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Sample records for computed tomography 3d

  1. 3D histomorphometric quantification from 3D computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F. de; Lopes, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    The histomorphometric analysis is based on stereologic concepts and was originally applied to biologic samples. This technique has been used to evaluate different complex structures such as ceramic filters, net structures and cancellous objects that are objects with inner connected structures. The measured histomorphometric parameters of structure are: sample volume to total reconstructed volume (BV/TV), sample surface to sample volume (BS/BV), connection thickness (Tb Th ), connection number (Tb N ) and connection separation (Tb Sp ). The anisotropy was evaluated as well. These parameters constitute the base of histomorphometric analysis. The quantification is realized over cross-sections recovered by cone beam reconstruction, where a real-time microfocus radiographic system is used as tomographic system. The three-dimensional (3D) histomorphometry, obtained from tomography, corresponds to an evolution of conventional method that is based on 2D analysis. It is more coherent with morphologic and topologic context of the sample. This work shows result from 3D histomorphometric quantification to characterize objects examined by 3D computer tomography. The results, which characterizes the internal structures of ceramic foams with different porous density, are compared to results from conventional methods

  2. 3D artefact for concurrent scale calibration in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, Alessandro; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A novel artefact for calibration of the scale in 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is presented. The artefact comprises a carbon fibre tubular structure on which a number of reference ruby spheres are glued. The artefact is positioned and scanned together with the workpiece inside the CT scanner...

  3. Computational optical tomography using 3-D deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh; Bui, Vy; Nehmetallah, George

    2018-04-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) offer a promising performance for many image processing areas, such as super-resolution, deconvolution, image classification, denoising, and segmentation, with outstanding results. Here, we develop for the first time, to our knowledge, a method to perform 3-D computational optical tomography using 3-D DCNN. A simulated 3-D phantom dataset was first constructed and converted to a dataset of phase objects imaged on a spatial light modulator. For each phase image in the dataset, the corresponding diffracted intensity image was experimentally recorded on a CCD. We then experimentally demonstrate the ability of the developed 3-D DCNN algorithm to solve the inverse problem by reconstructing the 3-D index of refraction distributions of test phantoms from the dataset from their corresponding diffraction patterns.

  4. Analysis of 3D crack propagation by microfocus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Bo; Chen Fuxing; Deng Cuizhen; Zeng Yabin

    2014-01-01

    The three-point bending test of notched specimens of 2A50 forging aluminum was performed by high frequency fatigue tester, and the surface cracks of different stages were analyzed and contrasted by SEM. The crack was reconstructed by microfocus computed tomography, and its size, position and distribution were visually displayed through 3D visualization. The crack propagation behaviors were researched through gray value and position of crack front of 2D CT images in two adjacent stages, and the results show that crack propagation is irregular. The projection image of crack was obtained if crack of two stages projected onto the reference plane respectively, a significant increase of new crack propagation was observed compared with the previous projection of crack, and the distribution curve of crack front of two stages was displayed. The 3D increment distribution of the crack front propagation was obtained through the 3D crack analysis of two stages. (authors)

  5. Efficacy of 3D-positron emission tomography/computed tomography for upper abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Koji; Nakahara, Tadaki

    2014-04-01

    Recent advancement in computed tomography (CT) enables us to obtain high spatial resolution image and made it possible to construct extensive high-definition three-dimensional (3D) images. But a lack of contrast resolution in CT alone is still remained problem. Meanwhile, as fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) can visualize tumors in high contrast, we can create 3D images fusing the accumulation in tumors on PET/CT images. Such images can play the role of a "map of body" which makes it easy to understand the anatomical information before surgery. We also try to evaluate segmental liver function by using PET/CT fusion images. By using (11) C-methionine PET/contrast-enhanced CT, superior image quality compared to single photon emission computed tomography/CT can be obtained. CT, especially with contrast enhancement for obtaining anatomical imaging information plus PET for obtaining functional imaging information is a highly compatible combination, and adding these two types information will further increase clinical usefulness. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  6. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  7. Analyzing 3D xylem networks in Vitis vinifera using High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent developments in High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) have made it possible to visualize three dimensional (3D) xylem networks without time consuming, labor intensive physical sectioning. Here we describe a new method to visualize complex vessel networks in plants and produce a quantitat...

  8. Initial evaluation of image performance of a 3-D x-ray system: phantom-based comparison of 3-D tomography with conventional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Robyn Melanie; Garcia, Meritxell Alzamora; Amsler, Felix; Voigt, Johannes; Fieselmann, Andreas; Falkowski, Anna Lucja; Stieltjes, Bram; Hirschmann, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Phantom-based initial performance assessment of a prototype three-dimensional (3-D) x-ray system and comparison of 3-D tomography with computed tomography (CT) were proposed. A 3-D image quality phantom was scanned with a prototype version of 3-D cone-beam CT imaging implemented on a twin robotic x-ray system using three trajectories (163 deg = table, 188 deg = upright, and 200 deg = side), six tube voltages (60, 70, 81, 90, 100, and 121 kV), and four detector doses (0.348, 0.696, 1.740, and [Formula: see text]). CT was obtained with a clinical protocol. Spatial resolution (line pairs/cm) and soft-tissue-contrast resolution were assessed by two independent readers. Radiation dose was assessed. Descriptive and analysis of variance (ANOVA) ([Formula: see text]) were performed. With 3-D tomography, a maximum of 16 lp/cm was visible and best soft-tissue-contrast resolution was 2 mm at 30 Hounsfield units (HU) for 160 projections. With CT, 10 lp/cm was visible and soft-tissue-contrast resolution was 4 mm at 20 HU. The upright trajectory yielded significantly better spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast, and the side trajectory yielded significantly higher soft tissue contrast than the table trajectory ([Formula: see text]). Radiation dose was higher in 3-D tomography (45 to 704 mGycm) than CT (44 mGycm). Three-dimensional tomography renders overall equal or higher spatial resolution and comparable soft tissue contrast to CT for medium- and high-dose protocols in the side and upright trajectories, but with higher radiation doses.

  9. Interpretation of mandibular condyle fractures using 2D- and 3D-computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa e Silva Adriana Paula de Andrade da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT has been increasingly used in the examination of patients with craniofacial trauma. This technique is useful in the examination of the temporomandibular joint and allows the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle. Aiming to verify whether the three-dimensional reconstructed images from CT (3D-CT produce more effective visual information than the two-dimensional (2D-CT ones, we evaluated 2D-CT and 3D-CT examinations of 18 patients with mandibular condyle fractures. We observed that 2D-CT and 3D-CT reconstructed images produced similar information for the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle, although the 3D-CT allowed a better visualization of the position and displacement of bone fragments, as well as the comminution of fractures. These results, together with the possibility of refining and manipulating perspectives in 3D images, reinforce the importance of its use in the surgical planning and evaluation of treatment. We concluded that 3D-CT presented supplementary information for a more effective diagnosis of mandibular condyle fractures.

  10. New solutions and applications of 3D computer tomography image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Ira; Kroll, Julia; Verl, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    As nowadays the industry aims at fast and high quality product development and manufacturing processes a modern and efficient quality inspection is essential. Compared to conventional measurement technologies, industrial computer tomography (CT) is a non-destructive technology for 3D-image data acquisition which helps to overcome their disadvantages by offering the possibility to scan complex parts with all outer and inner geometric features. In this paper new and optimized methods for 3D image processing, including innovative ways of surface reconstruction and automatic geometric feature detection of complex components, are presented, especially our work of developing smart online data processing and data handling methods, with an integrated intelligent online mesh reduction. Hereby the processing of huge and high resolution data sets is guaranteed. Besides, new approaches for surface reconstruction and segmentation based on statistical methods are demonstrated. On the extracted 3D point cloud or surface triangulation automated and precise algorithms for geometric inspection are deployed. All algorithms are applied to different real data sets generated by computer tomography in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new tools. Since CT is an emerging technology for non-destructive testing and inspection more and more industrial application fields will use and profit from this new technology.

  11. A 3D edge detection technique for surface extraction in computed tomography for dimensional metrology applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe-Fabra, J.A.; Ontiveros, S.; Jiménez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors influence the measurement uncertainty when using computed tomography for dimensional metrology applications. One of the most critical steps is the surface extraction phase. An incorrect determination of the surface may significantly increase the measurement uncertainty. This paper...... presents an edge detection method for the surface extraction based on a 3D Canny algorithm with sub-voxel resolution. The advantages of this method are shown in comparison with the most commonly used technique nowadays, i.e. the local threshold definition. Both methods are applied to reference standards...

  12. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: Hardware setup, reconstruction methods and first clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmeke, Hartmut; Hopp, Torsten; Zapf, Michael; Kaiser, Clemens; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2017-11-01

    A promising candidate for improved imaging of breast cancer is ultrasound computer tomography (USCT). Current experimental USCT systems are still focused in elevation dimension resulting in a large slice thickness, limited depth of field, loss of out-of-plane reflections, and a large number of movement steps to acquire a stack of images. 3D USCT emitting and receiving spherical wave fronts overcomes these limitations. We built an optimized 3D USCT, realizing for the first time the full benefits of a 3D system. The point spread function could be shown to be nearly isotropic in 3D, to have very low spatial variability and fit the predicted values. The contrast of the phantom images is very satisfactory in spite of imaging with a sparse aperture. The resolution and imaged details of the reflectivity reconstruction are comparable to a 3 T MRI volume. Important for the obtained resolution are the simultaneously obtained results of the transmission tomography. The KIT 3D USCT was then tested in a pilot study on ten patients. The primary goals of the pilot study were to test the USCT device, the data acquisition protocols, the image reconstruction methods and the image fusion techniques in a clinical environment. The study was conducted successfully; the data acquisition could be carried out for all patients with an average imaging time of six minutes per breast. The reconstructions provide promising images. Overlaid volumes of the modalities show qualitative and quantitative information at a glance. This paper gives a summary of the involved techniques, methods, and first results.

  13. Recent advances in Optical Computed Tomography (OCT) imaging system for three dimensional (3D) radiotherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul; Farah Rosli, Nurul; Zain, Shafirah Mohd; Zin, Hafiz M.

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy delivery techniques for cancer treatment are becoming more complex and highly focused, to enable accurate radiation dose delivery to the cancerous tissue and minimum dose to the healthy tissue adjacent to tumour. Instrument to verify the complex dose delivery in radiotherapy such as optical computed tomography (OCT) measures the dose from a three-dimensional (3D) radiochromic dosimeter to ensure the accuracy of the radiotherapy beam delivery to the patient. OCT measures the optical density in radiochromic material that changes predictably upon exposure to radiotherapy beams. OCT systems have been developed using a photodiode and charged coupled device (CCD) as the detector. The existing OCT imaging systems have limitation in terms of the accuracy and the speed of the measurement. Advances in on-pixel intelligence CMOS image sensor (CIS) will be exploited in this work to replace current detector in OCT imaging systems. CIS is capable of on-pixel signal processing at a very fast imaging speed (over several hundred images per second) that will allow improvement in the 3D measurement of the optical density. The paper will review 3D radiochromic dosimeters and OCT systems developed and discuss how CMOS based OCT imaging will provide accurate and fast optical density measurements in 3D. The paper will also discuss the configuration of the CMOS based OCT developed in this work and how it may improve the existing OCT system.

  14. Using computed tomography and 3D printing to construct custom prosthetics attachments and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liacouras, Peter C; Sahajwalla, Divya; Beachler, Mark D; Sleeman, Todd; Ho, Vincent B; Lichtenberger, John P

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic devices the military uses to restore function and mobility to our wounded warriors are highly advanced, and in many instances not publically available. There is considerable research aimed at this population of young patients who are extremely active and desire to take part in numerous complex activities. While prosthetists design and manufacture numerous devices with standard materials and limb assemblies, patients often require individualized prosthetic design and/or modifications to enable them to participate fully in complex activities. Prosthetists and engineers perform research and implement digitally designs in collaboration to generate equipment for their patient's rehabilitation needs. 3D printing allows for these devices to be manufactured from an array of materials ranging from plastic to titanium alloy. Many designs require form fitting to a prosthetic socket or a complex surface geometry. Specialty items can be scanned using computed tomography and digitally reconstructed to produce a virtual 3D model the engineer can use to design the necessary features of the desired prosthetic, device, or attachment. Completed devices are tested for fit and function. Numerous custom prostheses and attachments have been successfully translated from the research domain to clinical reality, in particular, those that feature the use of computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. The purpose of this project is to describe the research pathways to implementation for the following clinical designs: sets of bilateral hockey skates; custom weightlifting prosthetic hands; and a wine glass holder. This article will demonstrate how to incorporate CT imaging and 3D printing in the design and manufacturing process of custom attachments and assistive technology devices. Even though some of these prosthesis attachments may be relatively simple in design to an engineer, they have an enormous impact on the lives of our wounded warriors.

