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Sample records for computed tomography radiation

  1. RADIATION DOSE IN PAEDIATRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for the accurate ... increasing, and estimates suggest that quantitative lifetime ... Keywords: Computed Tomography, Radiation Risk, Radiation Dose, Patient Dose ... techniques, such as MRI and ultrasound, which do not ..... in the course of management are not monitored to.

  2. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Tingey, D.R.C

    1997-11-01

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors) 28 refs., 11 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. Operator radiation exposure in cone-beam computed tomography guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, S.J.; Strijen Van, M. J L; Meijer, E.; Heesewijk Van, J. P M; Mali, W. P T M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Quantitative analysis of operator dose in cone-beam computed tomography guidance (CBCT-guidance) and the effect of protective shielding. Methods: Using a Rando phantom, a model was set-up to measure radiation dose for the operator hand, thyroid and gonad region. The effect of sterile rad

  4. Glandular dose in breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Di Lillo, F; Longo, R; Sarno, A; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-21

    The purpose of this work is to provide an evaluation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for breast computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation in an axial scanning configuration with a partial or total organ volume irradiation, for the in vivo program of breast CT ongoing at the ELETTRA facility (Trieste, Italy). A Geant4 Monte Carlo code was implemented, simulating the photon irradiation from a synchrotron radiation source in the energetic range from 8 to 50 keV with 1 keV intervals, to evaluate the MGD. The code was validated with literature data, in terms of mammographic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) and with ad hoc experimental data, in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI). Simulated cylindrical phantoms of different sizes (diameter at phantom base 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 cm, axial length 1.5 times the radius) and glandular fraction by weight (0%, 14.3%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were implemented into the code. The validation of the code shows an excellent agreement both with previously published work and in terms of DgN and CDTI measurements. The implemented simulations show a dependence of the glandular dose estimate on the vertical dimension of the irradiated zone when a partial organ irradiation was implemented. Specific normalized coefficients for calculating the MGD to the whole breast or to the single irradiated slice were reported.

  5. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Kemerink, Gerrit J., E-mail: gerrit.kemerink@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  6. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  7. Fatigue Micromechanism Characterization in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0002 Fatigue micromechanism characterization in carbon fibre reinforced polymers using synchrotron radiation computed...SUBTITLE Fatigue micromechanism characterization in carbon fibre reinforced polymers using synchrotron radiation computed tomography 5a. CONTRACT...particularly within the aerospace sector due to their high specific stiffness and strength. CFRPs are widely identified as being very fatigue resistant, but

  8. [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in predicting radiation pneumonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hao; YU Jin-ming; Feng-ming Kong; LU Jie; BAI Tong; MA Li; FU Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Prevention is presently the only available method to limit radiation-induced lung morbidity. A good predictor is the key point of prevention. This study aimed to investigate if [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake changes in the lung after radiotherapy could be used as a new predictor for acute radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods Forty-one patients with lung cancer underwent FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging before and after radiotherapy. The mean standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured for the isodose regions of 0-9 Gy, 10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy, 40-49 Gy. The mean SUV of these regions after radiotherapy was compared with baseline. The mean SUV in patients who developed RP was also compared with that in those who did not. The statistical difference was determined by matched pair t test. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)criteria were used for diagnosis and grading of RP.Results With a median follow-up of 12 months, 11 (26.8%) of the 41 patients developed grade 2 and above acute RP.The mean SUV of regions (10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy, 40-49 Gy) increased after radiation therapy in all 41 patients.The mean SUVs after radiation therapy were 0.54, 0.68, 1.31, 1.74 and 2.27 for 0-9 Gy, 10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy and 40-49 Gy, respectively. Before the radiation therapy, the mean SUV in each region was 0.53, 0.52, 0.52, 0.53 and 0.54, respectively. These patients had significantly higher FDG activities in regions receiving 10 Gy or more (P <0.001).Compared with their counterparts, the elevation of SUV was significantly greater in those patients who developed acute RP subsequently.Conclusion The mean SUV of the lung tissue may be a useful predictor for the acute RR FDG-PET/CT may play a new role in the study of the radiation damage of the lung.

  9. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly developing technology, it is now more significant to accurately delineate the tumor tissue. F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (F18 FDG PET/CT has been established as an accurate method in correctly staging and detecting tumor dissemination in lung cancer. Since it provides both anatomic and biologic information, F18 FDG PET decreases interuser variability in tumor delineation. For instance, tumor volumes may be decreased as atelectasis and malignant tissue can be more accurately differentiated, as well as better evaluation of benign and malignant lymph nodes given the difference in FDG uptake. Using F18 FDG PET/CT, the radiation dose can be escalated without serious adverse effects in lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of F18 FDG PET/CT for RT planning in lung cancer.

  10. Motion management in positron emission tomography/computed tomography for radiation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2012-09-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners combine, in a unique gantry, 2 of the most important diagnostic imaging systems, a CT and a PET tomograph, enabling anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) studies to be performed in a single study session. Furthermore, as the 2 scanners use the same spatial coordinate system, the reconstructed CT and PET images are spatially co-registered, allowing an accurate localization of the functional signal over the corresponding anatomical structure. This peculiarity of the hybrid PET/CT system results in improved tumor characterization for oncological applications, and more recently, it was found to be also useful for target volume definition (TVD) and treatment planning in radiotherapy (RT) applications. In fact, the use of combined PET/CT information has been shown to improve the RT treatment plan when compared with that obtained by a CT alone. A limiting factor to the accuracy of TVD by PET/CT is organ and tumor motion, which is mainly due to patient respiration. In fact, respiratory motion has a degrading effect on PET/CT image quality, and this is also critical for TVD, as it can lead to possible tumor missing or undertreatment. Thus, the management of respiratory motion is becoming an increasingly essential component in RT treatment planning; indeed, it has been recognized that the use of personalized motion information can improve TVD and, consequently, permit increased tumor dosage while sparing surrounding healthy tissues and organs at risk. This review describes the methods used for motion management in PET/CT for radiation treatment planning. The article covers the following: (1) problems caused by organ and lesion motion owing to respiration, and the artifacts generated on CT, PET, and PET/CT images; (2) data acquisition and processing techniques used to manage respiratory motion in PET/CT studies; and (3) the use of personalized motion information for TVD and radiation treatment planning.

  11. Radiation protection: protection of patients undergoing cone beam computed tomography examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drage, Nicholas; Carmichael, Fiona; Brown, Jackie

    2010-10-01

    Cone beam computed tomography is becoming a popular imaging modality in dentistry. The effective dose from these examinations is generally higher than conventional plain film radiography. This article outlines the ways of protecting patients from the harmful effects of radiation. Cone beam computed tomography is an emerging imaging modality. The effective doses are generally higher than conventional radiography and it is therefore important that anyone requesting or performing these investigations understands how to keep the doses to patients as low as reasonably practicable.

  12. Comparison of radiation absorbed dose in target organs in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The objective of this study was to measure and compare the tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, salivary glands, eye and skin in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and computed tomography (CT."nMaterials and Methods: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were implanted in 14 sites of RANDO phantom to measure average tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual gland, lenses and buccal skin. The Promax (PLANMECA, Helsinki, Finland unit was selected for Panoramic, conventional linear tomography and cone beam computed tomography examinations and spiral Hispeed/Fxi (General Electric,USA was selected for CT examination. The average tissue absorbed doses were used for the calculation of the equivalent and effective doses in each organ."nResults: The average absorbed dose for Panoramic ranged from 0.038 mGY (Buccal skin to 0.308 mGY (submandibular gland, linear tomography ranged from 0.048 mGY (Lens to 0.510 mGY (submandibular gland,CBCT ranged from 0.322 mGY (thyroid glad to 1.144 mGY (Parotid gland and in CT ranged from 2.495 mGY (sublingual gland to 3.424 mGY (submandibular gland. Total effective dose in CBCT is 5 times greater than Panoramic and 4 times greater than linear tomography, and in CT, 30 and 22 times greater than Panoramic and linear tomography, respectively. Total effective dose in CT is 6 times greater than CBCT."nConclusion: For obtaining 3-dimensional (3D information in maxillofacial region, CBCT delivers the lower dose than CT, and should be preferred over a medical CT imaging. Furthermore, during maxillofacial imaging, salivary glands receive the highest dose of radiation.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  15. Computed Tomography Radiation Dose Reduction: Effect of Different Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms on Image Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, M.J.; Takx, R.A.P.; Jong, P.A. de; Budde, R.P.; Bleys, R.L.; Das, M.; Wildberger, J.E.; Prokop, M.; Buls, N.; Mey, J. de; Leiner, T.; Schilham, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of hybrid and model-based iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms from different vendors at multiple radiation dose levels on image quality of chest phantom scans.A chest phantom was scanned on state-of-the-art computed tomography scanners from 4 vendors at 4 dose levels

  16. Are we ready for positron emission tomography/computed tomography-based target volume definition in lymphoma radiation therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Kheng-Wei; Mikhaeel, N George

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has become indispensable for the clinical management of lymphomas. With consistent evidence that it is more accurate than anatomic imaging in the staging and response assessment of many lymphoma subtypes, its utility continues to increase. There have therefore been efforts to incorporate PET/CT data into radiation therapy decision making and in the planning process. Further, there have also been studies investigating target volume definition for radiation therapy using PET/CT data. This article will critically review the literature and ongoing studies on the above topics, examining the value and methods of adding PET/CT data to the radiation therapy treatment algorithm. We will also discuss the various challenges and the areas where more evidence is required.

  17. Systematic review on physician's knowledge about radiation doses and radiation risks of computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krille, Lucian, E-mail: lucian.krille@unimedizin-mainz.d [Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 69, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Hammer, Gael P.; Merzenich, Hiltrud [Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 69, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Zeeb, Hajo [Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social Medicine (BIPS), Department of Prevention and Evaluation, Linzer Strasse 10, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Background: The frequent use of computed tomography is a major cause of the increasing medical radiation exposure of the general population. Consequently, dose reduction and radiation protection is a topic of scientific and public concern. Aim: We evaluated the available literature on physicians' knowledge regarding radiation dosages and risks due to computed tomography. Methods: A systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane and PRISMA statements was performed using eight databases. 3091 references were found. Only primary studies assessing physicians' knowledge about computed tomography were included. Results: 14 relevant articles were identified, all focussing on dose estimations for CT. Overall, the surveys showed moderate to low knowledge among physicians concerning radiation doses and the involved health risks. However, the surveys varied considerably in conduct and quality. For some countries, more than one survey was available. There was no general trend in knowledge in any country except a slight improvement of knowledge on health risks and radiation doses in two consecutive local German surveys. Conclusions: Knowledge gaps concerning radiation doses and associated health risks among physicians are evident from published research. However, knowledge on radiation doses cannot be interpreted as reliable indicator for good medical practice.

  18. The Impact of Iterative Reconstruction on Computed Tomography Radiation Dosimetry: Evaluation in a Routine Clinical Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Moorin

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of introduction of iterative reconstruction as a mandated software upgrade on radiation dosimetry in routine clinical practice over a range of computed tomography examinations.Random samples of scanning data were extracted from a centralised Picture Archiving Communication System pertaining to 10 commonly performed computed tomography examination types undertaken at two hospitals in Western Australia, before and after the introduction of iterative reconstruction. Changes in the mean dose length product and effective dose were evaluated along with estimations of associated changes to annual cancer incidence.We observed statistically significant reductions in the effective radiation dose for head computed tomography (22-27% consistent with those reported in the literature. In contrast the reductions observed for non-contrast chest (37-47%; chest pulmonary embolism study (28%, chest/abdominal/pelvic study (16% and thoracic spine (39% computed tomography. Statistically significant reductions in radiation dose were not identified in angiographic computed tomography. Dose reductions translated to substantial lowering of the lifetime attributable risk, especially for younger females, and estimated numbers of incident cancers.Reduction of CT dose is a priority Iterative reconstruction algorithms have the potential to significantly assist with dose reduction across a range of protocols. However, this reduction in dose is achieved via reductions in image noise. Fully realising the potential dose reduction of iterative reconstruction requires the adjustment of image factors and forgoing the noise reduction potential of the iterative algorithm. Our study has demonstrated a reduction in radiation dose for some scanning protocols, but not to the extent experimental studies had previously shown or in all protocols expected, raising questions about the extent to which iterative reconstruction achieves dose reduction in real world clinical

  19. Low radiation dose in computed tomography: the role of iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschoff, Andrik J; Catalano, Carlo; Kirchin, Miles A; Krix, Martin; Albrecht, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Recent approaches to reducing radiation exposure during CT examinations typically utilize automated dose modulation strategies on the basis of lower tube voltage combined with iterative reconstruction and other dose-saving techniques. Less clearly appreciated is the potentially substantial role that iodinated contrast media (CM) can play in low-radiation-dose CT examinations. Herein we discuss the role of iodinated CM in low-radiation-dose examinations and describe approaches for the optimization of CM administration protocols to further reduce radiation dose and/or CM dose while maintaining image quality for accurate diagnosis. Similar to the higher iodine attenuation obtained at low-tube-voltage settings, high-iodine-signal protocols may permit radiation dose reduction by permitting a lowering of mAs while maintaining the signal-to-noise ratio. This is particularly feasible in first pass examinations where high iodine signal can be achieved by injecting iodine more rapidly. The combination of low kV and IR can also be used to reduce the iodine dose. Here, in optimum contrast injection protocols, the volume of CM administered rather than the iodine concentration should be reduced, since with high-iodine-concentration CM further reductions of iodine dose are achievable for modern first pass examinations. Moreover, higher concentrations of CM more readily allow reductions of both flow rate and volume, thereby improving the tolerability of contrast administration.

  20. QUANTIFYING LOCAL RADIATION-INDUCED LUNG DAMAGE FROM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Hogeweg, Laurens E.; Faber, Hette; Tukker, Wim G. J.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; van Luijk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal implementation of new radiotherapy techniques requires accurate predictive models for normal tissue complications. Since clinically used dose distributions are nonuniform, local tissue damage needs to be measured and related to local tissue dose. In lung, radiation-induced damage re

  1. Patient radiation biological risk in computed tomography angiography procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhorayef

    2017-02-01

    The mean patient dose value per procedure (dose length product [DLP], mGy·cm for all examinations was 437.8 ± 166, 568.8 ± 194, 516.0 ± 228, 581.8 ± 175, and 1082.9 ± 290 for the lower limbs, pelvis, abdomen, chest, and cerebral, respectively. The lens of the eye, uterus, and ovaries received high radiation doses compared to thyroid and testis. The overall patient risk per CTA procedure ranged between 15 and 36 cancer risks per 1 million procedures. Patient risk from CTA procedures is high during neck and abdomen procedures. Special concern should be provided to the lens of the eye and thyroid during brain CTA procedures. Patient dose reduction is an important consideration; thus, staff should optimize the radiation dose during CTA procedures.

  2. Readjustment of abdominal computed tomography protocols in a university hospital: impact on radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Ricardo Francisco Tavares; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Torres, Lucas Rios; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Bekhor, Daniel; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: ricardo.romano@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi [Fleury Medicina e Saude, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Objective: To assess the reduction of estimated radiation dose in abdominal computed tomography following the implementation of new scan protocols on the basis of clinical suspicion and of adjusted images acquisition parameters. Materials and Methods: Retrospective and prospective review of reports on radiation dose from abdominal CT scans performed three months before (group A - 551 studies) and three months after (group B - 788 studies) implementation of new scan protocols proposed as a function of clinical indications. Also, the images acquisition parameters were adjusted to reduce the radiation dose at each scan phase. The groups were compared for mean number of acquisition phases, mean CTDI{sub vol} per phase, mean DLP per phase, and mean DLP per scan. Results: A significant reduction was observed for group B as regards all the analyzed aspects, as follows: 33.9%, 25.0%, 27.0% and 52.5%, respectively for number of acquisition phases, CTDI{sub vol} per phase, DLP per phase and DLP per scan (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The rational use of abdominal computed tomography scan phases based on the clinical suspicion in conjunction with the adjusted images acquisition parameters allows for a 50% reduction in the radiation dose from abdominal computed tomography scans. (author)

  3. Assessment of radiation exposure on a dual-source computed tomography-scanner performing coronary computed tomography-angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchhoff, S., E-mail: sonja.kirchhoff@med.uni-muenchen.d [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich - Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Herzog, P., E-mail: peter.herzog@med.uni-muenchen.d [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich - Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Johnson, T., E-mail: Thorsten.johnson@med.uni-muenchen.d [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich - Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Boehm, H., E-mail: holger.boehm@med.uni-muenchen.d [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich - Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nikolaou, K., E-mail: konstantin.nikolaou@med.uni-muenchen.d [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich - Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, M.F., E-mail: maximilian.reiser@med.uni-muenchen.d [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich - Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Becker, C.H., E-mail: christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.d [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich - Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: The radiation exposure of a dual-source-64-channel multi-detector-computed-tomography-scanner (Somatom-Defintion, Siemens, Germany) was assessed in a phantom-study performing coronary-CT-angiography (CTCA) in comparison to patients' data randomly selected from routine scanning. Methods: 240 CT-acquisitions of a computed tomography dose index (CTDI)-phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were performed using a synthetically generated Electrocardiography (ECG)-signal with variable heart rates (30-180 beats per minute (bpm)). 120 measurements were acquired using continuous tube-output; 120 measurements were performed using ECG-synchronized tube-modulation. The pulsing window was set at minimum duration at 65% of the cardiac cycle between 30 and 75 bpm. From 90-180 bpm the pulsing window was set at 30-70% of the cardiac cycle. Automated pitch adaptation was always used. A comparison between phantom CTDI and two patient groups' CTDI corresponding to the two pulsing groups was performed. Results: Without ECG-tube-modulation CDTI-values were affected by heart-rate-changes resulting in 85.7 mGray (mGy) at 30 and 45 bpm, 65.5 mGy/60 bpm, 54.7 mGy/75 bpm, 46.5 mGy/90 bpm, 34.2 mGy/120 bpm, 27.0 mGy/150 bpm and 22.1 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 14.5 mSievert (mSv) at 30/45 bpm and 3.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Using ECG-tube-modulation these CTDI-values resulted: 32.6 mGy/30 bpm, 36.6 mGy/45 bpm, 31.4 mGy/60 bpm, 26.8 mGy/75 bpm, 23.7 mGy/90 bpm, 19.4 mGy/120 bpm, 17.2 mGy/150 bpm and 15.6 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 5.5 mSv at 30 bpm and 2.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Significant CTDI-differences were found between patients with lower/moderate and higher heart rates in comparison to the phantom CTDI-results. Conclusions: Dual source CTCA is particularly dose efficient at high heart rates when automated pitch adaptation, especially in combination with ECG-based tube-modulation is used. However in clinical routine scanning for patients with higher

  4. Image Registration of Cone-Beam Computer Tomography and Preprocedural Computer Tomography Aids in Localization of Adrenal Veins and Decreasing Radiation Dose in Adrenal Vein Sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busser, W.M.H.; Arntz, M.; Jenniskens, S.F.M.; Deinum, J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Lange, F. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether image registration of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images indicating the locations of the adrenal veins can aid in increasing the success rate of first-attempts adrenal vein sampling (AVS) and therefore decreasing patient radiation do

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography using lower doses of radiation for patients with Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Craig, Orla

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic resonance and ultrasonography have increasing roles in the initial diagnosis of Crohn\\'s disease, but computed tomography (CT) with positive oral contrast agents is most frequently used to identify those with acute extramural complications. However, CT involves exposure of patients to radiation. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT (at a dose comparable to that used to obtain an abdominal radiograph) with conventional-dose CT in patients with active Crohn\\'s disease.

  6. [Proper technics and the reduction of radiation in helical computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoliani, Y S; Hazebroucq, V; Sarrazin, J L; Lévêque, C; Marque, B; Goasdoué, P

    1999-02-01

    Helical computed tomography is the main source of ionizing radiation delivery in diagnostic radiology. For each series, average radiation dose is between 20 and 30 mGy. This dose can potentially be reduced by decreasing intensity or voltage and by increasing pitch. Helical acquisition allows reformating of images with smaller increment or different obliquity, and avoids additional irradiation. Hardware and software devices designed for dose reduction must be systematically used. Users of CT systems should be aware of radiation dose delivered with CT and must carefully assess the need of each additional acquisition. Obsolete habits, as gantry tilting for lumbar CT, which increases patient exposure, must be given up. Rational use of helical CT decreases radiation exposure and gains time, whereas thoughtless use increases radiation exposure without real benefit.

  7. Patient radiation dose and protection from cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Li,Gang

    2013-01-01

    After over one decade development, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely accepted for clinical application in almost every field of dentistry. Meanwhile, the radiation dose of CBCT to patient has also caused broad concern. According to the literature, the effective radiation doses of CBCTs in nowadays market fall into a considerably wide range that is from 19 µSv to 1073 µSv and closely related to the imaging detector, field of view, and voxel sizes used for scanning. To deeply...

  8. Application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation treatment planning for head and neck cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Musaddiq; J; Awan; Farzan; Siddiqui; David; Schwartz; Jiankui; Yuan; Mitchell; Machtay; Min; Yao

    2015-01-01

    18-fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography/computed tomography(18FDG-PET/CT) provides significant information in multiple settings in the management of head and neck cancers(HNC). This article seeks to define the additional benefit of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning for squamous cell carcinomas(SCCs) of the head and neck through a review of relevant literature. By helping further define both primary and nodal volumes, radiation treatment planning can be improved using PET/CT. Special attention is paid to the independent benefit of PET/CT in targeting mucosal primaries as well as in detecting nodal metastases. The utility of PET/CT is also explored for treatment planning in the setting of SCC of unknown primary as PET/CT may help define a mucosal target volume by guiding biopsies for examination under anesthesia thus changing the treatment paradigm and limiting the extent of therapy. Implications of the use of PET/CT for proper target delineation in patients with artifact from dental procedures are discussed and the impact of dental artifact on CT-based PET attenuation correction is assessed. Finally, comment is made upon the role of PET/CT in the high-risk post-operative setting, particularly in the context of radiation dose escalation. Real case examples are used in these settings to elucidate the practical benefits of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning in HNCs.

  9. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Radiographs in Dentistry: Aspects Related to Radiation Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Coelho Lorenzoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to discuss the radiation doses associated with plain radiographs, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, and conventional computed tomography (CT in dentistry, with a special focus on orthodontics. Methods. A systematic search for articles was realized by MEDLINE from 1997–March 2011. Results. Twenty-seven articles met the established criteria. The data of these papers were grouped in a table and discussed. Conclusions. Increases in kV, mA, exposure time, and field of view (FOV increase the radiation dose. The dose for CT is greater than other modalities. When the full-mouth series (FMX is performed with round collimation, the orthodontic radiographs transmit higher dose than most of the large FOV CBCT, but it can be reduced if used rectangular collimation, showing lower effective dose than large FOV CBCT. Despite the image quality, the CBCT does not replace the FMX. In addition to the radiation dose, image quality and diagnostic needs should be strongly taken into account.

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  11. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. IPN No. 5160, 07760 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  12. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Teogenes Augusto da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and methods: previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results: in none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/ year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion: in the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. (author)

  13. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT imaging center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila do Carmo Santana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods: Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results: In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year or free area (0.5 mSv/year as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion: In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed.

  14. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  15. Segmentation of Synchrotron Radiation micro-Computed Tomography Images using Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses, Anderson A.M. [Federal University of Western Para (Brazil); Physics Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Giusti, Alessandro [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Almeida, Andre P. de, E-mail: apalmeid@gmail.com [Physics Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson [Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos E. de [Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Barroso, Regina C. [Physics Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray micro-Computed Tomography (SR-{mu}CT) is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images, such as the phase contrast effect. The Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm represents state-of-art segmentation algorithm, presenting an enormous potential of application in SR-{mu}CT imaging. We describe the application of the algorithm EMvGC with swap move for the segmentation of bone images acquired at the ELETTRA Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of Wistar rats' ribs are investigated with Synchrotron Radiation {mu}CT imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The present work is part of a research on the effects of radiotherapy on the thoracic region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts algorithm for segmentation is described.

  16. Patient radiation dose and protection from cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang

    2013-06-01

    After over one decade development, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely accepted for clinical application in almost every field of dentistry. Meanwhile, the radiation dose of CBCT to patient has also caused broad concern. According to the literature, the effective radiation doses of CBCTs in nowadays market fall into a considerably wide range that is from 19 µSv to 1073 µSv and closely related to the imaging detector, field of view, and voxel sizes used for scanning. To deeply understand the potential risk from CBCT, this report also reviewed the effective doses from literatures on intra-oral radiograph, panoramic radiograph, lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric radiograph, multi-slice CT, and so on. The protection effect of thyroid collar and leaded glasses were also reviewed.

  17. Patient radiation dose and protection from cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China)

    2013-06-15

    After over one decade development, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely accepted for clinical application in almost every field of dentistry. Meanwhile, the radiation dose of CBCT to patient has also caused broad concern. According to the literature, the effective radiation doses of CBCTs in nowadays market fall into a considerably wide range that is from 19 {mu}Sv to 1073 {mu}Sv and closely related to the imaging detector, field of view, and voxel sizes used for scanning. To deeply understand the potential risk from CBCT, this report also reviewed the effective doses from literatures on intra-oral radiograph, panoramic radiograph, lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric radiograph, multi-slice CT, and so on. The protection effect of thyroid collar and leaded glasses were also reviewed.

  18. Assessment of knowledge and awareness among radiology personnel regarding current computed tomography technology and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness among 120 radiology personnel working in 7 public hospitals in Johor, Malaysia, concerning Computed Tomography (CT) technology and radiation doses based on a set of questionnaires. Subjects were divided into two groups (Medical profession (Med, n=32) and Allied health profession (AH, n=88). The questionnaires are addressed: (1) demographic data (2) relative radiation dose and (3) knowledge of current CT technology. One-third of respondents from both groups were able to estimate relative radiation dose for routine CT examinations. 68% of the allied health profession personnel knew of the Malaysia regulations entitled ‘Basic Safety Standard (BSS) 2010’, although notably 80% of them had previously attended a radiation protection course. No significant difference (p < 0.05) in mean scores of CT technology knowledge detected between the two groups, with the medical professions producing a mean score of (26.7 ± 2.7) and the allied health professions a mean score of (25.2 ± 4.3). This study points to considerable variation among the respondents concerning their understanding of knowledge and awareness of risks of radiation and CT optimization techniques.

  19. White Paper of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance on Dual-Energy CT, Part 2: Radiation Dose and Iodine Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, W Dennis; Shuman, William P; Siegel, Marilyn J; Sahani, Dushyant V; Boll, Daniel T; Bolus, David N; De Cecco, Carlo N; Kaza, Ravi K; Morgan, Desiree E; Schoepf, U Joseph; Vrtiska, Terri J; Yeh, Benjamin M; Berland, Lincoln L

    This is the second of a series of 4 white papers that represent Expert Consensus Documents developed by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance through its task force on dual-energy computed tomography. This paper, part 2, addresses radiation dose and iodine sensitivity in dual-energy computed tomography.

  20. Viewing the early stage of metal foam formation by computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfen, L. [Fraunhofer IZFP, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Baumbach, T. [Fraunhofer IZFP, D-01326 Dresden (Germany); Stanzick, H. [Fraunhofer IFAM, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Banhart, J. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Elmoutaouakkil, A.; Cloetens, P. [European Synchrotron Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2002-10-01

    Foamed aluminium alloy containing 7 wt.-% of Si is investigated by {mu}m-resolved X-ray computed tomography (CT) using synchrotron radiation. The foam is fabricated employing a powder metallurgical route. The evolution of foam microstructure is characterized by studying a series of samples representing different stages of foam expansion obtained by interrupting the foaming process for each sample at different foaming times. The computer tomographic reconstruction provides a 3D image of the pore structure as well as the spatial distribution of blowing agent particles. A statistical evaluation allows to determine the size distribution of the blowing agent and of the pores at different foaming stages. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Radiation dose reduction without degrading image quality during computed tomography examinations: Dosimetry and quality control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Felix Acquah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Computed tomography (CT, is an X-ray procedure that generates high quality cross-sectional images of the body, and by comparison to other radiological diagnosis, is responsible for higher doses to patients. This work studies the doses and image qualities produced from the default primary scanning factors of a Siemens CT machine and afterwards came up with scanning protocols that allow radiologists to obtain the necessary diagnostic information while reducing radiation doses to as low as reasonably achievable. Methods: Approximately 1000 CT scans from mostly common examinations; head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis routines were selected and analyzed for their image quality and radiation doses over a two year interval. Dose measurements were performed for the same routines using Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI phantoms, RTI barracuda system with electrometer, and CT dose Profiler detector to evaluate the doses delivered during these CT procedures. Subsequently, image quality checks were performed using the CT Catphan 600 and anthropomorphic phantoms. CTDI and Dose Length Product (DLP values were calculated for each scan. From analyzing these measurements, the appropriate machine scanning parameters were adjusted to reduce radiation does while at the same time providing good image quality.Results: Doses to patients using the default head sequence protocol had an average CTDIvol value of 65.45 mGy and a range of 7.10-16.80 mGy for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations whiles the new protocol had an average CTDIvol of 58.32 mGy for the head and a range of 3.83-15.24 mGy for the truck region. The DLP value for default head scans decreased from an average of 2279.85 mGy.cm to 874.53 mGy.cm with the new protocol. Tube potentials (KV and tube current-time (mAs had an effect on spatial resolution and low contrast detectability as well as doses. Conclusion: From the new protocols, lower values of KV and mAs together with other factors were

  2. Radiation dose of cone-beam computed tomography compared to conventional radiographs in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Luca; Patcas, Raphael; Peltomäki, Timo; Schätzle, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine radiation doses of different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan modes in comparison to a conventional set of orthodontic radiographs (COR) by means of phantom dosimetry. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips (3 × 1 × 1 mm) were used on an adult male tissue-equivalent phantom to record the distribution of the absorbed radiation dose. Three different scanning modes (i.e., portrait, normal landscape, and fast scan landscape) were compared to CORs [i.e., conventional lateral (LC) and posteroanterior (PA) cephalograms and digital panoramic radiograph (OPG)]. The following radiation levels were measured: 131.7, 91, and 77 μSv in the portrait, normal landscape, and fast landscape modes, respectively. The overall effective dose for a COR was 35.81 μSv (PA: 8.90 μSv; OPG: 21.87 μSv; LC: 5.03 μSv). Although one CBCT scan may replace all CORs, one set of CORs still entails 2-4 times less radiation than one CBCT. Depending on the scan mode, the radiation dose of a CBCT is about 3-6 times an OPG, 8-14 times a PA, and 15-26 times a lateral LC. Finally, in order to fully reconstruct cephalograms including the cranial base and other important structures, the CBCT portrait mode must be chosen, rendering the difference in radiation exposure even clearer (131.7 vs. 35.81 μSv). Shielding radiation-sensitive organs can reduce the effective dose considerably. CBCT should not be recommended for use in all orthodontic patients as a substitute for a conventional set of radiographs. In CBCT, reducing the height of the field of view and shielding the thyroid are advisable methods and must be implemented to lower the exposure dose.

  3. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography-guided lung interventions using an iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.H.; Hiss, S.; Borggrefe, J.; Bunck, A.C.; Maintz, D.; Hackenbroch, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Mueller, D. [Clinical Science Philips Healthcare GmbH, Munich (Germany). Clinical Science; Hellmich, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2015-10-15

    To compare the radiation doses and image qualities of computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions using a standard-dose CT (SDCT) protocol with filtered back projection and a low-dose CT (LDCT) protocol with both filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction. Image quality and radiation doses (dose-length product and CT dose index) were retrospectively reviewed for 130 patients who underwent CT-guided lung interventions. SDCT at 120 kVp and automatic mA modulation and LDCT at 100 kVp and a fixed exposure were each performed for 65 patients. Image quality was objectively evaluated as the contrast-to-noise ratio and subjectively by two radiologists for noise impression, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability on a four-point scale. The groups did not significantly differ in terms of diagnostic acceptability and complication rate. LDCT yielded a median 68.6 % reduction in the radiation dose relative to SDCT. In the LDCT group, iterative reconstruction was superior to filtered back projection in terms of noise reduction and subjective image quality. The groups did not differ in terms of beam hardening artifacts. LDCT was feasible for all procedures and yielded a more than two-thirds reduction in radiation exposure while maintaining overall diagnostic acceptability, safety and precision. The iterative reconstruction algorithm is preferable according to the objective and subjective image quality analyses.

  4. A survey of radiation dose to patients and operators during radiofrequency ablation using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidatul, A; Azlan, CA; Megat Amin, MSA; Abdullah, BJJ; Ng, KH

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy is able to give real time images to a physician undertaking minimally invasive procedures such as biopsies, percutaneous drainage, and radio frequency ablation (RFA). Both operators executing the procedure and patients too, are thus at risk of radiation exposure during a CT fluoroscopy. This study focuses on the radiation exposure present during a series of radio frequency ablation (RFA) procedures, and used Gafchromic film (Type XR-QA; International Specialty Products, USA) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100H; Bicron, USA) to measure the radiation received by patients undergoing treatment, and also operators subject to scatter radiation. The voltage was held constant at 120 kVp and the current 70mA, with 5mm thickness. The duration of irradiation was between 150-638 seconds. Ultimately, from a sample of 30 liver that have undergone RFA, the study revealed that the operator received the highest dose at the hands, which was followed by the eyes and thyroid, while secondary staff dosage was moderately uniform across all parts of the body that were measured. PMID:21611060

  5. A survey of radiation dose to patients and operators during radiofrequency ablation using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidatul, A; Azlan, Ca; Megat Amin, Msa; Abdullah, Bjj; Ng, Kh

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy is able to give real time images to a physician undertaking minimally invasive procedures such as biopsies, percutaneous drainage, and radio frequency ablation (RFA). Both operators executing the procedure and patients too, are thus at risk of radiation exposure during a CT fluoroscopy.This study focuses on the radiation exposure present during a series of radio frequency ablation (RFA) procedures, and used Gafchromic film (Type XR-QA; International Specialty Products, USA) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100H; Bicron, USA) to measure the radiation received by patients undergoing treatment, and also operators subject to scatter radiation.The voltage was held constant at 120 kVp and the current 70mA, with 5mm thickness. The duration of irradiation was between 150-638 seconds.Ultimately, from a sample of 30 liver that have undergone RFA, the study revealed that the operator received the highest dose at the hands, which was followed by the eyes and thyroid, while secondary staff dosage was moderately uniform across all parts of the body that were measured.

  6. Perception of radiation dose and potential risks of computed tomography in emergency department medical personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hee; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chanjong; Kang, Changwoo; Lee, Soo Hoon; Jeong, Jin Hee; Rhee, Joong Eui

    2015-01-01

    Objective Use of computed tomography (CT) continues to increase, but the relatively high radiation doses associated with CT have raised health concerns such as future risk of cancer. We investigated the level of awareness regarding radiation doses and possible risks associated with CT in medical personnel (MP). Methods This study was conducted from April to May 2012 and included physicians and nurses who worked in the emergency department of 17 training hospitals. The questionnaire included measurement of the effect of CT or radiography on health using a 10-point numerical rating scale, estimation of the radiation dose of one abdominal CT scan compared with one chest radiograph, and perception of the increased lifetime risk of cancer associated with CT. Results A total of 354 MP participated in this study: 142 nurses, 87 interns, 86 residents, and 39 specialists. Interns were less aware of the effects of CT or radiography on health than other physicians or nurses (mean±SD of 4.8±2.7, 5.9±2.7, 6.1±2.7, and 6.0±2.2 for interns, residents, specialists, and nurses, respectively; P<0.05). There was a significant difference in knowledge about the relative radiation dose of one abdominal CT scan compared with one chest radiograph between physicians and nurses (48.6% vs. 28.9% for physicians vs. nurses, P<0.05). MP perceived an increased risk of cancer from radiation associated with CT. Conclusion MP perceive the risk of radiation associated with CT, but their level of knowledge seems to be insufficient.

  7. Modeling lung motion using consistent image registration in four-dimensional computed tomography for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Song, Joo Hyun; Christensen, Gary E.; Parikh, Parag J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2006-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a significant source of error in conformal radiation therapy for the thorax and upper abdomen. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) has been proposed to reduce the uncertainty caused by internal respiratory organ motion. A 4D CT dataset is retrospectively reconstructed at various stages of a respiratory cycle. An important tool for 4D treatment planning is deformable image registration. An inverse consistent image registration is used to model lung motion from one respiratory stage to another during a breathing cycle. This diffeomorphic registration jointly estimates the forward and reverse transformations providing more accurate correspondence between two images. Registration results and modeled motions in the lung are shown for three example respiratory stages. The results demonstrate that the consistent image registration satisfactorily models the large motions in the lung, providing a useful tool for 4D planning and delivering.

  8. PROCEEDINGS ON SYNCHROTRON RADIATION: An ART iterative reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Tian; Zhang, Li; Huang, Zhi-Feng; Kang, Ke-Jun; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Fang, Qiao-Guang; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2009-11-01

    X-ray diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) has extremely high sensitivity for weakly absorbing low-Z samples in medical and biological fields. In this paper, we propose an Algebra Reconstruction Technique (ART) iterative reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI-CT). An Ordered Subsets (OS) technique is used to accelerate the ART reconstruction. Few-view reconstruction is also studied, and a partial differential equation (PDE) type filter which has the ability of edge-preserving and denoising is used to improve the image quality and eliminate the artifacts. The proposed algorithm is validated with both the numerical simulations and the experiment at the Beijing synchrotron radiation facility (BSRF).

  9. Nationwide radiation dose survey of computed tomography for fetal skeletal dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Osamu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sawai, Hideaki [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nishinomiya-shi, Hyogo (Japan); Murotsuki, Jun [Miyagi Children' s Hospital, Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Advanced Fetal and Developmental Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Horiuchi, Tetsuya [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Course of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, computed tomography (CT) has been used to diagnose fetal skeletal dysplasia. However, no surveys have been conducted to determine the radiation exposure dose and the diagnostic reference level (DRL). To collect CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) data from domestic hospitals implementing fetal skeletal 3-D CT and to establish DRLs for Japan. Scan data of 125 cases of 20 protocols from 16 hospitals were analyzed. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum values of CTDIvol and DLP were determined. The time-dependent change in radiation dose setting in hospitals with three or more cases with scans was also examined. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum CTDIvol values were 2.1, 3.7, 7.7, 11.3 and 23.1 mGy, respectively, and these values for DLP were 69.0, 122.3, 276.8, 382.6 and 1025.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Six of the 12 institutions reduced the dose setting during the implementation period. The DRLs of CTDIvol and DLP for fetal CT were 11.3 mGy and 382.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Institutions implementing fetal CT should use these established DRLs as the standard and make an effort to reduce radiation exposure by voluntarily decreasing the dose. (orig.)

  10. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography perfusion using spatial-temporal Bayesian methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ruogu; Raj, Ashish; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-03-01

    In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated X-ray radiation dose is of significant concern to patients and operators, especially CT perfusion (CTP) imaging that has higher radiation dose due to its cine scanning technique. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) parameter as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and degrade CT perfusion maps greatly if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. To capture the essential dynamics of CT perfusion, a simple spatial-temporal Bayesian method that uses a piecewise parametric model of the residual function is used, and then the model parameters are estimated from a Bayesian formulation of prior smoothness constraints on perfusion parameters. From the fitted residual function, reliable CTP parameter maps are obtained from low dose CT data. The merit of this scheme exists in the combination of analytical piecewise residual function with Bayesian framework using a simpler prior spatial constrain for CT perfusion application. On a dataset of 22 patients, this dynamic spatial-temporal Bayesian model yielded an increase in signal-tonoise-ratio (SNR) of 78% and a decrease in mean-square-error (MSE) of 40% at low dose radiation of 43mA.

