X-ray CT scanning and image reconstruction are discussed and some suggested solutions are presented. > Scanner is designed to reconstruct two- and three-dimensional images mapping the internal structures of the object with the aid of the computer. > Internal geometrical structure can be determined from CT images.

  19. Computed tomography:the details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  1. Computed tomography of intramuscular myxoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, L.; Herrlin, K.; Rydholm, A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in seven patients with intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well demarcated, of homogeneous appearance and attenuation values ranging from 10 to 60 (HU). The tumor size, as estimated at CT, correlated well with the size of the surgical specimen, which is in contrast to the findings in some high grade malignant sarcomas.

  2. Computed tomography for dimensional metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruth, J.P.; Bartscher, M.; Carmignato, S.

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives a survey of the upcoming use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) for dimensional quality control purposes: i.e. for traceable measurement of dimensions of technical (mechanical) components and for tolerance verification of such components. It describes the basic principles of CT met...

  3. Computed tomography in hepatic echinococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choliz, J.D.; Olaverri, F.J.L.; Casas, T.F.; Zubieta, S.O.

    1982-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 50 cases of hydatid disease of the liver. It was definite in 49 cases and negative in one case. Pre- and postcontrast scans were performed. CT may reveal the exact location and extension of cysts and possible complications. However, a false-negative case was found in a hydatid cyst located in a fatty liver.

  4. Three dimensional system integration

    CERN Document Server

    Papanikolaou, Antonis; Radojcic, Riko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuit (IC) stacking is the next big step in electronic system integration. It enables packing more functionality, as well as integration of heterogeneous materials, devices, and signals, in the same space (volume). This results in consumer electronics (e.g., mobile, handheld devices) which can run more powerful applications, such as full-length movies and 3D games, with longer battery life. This technology is so promising that it is expected to be a mainstream technology a few years from now, less than 10-15 years from its original conception. To achieve thi

  5. Three-Dimensional Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, Vitor; Viana, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In this book, the authors present the elements of a general theory for flows on three-dimensional compact boundaryless manifolds, encompassing flows with equilibria accumulated by regular orbits. The book aims to provide a global perspective of this theory and make it easier for the reader to digest the growing literature on this subject. This is not the first book on the subject of dynamical systems, but there are distinct aspects which together make this book unique. Firstly, this book treats mostly continuous time dynamical systems, instead of its discrete counterpart, exhaustively treated

  6. Application of high-tech three-dimensional imaging and computer-generated models in complex facial reconstructions with vascularized bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, E H; Norris, M S; Rosen, J M

    1993-02-01

    We present a series of six patients with eight flaps in whom computer-generated models were used for fabrication of vascularized bone grafts in complex facial restorations. Preoperative CT data, digitalized on tape, were converted by the CEMAX (Santa Clara, Calif.) 1500 Integrated Hardware and Software System to a three-dimensional visualization of the bone and soft-tissue deficiencies. These data were transmitted by direct computer link to a CNC milling machine that produced full-size slices "stacked" into a three-dimensional template. The acrylic replica aided selection of appropriate donor sites and intraoperative "carving" of bone transfers. Reconstructions included three zygomas, two maxillae, two mandibles, and one frontal bone. Donor sites were iliac crest, scapula, and outer calvarium. Four were free flaps and four island pedicle flaps. All healed without infection. Bone resorption was less than 10 percent. One flap was lost to thrombosis. Other complications included a transient facial palsy in one patient and temporary radial palsy from shoulder traction in another. Computer-generated templates for vascularized grafts are expensive and thus are not indicated or necessary in every patient. The advantages, however, are several. Custom models facilitate preoperative planning, with less guesswork of size, contour, and orientation of the graft, which is especially desirable with vascularized grafts, since the position of the pedicle is critical. Anesthesia time is decreased. Grafts can be fitted exactly, without reshaping and "nibbling." Nuances of depth and tapering are directly carved into the bone. By merging high-tech imaging and microsurgery, the best chance of optimal results can be achieved.

  7. K-FIX(GT): A computer program for modeling the expansion phase of steam explosions within complex three dimensional cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyder, M.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Farawila, Y.M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Halvorson, P.J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (US)

    1992-05-01

    In the development of the Severe Accident Analysis Program for the Savannah River production reactors, it was recognized that certain accidents have the potential for causing damaging steam explosions. The massive SRS reactor buildings are likely to withstand any imaginable steam explosion. However, reactor components and building structures including hatches, ventilation ducts, etc., could be at risk if such an explosion occurred. No tools were available to estimate the effects of such explosions on actual structures. To meet this need, the Savannah River Laboratory contracted with the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Institute for development of a computer-based calculational tool for estimating the effects of steam explosions. The goal for this study was to develop a computer code that could be used parametrically to predict the effects of various steam explosions on their surroundings. This would be able to predict whether a steam explosion of a given magnitude would be likely to fail a particular structure. This would require, of course, that the magnitude of the explosion be specified through some combination of judgment and calculation. The requested code, identified as the K-FIX(GT) code, was developed and delivered by the contractor, along with extensive documentation. The several individual reports that constitute the documentation are each being issued as a separate WSRC report. Documentation includes several model calculations, and representation of these in graphic form. This report gives detailed instructions for the use of the code, including identification of all input parameters required.