  15. Left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes as measured by 3D echocardiography and ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Nomura, Cesar H.; Tranchesi Junior, Bernardino; Oliveira, Wercules A. de; Naccarato, Gustavo; Serpa, Bruna S.; Passos, Rodrigo B.D.; Funari, Marcelo B. G.; Fischer, Claudio H.; Morhy, Samira S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT-3D-Echo) and ultrafast computed tomography (CT) are two novel methods for the analysis of LV ejection fraction and volumes. Objective: To compare LVEF and volume measurements as obtained using RT-3D-Echo and ultrafast CT. Methods: Thirty nine consecutive patients (27 men, mean age of 57+- 12 years) were studied using RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT. LVEF and LV volumes were analyzed. Statistical analysis: coefficient of correlation (r: Pearson), Bland-Altman analysis, linear regression analysis, 95% CI, p 5 .58)%; end-diastolic volume ranged from 49.6 to 178.2 (87+-27.8) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 11.4 to 78 (33.1+-13.6) ml. CT scan measurements: LVEF ranged from 53 to 86% (67.8+-7.78); end-diastolic volume ranged from 51 to 186 (106.5+-30.3) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 7 to 72 (35.5+-13.4)ml. Correlations between RT-3D-Echo and CT were: LVEF (r: 0.7888, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6301 to 0.8843); end-diastolic volume (r: 0.7695, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.5995 to 0.8730); end-systolic volume (r: 0.8119, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6673 to 0.8975). Conclusion: Good correlation between LVEF and ventricular volume parameters as measured by RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT was found in the present case series. (author)

  16. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  17. Coronary computed tomography angiography with 320-row detector and using the AIDR-3D: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasdelli Neto, Roberto; Nomura, Cesar Higa; Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Bianco, Danilo Perussi; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Szarf, Gilberto; Teles, Gustavo Borges da Silva; Shoji, Hamilton; Santana Netto, Pedro Vieira; Passos, Rodrigo Bastos Duarte; Chate, Rodrigo Caruso; Ishikawa, Walther Yoshiharu; Lima, Joao Paulo Bacellar Costa; Rocha, Marcelo Assis; Marcos, Vinicius Neves; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao; Failla, Bruna Bonaventura

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) is a powerful non-invasive imaging method to evaluate coronary artery disease. Nowadays, coronary CTA estimated effective radiation dose can be dramatically reduced using state-of-the-art scanners, such as 320-row detector CT (320-CT), without changing coronary CTA diagnostic accuracy. To optimize and further reduce the radiation dose, new iterative reconstruction algorithms were released recently by several CT manufacturers, and now they are used routinely in coronary CTA. This paper presents our first experience using coronary CTA with 320-CT and the Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR-3D). In addition, we describe the current indications for coronary CTA in our practice as well as the acquisition standard protocols and protocols related to CT application for radiation dose reduction. In conclusion, coronary CTA radiation dose can be dramatically reduced following the 'as low as reasonable achievable' principle by combination of exam indication and well-documented technics for radiation dose reduction, such as beta blockers, low-kV, and also the newest iterative dose reduction software as AIDR-3D. (author)

  18. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    AIMS: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D

  19. Detecting and visualizing internal 3D oleoresin in agarwood by means of micro-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairiah Yazid; Roslan Yahya; Mat Rosol Awang

    2012-01-01

    Detection and analysis of oleoresin is particularly significant since the commercial value of agarwood is related to the quantity of oleoresins that are present. A modern technique of non-destructive may reach the interior region of the wood. Currently, tomographic image data in particular is most commonly visualized in three dimensions using volume rendering. The aim of this paper is to explore the potential of high resolution non-destructive 3D visualization technique, X-ray micro-computed tomography, as imaging tools to visualize micro-structure oleoresin in agarwood. Investigations involving desktop X-ray micro-tomography system on high grade agarwood sample, performed at the Centre of Tomography in Nuclear Malaysia, demonstrate the applicability of the method. Prior to experiments, a reference test was conducted to stimulate the attenuation of oleoresin in agarwood. Based on the experiment results, micro-CT imaging with voxel size 7.0 μm is capable to of detecting oleoresin and pores in agarwood. This imaging technique, although sophisticated can be used for standard development especially in grading of agarwood for commercial activities. (author)

  20. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turmezei, Tom D.; Treece, Graham M.; Gee, Andrew H.; Fotiadou, Anastasia F.; Poole, Kenneth E.S.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K and L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K and L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  2. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, Tom D; Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Fotiadou, Anastasia F; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2016-07-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K&L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. • CT is being increasingly used to assess bony involvement in osteoarthritis • CBM provides accurate and reliable quantitative analysis of cortical bone thickness • Cortical bone is thicker at the superior femoral head-neck with worse osteoarthritis • Regions of increased thickness co-locate with impingement and osteophyte formation • Quantitative 3D bone analysis could enable clinical disease prediction and therapy development.

  3. Segmentation of 3D ultrasound computer tomography reflection images using edge detection and surface fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    An essential processing step for comparison of Ultrasound Computer Tomography images to other modalities, as well as for the use in further image processing, is to segment the breast from the background. In this work we present a (semi-) automated 3D segmentation method which is based on the detection of the breast boundary in coronal slice images and a subsequent surface fitting. The method was evaluated using a software phantom and in-vivo data. The fully automatically processed phantom results showed that a segmentation of approx. 10% of the slices of a dataset is sufficient to recover the overall breast shape. Application to 16 in-vivo datasets was performed successfully using semi-automated processing, i.e. using a graphical user interface for manual corrections of the automated breast boundary detection. The processing time for the segmentation of an in-vivo dataset could be significantly reduced by a factor of four compared to a fully manual segmentation. Comparison to manually segmented images identified a smoother surface for the semi-automated segmentation with an average of 11% of differing voxels and an average surface deviation of 2mm. Limitations of the edge detection may be overcome by future updates of the KIT USCT system, allowing a fully-automated usage of our segmentation approach.

  4. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  5. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); NECTAR Imaging srl Imola (Italy); Casali, F. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); Bontempi, M. [CEFLA Dental Group Imola (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  6. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A.; Casali, F.; Bontempi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  7. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  8. [Fabrication and accuracy research on 3D printing dental model based on cone beam computed tomography digital modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Rong; Yin, Le-Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yan, Li-Yi; Wang, Ning; Liu, Gang; An, Xiao-Li; Liu, Bin

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to build a digital dental model with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), to fabricate a virtual model via 3D printing, and to determine the accuracy of 3D printing dental model by comparing the result with a traditional dental cast. CBCT of orthodontic patients was obtained to build a digital dental model by using Mimics 10.01 and Geomagic studio software. The 3D virtual models were fabricated via fused deposition modeling technique (FDM). The 3D virtual models were compared with the traditional cast models by using a Vernier caliper. The measurements used for comparison included the width of each tooth, the length and width of the maxillary and mandibular arches, and the length of the posterior dental crest. 3D printing models had higher accuracy compared with the traditional cast models. The results of the paired t-test of all data showed that no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (P>0.05). Dental digital models built with CBCT realize the digital storage of patients' dental condition. The virtual dental model fabricated via 3D printing avoids traditional impression and simplifies the clinical examination process. The 3D printing dental models produced via FDM show a high degree of accuracy. Thus, these models are appropriate for clinical practice.

  9. Comparing the Use of 3D Photogrammetry and Computed Tomography in Assessing the Severity of Single-Suture Nonsyndromic Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Olivia A; Saber, Nikoo; Stephens, Derek; Clausen, April; Drake, James; Forrest, Christopher; Phillips, John

    2017-05-01

    Single-suture nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is diagnosed using clinical assessment and computed tomography (CT). With increasing awareness of the associated risks of radiation exposure, the use of CT is particularly concerning in patients with craniosynostosis since they are exposed at a younger age and more frequently than the average child. Three-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry is advantageous-it involves no radiation, is conveniently obtainable within clinic, and does not require general anaesthesia. This study aims to assess how 3D photogrammetry compares to CT in the assessment of craniosynostosis severity, to quantify surgical outcomes, and analyze the validity of 3D photogrammetry in craniosynostosis. Computed tomography images and 3D photographs of patients who underwent craniosynostosis surgery were assessed and aligned to best fit. The intervening area between the CT and 3D photogrammetry curves at the supraorbital bar (bandeau) level in axial view was calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t test. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were determined and equivalence margins were applied. In total, 41 pairs of CTs and 3D photographs were analyzed. The 95% confidence interval was 198.16 to 264.18 mm 2 and the mean was 231.17 mm 2 . When comparisons were made in the same bandeau region omitting the temporalis muscle, the 95% confidence interval was 108.94 to 147.38 mm 2 , and the mean was 128.16 mm 2 . Although statistically significant difference between the modalities was found, they can be attributable to the dampening effect of soft tissue. Within certain error margins, 3D photogrammetry is comparable to CT in assessing the severity of single-suture nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. However, a dampening effect can be attributable to the soft tissue. Three-dimensional photogrammetry may be more applicable for severe cases of craniosynostosis but not milder deformity. It may also be beneficial for assessing the overall appearance and

  10. 3D Nondestructive Visualization and Evaluation of TRISO Particles Distribution in HTGR Fuel Pebbles Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonuniform distribution of tristructural isotropic (TRISO particles within a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR pebble may lead to excessive thermal gradients and nonuniform thermal expansion during operation. If the particles are closely clustered, local hotspots may form, leading to excessive stresses on particle layers and an increased probability of particle failure. Although X-ray digital radiography (DR is currently used to evaluate the TRISO distributions in pebbles, X-ray DR projection images are two-dimensional in nature, which would potentially miss some details for 3D evaluation. This paper proposes a method of 3D visualization and evaluation of the TRISO distribution in HTGR pebbles using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT: first, a pebble is scanned on our high-resolution CBCT, and 2D cross-sectional images are reconstructed; secondly, all cross-sectional images are restructured to form the 3D model of the pebble; then, volume rendering is applied to segment and display the TRISO particles in 3D for visualization and distribution evaluation. For method validation, several pebbles were scanned and the 3D distributions of the TRISO particles within the pebbles were produced. Experiment results show that the proposed method provides more 3D than DR, which will facilitate pebble fabrication research and production quality control.

  11. Use of micro computed-tomography and 3D printing for reverse engineering of mouse embryo nasal capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesařová, M.; Zikmund, T.; Kaiser, J.; Kaucká, M.; Adameyko, I.; Jaroš, J.; Paloušek, D.; Škaroupka, D.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of increasingly complex cartilage in vertebrate embryos is one of the key tasks of developmental biology. This is especially important to study shape-organizing processes during initial skeletal formation and growth. Advanced imaging techniques that are reflecting biological needs give a powerful impulse to push the boundaries of biological visualization. Recently, techniques for contrasting tissues and organs have improved considerably, extending traditional 2D imaging approaches to 3D . X-ray micro computed tomography (μCT), which allows 3D imaging of biological objects including their internal structures with a resolution in the micrometer range, in combination with contrasting techniques seems to be the most suitable approach for non-destructive imaging of embryonic developing cartilage. Despite there are many software-based ways for visualization of 3D data sets, having a real solid model of the studied object might give novel opportunities to fully understand the shape-organizing processes in the developing body. In this feasibility study we demonstrated the full procedure of creating a real 3D object of mouse embryo nasal capsule, i.e. the staining, the μCT scanning combined by the advanced data processing and the 3D printing

  12. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H.; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren Yijin

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. Materials and methods: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D surface models were created of the mandible using two different segmentation protocols. The one series of 3D models was segmented by a commercial software company, while the other series was done by an experienced 3D clinician. The heads were then macerated following a standard process. A high resolution laser surface scanner was used to make a 3D model of the macerated mandibles, which acted as the reference 3D model or “gold standard”. The 3D models generated from the two rendering protocols were compared with the “gold standard” using a point-based rigid registration algorithm to superimpose the three 3D models. The linear difference at 25 anatomic and cephalometric landmarks between the laser surface scan and the 3D models generate from the two rendering protocols was measured repeatedly in two sessions with one week interval. Results: The agreement between the repeated measurement was excellent (ICC = 0.923–1.000). The mean deviation from the gold standard by the 3D models generated from the CS group was 0.330 mm ± 0.427, while the mean deviation from the Clinician's rendering was 0.763 mm ± 0.392. The surface models segmented by both CS and DS protocols tend to be larger than those of the reference models. In the DS group, the biggest mean differences with the LSS models were found at the points ConLatR (CI: 0.83–1.23), ConMedR (CI: −3.16 to 2.25), CoLatL (CI: −0.68 to 2.23), Spine (CI: 1.19–2.28), ConAntL (CI: 0.84–1.69), ConSupR (CI: −1.12 to 1.47) and RetMolR (CI: 0.84–1.80). Conclusion: The Commercially segmented models resembled the reality more closely than the Doctor's segmented models. If 3D models are needed for surgical drilling

  13. Comparison of surface extraction techniques performance in computed tomography for 3D complex micro-geometry dimensional measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torralba, Marta; Jiménez, Roberto; Yagüe-Fabra, José A.