  11. A comparative study for image quality and radiation dose of a cone beam computed tomography scanner and a multislice computed tomography scanner for paranasal sinus imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cock, Jens de; Canning, John [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Zanca, Federica; Hermans, Robert [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Imaging and Pathology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben [KU Leuven, Imaging and Pathology Department, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of a state of the art cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system and a multislice computed tomography (MSCT) system in patients with sinonasal poliposis. In this retrospective study two radiologists evaluated 57 patients with sinonasal poliposis who underwent a CBCT or MSCT sinus examination, along with a control group of 90 patients with normal radiological findings. Tissue doses were measured using a phantom model with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Overall image quality in CBCT was scored significantly higher than in MSCT in patients with normal radiologic findings (p-value: 0.00001). In patients with sinonasal poliposis, MSCT scored significantly higher than CBCT (p-value: 0.00001). The average effective dose for MSCT was 42 % higher compared to CBCT (108 μSv vs 63 μSv). CBCT and MSCT are both suited for the evaluation of sinonasal poliposis. In patients with sinonasal poliposis, clinically important structures of the paranasal sinuses can be better delineated with MSCT, whereas in patients without sinonasal poliposis, CBCT turns out to define the important structures of the sinonasal region better. However, given the lower radiation dose, CBCT can be considered for the evaluation of the sinonasal structures in patients with sinonasal poliposis. (orig.)

  12. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John (CT and MRI Dept., Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece)), e-mail: fotisdimi@yahoo.gr; Tsantioti, Dimitra (Statistician, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    2011-04-15

    Background: Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Material and Methods: Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Results: Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR =65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Conclusion: Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  16. Quantification and characterization of radiation-induced changes to mandibular vascularity using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sagar Satish; Donneys, Alexis; Farberg, Aaron Samuel; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Felice, Peter A; Buchman, Steven Richard

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps the most vexing and exigent problem confronting head and neck cancer reconstruction is overcoming the impediments of collateral damage imposed by radiation therapy (XRT) on normal surrounding tissue. Radiation therapy is detrimental to bone and soft tissue repair resulting in an unacceptably high incidence of devastating wound healing complications as well as the associated morbidity of late pathologic fractures, reduced bone healing, and osteoradionecrosis. The consequences of XRT on bone vasculature, long known to be affected by radiation, have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze the degree by which irradiation degrades existing bone vascularity using a powerful micro-computed tomography technique to attain highly precise quantitative metrics of the vascular tree. Fourteen 400-g male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 35 Gy of fractionated XRT at 7 Gy/d. The animals were euthanized after 28 days, and the left ventricle was fixed and injected with Microfil (MV-122; Flow Tech, Carver, Mass) contrast. Left hemimandibles were dissected and scanned using high-resolution micro-computed tomography (18-μm voxels). The vessel number, thickness, separation, connectivity, and vessel volume fraction were analyzed for the region of interest, defined to be the volume behind the third molar spanning a total distance of 5.1 mm. Stereologic analysis and subsequent analysis of variance test demonstrated a significant and quantifiable diminution in the irradiated vasculature when compared with control animals. The vessel volume fraction (0.016 vs 0.032, P ≤ 0.003) and vessel thickness (0.042 vs 0.067 mm, P ≤ 0.001) were markedly reduced. Interestingly, further analysis demonstrated no significant differences between vessel separation and vessel number. The results of our study specifically quantify the corrosive affects of XRT on the vasculature of the mandible. The data from this novel technique go even further and imply retention of blood

  17. Analysis and calibration of stage axial vibration for synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography (SR nano-CT) is a powerful analysis tool and can be used to perform chemical identification, mapping, or speciation of carbon and other elements together with X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. In practical applications, there are often challenges for SR nano-CT due to the misaligned geometry caused by the sample stage axial vibration. It occurs quite frequently because of experimental constraints from the mechanical error of manufacturing and assembly and the thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. The axial vibration will lead to the structure overlap among neighboring layers and degrade imaging results by imposing artifacts into the nano-CT images. It becomes worse for samples with complicated axial structure. In this work, we analyze the influence of axial vibration on nano-CT image by partial derivative. Then, an axial vibration calibration method for SR nano-CT is developed and investigated. It is based on the cross correlation of plane integral curves of the sample at different view angles. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission X-ray microscope nano-CT setup at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results demonstrate that the presented method can handle the stage axial vibration. It can work for random axial vibration and needs neither calibration phantom nor additional calibration scanning. It will be helpful for the development and application of synchrotron radiation nano-CT systems.

  18. Impact of heart rate and rhythm on radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, Christian, E-mail: neep@gmx.de [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany); Andres, Claudia; Foldyna, Borek [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany); Nagel, Hans Dieter [Wissenschaft and Technik für die Radiologie, Buchhholz i.d.N (Germany); Hoffmann, Janine; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Gutberlet, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of different heart rates and arrhythmias on scanner performance, image acquisition and applied radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography (pCT). Materials and methods: An ECG simulator (EKG Phantom 320, Müller and Sebastiani Elektronik GmbH, Munich, Germany) was used to generate different heart rhythms and arrhythmias: sinus rhythm (SR) at 45, 60, 75, 90 and 120/min, supraventricular arrhythmias (e.g. sinus arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation) and ventricular arrhythmias (e.g. ventricular extrasystoles), pacemaker-ECGs, ST-changes and technical artifacts. The analysis of the image acquisition process was performed on a 64-row multidetector CT (Brilliance, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, USA). A prospectively triggered scan protocol as used for routine was applied (120 kV; 150 mA s; 0.4 s rotation and exposure time per scan; image acquisition predominantly in end-diastole at 75% R-R-interval, in arrythmias with a mean heart rate above 80/min in systole at 45% of the R-R-interval; FOV 25 cm). The mean dose length product (DLP) and its percentage increase from baseline (SR at 60/min) were determined. Result: Radiation exposure can increase significantly when the heart rhythm deviates from sinus rhythm. ECG-changes leading to a significant DLP increase (p < 0.05) were bifocal pacemaker (61%), pacemaker dysfunction (22%), SVES (20%), ventricular salvo (20%), and atrial fibrillation (14%). Significantly (p < 0.05) prolonged scan time (>8 s) could be observed in bifocal pacemaker (12.8 s), pacemaker dysfunction (10.7 s), atrial fibrillation (10.3 s) and sinus arrhythmia (9.3 s). Conclusion: In prospectively ECG triggered CT, heart rate and rhythm can provoke different types of scanner performance, which can significantly alter radiation exposure and scan time. These results might have an important implication for indication, informed consent and contrast agent injection protocols.

  19. The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation therapy planning for patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Manus, Michael P; Hicks, Rodney J

    2012-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has rapidly assumed a critical role in the management of patients with locoregionally advanced lung cancers who are candidates for definitive radiation therapy (RT). Definitive RT is given with curative intent, but can only be successful in patients without distant metastasis and if all gross tumor is contained within the treated volume. An increasing body of evidence supports the use of PET-based imaging for selection of patients for both surgery and definitive RT. Similarly, the use of PET/CT images for accurate target volume definition in lung cancer is a dynamic area of research. Most available evidence on PET staging of lung cancer relates to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In general clinical use, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the primary radiopharmaceutical useful in NSCLC. Other tracers, including proliferation markers and hypoxia tracers, may have significant roles in future. Much of the FDG-PET literature describing the impact of PET on actual patient management has concerned candidates for surgical resection. In the few prospective studies where PET was used for staging and patient selection in NSCLC candidates for definitive RT, 25%-30% of patients were denied definitive RT, generally because PET detected unsuspected advanced locoregional or distant metastatic disease. PET/CT and CT findings are often discordant in NSCLC but studies with clinical-pathological correlation always show that PET-assisted staging is more accurate than conventional assessment. In all studies in which "PET-defined" and "non-PET-defined" RT target volumes were compared, there were major differences between PET and non-PET volumes. Therefore, in cases where PET-assisted and non-PET staging are different and biopsy confirmation is unavailable, it is rational to use the most accurate modality (namely PET/CT) to define the target volume. The use of PET/CT in patient selection and target volume definition is likely

  20. Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niikura, Naoki [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yang Wei [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rohren, Eric [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Valero, Vicente [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Ricardo H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lucci, Anthony [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes

  1. Optimizing Radiation Doses for Computed Tomography Across Institutions: Dose Auditing and Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demb, Joshua; Chu, Philip; Nelson, Thomas; Hall, David; Seibert, Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John; Krishnam, Mayil; Cagnon, Christopher; Bostani, Maryam; Gould, Robert; Miglioretti, Diana; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) vary substantially across institutions. To assess the impact of institutional-level audit and collaborative efforts to share best practices on CT radiation doses across 5 University of California (UC) medical centers. In this before/after interventional study, we prospectively collected radiation dose metrics on all diagnostic CT examinations performed between October 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, at 5 medical centers. Using data from January to March (baseline), we created audit reports detailing the distribution of radiation dose metrics for chest, abdomen, and head CT scans. In April, we shared reports with the medical centers and invited radiology professionals from the centers to a 1.5-day in-person meeting to review reports and share best practices. We calculated changes in mean effective dose 12 weeks before and after the audits and meeting, excluding a 12-week implementation period when medical centers could make changes. We compared proportions of examinations exceeding previously published benchmarks at baseline and following the audit and meeting, and calculated changes in proportion of examinations exceeding benchmarks. Of 158 274 diagnostic CT scans performed in the study period, 29 594 CT scans were performed in the 3 months before and 32 839 CT scans were performed 12 to 24 weeks after the audit and meeting. Reductions in mean effective dose were considerable for chest and abdomen. Mean effective dose for chest CT decreased from 13.2 to 10.7 mSv (18.9% reduction; 95% CI, 18.0%-19.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 3.8% to 23.5%. The mean effective dose for abdominal CT decreased from 20.0 to 15.0 mSv (25.0% reduction; 95% CI, 24.3%-25.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 10.8% to 34.7%. The number of CT scans that had an effective dose measurement that exceeded benchmarks was reduced considerably by 48% and 54% for chest and abdomen, respectively. After

  2. Variabilities of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-, Computed Tomography-, and Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography-Based Tumor and Lymph Node Delineations for Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Kishor; Saraiya, Siddharth; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Jan, Nuzhat; Schuster, Jessica; Schutzer, Matthew; Fahrner, Lester; Groves, Robert; Olsen, Kathryn M; Ford, John C; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    To investigate interobserver delineation variability for gross tumor volumes of primary lung tumors and associated pathologic lymph nodes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare the results with computed tomography (CT) alone- and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT-based delineations. Seven physicians delineated the tumor volumes of 10 patients for the following scenarios: (1) CT only, (2) PET-CT fusion images registered to CT ("clinical standard"), and (3) postcontrast T1-weighted MRI registered with diffusion-weighted MRI. To compute interobserver variability, the median surface was generated from all observers' contours and used as the reference surface. A physician labeled the interface types (tumor to lung, atelectasis (collapsed lung), hilum, mediastinum, or chest wall) on the median surface. Contoured volumes and bidirectional local distances between individual observers' contours and the reference contour were analyzed. Computed tomography- and MRI-based tumor volumes normalized relative to PET-CT-based volumes were 1.62 ± 0.76 (mean ± standard deviation) and 1.38 ± 0.44, respectively. Volume differences between the imaging modalities were not significant. Between observers, the mean normalized volumes per patient averaged over all patients varied significantly by a factor of 1.6 (MRI) and 2.0 (CT and PET-CT) (P=4.10 × 10(-5) to 3.82 × 10(-9)). The tumor-atelectasis interface had a significantly higher variability than other interfaces for all modalities combined (P=.0006). The interfaces with the smallest uncertainties were tumor-lung (on CT) and tumor-mediastinum (on PET-CT and MRI). Although MRI-based contouring showed overall larger variability than PET-CT, contouring variability depended on the interface type and was not significantly different between modalities, despite the limited observer experience with MRI. Multimodality imaging and combining different imaging characteristics might be the best approach to define

  3. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  4. Quantitative measurement of regional lung gas volume by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfraix, Sylvie [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Bayat, Sam [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Porra, Liisa [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Berruyer, Gilles [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Nemoz, Christian [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Thomlinson, William [Canadian Light Source, 101 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Sovijaervi, Anssi R A [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-01-07

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a novel respiration-gated spiral synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT) technique for direct quantification of absolute regional lung volumes, using stable xenon (Xe) gas as an inhaled indicator. Spiral SRCT with K-edge subtraction using two monochromatic x-ray beams was used to visualize and directly quantify inhaled Xe concentrations and airspace volumes in three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed lung images. Volume measurements were validated using a hollow Xe-filled phantom. Spiral images spanning 49 mm in lung height were acquired following 60 breaths of an 80% Xe-20% O{sub 2} gas mixture, in two anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits at baseline and after histamine aerosol inhalation. Volumetric images of 20 mm lung sections were obtained at functional residual capacity (FRC) and at end-inspiration. 3D images showed large patchy filling defects in peripheral airways and alveoli following histamine provocation. Local specific lung compliance was calculated based on FRC/end-inspiration images in normal lung. This study demonstrates spiral SRCT as a new technique for direct determination of regional lung volume, offering possibilities for non-invasive investigation of regional lung function and mechanics, with a uniquely high spatial resolution. An example of non-uniform volume distribution in rabbit lung following histamine inhalation is presented.

  5. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  6. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, R C; Xiao, T Q [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Longo, R; Arfelli, F; Castelli, E [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Rigon, L; Dreossi, D; Menk, R-H; Vallazza, E [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Zanconati, F; De Pellegrin, A, E-mail: rongchang.chen@gmail.co [Department of Pathologic Anatomy, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2010-09-07

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  7. Optical imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cânjǎu, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Duma, Virgil; Mǎnescu, Adrian; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-06-01

    The efforts aimed at early diagnosis of oral cancer should be prioritized towards developing a new screening instrument, based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), to be used directly intraorally, able to perform a fast, real time, 3D and non-invasive diagnosis of oral malignancies. The first step in this direction would be to optimize the OCT image interpretation of oral tissues. Therefore we propose plastination as a tissue preparation method that better preserves three-dimensional structure for study by new optical imaging techniques. The OCT and the synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) were employed for tissue sample analyze. For validating the OCT results we used the gold standard diagnostic procedure for any suspicious lesion - histopathology. This is a preliminary study of comparing features provided by OCT and Micro-CT. In the conditions of the present study, OCT proves to be a highly promising imaging modality. The use of x-ray based topographic imaging of small biological samples has been limited by the low intrinsic x-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissue and the lack of established contrast agents. Plastination can be used to enhance optical imagies of oral soft tissue samples.

  8. Computed tomography imaging parameters for inhomogeneity correction in radiation treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra J Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate dosimetry in heterogeneous media (such as a patient' body with the help of tissue characterization based on computed tomography (CT number. However, CT number depends on the type of scanner, tube voltage, field of view (FOV, reconstruction algorithm including artifact reduction and processing filters. The impact of these parameters on CT to electron density (ED conversion had been subject of investigation for treatment planning in various clinical situations. This is usually performed with a tissue characterization phantom with various density plugs acquired with different tube voltages (kilovoltage peak, FOV reconstruction and different scanners to generate CT number to ED tables. This article provides an overview of inhomogeneity correction in the context of CT scanning and a new evaluation tool, difference volume dose-volume histogram (DVH, dV-DVH. It has been concluded that scanner and CT parameters are important for tissue characterizations, but changes in ED are minimal and only pronounced for higher density materials. For lungs, changes in CT number are minimal among scanners and CT parameters. Dosimetric differences for lung and prostate cases are usually insignificant (<2% in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and < 5% for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT with CT parameters. It could be concluded that CT number variability is dependent on acquisition parameters, but its dosimetric impact is pronounced only in high-density media and possibly in IMRT. In view of such small dosimetric changes in low-density medium, the acquisition of additional CT data for financially difficult clinics and countries may not be warranted.

  9. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. I. Radiation doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L

    2004-03-01

    We investigated how patient age, size and composition, together with the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect radiation doses in head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Head size dimensions, cross-sectional areas, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images of 127 patients. For radiation dosimetry purposes patients were modeled as uniform cylinders of water. Dose computations were performed for 18 x 7 mm sections, scanned at a constant 340 mAs, for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Values of mean section dose, energy imparted, and effective dose were computed for patients ranging from the newborn to adults. There was a rapid growth of head size over the first two years, followed by a more modest increase of head size until the age of 18 or so. Newborns have a mean HU value of about 50 that monotonically increases with age over the first two decades of life. Average adult A-P and lateral dimensions were 186+/-8 mm and 147+/-8 mm, respectively, with an average HU value of 209+/-40. An infant head was found to be equivalent to a water cylinder with a radius of approximately 60 mm, whereas an adult head had an equivalent radius 50% greater. Adult males head dimensions are about 5% larger than for females, and their average x-ray attenuation is approximately 20 HU greater. For adult examinations performed at 120 kV, typical values were 32 mGy for the mean section dose, 105 mJ for the total energy imparted, and 0.64 mSv for the effective dose. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases patient doses by about a factor of 5. For the same technique factors, mean section doses in infants are 35% higher than in adults. Energy imparted for adults is 50% higher than for infants, but infant effective doses are four times higher than for adults. CT doses need to take into account patient age, head size, and composition as well as the selected x-ray technique factors.

  10. Computed Tomography Number Changes Observed During Computed Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Mei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Yang, Cungeng; Chen, Xiaojian; Xu, Shouping; Moraru, Ion [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lang, Jinyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Schultz, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate CT number (CTN) changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ at risk (OAR) according to daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography scans acquired using a CT-on-rails during daily CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for 15 patients with stage II to IVa squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were analyzed. The GTV, parotid glands, spinal cord, and nonspecified tissue were generated on each selected daily CT. The changes in CTN distributions and the mean and mode values were collected. Pearson analysis was used to assess the correlation between the CTN change, organ volume reduction, and delivered radiation dose. Results: Volume and CTN changes for GTV and parotid glands can be observed during radiation therapy delivery for HNC. The mean (±SD) CTNs in GTV and ipsi- and contralateral parotid glands were reduced by 6 ± 10, 8 ± 7, and 11 ± 10 Hounsfield units, respectively, for all patients studied. The mean CTN changes in both spinal cord and nonspecified tissue were almost invisible (<2 Hounsfield units). For 2 patients studied, the absolute mean CTN changes in GTV and parotid glands were strongly correlated with the dose delivered (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). For the correlation between CTN reductions and delivered isodose bins for parotid glands, the Pearson coefficient varied from −0.98 (P<.001) in regions with low-dose bins to 0.96 (P<.001) in high-dose bins and were patient specific. Conclusions: The CTN can be reduced in tumor and parotid glands during the course of radiation therapy for HNC. There was a fair correlation between CTN reduction and radiation doses for a subset of patients, whereas the correlation between CTN reductions and volume reductions in GTV and parotid glands were weak. More studies are needed to understand the mechanism for the radiation-induced CTN changes.

  11. Optimizing computed tomography simulation wait times in a busy radiation medicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, Jerry; Zahedi, Payam; Spence, Tara; Swanson, Lue-Ann; Li-Cheung, Fionna; Cops, Fred; Darcy, Patrick; Chhin, Veng; Moyo, Elen; Warde, Padraig; Foxcroft, Sophie; Liu, Fei-Fei

    An audit was conducted of patient schedules for computed tomography simulation (CT-Sim) scans within the Radiation Medicine Program at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre to investigate opportunities for improved efficiencies, enhancing process, reducing rescanning rates, and decreasing wait times. A 3-phased approach was undertaken to evaluate the current practice in the CT-Sim facility with a view toward implementing improvements. The first phase involved a review and assessment of the validity of current guidelines and protocols associated with 16 different disease sites. The second phase incorporated the use of a patient record and verification program MOSAIQ to capture the duration of each appointment. The last phase allocated additional time for patient-centered care and staff engagement. The audit revealed that efficiency could be achieved through staff training, updating protocols, and improving process coordination. With the exception of sarcoma, pediatric, and palliative patients who require unique management approaches, the duration for each CT-Sim appointment was successfully shortened for all disease sites by 22% to 33%, corresponding to a reduction of 10 to 15 minutes per appointment. Rescanning rates for patients requiring self-administered preparations before CT-Sim procedures were also significantly reduced by enhancing processes to increase patient compliance. Implementation of procedural changes resulted in an overall net gain of 3060 minutes, equivalent to 102 additional 30-minute CT-Sim appointment slots available for each month. This retrospective evaluation, review, and optimization of CT-Sim guidelines and practices identified opportunities to shorten appointment timeslots, and reduce rescanning rates for CT-Sim procedures, thereby significantly shortening wait times and improving access to service for our patients. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography with 256-slice computed tomography scanners: patient-specific assessment of radiation burden and associated cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E; Damilakis, John

    2012-02-01

    Risk-benefit analysis of triple-rule-out 256-slice computed tomography angiography (TRO-CTA) requires data on associated cancer risks, currently not available. The aim of the current study was to provide estimates of patient radiation burden and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of radiation-induced cancer in patients undergoing typical 256-slice TRO-CTA. Standard step-and-shoot 256-slice TRO-CTA exposures were simulated on 31 male and 31 female individual-specific voxelized phantoms using a Monte Carlo CT dosimetry software. Dose images were generated depicting the dose deposition on the exposed body region of the patient. Organ doses were obtained for all primarily irradiated radiosensitive organs. Organ doses were correlated to patient body size. TRO-CTA effective dose was estimated from (a) organ doses and (b) dose-length product data. Recently published sex-, age-, and organ-specific cancer risk factors were used to estimate the total LAR of radiation-induced cancer. The theoretical risks of radiation-induced cancer to the lung and breast following a 256-slice TRO-CTA were compared with the corresponding nominal risks for each of the studied patients. The highest organ doses were observed for the breast, heart, esophagus, and lung. Mean effective dose estimated using organ dose data was found to be 6.5 ± 1.0 mSv for female and 3.8 ± 0.7 mSv for male individuals subjected to 256-slice TRO-CTA. The associated mean LARs of cancer was found to be 41 per 10 female and 17 per 10 male patients. The total radiation-induced cancer risk was found to markedly decrease with patient age. TRO-CTA exposure was found to increase the intrinsic risks of developing lung or breast cancer during the remaining lifetime by less than 0.5% and 0.1%, respectively. The mean theoretical risk of radiation-induced cancer for a patient cohort subjected to step-and-shoot 256-slice TRO-CTA may be considered to be low compared with the intrinsic risk of developing cancer.

  13. Evaluating the microstructure of human brain tissues using synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Georg; Morel, Anne; Imholz, Martha S.; Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Zanette, Irene; Pfeiffer, Franz; David, Christian; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Minimally invasive deep brain neurosurgical interventions require a profound knowledge of the morphology of the human brain. Generic brain atlases are based on histology including multiple preparation steps during the sectioning and staining. In order to correct the distortions induced in the anisotropic, inhomogeneous soft matter and therefore improve the accuracy of brain atlases, a non-destructive 3D imaging technique with the required spatial and density resolution is of great significance. Micro computed tomography provides true micrometer resolution. The application to post mortem human brain, however, is questionable because the differences of the components concerning X-ray absorption are weak. Therefore, magnetic resonance tomography has become the method of choice for three-dimensional imaging of human brain. Because the spatial resolution of this method is limited, an alternative has to be found for the three-dimensional imaging of cellular microstructures within the brain. Therefore, the present study relies on the synchrotron radiationbased micro computed tomography in the recently developed grating-based phase contrast mode. Using data acquired at the beamline ID 19 (ESRF, Grenoble, France) we demonstrate that grating-based tomography yields premium images of human thalamus, which can be used for the correction of histological distortions by 3D non-rigid registration.

  14. Iterative Reconstruction for Cardiopulmonary Computed Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The number of computed tomography (CT) examinations has increased rapidly since CT became commercially available. This resulted in growing concerns regarding the risk of malignancies induced by application of medical ionizing radiation. Therefore, radiation dose reduction strategies ar

  15. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    extrafo al spot of an x-ray tube in one-beam omputed tomography, AAPM , Houston, TX,2008. 13 5. E. Pearson, S. Cho, X. Pan, and C. A. Pelizzari, Dose...redu tion in CBCT via intensity-weighted region-of-interest imaging, AAPM , Houston, TX, 2008.6. E. Pearson, S. Cho, X. Pan, and C. A. Pelizzari...Pelizzari, and X. Pan, Exa t image re onstru tion in reverseheli al one-beam CT for radiation therapy, AAPM , Minneapolis, MN, 2007.9. X. Han, S. Cho

  16. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  17. Image Registration of Cone-Beam Computer Tomography and Preprocedural Computer Tomography Aids in Localization of Adrenal Veins and Decreasing Radiation Dose in Adrenal Vein Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busser, Wendy M. H., E-mail: wendy.busser@radboudumc.nl; Arntz, Mark J.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Deinum, Jaap [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of General Internal Medicine (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeWe assessed whether image registration of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images indicating the locations of the adrenal veins can aid in increasing the success rate of first-attempts adrenal vein sampling (AVS) and therefore decreasing patient radiation dose.Materials and Methods CBCT scans were acquired in the interventional suite (Philips Allura Xper FD20) and rigidly registered to the vertebra in previously acquired CE-CT. Adrenal vein locations were marked on the CT image and superimposed with live fluoroscopy and digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide the AVS. Seventeen first attempts at AVS were performed with image registration and retrospectively compared with 15 first attempts without image registration performed earlier by the same 2 interventional radiologists. First-attempt AVS was considered successful when both adrenal vein samples showed representative cortisol levels. Sampling time, dose-area product (DAP), number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time, and skin dose were recorded.ResultsWithout image registration, the first attempt at sampling was successful in 8 of 15 procedures indicating a success rate of 53.3 %. This increased to 76.5 % (13 of 17) by adding CBCT and CE-CT image registration to AVS procedures (p = 0.266). DAP values (p = 0.001) and DSA runs (p = 0.026) decreased significantly by adding image registration guidance. Sampling and fluoroscopy times and skin dose showed no significant changes.ConclusionGuidance based on registration of CBCT and previously acquired diagnostic CE-CT can aid in enhancing localization of the adrenal veins thereby increasing the success rate of first-attempt AVS with a significant decrease in the number of used DSA runs and, consequently, radiation dose required.

  18. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  20. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumors. Predictive value of tumor response as evaluated by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Miyagi, Koichi; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Yamashiro, Katsumi; Sawada, Satoshi [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the outcome in patients with intracranial germ-cell tumors to determine whether tumor response during radiation therapy can predict achievement of primary local with radiation therapy alone. Between 1983 and 1993, 22 patients with untreated primary intracranial germ cell tumors received a total whole brain radiation dose of between 18 Gy and 45 Gy (mean 31.3 Gy) with or without a localized field of 10 to 36.4 Gy (mean, 22.4 Gy), or local irradiation only (1 patient). In 10 patients with pineal tumor only, who were treated first with radiation therapy, tumor response to radiation therapy was evaluated using computed tomography (CT) (at baseline, and approximately 20 Gy and 50 Gy). Areas of calcification in the tumor were subtracted from total tumor volume. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 12 years. Five-year actuarial survival rates for patients with germinoma were 71%, 100% for patients with a teratoma component, and 100% for patients without histologic verification. Patients with germinomas or tumors suspected of being germinomas who were given more than 50 Gy had no local relapse. There was no correlation between primary local control by radiation therapy alone and initial tumor volume. The rate of tumor volume response to irradiation assessed by CT was significantly different in those patients who relapsed compared to those who did not relapse. Tumor response during radiation therapy using CT was considered to be predictive of primary local control with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  1. Estimating radiation effective doses from whole body computed tomography scans based on U.S. soldier patient height and weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Brian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to explore how a patient's height and weight can be used to predict the effective dose to a reference phantom with similar height and weight from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan when machine-based parameters are unknown. Since machine-based scanning parameters can be misplaced or lost, a predictive model will enable the medical professional to quantify a patient's cumulative radiation dose. Methods One hundred mathematical phantoms of varying heights and weights were defined within an x-ray Monte Carlo based software code in order to calculate organ absorbed doses and effective doses from a chest abdomen pelvis scan. Regression analysis was used to develop an effective dose predictive model. The regression model was experimentally verified using anthropomorphic phantoms and validated against a real patient population. Results Estimates of the effective doses as calculated by the predictive model were within 10% of the estimates of the effective doses using experimentally measured absorbed doses within the anthropomorphic phantoms. Comparisons of the patient population effective doses show that the predictive model is within 33% of current methods of estimating effective dose using machine-based parameters. Conclusions A patient's height and weight can be used to estimate the effective dose from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan. The presented predictive model can be used interchangeably with current effective dose estimating techniques that rely on computed tomography machine-based techniques.

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  7. Dual-source computed tomography: Estimation of radiation exposure of ECG-gated and ECG-triggered coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, Dominik [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)], E-mail: dominik.ketelsen@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Thomas, Christoph; Werner, Matthias; Luetkhoff, Marie H. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Buchgeister, Markus [Departments of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Tsiflikas, Ilias; Reimann, Anja [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Burgstahler, Christof [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Ottfried-Mueller-Strasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Brodoefel, Harald; Kopp, Andreas F.; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to estimate radiation exposure of coronary calcium scoring and angiography using ECG-gated and ECG-triggered dual-source computed tomography. Materials and methods: An Alderson Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used for all dose measurements. Effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 103. Radiation exposure was performed on a dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) scanner with standard protocols for calcium scoring (DSCT-Ca) and coronary angiography (DSCTA) at different heart rates (40-100 beats/min). Furthermore, a scanning protocol with ECG-triggering as well as a standard chest CT scan were evaluated. Results: Depending on gender, heart rate and ECG-pulsing, the effective dose of a complete cardiac DSCT (DSCT-Ca and DSCTA) scan varies from 10.2 to 32.6 mSv. The effective radiation dose increased significantly with lower heart rates (p < 0.035). ECG-pulsing reduced the radiation exposure significantly in DSCTA (p < 0.001). Due to breast tissue in the primary scan range, females' doses showed an increase up to 69.9% compared to males in scan protocols without ECG-pulsing. Prospective ECG-triggered DSCTA resulted in estimated effective doses from 2.8 mSv (males) to 4.1 mSv (females). Conclusion: The ECG-pulsing technique has proven its effectiveness to reduce effective dose in coronary CT angiography and is recommended for all patients with regular heart rates. The patient's heart rate influences the radiation exposure with a significant decrease at higher heart rates. Due to its lower dose, ECG-triggered DSCTA should be implemented for special indications, i.e. for diagnosis of pathologies of the aortic root and the ascending aorta.

  8. Successful treatment of a free-moving abdominal mass with radiation therapy guided by cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihadeh Ferial

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Because tumors in the abdomen can change position, targeting these tumors for radiation therapy should be done with caution; use of daily image-guided radiation therapy is advised. Case presentation We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with recurrent mantle cell lymphoma who was referred for palliative radiation therapy for an abdominopelvic tumor. Computed tomography was used to generate images for radiation treatment planning. Comparison of those planning images with a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan ordered during the planning period revealed that the tumor had moved from one side of the abdomen to the other during the three-day interval between scans. To account for this unusual tumor movement, we obtained a second set of planning computed tomography scans and used a Varian cone-beam computed tomography scanner with on-board imaging capability to target the tumor before each daily treatment session, leading to successful treatment and complete resolution of the mass. Conclusion Abdominal masses associated with the mesentery should be considered highly mobile; thus, radiation therapy for such masses should be used with the utmost caution. Modern radiation therapy techniques offer the ability to verify the tumor location in real time and shift the treatment ports accordingly over the course of treatment.

  9. Radiation treatment planning for bladder cancer: a comparison of cystogram localisation with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, R.I.; Ash, D.V.; Jones, W.G. (Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (UK))

    1983-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the target volumes of radical radiotherapy treatment plans produced with the aid of marker cystograms, and target volumes derived from computed tomography (CT) scans in 60 patients with bladder cancer. This has demonstrated inadequacies of the cystograms due to the inability to delineate extravesical spread of tumour and, as many patients with bladder cancer had a significant residual urine, emptying the bladder by catheterisation may have given a false impression of the shape and size of the target volume. Analysis of the results showed that cystographic localisation resulted in serious underdosage of the tumour in 18% of patients and failure to include all the bladder in 37%. Conventionally produced target volumes showed potentially significant discrepancies in 85% of patients when compared with target volumes delineated by CT.

  10. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Sweet Ping, E-mail: sweet.ng@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod [Monash Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  11. Metal artifacts in computed tomography for radiation therapy planning: dosimetric effects and impact of metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; De Man, Bruno; Verburg, Joost; Trofimov, Alexei; Jin, Yannan; Wang, Ge; Gjesteby, Lars; Paganetti, Harald

    2017-04-01

    A significant and increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy present with metal objects close to, or even within, the treatment area, resulting in artifacts in computed tomography (CT) imaging, which is the most commonly used imaging method for treatment planning in radiation therapy. In the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings in treatment of head-and-neck tumors, spinal stabilization implants in spinal or paraspinal treatment or hip replacements in prostate cancer treatments, the extreme photon absorption by the metal object leads to prominent image artifacts. Although current CT scanners include a series of correction steps for beam hardening, scattered radiation and noisy measurements, when metal implants exist within or close to the treatment area, these corrections do not suffice. CT metal artifacts affect negatively the treatment planning of radiation therapy either by causing difficulties to delineate the target volume or by reducing the dose calculation accuracy. Various metal artifact reduction (MAR) methods have been explored in terms of improvement of organ delineation and dose calculation in radiation therapy treatment planning, depending on the type of radiation treatment and location of the metal implant and treatment site. Including a brief description of the available CT MAR methods that have been applied in radiation therapy, this article attempts to provide a comprehensive review on the dosimetric effect of the presence of CT metal artifacts in treatment planning, as reported in the literature, and the potential improvement suggested by different MAR approaches. The impact of artifacts on the treatment planning and delivery accuracy is discussed in the context of different modalities, such as photon external beam, brachytherapy and particle therapy, as well as by type and location of metal implants.

  12. Patient radiation dose from computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netwong, Y.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The 64-row multidetector computed tomography angiography (64-MDCTA) provides vascular image quality of the brain similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA), but the effective dose of CTA is lower than DSA studied in phantom. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effective dose from 64-MDCTA and DSA. Effective dose (according to ICRP 103) from 64-MDCTA and DSA flat panel detector for cerebral vessels examination of the brain using standard protocols as recommended by the manufacturer was calculated for 30 cases of MDCTA (15 male and 15 female).The mean patient age was 49.5 (23-89) yrs. 30 cases of DSA (14 male and 16 female), the mean patient age was 46.8 (21-81) yrs. For CTA, the mean effective dose was 3.7 (2.82- 5.19) mSv. For DSA, the mean effective dose was 5.78 (3.3-10.06) mSv. The effective dose of CTA depends on the scanning protocol and scan length. Low tube current can reduce patient dose whereas the number of exposures and number of series in 3D rotational angiography (3D RA) resulted in increasing effective dose in DSA patients.

  13. Coronary computed tomography angiography - Tolerability of β-blockers and contrast media, and temporal changes in radiation dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte; Thomsen, Camilla F; Hosbond, Susanne Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the risk of administration of β-blockers, contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) and trend in x-rays use, during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: A total of 416 patients were referred for elective CCTA. To achieve a resting heart rate below 60...... was compared with the exposure 3 years before. Results: There was no significant difference in the symptoms (dizziness, lipothymia and palpitations) between patients in and patients without β-blocker pre-treatment. Compared to baseline values, s-creatinine decreased non-significantly (75.2 versus 74.6 µmol....../L, p=0.09), while eGFR increased non-significantly (78 versus 79 mL/min, p=0.17). Also subgroups of patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes or pre-excisting slightly impaired renal function did not develop CIN. Mean radiation exposure decreased from 17.5 to 6.7 mSv, p

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... the best imaging modality for sinusitis. Tell your doctor if there’s a possibility you are pregnant and ...

  16. Radiation Optimized Dual-source Dual-energy Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography: Intra-individual and Inter-individual Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xie; Chen, Guo Zhong; Zhao, Yan E; Schoepf, U Joseph; Albrecht, Moritz H; Bickford, Matthew W; Gu, Hai Feng; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to intra-individually and inter-individually compare image quality, radiation dose, and diagnostic accuracy of dual-source dual-energy computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) protocols in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Thirty-three patients with suspected PE underwent initial and follow-up dual-energy CTPA at 80/Sn140 kVp (group A) or 100/Sn140 kVp (group B), which were assigned based on tube voltages. Subjective and objective CTPA image quality and lung perfusion map image quality were evaluated. Diagnostic accuracies of CTPA and perfusion maps were assessed by two radiologists independently. Effective dose (ED) was calculated and compared. Mean computed tomography (CT) values of pulmonary arteries were higher in group A than group B (P = .006). There was no difference in signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio between the two groups (both P > .05). Interobserver agreement for evaluating subjective image quality of CTPA and color-coded perfusion images was either good (κ = 0.784) or excellent (κ = 0.887). Perfusion defect scores and diagnostic accuracy of CTPA showed no difference between both groups (both P > .05). Effective dose of group A was reduced by 45.8% compared to group B (P energy CTPA with 80/Sn140 kVp allows for sufficient image quality and diagnostic accuracy for detecting PE while substantially reducing radiation dose. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a recovery period and will be given instructions on any limitations in activity for the day. ... Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment ... period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography ( ... more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment ... period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless ... table. Other imaging methods such as ultrasound or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can provide pictures of certain areas ...

  4. Proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  5. Low-dose radiation with 80-kVp computed tomography to diagnose pulmonary embolism: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, Ulf [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Lund, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Trelleborg (Sweden)], E-mail: ulf.nyman@skane.se; Bjoerkdahl, Peter [Dept. of Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Trelleborg (Sweden); Olsson, Marie-Louise; Gunnarsson, Mikael [Medical Radiation Physics, Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Univ. of Lund, Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Goldman, Bitte [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Trelleborg (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Background Mounting collective radiation doses from computed tomography (CT) implies an increased risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed populations, especially in the young. Purpose To evaluate radiation dose and image quality at 80-kVp CT to diagnose acute pulmonary embolism (PE) compared with a previous study at 100 and 120 kVp with all other scanning parameters unchanged. Material and Methods A custom-made chest phantom with a 12 mg I/mL-syringe was scanned at 80/100/120 kVp to evaluate relative changes in computed tomographic dose index (CTDIvol), attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Fifty patients underwent 80 kVp 16-row detector CT at 100 'Quality reference' mAs. A total of 350 mg I/kg were injected to compensate for increased CNR at 80 kVp, while 300 mg I/kg had been used at 100/120 kVp. CTDI{sub vol}, dose-length product (DLP), and estimated effective dose were evaluated including Monte Carlo simulations. Pulmonary artery attenuation and noise were measured and CNR calculated. Two radiologists evaluated subjective image quality using a four-grade scale. Results Switching from 120 to 80 kVp in the phantom study decreased radiation dose by 67% while attenuation and noise increased 1.6 and 2.0 times, respectively, and CNR decreased by 16%. Switching from 120 to 80 kVp in the patient studies decreased estimated effective dose from 4.0 to 1.2 mSv (70% decrease) in median while pulmonary artery attenuation and noise roughly doubled from 332 to 653 HU and from 22 to 49 HU, respectively, resulting in similar CNR (13 vs. 12). At 80 kVp all examinations were regarded as adequate (8%) or excellent (92%). Conclusion Switching from 120 to 80 kVp CT without increased mAs but slightly increased iodine dose may be of special benefit to diagnose PE in younger individuals with preserved renal function where the primary aim is to minimize radiation dose and reaching levels below that of scintigraphy.

  6. Radiation dose in computed tomography of the pelvis: comparison of helical and axial scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, A G; Budd, R S; McKenzie, A F

    1997-11-01

    An anthropomorphic Rando phantom was used to compare radiation doses sustained during helical and conventional axial CT of the pelvis. The values obtained with the Rando phantom were validated against cadaveric phantoms, and show good agreement. For the authors' particular CT unit, helical scanning was found to deliver a lower radiation dose than conventional axial scanning. This was most prominent at 1.0-s tube rotation times (average dose ratio 1.24). For realistic scanning parameters and exposure factors, the ratio of radiation dose to pelvic organs can be expected to lie in the range of 40-100 mGy. The whole-body effective dose (ED) depends on selection of scanning parameters and patients anatomy. In a favourable case scenario, the ED for CT scanning of the pelvis in a male can be expected to be between 10 and 20 mSv if the scrotum is not included in the radiation field, while the ED in a female will be approximately 20 mSv. An examination of scatter radiation fall-off curves from a single slice shows that the spread of scatter radiation is only marginally affected by slice thickness. A total of 10-12 cm of human soft tissue acts as a good barrier against internal scattered radiation. The use of such scatter fall-off curves, together with manufacturers' dosimetry specifications, allows a fast estimate of absorbed dose.

  7. Radiation dose measurements during kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography imaging in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sathish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Radiation dose to the eye, breast, and the surface of the pelvis have been arrived at during CBCT. The doses measured on patients agreed closely with those measured on humanoid phantom and with published values.