  8. Three-dimensional localization of abnormal EEG activity in migraine: a low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) study of migraine patients in the pain-free interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Béla; Bánk, József; Piros, Pálma; Bessenyei, Mónika; Veto, Sára; Tóth, Márton; Kondákor, István

    2008-09-01

    Investigating the brain of migraine patients in the pain-free interval may shed light on the basic cerebral abnormality of migraine, in other words, the liability of the brain to generate migraine attacks from time to time. Twenty unmedicated "migraine without aura" patients and a matched group of healthy controls were investigated in this explorative study. 19-channel EEG was recorded against the linked ears reference and was on-line digitized. 60 x 2-s epochs of eyes-closed, waking-relaxed activity were subjected to spectral analysis and a source localization method, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Absolute power was computed for 19 electrodes and four frequency bands (delta: 1.5-3.5 Hz, theta: 4.0-7.5 Hz, alpha: 8.0-12.5 Hz, beta: 13.0-25.0 Hz). LORETA "activity" (=current source density, ampers/meters squared) was computed for 2394 voxels and the above specified frequency bands. Group comparison was carried out for the specified quantitative EEG variables. Activity in the two groups was compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis for each frequency band. Statistically significant (uncorrected P pain-free interval and might be suitable for planning forthcoming investigations.

  9. Application of computer assisted three-dimensional simulation operation and biomechanics analysis in the treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhu, Wanchun; He, Jintao; Di, Fei; Wang, Lei; Li, Xin; Liu, Wei; Li, Chunde; Gong, Jian

    2017-10-01

    As a surgical method to treat children with sagittal craniosynostosis, calvarial vault reconstruction is subjected to some limitations. In traditional surgical method to treat children with sagittal craniosynostosis, surgical resection and fixation are performed all by the experience of surgical doctor, which is likely to cause individual differences, insecure fixation, configurational asymmetry, and waste of unnecessary fixtures materials. This study aims to provide surgical doctor with objective indicators via 3D simulation combined with biomechanical calculation, so as to improve the surgical efficiency. The aim of this study is to compare preoperative strategy integrating computer-assisted 3D simulation and biomechanical calculation and traditional strategy. A retrospective method was used to compare the effect and difference between these 2 strategies. The clinical data of 18 patients with sagittal synostosis were collected and compared. Among them, 10 patients were enrolled in Group A applied with traditional treatment method, while 8 were enrolled in Group B applied with preoperative strategy integrating computer-assisted 3D simulation and biomechanical calculation. The aim of this study is to evaluate two treatment methods by investigating indexes between two groups, such as length of operation, blood loss, operation cost, and postoperative complications. Through comparing the cranial index, head circumference, and cranial vault asymmetry index of two groups before and after treatment, the surgical effects of two groups can be evaluated. Moreover, biomechanical analyses for two groups were conducted. Regarding group B, the length of operation was (217±29.3min), blood loss was (70±11.7ml), operation cost was (34,495±8662¥); while for group A, the length of operation was (276±23.5min), blood loss was (90±15.5ml), operation cost was (25,149±4133¥). No postoperative complication was observed for group B, while there was 1 case of central nervous system

  10. Rotational and Translational Components of Motion Parallax: Observers' Sensitivity and Implications for Three-Dimensional Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Montegut, Michael J.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1995-01-01

    The motion of objects during motion parallax can be decomposed into 2 observer-relative components: translation and rotation. The depth ratio of objects in the visual field is specified by the inverse ratio of their angular displacement (from translation) or equivalently by the inverse ratio of their rotations. Despite the equal mathematical status of these 2 information sources, it was predicted that observers would be far more sensitive to the translational than rotational component. Such a differential sensitivity is implicitly assumed by the computer graphics technique billboarding, in which 3-dimensional (3-D) objects are drawn as planar forms (i.e., billboards) maintained normal to the line of sight. In 3 experiments, observers were found to be consistently less sensitive to rotational anomalies. The implications of these findings for kinetic depth effect displays and billboarding techniques are discussed.