    2018-01-01

    micro-geometries as well (i.e., in the sub-mm dimensional range). However, there are different factors that may influence the CT process performance, being one of them the surface extraction technique used. In this paper, two different extraction techniques are applied to measure a complex miniaturized......The number of industrial applications of computed tomography (CT) for dimensional metrology in 100–103 mm range has been continuously increasing, especially in the last years. Due to its specific characteristics, CT has the potential to be employed as a viable solution for measuring 3D complex...... dental file by CT in order to analyze its contribution to the final measurement uncertainty in complex geometries at the mm to sub-mm scales. The first method is based on a similarity analysis: the threshold determination; while the second one is based on a gradient or discontinuity analysis: the 3D...

  14. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  15. An Effective Approach of Teeth Segmentation within the 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Based on Deformable Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xutang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to extract the pixels of teeth from 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT image, in this paper, a novel 3D segmentation approach based on deformable surface mode is developed for 3D tooth model reconstruction. Different forces are formulated to handle the segmentation problem by using different strategies. First, the proposed method estimates the deformation force of vertex model by simulating the deformation process of a bubble under the action of internal pressure and external force field. To handle the blurry boundary, a “braking force” is proposed deriving from the 3D gradient information calculated by transforming the Sobel operator into three-dimension representation. In addition, a “border reinforcement” strategy is developed for handling the cases with complicate structures. Moreover, the proposed method combines affine cell image decomposition (ACID grid reparameterization technique to handle the unstable changes of topological structure and deformability during the deformation process. The proposed method was performed on 510 CBCT images. To validate the performance, the results were compared with those of two other well-studied methods. Experimental results show that the proposed approach had a good performance in handling the cases with complicate structures and blurry boundaries well, is effective to converge, and can successfully achieve the reconstruction task of various types of teeth in oral cavity.

  16. A novel structured dictionary for fast processing of 3D medical images, with application to computed tomography restoration and denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Davood; Ward, Rabab K.

    2016-03-01

    Sparse representation of signals in learned overcomplete dictionaries has proven to be a powerful tool with applications in denoising, restoration, compression, reconstruction, and more. Recent research has shown that learned overcomplete dictionaries can lead to better results than analytical dictionaries such as wavelets in almost all image processing applications. However, a major disadvantage of these dictionaries is that their learning and usage is very computationally intensive. In particular, finding the sparse representation of a signal in these dictionaries requires solving an optimization problem that leads to very long computational times, especially in 3D image processing. Moreover, the sparse representation found by greedy algorithms is usually sub-optimal. In this paper, we propose a novel two-level dictionary structure that improves the performance and the speed of standard greedy sparse coding methods. The first (i.e., the top) level in our dictionary is a fixed orthonormal basis, whereas the second level includes the atoms that are learned from the training data. We explain how such a dictionary can be learned from the training data and how the sparse representation of a new signal in this dictionary can be computed. As an application, we use the proposed dictionary structure for removing the noise and artifacts in 3D computed tomography (CT) images. Our experiments with real CT images show that the proposed method achieves results that are comparable with standard dictionary-based methods while substantially reducing the computational time.

  17. A fully 3D approach for metal artifact reduction in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, Bärbel; Weyers, Imke; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography imaging metal objects in the region of interest introduce inconsistencies during data acquisition. Reconstructing these data leads to an image in spatial domain including star-shaped or stripe-like artifacts. In order to enhance the quality of the resulting image the influence of the metal objects can be reduced. Here, a metal artifact reduction (MAR) approach is proposed that is based on a recomputation of the inconsistent projection data using a fully three-dimensional Fourier-based interpolation. The success of the projection space restoration depends sensitively on a sensible continuation of neighboring structures into the recomputed area. Fortunately, structural information of the entire data is inherently included in the Fourier space of the data. This can be used for a reasonable recomputation of the inconsistent projection data. Methods: The key step of the proposed MAR strategy is the recomputation of the inconsistent projection data based on an interpolation using nonequispaced fast Fourier transforms (NFFT). The NFFT interpolation can be applied in arbitrary dimension. The approach overcomes the problem of adequate neighborhood definitions on irregular grids, since this is inherently given through the usage of higher dimensional Fourier transforms. Here, applications up to the third interpolation dimension are presented and validated. Furthermore, prior knowledge may be included by an appropriate damping of the transform during the interpolation step. This MAR method is applicable on each angular view of a detector row, on two-dimensional projection data as well as on three-dimensional projection data, e.g., a set of sequential acquisitions at different spatial positions, projection data of a spiral acquisition, or cone-beam projection data. Results: Results of the novel MAR scheme based on one-, two-, and three-dimensional NFFT interpolations are presented. All results are compared in projection data space and spatial

  18. Reduction of metal artifact in three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) with dental impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, W S; Kim, K D; Shin, H K; Lee, S H

    2007-01-01

    Metal Artifact still remains one of the main drawbacks in craniofacial Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D CT). In this study, we tried to test the efficacy of additional silicone dental impression materials as a "tooth shield" for the reduction of metal artifact caused by metal restorations and orthodontic appliances. 6 phantoms with 4 teeth were prepared for this in vitro study. Orthodontic bracket, bands and amalgam restorations were placed in each tooth to reproduce various intraoral conditions. Standardized silicone shields were fabricated and placed around the teeth. CT image acquisition was performed with and without silicone shields. Maximum value, mean, and standard deviation of Hounsfield Units (HU) were compared with the presence of silicone shields. In every situation, metal artifacts were reduced in quality and quantity when silicone shields are used. Amalgam restoration made most serious metal artifact. Silicone shields made by dental impression material might be effective way to reduce the metal artifact caused by dental restoration and orthodontic appliances. This will help more excellent 3D image from 3D CT in craniofacial area.

  19. 3D artificial bones for bone repair prepared by computed tomography-guided fused deposition modeling for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Ye, Xiaojian; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Yuyun; Xu, Guohua; He, Dannong

    2014-09-10

    The medical community has expressed significant interest in the development of new types of artificial bones that mimic natural bones. In this study, computed tomography (CT)-guided fused deposition modeling (FDM) was employed to fabricate polycaprolactone (PCL)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and PCL 3D artificial bones to mimic natural goat femurs. The in vitro mechanical properties, in vitro cell biocompatibility, and in vivo performance of the artificial bones in a long load-bearing goat femur bone segmental defect model were studied. All of the results indicate that CT-guided FDM is a simple, convenient, relatively low-cost method that is suitable for fabricating natural bonelike artificial bones. Moreover, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones prepared by CT-guided FDM have more close mechanics to natural bone, good in vitro cell biocompatibility, biodegradation ability, and appropriate in vivo new bone formation ability. Therefore, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones could be potentially be of use in the treatment of patients with clinical bone defects.

  20. The history and principles of optical computed tomography for scanning 3-D radiation dosimeters: 2008 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, Simon J [CRUK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Surrey (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Simon.Doran@icr.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    The current status of optical CT for 3-D radiation dosimetry is reviewed. The technique is first placed in its historical context, pointing out the relationship with other methods of optical imaging and showing how optical-CT has emerged independently in several different fields and under different names. The theoretical background of the method is described briefly and this provides the foundation for an explanation of the different types of scanner. The relative advantages and disadvantages of instruments based on scanned lasers and pixelated (area) detectors are presented. The latest generation of 'fast laser scanners' is described and the review is concluded with a discussion of the different radiation-sensitive materials used as samples in optical CT.

  1. Three-dimensional (3D)- computed tomography bronchography and angiography combined with 3D-video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) versus conventional 2D-VATS anatomic pulmonary segmentectomy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Xiao-Wei; Gu, Yun-Bin; Xu, Chun; Li, Chang; Ding, Cheng; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Compared to the pulmonary lobe, the anatomical structure of the pulmonary segment is relatively complex and prone to variation, thus the risk and difficulty of segmentectomy is increased. We compared three-dimensional computed tomography bronchography and angiography (3D-CTBA) combined with 3D video-assisted thoracic surgery (3D-VATS) to perform segmentectomy to conventional two-dimensional (2D)-VATS for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed the data of randomly selected patients who underwent 3D-CTBA combined with 3D-VATS (3D-CTBA-VATS) or 2D-VATS at the Department of Thoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University Hospital, from January 2014 to May 2017. The operative duration of 3D group was significantly shorter than the 2D group (P 0.05). The extent of intraoperative bleeding and postoperative drainage in the 3D group was significantly lower than in the 2D group (P 3D group was shorter than in the 2D group (P 0.05). However, hemoptysis and pulmonary air leakage (>3d) occurred significantly less frequently in the 3D than in the 2D group (P 3D-CTBA-VATS is a more accurate and smooth technique and leads to reduced intraoperative and postoperative complications. © 2018 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. The description of condyle position in disc displacement with reduction using Cone Beam Computed Tomography 3D radiographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Rahmayani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the temporomandibular joint disorders that mostly occurs is disc displacement with reduction. Disc displacement that causes the displacement of condyle position can be evaluated by using radiograph. The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT-3D is a radiograph equipment which is able to capture the condyle position from many directions. This research was aimed to see the condyle position in patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms. This research was conducted to 11 patients with symptoms of disc displacement with reduction and 3 patients without symptoms of disc displacement with reduction as the counterpart. What was conducted to the sample was the radiographic imaging using CBCT-3D radiography, followed by measuring the joint space distance in the sagittal and coronal directions. The result of the research was analyzed using the T-test. Statistically, the result of the test showed a significant difference ( = 0.05 between patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms and the patients without symptoms, in sagittal and coronal views. The conclusion led to the difference in condyle positions in patients with the disc displacement with reduction and patients without the symptoms which meant there was a condyle position displacement that caused the distance alteration in joint space in sagittal and coronal directions.

  3. On the future of 3-D visualization in non-medical industrial x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of imaging is to capture and record the details of an object for both current and future analysis in a transportable and archival format. Generally, the development and understanding of the relationships of the features of interest thus revealed in the image is ultimately essential for the beneficial utilization of that that knowledge. Modern advanced imaging methods utilized in both medical and industrial applications are predominantly of a digital format, and increasingly moving from a 2-D to 3-D modality to allow for significantly improved detail resolution and clarity of volumetric visualization. Conventional digital radiography (DR), for example, compresses an entire object volume onto a 2-D planar image with consequent lack of spatial resolution and considerable loss of small volume feature resolution. Computed tomography (CT) overcomes both of these limitations, providing the highly desirable capability of precise 3-D detection, localization and characterization of multiple features throughout the subject object volume. CT has the further capability to reconstruct virtual 3-D solid object images with arbitrary and reversible planar sectioning and of variable transparency to clearly visualize features of different densities in situ within an otherwise opaque object. While tomographic imaging is utilized in various medical CT, MRI, PET, EBCT and 3-D Ultrasound modalities, only the X-ray CT imaging is briefly discussed here as it presents comparable high quality images and is quite similar and synergistic with industrial XCT. Medical CT procedures started in the late 1970's (originally known as CAT Scan) and have progressed to the extent of being experienced and accepted by much of the general population. Non-Medical CT (or Industrial XCT) technology has historically followed in the shadow of Medical CT but remains today considerably less pervasive. There are however increasingly several important equipment and application distinctions. These will

  4. Use of computed tomography slices 3D-reconstruction as a powerful tool to improve manufacturing processes on aeroengine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellan, C.; Dastarac, D.