  8. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moding, Everett J. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ghaghada, Ketan [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Johnson, G. Allan [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Badea, Cristian T., E-mail: cristian.badea@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  9. Scintimammography and single-photon emission computed tomography for postoperative image guidance for radiation treatment planning in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperkova, E; Chavdarova, L; Garanina, Z; Gocheva, L; Parvanova, V; Tzonevska, A; Dimitrova, M

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate post-surgical tumor-metabolic regions outside of the computed tomography (CT)-defined volume for radiation therapy (RT) planning using functional imaging of scintimammography (SMG) ± single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in breast cancer (BC) patients. 62 operated high-risk BC females, mean age 50.45 years, underwent SMG±SPECT before RT planning. Twenty-one and twelve patients with stage I and IIa respectively had lumpectomy (LT) with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and modified radical mastectomy (Patay) + ALND was realized in 29 stage IIb-III patients. All SMG images, positive for viable tumor tissue (VTT) or metastatically involved lymph nodes (LNs) were verified cytologically/ histologically. Three early planar and delayed images were acquired after i.v. administration of 550-740 MBq 99mTc- MIBI or 99mTc-TF. Uptake values (UV) > 1.65 revealed VTT. Data in 49 (79%) of 62 patients were characterized as true-negative (TN; UVVTT in scars, 1 newly defined BC in the contralateral breast and 18 regional LN metastases (6 axillary, 6 parasternal, 1 sub- and 5 supraclavicular). All 22 TP VTT lesions were imaged by scintigraphy using different tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals: 99mTc-MIBI - 17 (77%) and 99mTc- TF - 5 (23%) of the TP lesions. One false-positive (FP) (inflammation: UV>1.65) and one false-negative (FN) (UVVTT, LN metastases or altered biological activity in the scars after BC surgery and could modify the irradiated volume, optimizing the therapeutic effect and minimizing RT side effects.

  10. Computer processing of tomography data

    OpenAIRE

    Konečný, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Computer processing of tomography data Tomographs are one of the most important diagnostic devices, which are used in every hospital nowadays; they have already been so for a considerable period of time. The different types of tomographs and the processing of tomographic data and imaging of these data are the subject of this thesis. I have described the four most common types of tomography: X-ray Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon E...

  11. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  12. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  13. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease are important to test and optimize new therapeutic interventions. To evaluate the effect of these interventions, sensitive and accurate outcome measures are needed. The most commonly used endpoints are spirometric variables...... are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  14. Feasibility of synchrotron radiation computed tomography on rats bearing glioma after iodine or gadolinium injection. Jeune Equipe RSRM-UJF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, G; Corde, S; Elleaume, H; Estève, F; Charvet, A M; Brochard, T; Fiedler, S; Collomb, A; Le Bas, J F

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new imaging technique called synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT). This technique leads to a direct assessment of the in vivo concentration of an iodine- or gadolinium-labeled compound. Rats bearing C6 glioma were imaged by MRI prior to the SRCT experiment. The SRCT experiments were performed after a 1.3 g I/kg (n = 5) or a 0.4 g Gd/kg (n = 5) injection. Finally, brains were sampled for histology. The SRCT images exhibited contrast enhancement at the tumor location. Ten minutes after injection, iodine and gadolinium tissular concentrations were equal to 0.80 ( +/- 0.40) mg/cm3 and 0.50 ( +/- 0.10) mg/cm3, respectively in the peripheral area of the tumor (respective background value: 0.20 +/- 0.02 to 0.10 +/- 0.01). Correlation to MRI and histology revealed that the contrast uptake occurred in the most vascularized area of the tumor. The present study summarizes the feasibility of in vivo SRCT to obtain quantitative information about iodine and gadolinium-labeled compounds. Beyond brain tumor pathology, the SRCT appears as a complementary approach to MRI and CT, for studying iodine- and gadolinium-labeled compounds by the direct achievement of the tissular concentration value in the tissue.

  15. Characterization of a human tooth with carious lesions using conventional and synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadowiec, Iwona; Beckmann, Felix; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    In a dental office, every day X rays of teeth within the oral cavity are obtained. Caries induces a mineral loss and, therefore, becomes visible by reduced X-ray absorption. The detailed spatial distribution of the mineral loss, however, is inaccessible in conventional dental radiology, since the dose for such studies is intolerable. As a consequence, such measurements can only be performed after tooth extraction. We have taken advantage of synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography to characterize a human tooth with a rather small, natural caries lesion and an artificially induced lesion provoked by acidic etching. Both halves of the tooth were separately visualized from 2400 radiographs recorded at the beam line P07 / PETRA III (HASYLAB at DESY, Hamburg, Germany) with an asymmetric rotation axis at photon energy of 45 keV. Because of the setup, one finds an energy shift in the horizontal plane, to be corrected. After the appropriate three-dimensional registration of the data with the ones of the same crown using the better accessible phoenix nanotom® m of General Electric, Wunstorf, Germany, one can determine the joint histogram, which enable to calibrate the system with the conventional X-ray source.

  16. Automated segmentation of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography biomedical images using Graph Cuts and neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson, E-mail: ameneses@ieee.org [Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, CEP 20550-900, RJ (Brazil); Giusti, Alessandro [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Parreira Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson [Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cely Barroso, Regina [Laboratory of Applied Physics on Biomedical Sciences, Physics Department, Rio de Janeiro State University, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de [Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, CEP 20550-900, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-12-21

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) X-ray micro-Computed Tomography ({mu}CT) enables magnified images to be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique with a high space resolution for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of biomedical samples. The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to SR-{mu}CT is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images for visualization, such as the high resolution and the phase contrast effect. In this article, we describe and assess the application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm for the segmentation of SR-{mu}CT biomedical images acquired at the Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beam line at the Elettra Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). We also propose a method using EMvGC with Artificial Neural Networks (EMANNs) for correcting misclassifications due to intensity variation of phase contrast, which are important effects and sometimes indispensable in certain biomedical applications, although they impair the segmentation provided by conventional techniques. Results demonstrate considerable success in the segmentation of SR-{mu}CT biomedical images, with average Dice Similarity Coefficient 99.88% for bony tissue in Wistar Rats rib samples (EMvGC), as well as 98.95% and 98.02% for scans of Rhodnius prolixus insect samples (Chagas's disease vector) with EMANNs, in relation to manual segmentation. The techniques EMvGC and EMANNs cope with the task of performing segmentation in images with the intensity variation due to phase contrast effects, presenting a superior performance in comparison to conventional segmentation techniques based on thresholding and linear/nonlinear image filtering, which is also discussed in the present article.

  17. Computed tomography for preoperative planning in minimal-invasive total hip arthroplasty: Radiation exposure and cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppertz, Alexander, E-mail: Alexander.Huppertz@charite.de [Imaging Science Institute Charite Berlin, Robert-Koch-Platz 7, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Radmer, Sebastian, E-mail: s.radmer@immanuel.de [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Immanuel-Krankenhaus, Koenigstr. 63, D-14109, Berlin (Germany); Asbach, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Asbach@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Juran, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.juran@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schwenke@scossis.de [Biostatistician, Scossis Statistical Consulting, Zeltinger Str. 58G, D-13465 Berlin (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.diederichs@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.Hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Sparmann, Martin, E-mail: m.sparmann@immanuel.de [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Immanuel-Krankenhaus, Koenigstr. 63, D-14109, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was used for preoperative planning of minimal-invasive total hip arthroplasty (THA). 92 patients (50 males, 42 females, mean age 59.5 years) with a mean body-mass-index (BMI) of 26.5 kg/m{sup 2} underwent 64-slice CT to depict the pelvis, the knee and the ankle in three independent acquisitions using combined x-, y-, and z-axis tube current modulation. Arthroplasty planning was performed using 3D-Hip Plan (Symbios, Switzerland) and patient radiation dose exposure was determined. The effects of BMI, gender, and contralateral THA on the effective dose were evaluated by an analysis-of-variance. A process-cost-analysis from the hospital perspective was done. All CT examinations were of sufficient image quality for 3D-THA planning. A mean effective dose of 4.0 mSv (SD 0.9 mSv) modeled by the BMI (p < 0.0001) was calculated. The presence of a contralateral THA (9/92 patients; p = 0.15) and the difference between males and females were not significant (p = 0.08). Personnel involved were the radiologist (4 min), the surgeon (16 min), the radiographer (12 min), and administrative personnel (4 min). A CT operation time of 11 min and direct per-patient costs of 52.80 Euro were recorded. Preoperative CT for THA was associated with a slight and justifiable increase of radiation exposure in comparison to conventional radiographs and low per-patient costs.

  18. Computed tomography for preoperative planning in minimal-invasive total hip arthroplasty: radiation exposure and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Alexander; Radmer, Sebastian; Asbach, Patrick; Juran, Ralf; Schwenke, Carsten; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Sparmann, Martin

    2011-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used for preoperative planning of minimal-invasive total hip arthroplasty (THA). 92 patients (50 males, 42 females, mean age 59.5 years) with a mean body-mass-index (BMI) of 26.5 kg/m(2) underwent 64-slice CT to depict the pelvis, the knee and the ankle in three independent acquisitions using combined x-, y-, and z-axis tube current modulation. Arthroplasty planning was performed using 3D-Hip Plan(®) (Symbios, Switzerland) and patient radiation dose exposure was determined. The effects of BMI, gender, and contralateral THA on the effective dose were evaluated by an analysis-of-variance. A process-cost-analysis from the hospital perspective was done. All CT examinations were of sufficient image quality for 3D-THA planning. A mean effective dose of 4.0 mSv (SD 0.9 mSv) modeled by the BMI (p<0.0001) was calculated. The presence of a contralateral THA (9/92 patients; p=0.15) and the difference between males and females were not significant (p=0.08). Personnel involved were the radiologist (4 min), the surgeon (16 min), the radiographer (12 min), and administrative personnel (4 min). A CT operation time of 11 min and direct per-patient costs of 52.80 € were recorded. Preoperative CT for THA was associated with a slight and justifiable increase of radiation exposure in comparison to conventional radiographs and low per-patient costs.

  19. Collimation and Image Quality of C-Arm Computed Tomography: Potential of Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Equal Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werncke, Thomas; von Falck, Christian; Luepke, Matthias; Stamm, Georg; Wacker, Frank K; Meyer, Bernhard Christian

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential for radiation dose reduction in collimated C-arm computed tomography (CACT) while maintaining the image quality of the full field of view (FFOV) acquisition. A whole-body anthropomorphic phantom representing a 70-kg male was used in this study. The upper abdomen of the phantom was imaged using an angiographic system (Artis Zeego Q; Siemens Healthcare, Germany) with either the standard detector radiation dose level (RDL; D100, 360 nGy) or 14 experimental reduced RDLs ranging from 95% (D95, 342 nGy) to 30% D100 (D30, 108 nGy). Either the FFOV (craniocaudal coverage, 18 cm) or a collimated field of view (CFOV; craniocaudal coverage, 6 cm) was applied. The organ dose was measured using thermoluminescence detector dosimetry, and the mean effective dose was computed according to the recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. To compare the CFOV and the FFOV data sets, image quality was assessed in terms of high- and low-contrast resolution by calculating the modulation transfer function using the wire method as well as the image noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio using a low-contrast insert placed in the upper abdomen (Δ50 HU). Collimated imaging (CFOV) covering 33% of the FFOV led to an increase in the x-ray tube output of 152% for CFOV (D100; FFOV, 95.5 mGy; CFOV, 147.7 mGy) to maintain the detector dose. The mean effective dose of D100 was 6.0 mSv (male) and 6.2 mSv (female) for the FFOV and 3.7 mSv (male) and 4.1 mSv (female) for the CFOV. High-contrast resolution was comparable for all acquisition protocols (mean 10% modulation transfer function ± 95% confidence interval; FFOV, 8.8 ± 0.1 line pairs/cm; CFOV, 8.8 ± 0.1 line pairs/cm). Low-contrast resolution was superior for the CFOV compared with that for the FFOV for each RDL (D100; image noise: FFOV, 34 ± 2 HU; CFOV, 22 ± 1 HU; contrast-to-noise ratio: FFOV, 1.3 ± 0.2; CFOV, 1.8 ± 0

  20. Radiation Dose to the Lens of the Eye from Computed Tomography Scans of the Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januzis, Natalie Ann

    While it is well known that exposure to radiation can result in cataract formation, questions still remain about the presence of a dose threshold in radiation cataractogenesis. Since the exposure history from diagnostic CT exams is well documented in a patient's medical record, the population of patients chronically exposed to radiation from head CT exams may be an interesting area to explore for further research in this area. However, there are some challenges in estimating lens dose from head CT exams. An accurate lens dosimetry model would have to account for differences in imaging protocols, differences in head size, and the use of any dose reduction methods. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method to estimate radiation dose to the lens of the eye for patients receiving CT scans of the head. This research is comprised of a physics component, in which a lens dosimetry model was derived for head CT, and a clinical component, which involved the application of that dosimetry model to patient data. The physics component includes experiments related to the physical measurement of the radiation dose to the lens by various types of dosimeters placed within anthropomorphic phantoms. These dosimeters include high-sensitivity MOSFETs, TLDs, and radiochromic film. The six anthropomorphic phantoms used in these experiments range in age from newborn to adult. First, the lens dose from five clinically relevant head CT protocols was measured in the anthropomorphic phantoms with MOSFET dosimeters on two state-of-the-art CT scanners. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), which is a standard CT output index, was compared to the measured lens doses. Phantom age-specific CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factors were derived using linear regression analysis. Since head size can vary among individuals of the same age, a method was derived to estimate the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor using the effective head diameter. These conversion

  1. Reduced radiation exposure for face transplant surgical planning computed tomography angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Schultz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that wide area detector face transplant surgical planning CT angiograms with simulated lower radiation dose and iterative reconstruction (AIDR3D are comparable in image quality to those with standard tube current and filtered back projection (FBP reconstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sinograms from 320-detector row CT angiography of four clinical candidates for face transplantation were processed utilizing standard FBP, FBP with simulated 75, 62, and 50% tube current, and AIDR3D with corresponding dose reduction. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR were measured at muscle, fat, artery, and vein. Image quality for each reconstruction strategy was assessed by two independent readers using a 4-point scale. RESULTS: Compared to FBP, the median SNR and CNR for AIDR3D images were higher at all sites for all 4 different tube currents. The AIDR3D with simulated 50% tube current achieved comparable SNR and CNR to FBP with standard dose (median muscle SNR: 5.77 vs. 6.23; fat SNR: 6.40 vs. 5.75; artery SNR: 43.8 vs. 45.0; vein SNR: 54.9 vs. 55.7; artery CNR: 38.1 vs. 38.6; vein CNR: 49.0 vs. 48.7; all p-values >0.19. The interobserver agreement in the image quality score was good (weighted κ = 0.7. The overall score and the scores for smaller arteries were significantly lower when FBP with 50% dose reduction was used. The AIDR3D reconstruction images with 4 different simulated doses achieved a mean score ranging from 3.68 to 3.82 that were comparable to the scores from images reconstructed using FBP with original dose (3.68-3.77. CONCLUSIONS: Simulated radiation dose reduction applied to clinical CT angiography for face transplant planning suggests that AIDR3D allows for a 50% reduction in radiation dose, as compared to FBP, while preserving image quality.

  2. Patient dose from kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography imaging in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad K; Purdie, Thomas G; Norrlinger, Bernhard D; Alasti, Hamideh; Moseley, Douglas J; Sharpe, Michael B; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Jaffray, David A

    2006-06-01

    Kilovoltage cone-beam computerized tomography (kV-CBCT) systems integrated into the gantry of linear accelerators can be used to acquire high-resolution volumetric images of the patient in the treatment position. Using on-line software and hardware, patient position can be determined accurately with a high degree of precision and, subsequently, set-up parameters can be adjusted to deliver the intended treatment. While the patient dose due to a single volumetric imaging acquisition is small compared to the therapy dose, repeated and daily image guidance procedures can lead to substantial dose to normal tissue. The dosimetric properties of a clinical CBCT system have been studied on an Elekta linear accelerator (Synergy RP, XVI system) and additional measurements performed on a laboratory system with identical geometry. Dose measurements were performed with an ion chamber and MOSFET detectors at the center, periphery, and surface of 30 and 16-cm-diam cylindrical shaped water phantoms, as a function of x-ray energy and longitudinal field-of-view (FOV) settings of 5,10,15, and 26 cm. The measurements were performed for full 360 degrees CBCT acquisition as well as for half-rotation scans for 120 kVp beams using the 30-cm-diam phantom. The dose at the center and surface of the body phantom were determined to be 1.6 and 2.3 cGy for a typical imaging protocol, using full rotation scan, with a technique setting of 120 kVp and 660 mAs. The results of our measurements have been presented in terms of a dose conversion factor fCBCT, expressed in cGy/R. These factors depend on beam quality and phantom size as well as on scan geometry and can be utilized to estimate dose for any arbitrary mAs setting and reference exposure rate of the x-ray tube at standard distance. The results demonstrate the opportunity to manipulate the scanning parameters to reduce the dose to the patient by employing lower energy (kVp) beams, smaller FOV, or by using half-rotation scan.

  3. Longitudinal assessment of carotid atherosclerosis after Radiation Therapy using Computed Tomography: A case control Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzidei, Michele [Rome Univ. ' ' La Sapienza' ' (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Suri, Jasjit S.; Piga, Mario [AtheroPoint TM LLC, Roseville, CA (United States). Monitoring and Diagnostic Div.; Global Biomedical Technologies, Inc., CA (United States). Point of Care Devices; Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Saba, Luca [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Vascular Surgery; Laddeo, Giancarlo [New York Univ. Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Argiolas, Giovanni Maria [Azienda Ospedaliera Brotzu, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Raz, Eytan [Rome Univ. ' ' La Sapienza' ' (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; New York Univ. Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-01-15

    To study the carotid artery plaque composition and its volume changes in a group of patients at baseline and 2 years after head and neck radiation therapy treatment (HNXRT). In this retrospective study, 62 patients (41 males; mean age 63 years; range 52-81) who underwent HNXRT and 40 patients (24 males; mean age 65) who underwent surgical resection of neoplasm and did not undergo HNXRT were assessed, with 2-year follow-up. The carotid artery plaque volumes, as well as the volume of the sub-components (fatty-mixed-calcified), were semiautomatically quantified. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were used to test the hypothesis. In the HNXRT group, there was a statistically significant increase in the total volume of the carotid artery plaques (from 533 to 746 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.001), in the fatty plaques (103 vs. 202 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.001) and mixed plaque component volume (328 vs. 419 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.034). A statistically significant variation (from 21.8 % to 27.6 %) in the percentage of the fatty tissue was found. of this preliminary study suggest that HNXRT promotes increased carotid artery plaque volume, particularly the fatty plaque component. (orig.)

  4. Paediatric cardiac computed tomography: a review of imaging techniques and radiation dose consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Carolyn; Taylor, Andrew M. [UCL, Institute of Child Health, Cardiorespiratory Unit, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Cardiorespiratory Unit, London (United Kingdom); Owens, Catherine M. [UCL, Institute of Child Health, Cardiorespiratory Unit, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    The significant challenges involved in imaging the heart in small children (<15 kg) have been addressed by, and partially resolved with improvement in temporal and spatial resolution secondary to the advent of new multi-detector CT technology. This has enabled both retrospective and prospective ECG-gated imaging in children even at high heart rates (over 100 bpm) without the need for beta blockers. Recent studies have highlighted that the radiation burden associated with cardiac CT can be reduced using prospective ECG-gating. Our experience shows that the resultant dose reduction can be optimised to a level equivalent to that of a non-gated study. This article reviews the different aspects of ECG-gating and the preferred technique for cardiac imaging in the young child (<15 kg). We summarize our evidenced based recommendations for readers, referencing recent articles and using our in house data, protocols and dose measurements discussing the various methods available for dose calculations and their inherent bias. (orig.)

  5. Coronary computed tomography angiography using ultra-low-dose contrast media: radiation dose and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Sei; Kamata, Teruaki; Imai, Atsuko; Ohara, Tomoki; Takewa, Mitsuhiko; Ohe, Ryoko; Miyaji, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Junichi; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2013-08-01

    To analyze the invasiveness and image quality of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with 80 kV. We enrolled 181 patients with low body weight and low calcium level. Of these, 154 patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 280 HU/80 kV (n = 51); 350 HU/80 kV (n = 51); or 350 HU/120 kV (n = 52). The amount of contrast media (CM) was decided with a CT number-controlling system. Twenty-seven patients were excluded because of an invalid time density curve by timing bolus. The predicted amount of CM, volume CT dose index, dose-length product, effective dose, image noise, and 5-point image quality were measured. The amounts of CM for the 80 kV/280 HU, 80 kV/350 HU, and 120 kV/350 HU groups were 10 ± 4 mL, 15 ± 7 mL, and 30 ± 6 mL, respectively. Although image noise was greater at 80 than 120 kV, there was no significant difference in image quality between 80 kV/350 HU and 120 kV/350 HU (p = 0.390). There was no significant difference in image quality between 80 kV/280 HU and 80 kV/350 HU (4.4 ± 0.7 vs. 4.7 ± 0.4, p = 0.056). The amount of CM and effective dose was lower for 80 kV CCTA than for 120 kV CCTA. CCTA at 80 kV/280 HU may decrease the amount of CM and radiation dose necessary while maintaining image quality.

  6. Reduction of radiation exposure and improvement of image quality with BMI-adapted prospective cardiac computed tomography and iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosch, Waldemar, E-mail: waldemar.hosch@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Stiller, Wolfram [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Mueller, Dirk [Philips GmbH Healthcare Division, Hamburg (Germany); Gitsioudis, Gitsios [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Welzel, Johanna; Dadrich, Monika [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Buss, Sebastian J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans U. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Katus, Hugo A. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Korosoglou, Grigorios, E-mail: gkorosoglou@hotmail.com [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocols and iterative reconstruction algorithms (iDose) on patient radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective ECG-triggered 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: Image quality and radiation exposure were systematically analyzed in 100 patients. 60 Patients underwent prospective ECG-triggered CCTA using a non-tailored protocol and served as a 'control' group (Group 1: 120 kV, 200 mA s). 40 Consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent prospective CCTA, using BMI-adapted tube voltage and standard (Group 2: 100/120 kV, 100-200 mA s) versus reduced tube current (Group 3: 100/120 kV, 75-150 mA s). Iterative reconstructions were provided with different iDose levels and were compared to filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructions. Image quality was assessed in consensus of 2 experienced observers and using a 5-grade scale (1 = best to 5 = worse), and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR) were quantified. Results: CCTA was performed without adverse events in all patients (n = 100, heart rate of 47-87 bpm and BMI of 19-38 kg/m{sup 2}). Patients examined using the non-tailored protocol in Group 1 had the highest radiation exposure (3.2 {+-} 0.4 mSv), followed by Group 2 (1.7 {+-} 0.7 mSv) and Group 3 (1.2 {+-} 0.6 mSv) (radiation savings of 47% and 63%, respectively, p < 0.001). Iterative reconstructions provided increased SNR and CNR, particularly when higher iDose level 5 was applied with Multi-Frequency reconstruction (iDose5 MFR) (14.1 {+-} 4.6 versus 21.2 {+-} 7.3 for SNR and 12.0 {+-} 4.2 versus 18.1 {+-} 6.6 for CNR, for FBP versus iDose5 MFR, respectively, p < 0.001). The combination of BMI adaptation with iterative reconstruction reduced radiation exposure and simultaneously improved image quality (subjective image quality of 1.4 {+-} 0.4 versus 1.9 {+-} 0.5 for Group 2 reconstructed using

  7. [Quantitative structure characteristics and fractal dimension of Chinese medicine granules measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray computed micro tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-long; Zheng, Qin; Yin, Xian-zhen; Xiao, Guang-qing; Liao, Zu-hua; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ji-wen

    2015-06-01

    The shape and structure of granules are controlled by the granulation process, which is one of the main factors to determine the nature of the solid dosage forms. In this article, three kinds of granules of a traditional Chinese medicine for improving appetite and promoting digestion, namely, Jianwei Granules, were prepared using granulation technologies as pendular granulation, high speed stirring granulation, and fluidized bed granulation and the powder properties of them were investigated. Meanwhile, synchrotron radiation X-ray computed micro tomography (SR-µCT) was applied to quantitatively determine the irregular internal structures of the granules. The three-dimensional (3D) structure models were obtained by 3D reconstruction, which were more accurately to characterize the three-dimensional structures of the particles through the quantitative data. The models were also used to quantitatively compare the structural differences of granules prepared by different granulation processes with the same formula, so as to characterize how the production process plays a role in the pharmaceutical behaviors of the granules. To focus on the irregularity of the particle structure, the box counting method was used to calculate the fractal dimensions of the granules. The results showed that the fractal dimension is more sensitive to reflect the minor differences in the structure features than the conventional parameters, and capable to specifically distinct granules in structure. It is proved that the fractal dimension could quantitatively characterize the structural information of irregular granules. It is the first time suggested by our research that the fractal dimension difference (Df,c) between two fractal dimension parameters, namely, the volume matrix fractal dimension and the surface matrix fractal dimension, is a new index to characterize granules with irregular structures and evaluate the effects of production processes on the structures of granules as a new

  8. Determination of Internal Target Volume for Radiation Treatment Planning of Esophageal Cancer by Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaojian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lu, Haijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Radiation Oncology Center, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao (China); Tai, An; Johnstone, Candice; Gore, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To determine an efficient strategy for the generation of the internal target volume (ITV) for radiation treatment planning for esophageal cancer using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: 4DCT sets acquired for 20 patients with esophageal carcinoma were analyzed. Each of the 4DCT sets was binned into 10 respiratory phases. For each patient, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4DCT set at each phase. Various strategies to derive ITV were explored, including the volume from the maximum intensity projection (MIP; ITV{sub M}IP), unions of the GTVs from selected multiple phases ITV2 (0% and 50% phases), ITV3 (ITV2 plus 80%), and ITV4 (ITV3 plus 60%), as well as the volumes expanded from ITV2 and ITV3 with a uniform margin. These ITVs were compared to ITV10 (the union of the GTVs for all 10 phases) and the differences were measured with the overlap ratio (OR) and relative volume ratio (RVR) relative to ITV10 (ITVx/ITV10). Results: For all patients studied, the average GTV from a single phase was 84.9% of ITV10. The average ORs were 91.2%, 91.3%, 94.5%, and 96.4% for ITV{sub M}IP, ITV2, ITV3, and ITV4, respectively. Low ORs were associated with irregular breathing patterns. ITV3s plus 1 mm uniform margins (ITV3+1) led to an average OR of 98.1% and an average RVR of 106.4%. Conclusions: The ITV generated directly from MIP underestimates the range of the respiration motion for esophageal cancer. The ITV generated from 3 phases (ITV3) may be used for regular breathers, whereas the ITV generated from 4 phases (ITV4) or ITV3 plus a 1-mm uniform margin may be applied for irregular breathers.

  9. Radiation dose optimization in pediatric temporal bone computed tomography: influence of tube tension on image contrast and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauer, Claude Bertrand [University Hospital Berne, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Berne (Switzerland); Zentrales Roentgeninstitut, Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Zubler, Christoph; Weisstanner, Christian [University Hospital Berne, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Berne (Switzerland); Stieger, Christof [University Berne, Group for Artificial Hearing Research, ARTORG Center, Berne (Switzerland); Senn, Pascal [University Hospital Berne, Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Berne (Switzerland); Arnold, Andreas [University Berne, Group for Artificial Hearing Research, ARTORG Center, Berne (Switzerland); University Hospital Berne, Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, Berne (Switzerland)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effect of tube tension reduction on image contrast and image quality in pediatric temporal bone computed tomography (CT). Seven lamb heads with infant-equivalent sizes were scanned repeatedly, using four tube tensions from 140 to 80 kV while the CT-Dose Index (CTDI) was held constant. Scanning was repeated with four CTDI values from 30 to 3 mGy. Image contrast was calculated for the middle ear as the Hounsfield unit (HU) difference between bone and air and for the inner ear as the HU difference between bone and fluid. The influence of tube tension on high-contrast detail delineation was evaluated using a phantom. The subjective image quality of eight middle and inner ear structures was assessed using a 4-point scale (scores 1-2 = insufficient; scores 3-4 = sufficient). Middle and inner ear contrast showed a near linear increase with tube tension reduction (r = -0.94/-0.88) and was highest at 80 kV. Tube tension had no influence on spatial resolution. Subjective image quality analysis showed significantly better scoring at lower tube tensions, with highest image quality at 80 kV. However, image quality improvement was most relevant for low-dose scans. Image contrast in the temporal bone is significantly higher at low tube tensions, leading to a better subjective image quality. Highest contrast and best quality were found at 80 kV. This image quality improvement might be utilized to further reduce the radiation dose in pediatric low-dose CT protocols. (orig.)

  10. Metrizamide computed tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, T.; Tamakawa, Y.; Arii, H. (Akita Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, M.; Hirota, K.

    1981-11-01

    Serial computed tomography of the cervical cord was performed following metrizamide myelography in five cases of clinically suspected syringomyelia. The syrinx filled with refluxed metrizamide was demonstrated in all of the cases. The reflux of metrizamide into the syrinx was most marked several hours following intrathecal injection of metrizamide. Computed tomography combined with metrizamide myelography is essential in the diagnosis of communicating syringomyelia.

  11. Future of cardiac computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo N De Cecco; U Joseph Schoepf

    2015-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography(CCTA)has become an integral tool in the noninvasive diagnostic workup of patients with suspected coronary artery disease in both elective and emergency settings. Today, it represents a mature technique providing accurate, non-invasive morphological assessment of the coronary arteries and atherosclerotic plaque burden. Iterative reconstruction algorithms, low kV imaging, and single-heart beat acquisitions hold promise to further reduce dose requirements and improve the safety and robustness of the technique in several circumstances including imaging of heavily calcified vessels, patients with morbid obesity or irregular heart rates, and assessment in the emergency setting. However, it has become clear over recent years that cardiac radiologists need to take further steps towards the development and integration of functional imaging with morphological CCTA assessment to truly provide a comprehensive evaluation of the heart. Computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, including both dynamic and static dual-energy approaches, has demonstrated the ability to directly assess and quantify myocardial ischemia with simultaneous CCTA acquisition with a reasonable contrast medium volume and radiation dose delivered to the patient. In order to promote CCTA in the clinical and research environments, radiologists should prepare to embrace the change from morphological to functional imaging, furnishing all the necessary resources and information to referring clinicians.

  12. A Freeware Path to Neutron Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillinger, Burkhard; Craft, Aaron E.

    Neutron computed tomography has become a routine method at many neutron sources due to the availability of digital detection systems, powerful computers and advanced software. The commercial packages Octopus by Inside Matters and VGStudio by Volume Graphics have been established as a quasi-standard for high-end computed tomography. However, these packages require a stiff investment and are available to the users only on-site at the imaging facility to do their data processing. There is a demand from users to have image processing software at home to do further data processing; in addition, neutron computed tomography is now being introduced even at smaller and older reactors. Operators need to show a first working tomography setup before they can obtain a budget to build an advanced tomography system. Several packages are available on the web for free; however, these have been developed for X-rays or synchrotron radiation and are not immediately useable for neutron computed tomography. Three reconstruction packages and three 3D-viewers have been identified and used even for Gigabyte datasets. This paper is not a scientific publication in the classic sense, but is intended as a review to provide searchable help to make the described packages usable for the tomography community. It presents the necessary additional preprocessing in ImageJ, some workarounds for bugs in the software, and undocumented or badly documented parameters that need to be adapted for neutron computed tomography. The result is a slightly complicated, but surprisingly high-quality path to neutron computed tomography images in 3D, but not a replacement for the even more powerful commercial software mentioned above.

  13. Lung Texture in Serial Thoracic Computed Tomography Scans: Correlation of Radiomics-based Features With Radiation Therapy Dose and Radiation Pneumonitis Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra; Armato, Samuel G. [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Pham, Ngoc [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: hal-hallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between radiation dose and change in a set of mathematical intensity- and texture-based features and to determine the ability of texture analysis to identify patients who develop radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 106 patients who received radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified under institutional review board approval. For each patient, diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired before (0-168 days) and after (5-120 days) RT, and a treatment planning CT scan with an associated dose map was obtained. 32- × 32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) were randomly identified in the lungs of each pre-RT scan. ROIs were subsequently mapped to the post-RT scan and the planning scan dose map by using deformable image registration. The changes in 20 feature values (ΔFV) between pre- and post-RT scan ROIs were calculated. Regression modeling and analysis of variance were used to test the relationships between ΔFV, mean ROI dose, and development of grade ≥2 RP. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to determine each feature's ability to distinguish between patients with and those without RP. A classifier was constructed to determine whether 2- or 3-feature combinations could improve RP distinction. Results: For all 20 features, a significant ΔFV was observed with increasing radiation dose. Twelve features changed significantly for patients with RP. Individual texture features could discriminate between patients with and those without RP with moderate performance (AUCs from 0.49 to 0.78). Using multiple features in a classifier, AUC increased significantly (0.59-0.84). Conclusions: A relationship between dose and change in a set of image-based features was observed. For 12 features, ΔFV was significantly related to RP development. This study demonstrated the ability of radiomics to provide a quantitative, individualized

  14. Impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on computed tomography defined target volumes in radiation treatment planning of esophageal cancer: reduction in geographic misses with equal inter-observer variability: PET/CT improves esophageal target definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, L M A; Busz, D M; Paardekooper, G M R M; Beukema, J C; Jager, P L; Van der Jagt, E J; van Dam, G M; Groen, H; Plukker, J Th M; Langendijk, J A

    2010-08-01

    Target volume definition in modern radiotherapy is based on planning computed tomography (CT). So far, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has not been included in planning modality in volume definition of esophageal cancer. This study evaluates fusion of FDG-PET and CT in patients with esophageal cancer in terms of geographic misses and inter-observer variability in volume definition. In 28 esophageal cancer patients, gross, clinical and planning tumor volumes (GTV; CTV; PTV) were defined on planning CT by three radiation oncologists. After software-based emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) fusion, tumor delineations were redefined by the same radiation-oncologists. Concordance indexes (CCI's) for CT and PET/CT based GTV, CTV and PTV were calculated for each pair of observers. Incorporation of PET/CT modified tumor delineation in 17/28 subjects (61%) in cranial and/or caudal direction. Mean concordance indexes for CT-based CTV and PTV were 72 (55-86)% and 77 (61-88)%, respectively, vs. 72 (47-99)% and 76 (54-87)% for PET/CT-based CTV and PTV. Paired analyses showed no significant difference in CCI between CT and PET/CT. Combining FDG-PET and CT may improve target volume definition with less geographic misses, but without significant effects on inter-observer variability in esophageal cancer.

  15. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von;

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  1. Computed tomography of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Engelshoven, J M; Kreel, L

    1979-02-01

    The conventional anatomy of the prostate is reviewed and the computed tomography (CT) anatomy described and illustrated. The results of 55 "normal" cases were analyzed for size and relationship to the symphysis pubis, retropubic space, and bladder, as shown on CT sections correlating the features with age and possible urinary symptoms. Attention is also drawn to the differences between phleboliths and prostatic calcification. Computed tomography is an effective method of demonstrating the prostate and surrounding structures and of assessing prostatic enlargement.

  2. Impact of reduced-radiation dual-energy protocols using 320-detector row computed tomography for analyzing urinary calculus components: initial in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiangran; Zhou, Qingchun; Yu, Juan; Xian, Zhaohui; Feng, Youzhen; Yang, Wencai; Mo, Xukai

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of reduced-radiation dual-energy (DE) protocols using 320-detector row computed tomography on the differentiation of urinary calculus components. A total of 58 urinary calculi were placed into the same phantom and underwent DE scanning with 320-detector row computed tomography. Each calculus was scanned 4 times with the DE protocols using 135 kV and 80 kV tube voltage and different tube current combinations, including 100 mA and 570 mA (group A), 50 mA and 290 mA (group B), 30 mA and 170 mA (group C), and 10 mA and 60 mA (group D). The acquisition data of all 4 groups were then analyzed by stone DE analysis software, and the results were compared with x-ray diffraction analysis. Noise, contrast-to-noise ratio, and radiation dose were compared. Calculi were correctly identified in 56 of 58 stones (96.6%) using group A and B protocols. However, only 35 stones (60.3%) and 16 stones (27.6%) were correctly diagnosed using group C and D protocols, respectively. Mean noise increased significantly and mean contrast-to-noise ratio decreased significantly from groups A to D (P calculus component analysis while reducing patient radiation exposure to 1.81 mSv. Further reduction of tube currents may compromise diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. SADMFR guidelines for the use of cone-beam computed tomography/ Digital Volume Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Karl; Bornstein, Michael M.; Buser, Daniel; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Ettlin, Dominik A; Filippi, Andreas; Gabioud, François; Katsaros, Christos; Krastl, Gabriel; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Lauber, Roland; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Pazera, Pawel; Türp, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has been introduced in 1998. This radiological imaging procedure has been provided for dentistry and is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in medicine. It is expected that CBCT will have the same success in dental diagnostic imaging as computed tomography had in medicine. Just as CT is responsible for a significant rise in radiation dose to the population from medical X-ray diagnostics, CBCT studies will be accompanied by a significant increase of the ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it ... changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... conventional x-ray exam, a small amount of radiation is aimed at and passes through the part ... detectors rotate around you, measuring the amount of radiation being absorbed throughout your body. Sometimes, the examination ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, ... other changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT exam, the intravenous line used ... always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT exam, the intravenous line used ... always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top of page This page ... Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in ...

  15. Improving radiation awareness and feeling of personal security of non-radiological medical staff by implementing a traffic light system in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmaier, C.; Mayor, A.; Zuber, N.; Weishaupt, D. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Fodor, P. [Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine

    2016-03-15

    Non-radiological medical professionals often need to remain in the scanning room during computed tomography (CT) examinations to supervise patients in critical condition. Independent of protective devices, their position significantly influences the radiation dose they receive. The purpose of this study was to assess if a traffic light system indicating areas of different radiation exposure improves non-radiological medical staff's radiation awareness and feeling of personal security. Phantom measurements were performed to define areas of different dose rates and colored stickers were applied on the floor according to a traffic light system: green = lowest, orange = intermediate, and red = highest possible radiation exposure. Non-radiological medical professionals with different years of working experience evaluated the system using a structured questionnaire. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's correlation test were applied for statistical analysis. Fifty-six subjects (30 physicians, 26 nursing staff) took part in this prospective study. Overall rating of the system was very good, and almost all professionals tried to stand in the green stickers during the scan. The system significantly increased radiation awareness and feeling of personal protection particularly in staff with ? 5 years of working experience (p < 0.05). The majority of non-radiological medical professionals stated that staying in the green stickers and patient care would be compatible. Knowledge of radiation protection was poor in all groups, especially among entry-level employees (p < 0.05). A traffic light system in the CT scanning room indicating areas with lowest, in-termediate, and highest possible radiation exposure is much appreciated. It increases radiation awareness, improves the sense of personal radiation protection, and may support endeavors to lower occupational radiation exposure, although the best radiation protection always is to re-main outside the CT room during the scan.

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  17. Comparison of the radiation dose from cone beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography in examinations of the hand; Vergleich der Strahlendosis von Cone-Beam Computertomografie und Multidetektor Computertomografie in Untersuchungen der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, J.; Neubauer, C.; Gerstmair, A.; Krauss, T.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Reising, K. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery; Zajonc, H. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Plastic and Hand Surgery; Fiebich, M.; Voigt, J. [University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection

    2016-05-15

    Comparison of radiation dose of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in examinations of the hand. Dose calculations were carried out by means of Monte Carlo simulations in MDCT and CBCT. A corpse hand was examined in a 320-row MDCT scanner and a dedicated extremities CBCT scanner with standard protocols and multiple low-dose protocols. The image quality of the examinations was evaluated by 5 investigators using a Likert scale from 1 (very good) to 5 (very poor) regarding depiction of cortical bone, cancellous bone, joint surfaces, soft tissues and artifacts. For a sum of ratings of all structures < 50 a good overall image quality was expected. The studies with at least good overall image quality were compared with respect to the dose. The dose of the standard examination was 13.21 (12.96 to 13.46 CI) mGy in MDCT and 7.15 (6.99 to 7.30 CI) mGy in CBCT. The lowest dose in a study with good overall image quality was 4.54 (4.43 to 4.64 CI) mGy in MDCT and 5.72 (5.59 to 5.85 CI) mGy in CBCT. Although the dose of the standard protocols in the CBCT is lower than in the MDCT, the MDCT can realize a good overall image quality at a lower dose than the CBCT. Dose optimization of CT examination protocols for the hand is useful in both modalities, the MDCT has an even greater potential for optimization.