  11. Comparison of alveolar ridge preservation method using three dimensional micro-computed tomographic analysis and two dimensional histometric evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Seok; Kim, Sung Tae; Oh, Seung Hee; Park, Hee Jung; Lee, Sophia; Kim, Taeil; Lee, Young Kyu; Heo, Min Suk [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study evaluated the efficacy of alveolar ridge preservation methods with and without primary wound closure and the relationship between histometric and micro-computed tomographic (CT) data. Porcine hydroxyapatite with polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was implanted into a canine extraction socket. The density of the total mineralized tissue, remaining hydroxyapatite, and new bone was analyzed by histometry and micro-CT. The statistical association between these methods was evaluated. Histometry and micro-CT showed that the group which underwent alveolar preservation without primary wound closure had significantly higher new bone density than the group with primary wound closure (P<0.05). However, there was no significant association between the data from histometry and micro-CT analysis. These results suggest that alveolar ridge preservation without primary wound closure enhanced new bone formation more effectively than that with primary wound closure. Further investigation is needed with respect to the comparison of histometry and micro-CT analysis.

  12. Three-dimensional virtual bronchoscopy using a tablet computer to guide real-time transbronchial needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Raucci, Antonio; Cascone, Roberto; Reginelli, Alfonso; Di Natale, Davide; Santoriello, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonio; Grassi, Roberto; Serra, Nicola; Polverino, Mario; Santini, Mario

    2017-04-01

    We proposed a new virtual bronchoscopy tool to improve the accuracy of traditional transbronchial needle aspiration for mediastinal staging. Chest-computed tomographic images (1 mm thickness) were reconstructed with Osirix software to produce a virtual bronchoscopic simulation. The target adenopathy was identified by measuring its distance from the carina on multiplanar reconstruction images. The static images were uploaded in iMovie Software, which produced a virtual bronchoscopic movie from the images; the movie was then transferred to a tablet computer to provide real-time guidance during a biopsy. To test the validity of our tool, we divided all consecutive patients undergoing transbronchial needle aspiration retrospectively in two groups based on whether the biopsy was guided by virtual bronchoscopy (virtual bronchoscopy group) or not (traditional group). The intergroup diagnostic yields were statistically compared. Our analysis included 53 patients in the traditional and 53 in the virtual bronchoscopy group. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy for the traditional group were 66.6%, 100%, 100%, 10.53% and 67.92%, respectively, and for the virtual bronchoscopy group were 84.31%, 100%, 100%, 20% and 84.91%, respectively. The sensitivity ( P  = 0.011) and diagnostic accuracy ( P  = 0.011) of sampling the paratracheal station were better for the virtual bronchoscopy group than for the traditional group; no significant differences were found for the subcarinal lymph node. Our tool is simple, economic and available in all centres. It guided in real time the needle insertion, thereby improving the accuracy of traditional transbronchial needle aspiration, especially when target lesions are located in a difficult site like the paratracheal station.

  13. Computer-assisted three-dimensional tracking of sensory innervation in the murine bladder mucosa with two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueth, Anna; Spronck, Bart; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; van Koeveringe, Gommert A

    2017-11-01

    A strong association between functional bladder disorders and bladder sensation is well-known, with a relationship between malfunctioning detrusor muscle and abnormal sensation arising from the sub-urothelium and the lamina propria (LP), has been suggested. However, the exact underlying pathophysiology of these bladder disorders is not completely understood. Therefore, it is important to gain knowledge on sensory innervation of the urinary bladder in order to understand the neural network function in healthy and diseased bladder. In the present study we aim at the development of a computer-assisted method for 3D-tracking of sensory innervation in the murine bladder mucosa using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). TPLSM was performed on 10 fixed, stained (CGRP) bladder samples in both the trigone and dome. Nerve tracking was performed in subvolumes (6.3±2.9106μm3; median±IQR) of 22 stacks with determining total nerve length, nerve segment lengths, curviness, straightness, and locations of branching and ending points in the lamina propria (LP). The results show that the highest concentration of afferent fibres was found at the urothelium-LP interface. Nerve curviness, a presumed indicator of nerve activity, showed an equal value throughout the complete LP. We found a significantly higher median nerve segment length in the LP of the trigone and significantly more curved nerves in the dome of the bladder. This indicates an adaptation to, or an involvement in the detection of, bladder volume changes. Conclusively, we successfully developed a computer-assisted method for 3D tracking of sensory nerve fibres in the LP of the murine bladder wall. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  15. Comparison between Simple Radiographic and Computed Tomographic Three-Dimensional Reconstruction for Evaluation of the Distal Metatarsal Articular Angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Eduardo Pedrini; Wagner, Felipe Victora; Henning, Carlo; Sanhudo, José Antônio Veiga; Pagnussato, Fernando; Galia, Carlos Roberto