    2000-01-01

    TURBOMECA has been using computed tomography for several years as an inner-health analysis powerful tool for engine components. From 2D slices of the examined part, detailed information about lacks or inclusions could easily be extracted. But, measurements on internal features were quickly required because no other NDT methods were able to do it. CT has thus logically become a powerful 2D dimensional measuring tool. Recently, with new software and the latest computers able to deal with huge files, CT has become a powerful 3D digitization tool and now, TOMO ADOUR can offer a complete solution for reverse engineering of complex parts. Several months ago, TURBOMECA introduced CT into many development, validation and industrialization processes and has demonstrated how to take corrective actions to process deviation on their aeroengine components by: extracting the nonexisting CAD model of a part, generating CAD compatible data to check dimensional conformity and, eventually correct design misfits or manufacturing drifts, highlighting the metallurgical health of first article parts, making the decision of repairing the defining the appropriate method, generating a file (.STL) to build a rapid prototype or a file to pilot tool parts for machining, calculating physical properties such as behavior or flow analysis on a 'real' model. The image also allows a drawing to be made of a part that was originally produced by a supplier or competitor. This paper will be illustrated with a large number of examples

  5. Internal structures of scaffold-free 3D cell cultures visualized by synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldamli, Belma; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Tübel, Jutta; Schauwecker, Johannes; Burgkart, Rainer; Jürgens, Philipp; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Sader, Robert; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Recently the importance of the third dimension in cell biology has been better understood, resulting in a re-orientation towards three-dimensional (3D) cultivation. Yet adequate tools for their morphological characterization have to be established. Synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT) allows visualizing such biological systems with almost isotropic micrometer resolution, non-destructively. We have applied SRμCT for studying the internal morphology of human osteoblast-derived, scaffold-free 3D cultures, termed histoids. Primary human osteoblasts, isolated from femoral neck spongy bone, were grown as 2D culture in non-mineralizing osteogenic medium until a rather thick, multi-cellular membrane was formed. This delicate system was intentionally released to randomly fold itself. The folded cell cultures were grown to histoids of cubic milli- or centimeter size in various combinations of mineralizing and non-mineralizing osteogenic medium for a total period of minimum 56 weeks. The SRμCT-measurements were performed in the absorption contrast mode at the beamlines BW 2 and W 2 (HASYLAB at DESY, Hamburg, Germany), operated by the GKSS-Research Center. To investigate the entire volume of interest several scans were performed under identical conditions and registered to obtain one single dataset of each sample. The histoids grown under different conditions exhibit similar external morphology of globular or ovoid shape. The SRμCT-examination revealed the distinctly different morphological structures inside the histoids. One obtains details of the histoids that permit to identify and select the most promising slices for subsequent histological characterization.

  6. Computed Tomography Image Origin Identification Based on Original Sensor Pattern Noise and 3-D Image Reconstruction Algorithm Footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuping; Bouslimi, Dalel; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Coatrieux, Gouenou

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we focus on the "blind" identification of the computed tomography (CT) scanner that has produced a CT image. To do so, we propose a set of noise features derived from the image chain acquisition and which can be used as CT-scanner footprint. Basically, we propose two approaches. The first one aims at identifying a CT scanner based on an original sensor pattern noise (OSPN) that is intrinsic to the X-ray detectors. The second one identifies an acquisition system based on the way this noise is modified by its three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction algorithm. As these reconstruction algorithms are manufacturer dependent and kept secret, our features are used as input to train a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier to discriminate acquisition systems. Experiments conducted on images issued from 15 different CT-scanner models of 4 distinct manufacturers demonstrate that our system identifies the origin of one CT image with a detection rate of at least 94% and that it achieves better performance than sensor pattern noise (SPN) based strategy proposed for general public camera devices.

  7. 3D exemplar-based random walks for tooth segmentation from cone-beam computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yuru, E-mail: peiyuru@cis.pku.edu.cn; Ai, Xingsheng; Zha, Hongbin [Department of Machine Intelligence, School of EECS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Tianmin [School of Stomatology, Stomatology Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Ma, Gengyu [uSens, Inc., San Jose, California 95110 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Tooth segmentation is an essential step in acquiring patient-specific dental geometries from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Tooth segmentation from CBCT images is still a challenging task considering the comparatively low image quality caused by the limited radiation dose, as well as structural ambiguities from intercuspation and nearby alveolar bones. The goal of this paper is to present and discuss the latest accomplishments in semisupervised tooth segmentation with adaptive 3D shape constraints. Methods: The authors propose a 3D exemplar-based random walk method of tooth segmentation from CBCT images. The proposed method integrates semisupervised label propagation and regularization by 3D exemplar registration. To begin with, the pure random walk method is to get an initial segmentation of the teeth, which tends to be erroneous because of the structural ambiguity of CBCT images. And then, as an iterative refinement, the authors conduct a regularization by using 3D exemplar registration, as well as label propagation by random walks with soft constraints, to improve the tooth segmentation. In the first stage of the iteration, 3D exemplars with well-defined topologies are adapted to fit the tooth contours, which are obtained from the random walks based segmentation. The soft constraints on voxel labeling are defined by shape-based foreground dentine probability acquired by the exemplar registration, as well as the appearance-based probability from a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. In the second stage, the labels of the volume-of-interest (VOI) are updated by the random walks with soft constraints. The two stages are optimized iteratively. Instead of the one-shot label propagation in the VOI, an iterative refinement process can achieve a reliable tooth segmentation by virtue of exemplar-based random walks with adaptive soft constraints. Results: The proposed method was applied for tooth segmentation of twenty clinically captured CBCT

  8. Computer assisted tomography tandem and ovoids (CATTO): results of a 3D CT based assessment of bladder and rectal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebara, Wade; Weeks, Ken; Hahn, Carol; Montana, Gustavo; Anscher, Mitchell

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To compare bladder and rectal dose rates in tandem and ovoid applications using two different dosimetry systems: traditional orthogonal radiograph-based dosimetry (TORD) vs. computer assisted tomography tandem and ovoids dosimetry (CATTO). Materials and Methods: From August 1992 through February 1996, 22 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix received the brachytherapy component of their radiotherapy with a CT-compatible Fletcher-Suit-Delclos device. Three-dimensional (3D) anatomic reconstructions were created with axial CT images. Three-dimensional dose calculations were then performed, and the isodose map was superimposed on the 3D anatomic reconstructions. Maximum bladder (B max ) and rectal (R max ) dose rates were determined from the result of calculating the dose rate to each point on the 3D surface of those organs. Three-dimensional computer displays were also obtained to determine the anatomic positions of the largest dose. Additionally, orthogonal radiography, with contrast in a Foley catheter balloon and a radio-opaque rectal tube was used to define rectal and bladder points. The dose rates at these points were calculated using a commercial treatment planning system. The effect of the tungsten shielding was ignored in the TORD calculations, but included in the CATTO calculations. Bladder and rectal dose rates determined by each dosimetry system were compared. Results: The B max calculated using the CATTO system was higher in all 22 patients when compared with the TORD system. The average B max for the patients using TORD was 43.4 cGy/hr, as compared to 86.2 cGy/hr using the CATTO system (p = 0.0083). The location of B max on CATTO was never at the Foley bulb where the maximum bladder dose was calculated with TORD. It was located approximately 1 cm superior to the colpostats and just anterior to the tandem in (16(22)) patients. R max was higher in (17(22)) patients using the CATTO system when compared with TORD. The average R max using TORD

  9. Measurement of left atrial volume by 2D and 3D non-contrast computed tomography compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredgart, Maise Høigaard; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob Eifer

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the gold standard for assessment of left atrial (LA) volume. We assessed the feasibility of evaluating LA volume using 3D non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT). Furthermore, since manual tracing of LA volume is time consuming, we...... evaluated the accuracy of the LA area using 2D NCCT imaging for LA volume assessment. Methods: MRI and NCCT imaging were performed in 69 patients before and one year after aortic valve replacement. In 3D MRI and 3D NCCT, each slice was manually traced, excluding the pulmonary veins and atrial appendage...

  10. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512 3 to 8192 3 voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H t (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections

  11. Stereological measures of trabecular bone structure: comparison of 3D micro computed tomography with 2D histological sections in human proximal tibial bone biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Laib, A.; Koller, B.

    2005-01-01

    Stereology applied on histological sections is the 'gold standard' for obtaining quantitative information on cancellous bone structure. Recent advances in micro computed tomography (microCT) have made it possible to acquire three-dimensional (3D) data non-destructively. However, before the 3D...... methods can be used as a substitute for the current 'gold standard' they have to be verified against the existing standard. The aim of this study was to compare bone structural measures obtained from 3D microCT data sets with those obtained by stereology performed on conventional histological sections...... tibial metaphysis. The biopsies were embedded in methylmetacrylate before microCT scanning in a Scanco microCT 40 scanner at a resolution of 20 x 20 x 20 microm3, and the 3D data sets were analysed with a computer program. After microCT scanning, 16 sections were cut from the central 2 mm of each biopsy...

  12. 3D electrical conductivity tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Revil, A.; Byrdina, S.; Coperey, A.; Gailler, L.; Grobbe, N.; Viveiros, F.; Silva, C.; Jougnot, D.; Ghorbani, A.; Hogg, C.; Kiyan, D.; Rath, V.; Heap, M. J.; Grandis, H.; Humaida, H.

    2018-05-01

    Electrical conductivity tomography is a well-established galvanometric method for imaging the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution. We characterize the conductivity distribution of a set of volcanic structures that are different in terms of activity and morphology. For that purpose, we developed a large-scale inversion code named ECT-3D aimed at handling complex topographical effects like those encountered in volcanic areas. In addition, ECT-3D offers the possibility of using as input data the two components of the electrical field recorded at independent stations. Without prior information, a Gauss-Newton method with roughness constraints is used to solve the inverse problem. The roughening operator used to impose constraints is computed on unstructured tetrahedral elements to map complex geometries. We first benchmark ECT-3D on two synthetic tests. A first test using the topography of Mt. St Helens volcano (Washington, USA) demonstrates that we can successfully reconstruct the electrical conductivity field of an edifice marked by a strong topography and strong variations in the resistivity distribution. A second case study is used to demonstrate the versatility of the code in using the two components of the electrical field recorded on independent stations along the ground surface. Then, we apply our code to real data sets recorded at (i) a thermally active area of Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming, USA), (ii) a monogenetic dome on Furnas volcano (the Azores, Portugal), and (iii) the upper portion of the caldera of Kīlauea (Hawai'i, USA). The tomographies reveal some of the major structures of these volcanoes as well as identifying alteration associated with high surface conductivities. We also review the petrophysics underlying the interpretation of the electrical conductivity of fresh and altered volcanic rocks and molten rocks to show that electrical conductivity tomography cannot be used as a stand-alone technique due to the non-uniqueness in

  13. APPLICATION OF 3D COMPUTER-AIDED TOMOGRAPHY TO THE QUANTIFICATION OF MARINE SEDIMENT COMMUNITIES IN POLLUTION GRADIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) has been demonstrated to be a cost efficient tool for the qualitative and quantitative study of estuarine benthic communities along pollution gradients.Now we have advanced this technology to successfully visualize and discriminate three dimen...

  14. GAMBARAN KETEBALAN DAN DENSITAS TULANG KORTIKAL MAKSILA DAN MANDIBULA MANUSIA PAWON DENGAN PENCITRAAN CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisam Rizqullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The science on the existence of maxillary and mandibular cortical bone thickness and density of prehistoric human which had been found from Pawon cave, are  still unidentified by any research, further more if it is compared with those of modern human. The aim of this study was to investigate the Pawon-man’s maxillary and mandibular cortical bone thickness and density by using a 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography imaging. The research method is a descriptive one which was consisted of 3 maxillas and 3 mandibles of Pawon-man as samples. This research was conducted by using Ez Implant software used in 3 dimensional aspects (axial, coronal and sagittal. All aspects were recorded, collected and presented in tabular form. The Pawon-man’s maxilla showed that the average of cortical corpus bone thickness was 1,53 mm with the average of density of 971,98 HU, meanwhile the average of cortical alveolar crest bone thickness was 0,69 mm with the average of density of 750,87 HU. Whereas the Pawon-man’s mandible average cortical corpus bone thickness was 3,43 mm with the average of density  of 1042,26 HU, on the other hand the average cortical alveolar crest bone thickness was 0,89 mm with the average of density of 995,45 HU. The result of the interdental region measurement  showed the highest cortical bone thickness of maxilla was located in the F region (interdental region Molar 1 and Molar 2 with the average thickness of 1,29 mm and the average density of 887,80 HU, whereas in mandible which was located in the E region (interdental region Premolar 2 and Molar 1 with the average thickness of 2,61 mm and the average density of 999,22 HU. The Pawon-man’s mandible has more cortical bone thickness and density compared with those of Pawon-man’s maxilla with highest cortical bone thickness which was located in the posterior region and the cortical bone thickness of Pawon-man’s jaw was higher than modern human’s.