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on

  19. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on t

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ... in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the passage of a ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  5. Influence of image acquisition settings on radiation dose and image quality in coronary angiography by 320-detector volume computed tomography: the CORE320 pilot experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Arbab-Zadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of image acquisition settings and patients’ characteristics on image quality and radiation dose for coronary angiography by 320-row computed tomography (CT. CORE320 is a prospective study to investigate the diagnostic performance of 320-detector CT for detecting coronary artery disease and associated myocardial ischemia. A run-in phase in 65 subjects was conducted to test the adequacy of the computed tomography angiography (CTA acquisition protocol. Tube current, exposure window, and number of cardiac beats per acquisition were adjusted according to subjects’ gender, heart rate, and body mass index (BMI. Main outcome measures were image quality, assessed by contrast/noise measurements and qualitatively on a 4-point scale, and radiation dose, estimated by the dose-length-product. Average heart rate at image acquisition was 55.0±7.3 bpm. Median Agatston calcium score was 27.0 (interquartile range 1-330. All scans were prospectively triggered. Single heart beat image acquisition was obtained in 61 of 65 studies (94%. Sixty-one studies (94% and 437 of 455 arterial segments (96% were of diagnostic image quality. Estimated radiation dose was significantly greater in obese (5.3±0.4 mSv than normal weight (4.6±0.3 mSv or overweight (4.7±0.3 mSv subjects (P<0.001. BMI was the strongest factor influencing image quality (odds ratio=1.457, P=0.005. The CORE320 CTA image acquisition protocol achieved a good balance between image quality and radiation dose for a 320-detector CT system. However, image quality in obese subjects was reduced compared to normal weight subjects, possibly due to tube voltage/current restrictions mandated by the study protocol.

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in X-Ray and ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Materials Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... presence of inflammatory diseases. provide additional information about tumors of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for ... Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your ... skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, ... radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and ... generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... causing hearing problems. determine whether inflammation or other changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and needle aspirations of many areas of the ... eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a needle used to obtain a tissue sample ( biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations ... eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate ... and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of electronic x-ray detectors rotate around you, measuring the amount of radiation being absorbed throughout your ... quickly. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate ... and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page How should ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, ... radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough ...

  11. Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Know its Secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Mohan; Shanavas, Muhammad; Sidappa, Ashwin; Kiran, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. CBCT proved to be a successful investigative modality that has been used for dental and maxillofacial imaging. Radiation exposure dose from CBCT is 10 times less than from conventional CT scans during maxillofacial exposure. Furthermore, CBCT is highly accurate and can provide a three-dimensional volumetric data in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. This article...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a sudden severe headache. a blood clot or bleeding within the brain shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a stroke. a ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT examination. X-rays used in CT ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ... side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ... side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ... side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ... side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ... with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ... with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... circumstances. For example, sometimes a parent wearing a lead shield may stay in the room with their child. However, the technologist will always be able to see, hear and speak with you through ... to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... circumstances. For example, sometimes a parent wearing a lead shield may stay in the room with their child. However, the technologist will always be able to see, hear and speak with you through ... to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other ...

  10. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  11. Computed tomography:the details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  12. Radiation dose considerations by intra-individual Monte Carlo simulations in dual source spiral coronary computed tomography angiography with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation and adaptive pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Kuettner, Axel; Lell, Michael M.; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Uder, Michael [University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Deak, Paul; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Keller, Andrea K.; Haeberle, Lothar [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan; Seltmann, Martin [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate radiation dose levels in patients undergoing spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) on a dual-source system in clinical routine. Coronary CTA was performed for 56 patients with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation (TCM) and heart-rate (HR) dependent pitch adaptation. Individual Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed for dose assessment. Retrospective simulations with constant tube current (CTC) served as reference. Lung tissue was segmented and used for organ and effective dose (ED) calculation. Estimates for mean relative ED was 7.1 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs for TCM and 12.5 {+-} 5.3 mSv/100 mAs for CTC (P < 0.001). Relative dose reduction at low HR ({<=}60 bpm) was highest (49 {+-} 5%) compared to intermediate (60-70 bpm, 33 {+-} 12%) and high HR (>70 bpm, 29 {+-} 12%). However lowest ED is achieved at high HR (5.2 {+-} 1.5 mSv/100 mAs), compared with intermediate (6.7 {+-} 1.6 mSv/100 mAs) and low (8.3 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs) HR when automated pitch adaptation is applied. Radiation dose savings up to 52% are achievable by TCM at low and regular HR. However lowest ED is attained at high HR by pitch adaptation despite inferior radiation dose reduction by TCM. circle Monte Carlo simulations allow for individual radiation dose calculations. (orig.)

  13. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis and vulvodynia via a ganglion impar block using a lateral approach under computed tomography guidance: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Kwak, Kyung-Hwa; Hong, Seong Wook; Jung, Hoon; Chung, Seung-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after colorectal cancer surgery can prevent local recurrence, but has several side effects. Precise injection of drugs into the affected areas is complicated by radiation-induced fibrosis of soft or connective tissue. A 48-year-old woman experienced severe intractable perineal pain, dysuria, urinary urgency, and frequent urination after rectal cancer surgery and adjuvant RT, and was diagnosed with radiation-induced cystitis and vulvodynia. Her symptoms persisted despite two fluoroscopy-guided ganglion impar blocks. Fluoroscopy revealed atypical needle tip positioning and radiolucent dye distribution, presumably due to radiation-induced fibrosis in the target region. We performed two computed tomography (CT)-guided ganglion impar blocks by using a lateral approach, which allowed more accurate po-sitioning of the needle tip. Her pain visual analog score decreased from 9 to 3, and she recently resumed sexual intimacy. CT guidance is a viable alternative to fluoroscopy guidance when performing ganglion impar blocks in fibrotic areas. PMID:28184272

  14. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  15. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible.

  16. Image quality and radiation dose of brain computed tomography in children: effects of decreasing tube voltage from 120 kVp to 80 kVp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun Suk; Ryu, Young Jin; Kim, Yu Jin [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Computed tomography (CT) has generated public concern associated with radiation exposure, especially for children. Lowering the tube voltage is one strategy to reduce radiation dose. To assess the image quality and radiation dose of non-enhanced brain CT scans acquired at 80 kilo-voltage peak (kVp) compared to those at 120 kVp in children. Thirty children who had undergone both 80- and 120-kVp non-enhanced brain CT were enrolled. For quantitative analysis, the mean attenuation of white and gray matter, attenuation difference, noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and posterior fossa artifact index were measured. For qualitative analysis, noise, gray-white matter differentiation, artifact and overall image quality were scored. Radiation doses were evaluated by CT dose index, dose-length product and effective dose. The mean attenuations of gray and white matter and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly increased at 80 kVp, while parameters related to image noise, i.e. noise, signal-to-noise ratio and posterior fossa artifact index were higher at 80 kVp than at 120 kVp. In qualitative analysis, 80-kVp images showed improved gray-white differentiation but more artifacts compared to 120-kVp images. Subjective image noise and overall image quality scores were similar between the two scans. Radiation dose parameters were significantly lower at 80 kVp than at 120 kVp. In pediatric non-enhanced brain CT scans, a decrease in tube voltage from 120 kVp to 80 kVp resulted in improved gray-white matter contrast, comparable image quality and decreased radiation dose. (orig.)

  17. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillo-facial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontics. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice.

  19. Dual-source cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in the follow-up of cardiac transplant: comparison of image quality and radiation dose using three different imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitzke, D.; Berger-Kulemann, V.; Unterhumer, S.; Loewe, C.; Wolf, F. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image Guided Therapy, Division of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, V. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image Guided Therapy, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Spitzer, E. [Bern University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Bern (Switzerland); Feuchtner, G.M. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology II, Innsbruck (Austria); Gyoengyoesi, M. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Cardiology, Vienna (Austria); Uyanik-Uenal, K.; Zuckermann, A. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate image quality (IQ) and radiation dose of dual-source cardiac computed tomography (CCTA) using different imaging protocols. CCTA was performed in 150 patients using the retrospective ECG-gated spiral technique (rECG) the prospective ECG-gated technique (pECG), or the prospective ECG-gated technique with systolic imaging and automated tube voltage selection (pECGsys). IQ was rated using a 16-segment coronary artery model. Techniques were compared for overall IQ, IQ of the large and the small coronary artery segments. Effective dose was used for comparison of radiation dose. Overall IQ and IQ of the large segments showed no differences between the groups. IQ analysis of the small segments showed lowered IQ in pECGsys compared to rECG (p = 0.02), but not to pECG (p = 0.6). Effective dose did not differ significantly between rECG and pECG (p = 0.13), but was significantly lower for pECGsys (p < 0.001 vs. rECG and pECG). Radiation dose of dual-source CCTA in heart transplant recipients is significantly reduced by using prospective systolic scanning and automated tube voltage selection, while overall IQ and IQ of the large coronary segments are maintained. IQ appears to be lower compared to retrospective techniques with regard to small coronary segments. (orig.)

  20. Patient Position Verification and Corrective Evaluation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in Intensity modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Gyeong Min; Jeong, Deok Yang; Kim, Young Bum [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using an on board imager (OBI) can check the movement and setup error in patient position and target volume by comparing with the image of computer simulation treatment in real.time during patient treatment. Thus, this study purposed to check the change and movement of patient position and target volume using CBCT in IMRT and calculate difference from the treatment plan, and then to correct the position using an automated match system and to test the accuracy of position correction using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and examine the usefulness of CBCT in IMRT and the accuracy of the automatic match system. The subjects of this study were 3 head and neck patients and 1 pelvis patient sampled from IMRT patients treated in our hospital. In order to investigate the movement of treatment position and resultant displacement of irradiated volume, we took CBCT using OBI mounted on the linear accelerator. Before each IMRT treatment, we took CBCT and checked difference from the treatment plan by coordinate by comparing it with the image of CT simulation. Then, we made correction through the automatic match system of 3D/3D match to match the treatment plan, and verified and evaluated using electronic portal imaging device. When CBCT was compared with the image of CT simulation before treatment, the average difference by coordinate in the head and neck was 0.99 mm vertically, 1.14 mm longitudinally, 4.91 mm laterally, and 1.07 degrees in the rotational direction, showing somewhat insignificant differences by part. In testing after correction, when the image from the electronic portal imaging device was compared with DRR image, it was found that correction had been made accurately with error less than 0.5 mm. By comparing a CBCT image before treatment with a 3D image reconstructed into a volume instead of a 2D image for the patient's setup error and change in the position of the organs and the target, we could measure and

  1. Dosimetric and radiobiological consequences of computed tomography-guided adaptive strategies for intensity modulated radiation therapy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Jerry J; Johnson, Carol; Turnbull, David; Kempe, Jeff; Bzdusek, Karl; Van Dyk, Jacob; Bauman, Glenn

    2013-12-01

    To examine a range of scenarios for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer, including different schedules for megavoltage CT imaging, patient repositioning, and dose replanning. We simulated multifraction dose distributions with deformable registration using 35 sets of megavoltage CT scans of 13 patients. We computed cumulative dose-volume histograms, from which tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for rectum were calculated. Five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 18-MV x-rays was planned to achieve an isocentric dose of 76 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV). The differences between D95, tumor control probability, V70Gy, and NTCP for rectum, for accumulated versus planned dose distributions, were compared for different target volume sizes, margins, and adaptive strategies. The CTV D95 for IMRT treatment plans, averaged over 13 patients, was 75.2 Gy. Using the largest CTV margins (10/7 mm), the D95 values accumulated over 35 fractions were within 2% of the planned value, regardless of the adaptive strategy used. For tighter margins (5 mm), the average D95 values dropped to approximately 73.0 Gy even with frequent repositioning, and daily replanning was necessary to correct this deficit. When personalized margins were applied to an adaptive CTV derived from the first 6 treatment fractions using the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) algorithm, target coverage could be maintained using a single replan 1 week into therapy. For all approaches, normal tissue parameters (rectum V(70Gy) and NTCP) remained within acceptable limits. The frequency of adaptive interventions depends on the size of the CTV combined with target margins used during IMRT optimization. The application of adaptive target margins (adaptive CTV determined 1 week into therapy minimizes the need for subsequent dose replanning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cranial computed tomography in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltshauser, E. (Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Kinderklinik)

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals mainly with methodical aspects (such as sedation, intravenous and intrathecal application of contrast media) and with common difficulties in interpretation of computed tomography images. The indications for cranial CT are discussed in respect to probable therapeutic consequences and expected diagnostic yield. In the view of the author CT is, as a rule, not required in assessing chronic headache, generalised epileptic convulsions, non-specific mental retardation and cerebral palsy.

  3. Automated tube voltage adaptation in head and neck computed tomography between 120 and 100 kV: effects on image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); University Erlangen, Imaging Science Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Kramer, Manuel R.; Eller, Achim; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Brand, Michael; Saake, Marc [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Bernhard [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Low tube voltage allows for computed tomography (CT) imaging with increased iodine contrast at reduced radiation dose. We sought to evaluate the image quality and potential dose reduction using a combination of attenuation based tube current modulation (TCM) and automated tube voltage adaptation (TVA) between 100 and 120 kV in CT of the head and neck. One hundred thirty consecutive patients with indication for head and neck CT were examined with a 128-slice system capable of TCM and TVA. Reference protocol was set at 120 kV. Tube voltage was reduced to 100 kV whenever proposed by automated analysis of the localizer. An additional small scan aligned to the jaw was performed at a fixed 120 kV setting. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists on a standardized Likert-scale and measurements of signal- (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Radiation dose was assessed as CTDI{sub vol}. Diagnostic image quality was excellent in both groups and did not differ significantly (p = 0.34). Image noise in the 100 kV data was increased and SNR decreased (17.8/9.6) in the jugular veins and the sternocleidomastoid muscle when compared to 120 kV (SNR 24.4/10.3), but not in fatty tissue and air. However, CNR did not differ statistically significant between 100 (23.5/14.4/9.4) and 120 kV data (24.2/15.3/8.6) while radiation dose was decreased by 7-8 %. TVA between 100 and 120 kV in combination with TCM led to a radiation dose reduction compared to TCM alone, while keeping CNR constant though maintaining diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukhi, J.; Yusob, D.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Vuanghao, L.; Zainon, R.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging.

  5. The application of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) on image quality and radiation dose at abdominal computed tomography (CT): A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Zhao, Xinming; Song, Junfeng; Guo, Ning; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Jianxin; Qi, Weiwei; Wu, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Feng, Shichao; Hu, Mancang; Zhou, Chunwu; Wang, Xiaoying; Hong, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Multi-phase spiral Computed tomography (CT) of abdomen has been widely used as an effective imaging modality to diagnose variety of diseases. As a result, the accumulated radiation exposure on the abdomen is substantially higher than other human organ regions. According to ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle, how to control radiation dose without compromising imaging quality becomes a research topic of high interest. However, how to achieve dose optimization of the abdomen CT examinations in Chinese patients have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In this study, we develop an abdomen-equivalent tissue model made by well-known CTP579 auxiliary testing model and the real CT data acquired from 68 Chinese male subjects. Combining with catphan600, we simulated the visibility of low and high contrast objects at adult abdomen under variety of x-ray dose levels. Using the automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) technique, we reduced the total radiation dose and identified a proper noise index (NI) for Chinese patients to maintain low or high contrast detectability of abdominal CT image. Our numerical experiments showed that in the phantom study for Chinese patients, when a NI was set at 10, the radiation dose reduced by 34.3% with low contrast objects detectable, while setting NI at 14 the dose level decreased by 65.1% without change the detectability of high contrast targets. The subjective ratings from three radiologists also yielded high consistence with Kappa > 0.75. This study demonstrated the feasibility of performing the CT dose optimization studies through a unique phantom with the ATCM method.

  6. Prostate positioning using cone-beam computer tomography based on manual soft-tissue registration. Interobserver agreement between radiation oncologists and therapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Pobbiati, C.; Fanti, P. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Santoro, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Fodor, C.; Zerini, D. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy); Vigorito, S. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Baroni, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Information and Bioengineering, Milan (Italy); De Cobelli, O. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Urology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy); National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    To check the interobserver agreement between radiation oncologists and therapists (RTT) using an on- and off-line cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT) protocol for setup verification in the radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The CBCT data from six prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were independently reviewed off-line by four observers (one radiation oncologist, one junior and two senior RTTs) and benchmarked with on-line CBCT positioning performed by a radiation oncologist immediately prior to treatment. CBCT positioning was based on manual soft-tissue registration. Agreement between observers was evaluated using weighted Cohen's kappa statistics. In total, 152 CBCT-based prostate positioning procedures were reviewed by each observer. The mean (± standard deviation) of the differences between off- and on-line CBCT-simCT registration translations along the three directions (antero-posterior, latero-lateral and cranio-caudal) and rotation around the antero-posterior axis were - 0.7 (3.6) mm, 1.9 (2.7) mm, 0.9 (3.6) mm and - 1.8 (5.0) degrees, respectively. Satisfactory interobserver agreement was found, being substantial (weighted kappa > 0.6) in 10 of 16 comparisons and moderate (0.41-0.60) in the remaining six comparisons. CBCT interpretation performed by RTTs is comparable to that of radiation oncologists. Our study might be helpful in the quality assurance of radiotherapy and the optimization of competencies. Further investigation should include larger sample sizes, a greater number of observers and validated methodology in order to assess interobserver variability and its impact on high-precision prostate cancer IGRT. In the future, it should enable the wider implementation of complex and evolving radiotherapy technologies. (orig.)

  7. Automated tube voltage adaptation in head and neck computed tomography between 120 and 100 kV: effects on image quality and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Kramer, Manuel R; Eller, Achim; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Brand, Michael; Saake, Marc; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2014-09-01

    Low tube voltage allows for computed tomography (CT) imaging with increased iodine contrast at reduced radiation dose. We sought to evaluate the image quality and potential dose reduction using a combination of attenuation based tube current modulation (TCM) and automated tube voltage adaptation (TVA) between 100 and 120 kV in CT of the head and neck. One hundred thirty consecutive patients with indication for head and neck CT were examined with a 128-slice system capable of TCM and TVA. Reference protocol was set at 120 kV. Tube voltage was reduced to 100 kV whenever proposed by automated analysis of the localizer. An additional small scan aligned to the jaw was performed at a fixed 120 kV setting. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists on a standardized Likert-scale and measurements of signal- (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Radiation dose was assessed as CTDIvol. Diagnostic image quality was excellent in both groups and did not differ significantly (p = 0.34). Image noise in the 100 kV data was increased and SNR decreased (17.8/9.6) in the jugular veins and the sternocleidomastoid muscle when compared to 120 kV (SNR 24.4/10.3), but not in fatty tissue and air. However, CNR did not differ statistically significant between 100 (23.5/14.4/9.4) and 120 kV data (24.2/15.3/8.6) while radiation dose was decreased by 7-8%. TVA between 100 and 120 kV in combination with TCM led to a radiation dose reduction compared to TCM alone, while keeping CNR constant though maintaining diagnostic image quality.

  8. Computed tomography of bones and joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, J; Sehr, A

    1989-01-01

    The monograph sums up the problem of CT diagnosis of bones and joints making use of predominantly the authors' own experience based on CT tests of more than 45,000 patients examined at the Department of Radiology, Charles University Medical Faculty of Hygiene teaching hospital in Prague in the years 1980-1988. Specific scans of the skeleton were made in 4,500 patients, mostly for suspicion or closer assessment of neoplasms (43.5%), the radicular lumbosacral syndrome (34.5%), and injuries (12%). The opening chapters sum up basic facts about the principle of computed tomography, the apparatus in use, the evaluation of CT images, CT radiation doses, and the patients' preparation for CT scanning. The use of contrast media is discussed with regard to the possible hazards involved and to the need to hear allergological opinion first. For spinal canal visualization non-ionogenic contrast media are used exclusively. The management of side reactions to contrast medium application is also reviewed. Indications for bone and joint computed tomography now comprise a whole series of traumatological, orthopaedic, oncological, rheumatological, neurological and rehabilitation conditions, each of which is discussed in detail in a separate chapter. CT anatomical studies offer the advantage of being applicable even in patients examined for other than bone or articular diseases. The option of simultaneous soft tissue assessment represents another advantage. The authors describe different anatomical structures in terms of CT images, some of them complete with dimensional and density values. The chapter on anomalies and developmental variants stresses the relevance of computed tomography for precise characteristics of clefts of the spinal column and facial bones and for the diagnosis of anomalies and dysplasias of the spinal column and the chest. A rare case of cephalothoracopagus is demonstrated. As for traumatology, computed tomography is found useful in diagnosing fractures of the

  9. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi Kyong [Yonsei University, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. (orig.)

  10. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...... and limitations of sparse reconstruction methods in CT, in particular in a quantitative sense. For example, relations between image properties such as contrast, structure and sparsity, tolerable noise levels, suficient sampling levels, the choice of sparse reconstruction formulation and the achievable image...

  11. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Industrial applications of computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Kruth, J. -P.

    2014-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of Computed Tomography(CT) is large and rapidly increasing. After a brief market overview, the paper gives a survey of state of the art and upcoming CT technologies, covering types of CT systems, scanning capabilities, and technological advances. The paper...... contains a survey of application examples from the manufacturing industry as well as from other industries, e.g., electrical and electronic devices, inhomogeneous materials, and from the food industry. Challenges as well as major national and international coordinated activities in the field of industrial...

  13. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    Modern diagnostic imagining techniques are gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Denmark has been involved in the development of this use of imaging techniques from the beginning. The Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Southern Denmark acquired a helical computed tomography (CT...... AND METHODS: This thesis investigated 900 forensic cases that were CT-scanned and autopsied at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, from 2006-2011. The scanner was a Siemens Somatom Spirit dual-slice CT-scanner with a Siemens Syngo MultiModality workstation. Contrast enhancement...

  14. Impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on computed tomography defined target volumes in radiation treatment planning of esophageal cancer : reduction in geographic misses with equal inter-observer variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, Liesbeth; Busz, D. M.; Paardekooper, G. M. R. M.; Beukema, J. C.; Jager, P. L.; Van der Jagt, E. J.; van Dam, G. M.; Groen, H.; Plukker, J. Th. M.; Langendijk, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    P>Target volume definition in modern radiotherapy is based on planning computed tomography (CT). So far, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has not been included in planning modality in volume definition of esophageal cancer. This study evaluates fusion of FDG-PET and CT in

  15. Impact of different beam directions on intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivered to functioning lung tissue identified using single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qin; Zhang, Fucheng; Wang, Yanming; Qu, Weiqiang

    2014-01-01

    To use different beam arrangements and numbers to plan intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and investigate their effects on low and high radiation doses delivered to the functional lung, in order to reduce radiation-induced lung damage. Ten patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) underwent IMRT. Beam arrangements were selected on the basis of orientation and dose-volume histograms to create SPECT-guided IMRT plans that spared the functional lung and maintained target coverage. Four different plans, including CT-7, SPECT-7, SPECT-4, SPECT-5 with different beam arrangements, were used. The differences of conformity index (CI), heterogeneity index (HI) between the plans were analyzed, by using a paired t-test. The seven-beam SPECT (SPECT-7) plan reduced the volume of the functional lung irradiated with at least 20 Gy (FV20) and 30 Gy (FV30) by 26.02% ±15.45% and 14.41% ±16.66%, respectively, as compared to the seven-beam computed tomography (CT-7) plan. The CI significantly differed between the SPECT-7 and SPECT-4 plans and between the SPECT-5 and SPECT-4 plans, but not between the SPECT-5 and SPECT-7 plans. The CIs in the SPECT-5 and SPECT-7 plans were better than that in the SPECT-4 plan. The heterogeneity index significantly differed among the three SPECT plans and was best in the SPECT-7 plan. The incorporation of SPECT images into IMRT planning for NSCLC greatly affected beam angles and number of beams. Fewer beams and modified beam angles achieved similar or better IMRT quality. The low-dose volumes were lower in SPECT-4.

  16. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  17. Interpretation and Prognostic Value of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography After Induction Chemotherapy With or Without Radiation in IIIA-N2 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Receive Curative Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Guk Jin; Jeong, Songmi; Kwak, Yoo-Kang; Kim, Hoon-Kyo; Cho, Deog Gon; Park, Young Ha; Yu, Mina; Yoon, Sei Chul

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate the correlation of clinical staging on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and pathologic staging and the prognostic value of PET-CT after induction chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 42 cases of clinical stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC who receive 2 to 4 cycles of preoperative chemotherapy with or without radiation followed by curative resection. The maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the suspected lesion on PET-CT was recorded. PET-CT findings after induction chemotherapy were compared with those of initial PET-CT and pathology after surgery. The accuracy of PET-CT in restaging of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy was 50.0%. Eighteen (42.8%) of 42 patients were underestimated ycT stage, and 3 (7.1%) of 42 patients was overestimated ycT stage by PET-CT scan. The accuracy of PET-CT in restaging of the nodal disease was 71.4%. Six (14.3%) of 42 patients were underestimated ycN stage, and 6 (14.3%) of 42 patients were overestimated ycN stage as compared with pathologic staging. The 2-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rate were 68.5% and 40.9%, respectively. Complete responders (ycT0N0M0) on PET-CT after induction chemotherapy had a significantly longer RFS time than did incomplete responders (28.3 vs 9.1 months, P = 0.021). Complete response on PET-CT after induction chemotherapy with or without radiation was a good prognosticator for RFS in stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC patients who received surgery. However, response evaluation on PET-CT after induction chemotherapy should be interpreted with caution due to its unacceptable accuracy.

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion in Abdominal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Norling, Rikke; Lauridsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion is an evolving method to visualize perfusion in organs and tissue. With the introduction of multidetector CT scanners, it is now possible to cover up to 16 cm in one rotation, and thereby making it possible to scan entire organs such as the liver with a fixed...... table position. Advances in reconstruction algorithms make it possible to reduce the radiation dose for each examination to acceptable levels. Regarding abdominal imaging, CT perfusion is still considered a research tool, but several studies have proven it as a reliable non-invasive technique...... for assessment of vascularity. CT perfusion has also been used for tumor characterization, staging of disease, response evaluation of newer drugs targeted towards angiogenesis and as a method for early detection of recurrence after radiation and embolization. There are several software solutions available...

  19. The impact of integrating images of positron emission tomography with computed tomography simulation on radiation therapy planning; Tomographie par emission de positons et fusion d'images de simulation virtuelle par tomodensitometrie: impact sur la planification de la radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touboul, E.; Deniaud-Alexandre, E.; Moureau-Zabotto, L.; Lerouge, D. [Hopital Tenon AP-HP, Service d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, Cancerest, Universite Paris-6, CHU-Est, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-11-01

    The co-registration of planning CT and {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-2-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) with patient in the sane treatment position is the principally well-established tool for improving the target coverage defined and the target planning volume to treat the metabolic target volume. Most of the interest in the co-registered CT/PET images on volume delineation has focused on conformal radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer. In spite of technical difficulties related to the target volume displacements, and the sensitivity and the specificity of FDG-PET images < 100 %, the target volume delineation is significantly changed by the co-registration of FDG-PET images and planning CT by either reduction of the radiation volume (excluding atelectasis or mediastinal lymph node) or the increasing of mediastinal lymph node involvement. Image fusion technique reduces the interobserver variability in target volume delineation. Furthermore, after induction chemotherapy image fusion leads to improve the patient management by detecting locoregional progression disease or the presence of metastatic disease. Other anatomic tumor sites are going to investigate such as: head-and-neck cancer, gynecologic cancer, oesophageal cancer, anal cancer, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The impact on treatment outcome remains to be demonstrated. (authors)

  20. Accuracy and Radiation Dose Reduction Using Low-Voltage Computed Tomography Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring With Tin Filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesche, Christian; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Albrecht, Moritz Moritz H.; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Duguay, Taylor M.; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Bayer, Richard R.; Canstein, Christian; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Morris, Pamela B.; Flohr, Thomas G.; Hoffmann, Ellen; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This study prospectively investigated the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of CT coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) using a 100 kVp acquisition protocol with tin filtration (Sn100 kVp) compared with the standard 120 kVp acquisition protocol; 70 patients (59% men, 62.1 10.7 years) who

  1. Adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The present proposal describes the development of an adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), or "Snapshot" spectrometer which can "instantaneously"...

  2. Simultaneous in vivo synchrotron radiation computed tomography of regional ventilation and blood volume in rabbit lung using combined K-edge and temporal subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhonen, H [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki (Finland); Porra, L [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki (Finland); Bayat, S [Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, Faculte de Medecine, PERITOX (EA-INI RIS) and Cardiologie et Pneumo-Allerglogie Pediatriques, CHU Amiens (France); Sovijaervi, A R A [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Suortti, P [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-02-07

    In K-edge subtraction (KES) imaging with synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT), two images are taken simultaneously using energies above and below the K-absorption edge of a contrast agent. A logarithmic difference image reveals the contrast agent concentration with good accuracy. Similarly, in temporal subtraction imaging (TSI) the reference image is taken before the introduction of the contrast agent. Quantitative comparisons of in vivo images of rabbit lung indicated that similar results for concentrations of iodine in blood vessels and xenon in airways are obtained by KES and TSI, but the level of noise and artifacts was higher in the latter. A linear fit showed that in the lung parenchyma {rho}{sub TSI} = (0.97 {+-} 0.03){rho}{sub KES} + (0.00 {+-} 0.05) for xenon and {rho}{sub TSI} = (1.21 {+-} 0.15){rho}{sub KES} + (0.0 {+-} 0.1) for iodine. For xenon the calculation of time constant of ventilation gave compatible values for both of the methods. The two methods are combined for the simultaneous determination of the xenon concentration (by KES) and the iodine concentration (by TSI) in lung imaging, which will allow simultaneous in vivo determination of ventilation and perfusion.

  3. 3D investigation on polystyrene colloidal crystals by floatage self-assembly with mixed solvent via synchrotron radiation x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanan; Xie, Honglan; Deng, Biao; Du, Guohao; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2017-06-01

    The floatage self-assembly method was introduced with mixed solvent as the medium of polystyrene sphere suspension to fabricate the colloidal crystal. The three dimensional (3D) void system of the colloidal crystal was noninvasively characterized by synchrotron radiation phase-contrast computed tomography, and the quantitative image analysis was implemented aiming to the polystyrene sphere colloidal crystal. Comparing with gravity sedimentation method, the three samples fabricated from floatage self-assembly with mixed solvents have the lowest porosity, and when ethylene glycol and water were mixed with ratio of 1:1, the lowest porosity of 27.49% could be achieved, that has been very close to the minimum porosity of ordered 3D monodisperse sphere array (26%). In single slices, the porosities and fractal dimension for the voids were calculated. The results showed that two factors would significantly influence the porosity of the whole colloidal crystal: the first deposited sphere layer's orderliness and the sedimentation speed of the spheres. The floatage self-assembly could induce a stable close-packing process, resulted from the powerful nucleation force-lateral capillary force coupled with the mixed solvent to regulate the floating upward speed for purpose of matching the assembly rate.

  4. Attenuation-based automatic kilovolt (kV)-selection in computed tomography of the chest: effects on radiation exposure and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Achim; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate an automated attenuation-based kV-selection in computed tomography of the chest in respect to radiation dose and image quality, compared to a standard 120 kV protocol. 104 patients were examined using a 128-slice scanner. Fifty examinations (58 ± 15 years, study group) were performed using the automated adaption of tube potential (100-140 kV), based on the attenuation profile of the scout scan, 54 examinations (62 ± 14 years, control group) with fixed 120 kV. Estimated CT dose index (CTDI) of the software-proposed setting was compared with a 120 kV protocol. After the scan CTDI volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded. Image quality was assessed by region of interest (ROI) measurements, subjective image quality by two observers with a 4-point scale (3--excellent, 0--not diagnostic). The algorithm selected 100 kV in 78% and 120 kV in 22%. Overall CTDIvol reduction was 26.6% (34% in 100 kV) overall DLP reduction was 22.8% (32.1% in 100 kV) (all pimage quality was excellent in both groups. The attenuation based kV-selection algorithm enables relevant dose reduction (~27%) in chest-CT while keeping image quality parameters at high levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Utility of the inspiratory phase in high-resolution computed tomography evaluations of pediatric patients with bronchiolitis obliterans after allogeneic bone marrow transplant: reducing patient radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Togni Filho

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the utility of the inspiratory phase in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT of the chest for the diagnosis of post-bone marrow transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study. We selected patients of either gender who underwent bone marrow transplantation and chest HRCT between March 1, 2002 and December 12, 2014. Ages ranged from 3 months to 20.7 years. We included all examinations in which the HRCT was performed appropriately. The examinations were read by two radiologists, one with extensive experience in pediatric radiology and another in the third year of residency, who determined the presence or absence of the following imaging features: air trapping, bronchiectasis, alveolar opacities, nodules, and atelectasis. Results: A total of 222 examinations were evaluated (mean, 5.4 ± 4.5 examinations per patient. The expiratory phase findings were comparable to those obtained in the inspiratory phase, except in one patient, in whom a small uncharacteristic nodule was identified only in the inspiratory phase. Air trapping was identified in a larger number of scans in the expiratory phase than in the inspiratory phase, as was atelectasis, although the difference was statistically significant only for air trapping. Conclusion: In children being evaluated for post-bone marrow transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans, the inspiratory phase can be excluded from the chest HRCT protocol, thus reducing by half the radiation exposure in this population.

  6. Dose measurements on cone beam computed tomography for trilogy and truebeam STx for image-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwon; Ye, Sung Joon [Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuck Jun; Sung, Won Mo [Interdisciplinary program in Radiation applied Life Science, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital,Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The number of use of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the kV cone beam CT for the image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has increased. With the increased frequency in use of IGRT, the patient absorbed radiation dose during the treatment procedure has increased and become the major concern that there have been studies about these issue. The purpose of this study is to confirm the patient dose from the daily CBCT scan during the IGRT using the On-Board Imager(OBI) of Trilogy and Truebeam STx (Varian Medical Systems, CA, USA). These two linear accelerators are newly set up in SNUH that the patient dose from CBCT scan is needed to be verified before the start of IGRT. Daily CBCT scans can provide better patient localizing but increase the patient absorbed dose slightly. Considering the beneficial advantage on the localizing patient, CT dose during IGRT would be a reasonable cost.

  7. Knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction: comparative image quality and radiation dose with a pediatric computed tomography phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Jin; Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Seongmin [New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Weill Cornell Medical College, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    CT of pediatric phantoms can provide useful guidance to the optimization of knowledge-based iterative reconstruction CT. To compare radiation dose and image quality of CT images obtained at different radiation doses reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction, hybrid iterative reconstruction and filtered back-projection. We scanned a 5-year anthropomorphic phantom at seven levels of radiation. We then reconstructed CT data with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (iterative model reconstruction [IMR] levels 1, 2 and 3; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA), hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose{sup 4}, levels 3 and 7; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA) and filtered back-projection. The noise, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated. We evaluated low-contrast resolutions and detectability by low-contrast targets and subjective and objective spatial resolutions by the line pairs and wire. With radiation at 100 peak kVp and 100 mAs (3.64 mSv), the relative doses ranged from 5% (0.19 mSv) to 150% (5.46 mSv). Lower noise and higher signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise and objective spatial resolution were generally achieved in ascending order of filtered back-projection, iDose{sup 4} levels 3 and 7, and IMR levels 1, 2 and 3, at all radiation dose levels. Compared with filtered back-projection at 100% dose, similar noise levels were obtained on IMR level 2 images at 24% dose and iDose{sup 4} level 3 images at 50% dose, respectively. Regarding low-contrast resolution, low-contrast detectability and objective spatial resolution, IMR level 2 images at 24% dose showed comparable image quality with filtered back-projection at 100% dose. Subjective spatial resolution was not greatly affected by reconstruction algorithm. Reduced-dose IMR obtained at 0.92 mSv (24%) showed similar image quality to routine-dose filtered back-projection obtained at 3.64 mSv (100%), and half-dose iDose{sup 4} obtained at 1.81 mSv. (orig.)

  8. High-pitch computed tomography of the lung in pediatric patients. An intraindividual comparison of image quality and radiation dose to conventional 64-MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiflikas, I.; Thomas, C.; Ketelsen, D.; Claussen, C.D.; Schaefer, J.F. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Seitz, G.; Warmann, S. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Pediatric Surgery

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of typical artifacts in low-dose pediatric lung examinations using high-pitch computed tomography (HPCT) compared to MDCT, and to estimate the effective radiation dose (E{sub eff}). Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval for this retrospective study was obtained. 35 patients (17 boys, 18 girls; mean age 112 ± 69 months) were included and underwent MDCT and follow-up scan by HPCT or vice versa (mean follow-up time 87 days), using the same tube voltage and current. The total artifact score (0-8) was defined as the sum of artifacts arising from movement, breathing or pulsation of the heart or pulmonary vessels (0 - no; 1 - moderate; 2 - severe artifacts). E{sub eff} was estimated according to the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Multislice Computed Tomography. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze differences between the patient groups. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for correlation of ordinal variables. Results: The scan time was significantly lower for HPCT compared to MDCT (0.72 ± 0.13 s vs. 3.65 ± 0.81s; p < 0.0001). In 28 of 35 (80 %) HPCT examinations no artifacts were visible, whereas in MDCT artifacts occurred in all examinations. The frequency of pulsation artifacts and breathing artifacts was higher in MDCT compared to HPCT (100% vs. 17% and 31% vs. 6%). The total artifact score significantly correlated with the patient's age in MDCT (r=-0.42; p=0.01), but not in HPCT (r=-0.32; p=0.07). The estimated E{sub eff} was significantly lower in HPCT than in MDCT (1.29±0.31 vs. 1.47±0.37 mSv; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our study indicates that the use of HPCT has advantages for pediatric lung imaging with a reduction of breathing and pulsation artifacts. Moreover, the estimated E{sub eff} was lower. In addition, examinations can be performed without sedation or breath-hold without losing image quality. (orig.)

  9. Computed tomography of the gallbladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrilla, T R; Reich, N E; Haaga, J R; Seidelmann, F E; Cooperman, A M; Alfidi, R J

    1978-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to study 79 patients with suspected gallbladder disease. First and second generation scanners were used to determine the efficacy of CT in detecting cholecystitis or cholelithiasis. Manifestations of gallbladder disease such as hydrops, opaque and nonopaque gallstones, chronic cholecystitis with thickened inflammatory walls, and secondary liver abscesses can be easily detected. It is a useful technique for individuals in whom the gallbladder has failed to opacity on oral cholecystography. The scanning method is described, and estimates of reliability are given including its accuracy, limitations, and place in the management of gallbladder disease, especially cholelithiasis. When conventional radiographic examinations or ultrasound fail to give definitive diagnostic information, CT can be a useful alternative with an overall diagnostic accuracy greater than 80%.

  10. [Computer tomography of sports injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M; Rupp, N

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability.

  11. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Rupp, N.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability.

  12. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  13. [Role of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnostic otorhinolaryngological imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perényi, Ádám; Bella, Zsolt; Baráth, Zoltán; Magyar, Péter; Nagy, Katalin; Rovó, László

    2016-01-10

    Accurate diagnosis and preoperative planning in modern otorhinolaryngology is strongly supported by imaging with enhanced visualization. Computed tomography is often used to examine structures within bone frameworks. Given the hazards of ionizing radiation, repetitive imaging studies exponentially increase the risk of damages to radiosensitive tissues. The authors compare multislice and cone-beam computed tomography and determine the role, advantages and disadvantages of cone-beam computed tomography in otorhinolaryngological imaging. They summarize the knowledge from the international literature and their individual imaging studies. They conclude that cone-beam computed tomography enables high-resolution imaging and reconstruction in any optional plane and in space with considerably lower effective radiation dose. Cone-beam computed tomography with appropriate indications proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool in otorhinolaryngological imaging. It makes an alternative to multislice computed tomography and it is an effective tool in perioperative and postoperative follow-up, especially in those cases which necessitate repetitive imaging with computed tomography.