    The hallux valgus is a pathologic condition in the forefoot that often causes pain and functional limitations. Assessing all deformity components, such as the distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA) is essential to hallux valgus treatment. Nevertheless, interobserver agreement of DMAA is poor on plain radiographs. The present study compared computed tomographic (CT) 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction with plain radiographic measurements for measuring the DMAA. We included 43 consecutive patients (77 feet), diagnosed with hallux valgus at the orthopedic outpatient clinic at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (Porto Alegre, Brazil) from April 2014 to June 2015 in our prospective study. The DMAAs were measured by 2 observers using CT 3D reconstruction. The results were compared between observers and with the plain radiographic measurements using the concordance correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman plot to determine the agreement between the 2 methods. The interobserver agreement of the CT 3D measurements was high (concordance correlation coefficient 0.90; p DMAA values were associated with the presence of metatarsal rotation. The interobserver agreement of DMAA measurements was greater on CT 3D reconstruction than on plain radiography. The poor interobserver agreement of the radiographic DMAA might have resulted from metatarsal rotation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of three-dimensional volume-targeted thin-slab FIESTA magnetic resonance angiography and 64-multidetector computed tomographic angiography for the identification of proximal coronary stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liuquan; Ma, Lin; Schoenhagen, Paul; Ye, Huiyi; Lou, Xin; Gao, Yuangui; Zhao, Xihai; Wang, Xinjiang; Dong, Wei

    2013-09-10

    Based on recent clinical data, an imaging strategy of identifying proximal coronary disease allows further management decisions in patients with stable angina pectoris. We aimed to compare diagnostic accuracy of non-contrast fast steady-state (FIESTA) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with 64-multidetector computed tomographic angiography (CTA), using conventional coronary angiography (CA) as the reference standard. Thirty patients with suspected coronary artery disease consented to participate in an institutional review board-approved protocol. Coronary MRA was performed at 1.5 T using a respiratory navigator and electrocardiogram-gated three-dimensional FIESTA pulse sequence. CTA images were acquired using a 64-multidetector computed tomographic scanner, using beta blockade to reduce the heart rate to less than 70 bpm. Coronary luminal stenosis >50% was identified. Plaques were classified as non-calcified, mixed, or calcified on CTA, and as high-, intermediate-, or low-signal on FIESTA MRA. Compared to CA, the sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy for detection of >50% proximal coronary stenoses were 83.0%, 86.9%, and 86.1% for MRA and 85.1%, 87.2%, and 86.8% for CTA, respectively. For the 24 calcified stenoses, MRA corrected 16 segments that overestimated on CTA and MRA had an accuracy of 75% in evaluating calcified plaques. High-resolution three-dimensional FIESTA MRA and CTA have a similar accuracy in detecting proximal coronary stenosis. The clinical impact of identification of proximal disease in patients with stable CAD needs to be examined in future studies. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. An interpolation-free ALE scheme for unsteady inviscid flows computations with large boundary displacements over three-dimensional adaptive grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, B.; Dobrzynski, C.; Guardone, A.

    2017-07-01

    A novel strategy to solve the finite volume discretization of the unsteady Euler equations within the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework over tetrahedral adaptive grids is proposed. The volume changes due to local mesh adaptation are treated as continuous deformations of the finite volumes and they are taken into account by adding fictitious numerical fluxes to the governing equation. This peculiar interpretation enables to avoid any explicit interpolation of the solution between different grids and to compute grid velocities so that the Geometric Conservation Law is automatically fulfilled also for connectivity changes. The solution on the new grid is obtained through standard ALE techniques, thus preserving the underlying scheme properties, such as conservativeness, stability and monotonicity. The adaptation procedure includes node insertion, node deletion, edge swapping and points relocation and it is exploited both to enhance grid quality after the boundary movement and to modify the grid spacing to increase solution accuracy. The presented approach is assessed by three-dimensional simulations of steady and unsteady flow fields. The capability of dealing with large boundary displacements is demonstrated by computing the flow around the translating infinite- and finite-span NACA 0012 wing moving through the domain at the flight speed. The proposed adaptive scheme is applied also to the simulation of a pitching infinite-span wing, where the bi-dimensional character of the flow is well reproduced despite the three-dimensional unstructured grid. Finally, the scheme is exploited in a piston-induced shock-tube problem to take into account simultaneously the large deformation of the domain and the shock wave. In all tests, mesh adaptation plays a crucial role.

  18. Method for Parametric Design of Three-Dimensional Shapes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to computer-aided design of three-dimensional shapes and more particularly, relates to a system and method for parametric design of three-dimensional hydrodynamic shapes...

  19. Three dimensional analysis of natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioua Kolsi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A computational study has been performed to make a computational analysis of natural convection and entropy generation in a sharp edged finned cavity. Three dimensional analysis has been done by solving governing equations with a written computational code in Fortran. The study is performed for fin inclination angles from −60° to 60°, Ra = 105, Pr = 0.7, Rc (conductivities ratio changes from 0.01 to 100 and irreversibility coefficient is taken as φ=10-5. It is observed that higher values of thermal conductivity ratio (Rc ⩾ 1 do not affect entropy generation due to heat transfer and Bejan number.

  20. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.