  15. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mory, Cyril, E-mail: cyril.mory@philips.com [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo [Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk [Philips Research, Röntgenstrasse 24–26, D-22335 Hamburg (Germany); Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado Denver, 12605 East 16th Avenue, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Rit, Simon [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Centre Léon Bérard, 28 rue Laënnec, F-69373 Lyon (France); Peyrin, Françoise [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); X-ray Imaging Group, European Synchrotron, Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, 28 Avenue du Doyen Jean Lépine, 69500 Bron (France)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  16. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mory, Cyril; Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo; Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk; Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D.; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise; Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection

  17. DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES OF 3D-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY WITH INTRALESIONAL APPLICATION OF CONTRAST MATERIAL IN A CASE OF VERY LARGE RADICULAR MAXILLARY CYST - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Gavazova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosis of odontogenic cysts despite their benign nature is a critical and challenging problem. Aim: The aim of this article is to demonstrate a different diagnostic approach in case of very large odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: This study was executed on one male patient aged of 38 using 3D computed tomography and contrast material inside the lesion. Differential diagnosis made by the residents was compared to the histopathological examination as the gold standard for identifying the nature of the cysts. Results: This diagnostic approach using 3D computed tomography combined with contrast material injected inside the lesion shows the real borders of the cyst of the maxilla and helps oral surgeon in planning the volume of the surgical intervention. Conclusion: Precise diagnose ensure the possibility of doing the optimal surgical intervention- a precondition for best wound healing.

  18. Thoracoscopic anatomical lung segmentectomy using 3D computed tomography simulation without tumour markings for non-palpable and non-visualized small lung nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirohisa; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Jun; Hamada, Akira; Watarai, Hikaru; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-09-01

    Although wedge resection can be curative for small lung tumours, tumour marking is sometimes required for resection of non-palpable or visually undetectable lung nodules as a method for identification of tumours. Tumour marking sometimes fails and occasionally causes serious complications. We have performed many thoracoscopic segmentectomies using 3D computed tomography simulation for undetectable small lung tumours without any tumour markings. The aim of this study was to investigate whether thoracoscopic segmentectomy planned with 3D computed tomography simulation could precisely remove non-palpable and visually undetectable tumours. Between January 2012 and March 2016, 58 patients underwent thoracoscopic segmentectomy using 3D computed tomography simulation for non-palpable, visually undetectable tumours. Surgical outcomes were evaluated. A total of 35, 14 and 9 patients underwent segmentectomy, subsegmentectomy and segmentectomy combined with adjacent subsegmentectomy, respectively. All tumours were correctly resected without tumour marking. The median tumour size and distance from the visceral pleura was 14 ± 5.2 mm (range 5-27 mm) and 11.6 mm (range 1-38.8 mm), respectively. Median values related to the procedures were operative time, 176 min (range 83-370 min); blood loss, 43 ml (range 0-419 ml); duration of chest tube placement, 1 day (range 1-8 days); and postoperative hospital stay, 5 days (range 3-12 days). Two cases were converted to open thoracotomy due to bleeding. Three cases required pleurodesis for pleural fistula. No recurrences occurred during the mean follow-up period of 44.4 months (range 5-53 months). Thoracoscopic segmentectomy using 3D computed tomography simulation was feasible and could be performed to resect undetectable tumours with no tumour markings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility of differential quantification of 3D temporomandibular kinematics during various oral activities using a cone-beam computed tomography-based 3D fluoroscopic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: A new CBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic method was proposed and shown to be capable of quantitatively differentiating TMJ movement patterns among complicated functional activities. It also enabled a complete description of the rigid-body mandibular motion and descriptions of as many reference points as needed for future clinical applications. It will be helpful for dental practice and for a better understanding of the functions of the TMJ.

  20. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xin; Lambrichts, Ivo; Sun Yi; Denis, Kathleen; Hassan, Bassam; Li Limin; Pauwels, Ruben; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  1. Experimental approach for the uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometry dimensional measurements using computed tomography at the mm and sub-mm scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Roberto; Torralba, Marta; Yagüe-Fabra, José A.

    2017-01-01

    The dimensional verification of miniaturized components with 3D complex geometries is particularly challenging. Computed Tomography (CT) can represent a suitable alternative solution to micro metrology tools based on optical and tactile techniques. However, the establishment of CT systems......’ traceability when measuring 3D complex geometries is still an open issue. In this work, an alternative method for the measurement uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometries by using CT is presented. The method is based on the micro-CT system Maximum Permissible Error (MPE) estimation, determined...... experimentally by using several calibrated reference artefacts. The main advantage of the presented method is that a previous calibration of the component by a more accurate Coordinate Measuring System (CMS) is not needed. In fact, such CMS would still hold all the typical limitations of optical and tactile...

  2. Frozen Gaussian approximation for 3D seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) wave-equation-based seismic tomography is computationally challenging in large scales and high-frequency regime. In this paper, we apply the frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) method to compute 3D sensitivity kernels and seismic tomography of high-frequency. Rather than standard ray theory used in seismic inversion (e.g. Kirchhoff migration and Gaussian beam migration), FGA is used to compute the 3D high-frequency sensitivity kernels for travel-time or full waveform inversions. Specifically, we reformulate the equations of the forward and adjoint wavefields for the purpose of convenience to apply FGA, and with this reformulation, one can efficiently compute the Green’s functions whose convolutions with source time function produce wavefields needed for the construction of 3D kernels. Moreover, a fast summation method is proposed based on local fast Fourier transform which greatly improves the speed of reconstruction as the last step of FGA algorithm. We apply FGA to both the travel-time adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion (FWI) on synthetic crosswell seismic data with dominant frequencies as high as those of real crosswell data, and confirm again that FWI requires a more sophisticated initial velocity model for the convergence than travel-time adjoint tomography. We also numerically test the accuracy of applying FGA to local earthquake tomography. This study paves the way to directly apply wave-equation-based seismic tomography methods into real data around their dominant frequencies.

  3. Coronary computed tomography angiography with 320-row detector and using the AIDR-3D: initial experience; Angiotomografia computadorizada de coronarias com tomografo com 320 fileiras de detectores e utilizando o AIDR-3D: experiencia inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasdelli Neto, Roberto; Nomura, Cesar Higa; Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Bianco, Danilo Perussi; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Szarf, Gilberto; Teles, Gustavo Borges da Silva; Shoji, Hamilton; Santana Netto, Pedro Vieira; Passos, Rodrigo Bastos Duarte; Chate, Rodrigo Caruso; Ishikawa, Walther Yoshiharu; Lima, Joao Paulo Bacellar Costa; Rocha, Marcelo Assis; Marcos, Vinicius Neves; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao, E-mail: roberto.neto@einstein.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Failla, Bruna Bonaventura [Universidade Metodista de Sao Paulo, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) is a powerful non-invasive imaging method to evaluate coronary artery disease. Nowadays, coronary CTA estimated effective radiation dose can be dramatically reduced using state-of-the-art scanners, such as 320-row detector CT (320-CT), without changing coronary CTA diagnostic accuracy. To optimize and further reduce the radiation dose, new iterative reconstruction algorithms were released recently by several CT manufacturers, and now they are used routinely in coronary CTA. This paper presents our first experience using coronary CTA with 320-CT and the Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR-3D). In addition, we describe the current indications for coronary CTA in our practice as well as the acquisition standard protocols and protocols related to CT application for radiation dose reduction. In conclusion, coronary CTA radiation dose can be dramatically reduced following the 'as low as reasonable achievable' principle by combination of exam indication and well-documented technics for radiation dose reduction, such as beta blockers, low-kV, and also the newest iterative dose reduction software as AIDR-3D. (author)

  4. 3D reconstruction of emergency cranial computed tomography scans as a tool in clinical forensic radiology after survived blunt head trauma--report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, M; Gehl, A; Püschel, K; Turk, E E

    2011-04-15

    When requested to evaluate surviving victims of blunt head trauma the forensic expert has to draw mainly on medical documentation from the time of hospital admission. In many cases these consist of written clinical records, radiographs and in some cases photographic documentation of the injuries. We report two cases of survived severe blunt head trauma where CT images, which had primarily been obtained for clinical diagnostic purposes, were used for forensic assessment. 3D reconstructions of the clinical CT-images yielded valuable information regarding the sequence, number and direction of the impacts to the head, their gross morphology and the inflicting weapon. We conclude that computed tomography and related imaging methods, along with their 3D reconstruction capabilities, provide a useful tool to approach questions in clinical forensic casework. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 3D fast reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, M.L.; Scheurer, A. Hermann; Joseph, C.; Morel, C.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of long reconstruction times in positron emission tomography (PET) has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstructions in a few minutes per frame : on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementation of computationally less intensive algorithms

  6. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  7. Virtual forensic entomology: improving estimates of minimum post-mortem interval with 3D micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Cameron S; Simonsen, Thomas J; Abel, Richard L; Hall, Martin J R; Schwyn, Daniel A; Wicklein, Martina

    2012-07-10

    We demonstrate how micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) can be a powerful tool for describing internal and external morphological changes in Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) during metamorphosis. Pupae were sampled during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th quarter of development after the onset of pupariation at 23 °C, and placed directly into 80% ethanol for preservation. In order to find the optimal contrast, four batches of pupae were treated differently: batch one was stained in 0.5M aqueous iodine for 1 day; two for 7 days; three was tagged with a radiopaque dye; four was left unstained (control). Pupae stained for 7d in iodine resulted in the best contrast micro-CT scans. The scans were of sufficiently high spatial resolution (17.2 μm) to visualise the internal morphology of developing pharate adults at all four ages. A combination of external and internal morphological characters was shown to have the potential to estimate the age of blowfly pupae with a higher degree of accuracy and precision than using external morphological characters alone. Age specific developmental characters are described. The technique could be used as a measure to estimate a minimum post-mortem interval in cases of suspicious death where pupae are the oldest stages of insect evidence collected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  9. Comparative evaluation of the accuracy of linear measurements between cone beam computed tomography and 3D microtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Mangione

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of artifacts on the accuracy of linear measurements estimated with a common cone beam computed tomography (CBCT system used in dental clinical practice, by comparing it with microCT system as standard reference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten bovine bone cylindrical samples containing one implant each, able to provide both points of reference and image quality degradation, have been scanned by CBCT and microCT systems. Thanks to the software of the two systems, for each cylindrical sample, two diameters taken at different levels, by using implants different points as references, have been measured. Results have been analyzed by ANOVA and a significant statistically difference has been found. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Due to the obtained results, in this work it is possible to say that the measurements made with the two different instruments are still not statistically comparable, although in some samples were obtained similar performances and therefore not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: With the improvement of the hardware and software of CBCT systems, in the near future the two instruments will be able to provide similar performances.

  10. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Utility of 3D Reconstruction of 2D Liver Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Images as a Surgical Planning Tool for Residents in Liver Resection Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Caitlin T; MacDonald, Andrew; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Jalink, Diederick; Zevin, Boris; Fichtinger, Gabor; Nanji, Sulaiman

    A fundamental aspect of surgical planning in liver resections is the identification of key vessel tributaries to preserve healthy liver tissue while fully resecting the tumor(s). Current surgical planning relies primarily on the surgeon's ability to mentally reconstruct 2D computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) images into 3D and plan resection margins. This creates significant cognitive load, especially for trainees, as it relies on image interpretation, anatomical and surgical knowledge, experience, and spatial sense. The purpose of this study is to determine if 3D reconstruction of preoperative CT/MR images will assist resident-level trainees in making appropriate operative plans for liver resection surgery. Ten preoperative patient CT/MR images were selected. Images were case-matched, 5 to 2D planning and 5 to 3D planning. Images from the 3D group were segmented to create interactive digital models that the resident can manipulate to view the tumor(s) in relation to landmark hepatic structures. Residents were asked to evaluate the images and devise a surgical resection plan for each image. The resident alternated between 2D and 3D planning, in a randomly generated order. The primary outcome was the accuracy of resident's plan compared to expert opinion. Time to devise each surgical plan was the secondary outcome. Residents completed a prestudy and poststudy questionnaire regarding their experience with liver surgery and the 3D planning software. Senior level surgical residents from the Queen's University General Surgery residency program were recruited to participate. A total of 14 residents participated in the study. The median correct response rate was 2 of 5 (40%; range: 0-4) for the 2D group, and 3 of 5 (60%; range: 1-5) for the 3D group (p surgery planning increases accuracy of resident surgical planning and decreases amount of time required. 3D reconstruction would be a useful model for improving trainee understanding of liver anatomy and surgical

  12. 2D-3D radiograph to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) registration for C-arm image-guided robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen Pei; Otake, Yoshito; Azizian, Mahdi; Wagner, Oliver J; Sorger, Jonathan M; Armand, Mehran; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-08-01

    C-arm radiographs are commonly used for intraoperative image guidance in surgical interventions. Fluoroscopy is a cost-effective real-time modality, although image quality can vary greatly depending on the target anatomy. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are sometimes available, so 2D-3D registration is needed for intra-procedural guidance. C-arm radiographs were registered to CBCT scans and used for 3D localization of peritumor fiducials during a minimally invasive thoracic intervention with a da Vinci Si robot. Intensity-based 2D-3D registration of intraoperative radiographs to CBCT was performed. The feasible range of X-ray projections achievable by a C-arm positioned around a da Vinci Si surgical robot, configured for robotic wedge resection, was determined using phantom models. Experiments were conducted on synthetic phantoms and animals imaged with an OEC 9600 and a Siemens Artis zeego, representing the spectrum of different C-arm systems currently available for clinical use. The image guidance workflow was feasible using either an optically tracked OEC 9600 or a Siemens Artis zeego C-arm, resulting in an angular difference of Δθ:∼ 30°. The two C-arm systems provided TRE mean ≤ 2.5 mm and TRE mean ≤ 2.0 mm, respectively (i.e., comparable to standard clinical intraoperative navigation systems). C-arm 3D localization from dual 2D-3D registered radiographs was feasible and applicable for intraoperative image guidance during da Vinci robotic thoracic interventions using the proposed workflow. Tissue deformation and in vivo experiments are required before clinical evaluation of this system.