  14. Detection of parathyroid adenomas using a monophasic dual-energy computed tomography acquisition: diagnostic performance and potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Flors, Lucia; Durst, Christopher R.; Hou, Qinghua; Mukherjee, Sugoto [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Patrie, James T. [University of Virginia, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wintermark, Max [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic performance of a combination of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images and arterial images obtained from a single-phase dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisition and standard non-contrast and arterial images from a biphasic protocol and to study the potential radiation dose reduction of the former approach. All DECT examinations performed for evaluation of parathyroid adenomas during a 13-month period were retrospectively reviewed. An initial single-energy unenhanced acquisition was followed by a dual-energy arterial phase acquisition. ''Virtual non-contrast images'' were generated from the dual-energy acquisition. Two independent and blinded radiologists evaluated three different sets of images during three reading sessions: single arterial phase, single-phase DECT (virtual non-contrast and arterial phase), and standard biphasic protocol (true non-contrast and arterial phase). The accuracy of interpretation in lateralizing an adenoma to the side of the neck and localizing it to a quadrant in the neck was evaluated. Sixty patients (mean age, 65.5 years; age range, 38-87 years) were included in the study. The lateralization and localization accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predicted value (PPV) and negative predicted value (NPV) of the different image datasets were comparable. The combination of VNC and arterial images was more specific than arterial images alone to lateralize a parathyroid lesion (OR = 1.93, p = 0.043). The use of the single-phase protocol resulted in a calculated radiation exposure reduction of 52.8 %. Virtual non-contrast and arterial images from a single DECT acquisition showed similar diagnostic accuracy than a biphasic protocol, providing a significant dose reduction. (orig.)

  15. Low-dose head computed tomography in children: a single institutional experience in pediatric radiation risk reduction: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Ryan P; Reynolds, Renee M; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Levitt, Michael R; Hopper, Richard A; Lee, Amy; Browd, Samuel R

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the authors describe their experience with a low-dose head CT protocol for a preselected neurosurgical population at a dedicated pediatric hospital (Seattle Children's Hospital), the largest number of patients with this protocol reported to date. All low-dose head CT scans between October 2011 and November 2012 were reviewed. Two different low-dose radiation dosages were used, at one-half or one-quarter the dose of a standard head CT scan, based on patient characteristics agreed upon by the neurosurgery and radiology departments. Patient information was also recorded, including diagnosis and indication for CT scan. Six hundred twenty-four low-dose head CT procedures were performed within the 12-month study period. Although indications for the CT scans varied, the most common reason was to evaluate the ventricles and catheter placement in hydrocephalic patients with shunts (70%), followed by postoperative craniosynostosis imaging (12%). These scans provided adequate diagnostic imaging, and no patient required a follow-up full-dose CT scan as a result of poor image quality on a low-dose CT scan. Overall physician comfort and satisfaction with interpretation of the images was high. An additional 2150 full-dose head CT scans were performed during the same 12-month time period, making the total number of CT scans 2774. This value compares to 3730 full-dose head CT scans obtained during the year prior to the study when low-dose CT and rapid-sequence MRI was not a reliable option at Seattle Children's Hospital. Thus, over a 1-year period, 22% of the total CT scans were able to be converted to low-dose scans, and full-dose CT scans were able to be reduced by 42%. The implementation of a low-dose head CT protocol substantially reduced the amount of ionizing radiation exposure in a preselected population of pediatric neurosurgical patients. Image quality and diagnostic utility were not significantly compromised.

  16. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 19, ... The ECG is also needed to help the computer that is connected to the CT scanner create ...

  17. Cervical gross tumor volume dose predicts local control using magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion-weighted imaging-guided high-dose-rate and positron emission tomography/computed tomography-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A; Fowler, Kathryn J; Narra, Vamsi; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2014-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (PD100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of pediatric-specific dose modulation curves on radiation dose and image quality in head computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joana; Paulo, Graciano [Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, ESTESC, DMIR, Coimbra (Portugal); Foley, Shane; Rainford, Louise [University College Dublin, School of Medicine and Medical Science, Health Science Centre, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEntee, Mark F. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumberland Campus, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    The volume of CT examinations has increased with resultant increases in collective dose values over the last decade. To analyze the impact of the tube current and voltage modulation for dose values and image quality of pediatric head CT examinations. Head CT examinations were performed on anthropomorphic phantoms and four pediatric age categories before and after the introduction of dedicated pediatric curves for tube voltage and current modulation. Local diagnostic reference levels were calculated. Visual grading characteristic image quality evaluation was performed by four pediatric neuroradiologists and image noise comparisons were performed. Pediatric-specific modulation curves demonstrated a 49% decrease in mean radiation dose for phantom examinations. The local diagnostic reference levels (CTDIvol) for clinical examinations decreased by 52%, 41%, 46% and 40% for newborn, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old patients, respectively. Visual grading characteristic image quality was maintained for the majority of age categorizations (area under the curve = 0.5) and image noise measurements did not change (P = 0.693). Pediatric-specific dose modulation curves resulted in an overall mean dose reduction of 45% with no significant differences in subjective or objective image quality findings. (orig.)

  19. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  20. Multi-detector computed tomography radiation doses in the follow-up of paediatric neurosurgery patients in KwaZulu-Natal: A dosimetric audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Sikwila

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT is the preferred modality for follow-up of paediatric neurosurgery patients. Serial imaging, however, has the disadvantage of an ionising radiation burden, which may be mitigated using the ‘as low as reasonably achievable’ (ALARA principle. Objectives: The primary objectives were to determine the radiation dose exposure in paediatric patients subjected to MDCT imaging following neurosurgery and to compare these values with references in current literature. Our secondary objective was to assess the relationship between radiation dose and clinical scenario. Method: Retrospective descriptive data were collected from all paediatric postsurgical patients (n = 169 between the ages of 0 and 12 years who had their first followed-up scan in the year 2010 and were followed up for six months or less. Dose-length product (DLP and current-time product were collected from the picture archiving and communication system. Demographic data including radiology reports were collected from the hospital information system. The effective doses (ED were calculated from the corresponding DLP using age-adjusted conversion factors. For purposes of comparison with other studies, median dosimetric values were calculated and the children were grouped into three age ranges, namely younger than 3 years, 3–7 years and 8–12 years old. Results: The highest median radiation doses were noted in patients being followed-up for intracranial abscesses (1183 mGy cm in the 8–12 year age group, most of whom were female. The lowest radiation doses were for intracranial shunt follow-ups (447 mGy cm. Median values for DLP, ED and current-time product (mAs were comparable to reference doses in all three age groups. However, our study showed a much broader distribution of values with higher upper limits relative to reference values. Indications for follow-up included shunts (n = 110; 65%, intracranial abscess (n = 31; 18%, subdural

  1. Technique and radiation dose of conventional X-rays and computed tomography of the sacroiliac joint; Technik und Strahlendosis konventioneller Roentgenaufnahmen und Computertomographie des Sakroiliakalgelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurik, A.G. [Department of Radiology R, Aarhus Kommunehospital (Denmark)

    2004-03-01

    Anterior-posterior (a.p.) or posterior-anterior X-rays of the sacroiliac joint, sometimes supplemented by a transverse view, have been the method of choice for diagnosis of patients suspected of having sacroiliitis. The sensitivity and specificity of conventional X-rays are relatively low, which can delay the diagnosis of sacroiliitis. Computed tomography (CT) is superior to conventional X-rays for diagnosis of sacroiliitis, but does emit a relatively higher dose of radiation. For this reason, particularly for females, CT should be optimized by employing semi-coronal planes, which require a lower radiation dose than axial planes. CT in a semi-coronal plane causes minimal radiation to the ovaries, and the effective radiation dose for women might even be lower than with conventional AP X-rays. Therefore, for suspected sacroiliitis in young women, CT in the semi-coronal plane is the preferred imaging method with respect to diagnostics and radiation protection when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not available. Male gonads can be protected from radiation doses in conventional X-rays, and CT as the primary imaging method can only be justified in these cases because of its better diagnostic capabilities. Due to the lack of inherent risk factors, MRI is superior to CT for diagnostics since it provides images of inflammatory signs in addition to joint destruction. Thus, when available, MRI should be given preference for diagnosis of sacroiliitis. (orig.) [German] Roentgenaufnahmen des Sakroiliakalgelenks im anterior-posterioren bzw. posterior-anterioren Strahlengang, gelegentlich ergaenzt durch die Schraegaufnahme, sind seit vielen Jahren die Methode der Wahl fuer die Diagnostik bei Patienten mit Verdacht auf Sakroiliitis. Die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet des konventionellen Roentgens sind relativ niedrig, was die Diagnose der Sakroiliitis verzoegern koennte. Die Computertomographie (CT) ist dem konventionellen Roentgen fuer die Diagnostik der Sakroiliitis ueberlegen

  2. Lens dosimetry during examination of the sella turcica: comparison between conventional tomography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, O.; Bette, L.; Noseda, A.

    1986-01-01

    Lens irradiation measurements were performed with thermo-luminescent lithium fluoride dosimeters during tomographic examinations of the sella turcica, simulated on a phantom head. Lens dosimetry during linear or hypocycloidal conventional tomography was compared with that during computed tomography (CT). Results showed that CT involved much lower radiation exposure to the lens than did conventional tomography and that the major part of the irradiation delivered by CT was related to axial scanning. Therefore, the major finding was that lens irradiation during CT of the sella can be kept at a particularly low level (< 1 m Gy/8 sections) when only coronal scanning is performed.

  3. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  4. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  5. Use of three-dimensional computed tomography overlay for real-time cryoballoon ablation in atrial fibrillation reduces radiation dose and contrast dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Velthuis, B; Molenaar, M; Reinhart Dorman, H G; Stevenhagen, J Y; Scholten, M F; van der Palen, J; van Opstal, J M

    2017-06-01

    Cryoballoon pulmonary vein (PV) isolation in patients with atrial fibrillation has proven to be effective in short-term and long-term follow-up. To visualise the PV anatomy, pre-ablation contrast pulmonary venography is commonly performed. Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) overlay is a new technique creating a live 3D image of the left atrium by integrating a previously obtained CT scan during fluoroscopy. To evaluate the benefits of 3D CT overlay during cryoballoon ablation, we studied the use of 3D CT overlay versus contrast pulmonary venography in a randomised fashion in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation undergoing cryoballoon PV isolation. Between October 2012 and June 2013, 30 patients accepted for PV isolation were randomised to cryoballoon PV isolation using either 3D CT overlay or contrast pulmonary venography. All patients underwent a pre-procedural cardiac CT for evaluation of the anatomy of the left atrium (LA) and the PVs. In the 3D CT overlay group, a 3D reconstruction of the LA and PVs was made. An overlay of the CT reconstruction was then projected over live fluoroscopy. Patients in the contrast pulmonary venography group received significantly more contrast agent (77.1 ± 21.2 cc vs 40.1 ± 17.6 cc, p overlay group. There was no difference in total procedure time, fluoroscopy time and the amount of cryoapplications between the two groups. The use of 3D CT overlay decreases radiation and contrast dye exposure and can assist in guiding cryoballoon-based PV isolation.

  6. Imaging performance of phase-contrast breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation and a CdTe photon-counting detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, A; Mettivier, G; Golosio, B; Oliva, P; Spandre, G; Di Lillo, F; Fedon, C; Longo, R; Russo, P

    2016-05-01

    Within the SYRMA-CT collaboration based at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation (SR) facility the authors investigated the imaging performance of the phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) system dedicated to monochromatic in vivo 3D imaging of the female breast, for breast cancer diagnosis. Test objects were imaged at 38keV using monochromatic SR and a high-resolution CdTe photon-counting detector. Signal and noise performance were evaluated using modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum. The analysis was performed on the images obtained with the application of a phase retrieval algorithm as well as on those obtained without phase retrieval. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the capability of detecting test microcalcification clusters and soft masses were investigated. For a voxel size of (60μm)(3), images without phase retrieval showed higher spatial resolution (6.7mm(-1) at 10% MTF) than corresponding images with phase retrieval (2.5mm(-1)). Phase retrieval produced a reduction of the noise level and an increase of the CNR by more than one order of magnitude, compared to raw phase-contrast images. Microcalcifications with a diameter down to 130μm could be detected in both types of images. The investigation on test objects indicates that breast CT with a monochromatic SR source is technically feasible in terms of spatial resolution, image noise and contrast, for in vivo 3D imaging with a dose comparable to that of two-view mammography. Images obtained with the phase retrieval algorithm showed the best performance in the trade-off between spatial resolution and image noise. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Coronary computed tomography - present status and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apfaltrer, P.; Schoepf, U. J.; Vliegenthart, R.; Rowe, G. W.; Spears, J. R.; Fink, C.; Nance, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The use of coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) is growing rapidly, in large part because of fast-paced technical innovations that have increased diagnostic accuracy while providing new opportunities for radiation dose reduction. cCTA using recent generation CT scanners has been repeatedl

  8. X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, Willi A [Institute of Medical Physics, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestr. 91, D-91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-07-07

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  9. Computed tomography of arachnoid cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Min Gi; Bae, Weon Tae; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyun De [College of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    The preoperative diagnosis of intracranial arachnoid cysts has been simplified, and made more rapid and accurate with computed tomography (CT). Using CT cisternography, detailed anatomic and physiologic information of arachnoid cysts could be obtained. CT features of pathologically proven 21 arachnoid cysts that were examined at Chonnam National University Hospital from June 1983 to May 1987 were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1.Prevalent age group was the 1st decade (8 cases) and male to female ratio was 17:4. 2.Clinical features were related to the location of arachnoid cyst, common symptoms were headache (53.3%), convulsion, mental change and walking disturbance. 3.Location of the arachnoid cyst were in supratentorial region (15 cases) most in middle cranial fossa (12 cases), and infratentorial region (6 cases), common at the retrocerebellar cisternal space (3 cases). 4.Shapes of arachnoid cyst were biconvex with straight inner margin (8 cases), spherical (7 cases), simple biconvex (3 cases) and others (3 cases). 5.Size of the arachnoid cyst, in the greatest dimension, was ranged from 2cm to 9cm and commonly distributed between 3cm to 5cm (14 cases). 6.Of all 14 cases, who did CT cisternography using metrizamide (11 cases) and iopamidol (3 cases), 2 cases had communication with the subarachnoid space.

  10. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara C, A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Osorio V, M. [ISSSTE, Centro Medico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, Felix Cuevas 540, Col. del Valle, 03100 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Hernandez O, O., E-mail: armando_lara_cam@yahoo.com.mx [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we studied the dosimetry performed on CT scan in two different equipment, SOMATOM and Phillips, with 16 and 64 slice respectively. We used 51 pellets of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF: Mg, Ti) also knows as TLD-100 due to its physical properties and its easy of use, in this study, first analysis a batch of 56 pellets, but only 53 pellets were optimal for this study, cesium-137 was used as source irradiation, then proceeded to calibrate the batch with X-rays source, measuring the corresponding dose in a Farmers ionization chamber, then, we obtained a calibration curve, and we used as reference to calculation of the applied dose, finally designing ergonomic mesh, were it was deposited a TLD 100, placed in a regions of interest were made to each scan type. Once characterized our material proceeded to testing in 30 patients, which were irradiated with X-ray tube, whose operation was performed at 80, 120 kV with a current of 100, 300 and 400 m A according to scanning protocol. Overall we measured dose of 5 mGy to 53 mGy, these measurements reflect significant dose to can induced cancer, due previous reports published, that doses greater than 20 mGy there is a risk of developing cancer in the long term, but in practice when it assigned a medical diagnosis, there are no dose limits due to benefits patients, however, IAEA publish recommendations that allow us to carry out optimum handling of ionizing radiation, among these is the quality control of the tomography equipment that helps greatly reduce patient dose. (Author)

  11. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Naimuddin, Md; Blazey, G; Boi, S; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Rukalin, V; Uzunyan, S A; Zutshi, V; Fordt, R; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P

    2015-01-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantageous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  12. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md. [Delhi U.; Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Boi, S. [Northern Illinois U.; Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Erdelyi, B. [Northern Illinois U.; Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois U.; Krider, J. [Northern Illinois U.; Rukalin, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois U.; Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Fordt, R. [Fermilab; Sellberg, G. [Fermilab; Rauch, J. E. [Fermilab; Roman, M. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab; Wilson, P. [Fermilab

    2016-02-04

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  13. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  14. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M C; Posniak, H V; McDonald, V; Wisniewski, R; Moncada, R

    1989-07-01

    Computed tomography is an established modality for the evaluation of the pericardium. It is used to evaluate complicated pericardial effusions, pericardial thickening, calcific pericarditis, pericardial cysts, postoperative changes and primary and metastatic neoplasms of the pericardium. Magnetic resonance imaging is being used with increasing frequency in the evaluation of pericardial disease. It offers advantages over computed tomography, including a potential for tissue characterization, absence of ionizing radiation or need for intravenous contrast medium, and the ability to scan in any plane. Disadvantages include greater cost, longer examination times and the inability to identify calcification positively.

  15. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Silvia; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Longo, Renata; Olivo, Alessandro; Poropat, Paolo; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico D.; Castelli, Edoardo

    2002-05-01

    A feasibility study of breast CT with synchrotron radiation is currently being carried on at Elettra, the Trieste synchrotron radiation facility. Breast CT cannot be implemented easily with conventional radiographic tubes, due to the high dose that would be delivered to the breast by a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The possibility of tuning the beam energy, available at a synchrotron radiation beamline, allows a significant reduction in the delivered dose, and at the same time the use of monochromatic beams avoids beam hardening artifacts on the reconstructed image. Images of in vitro breast tissue samples have been acquired by means of a high efficiency linear array detector coupled to a VLSI single photon counting readout electronics. The pixel width, determining the pixel size of the reconstructed image, is 200 micrometers , while the pixel height, determining the CT slice thickness, is 300 micrometers . Tomograms have been reconstructed by means of standard filtered backprojection algorithms. Images of normal and pathologic breast tissue samples show a good visibility of glandular structure. The delivered dose was in all cases comparable to the one delivered in clinical planar mammography. Due to the promising results we obtained, in vivo studies are under evaluation.

  16. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  17. Extended Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Boost for Lymph Node–Positive Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Regional Control and Recurrence Patterns in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Kim, Hayeon; Choi, Serah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is commonly used for nodal staging in locally advanced cervical cancer; however the false negative rate for para-aortic disease are 20% to 25% in PET-positive pelvic nodal disease. Unless surgically staged, pelvis-only treatment may undertreat para-aortic disease. We have treated patients with PET-positive nodes with extended field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to address the para-aortic region prophylactically with concomitant boost to involved nodes. The purpose of this study was to assess regional control rates and recurrence patterns. Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with cervical cancer (stage IBI-IVA) diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 with PET-avid pelvic nodes treated with extended field IMRT (45 Gy in 25 fractions with concomitant boost to involved nodes to a median of 55 Gy in 25 fractions) with concurrent cisplatin and brachytherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The nodal location was pelvis-only in 41 patients (67%) and pelvis + para-aortic in 20 patients (33%). There were a total of 179 nodes, with a median number of positive nodes of 2 (range, 1-16 nodes) per patient and a median nodal size of 1.8 cm (range, 0.7-4.5 cm). Response was assessed by PET/CT at 12 to 16 weeks. Results: Complete clinical and imaging response at the first follow-up visit was seen in 77% of patients. At a mean follow-up time of 29 months (range, 3-116 months), 8 patients experienced recurrence. The sites of persistent/recurrent disease were as follows: cervix 10 (16.3%), regional nodes 3 (4.9%), and distant 14 (23%). The rate of para-aortic failure in patients with pelvic-only nodes was 2.5%. There were no significant differences in recurrence patterns by the number/location of nodes, largest node size, or maximum node standardized uptake value. The rate of late grade 3+ adverse events was 4%. Conclusions: Extended field IMRT was well tolerated and resulted in low regional recurrence

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... materials and a metallic taste in his/her mouth that lasts for a few minutes. Occasionally, a ...

  19. Quantitative computed tomography evaluation of pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcevoy, Fintan J; Buelund, Lene; Strathe, Anders B

    2009-01-01

    Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present.......Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present....

  20. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  1. Examination of weld defects by computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jovanović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defects in metal arc gas (MAG welds made in S235JR low carbon steel of 6 mm thickness were examined. A sample containing lack of fusion (LOF and pores was examined by computed tomography – CT. The computed tomography examination was performed in order to define LOF size and position as well as dimensions and distribution of accompanying pores in the weld metal.

  2. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of the skull in malignant otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe, rare infective condition of the external auditory canal and skull base. The diagnosis is generally made from a range of clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy is known to detect osteomyelitis earlier than computed tomography. The authors present a patient with bilateral malignant otitis externa where the extent of skull base involvement was determined on 3-phase bone scintigraphy with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

  3. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Benjamin M., E-mail: benjamin.white@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vennarini, Sabina [L' Unità Operativa di Protonterapia, Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari, Trento (Italy); Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  4. Comparison of Synchrotron Radiation-based Propagation Phase Contrast Imaging and Conventional Micro-computed Tomography for Assessing Intervertebral Discs and Endplates in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhong; Ni, Shuangfei; Cao, Yong; Wang, Xiaokai; Liao, Shenghui; Lu, Hongbin

    2017-08-01

    The synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography (SRμCT) and micro-CT (μCT) were applied to comparatively assess the intervertebral disc (IVD) and endplate (EP). To explore a new approach to evaluate the detailed structure of the IVD and EP during maturation and aging in a murine model. Till date, methods to observe the morphological changes in the IVD and EP from rodents have been relatively limited. SRμCT has been recognized as a potential way to visualize the structures containing sclerous and soft tissue. Our study focused on comparing the capacity of SRμCT and μCT in evaluating the detailed structure of the IVD and EP. Both SRμCT and μCT were performed to depict the structure of spinal tissue from 4-month-old mice. Then, the imaging quality was evaluated in the three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed model. Further, the changes in the EP and IVD during the maturation and aging process were assessed morphologically and quantitatively using SRμCT. The 3D reconstructed model of the EP from both μCT and SRμCT provided detailed information on its inner structure. However, the IVD was only depicted using SRμCT. Multi-angle observations of the 3D structure of EP and IVD from mice of different ages (15 days, 2 months, 4 months, and 18 months) were dynamically performed by SRμCT. Quantitative evaluations indicated that the total volume of EP and IVD, the average height of IVD and the canal-total volume ratio of EP increased from 15-day-old mice to 4-month-old mice and decreased in 18-month-old mice. The EP and IVD were clearly visualized using SRμCT. Compared with μCT, SRμCT provided a better ultrahigh resolution image of soft tissue and hard tissue simultaneously, which makes it a promising approach for the noninvasive study of disc degeneration. N /A.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray examinations. X-rays are a form of radiation, like light or radio waves that can be ... conventional x-ray exam, a small burst of radiation passes through the body, recording an image on ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... be required to wear a lead apron to prevent radiation exposure. The radiation dose directly outside of ... child will stay in the department for a recovery period and will be given instructions on any ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... to wear a lead apron to prevent radiation exposure. The radiation dose directly outside of the CT ... However, CT scans result in a low-level exposure. Whether such levels cause cancer is debatable but ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be required to wear a lead apron to prevent radiation exposure. The radiation dose directly outside of ... child will stay in the department for a recovery period and will be given instructions on any ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... radiation children may receive from a CT scan. One of the best ways of limiting radiation exposure ... or pediatrician and the radiologist will decide which type of examination is best for your child. top ...

  10. Computed Tomography evaluation of maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Natraj Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The maxillofacial region, a complex anatomical structure, can be evaluated by conventional (plain films, Tomography, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography, Orthopantomogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The study was conducted with objective of describing various forms of maxillofacial injuries, imaging features of different types of maxillofacial fractures and the advantage of using Three- Dimensional Computed Tomography reconstructed image. Materials & Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients during April 2014 to September 2016 using Toshiba Aquilion Prime 160 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography scanner.Results: The maxillofacial fractures were significantly higher in male population (88% than female population (12 %. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury others being physical assault and fall from height. It was most common in 31-40 years (26% and 21-30 (24% years age group. Maxillary sinus was the commonest fracture (36% followed by nasal bone and zygomatic bone (30%, mandible and orbital bones (28%. Soft tissue swelling was the commonest associated finding. Three dimensional images (3 D compared to the axial scans missed some fractures. However, the extension of the complex fracture lines and degree of displacement were more accurately assessed. Complex fractures found were Le fort (6% and naso-orbito-ethmoid (4% fractures.Conclusion: The proper evaluation of complex anatomy of the facial bones requires Multidetector Computed Tomography which offers excellent spatial resolution enabling multiplanar reformations and three dimensional reconstructions for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning.

  11. Comprehensive Oncologic Imaging in Infants and Preschool Children With Substantially Reduced Radiation Exposure Using Combined Simultaneous ¹⁸F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Direct Comparison to ¹⁸F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Gücke, Brigitte; Bezrukov, Ilja; Seitz, Guido; Ebinger, Martin; Reimold, Matthias; Pfannenberg, Christina A; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schäfer, Jürgen F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical applicability and technical feasibility of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) in young children focusing on lesion detection, PET quantification, and potential savings in radiation exposure. Twenty examinations (10 PET/CT and 10 PET/MRI examinations) were performed prospectively in 9 patients with solid tumors (3 female, 6 male; mean age, 4.8 [1-6] years). Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and FDG PET/MRI were performed sequentially after a single tracer injection. Lesion detection and analysis were performed independently in PET/CT and PET/MRI. Potential changes in diagnostic or therapeutic patient management were recorded. Positron emission tomography quantification in PET/MRI was evaluated by comparing standardized uptake values resulting from MRI-based and CT-based attenuation correction. Effective radiation doses of PET and CT were estimated. Twenty-one PET-positive lesions were found congruently in PET/CT and PET/MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging enabled significantly better detection of morphologic PET correlates compared with CT. Eight suspicious PET-negative lesions were identified by MRI, of which one was missed in CT. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for correct lesion classification were not significantly different (90%, 47%, and 62% in PET/CT; 100%, 68%, and 79% in PET/MRI, respectively). In 4 patients, the use of PET/MRI resulted in a potential change in diagnostic management compared with PET/CT, as local and whole-body staging could be performed within 1 single examination. In 1 patient, PET/MRI initiated a change in therapeutic management. Positron emission tomography quantification using MRI-based attenuation correction was accurate compared with CT-based attenuation correction. Higher standardized uptake value deviations of about 18% were observed in the lungs due to misclassification in MRI

  12. Possible Radiation-Induced Damage to the Molecular Structure of Wooden Artifacts Due to Micro-Computed Tomography, Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Kozachuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to ascertain whether radiation produced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, micro-computed tomography (μCT and/or portable handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF equipment might damage wood artifacts during analysis. Changes at the molecular level were monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR analysis. No significant changes in FTIR spectra were observed as a result of μCT or handheld XRF analysis. No substantial changes in the collected FTIR spectra were observed when XPS analytical times on the order of minutes were used. However, XPS analysis collected over tens of hours did produce significant changes in the FTIR spectra.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... able to see, hear and speak with your child at all times. A parent may be allowed in the room but will be required to wear a lead apron to prevent radiation exposure. The radiation ... child. Some imaging facilities may use general anesthesia or ...

  14. Positron emission tomography and radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, PhD, Gary D.; Fox, MD, Peter; Phillips, MD, William T.

    2001-10-01

    Medical physics research is providing new avenues for addressing the fundamental problem of radiation therapy-how to provide a tumor-killing dose while reducing the dose to a non-lethal level for critical organs in adjacent portions of the patient anatomy. This talk reviews the revolutionary impact of Positron Emission Tomography on the practice of radiation oncology. The concepts of PET imaging and the development of "tumor" imaging methods using 18F-DG flouro-deoxyglucose are presented to provide the foundation for contemporary research and application to therapy. PET imaging influences radiation therapy decisions in multiple ways. Imaging of occult but viable tumor metastases eliminates misguided therapy attempts. The ability to distinguish viable tumor from scar tissue and necroses allows reduction of treatment portals and more selective treatments. Much research remains before the clinical benefits of these advances are fully realized.

  15. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M.; Bonanno, D.; Brianzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Presti, D. Lo; Maccioni, G.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Sipala, V.; Talamonti, C.; Vanzi, E.

    2017-02-01

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to 1% and spatial resolutions CT in hadron-therapy.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and needle aspirations of many areas of the ... eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are a form of radiation, like light or radio waves that can be directed at the body. ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is possible, every effort is made to limit the amount of radiation children may receive from ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. Other ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body area being examined, and the child's size. Radiologists generally attempt to use the lowest radiation ... being prepared for a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called "multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-rays are a form of radiation, like light or radio waves that can be directed at ... with medication, if necessary. If your child becomes light-headed or experiences difficulty breathing, you should notify ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a gown. You may be instructed to withhold food or drink beforehand, especially if sedation or anesthesia ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sensitive to radiation, they should have a CT study only if it is essential for making a diagnosis and should not have repeated CT studies unless absolutely necessary. top of page What are ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or ... receive from a CT scan. One of the best ways of limiting radiation exposure is to avoid ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. There ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... sensitive to radiation, they should have a CT study only if it is essential for making a ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-rays are a form of radiation, like light or radio waves that can be directed at ... with medication, if necessary. If your child becomes light-headed or experiences difficulty breathing, you should notify ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a gown. You may be instructed to withhold food or drink beforehand, especially if sedation or anesthesia ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. There ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... CT scans that are not clearly needed. Another strategy is to consider other tests, such as MRI ... sensitive to radiation, they should have a CT study only if it is essential for making a ...

  15. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it; Russo, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia, Napoli I-80126, Italy and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli I-80126 (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed.

  16. A Detector for Proton Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazey, G.; et al.

    2013-12-06

    Radiation therapy is a widely recognized treatment for cancer. Energetic protons have distinct features that set them apart from photons and make them desirable for cancer therapy as well as medical imaging. The clinical interest in heavy ion therapy is due to the fact that ions deposit almost all of their energy in a sharp peak – the Bragg peak- at the very end of their path. Proton beams can be used to precisely localize a tumor and deliver an exact dose to the tumor with small doses to the surrounding tissue. Proton computed tomography (pCT) provides direct information on the location on the target tumor, and avoids position uncertainty caused by treatment planning based on imaging with X-ray CT. The pCT project goal is to measure and reconstruct the proton relative stopping power distribution directly in situ. To ensure the full advantage of cancer treatment with 200 MeV proton beams, pCT must be realized.

  17. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Manni, Carlo; Santoni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomic imaging procedures (computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) have become essential tools for brain tumor assessment. Functional images (positron emission tomography [PET] and single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) can provide additional information useful during the diagnostic workup to determine the degree of malignancy and as a substitute or guide for biopsy. After surgery and/or radiotherapy, nuclear medicine examinations are essential to assess persistence of tumor, to differentiate recurrence from radiation necrosis and gliosis, and to monitor the disease. The combination of functional images with anatomic ones is of the utmost importance for a full evaluation of these patients, which can be obtained by means of imaging fusion. Despite the fast-growing diffusion of PET, in most cases of brain tumors, SPECT studies are adequate and provide results that parallel those obtained with PET. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with brain tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is the lack of precise anatomic details; this drawback is overcome by the fusion with morphological studies that provide an anatomic map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or MRI demonstrated usefulness for brain tumor assessment, but this process is often time consuming and not practical for everyday nuclear medicine studies. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which allow the acquisition of SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, and their co-registration by means of the hardware, has facilitated this process. In SPECT studies of brain tumors with various radiopharmaceuticals, fused images are helpful in providing the precise localization of neoplastic lesions, and in excluding the disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. This information is useful for optimizing diagnosis, therapy monitoring, and radiotherapy treatment planning, with a

  18. Comparison of radiation dose and image quality of triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography between conventional helical scanning and a strategy incorporating sequential scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Eric D; Peters, M Robert; Wolff, Steven D; Qureshi, Mehreen A; Atluri, Prashanth; Pearson, Gregory D N; Einstein, Andrew J

    2011-04-01

    Triple-rule-out computed tomographic angiography (TRO CTA), performed to evaluate the coronary arteries, pulmonary arteries, and thoracic aorta, has been associated with high radiation exposure. The use of sequential scanning for coronary computed tomographic angiography reduces the radiation dose. The application of sequential scanning to TRO CTA is much less well defined. We analyzed the radiation dose and image quality from TRO CTA performed at a single outpatient center, comparing the scans from a period during which helical scanning with electrocardiographically controlled tube current modulation was used for all patients (n = 35) and after adoption of a strategy incorporating sequential scanning whenever appropriate (n = 35). Sequential scanning was able to be used for 86% of the cases. The sequential-if-appropriate strategy, compared to the helical-only strategy, was associated with a 61.6% dose decrease (mean dose-length product of 439 mGy × cm vs 1,144 mGy × cm and mean effective dose of 7.5 mSv vs 19.4 mSv, respectively, p TRO CTA with a diagnostic strategy of sequential scanning, as appropriate, can offer a marked reduction in the radiation dose while maintaining the image quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Computed tomography versus invasive coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napp, Adriane E; Haase, Robert; Laule, Michael

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: More than 3.5 million invasive coronary angiographies (ICA) are performed in Europe annually. Approximately 2 million of these invasive procedures might be reduced by noninvasive tests because no coronary intervention is performed. Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate noninva...... angiography (ICA) is the reference standard for detection of CAD. • Noninvasive computed tomography angiography excludes CAD with high sensitivity. • CT may effectively reduce the approximately 2 million negative ICAs in Europe. • DISCHARGE addresses this hypothesis in patients with low...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a small burst of radiation passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special image recording ... this series of pictures, or slices of the body, to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images, which are then displayed on a monitor. Special ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from a CT scan. One of the best ways of limiting radiation exposure is to avoid CT scans that are not clearly needed. Another strategy is to consider other tests, such as MRI or ultrasound which might give the same information. Other measures are to restrict the area scanned ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or your child remember to tell health care providers in the future. If the contrast material is ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and needle aspirations of many areas of the body, particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. Sometimes ultrasound is substituted for CT as a ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special image recording plate . Bones appear ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or ... of the machine, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other ...

  8. Paradoxical emboli: demonstration using helical computed tomography of the pulmonary artery associated with abdominal computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delalu, P.; Ferretti, G.R.; Bricault, I.; Ayanian, D.; Coulomb, M. [Service Central de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale, CHU Grenoble (France)

    2000-02-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman with a recent history of a cerebrovascular accident. Because of clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism and negative Doppler ultrasound findings of the lower limbs, spiral computed tomography of the pulmonary artery was performed and demonstrated pulmonary emboli. We emphasize the role of computed tomography of the abdomen, performed 3 min after the thoracic acquisition, which showed an unsuspected thrombus within the abdominal aorta and the left renal artery with infarction of the left kidney. Paradoxical embolism was highly suspected on computed tomography data and confirmed by echocardiography which demonstrated a patent foramen ovale. (orig.)

  9. {sup 18}F-Choline Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography–Driven High-Dose Salvage Radiation Therapy in Patients With Biochemical Progression After Radical Prostatectomy: Feasibility Study in 60 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Angelillo, Rolando M., E-mail: r.dangelillo@unicampus.it [Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Sciuto, Rosa [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Ramella, Sara [Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Papalia, Rocco [Department of Urology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Trodella, Luca E.; Fiore, Michele [Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Gallucci, Michele [Department of Urology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Maini, Carlo L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Trodella, Lucio [Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review data of a cohort of patients with biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy, treated according to a uniform institutional treatment policy, to evaluate toxicity and feasibility of high-dose salvage radiation therapy (80 Gy). Methods and Materials: Data on 60 patients with biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy between January 2009 and September 2011 were reviewed. The median value of prostate-specific antigen before radiation therapy was 0.9 ng/mL. All patients at time of diagnosis of biochemical recurrence underwent dynamic {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), which revealed in all cases a local recurrence. High-dose salvage radiation therapy was delivered up to total dose of 80 Gy to 18F-choline PET/CT-positive area. Toxicity was recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, scale. Results: Treatment was generally well tolerated: 54 patients (90%) completed salvage radiation therapy without any interruption. Gastrointestinal grade ≥2 acute toxicity was recorded in 6 patients (10%), whereas no patient experienced a grade ≥2 genitourinary toxicity. No grade 4 acute toxicity events were recorded. Only 1 patient (1.7%) experienced a grade 2 gastrointestinal late toxicity. With a mean follow-up of 31.2 months, 46 of 60 patients (76.6%) were free of recurrence. The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival rate was 72.5%. Conclusions: At early follow-up, {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT-driven high-dose salvage radiation therapy seems to be feasible and well tolerated, with a low rate of toxicity.

  10. Cervical diplomyelia revealed by computed tomography (CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, G.B.; Davidovits, P.; Cerisoli, M.; Giulioni, M.

    1982-05-01

    An unusual case of cervical diplomyelia diagnosed by Computed Tomography (CT) is reported. The usefulness of CT examination in the evaluation of spinal dysraphic defects is emphasized, though performed without CSF enhancement. Visualisation of spinal cord splitting in the absence of bony spicula allows the authors to differentiate between diplomyelia and diastematomyelia which have been often described by using both terms interchangeably.

  11. Computed tomography demonstration of cholecystogastric fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Kuao Chou, MD, MPH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystogastric fistula is a rare complication of chronic cholecystitis or long-standing cholelithiasis. It results from the gradual erosion of the approximated, chronically inflamed wall of the gall bladder and stomach with fistulous tract formation. The present case describes the direct visualization of a cholecystogastric fistula by computed tomography in a patient without prior biliary system complaints.

  12. Computed tomography in untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harinarayana, C.V.; Renu, G.; Ammini, A.C.; Khurana, M.L.; Ved, P.; Karmarkar, M.G.; Ahuja, M.M.S.; Berry, M. (AIIMS, New Delhi (India))

    1991-02-01

    Six children with untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were examined by computed tomography (CT). Three cases demonstrated diffuse enlargement of both adrenal glands with preservation of normal configuration and two showed tumorous transformation in one of the enlarged glands. One had equivocal in this group (age 2 years) also showed bilateral hyperplasia. (orig.).

  13. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal reconstruc

  14. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal reconstruc

  15. Neutron computed tomography of rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzke, R W; Wall, W A [Institute for Computational Mechanics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Runck, H; Stahl, C A; Schneider, M; Guttmann, J [Department of Anesthesiology, Section for Experimental Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Schillinger, B; Calzada, E; Muehlbauer, M; Schulz, M [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) and Fakultaet fuer Physik E21 at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Priebe, H-J, E-mail: metzke@lnm.mw.tum.d [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-01-07

    Using conventional methods, three-dimensional imaging of the lung is challenging because of the low contrast between air and tissue and the large differences in dimensions between various pulmonary structures. The small distal airway structures and the high air-to-tissue ratio of lung tissue require an imaging technique which reliably discriminates between air and water. The objective of this study was to assess whether neutron computed tomography would satisfy such a requirement. This method utilizes the unique characteristic of neutrons of directly interacting with the atomic nucleus rather than being scattered by the atomic shell. Neutron computed tomography was tested in rats and allowed differentiation of larger lung structures (e.g., lobes) and distal airways. Airways could be identified reliably down to the sixth bronchial generation, in some cases even down to the tenth generation. The lung could be stabilized for sufficiently long exposure times to achieve an image resolution of 50-60 {mu}m, which is the current physical resolution limit of the neutron computed tomography facility. Neutron computed tomography allowed excellent lung imaging without the need for additional tissue preparation or contrast media. The enhanced structural resolution obtained by applying this new research technique may improve understanding of lung physiology and respiratory therapy. (note)

  16. Parallel Computing for the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    This software computes the tomographic reconstruction of spatial-spectral data from raw detector images of the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which enables transient-level, multi-spectral imaging by capturing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot.

  17. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Noriko; Sato, Hiromi; Kawaguchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Katsuzo; Tanaka, Makoto (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detectors rotate around the patient. At the same time, the examination table is moving through the scanner, so that the x-ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this series of pictures, or slices of the body, to ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ...

  20. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for malignant otitis externa: lesion not shown on planar image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Hsieh, Hung-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe and rare infection of the external acoustic meatus. Triphasic bone and (67)Ga scintigraphies are used to initial detect and follow-up the response of therapy. With single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images, the diagnostic sensitivity is higher. We presented a case with malignant otitis externa with initial negative planar scintigraphic finding. The lesion was detected by photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images. We concluded that the photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography should be performed routinely for patients with suspected malignant otitis externa, even without evidence of lesion on planar images.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Findings During Therapy Predict Outcome in Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With Chemotherapy Alone but Not in Those Who Receive Consolidation Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabaja, Bouthaina S., E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hess, Kenneth [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shihadeh, Ferial [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Podoloff, Donald A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Medeiros, L. Jeffrey [Department of Hematopathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Arzu, Isidora [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Oki, Yasuhiro; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Fayad, Luis E. [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reed, Valerie K.; Kedir, Aziza; Wogan, Christine F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez, Alma [Office of the Executive Vice President and Physician-in-Chief, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of mid-therapy positron emission tomography (PET) findings for predicting survival and disease progression in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, considering type of therapy (chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 294 patients with histologically confirmed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with respect to age, sex, disease stage, International Prognostic Index score, mid-therapy PET findings (positive or negative), and disease status after therapy and at last follow-up. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared according to mid-therapy PET findings. Results: Of the 294 patients, 163 (55%) were male, 144 (49%) were age >61 years, 110 (37%) had stage I or II disease, 219 (74%) had International Prognostic Index score ≤2, 216 (73%) received ≥6 cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, and 88 (30%) received consolidation radiation therapy. Five-year PFS and OS rates were associated with mid-therapy PET status: PFS was 78% for those with PET-negative (PET−) disease versus 63% for PET-positive (PET+) disease (P=.024), and OS was 82% for PET− versus 62% for PET+ (P<.002). These associations held true for patients who received chemotherapy only (PFS 71% for PET− vs 52% PET+ [P=.012], OS 78% for PET− and 51% for PET+ [P=.0055]) but not for those who received consolidation radiation therapy (PFS 84% PET− vs 81% PET+ [P=.88]; OS 90% PET− vs 81% PET+ [P=.39]). Conclusion: Mid-therapy PET can predict patient outcome, but the use of consolidation radiation therapy may negate the significance of mid-therapy findings.

  2. Computed tomography of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the computed tomographic (CT) techniques for imaging the different elements comprising the spinal column and canal. The use of intravenous and intrathecal contrast enhancement and of xenon enhancement is briefly mentioned. Reconstruction techniques and special problems regarding CT of the spine are presented. CT of the spinal cord, meninges and subarachnoid space, epidural space, intervertebral discs, facet joints, and vertebrae present normal anatomy, and several common pathologic conditions. (KRM)

  3. Computed tomography in mitochondrial cytopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, J.; Kendall, B.E.

    1981-10-01

    The clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in 11 proven cases of mitochondrial cytopathy (mitochondrial myopathy, Kearns Sayre syndrome, ophthalmoplegia plus) were studied. The CT changes included focal low density lesions in the basal ganglia and white matter and atrophy which could be slight or diffuse and severe. Calcification has been described in the basal ganglia, but did not occur in our series. Serial CT showed progression of the abnormalities. The differential diagnosis is discussed.

  4. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  5. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  6. Trip report: Marshall Space Center computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, J. R.; Andrews, M. K.

    BIR Inc. is a small company out of the Chicago area which sells equipment for producing images by tomography. They have built a relatively large instrument, called ACTIS, for NASA at the Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama and still gave access to this instrument. BIR has a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the utility of computed tomography (CT) for characterization of nuclear and hazardous waste within the DOE complex. As part of this effort, the potential of this technique for obtaining images of canistered waste forms has been investigated. Funding for data acquisition was provided through this grant.

  7. Dose reduction with adaptive bolus chasing computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-Wei; Wang, Ge; Sharafuddin, Melhem J; Abada, Hicham T

    2010-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become an effective diagnosis and evaluating tool in clinical; however, its radiation exposure has drawn great attention as more and more CT scans are performed every year. How to reduce the radiation dose and meanwhile keep the resultant CT images diagnosable becomes an important research topic. In this paper, we propose a dose reduction approach along with the adaptive bolus chasing CT Angiography (CTA) techniques, which are capable of tracking the contrast bolus peak over all the blood vessel segments during the CTA scan. By modulating the tube current (and collimator width) online, we can reduce the total radiation dose and maintain the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the blood vessel. Numerical experiments on reference DSA data sets show that by using the proposed dose reduction method, the effective radiation dose can be saved about 39%.

  8. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  9. A systematic review comparing the appropriateness of the intravenous urogram and the Computed Tomography Urogram in terms of diagnostic accuracy and risk of radiation dose for patients with urolithiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crompton, G., E-mail: gemmacrompton@hotmail.co.uk [University of Teesside, School of Health and Social Care, Borough Road, Middlesbrough TS1 3BA (United Kingdom); Cosson, P. [University of Teesside, School of Health and Social Care, Borough Road, Middlesbrough TS1 3BA (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Background: Urolithiasis affects 5-15% of the population, with 70% of suffers between the ages 18 and 50. Guidelines detail Intravenous Urography (IVU) as the 'gold standard' for diagnosis; however advances in Computed Tomography Urography (CTU) have led to adoption of this alternative test. The radiation risks from CTU have not been widely reported. Objectives: To compare IVU and CTU for diagnostic accuracy and radiation risk. Consideration criteria: Prospective, randomised control trials, diagnostic accuracy and adverse effects studies comparing IVU and CTU accuracy and/or radiation dose were included. Participants were adults with confirmed or suspected urolithiasis. Search strategy: A search of the databases; AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE and Science Direct, was conducted between 1995 and week 40, 2009. Secondary searches of reference lists and main subject journals were completed. Methods of review: A systematic review method was employed using 'a priori' standardised forms, by two independent reviewers, to select studies, assess quality and extract data. Results: Ten studies from 283 potential references met the inclusion criteria. Diagnostic accuracy results showed consensus that CTU provides better sensitivity with comparable specificity to IVU. Dose results showed CTU to be associated with greater dose and risk of cancer than IVU. Conclusion: Decisions regarding which test should be used for urolithiasis should be taken with regard to their age and associated risk from ionising radiation. IVU represents a specific and low dose method of assessment.

  10. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    -CCTR, showed that coronary CT angiographies accounted for only 23% of all nonregistered cardiac CTs, indicating >90% completeness of coronary CT angiographies in the WDHR-CCTR. The completeness of individual variables varied substantially (range: 0%-100%), but was >85% for more than 70% of all variables. Using......BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... expected numbers; and 4) positive predictive values as well as negative predictive values of 19 main patient and procedure variables. RESULTS: By December 31, 2012, almost 22,000 cardiac CTs with up to 40 variables for each procedure have been registered. Of these, 87% were coronary CT angiography...

  11. [Pneumothorax revealed by postoperative computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shizuka; Katori, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Nitahara, Keiichi; Higa, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    We report a case of pneumothorax revealed by postoperative computed tomography. A 39-year-old obese woman (height 153 cm, weight 70 kg) with fractures of the radius, ulna, clavicle, and femur in a traffic accident, was scheduled for osteosynthesis. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental and maintained with 50% nitrous oxide in oxygen and sevoflurane. The Spo2 decreased from 99% to 94% during the surgery. Bilateral chest sounds were symmetrical. The Spo2 increased to 100% after discontinuation of nitrous oxide. Pneumothorax was not evident on a postoperative chest X-ray, but computed tomography of the chest demonstrated right-sided pneumothorax. An ECG electrode had overlapped the fractured rib on the preoperative chest X-ray.

  12. Contrast-induced nephropathy after computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano da Silva Selistre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast induced nephropathy is the third most prevalent preventable cause of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients. It defined as an absolute increase in serum creatinine ≥ 0.5 mg/dL and relative ≥ 25% increase. Objective: We studied the risk factors to intravenous injection contrast nephropathy after computed tomography. Methods: We studied 400 patients prospectively. Results: The incidence of contrast induced nephropathy, with an absolute or a relative increase were 4.0% and 13.9%, respectively. Diabetes and cardiac failure were independent risk factors for CIN a relative increase de serum creatinine (O.R.: 3.5 [95% CI: 1.92-6.36], p < 0.01, 2.61 [95% CI: 1.14-6.03%], p < 0.05, respectively. Conclusions: We showed association between uses of intravenous injection contrast after computed tomography with acute injury renal, notably with diabetes and heart failure.

  13. Initial water quantification results using neutron computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, A.K. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States)], E-mail: axh174@psu.edu; Shi, L.; Brenizer, J.S.; Mench, M.M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States)

    2009-06-21

    Neutron computed tomography is an important imaging tool in the field of non-destructive testing and in fundamental research for many engineering applications. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, such as hydrogen, but can penetrate many heavy materials. Thus, neutron computed tomography is useful in obtaining important three-dimensional information about a sample's interior structure and material properties that other traditional methods cannot provide. The neutron computed tomography system at Pennsylvania State University's Radiation Science and Engineering Center is being utilized to develop a water quantification technique for investigation of water distribution in fuel cells under normal conditions. A hollow aluminum cylinder test sample filled with a known volume of water was constructed for purposes of testing the quantification technique. Transmission images of the test sample at different angles were easily acquired through the synthesis of a dedicated image acquisition computer driving a rotary table controller and an in-house developed synchronization software package. After data acquisition, Octopus (version 8.2) and VGStudio Max (version 1.2) were used to perform cross-sectional and three-dimensional reconstructions of the sample, respectively. The initial reconstructions and water quantification results are presented.

  14. Computed tomography of ancient Egyptian mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood-Nash, D C

    1979-12-01

    This first report of the application of computed tomography (CT) to the study of ancient mummies, the desiccated brain of a boy and the body of a young woman within her cartonnage, shows that CT is uniquely suitable for the study of such antiquities, a study that does not necessitate destruction of the mummy or its cartonnage. Exquisite images result that are of great paleoanatomical, paleopathological, and archeological significance.

  15. Computed tomography and obstructive biliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrilla, T R; Haaga, J R; Alfidi, R J; Reich, N E

    1977-05-01

    Forty-four patients with confirmed biliary diseases were studied to determine the value of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of biliary pathology. The results indicate that CT is useful and highly accurate in differentiating between obstructive (surgical) and nonobstructive (medical) disease entities. Of the cases with proved obstruction, 88% were correctly identified. All of the nonobstructive cases had positive CT correlation. In addition, the underlying cause of the occlusion was determined in the majority of cases.

  16. Computed Tomography of Transverse Phase Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, A. [Fermilab; Johnstone, C. [Fermilab; Johnstone, J. [Fermilab

    2016-09-19

    Two computed tomography techniques are explored to reconstruct beam transverse phase space using both simulated beam and multi-wire profile data in the Fermilab Muon Test Area ("MTA") beamline. Both Filtered Back-Projection ("FBP") and Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique ("SART") algorithms [2] are considered and compared. Errors and artifacts are compared as a function of each algorithm’s free parameters, and it is shown through simulation and MTA beamline profiles that SART is advantageous for reconstructions with limited profile data.

  17. Cone beam computed tomography use in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervina, J M

    2012-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used by orthodontists to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of their patients. This is of value as malocclusion results from discrepancies in three planes of space. This review tracks the use of CBCT in orthodontics, from its validation as an accurate and reliable tool, to its use in diagnosing and treatment planning, and in assessing treatment outcomes in orthodontics.

  18. Encapsulating peritonitis: computed tomography and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadow, Juliana Santos; Fingerhut, Carla Jeronimo Peres; Fernandes, Vinicius de Barros; Coradazzi, Klaus Rizk Stuhr; Silva, Lucas Marciel Soares; Penachim, Thiago Jose, E-mail: vinicius.barros.fernandes@gmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Campinas (PUC-Campinas), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Hospital e Maternidade Celso Pierro

    2014-07-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis is a rare and frequently severe entity characterized by total or partial involvement of small bowel loops by a membrane of fibrous tissue. The disease presents with nonspecific clinical features of intestinal obstruction, requiring precise imaging diagnosis to guide the treatment. The present report emphasizes the importance of computed tomography in the diagnosis of this condition and its confirmation by surgical correlation. (author)

  19. Salvage interstitial brachytherapy based on computed tomography for recurrent cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant radiation therapy: case presentations and introduction of the technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Shan; Guo, Jie; Zhao, Yang-Zhi; Lin, Xia; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Ming; Li, Jiang-Ming; Ren, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Bing-Ya; Wang, Tie-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Locally recurring cervical cancer after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy remains a major therapeutic challenge. This paper presents a new therapeutic technique for such patients: interstitial brachytherapy (BT) guided by real-time three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). Sixteen patients with recurrent cervical cancer after radical surgery and adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were included in this study. These patients underwent high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial BT with free-hand placement of metal needles guided by real-time 3D-CT. Six Gy in 6 fractions were prescribed for the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). D90 and D100 for HR-CTV of BT, and the cumulative D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, including previous EBRT and present BT were analyzed. Treatment-related complications and 3-month tumor-response rates were investigated. The mean D90 value for HR-CTV was 52.5 ± 3.3 Gy. The cumulative D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 85.6 ± 5.8, 71.6 ± 6.4, and 69.6 ± 5.9 Gy, respectively. The mean number of needles was 6.1 ± 1.5, with an average depth of 3.5 ± 0.9 cm for each application. Interstitial BT was associated with minor complications and passable tumor-response rate. Interstitial BT guided by real-time 3D-CT for recurrent cervical cancer results in good dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. The current technique may be clinically feasible. However, long-term clinical outcomes should be further investigated.

  20. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice.

  1. Computed tomography dose optimisation in cystic fibrosis: A review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ferris, Helena

    2016-04-28

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive disease of the Caucasian population worldwide, with respiratory disease remaining the most relevant source of morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) is frequently used for monitoring disease complications and progression. Over the last fifteen years there has been a six-fold increase in the use of CT, which has lead to a growing concern in relation to cumulative radiation exposure. The challenge to the medical profession is to identify dose reduction strategies that meet acceptable image quality, but fulfil the requirements of a diagnostic quality CT. Dose-optimisation, particularly in CT, is essential as it reduces the chances of patients receiving cumulative radiation doses in excess of 100 mSv, a dose deemed significant by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. This review article explores the current trends in imaging in CF with particular emphasis on new developments in dose optimisation.

  2. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohenca, Nestor; Shemesh, Hagay

    2015-09-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the application and advantages associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications, while reducing radiation exposure during complex endodontic procedures. The benefits of the added diagnostic information provided by intraoperative CBCT images in select cases justify the risk associated with the limited level of radiation exposure.

  3. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  4. Dosimetry in abdominal imaging by 6-slice computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Sonia Isabel [Hospital de Faro, EPE (Portugal); Abrantes, Antonio Fernando; Ribeiro, Luis Pedro; Almeida, Rui Pedro Pereira [University of Algarve (Portugal). School of Health. Dept. of Radiology

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To determine the effective dose in abdominal computed tomography imaging and to study the influence of patients' characteristics on the received dose. Materials and Methods: Dose values measurements were performed with an ionization chamber on phantoms to check the agreement between dose values and those presented by the computed tomography apparatus, besides their compliance with the recommended reference dose levels. Later, values of dose received by physically able patients submitted to abdominal computed tomography (n = 100) were measured and correlated with their anthropometric characteristics. Finally, the dose to organs was simulated with the Monte Carlo method using the CT-Expo V 1.5 software, and the effect of automatic exposure control on such examinations. Results: The main characteristics directly influencing the dose include the patients' body mass, abdominal perimeter and body mass index, whose correlation is linear and positive. Conclusion: The radiation dose received from abdominal CT scans depends on some patient's characteristics, and it is important to adjust the acquisition parameters to their dimensions (author)

  5. SADMFR guidelines for the use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography/ Digital Volume Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Karl; Bornstein, Michael M; Buser, Daniel; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Ettlin, Dominik A; Filippi, Andreas; Gabioud, François; Katsaros, Christos; Krastl, Gabriel; Lambrecht, J Thomas; Lauber, Roland; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Pazera, Pawel; Türp, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has been introduced in 1998. This radiological imaging procedure has been provided for dentistry and is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in medicine. It is expected that CBCT will have the same success in dental diagnostic imaging as computed tomography had in medicine. Just as CT is responsible for a significant rise in radiation dose to the population from medical X-ray diagnostics, CBCT studies will be accompanied by a significant increase of the dose to our patients by dentistry. Because of the growing concern for an uncritical and consequently rapidly increasing use of CBCT the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology convened a first consensus conference in 2011 to formulate indications for CBCT, which can be used as guidelines. In this meeting, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics and temporomandibular joint disorders and diseases were treated and the most important and most experienced users of DVT in these areas were asked to participate. In general, a highly restrictive use of CBCT is required. Justifying main criterion for CBCT application is that additional, therapy-relevant information is expected that should lead to a significant benefit in patient care. All users of CBCT should have completed a structured, high-level training, just like that offered by the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology.

  6. Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  7. Study of inter-fraction movements of tongue during radiation therapy in cases of tongue malignancy using volumetric cone beam computed tomography (CBCT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Athar Ali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Tongue is a mobile organ in head and neck region predisposing it for geographic miss during the course of fractionated radiotherapy for tongue malignancy. This study analyses movement of tongue during the course of radiotherapy using volumetric KV-cone beam computed tomography (KV-CBCT imaging for patients of tongue malignancy treated without using tongue bite. Methods: We analysed 100 KV-cone beam CTs performed on 10 patients with carcinoma of tongue undergoing fractionated radiotherapy. All the patients underwent thermoplastic mask immobilisation and CT simulation. During the course of radiotherapy, all patients underwent volumetric KV-CBCT imaging to assess the movements of tongue. Five arbitrary reference points were used to analyse the movements of tongue in 3-dimensions: 1 Point A: Tip of tongue; 2 Point B: Point over right lateral border, 4 cm posterior to the tip of tongue; 3 Point C: Point over left lateral border, 4 cm posterior to the tip of tongue; 4 Point D: Point over superior most part (dorsum of tongue, 4 cm posterior to the tip of tongue; 5 Point E: Point over the surface of base of tongue at the level of tip of epiglottis. Results: Mean movements of point A: +0.21 cm (SD: 0.12 and -0.23 cm (SD: 0.14, point B: +0.14 cm (SD: 0.04 and -0.19 cm (SD: 0.1, point C: +0.12 cm (SD: 0.05 and -0.14 cm (SD: 0.06, point D: +0.15 cm (SD: 0.07 and -0.29 cm (SD: 0.22 and point E: +0.23 cm (SD: 0.15 and -0.23 cm (SD: 0.14. Conclusion: Organ movement is one of the great challenges encountered during radiotherapy. Tongue is one such organ in head and neck region. Concept of internal target volume (ITV margin which takes into account the internal organ movements should be considered for tongue malignancies. ITV to PTV margin will depend on the setup accuracy, immobilization device and imaging modality utilised for setup verification. In an IGRT (Image Guided Radio Therapy setup, a PTV margin of 0.3 to 0.5 cm from ITV would be safe.

  8. Computed tomography appearances of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, C. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: cheriangeorge@hotmail.com; Al-Zwae, K. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom); Nair, S. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom); Cast, J.E.I. [Department of Radiology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) characterized by thickened peritoneal membranes, which lead to decreased ultra-filtration and intestinal obstruction. Its early clinical features are nonspecific, and it is often diagnosed late following laparotomy and peritoneal biopsy, when the patient develops small bowel obstruction, which can be a life-threatening complication. However, this is changing with increasing awareness of computed tomography (CT) findings in SEP. CT can yield an early, non-invasive diagnosis that may improve patient outcome. We present a review of the CT appearances of SEP.

  9. Computed tomography in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valavanis, A.; Schubiger, O.; Hayek, J.; Friede, R.L

    1981-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) findings in a verified case of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are presented. CT revealed diffuse and severe cerebral atrophy, reflected by generalized subarachnoid space enlargement and symmetric ventricular dilatation. There was no evidence of abnormalities of the white matter. The CT features in our case of NCL correspond perfectly with the neuropathologic changes of the disease mentioned in the literature. Furthermore, CT is of considerable help in differentiating between those inherited metabolic brain diseases characterized primarily by white matter involvement and those presenting predominantly with changes of grey matter.

  10. Comparison on Computed Tomography using industrial items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In a comparison involving 27 laboratories from 8 countries, measurements on two common industrial items, a polymer part and a metal part, were carried out using X-ray Computed Tomography. All items were measured using coordinate measuring machines before and after circulation, with reference...... measurement uncertainties in the range 1.5–5.5 μm, showing a good stability over the 6 months of the circulation. The comparison has shown that CT measurements on the industrial parts used lie in the range 6–53 μm, with maximum values up to 158 μm....

  11. Tomography and spectroscopy as quantum computations

    CERN Document Server

    Miquel, C; Saraceno, M; Knill, E H; Laflamme, R; Negrevergne, C; Miquel, Cesar; Paz, Juan Pablo; Saraceno, Marcos; Knill, Emmanuel; Laflamme, Raymond; Negrevergne, Camille

    2001-01-01

    Determining the state of a system and measuring properties of its evolution are two of the most important tasks a physicist faces. For the first purpose one can use tomography, a method that after subjecting the system to a number of experiments determines all independent elements of the density matrix. For the second task, one can resort to spectroscopy, a set of techniques used to determine the spectrum of eigenvalues of the evolution operator. In this letter, we show that tomography and spectroscopy can be naturally interpreted as dual forms of quantum computation. We show how to adapt the simplest case of the well-known phase estimation quantum algorithm to perform both tasks, giving it a natural interpretation as a simulated scattering experiment. We show how this algorithm can be used to implement an interesting form of tomography by performing a direct measurement of the Wigner function of a quantum system. We present results of such measurements performed on a system of three qubits using liquid state...

  12. Shielding Calculations for Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baasandorj, Khashbayar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jeongseon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Integrated PET-CT has been shown to be more accurate for lesion localization and characterization than PET or CT alone, and the results obtained from PET and CT separately and interpreted side by side or following software based fusion of the PET and CT datasets. At the same time, PET-CT scans can result in high patient and staff doses; therefore, careful site planning and shielding of this imaging modality have become challenging issues in the field. In Mongolia, the introduction of PET-CT facilities is currently being considered in many hospitals. Thus, additional regulatory legislation for nuclear and radiation applications is necessary, for example, in regulating licensee processes and ensuring radiation safety during the operations. This paper aims to determine appropriate PET-CT shielding designs using numerical formulas and computer code. Since presently there are no PET-CT facilities in Mongolia, contact was made with radiological staff at the Nuclear Medicine Center of the National Cancer Center of Mongolia (NCCM) to get information about facilities where the introduction of PET-CT is being considered. Well-designed facilities do not require additional shielding, which should help cut down overall costs related to PET-CT installation. According to the results of this study, building barrier thicknesses of the NCCM building is not sufficient to keep radiation dose within the limits.

  13. [Spiral computed tomography in the diagnosis of limb osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Bulanova, T V; Onishchenko, M P

    2003-01-01

    The results of radiation studies in 121 patients of different age (4 to 75 years) examined for limb osteomyelitis are analyzed. All the patients underwent routine X-ray study and computed tomography (CT), 26 patients had X-ray fistulography; 8, linear tomography; 10, CT fistulography; 6, scintigraphy, and 15, ultrasound study. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO), chronic hematogenous osteomyelitis (CHO), and atypical (here Garre's sclerosing osteomyelitis and Brodie's abscess) osteomyelitis were ascertained in 10.6, 26.4, and 10.1% of cases, respectively. Posttraumatic osteomyelitis was diagnosed in almost 50% of the patients. CT defined the phase of chronic limb osteomyelitis. Spiral CT has proven to be the most effective technique for diagnosing limb osteomyelitis as compared with routine X-ray study: the accuracy of X-ray study was 81.8%, its sensitivity, 84.9%, and specificity, 60.0% and those of computed tomography were 96.7, 99.1, and 80.0%, respectively.

  14. Radiation dose in neurological computed tomographic scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitmore, R.C.; Bushong, S.C.; Archer, B.A.; Glaze, S.A.

    1979-07-01

    Patient dose and dose distribution during neurologicl computed tomography examinations were determined with five different computed tomography scanners. Maximum intracranial doses ranged from 1.17 to 2.67 rads. Doses to the lens of the eye ranged from 0.23 to 2.81 rads. These levels are considered and compared with patient doses reported for other computed tomography studies and for conventional tomographic examinations. In general, patient dose during computer tomographic examinations is less than one quarter of that during conventional tomography of the head.

  15. Simulation of computed tomography dose based on voxel phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyu; Lv, Xiangbo; Li, Zhaojun

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the preferred and the most valuable imaging tool used in diagnostic radiology, which provides a high-quality cross-sectional image of the body. It still causes higher doses of radiation to patients comparing to the other radiological procedures. The Monte-Carlo method is appropriate for estimation of the radiation dose during the CT examinations. The simulation of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) phantom was developed in this paper. Under a similar conditions used in physical measurements, dose profiles were calculated and compared against the measured values that were reported. The results demonstrate a good agreement between the calculated and the measured doses. From different CT exam simulations using the voxel phantom, the highest absorbed dose was recorded for the lung, the brain, the bone surface. A comparison between the different scan type shows that the effective dose for a chest scan is the highest one, whereas the effective dose values during abdomen and pelvis scan are very close, respectively. The lowest effective dose resulted from the head scan. Although, the dose in CT is related to various parameters, such as the tube current, exposure time, beam energy, slice thickness and patient size, this study demonstrates that the MC simulation is a useful tool to accurately estimate the dose delivered to any specific organs for patients undergoing the CT exams and can be also a valuable technique for the design and the optimization of the CT x-ray source.

  16. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF TOOTH RESORPTION IN CATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Linda G; Wilkinson, Thomas E; White, Tammy L; Farnsworth, Raelynn K; Potter, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    Tooth resorption is the most common dental disease in cats and can be a source of oral pain. The current clinical gold standard for diagnosis includes a combination of oral exam and dental radiography, however early lesions are not always detected. Computed tomography (CT) of the skull, including the dental arches, is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure, however the appearance of tooth resorption on CT and the diagnostic ability of CT to detect tooth resorption have not been evaluated. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive, diagnostic accuracy study was to characterize the CT appearance of tooth resorption in a sample of affected cats and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT for tooth resorption compared to the clinical gold standard of oral exam and intraoral dental radiography. Twenty-eight cat cadaver specimens were recruited for inclusion. Each specimen was evaluated using oral exam, intraoral dental radiography, and computed tomography (four different slice thicknesses). Each tooth was evaluated for the presence or absence of tooth resorption. Teeth with lesions and a subset of normal teeth were evaluated with histopathology. On CT, tooth resorption appeared as irregularly marginated hypoattenuating defects in the mineral attenuating tooth components, most commonly involving the root or cementoenamel junction. Sensitivity for CT detection of tooth resorption was fair to poor (42.2-57.7%) and specificity was good to excellent (92.8-96.3%). Findings from this study indicated that CT has high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of tooth resorption in cats.

  17. Computed tomography in pelvic and acetabular fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, H.; Schmidt, C.

    1988-06-01

    In a retrospective study we analyzed the results of 127 patients, who were examined not only by means of conventional radiography but also by means of computed tomography after a trauma of the pelvic. Our investigations were based upon such patients, to whom a definite diagnostic procedure of plain radiography had been performed. Therefore all polytraumatized patients were inapplicable. They were only examined by computed tomography because of other more important accompanying injuries of other body regions. We compared the results of 127 patients with pelvic trauma. The results of the CT were in accordance with the results of the plain radiography for 103 patients. The results of the CT concerning the availability and the localization of the fractures were basically coincident with the plain radiography for 22 patients, but the CT showed a higher degree of trauma and additional intraarticular fragments. Two isolated lesions of the sacroiliac joint could not be recognized by both methods. They could only be diagnosed by bone scintigraphy on the third day after trauma.

  18. Non-diffusing photochromic gel for optical computed tomography phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study examines photochromic response in radiation sensitive hydrogels. Genipin, crosslinked, gelatin gel can support high resolution images because the chromophores do not diffuse. A low power, 633 nm He-Ne laser was used to write lines into the gels by a photobleaching reaction. Optical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans mapped the high resolution images in 3D with 0.25 mm voxel resolution. A straight line was written into a deformed gel and then readout in its relaxed, initial shape. The curved, photo-bleached line demonstrated deformable 3D dosimetry is possible with this system to the balloon edge. High resolution, photochromic images provide key information for characterizing optical CT scanners and 3D dosimeters. Many, ionizing radiation, dosimeter materials demonstrate either a photochromic or photothermal response, allowing this approach to be widely used in quantitative 3D scanning.

  19. Recent Developments in Computed Tomography for Urolithiasis: Diagnosis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Mc Laughlin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To critically evaluate the current literature in an effort to establish the current role of radiologic imaging, advances in computed tomography (CT and standard film radiography in the diagnosis, and characterization of urinary tract calculi. Conclusion. CT has a valuable role when utilized prudently during surveillance of patients following endourological therapy. In this paper, we outline the basic principles relating to the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as a result of CT scanning. We discuss the current developments in low-dose CT technology, which have resulted in significant reductions in CT radiation doses (to approximately one-third of what they were a decade ago while preserving image quality. Finally, we will discuss an important recent development now commercially available on the latest generation of CT scanners, namely, dual energy imaging, which is showing promise in urinary tract imaging as a means of characterizing the composition of urinary tract calculi.

  20. Iterative image reconstruction and its role in cardiothoracic computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Padole, Atul; Lira, Diego; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2013-11-01

    Revolutionary developments in multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) scanner technology offer several advantages for imaging of cardiothoracic disorders. As a result, expanding applications of CT now account for >85 million CT examinations annually in the United States alone. Given the large number of CT examinations performed, concerns over increase in population-based risk for radiation-induced carcinogenesis have made CT radiation dose a top safety concern in health care. In response to this concern, several technologies have been developed to reduce the dose with more efficient use of scan parameters and the use of "newer" image reconstruction techniques. Although iterative image reconstruction algorithms were first introduced in the 1970s, filtered back projection was chosen as the conventional image reconstruction technique because of its simplicity and faster reconstruction times. With subsequent advances in computational speed and power, iterative reconstruction techniques have reemerged and have shown the potential of radiation dose optimization without adversely influencing diagnostic image quality. In this article, we review the basic principles of different iterative reconstruction algorithms and their implementation for various clinical applications in cardiothoracic CT examinations for reducing radiation dose.

  1. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and gamma radiation meter for comparison with and validation and tuning of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Chaminda; Yan, Ru; Vestøl, Sondre; Melaaen, Morten C.; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2014-07-01

    The electrical capacitance tomographic (ECT) approach is increasingly seen as attractive for measurement and control applications in the process industries. Recently, there is increased interest in using the tomographic details from ECT for comparing with and validating and tuning CFD models of multiphase flow. Collaboration with researchers working in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flows gives valuable information for both groups of researchers in the field of ECT and CFD. By studying the ECT tomograms of multiphase flows under carefully monitored inflow conditions of the different media and by obtaining the capacitance values, C(i, j, t) with i = 1…N, j = 1, 2,…N and i ≠ j obtained from ECT modules with N electrodes, it is shown how the interface heights in a pipe with stratified flow of oil and air can be fruitfully compared to the values of those obtained from ECT and gamma radiation meter (GRM) for improving CFD modeling. Monitored inflow conditions in this study are flow rates of air, water and oil into a pipe which can be positioned at varying inclinations to the horizontal, thus emulating the pipelines laid in subsea installations. It is found that ECT-based tomograms show most of the features seen in the GRM-based visualizations with nearly one-to-one correspondence to interface heights obtained from these two methods, albeit some anomalies at the pipe wall. However, there are some interesting features the ECT manages to capture: features which the GRM or the CFD modeling apparently do not show, possibly due to parameters not defined in the inputs to the CFD model or much slower response of the GRM. Results presented in this paper indicate that a combination of ECT and GRM and preferably with other modalities with enhanced data fusion and analysis combined with CFD modeling can help to improve the modeling, measurement and control of multiphase flow in the oil and gas industries and in the process industries

  2. The Comparison of Ultrasonography and Non Enhanced Helical Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Ureteral Calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Kılınç

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous urography, ultrasonography, and non-contrast spiral computed tomography have been used to diagnose ureteral calculi. We aimed to compare the accuracy of non-contrast spiral computed tomography with ultrasonography in the evaluation of patients with renal colic.Fourty-one patients with flank pain were examined with both computed tomography and ultrasonography over a period of 11 months. Findings of ultrasonography and computed tomography of 28 patients in whom üreteral stones were confirmed by standart methods were comparedUreteral calculi were diagnosed in 28 of 41 patients. Ureteral stones could be demonstrated in 18 patients by ultrasonography and in 27 patients by computed tomography. Ultrasonography showed 64.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity in the diagnosis of ureterolithiasis; computed tomography showed 96.4% and 100%, respectively. Spiral computed tomography is superior to ultrasonography in the demonstration of ureteral calculi in patients with renal colic. But because of higher cost and higher radiation dose, it should be reserved for symptomatic cases in whom ultrasonography is non-diagnostic.

  3. Dedicated Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography and Diagnostic Mammography: Comparison of Radiation Dose, Patient Comfort, And Qualitative Review of Imaging Findings in BI-RADS 4 and 5 Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avice M O′Connell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This pilot study was undertaken to compare radiation dose, relative visibility/conspicuity of biopsy-proven lesions, and relative patient comfort in diagnostic mammography and dedicated cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT in Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS® 4 or 5 lesions. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six consecutive patients (37 breasts with abnormal mammographic and/or ultrasound categorized as BI-RADS® 4 or 5 lesions were evaluated with CBBCT prior to biopsy. Administered radiation dose was calculated for each modality. Mammograms and CBBCT images were compared side-by-side and lesion visibility/conspicuity was qualitatively scored. Histopathology of lesions was reviewed. Patients were administered a survey for qualitative evaluation of comfort between the two modalities. Results: CBBCT dose was similar to or less than diagnostic mammography, with a mean dose of 9.4 mGy (±3.1 SD for CBBCT vs. 16.9 mGy (±6.9 SD for diagnostic mammography in a total of 37 imaged breasts (P<0.001. Thirty-three of 34 mammographic lesions were scored as equally or better visualized in CBBCT relative to diagnostic mammography. Characterization of high-risk lesions was excellent. Patients reported greater comfort in CBBCT imaging relative to mammography. Conclusion: Our experience of side-by-side comparison of CBBCT and diagnostic mammography in BI-RADS® 4 and 5 breast lesions demonstrated a high degree of correlation between the two modalities across a variety of lesion types. Owing to favorable radiation dose profile, excellent visualization of lesions, and qualitative benefits including improved patient comfort, excellent field-of-view, and more anatomical evaluation of lesion margins, CBBCT offers a promising modality for diagnostic evaluation of breast lesions.

  4. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  5. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baiyu; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d'). d' was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1-4 mm), contrast levels (10-100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d' values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDIvol: 3.4-64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d' values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction potentials (11-54 mGy, 77%-84%), followed by

  6. Use of high-resolution computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of stage IA adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Yoshihiro; Tsutani, Yasuhiro; Okada, Morihito

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative determination of malignant behavior is critical in choosing suitable therapeutic strategies such as sublobar resection for patients with small lung cancers. The aim of present review was to evaluate high-resolution computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography as tools for management of clinical stage IA adenocarcinoma.

  7. Denoising Message Passing for X-ray Computed Tomography Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Perelli, Alessandro; Can, Ali; Davies, Mike E

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) reconstruction from sparse number of views is becoming a powerful way to reduce either the radiation dose or the acquisition time in CT systems but still requires a huge computational time. This paper introduces an approximate Bayesian inference framework for CT reconstruction based on a family of denoising approximate message passing (DCT-AMP) algorithms able to improve both the convergence speed and the reconstruction quality. Approximate Message Passing for Compressed Sensing has been extensively analysed for random linear measurements but there are still not clear solutions on how AMP should be modified and how it performs with real world problems. In particular to overcome the convergence issues of DCT-AMP with structured measurement matrices, we propose a disjoint preconditioned version of the algorithm tailored for both the geometric system model and the noise model. In addition the Bayesian DCT-AMP formulation allows to measure how the current estimate is close to the pr...

  8. Spatiotemporal computed tomography of dynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Anders; Münch, Beat; Trtik, Pavel; Butler, Les

    2011-12-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) equipment allowing fast 3-D imaging also makes it possible to monitor dynamic processes by 4-D imaging. Because the acquisition time of various 3-D-CT systems is still in the range of at least milliseconds or even hours, depending on the detector system and the source, the balance of the desired temporal and spatial resolution must be adjusted. Furthermore, motion artifacts will occur, especially at high spatial resolution and longer measuring times. We propose two approaches based on nonsequential projection angle sequences allowing a convenient postacquisition balance of temporal and spatial resolution. Both strategies are compatible with existing instruments, needing only a simple reprograming of the angle list used for projection acquisition and care with the projection order list. Both approaches will reduce the impact of artifacts due to motion. The strategies are applied and validated with cold neutron imaging of water desorption from originally saturated particles during natural air-drying experiments and with x-ray tomography of a polymer blend heated during imaging.

  9. Study of radiation conditions for obtaining standard beam computed tomography; Estudo das condicoes de radiacao para obtencao do feixe padrao em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Lucio das Chagas de; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira, E-mail: lucio-andrade@hotmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil there is a need to expand the traceability for the calibration of cameras used in dosimetry in CT. Thus, in order to promote the expansion of the radiation conditions RQT, LNMRI disseminate this greatness. These radiation conditions may be characterized in terms of tension in the X-ray tube (PPV), the first half-value layer (1{sup st} HVL) and homogeneity coefficient (CH). The LNMRI achieved satisfactory results within the international specifications suggested by IEC 61267 and TRS 457. (author)

  10. Radiation dose and imaging quality of abdominal computed tomography before and scan protocol adjustment: Single-institution experience in three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hwi Young; Choi, Joon Il; Jung, Seung Eun; Rha, Seong Eun; Oh, Nam Soon; Lee, Young Joon; Byun, Jae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To compare radiation dose and image quality of abdominal CT for patients who underwent repeated CT examinations before and after adjustment of scan protocol. We compared radiation dose and image quality of repeated abdominal CT scans (at three-year-interval) of 50 patients with chronic liver disease, 50 patients with early gastric cancer, and 50 patients with uterine cancer. To reduce radiation dose, we optimized CT protocols by omitting unnecessary pre-contrast phase, reducing kVp, and setting higher noise index. Data of dose reports were collected. Objective image quality was evaluated for noise level, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast noise ratio (CNR). For subjective image quality, we evaluated image noise, contrast, and overall diagnostic acceptability. The mean values of dose length product of 2011 CT scans compared to those of 2008 CT scans were 27.6% to 45.7%. The image noise level, SNR, and CNR were significantly (p < 0.05) worse in 2011 CT scans compared to 2008 CT scans. For subjective image quality, image noise was also significantly (p < 0.05) worse in 2011. However, CNR and diagnostic acceptability showed variable results. No CT scans were considered as unacceptable image.We modified abdominal CT protocols to reduce radiation exposure while trying to maintain diagnostic acceptability.

  11. Imaging of Cardiac Valves by Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Feuchtner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes “how to” examine cardiac valves with computed tomography, the normal, diseased valves, and prosthetic valves. A review of current scientific literature is provided. Firstly, technical basics, “how to” perform and optimize a multislice CT scan and “how to” interpret valves on CT images are outlined. Then, diagnostic imaging of the entire spectrum of specific valvular disease by CT, including prosthetic heart valves, is highlighted. The last part gives a guide “how to” use CT for planning of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, an emerging effective treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. A special focus is placed on clinical applications of cardiac CT in the context of valvular disease.

  12. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...... have become the standard with which to assess emphysema extent but airway abnormalities have so far been more challenging to quantify. Automated methods for analysis are indispensable as the visible airway tree in a CT scan can include several hundreds of individual branches. However, automation...... of scan on airway dimensions in subjects with and without COPD. The results show measured airway dimensions to be affected by differences in the level of inspiration and this dependency is again influenced by COPD. Inspiration level should therefore be accounted for when measuring airways, and airway...

  13. Findings of computed tomography in intracranial tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, H. G.; Bae, K. S.; Lee, H. K.; Kwon, K. H.; Kim, K. J. [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    In intracranial tuberculosis, the Computed Tomography (CT) is a new radiological technique which is helpful in diagnosis and determining the location, extents of the lesion. It can also make it possible to assess the presence and degree of the complications and to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. 25 cases of clinically proven intracranial tuberculosis were studied by CT, in Soonchunhyang hospital from Jun. 1980 to Jun. 1983. The result were as follows; 1. 4 cases were normal in CT finding, despite of the clinically proven tuberculous meningitis. 2. Total or partial obliteration of cisterns were observed in 13 cases. 3. Intense abnormal contrast enhancement of the cisterns were observed in 8 cases. 4. 19 cases show moderate to marked ventricular dilatation. 5. 2 cases of cerebral infarction were observed. 6. One case of tuberculoma was observed.