  13. Development of an organ-specific insert phantom generated using a 3D printer for investigations of cardiac computed tomography protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kamarul A; McEntee, Mark F; Reed, Warren; Kench, Peter L

    2018-04-30

    An ideal organ-specific insert phantom should be able to simulate the anatomical features with appropriate appearances in the resultant computed tomography (CT) images. This study investigated a 3D printing technology to develop a novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom derived from volumetric CT image datasets of anthropomorphic chest phantom. Cardiac insert volumes were segmented from CT image datasets, derived from an anthropomorphic chest phantom of Lungman N-01 (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan). These segmented datasets were converted to a virtual 3D-isosurface of heart-shaped shell, while two other removable inserts were included using computer-aided design (CAD) software program. This newly designed cardiac insert phantom was later printed by using a fused deposition modelling (FDM) process via a Creatbot DM Plus 3D printer. Then, several selected filling materials, such as contrast media, oil, water and jelly, were loaded into designated spaces in the 3D-printed phantom. The 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was positioned within the anthropomorphic chest phantom and 30 repeated CT acquisitions performed using a multi-detector scanner at 120-kVp tube potential. Attenuation (Hounsfield Unit, HU) values were measured and compared to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. The output of the 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was a solid acrylic plastic material, which was strong, light in weight and cost-effective. HU values of the filling materials were comparable to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. A novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom for anthropomorphic chest phantom was developed using volumetric CT image datasets with a 3D printer. Hence, this suggested the printing methodology could be applied to generate other phantoms for CT imaging studies. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical

  14. Coupled X-ray computed tomography and grey level co-occurrence matrices as a method for quantification of mineralogy and texture in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, M. A.; Miller, J. A.; Becker, M.

    2018-02-01

    Texture is one of the most basic descriptors used in the geological sciences. The value derived from textural characterisation extends into engineering applications associated with mining, mineral processing and metal extraction where quantitative textural information is required for models predicting the response of the ore through a particular process. This study extends the well-known 2D grey level co-occurrence matrices methodology into 3D as a method for image analysis of 3D x-ray computed tomography grey scale volumes of drill core. Subsequent interrogation of the information embedded within the grey level occurrence matrices (GLCM) indicates they are sensitive to changes in mineralogy and texture of samples derived from a magmatic nickel sulfide ore. The position of the peaks in the GLCM is an indication of the relative density (specific gravity, SG) of the minerals and when interpreted using a working knowledge of the mineralogy of the ore presented a means to determine the relative abundance of the sulfide minerals (SG > 4), dense silicate minerals (SG > 3), and lighter silicate minerals (SG < 3). The spread of the peaks in the GLCM away from the diagonal is an indication of the degree of grain boundary interaction with wide peaks representing fine grain sizes and narrow peaks representing coarse grain sizes. The method lends itself to application as part of a generic methodology for routine use on large XCT volumes providing quantitative, timely, meaningful and automated information on mineralogy and texture in 3D.

  15. 3D non-destructive fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) with a CdTe array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Yeon; Lee, Won Ho; Kim, Young Hak [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In our research, the material was exposed to an X-ray and not only the conventional transmission image but also 3D images based on the information of characteristic X-ray detected by a 2D CdTe planar detector array were reconstructed. Since atoms have their own characteristic X-ray energy, our system was able to discriminate materials of even a same density if the materials were composed of different atomic numbers. We applied FXCT to distinguish various unknown materials with similar densities. The materials with similar densities were clearly distinguished in the 3D reconstructed images based on the information of the detected characteristic X-ray, while they were not discriminated from each other in the images based on the information of the detected transmission X-ray. In the fused images consisting of 3D transmitted and characteristic X-ray images, all of the positions, densities and atomic numbers of materials enclosed in plastic phantom or pipe were clearly identified by analyzing energy, position and amount of detected radiation.

  16. Adaptive regridding in 3D reflection tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vesnaver

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D reflection tomography allows the macro-model of complex geological structures to be reconstructed. In the usual approach, the spatial distribution of the velocity field is discretized by regular grids. This choice simplifies the development of the related software, but introduces two serious drawbacks: various domains of the model may be poorly covered, and a relevant mismatch between the grid and a complex velocity field may occur. So the tomographic inversion becomes unstable, unreliable and necessarily blurred. In this paper we introduce an algorithm to adapt the grid to the available ray paths and to the velocity field in sequence: so we get irregular grids with a locally variable resolution. We can guide the grid fitting procedure interactively, if we are going to introduce some geological a priori information; otherwise, we define a fully automatic approach, which exploits the Delauny triangles and Voronoi polygons.

  17. Evaluation of right ventricular function by coronary computed tomography angiography using a novel automated 3D right ventricle volume segmentation approach: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghard, Philipp; Plank, Fabian; Beyer, Christoph; Müller, Silvana; Dörler, Jakob; Zaruba, Marc-Michael; Pölzl, Leo; Pölzl, Gerhard; Klauser, Andrea; Rauch, Stefan; Barbieri, Fabian; Langer, Christian-Ekkehardt; Schgoer, Wilfried; Williamson, Eric E; Feuchtner, Gudrun

    2018-06-04

    To evaluate right ventricle (RV) function by coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) using a novel automated three-dimensional (3D) RV volume segmentation tool in comparison with clinical reference modalities. Twenty-six patients with severe end-stage heart failure [left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF) right heart invasive catheterisation (IC). Automated 3D RV volume segmentation was successful in 26 (100%) patients. Read-out time was 3 min 33 s (range, 1 min 50s-4 min 33s). RV EF by CTA was stronger correlated with right atrial pressure (RAP) by IC (r = -0.595; p = 0.006) but weaker with TAPSE (r = 0.366, p = 0.94). When comparing TAPSE with RAP by IC (r = -0.317, p = 0.231), a weak-to-moderate non-significant inverse correlation was found. Interobserver correlation was high with r = 0.96 (p right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) was 196.9 ± 75.3 and 217.5 ± 76.1 HU, respectively. Measurement of RV function by CTA using a novel 3D volumetric segmentation tool is fast and reliable by applying a dedicated biphasic injection protocol. The RV EF from CTA is a closer surrogate of RAP than TAPSE by TTE. • Evaluation of RV function by cardiac CTA by using a novel 3D volume segmentation tool is fast and reliable. • A biphasic contrast agent injection protocol ensures homogenous RV contrast attenuation. • Cardiac CT is a valuable alternative modality to CMR for the evaluation of RV function.

  18. Computation of a voxelized anthropomorphic phantom from Computer Tomography slices and 3D dose distribution calculation utilizing the MCNP5 Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this work is to obtain the voxelization of a series of tomography slices in order to provide a voxelized human phantom throughout a MatLab algorithm, and the consequent simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project provides as results dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized anthropomorphic phantom. Prior works have validated the cobalt therapy model utilizing a simple heterogeneous water cube-shaped phantom. The reference phantom model utilized in this work is the Zubal phantom, which consists of a group of pre-segmented CT slices of a human body. The CT slices are to be input into the Matlab program which computes the voxelization by means of two-dimensional pixel and material identification on each slice, and three-dimensional interpolation, in order to depict the phantom geometry via small cubic cells. Each slice is divided in squares with the size of the desired voxelization, and then the program searches for the pixel intensity with a predefined material at each square, making a subsequent three-dimensional interpolation. At the end of this process, the program produces a voxelized phantom in which each voxel defines the mixture of the different materials that compose it. In the case of the Zubal phantom, the voxels result in pure organ materials due to the fact that the phantom is presegmented. The output of this code follows the MCNP input deck format and is integrated in a full input model including the 60 Co radiotherapy unit. Dose rates are calculated using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally. This feature allows to tally particles on an independent mesh over the problem geometry, and to obtain the length estimation of the particle flux, in units of particles/cm 2 (tally F4). Furthermore, the particle flux is transformed into dose by

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O' Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H. [Victoria House Medical Imaging, Prahran, Victoria (Australia); Schneider, M.E. [Monash University, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O'Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H.; Schneider, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  1. Adult Sex Identification Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D-CT of the Pelvis: A Study Among a Sample of the Egyptian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas M. A. Mostafa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sex identification of unknown human skeletal remains is of great importance in establishing identity and individuality. In adults, the hip bone is the most reliable sex indicator because of its sexual dimorphism. Each population should have its own specific standards of identification. The objective of this study is to develop a logistic regression formula for adult sex identification using threedimensional computed tomography (3D-CT of the pelvis and to perform an assessment of its validity in sex determination among a sample of the Egyptian population in the Suez Canal region. 141 pelvic-abdominal CT images (free of any pelvic orthopaedic disorder were included; they were reconstructed to produce 3D-CT pelvic images which were divided into a calibration group (47 male and 47 female and a test group (47 CT images the sex of which was unknown to the observers. Twenty radiometric variables were measured for the calibration group. A logit response formula for sex prediction was developed and applied on the test group for sex prediction. The logit response formula for the test sample showed sensitivity, specificity, and an overall accuracy of 100%. The proposed method represents a quick and reliable metric method in establishing sex from a CT image of the pelvis bone.

  2. A comparison of 3-D computed tomography versus 2-D radiography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Y; Moritomo, H; Omori, S; Kataoka, T; Murase, T; Sugamoto, K

    2014-06-01

    Positive ulnar variance is associated with ulnar impaction syndrome and ulnar variance is reported to increase with pronation. However, radiographic measurement can be affected markedly by the incident angle of the X-ray beam. We performed three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation and compared these with plain radiographic measurements in 15 healthy wrists. From supination to pronation, ulnar variance increased in all cases on the radiographs; mean ulnar variance increased significantly and mean ulnolunate distance decreased significantly. However on 3-D imaging, ulna variance decreased in 12 cases on moving into pronation and increased in three cases; neither the mean ulnar variance nor mean ulnolunate distance changed significantly. Our results suggest that the forearm position in which ulnar variance increased varies among individuals. This may explain why some patients with ulnar impaction syndrome complain of wrist pain exacerbated by forearm supination. It also suggests that standard radiographic assessments of ulnar variance are unreliable. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. 3D computed tomography using a microfocus X-ray source: Analysis of artifact formation in the reconstructed images using simulated as well as experimental projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmel, S.; Stephan, J.; Baumann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this contribution is to identify and to quantify the influence of different parameters on the formation of image artifacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT) resulting for example, from beam hardening or from partial lack of information using 3D cone beam CT. In general, the reconstructed image quality depends on a number of acquisition parameters concerning the X-ray source (e.g. X-ray spectrum), the geometrical setup (e.g. cone beam angle), the sample properties (e.g. absorption characteristics) and the detector properties. While it is difficult to distinguish the influence of different effects clearly in experimental projection data, they can be selected individually with the help of simulated projection data by varying the parameter set. The reconstruction of the 3D data set is performed with the filtered back projection algorithm according to Feldkamp, Davis and Kress for experimental as well as for simulated projection data. The experimental data are recorded with an industrial microfocus CT system which features a focal spot size of a few micrometers and uses a digital flat panel detector for data acquisition

  4. Translation of First North American 50 and 70 cc Total Artificial Heart Virtual and Clinical Implantations: Utility of 3D Computed Tomography to Test Fit Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferng, Alice S; Oliva, Isabel; Jokerst, Clinton; Avery, Ryan; Connell, Alana M; Tran, Phat L; Smith, Richard G; Khalpey, Zain