  14. Computed Tomography in the Modern Slaughterhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb

    of technology. Recently, the use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) coupled with methods from image analysis has been introduced as a powerful means to optimise production, by providing detailed information on the raw materials. This thesis covers two aspects of the application of CT in the modern abattoir...... concerns measurements of each single carcass, to improve the raw material utilisation by individually adapted processing. Measurements performed online in the abattoir demand fast, robust and cost-effective imaging. We propose a tomographic reconstruction algorithm, enabling a substantial reduction...... of the subject-specific X-ray data needed to produce high quality images for accurate measurements. This is very beneficial for the abattoirs, as a reduction in acquired data translates directly into higher speed and a lower cost. The thesis demonstrates the great potential of CT as a technology for improving...

  15. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  16. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  17. Reconstructing cetacean brain evolution using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Uhen, Mark D; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Frohlich, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    Until recently, there have been relatively few studies of brain mass and morphology in fossil cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) because of difficulty accessing the matrix that fills the endocranial cavity of fossil cetacean skulls. As a result, our knowledge about cetacean brain evolution has been quite limited. By applying the noninvasive technique of computed tomography (CT) to visualize, measure, and reconstruct the endocranial morphology of fossil cetacean skulls, we can gain vastly more information at an unprecedented rate about cetacean brain evolution. Here, we discuss our method and demonstrate it with several examples from our fossil cetacean database. This approach will provide new insights into the little-known evolutionary history of cetacean brain evolution.

  18. Computed tomography findings of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiota, Yutaro; Sato, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Ono, Tetsuya; Kaji, Masaro; Niiya, Harutaka (Kure Kyosai Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings were assessed in 7 patients with malignant mesothelioma. CT findings were also reviewed in 9 patients with lung cancer and pleuritis carcinomatosa and in 11 patients with tuberculous pleuritis. Five patients with malignant mesothelioma underwent CT scans twice, on admission and from 1 to 7 months after admission. Tuberculous pleuritis could be distinguished from pleuritis carcinomatosa and malignant mesothelioma by the presence or absence of pleural nodularity and chest wall invasion. Although it was difficult to identify specific CT features clearly distinguishing malignant mesothelioma from pleuritis carcinomatosa, characteristic findings of malignant mesothelioma appeared to include the rapid development and progression of pleural rind and a tendency to spread directly into the chest wall. We divided the pleural into the four regions; upper anterior, upper posterior, lower anterior and lower posterior regions. Pleural changes were more frequently seen in the lower pleural regions than in the upper pleural regions in malignant mesothelioma. (author).

  19. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An interlaboratory comparison on industrial X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within the project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning...... - CIA-CT”. In the comparison, 27 laboratories from 8 countries were involved, and CT scanned two items selected among common industrial parts: a polymer part and a metal part. Altogether, 27 sets of items were circulated in parallel to the participants. Different measurands are considered, encompassing...... influence from the surrounding wall thickness on the measurement of roundness was documented for the metal item. The comparison shows that CT scanning on small industrial parts, generally speaking, is connected with uncertainties in the range 8-53 μm, as compared to an uncertainty range of 1.5-5.5 μm using...

  20. Dental cone beam computed tomography: justification for use in planning oral implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Intra-oral and panoramic radiographs are most frequently used in oral health care. Yet, the inherent nature of jaws and teeth renders three-dimensional diagnosis essential, especially in relation to oral surgery. Nowadays, this can be accomplished by dental cone beam computed tomography, which provides high-quality images at low radiation doses and low costs. Nonetheless, the effective dose ranges of cone beam computed tomography machines may easily vary from 10 to 1000 μSv, this being equivalent to two to 200 panoramic radiographs, even for similar presurgical indications. Moreover, the diagnostic image quality varies massively among available machines and parameter settings. Apart from the radiodiagnostic possibilities, dental cone beam computed tomography may offer a vast therapeutic potential, including opportunities for surgical guidance and further prosthetic rehabilitation via computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing solutions. These additional options may definitely explain part of the success of cone beam computed tomography for oral implant placement. In conclusion, dental cone beam computed tomography imaging could be justified for oral implant-related diagnosis, planning and transfer to surgical and further prosthetic treatment, but guidelines for justification and cone beam computed tomography optimization remain mandatory.

  1. Computed Tomography in Management of Patients with Non-Localizing Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalsa Al-Nabhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the usefulness of a computed tomography scan in patients with non-localized headache. Methods: One-hundred and forty-two patients with non-localized headache were included in a retrospective study after reviewing the medical records of 896 patients at the Radiology Department, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Patients with neurological deficits, head injury, previous intracranial intervention, or malignancy were excluded. Radiological findings of all patients were reviewed and results were divided into 3 groups: 1 no intracranial abnormality; 2 with clinically significant intracranial abnormality; and 3 positive without clinical significance or with extracranial abnormality. All patient history records were reviewed for a period of six months following their initial computed tomography scan to assess their clinical outcomes. The cost of computed tomography examination and patient radiation dose were calculated. Results: Of the 142 patients, 64% were females and 36% males (7% pediatric with an age range of 4-87 years (mean: 36.2 years. Among the patients, 70% demonstrated negative computed tomography findings (grade 1, only 4% showed clinically significant findings (grade 2, and 26% demonstrated incidental positive findings with no clinical significance (grade 3. The average cost of computed tomography head examination was approximately 60 Omani Riyal ($156. The clinically significant positive cases were fewer than expected. The average estimated radiation dose for these patients was calculated and found to be around 5 times the radiation from computed tomography of the sinuses (approximately 1.84 mSv. Conclusion: Computed tomography head imaging in patients with non-localized headache has a low likelihood for any significant intracranial lesion. Therefore, it is essential to develop local standard operating procedures to promote better utilization of this type of imaging service.

  2. Intravenous coronary angiography using electron beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensing, B J; Bongaerts, A H; van Geuns, R J; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    Intravenous coronary angiography with electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) allows for the noninvasive visualisation of coronary arteries. With dedicated computer hardware and software, three-dimensional renderings of the coronary arteries, veins, and other cardiac structures can be constructed f

  3. Radiation doses to patients in computed tomography including a ready reckoner for dose estimation; Patientdoser vid datortomografi med lathund foer beraekning av effektiv dos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szendroe, G.; Axelsson, B.; Leitz, W.

    1995-11-01

    The radiation burden from CT-examinations is still growing in most countries and has reached a considerable part of the total from medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Efforts for avoiding excess radiation doses are therefore especially well motivated within this field. A survey of CT-examination techniques practised in Sweden showed that standard settings for the exposure variables are used for the vast majority of examinations. Virtually no adjustments to the patient`s differences in anatomy have been performed - even for infants and children on average the same settings have been used. The adjustment of the exposure variables to the individual anatomy offers a large potential of dose savings. Amongst the imaging parameters, a change of the radiation dose will primarily influence the noise. As a starting point it is assumed that, irrespective of the patient`s anatomy, the same level of noise can be accepted for a certain diagnostic task. To a large extent the noise level is determined by the number of photons that are registered in the detector. Hence, for different patient size and anatomy, the exposure should be adjusted so that the same transmitted photon fluence is achieved. An appendix with a ready reckoner for dose estimation for CT-scanners used in Sweden is attached. 7 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs.

  4. Otimização da dose em exames de rotina em tomografia computadorizada: estudo de viabilidade em um Hospital Universitário Radiation dose optimization in routine computed tomography: a study of feasibility in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciléia Dalmazo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a viabilidade de redução da dose de radiação em protocolos de aquisição de imagens de tomografia helicoidal em um hospital universitário. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foi realizado levantamento de dose de radiação de protocolos de tomografia com objetos simuladores e câmara de ionização. Foram propostas variações de kVp e mAs, determinando-se a média de ruído. Protocolos com valores de ruído menores ou iguais a 1% foram submetidos à avaliação qualitativa de contraste e resolução espacial por três observadores. RESULTADOS: Foram realizados 22 testes de variações para o protocolo de crânio pediátrico, 26 para crânio adulto, 28 para abdome e 18 para tórax. A redução da dose conseguida variou entre 7,4-13% para protocolo de crânio pediátrico, 3,8-25% para crânio adulto, 9,6-34,3% para abdome e 6,4-12% para tórax. Notou-se também que a utilização de ferramentas de janelamento e zoom favoreceu o aceite das imagens pelos observadores. CONCLUSÃO: É possível reduzir os níveis de dose de radiação em até 34,4%, comparativamente aos protocolos utilizados na rotina, mantendo-se o ruído em níveis aceitáveis. O uso de ferramentas de manipulação digital das imagens possibilitou a aceitação de imagens com níveis maiores de ruído, favorecendo o processo de redução de dose de radiação.OBJECTIVE: To study the feasibility of reducing radiation dose in protocols for acquisition of helical computed tomography images in a University Hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey of radiation doses in computed tomography protocols was performed with phantoms and ionization chamber. Changes in kVp and mAs were proposed, determining the average noise. Protocols with noise values 1% were submitted to qualitative assessment of contrast and spatial resolution by three observers. RESULTS: Tests of variations were performed with 22 protocols for pediatric skulls, 26 for adult skulls, 28 for abdomen, and 18 for

  5. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J.N.; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  6. Computed tomography in traumatic defects of the diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, T C; Solomon, C; Posniak, H V; Flisak, M J

    1989-03-01

    Two patients with traumatic diaphragmatic defects visible on computed tomography are presented. The diagnosis was delayed for several years in both patients. The diagnosis of these acquired diaphragmatic defects is often difficult. Computed tomography can lead to earlier diagnosis by demonstrating the defect in some patients when radiographic studies are not diagnostic.

  7. Diagnosis of lumbar disc hernia with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizumi, Atsuro; Ohira, Nobuhiro; Ojima, Tadashi; Oshida, Midori; Horaguchi, Mitsuru (Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai (Japan))

    1982-07-01

    Results of computed tomography performed on patients with clinically diagnosed hernia were compared with those of myelography and operative findings. This comparative study suggested that computed tomography is quite different from other methods and very useful in diagnosis of hernia. Some cases of hernia were shown, and the characteristics of CT were reviewed.

  8. Comparison of Adsorbed Skin Dose Received by Patients in Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Spiral and Conventional Computed Tomography Scanninng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The evaluation of absorbed dose received by patients could give useful information for radiation risk estimation. This study was performed to compare the entrance skin dose received by patients in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, conventional and spiral computed tomography (CT.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 81 calibrated TLD chips were used. the TLD chips were placed on facial, thyroid and end of sternum skin surface in patients referred for CT of the paranasal sinuses(3 TLD chips for each area to estimate the absorbed dose received by central part of radiation field, thyroid and out of field areas, respectively. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: The dose delivered to the center of irradiated field was about 0.79±0.09 mGy in CBCT technique compared with 16.31±3.71 and 18.84±4.12 mGy for spiral and conventional CT, respectively. The received dose by the out of field areas was about 54 percent of central area dose. There was statistical significant relationship between the imaging modalities and absorbed dose received by patients (P=0.016. The least absorbed dose was for CBCT and the greatest dose was for conventional CT imaging technique.Conclusion: The dose delivered to central area of irradiated field in conventional and spiral CT imaging modalities was about 24 times greater than of that in CBCT. Also, the highest received dose was for central area of radiated field and the lowest dose was for the out of field areas.

  9. Computed tomography in the evaluation of acquired stenosis in the neonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faw, K.; Muntz, H.; Siegel, M.; Spector, G.

    1982-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of computed tomographic evaluation of the neonatal airway. Three neonatal larynges, removed at necroscopy, were examined by computed tomography. Good resolution of soft tissue, cartilage and airway lumen was obtained in these small specimens. On the basis of these findings two neonates with acquired subglottic stenosis were examined by endoscopy, soft tissue airway radiographs, and computed tomography. Measurements of radiation dose revealed that a computed tomographic study delivered 36% of the mean tissue dose of standard image intensifier fluoroscopy. Computed tomography and fluoroscopy both demonstrated the degree and length of this stenosis accurately. An advantage of CT over conventional imaging procedures was better definition of the cross sectional area of the airway.

  10. X-Ray Computed Tomography for Advanced Materials and Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-30

    percent. In this example, we have assumed $I M, $5(X)K and $200K CT systems operating at 10 percent of the capital investment per year for maintenance...Computed Tomo &:aphy of Composites," WRDC-TR-90-4014, July 1990. 5. P. Burstein and R. H. Bossi, "A Guide to Computed Tomography System Specifications," WRDC...Lannutti, "Applications of High- Resolution Computed Tomography," Proceedings of the 1991 Industrial Computed Tomography II Topical Conference, May 20-24

  11. Free-breathing high-pitch 80kVp dual-source computed tomography of the pediatric chest: Image quality, presence of motion artifacts and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelle, Boris; Fischbach, Constanze; Booz, Christian; Yel, Ibrahim; Frellesen, Claudia; Beeres, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J; Scholtz, Jan-Erik

    2017-04-01

    To investigate image quality, presence of motion artifacts and effects on radiation dose of 80kVp high-pitch dual-source CT (DSCT) in combination with an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction algorithm (ADMIRE) of the pediatric chest compared to single-source CT (SSCT). The study was approved by the institutional review board. Eighty-seven consecutive pediatric patients (mean age 9.1±4.9years) received either free-breathing high-pitch (pitch 3.2) chest 192-slice DSCT (group 1, n=31) or standard-pitch (pitch 1.2) 128-slice SSCT (group 2, n=56) with breathing-instructions by random assignment. Tube settings were similar in both groups with 80 kVp and 74 ref. mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP for both groups. Additionally, ADMIRE was used in group 1. Effective thorax diameter, image noise, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the pectoralis major muscle and the thoracic aorta were calculated. Motion artifacts were measured as doubling boarders of the diaphragm and the heart. Images were rated by two blinded readers for overall image quality and presence of motion artifacts on 5-point-scales. Size specific dose estimates (SSDE, mGy) and effective dose (ED, mSv) were calculated. Age and effective thorax diameter showed no statistically significant differences in both groups. Image noise and SNR were comparable (p>0.64) for SSCT and DSCT with ADMIRE, while DSCT with FBP showed inferior results (pquality while lowering radiation exposure in free-breathing pediatric patients without sedation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cone beam computed tomography: A boon for maxillofacial imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Rao Ghali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day to day practice, the radiographic techniques used individually or in combination suffer from some inherent limits of all planar two-dimensional (2D projections such as magnification, distortion, superimposition, and misrepresentation of anatomic structures. The introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, specifically dedicated to imaging the maxillofacial region, heralds a major shift from 2D to three-dimensional (3D approach. It provides a complete 3D view of the maxilla, mandible, teeth, and supporting structures with relatively high resolution allowing a more accurate diagnosis, treatment planning and monitoring, and analysis of outcomes than conventional 2D images, along with low radiation exposure to the patient. CBCT has opened up new vistas for the use of 3D imaging as a diagnostic and treatment planning tool in dentistry. This paper provides an overview of the imaging principles, underlying technology, dental applications, and in particular focuses on the emerging role of CBCT in dentistry.

  13. Survey of patient dose in computed tomography in Syria 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharita, M H; Khazzam, S

    2010-09-01

    The radiation doses to patient in computed tomography (CT) in Syria have been investigated and compared with similar studies in different countries. This work surveyed 30 CT scanners from six different manufacturers distributed all over Syria. Some of the results in this paper were part of a project launched by the International Atomic Energy Agency in different regions of the world covering Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe. The dose quantities covered are CT dose index (CTDI(w)), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose (E) and collective dose. It was found that most CTDI(w) and DLP values were similar to the European reference levels and in line with the results of similar surveys in the world. The results were in good agreement with the UNSCEAR Report 2007. This study concluded a recommendation for national diagnostic reference level for the most common CT protocols in Syria. The results can be used as a base for future optimisation studies in the country.

  14. Quality Criteria Implementation for Brain Computed Tomography Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzado, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Munoz, A

    1998-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to implement the quality criteria proposed by the European Commission for brain computed tomography (CT) examinations. The proposed criteria were evaluated for 102 brain CT examinations, with a special emphasis on the diagnostic and radiation dose requirements. The examinations were selected at random from brain examinations performed over a period of a month at eight scanners of the CT Pace range. Achievement of image criteria was evaluated by two independent observers. The most important preliminary findings concerning image criteria fulfilment or lack of it and disagreements between observers are presented and discussed. The mean values of the proposed dosimetric quantities are compared to the reference values. The examinations performed with and without injection of a contrast agent are also analysed in relation to dosimetric quantities and criteria fulfilment. (author)

  15. Effect of reduced z-axis scan coverage on diagnostic performance and radiation dose of neck computed tomography in patients with suspected cervical abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jakob; Maurer, Michael; Ketelsen, Dominik; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Zinsser, Dominik; Wichmann, Julian L; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian; Othman, Ahmed E

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of reduced z-axis scan coverage on diagnostic performance and radiation dose of neck CT in patients with suspected cervical abscess. Fifty-one patients with suspected cervical abscess were included and underwent contrast-enhanced neck CT on a 2nd or 3rd generation dual-source CT system. Image acquisition ranged from the aortic arch to the upper roof of the frontal sinuses (CTstd). Subsequently, series with reduced z-axis coverage (CTred) were reconstructed starting at the aortic arch up to the orbital floor. CTstd and CTred were independently assessed by two radiologists for the presence/absence of cervical abscesses and for incidental and alternative findings. In addition, diagnostic accuracy for the depiction of the cervical abscesses was calculated for both readers. Furthermore, DLP (dose-length-product), effective dose (ED) and organ doses were calculated and compared for CTred and CTstd, using a commercially available dose management platform. A total of 41 abscesses and 3 incidental/alternative findings were identified in CTstd. All abscesses and incidental/alternative findings could also be detected on CTred resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 1.0 for both readers. DLP, ED and organ doses of the brain, the eye lenses, the red bone marrow and the salivary glands of CTred were significantly lower than for CTstd (pz-axis coverage of neck CT allows for a significant reduction of effective dose and organ doses at similar diagnostic performance as compared to CTstd.

  16. Cerebral computed tomography angiography using a 70 kVp protocol: improved vascular enhancement with a reduced volume of contrast medium and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun-Suk; Chung, Tae-Sub; Baek, Jang Hun; Suh, Sang Hyun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Jun [Severance Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chong, KyoungHoon [Siemens Healthcare Korea, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the feasibility of using a 70-kVp protocol compared with a 120-kVp protocol for cerebral CT angiography. An additional target was to investigate a possible reduction in the volume of contrast medium (CM) using the 70-kVp protocol. Attenuation value and CNR for iodine were determined at various tube voltage settings using a phantom. Sixty-nine volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three protocols: group A (120-kVp and CM 64 mL), group B (70-kVp and CM 64 mL), or group C (70-kVp and CM 40 mL). The attenuation value, SNR, and CNR of cerebral arteries, subjective image quality, and radiation dose were compared among the groups. The vascular attenuation, SNR, and CNR of group B were significantly higher than those of group A. Group C had a significantly higher vascular attenuation than group A. Groups B and C were significantly better than group A with respect to subjective image quality. An effective dose of 70-kVp was 10 % lower than that of 120-kVp. Using 70-kVp improved arterial enhancement, SNR, and CNR, and provided better subjective image quality, using a 10 % lower effective dose. Furthermore, the 70-kVp protocol may both reduce volume of CM by 37.5 % and improve arterial enhancement. (orig.)

  17. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Generally, you will be asked not to ... result in relatively low radiation exposure to the patient, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the radiation risk is very low compared with the potential benefits. ...

  18. Computed tomography dose optimisation in cystic fibrosis:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena Ferris; Maria Twomey; Fiachra Moloney; Siobhan B O’Neill; Kevin Murphy; Owen J O’Connor; Michael Maher

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis(CF)is the most common autosomal recessive disease of the Caucasian population worldwide,with respiratory disease remaining the most relevant source of morbidity and mortality.Computed tomography(CT)is frequently used for monitoring disease complications and progression.Over the last fifteen years there has been a six-fold increase in the use of CT,which has lead to a growing concern in relation to cumulative radiation exposure.The challenge to the medical profession is to identify dose reduction strategies that meet acceptable image quality,but fulfil the requirements of a diagnostic quality CT.Dose-optimisation,particularly in CT,is essential as it reduces the chances of patients receiving cumulative radiation doses in excess of 100 m Sv,a dose deemed significant by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.This review article explores the current trends in imaging in CF with particular emphasis on new developments in dose optimisation.

  19. Nationwide survey of radiation exposure during pediatric computed tomography examinations and proposal of age-based diagnostic reference levels for Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Yasutaka [Kanazawa University, Department of Quantum Medical Technology, Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Miyazaki, Osamu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro [Kanazawa University, Department of Quantum Medical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ishikawa (Japan); Shimada, Yoshiya; Akahane, Keiichi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Medical Exposure Research Project, Chiba (Japan); Muramatsu, Yoshihisa [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Department of Radiology, Chiba (Japan); Fujii, Keisuke [Nagoya University, Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi (Japan); Suzuki, Shoichi [Fujita Health University, Faculty of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Aichi (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) have not been established in Japan. To propose DRLs for CT of the head, chest and abdomen for three pediatric age groups. We sent a nationwide questionnaire by post to 339 facilities. Questions focused on pediatric CT technology, exposure parameters, CT protocols, and radiation doses for age groups <1 year, 1-5 years, and 6-10 years. For the three age groups in the 196 facilities that responded, the 75th percentile values of volume CT dose index based on a 16-cm phantom (CTDI{sub vol} 16 [mGy]) for head, chest and abdominal CT were for infants 39.1, 11.1 and 12.0, respectively; for 1-to 5-year-olds 46.9, 14.3 and 16.7, respectively; and for 6-to 10-year-olds 67.7, 15.0 and 17.0, respectively. The corresponding dose-length products (DLP 16 [mGy·cm]) for head, chest and abdominal CT were for infants 526.1, 209.1 and 261.5, respectively; for 1-to 5-year-olds 665.5, 296.0 and 430.8, respectively; and for 6-to 10-year-olds 847.9, 413.0 and 532.2, respectively. The majority of CTDI{sub vol} 16 and DLP 16 values for the head were higher than DRLs reported from other countries. For risk reduction, it is necessary to establish DRLs for pediatric CT in Japan. (orig.)

  20. Micro computed tomography for vascular exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Zhen W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vascular exploration of small animals requires imaging hardware with a very high spatial resolution, capable of differentiating large as well as small vessels, in both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Micro Computed Tomography (micro-CT has emerged in recent years as the preferred modality for this purpose, providing high resolution 3D volumetric data suitable for analysis, quantification, validation, and visualization of results. The usefulness of micro-CT, however, can be adversely affected by a range of factors including physical animal preparation, numerical quantification, visualization of results, and quantification software with limited possibilities. Exacerbating these inherent difficulties is the lack of a unified standard for micro-CT imaging. Most micro-CT today is aimed at particular applications and the software tools needed for quantification, developed mainly by imaging hardware manufacturers, lack the level of detail needed to address more specific aims. This review highlights the capabilities of micro-CT for vascular exploration, describes the current state of imaging protocols, and offers guidelines and suggestions aimed at making micro-CT more accurate, replicable, and robust.

  1. Computed tomography characterisation of additive manufacturing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibb, Richard; Thompson, Darren; Winder, John

    2011-06-01

    Additive manufacturing, covering processes frequently referred to as rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing, provides new opportunities in the manufacture of highly complex and custom-fitting medical devices and products. Whilst many medical applications of AM have been explored and physical properties of the resulting parts have been studied, the characterisation of AM materials in computed tomography has not been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the CT number of commonly used AM materials. There are many potential applications of the information resulting from this study in the design and manufacture of wearable medical devices, implants, prostheses and medical imaging test phantoms. A selection of 19 AM material samples were CT scanned and the resultant images analysed to ascertain the materials' CT number and appearance in the images. It was found that some AM materials have CT numbers very similar to human tissues, FDM, SLA and SLS produce samples that appear uniform on CT images and that 3D printed materials show a variation in internal structure.

  2. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  3. Computed Tomography Following Body Stuffing Heroin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Nordt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED in police custody for “medical clearance” before being taken to jail. The patient was approached by police officers for suspicion of selling illicit drugs. When approached by police he ran away and was witnessed to swallow several small plastic baggies suspected to contain heroin. He was apprehended and brought to the ED. On arrival, he was asymptomatic with a blood pressure 144/83mmHg, heart rate 67bpm, respiratory rate of 19bpm, oxygen saturation of 99% on room air and afebrile. A Glasgow coma score was 15 and he was alert and oriented to person, place and time. Patient had a negative review of systems. On physical examination pupils were 4mm and reactive to light, lungs clear to auscultation and had normal respiratory rate with normal cardiovascular exam. Abdomen was soft, non-tender and non-distended with present bowel sounds. The patient admitted to ingesting approximately 20 packets of heroin to avoid being charged with possession. The patient declined activated charcoal and whole bowel irrigation (WBI with polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution (PEG-ELS. The patient declined a urine toxicology immunoassay screen. A computed tomography (CT of his abdomen with contrast was obtained and read as normal except for a cluster of foreign bodies within the distal stomach likely contained within a plastic bag.

  4. Virtual computed tomography cystoscopy in bladder pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Arslan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessed the usefulness of virtual cystoscopy performed with multidetector computed tomography (CT in patients with different urinary bladder pathologies compared to the conventional cystoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients with different bladder pathologies, which consisted of 11 tumors, 3 diverticula, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones, were assessed with conventional cystoscopy and virtual CT cystoscopy. The results of virtual CT cystoscopy were compared with the findings of conventional cystoscopy. We determined the detection rate and positive predictive value of CT imaging based virtual cystoscopy in the diagnosis of urinary bladder lesions. RESULTS: CT scanning was well tolerated by all patients, and no complications occurred. Images in 16 (88% of the 18 virtual cystoscopic examinations were either of excellent or good quality. All tumors except one, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones were characterized with similar findings in the both of methods. The masses ranged from 0.4 to 7.0 cm in diameter. While conventional cystoscopy could not evaluate interior part of the diverticulum, virtual CT cystoscopy could demonstrate clearly within it. There were no false-positive findings in our series. CONCLUSION: Virtual CT cystoscopy is a promising technique to be used in the detection of bladder lesions. It should be considered especially at the evaluation of bladder diverticula. In the future, it may be possible or even advantageous to incorporate into the imaging algorithm for evaluation of bladder lesion.

  5. Virtual computed tomography cystoscopy in bladder pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Halil; Ceylan, Kadir; Harman, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Yuksel; Temizoz, Osman; Can, Saban [Yuzuncu Yil University School of Medicine, Van (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology and Urology]. E-mail: drhalilarslan@hotmail.com

    2006-03-15

    Objective: assessed the usefulness of virtual cystoscopy performed with multidetector computed tomography (CT) in patients with different urinary bladder pathologies compared to the conventional cystoscopy.Materials and methods: eighteen patients with different bladder pathologies, which consisted of 11 tumors, 3 diverticula, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones, were assessed with conventional cystoscopy and virtual CT cystoscopy. The results of virtual CT cystoscopy were compared with the findings of conventional cystoscopy. We determined the detection rate and positive predictive value of CT imaging based virtual cystoscopy in the diagnosis of urinary bladder lesions. Results: CT scanning was well tolerated by all patients, and no complications occurred. Images in 16 (88%) of the 18 virtual cystoscopic examinations were either of excellent or good quality. All tumors except one, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones were characterized with similar findings in the both of methods. The masses ranged from 0.4 to 7.0 cm in diameter. While conventional cystoscopy could not evaluate interior part of the diverticulum, virtual CT cystoscopy could demonstrate clearly within it. There were no false-positive findings in our series. Conclusion: virtual CT cystoscopy is a promising technique to be used in the detection of bladder lesions. It should be considered especially at the evaluation of bladder diverticula. In the future, it may be possible or even advantageous to incorporate into the imaging algorithm for evaluation of bladder lesion. (author)

  6. Application of computed tomography to spinal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, N.; Kurihara, A.; Kataoka, O. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1980-08-01

    The axial tomographic examination of the spine and its soft tissues is now readily available for orthopaedic surgery. If the appropriate conditions are maintained, computed tomography (CT) can provide useful information concerning the diagnosis and the treatment of spinal diseases. There are, however, some pitfalls in interpreting CT scans: 1) the existence of the lesion may be masked, and 2) its extent and configuration may be over- or under-evaluated depending on such technical factors as the slicing level, the slicing angle, the window width, and the window level. Experimental studies were carried out on a plaster of Paris model of the spine and a cadaver spine to determine the appropriate technical factors by which the CT (EMI whole body CT scanner 5005) can be applied accurately to a diseased spine. The factors obtained were then applied in examining ninety-nine patients with various spinal disorders. Window levels ranging between 100 and 150 were found to be most appropriate. The slicing angle should be 90/sup 0/, or perpendicular to the long axis of the object under study. However, deviations of +10 or -10 degrees are acceptable. The CT view of the spine may be divided into two patterns at the cervical and thoracic levels and into three patterns at the lumbar level. In addition, the usefulness and the diagnostic value of CT for various spinal problems are discussed based on our clinical material.

  7. Computed tomography in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, Karl-Olof [HUG-Geneva University Hospital, Geneva University Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Department of Imaging and Medical Informatics, Geneva (Switzerland); Baird, Alison E. [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Cerebrovascular Disease and Stroke, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Box 1213, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Stroke remains the third most important cause of mortality in industrialized countries; this has prompted research for improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with signs of acute cerebral ischemia. Over the last decade, there has been a parallel in progress in techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic options. While previously only used for excluding hemorrhage, imaging now has the possibility to detect ischemia, vascular occlusion, as well as detect tissue at risk in one setting. It should also allow to monitor treatment and predict/exclude therapeutic complications. Parallel to advances in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke, computed tomography has improved immensely over the last decade due to the development of CT scanners that are faster and that allow to acquire studies such as CT perfusion or CT angiography in a reliable way. CT can detect many signs that might help us detect impending signs of massive infarction, but we still lack the experience to use these alone to prevent a patient from benefitting from possible therapy. (orig.)

  8. Application of computed tomography in paleoanthropological research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiujie Wu; Lynne A.Schepartz

    2009-01-01

    Hominin fossils are the most important materials for exploring questions about human origins and evolution. Because human fossils are very rare, it is impossible to use highly destructive techniques in order to study their morphology. Traditional analyses can only rely on the information gained from the study of the external morphology of specimens, and these approaches limited the study of human evolution. The application of computed tomography (CT) has facilitated major developments in paleoanthropology. To date, few studies on Chinese hominin fossils have used CT scanning methodology, but this is rapidly changing. In order to better understand the appli-cation of CT methodology in paleoanthropology, we review the applications of CT scanning on hominin fossils throughout the world.Studies examined include virtual fossil reconstruction, the use of endocasts to elucidate brain morphology, biomechanical analyses of bone distribution, imaging of mummies and research on early human health, and skeletal and dental microanatomical research.2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press. All rights reserved.

  9. Computed tomography of the orbital lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Eon; Suh, Soo Jhi; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    The use of computed tomography in investigation of orbital lesions was of value for the localization of the lesions as well as making the specific diagnosis. We advocated the combined use of transverse axial section and contrast enhancement in CT as a routine procedure often including coronal section in the diagnosis of orbital lesions because of its usefulness and more precise three dimensional imaging. The authors examined 68 patients with various ophthalmic problems by EMI-CT scanner 5005 from October 1977 to November 1979. Fifty one orbital lesions out of 68 CT scans were analyzed by CT, angiography and operative findings and results were as follows; 1. Among 43 males and 25 females, their age range was from 4 months to 66 years with the most frequent age group of first decade (17 cases; 25%) 2. The distribution of the lesions was mucocele, pseudotumor, optic nerve atrophy, metastasis, lacrimal gland tumor, persistent hypertrophic primary vitreous, granulosa cell myoblastoma, hemangioma in order with 13 malignancies (25%). 3. It was difficult to differentiate pathological diagnosis of the lesions, but the character of the lesions was determined by its characteristic location, and its relationship to eyeball, optic nerve, extraocular muscles and bony orbit. 4. It was thought that more accurate diagnosis of orbital lesions could be made by development of CT scanner having fine matrix, short time exposure and thin slice in the future.

  10. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  11. Gradient computation for VTI acoustic wavefield tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Vladimir

    2016-09-06

    Wavefield tomography can handle complex subsurface geology better than ray-based techniques and, ultimately, provide a higher resolution. Here, we implement forward and adjoint wavefield extrapolation for VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media using a pseudospectral operator that employes a separable approximation of the P-wave dispersion relation. This operator is employed to derive the gradients of the differential semblance optimization (DSO) and modified stack-power objective functions. We also obtain the gradient expressions for the data-domain objective function, which can incorporate borehole information necessary for stable VTI velocity analysis. These gradients are compared to the ones obtained with a space-time finite-difference (FD) scheme for a system of coupled wave equations. Whereas the kernels computed with the two wave-equation operators are similar, the pseudospectral method is not hampered by the imprint of the shear-wave artifact. Numerical examples also show that the modified stack-power objective function produces cleaner gradients than the more conventional DSO operator.

  12. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandan; J; Das; Usha; Thingujam; Ananya; Panda; Sanjay; Sharma; Arun; Kumar; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma(RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography(CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT(p CT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. p CT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using p CT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of p CT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs.

  13. REVIEW: X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention.

  14. Computer tomography-aided ventriculography and cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernoch, Z.; Sercl, M.; Heger, L.; Parizek, J. (Karlova Univ., Hradec Kralove (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta)

    1983-01-28

    Computer tomography was used in 42 patients for the exploration of ventricular and subarachnoidal spaces following intraventricular, lumbar or suboccipital injections of 3 to 5 ml Amipaque using the kind of manoeuvre to permit optimum filling of the region concerned. This type of CT ventriculo- or cisternography is a significant supplement to plain CT examination particularly because it supplies data on the causes of CSF passage blocks. Thus, in two female patients it proved possible to localize cysts in the 3rd ventricle, the density of which was no different from that of CSF. As regards benign stenoses of the aqueduct, it is likely to yield less information than conventional specific ventriculography. On the other hand, the technique gives perfect visualization of all possible communications between pathological intracranial cavities and the ventricular system. CT cisternography proved useful for the identification of small-size isodense growths in the region of the sella turcica, and brought convincing evidence of the causes of profuse liquorrhea by demonstrating the presence of nasal meningocele. It was also found helpful in the analysis of the craniocervical region, otherwise difficult to survey.

  15. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: computed tomography features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng; Dong; Jing-Jing; Chen; Xi-Zhen; Wang; Ya-Qin; Wang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography(CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess(IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis(TB). All IPTAs(11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis.

  16. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Mari Aparici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-positron emission tomography (PET/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results.

  17. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  18. SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, R [East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The concept separates the mechanical connection between the radiation source and detector. This design allows the trajectory and orientation of the radiation source/detector to be customized to the object that is being imaged. This is in contrast to the formulaic rotation-translation image acquisition of conventional computed tomography(CT).Background/significance:CT devices that image a full range of: anatomy, patient populations, and imaging procedures are large. The root cause of the expanding size of comprehensive CT is due to the commitment to helical geometry that is hardwired into the image reconstruction. FGCT extends the application of alternative reconstruction techniques, i.e. tomosynthesis, by separating the two main components— radiation source and detector— and allow for 6 degrees of freedom motion for radiation source, detector, or both. The image acquisition geometry is then tailored to how the patient/object is positioned. This provides greater flexibility on the position and location that the patient/object is being imaged. Additionally, removing the need of a rotating gantry reduces the footprint so that CT is more mobile and more available to move to where the patient/object is at, instead of the other way around. Methods: As proof-of-principle, a reconstruction algorithm is designed to produce FGCT images. Using simulated detector data, voxels intersecting a line drawn between the radiation source and an individual detector are traced and modified using the detector signal. The detector signal is modified to compensate for changes in the source to detector distance. Adjacent voxels are modified in proportion to the detector signal, providing a simple image filter. Results: Image-quality from the proposed FGCT reconstruction technique is proving to be a challenge, producing hardily recognizable images from limited projections angles. Conclusion: Preliminary assessment of the reconstruction technique demonstrates the inevitable

  19. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  20. Diffuse abnormalities of the trachea: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com; Pozes, Aline Serfaty [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [The Cardiothoracic Centre NHS Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Araujo Neto, Cesar de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Barillo, Jorge Luiz; Zanetti, Glaucia [Faculdade de Medicina de Petropolis (FMP), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia Clinica; Souza, Carolina Althoff [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this pictorial essay was to present the main computed tomography findings seen in diffuse diseases of the trachea. The diseases studied included amyloidosis, tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica, tracheobronchomegaly, laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis, lymphoma, neurofibromatosis, relapsing polychondritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, tuberculosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, and tracheobronchomalacia. The most common computed tomography finding was thickening of the walls of the trachea, with or without nodules, parietal calcifications, or involvement of the posterior wall. Although computed tomography allows the detection and characterization of diseases of the central airways, and the correlation with clinical data reduces the diagnostic possibilities, bronchoscopy with biopsy remains the most useful procedure for the diagnosis of diffuse lesions of the trachea. (author)

  1. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tânia Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanês, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mário Flores

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results Abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion Computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:25987748

  2. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tania Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanes, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mario Flores, E-mail: marlivermelho@globo.com [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas (IIER), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  3. Evaluation of ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography in microPET/CT laboratory; Avaliacao dos niveis de radiacao ambiental no laboratorio de tomografia por emissao de positrons acoplada a tomografia computadorizada, microPET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, Daniele Martins

    2016-11-01

    Micro PET/CT scanner is an essential tool generally used for small animal molecular imaging. Fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose is the most widely used radioisotope in this technique. The present study aimed to evaluate the radiation levels in a micro PET/CT research laboratory of the Radiopharmacy Center at IPEN-CNEN / SP, in order to accomplish both national standards and international recommendations. The radioprotection team has classified the laboratory as supervised area; even this laboratory does not require the adoption of specific measures for protection and safety, should be done regular re-evaluation of the conditions of occupational exposures. Workplace monitoring and individual control assessment were carried out to ensure the radiological protection of all workers directly involved in handling the scanner. Initially, there was conducted a radiometric survey, as well as measurements of the external radiation level in the workplace and its surroundings. To achieve this goal, there were placed nine thermoluminescent dosimeters of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy in preselected locations. Monthly evaluations of the occupationally exposed individuals were carried out through the use of TL dosimeters, ported in the workers' chest. Moreover, whole body measurements were performed every six months. The study period was about two-years which started in April 2014. All tests to evaluate micro PET/CT performance were based on the standard protocol of the equipment in accordance with the standard developed by the Animal PET Standard Task Force. Present study's results demonstrated that the ambient radiation levels (ambient and effective estimated radiation dose), as well as the effective shielding equipment are both adequate. This study emphasizes that it is essential to strictly follow the principles of radioprotection in workplace, whenever researches involve radioactive unsealed sources. (author)

  4. Doses of Coronary Study in 64 Channel Multi-Detector Computed Tomography : Reduced Radiation Dose According to Varity of Examnination Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Chan [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    To compare radiation dose for coronary CT angiography (CTA) obtained with 6 examination protocols such as a retrospectively ECG gated helical scan, a prospectively ECG gated sequential scan, low kVp technique, and cardiac dose modulation technique. Coronary CTA was performed by using 6 current clinical protocols to evaluate effective dose and organ dose in primary beam area with anthropomorphic female phantom and glass dosimetric system in 64 channel multi-detector CT. After acquiring topograms of frontal and lateral projection with 80 kVp and 10 mA, main coronary scan was done with 0.35 sec tube rotation time, 40 mm collimation (0.625 mm x 64 ea), small scan field of view (32 cm diameter), 105 mm scan length. Heart beat rate of phantom was maintained 60 bpm in ECG gating. In constant mAs technique 120 kVp, 600 mA was used, and 100 kVp for low kVp technique. In a retrospectively ECG gated helical CT technique 0.22 pitch was used, peak mA (600 mA) was adopted in range of 40-80% of R-R interval and 120 mA (80% reduction) in others with cardiac dose modulation. And 210 mAs was used without cardiac dose modulation. In a prospectively ECG gated sequential CT technique data were acquired at 75% R-R interval (middle diastolic phase in cardiac cycle), and 120 msec additional padding of the tube-on time was used. For effective dose calculation region specific conversion factor of dose length product in thorax was used, which was recommended by EUR 16262. The mean effective dose for conventional coronary CTA without cardiac dose modulation in a retrospectively ECG gated helical scan was 17.8 mSv, and mean organ dose of heart was 103.8 mGy. With low kVp and cardiac dose modulation the mean effective dose showed 54.5% reduction, and heart dose showed 52.3% reduction, compared with that of conventional coronary CTA. And at the sequential scan(SnapShot pulse mode) under prospective ECG gating the mean effective dose was 4.9 mSv, this represents an 72.5% reduction compared with

  5. Quantifying the debonding of inclusions through tomography and computational homology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Johnson, George C. (University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA); Mota, Alejandro; Foulk, James W., III; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-09-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to use of synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) data to determine the conditions and mechanisms that lead to void nucleation in rolled alloys. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has provided SRCT data of a few specimens of 7075-T7351 aluminum plate (widely used for aerospace applications) stretched to failure, loaded in directions perpendicular and parallel to the rolling direction. The resolution of SRCT data is 900nm, which allows elucidation of the mechanisms governing void growth and coalescence. This resolution is not fine enough, however, for nucleation. We propose the use statistics and image processing techniques to obtain sub-resolution scale information from these data, and thus determine where in the specimen and when during the loading program nucleation occurs and the mechanisms that lead to it. Quantitative analysis of the tomography data, however, leads to the conclusion that the reconstruction process compromises the information obtained from the scans. Alternate, more powerful reconstruction algorithms are needed to address this problem, but those fall beyond the scope of this project.