    2017-08-01

    Since the creation of SynCardia's 50 cc Total Artificial Hearts (TAHs), patients with irreversible biventricular failure now have two sizing options. Herein, a case series of three patients who have undergone successful 50 and 70 cc TAH implantation with complete closure of the chest cavity utilizing preoperative "virtual implantation" of different sized devices for surgical planning are presented. Computed tomography (CT) images were used for preoperative planning prior to TAH implantation. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of preoperative chest CT images were generated and both 50 and 70 cc TAHs were virtually implanted into patients' thoracic cavities. During the simulation, the TAHs were projected over the native hearts in a similar position to the actual implantation, and the relationship between the devices and the atria, ventricles, chest wall, and diaphragm were assessed. The 3D reconstructed images and virtual modeling were used to simulate and determine for each patient if the 50 or 70 cc TAH would have a higher likelihood of successful implantation without complications. Subsequently, all three patients received clinical implants of the properly sized TAH based on virtual modeling, and their chest cavities were fully closed. This virtual implantation increases our confidence that the selected TAH will better fit within the thoracic cavity allowing for improved surgical outcome. Clinical implantation of the TAHs showed that our virtual modeling was an effective method for determining the correct fit and sizing of 50 and 70 cc TAHs. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Experimental Investigation of 2D thermal signature and 3D X-Ray Computed Tomography in contrasting Wettable and Water-Repellent Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsih, Abdulkareem; Flavel, Richard; McGrath, Gavan

    2017-04-01

    This study presents experimental results investigating spatial patterns of infiltration and evaporation in heterogeneous water repellent media. Infrared camera measurements and 3D X-ray computed tomography imaging was performed across wet-dry cycles on glass beads with engineered patches of water repellence. The imaging revealed spatial variability in infiltration and the redistribution of water in the media resulting in differences in relative evaporation rates during drying. It appears that the spatial organization of the heterogeneity play a role in the breakdown of water repellence at the interface of the two media. This suggests a potential mechanism for self-organization of repellency spatial patterns in field soils. At the interface between wettable and water repellent beads a lateral drying front propagates towards the wettable beads from the repellent beads. During this drying the relative surface temperatures change from a relatively cooler repellent media surface to a relatively cooler wettable media surface indicating the changes in evaporative water loss between the beads of varying water repellence. The lateral drying front was confirmed using thermography in a small-scale model of glass beads with chemically induced repellence and then subjected to 3D X-ray imaging. Pore-scale imaging identified the hydrology at the interface of the two media and at the drying front giving insights into the physics of water flow in water repellent soil.

  6. The diagnosis and conservative treatment of a complex type 3 dens invaginatus using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D plastic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfir, A; Telishevsky-Strauss, Y; Leitner, A; Metzger, Z

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the use of 3D plastic models, printed from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data, for accurate diagnosis and conservative treatment of a complex case of dens invaginatus. A chronic apical abscess with a draining sinus tract was diagnosed during the treatment planning stage of orthodontic therapy. Radiographic examination revealed a large radiolucent area associated with an invaginated right maxillary central incisor, which was found to contain a vital pulp. The affected tooth was strategic in the dental arch. Conventional periapical radiographs provided only partial information about the invagination and its relationship with the main root canal and with the periapical tissues. A limited-volume CBCT scan of the maxilla did not show evidence of communication between the infected invagination and the pulp in the main root canal, which could explain the pulp vitality. A novel method was adopted to allow for instrumentation, disinfection and filling of the invagination, without compromising the vitality of the pulp in the complex root canal system. The CBCT data were used to produce precise 3D plastic models of the tooth. These models facilitated the treatment planning process and the trial of treatment approaches. This approach allowed the vitality of the pulp to be maintained in the complex root canal space of the main root canal whilst enabling the healing of the periapical tissues. Even when extensive periapical pathosis is associated with a tooth with type III dens invaginatus, pulp sensibility tests should be performed. CBCT is a diagnostic tool that may allow for the management of such teeth with complex anatomy. 3D printed plastic models may be a valuable aid in the process of assessing and planning effective treatment modalities and practicing them ex vivo before actually performing the clinical procedure. Unconventional technological approaches may be required for detailed treatment planning of complex cases of dens invaginatus. © 2012

  7. Characterization of macropore structure of Malan loess in NW China based on 3D pipe models constructed by using computed tomography technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanrong; He, Shengdi; Deng, Xiaohong; Xu, Yongxin

    2018-04-01

    Malan loess is a grayish yellow or brownish yellow, clastic, highly porous and brittle late Quaternary sediment formed by the accumulation of windblown dust. The present-day pore structure of Malan loess is crucial for understanding the loessification process in history, loess strengths and mechanical behavior. This study employed a modern computed tomography (CT) device to scan Malan loess samples, which were obtained from the east part of the Loess Plateau of China. A sophisticated and efficient workflow for processing the CT images and constructing 3D pore models was established by selecting and programming relevant mathematical algorithms in MATLAB, such as the maximum entropy method, medial axis method, and node recognition algorithm. Individual pipes within the Malan loess were identified and constructed by partitioning and recombining links in the 3D pore model. The macropore structure of Malan loess was then depicted using quantitative parameters. The parameters derived from 2D images of CT scanning included equivalent radius, length and aspect ratio of pores, porosity, and pore distribution entropy, whereas those derived from the constructed 3D structure models included porosity, coordination number, node density, pipe radius, length, length density, dip angle, and dip direction. The analysis of these parameters revealed that Malan loess is a strongly anisotropic geomaterial with a dense and complex network of pores and pipes. The pores discovered on horizontal images, perpendicular to the vertical direction, were round and relatively uniform in shape and size and evenly distributed, whereas the pores discovered on vertical images varied in shape and size and were distributed in clusters. The pores showed good connectivity in vertical direction and formed vertically aligned pipes but displayed weak connectivity in horizontal directions. The pipes in vertical direction were thick, long, and straight compared with those in horizontal directions. These

  8. Experimental Approach for the Uncertainty Assessment of 3D Complex Geometry Dimensional Measurements Using Computed Tomography at the mm and Sub-mm Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Roberto; Torralba, Marta; Yagüe-Fabra, José A; Ontiveros, Sinué; Tosello, Guido

    2017-05-16

    The dimensional verification of miniaturized components with 3D complex geometries is particularly challenging. Computed Tomography (CT) can represent a suitable alternative solution to micro metrology tools based on optical and tactile techniques. However, the establishment of CT systems' traceability when measuring 3D complex geometries is still an open issue. In this work, an alternative method for the measurement uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometries by using CT is presented. The method is based on the micro-CT system Maximum Permissible Error (MPE) estimation, determined experimentally by using several calibrated reference artefacts. The main advantage of the presented method is that a previous calibration of the component by a more accurate Coordinate Measuring System (CMS) is not needed. In fact, such CMS would still hold all the typical limitations of optical and tactile techniques, particularly when measuring miniaturized components with complex 3D geometries and their inability to measure inner parts. To validate the presented method, the most accepted standard currently available for CT sensors, the Verein Deutscher Ingenieure/Verband Deutscher Elektrotechniker (VDI/VDE) guideline 2630-2.1 is applied. Considering the high number of influence factors in CT and their impact on the measuring result, two different techniques for surface extraction are also considered to obtain a realistic determination of the influence of data processing on uncertainty. The uncertainty assessment of a workpiece used for micro mechanical material testing is firstly used to confirm the method, due to its feasible calibration by an optical CMS. Secondly, the measurement of a miniaturized dental file with 3D complex geometry is carried out. The estimated uncertainties are eventually compared with the component's calibration and the micro manufacturing tolerances to demonstrate the suitability of the presented CT calibration procedure. The 2U/T ratios resulting from the

  9. Role of volume rendered 3-D computed tomography in conservative management of trauma-related thoracic injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OʼLeary, Donal Peter

    2012-09-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are a tool used commonly in the construction industry and are widely available. Accidental injuries from nail guns are common, and several cases of suicide using a nail gun have been reported. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging, together with echocardiography, has been shown to be the gold standard for investigation of these cases. We present a case of a 55-year-old man who presented to the accident and emergency unit of a community hospital following an accidental pneumatic nail gun injury to his thorax. Volume-rendered CT of the thorax allowed an accurate assessment of the thoracic injuries sustained by this patient. As there was no evidence of any acute life-threatening injury, a sternotomy was avoided and the patient was observed closely until discharge. In conclusion, volume-rendered 3-dimensional CT can greatly help in the decision to avoid an unnecessary sternotomy in patients with a thoracic nail gun injury.

  10. Comparative analysis of the results of surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with the use of 3D reconstructions of computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Grachev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: The relapse rates after surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal and/or skull base angiofibroma is in the range of 23 to 27.5%, which is mostly related to diagnostic issues. Aim: To perform a comparative analysis of the results of surgical treatment for juvenile nasopharyngeal and skull base angiofibroma based on our technique of 3D reconstructions of computed tomography angiograms in patients with primary tumors and with relapses. Materials and methods: We analyzed retrospectively the data from 32 patients with juvenile nasopharyngeal and skull base angiofibroma who had been diagnosed and treated from 2013 to 2017 (42 surgeries. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT angiography with 3D reconstruction was used for the planning of surgical approaches. At days 3 to 7 after the surgery, in 31 patients with stages II, IIIa and IIIb (according to U. Fisch classification modified by R. Andrews, 1989, we looked for residual tumor tissues by MSCT with standard analysis and with 3D MSCT angiography reconstructions, comparing them with their corresponding baseline images. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, 17 patients with primary tumors (median age 13.5 years, group 2, 14 patients who had been previously operated (median age 14 years. Both groups were comparable in their clinical and demographic characteristics, as well as in the tumor staging (p > 0.05. Results: The relapse rates were 22.58% (7 / 31 patients, being 11.76% (2 / 17 in the group 1 and 35.71% (5 / 14 in the group 2 (p > 0.05. In each group, the maximal difference in the resected tumor volume was found in stage II patients, with more radical resection in the patients with primary tumors (p < 0.05. Contrast-enhanced MSCT showed residual tumor masses in 19 patients (8, with primary tumors and 11, with relapses. From those, 10 patients (3 with primary tumors and 7 who had underwent surgery earlier required second surgeries (4 patients were curatively operated, and 2

  11. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, J.C.E.; Williams, J.J.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-01-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution

  12. Diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT): an emerging tool for rapid, high-resolution, 3-D imaging of metazoan soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J; Clarke, Julia A; Colbert, Matthew W; Morhardt, Ashley C; Cerio, Donald; Cost, Ian N; Cox, Philip G; Daza, Juan D; Early, Catherine M; Echols, M Scott; Henkelman, R Mark; Herdina, A Nele; Holliday, Casey M; Li, Zhiheng; Mahlow, Kristin; Merchant, Samer; Müller, Johannes; Orsbon, Courtney P; Paluh, Daniel J; Thies, Monte L; Tsai, Henry P; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-06-01

    Morphologists have historically had to rely on destructive procedures to visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) anatomy of animals. More recently, however, non-destructive techniques have come to the forefront. These include X-ray computed tomography (CT), which has been used most commonly to examine the mineralized, hard-tissue anatomy of living and fossil metazoans. One relatively new and potentially transformative aspect of current CT-based research is the use of chemical agents to render visible, and differentiate between, soft-tissue structures in X-ray images. Specifically, iodine has emerged as one of the most widely used of these contrast agents among animal morphologists due to its ease of handling, cost effectiveness, and differential affinities for major types of soft tissues. The rapid adoption of iodine-based contrast agents has resulted in a proliferation of distinct specimen preparations and scanning parameter choices, as well as an increasing variety of imaging hardware and software preferences. Here we provide a critical review of the recent contributions to iodine-based, contrast-enhanced CT research to enable researchers just beginning to employ contrast enhancement to make sense of this complex new landscape of methodologies. We provide a detailed summary of recent case studies, assess factors that govern success at each step of the specimen storage, preparation, and imaging processes, and make recommendations for standardizing both techniques and reporting practices. Finally, we discuss potential cutting-edge applications of diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT) and the issues that must still be overcome to facilitate the broader adoption of diceCT going forward. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Anatomical Society.