  6. Calcium score of small coronary calcifications on multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groen, J M; Kofoed, K F; Zacho, M;

    2013-01-01

    Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) underestimates the coronary calcium score as compared to electron beam tomography (EBT). Therefore clinical risk stratification based on MDCT calcium scoring may be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a new phantom which ena...

  7. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  8. Assessment of coronary artery bypass graft patency by multidetector computed tomography and electron-beam tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, LH; Dorgelo, J; Tio, RA; Jessurun, GAJ; Oudkerk, M; Zijlstra, F

    2005-01-01

    This case report describes the use of retrospectively ECG-gated 16-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and electron-beam tomography (EBT) for assessing bypass graft patency in two patients with recurrent angina after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The results of each tomographic mo

  9. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  10. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography for optimized colon cancer staging and follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Optimal management of colon cancer (CC) requires detailed assessment of extent of disease. This study prospectively investigates the diagnostic accuracy of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and detection of recurrence...

  11. The Use of GPUs for Solving the Computed Tomography Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Kovtanyuk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is a widespread method used to study the internal structure of objects. The method has applications in medicine, industry and other fields of human activity. In particular, Electronic Imaging, as a species CT, can be used to restore the structure of nanosized objects. Accurate and rapid results are in high demand in modern science. However, there are computational limitations that bound the possible usefulness of CT. On the other hand, the introduction of high-performance calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs provides improving quality and performance of computed tomography investigations. Moreover, parallel computing with GPUs gives significantly higher computation speeds when compared with (Central Processing Units CPUs, because of architectural advantages of the former. In this paper a computed tomography method of recovering the image using parallel computations powered by NVIDIA CUDA technology is considered. The implementation of this approach significantly reduces the required time for solving the CT problem.

  12. Computed tomography (CT) and diastematomyelia's diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, M.B. dos; Luca, V. de; Ferreira, M.A.S. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina); Barros, A.P. de (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Hospital Universitario)

    After a case of diastematomyelia observed at the University Hospital (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) a review is done of the pertaining literature, and the contribution of the computed tomography for the diagnosis of this disease is emphasized.

  13. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate key elements of feasibility for a high speed automated time domain terahertz computed axial tomography (TD-THz CT) non destructive...

  14. Perfusion computed tomography to assist decision making for stroke thrombolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Christopher; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; McElduff, Patrick; Miteff, Ferdi; Spratt, Neil J.; Bateman, Grant; Donnan, Geoffrey; Davis, Stephen; Parsons, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of perfusion imaging to guide selection of patients for stroke thrombolysis remains controversial because of lack of supportive phase three clinical trial evidence. We aimed to measure the outcomes for patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) at a comprehensive stroke care facility where perfusion computed tomography was routinely used for thrombolysis eligibility decision assistance. Our overall hypothesis was that patients with ‘target’ mismatch on perfusion computed tomography would have improved outcomes with rtPA. This was a prospective cohort study of consecutive ischaemic stroke patients who fulfilled standard clinical/non-contrast computed tomography eligibility criteria for treatment with intravenous rtPA, but for whom perfusion computed tomography was used to guide the final treatment decision. The ‘real-time’ perfusion computed tomography assessments were qualitative; a large perfusion computed tomography ischaemic core, or lack of significant perfusion lesion-core mismatch were considered relative exclusion criteria for thrombolysis. Specific volumetric perfusion computed tomography criteria were not used for the treatment decision. The primary analysis compared 3-month modified Rankin Scale in treated versus untreated patients after ‘off-line’ (post-treatment) quantitative volumetric perfusion computed tomography eligibility assessment based on presence or absence of ‘target’ perfusion lesion-core mismatch (mismatch ratio >1.8 and volume >15 ml, core perfusion computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients to an Australian historical cohort of non-contrast computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients. Of 635 patients with acute ischaemic stroke eligible for rtPA by standard criteria, thrombolysis was given to 366 patients, with 269 excluded based on visual real-time perfusion computed tomography assessment. After off-line quantitative perfusion computed tomography classification

  15. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase 2 project, we propose to develop, construct, and deliver to NASA a computed axial tomography time-domain terahertz (CT TD-THz) non destructive...

  16. Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... the subjects who had cranial scans done in five years were children with seizures disorders.

  17. Single-photon emission computed tomography and positron-emission tomography assays for tissue oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D; Schneider, R F; Urbain, J L; Hanks, G E

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy prescription can now be customized to target the major mechanism(s) of resistance of individual tumors. In that regard, functional imaging techniques should be exploited to identify the dominant mechanism(s). Tumor biology research has identified several mechanisms of tumor resistance that may be unique to radiation treatments. These fall into 3 broad areas associated with (1) tumor hypoxic fraction, (2) tumor growth rate, (3) and the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor clonogens. Imaging research has markers in various stages of development for quantifying relevant information about each of these mechanisms, and those that measure tumor oxygenation and predict for radioresistance are the most advanced. Positron-emission tomography (PET) measurement of oxygen 15 has yielded important information, particularly about brain tissue perfusion, metabolism, and function. Indirect markers of tumor hypoxia have exploited the covalent binding of bioreductive intermediates of azomycin-containing compounds whose uptakes are inversely proportional to intracellular oxygen concentrations. Pilot clinical studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET detection of radiolabeled markers to tumor hypoxia have been reported. Recently, other studies have attempted to exploit the reduction properties of both technetium and copper chelates for the selective deposition of radioactive metals in hypoxic tissues. A growing number of potentially useful isotopes are now available for labeling several novel chemicals that could have the appropriate specificity and sensitivity. Preclinical studies with "microSPECT" and "microPET" will be important to define the optimal radiodiagnostic(s) for measuring tissue oxygenation and for determining the time after their administration for optimal hypoxic signal acquisition. Radiolabeled markers of growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells in solid tumors are also being developed. We conclude that

  18. Optimisation of post mortem cardiac computed tomography compared to optical coherence tomography and histopathology - Technical note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Leth, Peter Mygind; Thygesen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality. New technological developments in computed tomography (CT), including dual energy, iterative reconstructions and high definition scanning, could significantly improve the non-invasive identification of atherosclerosis plaques...

  19. Effect of object location on the density measurement in cone-beam computed tomography versus multislice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Abdinian, Mehrdad; Salemi, Fatemeh; Hashemzadeh, Zahra; Safaei, Mehran

    2012-12-01

    Bone density measurement in a radiographic view is a valuable method for evaluating the density of bone quality before performing some dental procedures such as, dental implant placements. It seems that Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) can be used as a diagnostic tool for evaluating the density of the bone, prior to any treatment, as the reported radiation dose in this method is minimal. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of object location on the density measurement in CBCT versus Multislice computed tomography (CT). In an experimental study, three samples with similar dimensions, but different compositions, different densities (Polyethylene, Polyamide, Polyvinyl Chloride), and three bone pieces of different parts of the mandibular bone were imaged in three different positions by CBCT and Multislice CT sets. The average density value was computed for each sample in each position. Then the data obtained from each CBCT was converted to a Hounsfield unit and evaluated using a single variable T analysis. A P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. The density in a Multislice CT is stable in the form of a Hounsfield Number, but this density is variable in the images acquired through CBCT, and the change in the position results in significant changes in the density. In this study, a statistically significant difference (P value = 0.000) has been observed for the position of the sample and its density in CBCT in comparison to Multislice CT. Density values in CBCT are not real because they are affected by the position of the object in the machine.

  20. CCD imaging for optical tomography of gel radiation dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolodzko, J G; Marsden, C; Appleby, A

    1999-11-01

    Several investigations have been carried out by a number of researchers over the past few years to evaluate the utility of imaging gel dosimeters for the three-dimensional measurement of radiation fields. These have been proposed to be of particular value in mapping radiation dose distributions associated with emerging and complex approaches to cancer treatment such as conformal (CRT), intensity modulated (IMRT), "gamma knife," and pencil beam radiotherapies. Imaging of the gels has been successfully accomplished with clinical MRI units and via laser-based optical scanning. However, neither of these methods is generally accessible to all potential users, limiting the broader study and implementation of this valuable tool. We report here the design, methodology, and results of a preliminary study carried out to evaluate the utility of a new, inexpensive, and simplified approach to tomographic imaging of gel radiation dosimeters. For the purpose of this initial investigation, an array of liquid scintillation vials was prepared, containing a ferrous sulphate xylenol orange (FSX) gelatin formulation. The FSX formulation undergoes a change in optical absorption characteristics following irradiation, and the resulting color change can be observed visually. The vials were irradiated individually to different doses. Three-dimensional imaging was accomplished by tomographic reconstruction from two-dimensional optical images acquired using a diffuse, fluorescent light source, a digital charge-coupled device camera, single-photon-emission-computed tomography software, and other simple components designed by the authors. The resulting transverse images were evaluated through a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis to obtain the average change in image density in each vial as a function of radiation dose. These measured ROI values were subjected to a linear regression analysis to fit them to a straight line, and to determine the goodness of fit. Results from multiple imaging trials

  1. A Clinical Evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of dental implant site dimensions. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 2011;40:67-75...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science in Oral Biology June 2013 Naval Postgraduate Dental

  2. Computed tomography of the mediastinum in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertler, K.F.; Janzen, R.W.C.; Hagemann, J.; Otto, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography of the mediastinum was performed in 45 patients with myasthenia gravis. Surgery was carried out in fourteen. Amongst these, there were four thymomas, one thymolipoma, eight thymic hyperplasias and one normal thymus gland. A further patient, who did not have surgery, probably also had a thymic tumour. The normal thymus and thymic hyperplasia cannot be distinguished on computed tomography. Differentiation of small thymomas from normal thymus is not always possible. Invasion by thymomas can only be appreciated with large tumours.

  3. Comparison between conventional tomography and computer tomography in diseases of the sacroiliac joints. Vergleich von konventioneller Tomographie und Computertomographie bei Erkrankungen der Sakroiliakalgelenke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, J.D.; Ganter, H.; Winter, C. (Bundeswehrkrankenhaus, Giessen (Germany, F.R.). Roentgenabteilung Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Giessen (Germany, F.R.). Roentgenabteilung)

    1990-10-01

    16 patients with diseases of the sacroiliac joints were examined both with computer tomography and with conventional tomography. Both techniques were characterized by a high sensitivity. Computer tomography was superior in exactly delineating the extent of the pathologic changes. In conventional tomography the joint surface was more blurred, erosions were larger, and signs of ankylosis were more expanded, so that the joints seemed to be more altered in 8 cases than demonstrated by computer tomography. Very accurate changes like subchondral cysts were recognized only in the computer tomograms. In all cases in which anteroposterior radiographs revealed no clear result, the authors recommend to additionally employ computer tomography. (orig.).

  4. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  5. Optimization of X-ray tomography through a cooperative computing system in grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Moin, E-mail: mmoinhhasan@gmail.com; Goraya, Major Singh, E-mail: mjrsingh@yahoo.com [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, SLIET (Longowal) (India)

    2015-08-28

    Cooperative Computing implemented as Cooperative Computing System (CCS) in grid has been proved a considerably reliable technique to execute the tasks with real time constraints in a grid environment. This technique can be applied in many high performance distributed computing applications. HPC has a large number of applications in various fields of physics. One such application in radiation physics is X-ray tomography. X-Ray tomography contains numerous applications in various fields of science, technology and research. As the technology is changing from analog to digital in almost all the scenarios, this paper presents an idea towards the attachment of X-ray tomography assembly to HPC environment so as to obtain the highly reliable optimization.

  6. Multiscale and multimodality computed tomography for cortical bone analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, A.; Peyrin, F.; Gouttenoire, P. J.; Laredo, J. D.; DeVernejoul, M. C.; Cohen Solal, M.; Chappard, C.

    2016-12-01

    In clinical studies, high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is used to separately evaluate cortical bone and trabecular bone with an isotropic voxel of 82 µm3, and typical cortical parameters are cortical density (D.comp), thickness (Ct.Th), and porosity (Ct.Po). In vitro, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is used to explore the internal cortical bone micro-structure with isotropic voxels and high resolution synchrotron radiation (SR); micro-CT is considered the ‘gold standard’. In 16 tibias and 8 femurs, HR-pQCT measurements were compared to conventional micro-CT measurements. To test modality effects, conventional micro-CT measurements were compared to SR micro-CT measurements at 7.5 µm3 SR micro-CT measurements were also tested at different voxel sizes for the femurs, specifically, 7.5 µm3 versus 2.8 µm3. D.comp (r  =  -0.88, p  images provided consistent results compared to those obtained using conventional micro-CT at the distal tibia. D.comp was highly correlated to Po.V/TV because it considers both the micro-porosity (Haversian systems) and macro-porosity (resorption lacunae) of cortical bone. The complexity of canal organization, (including shape, connectivity, and surface) are not fully considered in conventional micro-CT in relation to beam hardening and cone beam reconstruction artifacts. With the exception of Po.V/TV measurements, morphological and topological measurements depend on the characteristics of the x-ray beam, and to a lesser extent, on image resolution.

  7. Computed tomography of the orbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jai Korl; Lee, Hwang Bok; Kang, Eun Young; Seol, Hae Young; Suh, Won Hyuck [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byeong Yeob [Han Mi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    The development of computed tomography (CT) provided a noninvasive safe technique for imaging the orbit in any plane exquisitely demonstrating its normal anatomy as well as its pathologic process. The orbit is an ideal structure to be examined by CT because of large difference of absorption values between the intraorbital fat, muscle, optic nerve and vessels. In this study, the authors reviewed CT findings of 66 pathologically proven orbital tumors and tumorous conditions among the total of 98 cases who had taken orbital CT scan because if exophthalmos, ocular pain, diplopia and other ophthalmologic symptoms suggesting orbital masses during the period of 3 years. For the analysis of characteristic CT findings of the orbital lesions, all lesions are divided into 4 groups according to the site of origin, i.e., tumors arising in the eyeball (group 1); from intraconal space (group 2); from extraconal space (group 3); and from extraorbital regions (group 4). The results are as follows; 1.Extra tumor detection and localization was possible in 63 cases. Thus the detection rate was 95% with CT scan. 2.Among 36 males and 30 females, their age ranged from 10 months to 72 years. 3.Intraocular tumors (group 1) were 10 cases. Retinoblastoma occurred wholly in the young children under 5 years and combined with calcification in 57%. Choroidal melanoma occurred wholly in adults. 4.Intraconal tumors (group 2) were 9 cases. Vascular tumors (7 cases) were the most frequent and well enhancing mass. 5.The tumors arising in the extraconal region (group 3) were pseudotumor (12 cases), lymphoma (3 cases), dermoid cyst (4 cases), metastasis (2 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma (1 case) and teratoma (1 case). A case of lymphoma demonstrating retrobulbar ill defined mass with scleral l thickening could not be differentiated from the pseudotumor which showing similar finding. 6.The lesions arising from extraorbital region (group 4) were PNS cancer (9 cases), mucocele (3 cases), lid cancer (4

  8. Incidence of blunt craniocervical artery injuries: use of whole-body computed tomography trauma imaging with adapted computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Steffen K; Langner, Soenke; Baldauf, Joerg; Kirsch, Michael; Kohlmann, Thomas; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of traumatic craniocervical artery dissection varies in published trauma series. To determine the frequency of traumatic craniocervical artery injury in polytrauma patients by using standardized whole-body trauma computed tomography with adapted computed tomography angiography of the craniocervical vessels. A total of 718 consecutive patients requiring whole-body trauma computed tomography (16-row multislice) because of the mechanism of their injury patterns and an Injury Severity Scale score greater than 16 were analyzed prospectively. After a cranial scan, computed tomography angiography of the craniocervical vessels with 40 mL of iodinated contrast agent was performed using bolus tracking. The overall incidence of blunt carotid and vertebral injuries (BCVIs) in the screened population was 1.7%. BCVIs were observed in 27.3% of patients with detected isolated cervical spine injuries and in 3.9% of patients with isolated cranial fractures with or without intracranial hemorrhage, whereas 5.3% of patients with combined cervical and cranial lesions were associated with BCVIs. In addition, 0.4% of BCVIs occurred in patients without evidence of head or neck trauma. Whole-body trauma computed tomography with an adapted scanning protocol for the craniocervical vessels is a fast, safe, and feasible method for detecting vascular injuries. It allows prompt further treatment if necessary. Computed tomography angiography could be a part of a broad screening protocol for craniocervical vessels in documented injuries of the head and neck and in trauma mechanisms influencing the craniocervical region as well.

  9. Cone-beam computed tomography: Time to move from ALARA to ALADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaju, Prashant P.; Jaju, Sushma P. [Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopa(Indonesia)

    2015-12-15

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is routinely recommended for dental diagnosis and treatment planning. CBCT exposes patients to less radiation than does conventional CT. Still, lack of proper education among dentists and specialists is resulting in improper referral for CBCT. In addition, aiming to generate high-quality images, operators may increase the radiation dose, which can expose the patient to unnecessary risk. This letter advocates appropriate radiation dosing during CBCT to the benefit of both patients and dentists, and supports moving from the concept of 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) to 'as low as diagnostically acceptable' (ALADA.

  10. Dose Assessment in Computed Tomography Examination and Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels in Mazandaran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janbabanezhad Toori A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical X-rays are the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. While the benefits of Computed Tomography (CT are well known in accurate diagnosis, those benefits are not risk-free. CT is a device with higher patient dose in comparison with other conventional radiation procedures. Objective: This study is aimed at evaluating radiation dose to patients from Computed Tomography (CT examination in Mazandaran hospitals and defining diagnostic reference level (DRL. Methods: Patient-related data on CT protocol for four common CT examinations including brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic were collected. In each center, Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI measurements were performed using pencil ionization chamber and CT dosimetry phantom according to AAPM report No. 96 for those techniques. Then, Weighted Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDIW, Volume Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI vol and Dose Length Product (DLP were calculated. Results: The CTDIw for brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic ranged (15.6- 73, (3.8-25. 8, (4.5-16.3 and (7-16.3, respectively. Values of DLP had a range of (197.4-981, (41.8-184, (131-342.3 and (283.6-486 for brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic, respectively. The 3rd quartile of CTDIW, derived from dose distribution for each examination is the proposed quantity for DRL. The DRLs of brain, sinus, chest and abdomen & pelvic are measured 59.5, 17, 7.8 and 11 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study demonstrated large scales of dose for the same examination among different centers. For all examinations, our values were lower than international reference doses.

  11. Time-Adjusted Internal Target Volume: A Novel Approach Focusing on Heterogeneity of Tumor Motion Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo; Ochi, Yusuke [Division of Radiation Therapy, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Takahashi, Ippei; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ozawa, Syuichi; Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Wadasaki, Koichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To consider nonuniform tumor motion within the internal target volume (ITV) by defining time-adjusted ITV (TTV), a volume designed to include heterogeneity of tumor existence on the basis of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 30 lung cancer patients. Breath-hold CT (BH-CT) and free-breathing 4D-CT scans were acquired for each patient. The tumors were manually delineated using a lung CT window setting (window, 1600 HU; level, −300 HU). Tumor in BH-CT images was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the sum of tumors in 4D-CT images was defined as ITV-4D. The TTV images were generated from the 4D-CT datasets, and the tumor existence probability within ITV-4D was calculated. We calculated the TTV{sub 80} value, which is the percentage of the volume with a tumor existence probability that exceeded 80% on ITV-4D. Several factors that affected the TTV{sub 80} value, such as the ITV-4D/GTV ratio or tumor centroid deviation, were evaluated. Results: Time-adjusted ITV images were acquired for all patients, and tumor respiratory motion heterogeneity was visualized. The median (range) ITV-4D/GTV ratio and median tumor centroid deviation were 1.6 (1.0-4.1) and 6.3 mm (0.1-30.3 mm), respectively. The median TTV{sub 80} value was 43.3% (2.9-98.7%). Strong correlations were observed between the TTV{sub 80} value and the ITV-4D/GTV ratio (R=−0.71) and tumor centroid deviation (R=−0.72). The TTV images revealed the tumor motion pattern features within ITV. Conclusions: The TTV images reflected nonuniform tumor motion, and they revealed the tumor motion pattern features, suggesting that the TTV concept may facilitate various aspects of radiation therapy planning of lung cancer while incorporating respiratory motion in the future.

  12. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: a comprehensive review. Part 2: applications associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohenca, N.; Shemesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript

  13. Foveola pharyngea - demonstration in conventional tomography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiegler, W.; Stolle, E.

    1980-08-01

    The foveola pharyngea is a cavity on the underside of the clivus, located before the tuberculum pharyngeum and, as a larger pit it was detectable in approx. 1% overall in approx. 4% of the personally examined X-rays (11/284) and computed tomograms (6/154) of the skull base. The canalis basilaris medianus inferior and canalis basilaris medianus bifurcatus almost always empties into one of the three forms of the foveola pharyngea (foveola pharyngea infundibuliformis posterior). The differential diagnosis to canalis basilaris medianus, canalis craniopharyngeus, sutura sphenooccipitalis and bone destruction is discussed.

  14. Evaluation of dosimetric parameters of a commercial semiconductor device in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, C. M. S.; Sobrinho, M. C.; Souza, D. N. [Departmento de Fisica, Universidade Federale de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49.100-000, Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao-SE (Brazil); Santos, L. A. P. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares, Av. Professor Luiz Freire, 200, 50.740-540 Recife-PE (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Semiconductor devices have been widely used for dosimetry in radiotherapy and more recently in diagnostic radiology. In order to evaluate the performance of a phototransistor as a radiation detector in computed tomography (CT), some dosimetric parameters were evaluated, such as: repetitive, angular dependence, response for different tube potentials, dose and dose rate dependence. The irradiation was performed with the detector on the axis of rotation of a X-ray tube in CT scanner. The results showed that, making the necessary corrections, it is possible to use the phototransistor for dosimetry in tomography. (Author)

  15. Acute mediastinitis: multidetector computed tomography findings following cardiac surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Clarissa Aguiar de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Instituto do Coracao (InCor)]. E-mail: clarissaaguiarm@yahoo.com.br; Baena, Marcos Eduardo da Silva [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Ultrasonography; Uezumi, Kiyomi Kato [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Computed Tomography; Castro, Claudio Campi de [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Lucarelli, Claudio Luiz [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Center of Diagnosis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Radiology

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative mediastinitis is defined as an infection of the organs and tissues in the mediastinal space, with an incidence ranging between 0.4% and 5% of cases. This disease severity varies from infection of superficial tissues in the chest wall to fulminant mediastinitis with sternal involvement. Diagnostic criterion for postoperative detection of acute mediastinitis at computed tomography is the presence of fluid collections and gas in the mediastinal space, which might or might not be associated with peristernal abnormalities such as edema of soft tissues, separation of sternal segments with marginal bone resorption, sclerosis and osteomyelitis. Other associated findings include lymphadenomegaly, pulmonary consolidation and pleural/ pericardial effusion. Some of these findings, such as mediastinal gas and small fluid collections can be typically found in the absence of infection, early in the period following thoracic surgery where the effectiveness of computed tomography is limited. After approximately two weeks, computed tomography achieves almost 100% sensitivity and specificity. Patients with clinical suspicion of mediastinitis should be submitted to computed tomography for investigating the presence of fluid collections to identify the extent and nature of the disease. Multidetector computed tomography allows 3D images reconstruction, contributing particularly to the evaluation of the sternum. (author)

  16. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle Westergren;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...... study investigates the positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of PET-CT in stage I disease and the clinical impact of the scan results in all disease stages....

  17. Pigmented villonodular synovitis mimics metastases on fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumogo, Comfort O; Kochenderfer, James N; Civelek, A Cahid; Bluemke, David A

    2016-04-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign joint disease best characterized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The role of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) position emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in the diagnosis or characterization remains unclear. PVNS displays as a focal FDG avid lesion, which can masquerade as a metastatic lesion, on PET-CET. We present a case of PVNS found on surveillance imaging of a lymphoma patient.

  18. Optimisation of post mortem cardiac computed tomography compared to optical coherence tomography and histopathology - Technical note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Leth, Peter Mygind; Thygesen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality. New technological developments in computed tomography (CT), including dual energy, iterative reconstructions and high definition scanning, could significantly improve the non-invasive identification of atherosclerosis plaques....... Here, a new method for optimising cardiac coronary CT with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histopathology is presented. Materials and methods: Twenty human hearts obtained from autopsies were used. A contrast agent that solidifies after cooling was injected into the coronary arteries. CT...

  19. Multifocal sparganosis mimicking lymphoma involvement: Multimodal imaging findings of ultrasonography, CT, MRI, and position emission tomography-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, So Young; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Kim, Tae Jung [Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Dev. of Hematology-Omcology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Hyun Jung [Dev. of Hematology-Omcology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by the migrating plerocercoid larva of Spirometra species tapeworms. The most frequent clinical manifestation is a subcutaneous nodule resembling a neoplasm. In this study, we presented multimodal findings of ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography-computed tomography and follow-up imagings on multifocal sparganosis, mimicking lymphoma involvement in a patient with lymphoma.

  20. Computer-aided classification of lung nodules on computed tomography images via deep learning technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kai-Lung Hua,1 Che-Hao Hsu,1 Shintami Chusnul Hidayati,1 Wen-Huang Cheng,2 Yu-Jen Chen3 1Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 2Research Center for Information Technology Innovation, Academia Sinica, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Lung cancer has a poor prognosis when not diagnosed early and unresectable lesions are present. The management of small lung nodules noted on computed tomography scan is controversial due to uncertain tumor characteristics. A conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD scheme requires several image processing and pattern recognition steps to accomplish a quantitative tumor differentiation result. In such an ad hoc image analysis pipeline, every step depends heavily on the performance of the previous step. Accordingly, tuning of classification performance in a conventional CAD scheme is very complicated and arduous. Deep learning techniques, on the other hand, have the intrinsic advantage of an automatic exploitation feature and tuning of performance in a seamless fashion. In this study, we attempted to simplify the image analysis pipeline of conventional CAD with deep learning techniques. Specifically, we introduced models of a deep belief network and a convolutional neural network in the context of nodule classification in computed tomography images. Two baseline methods with feature computing steps were implemented for comparison. The experimental results suggest that deep learning methods could achieve better discriminative results and hold promise in the CAD application domain. Keywords: nodule classification, deep learning, deep belief network, convolutional neural network

  1. Reliability of computer memories in radiation environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fetahović Irfan S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is examining a radiation hardness of the magnetic (Toshiba MK4007 GAL and semiconductor (AT 27C010 EPROM and AT 28C010 EEPROM computer memories in the field of radiation. Magnetic memories have been examined in the field of neutron radiation, and semiconductor memories in the field of gamma radiation. The obtained results have shown a high radiation hardness of magnetic memories. On the other side, it has been shown that semiconductor memories are significantly more sensitive and a radiation can lead to an important damage of their functionality. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171007

  2. Evaluation of myocardial ischemia by multiple detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Fabio Vieira, E-mail: rccury@me.com [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cury, Roberto Caldeira [Hospital Samaritano, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    For years, cardiovascular diseases have been the leading cause of death worldwide, bringing on important social and economic consequences. Given this scenario, the search for a method capable of diagnosing coronary artery diseases in an early and accurate way is increasingly higher. The coronary computed tomography angiogram is already widely established for the stratification of coronary artery diseases, and, more recently, the computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging has been providing relevant information by correlating ischemia and the coronary anatomy. The objective of this review is to describe the evaluation of myocardial ischemia by multiple detector computed tomography. This study will resort to controlled clinical trials that show the possibility of a single method to identify the atherosclerotic load, presence of coronary artery luminal narrowing and possible myocardial ischemia, by means of a fast, practical and reliable method validated by a multicenter study. (author)

  3. A constrained conjugate gradient algorithm for computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Goodman, D.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Image reconstruction from projections of x-ray, gamma-ray, protons and other penetrating radiation is a well-known problem in a variety of fields, and is commonly referred to as computed tomography (CT). Various analytical and series expansion methods of reconstruction and been used in the past to provide three-dimensional (3D) views of some interior quantity. The difficulties of these approaches lie in the cases where (a) the number of views attainable is limited, (b) the Poisson (or other) uncertainties are significant, (c) quantifiable knowledge of the object is available, but not implementable, or (d) other limitations of the data exist. We have adapted a novel nonlinear optimization procedure developed at LLNL to address limited-data image reconstruction problems. The technique, known as nonlinear least squares with general constraints or constrained conjugate gradients (CCG), has been successfully applied to a number of signal and image processing problems, and is now of great interest to the image reconstruction community. Previous applications of this algorithm to deconvolution problems and x-ray diffraction images for crystallography have shown the great promise.

  4. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostipo por Imagem; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods: the study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results: No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (C{sub W}), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (C{sub VOL}), air kerma-length product (P{sub KL,CT}) and effective dose. Conclusion: Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, P{sub KL,CT} and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. (author)

  5. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study.

  7. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  8. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamat, Nurwahidah; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik [Faculty of Science Computer and Mathematics, Universiti Teknologi Mara Malaysia, 40450 Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia); Mahmud, Rozi [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 Serdang Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-12-04

    Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan.

  9. Use of dentomaxillofacial cone beam computed tomography in dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K?van?; Kamburo?lu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) was developed and introduced specifically for dento-maxillofacial imaging. CBCT possesses a number of advantages over medical CT in clinical practice, such as lower effective radiation doses, lower costs, fewer space requirements,easier image acquisition, and interactive display modes such as mutiplanar reconstruction that are applicable to maxillofacial imaging. However, the disadvantages of CBCT include higher doses than two-dimensional imaging; the inability to accurately represent the internal structure of soft tissues and soft-tissue lesions; a limited correlation with Hounsfield Units for standardized quantification of bone density; and the presence of various types of image artifacts, mainly those produced by metal restorations. CBCT is now commonly used for a variety of purposes in oral implantology, dentomaxillofacial surgery, image-guided surgical procedures, endodontics, periodontics and orthodontics. CBCT applications provide obvious benefits in the assessment of dentomaxillofacial region, however; it should be used only in correct indications considering the necessity and the potential hazards of the examination.

  10. Low-dose computed tomography to diagnose fetal bone dysplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya Filardi, A; Guasp Vizcaíno, M; Gómez Fernández-Montes, J; Llorens Salvador, R

    We present a case of cleidocranial dysplasia diagnosed by low-dose fetal computed tomography (CT) in the 25th week of gestation. Severe bone dysplasia was suspected because of the fetus' low percentile in long bones length and the appearance of craniosynostosis on sonography. CT found no abnormalities incompatible with life. The effective dose was 5 mSv, within the recommended range for this type of examination. Low-dose fetal CT is a new technique that makes precision study of the bony structures possible from the second trimester of pregnancy. In Spain, abortion is legal even after the 22nd week of gestation in cases of severe fetal malformations. Therefore, in cases in which severe bone dysplasia is suspected, radiologists must know the strategies for reducing the dose of radiation while maintaining sufficient diagnostic quality, and they must also know which bony structures to evaluate. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Utility of the computed tomography indices on cone beam computed tomography images in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyung A [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    This study evaluated the potential use of the computed tomography indices (CTI) on cone beam CT (CBCT) images for an assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Twenty-one postmenopausal osteoporotic women and 21 postmenopausal healthy women were enrolled as the subjects. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were calculated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using a DXA scanner. The CBCT images were obtained from the unilateral mental foramen region using a PSR-9000N Dental CT system. The axial, sagittal, and coronal images were reconstructed from the block images using OnDemend3D. The new term 'CTI' on CBCT images was proposed. The relationship between the CT measurements and BMDs were assessed and the intra-observer agreement was determined. There were significant differences between the normal and osteoporotic groups in the computed tomography mandibular index superior (CTI(S)), computed tomography mandibular index inferior (CTI(I)), and computed tomography cortical index (CTCI). On the other hand, there was no difference between the groups in the computed tomography mental index (CTMI: inferior cortical width). CTI(S), CTI(I), and CTCI on the CBCT images can be used to assess the osteoporotic women.

  12. Detection of low-contrast lesions in computed body tomography: an experimental study of simulated lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, T F; Raudkivi, U; McIntyre, W J; Gallagher, J H; Haaga, J R; Havrilla, T R; Reich, N E

    1980-01-01

    Observer accuracy in the identification of low-contrast objects in computed tomography (CT) was studied. Thresholds were established for detection of lesions of various sizes and attenuation differences in CT images produced at different radiation doses. Noise reduction was important in identifying certain types of lesions. Detection was not accurate when the standard deviation of the mean of an organ exceeded the difference in the means of the lesion and the surround region.

  13. Optimizing spatial resolution with the mechanical design of an X-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lowell D.; Bernardi, Richard T.; Hughes, Simon H. C.; Slocum, Robert E.

    The most important factor limiting spatial resolution in a well-designed CT scanner - the width of the X-ray beam as it passes through the object being examined - is described. The Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS), a second-generation CT scanner that has a variable geometry to allow a wide variety of objects to be scanned at peak spatial resolution, even with different radiation sources, is described.

  14. Advances in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Hardware and Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Marina; Garcia, Ernest V

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques remain today's most reliable modality for the assessment and quantification of myocardial perfusion. In recent years, the field has experienced tremendous progress both in terms of dedicated cameras for cardiac applications and software techniques for image reconstruction. The most recent advances in single-photon emission computed tomography hardware and software are reviewed, focusing on how these improvements have resulted in an even more powerful diagnostic tool with reduced injected radiation dose and acquisition time.

  15. Computed tomography of sellar and parasellar lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Mitsunori; Aoki, Hideo (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-06-01

    Neuroradiological modalities, particularly CT, for sellar and parasellar lesions were reviewed. Although accurate preoperative diagnosis is sometimes difficult, CT diagnosed 83% as far as pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma and meningioma were concerned and demonstrated abnormal findings in 95% of parasellar tumors. At the authors' department, CT visualized abnormalities in all cases, with the exception of suprasellar arachnoid cyst, but a histological diagnosis was possible only in 84%. Since lesions including tumors cannot be completely denied even if CT shows normal images, findings by modalities such as plain craniography, cerebral tomography, cerebral angiography and cisternography should be judged comprehensively.

  16. Anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, W; Taeger, K

    2000-08-01

    The need for general anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography investigations can be reduced by the implementation of structured sedation programmes supervised by anaesthetists. Despite its side-effects, chloral hydrate is still the drug most widely used. Rectal thiopental or intravenous propofol are suggested anaesthetic agents for pre-school children and uncooperative or claustrophobic individuals. Spiral computed tomography scans and ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging shorten immobilization times further. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging and intervention techniques in neuroradiology depend on a motionless patient. A useful strategy for testing anaesthesia equipment has been outlined.

  17. Investigation of a near-infrared-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Satoi, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    In the near-infrared-ray computed tomography (NIR-CT) scanner, NIR rays are produced from a light-emitting diode (LED) and detected using an NIR phototransistor (PT). The wavelengths of the LED peak intensity and the PT high sensitivity in the data table are both 940 nm. The photocurrents flowing through the PTR are converted into voltages using an emitter-follower circuit, and the output voltages are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter. The NIR projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object, and the scanning is conducted in both directions of its movement.

  18. Direct sagital computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzione, J.V. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA); Seltzer, S.E.; Katzberg, R.W.; Hammerschlag, S.B.; Chiango, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a common clinical problem that has been reported to affect 4%-28% of adults. Temporomandibular joint arthrography has shown that many of these patients have intraarticular abnormalities involving the meniscus. A noninvasive test that could demonstrate the meniscus as well as bony abnormalities of the joint would be an important advance. In an attempt to develop such a noninvasive test, we have performed direct sagittal computed tomography (CT) on cadaver temporomandibular joints and have correlated the images with anatomic sections. We are currently applying this technique clinically and report one representative example in which direct sagittal computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint accurately demonstrated an anteriorly displaced meniscus.

  19. Dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography with automated exposure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibek, Sedat; Brand, Martin; Suess, Christoph; Wuest, Wolfgang; Uder, Michael; Greess, Holger

    2011-06-01

    Since the introduction of computed tomographic (CT) imaging in the 1970s, the number of examinations has increased steadily. CT imaging is an essential part of routine workup in diagnostic radiology. The great advantage of multidetector computed tomography is the acquisition of a large amount of data in a short time period, thus speeding up diagnostic procedures. To protect patients from unnecessary radiation exposure, different approaches have been developed. In this study, the efficacy of automated exposure control (AEC) software in multidetector CT imaging with a focus on dose reduction in pediatric examinations was assessed. Between August 2004 and September 2005, a total of 71 children (40 male, 31 female; age range, 2-13 years; mean age, 7.2 years) were examined using a multisource CT scanner. Three different regions (chest, upper abdomen, and pelvis) were examined. Overall image quality was assessed with a subjective scale (1 = excellent, 2 = diagnostic, 3 = nondiagnostic). For all examinations, AEC was used. From the scanner's patient protocol, dose-length product, volume CT dose index, and tube current-time product were calculated for each examination. With AEC, a mean dose reduction of 30.6% was calculated. Images were rated as excellent (n = 39) or diagnostic (n = 32). Nondiagnostic image quality was not seen. Dose-length product and volume CT dose index were reduced by 30.4% and 29.5%, respectively. Overall, a mean dose reduction of 30.1% of the effective dose (5.8 ± 3.1 vs 8.4 ± 4.6 mSv) was achieved (P image quality is possible. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. NDA via gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decman, D.J.; Martz, H.E.; Roberson, G.P.; Johansson, E.

    1996-10-01

    Gamma-ray-based computed tomography (CT) requires that two different measurements be made on a closed waste container. [MAR92 and ROB94] When the results from these two measurements are combined, it becomes possible to identify and quantify all detectable gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes within a container. All measurements are made in a tomographic manner, i.e., the container is moved sequentially through well- known and accurately reproducible translation, rotation, and elevation positions in order to obtain gamma-ray data that is reconstructed by computer into images that represent waste contents. [ROB94] The two measurements modes are called active (A) and passive (P) CT. In the ACT mode, a collimated gamma-ray source external to the waste container emits multiple, mono-energetic gamma rays that pass through the container and are detected on the opposite side. The attenuated gamma-rays transmitted are measured as a function of both energy and position of the container. Thus, container contents are `mapped` via the measured amount of attenuation suffered at each gamma-ray energy. In effect, a three dimensional (3D) image of gamma- ray attenuation versus waste content is obtained. In the PCT measurement mode, the external radioactive source is shuttered turned- off, and the waste container, is moved through similar positions used for the ACT measurements. However, this time the radiation detectors record any gamma-rays emitted by radioactive sources on the inside of the waste container. Thus, internal radioactive content is mapped or 3D-imaged in the same tomographic manner as the attenuating matrix materials were in the ACT measurement mode.