  13. Imaging the Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathway in Human Eyes by Three-dimensional Micro-computed Tomography (3D micro-CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Hann; M Bentley; A Vercnocke; E Ritman; M Fautsch

    2011-12-31

    The site of outflow resistance leading to elevated intraocular pressure in primary open-angle glaucoma is believed to be located in the region of Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelium, its basement membrane and the adjacent juxtacanalicular tissue. Evidence also suggests collector channels and intrascleral vessels may have a role in intraocular pressure in both normal and glaucoma eyes. Traditional imaging modalities limit the ability to view both proximal and distal portions of the trabecular outflow pathway as a single unit. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (3D micro-CT) as a potential method to view the trabecular outflow pathway. Two normal human eyes were used: one immersion fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and one with anterior chamber perfusion at 10 mmHg followed by perfusion fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde/2% glutaraldehyde. Both eyes were postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and scanned with 3D micro-CT at 2 {mu}m or 5 {mu}m voxel resolution. In the immersion fixed eye, 24 collector channels were identified with an average orifice size of 27.5 {+-} 5 {mu}m. In comparison, the perfusion fixed eye had 29 collector channels with a mean orifice size of 40.5 {+-} 13 {mu}m. Collector channels were not evenly dispersed around the circumference of the eye. There was no significant difference in the length of Schlemm's canal in the immersed versus the perfused eye (33.2 versus 35.1 mm). Structures, locations and size measurements identified by 3D micro-CT were confirmed by correlative light microscopy. These findings confirm 3D micro-CT can be used effectively for the non-invasive examination of the trabecular meshwork, Schlemm's canal, collector channels and intrascleral vasculature that comprise the distal outflow pathway. This imaging modality will be useful for non-invasive study of the role of the trabecular outflow pathway as a whole unit.

  14. 3D false color computed tomography for diagnosis and follow-up of permanent denervated human muscles submitted to home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Carraro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This report outlines the use of a customized false-color 3D computed tomography (CT protocol for the imaging of the rectus femoris of spinal cord injury (SCI patients suffering from complete and permanent denervation, as characterized by complete Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome. This muscle imaging method elicits the progression of the syndrome from initial atrophy to eventual degeneration, as well as the extent to which patients' quadriceps could be recovered during four years of home-based functional electrical stimulation (h-b FES. Patients were pre-selected from several European hospitals and functionally tested by, and enrolled in the EU Commission Shared Cost Project RISE (Contract n. QLG5-CT-2001-02191 at the Department of Physical Medicine, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Denervated muscles were electrically stimulated using a custom-designed stimulator, large surface electrodes, and customized progressive stimulation settings. Spiral CT images and specialized computational tools were used to isolate the rectus femoris muscle and produce 3D and 2D reconstructions of the denervated muscles. The cross sections of the muscles were determined by 2D Color CT, while muscle volumes were reconstructed by 3D Color CT. Shape, volume, and density changes were measured over the entirety of each rectus femoris muscle. Changes in tissue composition within the muscle were visualized by associating different colors to specified Hounsfield unit (HU values for fat, (yellow: [-200; -10], loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, (cyan: [-9; 40], and normal muscle, fascia and tendons included, (red: [41; 200]. The results from this analysis are presented as the average HU values within the rectus femoris muscle reconstruction, as well as the percentage of these tissues with respect to the total muscle volume. Results from this study demonstrate that h-b FES induces a compliance-dependent recovery of muscle volume and size of muscle fibers, as

  15. 3D False Color Computed Tomography for Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Permanent Denervated Human Muscles Submitted to Home-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Ugo; Edmunds, Kyle J; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    This report outlines the use of a customized false-color 3D computed tomography (CT) protocol for the imaging of the rectus femoris of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients suffering from complete and permanent denervation, as characterized by complete Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome. This muscle imaging method elicits the progression of the syndrome from initial atrophy to eventual degeneration, as well as the extent to which patients' quadriceps could be recovered during four years of home-based functional electrical stimulation (h-b FES). Patients were pre-selected from several European hospitals and functionally tested by, and enrolled in the EU Commission Shared Cost Project RISE (Contract n. QLG5-CT-2001-02191) at the Department of Physical Medicine, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Denervated muscles were electrically stimulated using a custom-designed stimulator, large surface electrodes, and customized progressive stimulation settings. Spiral CT images and specialized computational tools were used to isolate the rectus femoris muscle and produce 3D and 2D reconstructions of the denervated muscles. The cross sections of the muscles were determined by 2D Color CT, while muscle volumes were reconstructed by 3D Color CT. Shape, volume, and density changes were measured over the entirety of each rectus femoris muscle. Changes in tissue composition within the muscle were visualized by associating different colors to specified Hounsfield unit (HU) values for fat, (yellow: [-200; -10]), loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, (cyan: [-9; 40]), and normal muscle, fascia and tendons included, (red: [41; 200]). The results from this analysis are presented as the average HU values within the rectus femoris muscle reconstruction, as well as the percentage of these tissues with respect to the total muscle volume. Results from this study demonstrate that h-b FES induces a compliance-dependent recovery of muscle volume and size of muscle fibers, as evidenced by the

  16. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens

  17. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  18. Simultaneous reconstruction of 3D refractive index, temperature, and intensity distribution of combustion flame by double computed tomography technologies based on spatial phase-shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenyan; Song, Yang; Yuan, Qun; Wulan, Tuya; Chen, Lei

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a transient multi-parameter three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction method is proposed to diagnose and visualize a combustion flow field. Emission and transmission tomography based on spatial phase-shifted technology are combined to reconstruct, simultaneously, the various physical parameter distributions of a propane flame. Two cameras triggered by the internal trigger mode capture the projection information of the emission and moiré tomography, respectively. A two-step spatial phase-shifting method is applied to extract the phase distribution in the moiré fringes. By using the filtered back-projection algorithm, we reconstruct the 3D refractive-index distribution of the combustion flow field. Finally, the 3D temperature distribution of the flame is obtained from the refractive index distribution using the Gladstone-Dale equation. Meanwhile, the 3D intensity distribution is reconstructed based on the radiation projections from the emission tomography. Therefore, the structure and edge information of the propane flame are well visualized.

  19. The posterior communicating artery: morphometric study in 3D angio-computed tomography reconstruction. The proof of the mathematical definition of the hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierżanowski, J; Szarmach, A; Słoniewski, P; Czapiewski, P; Piskunowicz, M; Bandurski, T; Szmuda, T

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphometry of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA), on the basis of angio-computed tomography (CT), and to give proof of the mathematical definition of the term "hypopal sia of the PCoA". One hundred 3-dimensional (3D) angio-CT images, performed in adult patients with bilateral reconstruction of the PCoA (200 results) were used tocalculate the morphometry of the vessel. The average length of the vessel on the right side was 14.48 ± 3.47 mm, andon the left side 14.98 ± 4.77 mm (in women 14.75 mm, in men 14.70 mm). The mean of the diameter at the "proximal" point (the junction with P1) on the right side was 1.49 ± 0.51 mm, and on the left 1.46 ± 0.47 mm (in women 1.44 mm and in men 1.51 mm). The mean of the diameter in the "distal" part (the connection with ICA) on the right side was 1.4 ± 0.49 mm, and on the left 1.37 ± 0.41 mm (in women 1.38 mm, and in men 1.39 mm). No statistical correlation between the length and the diameter of the PCoA in relation to the sex and side was shown. On the basis of our measurements, we defined the hypoplasia of the artery as the estimated value less than the average diameter minus the standard deviation. The percentage distribution was as follows: the left artery 15.5%, the right artery 24%, women 11.5%, and the men 9%. Similarly to the above parameters, we have not found any statistical differences. The presence of the foetal origin was noted in 25% of the radiological examinations. The infundibular widening was visualised in 11.5% of cases of 3D reconstructions. The agenesis of PCoA was found in 9% (never bilaterally), and in 1 case the unilateral duplication of the artery was observed. No statistical differences between those parameters in relation to sex and the examined side were revealed. Morphological calculation of the PCoA on the basis of angio-CT from adult patients did not show any statistical differences depending on sex or the investigated side. The presented

  20. 3-D waveform tomography sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2014-01-01

    The complications in anisotropic multi-parameter inversion lie in the trade-off between the different anisotropy parameters. We compute the tomographic waveform sensitivity kernels for a VTI acoustic medium perturbation as a tool to investigate this ambiguity between the different parameters. We use dynamic ray tracing to efficiently handle the expensive computational cost for 3-D anisotropic models. Ray tracing provides also the ray direction information necessary for conditioning the sensitivity kernels to handle anisotropy. The NMO velocity and η parameter kernels showed a maximum sensitivity for diving waves which results in a relevant choice of those parameters in wave equation tomography. The δ parameter kernel showed zero sensitivity; therefore it can serve as a secondary parameter to fit the amplitude in the acoustic anisotropic inversion. Considering the limited penetration depth of diving waves, migration velocity analysis based kernels are introduced to fix the depth ambiguity with reflections and compute sensitivity maps in the deeper parts of the model.

  1. Evaluation of the 3D spatial distribution of the Calcium/Phosphorus ratio in bone using computed-tomography dual-energy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipanteli, A; Kourkoumelis, N; Fromme, P; Huang, J; Speller, R D

    2016-01-01

    The Calcium/Phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio was shown to vary between healthy bones and bones with osteoporotic symptoms. The relation of the Ca/P ratio to bone quality remains under investigation. To study this relation and determine if the ratio can be used to predict bone fractures, a non-invasive 3D imaging technique is required. The first aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a computed-tomography dual-energy analysis (CT-DEA) technique developed to assess the Ca/P ratio in bone apatite (collagen-free bone) in identifying differences between healthy and inflammation-mediated osteoporotic (IMO) bones. The second aim was to extend the above technique for its application to a more complex structure, intact bone, that could potentially lead to clinical use. For the first aim, healthy and IMO rabbit cortical bone apatite samples were assessed. For the second aim, some changes were made to the technique, which was applied to healthy and IMO intact bone samples. Statistically significant differences between healthy and IMO bone apatite were found for the bulk Ca/P ratio, low Ca/P ratio proportion and interconnected low Ca/P ratio proportion. For the intact bone samples, the bulk Ca/P ratio was found to be significantly different between healthy and IMO. Results show that the CT-DEA technique can be used to identify differences in the Ca/P ratio between healthy and osteoporotic, in both bone apatite and intact bone. With quantitative imaging becoming an increasingly important advancement in medical imaging, CT-DEA for bone decomposition could potentially have several applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Use of the stereoscopic virtual reality display system for the detection and characterization of intracranial aneurysms: A Icomparison with conventional computed tomography workstation and 3D rotational angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiujuan; Tao, Haiquan; Xiao, Xigang; Guo, Binbin; Xu, Shangcai; Sun, Na; Li, Maotong; Xie, Li; Wu, Changjun

    2018-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of the stereoscopic virtual reality display system with the conventional computed tomography (CT) workstation and three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA) for intracranial aneurysm detection and characterization, with a focus on small aneurysms and those near the bone. First, 42 patients with suspected intracranial aneurysms underwent both 256-row CT angiography (CTA) and 3DRA. Volume rendering (VR) images were captured using the conventional CT workstation. Next, VR images were transferred to the stereoscopic virtual reality display system. Two radiologists independently assessed the results that were obtained using the conventional CT workstation and stereoscopic virtual reality display system. The 3DRA results were considered as the ultimate reference standard. Based on 3DRA images, 38 aneurysms were confirmed in 42 patients. Two cases were misdiagnosed and 1 was missed when the traditional CT workstation was used. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of the conventional CT workstation were 94.7%, 85.7%, 97.3%, 75%, and99.3%, respectively, on a per-aneurysm basis. The stereoscopic virtual reality display system missed a case. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of the stereoscopic virtual reality display system were 100%, 85.7%, 97.4%, 100%, and 97.8%, respectively. No difference was observed in the accuracy of the traditional CT workstation, stereoscopic virtual reality display system, and 3DRA in detecting aneurysms. The stereoscopic virtual reality display system has some advantages in detecting small aneurysms and those near the bone. The virtual reality stereoscopic vision obtained through the system was found as a useful tool in intracranial aneurysm diagnosis and pre-operative 3D imaging. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Refining experimental dental implant testing in the Göttingen Minipig using 3D computed tomography-A morphometric study of the mandibular canal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano M Corte

    Full Text Available This study reports morphometric and age-related data of the mandibular canal and the alveolar ridge of the Göttingen Minipig to avoid complications during in vivo testing of endosseus dental implants and to compare these data with the human anatomy. Using 3D computed tomography, six parameters of the mandibular canal as well as the alveolar bone height and the alveolar ridge width were measured in Göttingen Minipigs aged 12, 17 and 21 months. Our null hypothesis assumes that the age and the body mass have an influence on the parameters measured. The study found that the volume, length and depth of the mandibular canal all increase with age. The width of the canal does not change significantly with age. The body mass does not have an influence on any of the measured parameters. The increase in canal volume appears to be due to loss of deep spongy bone in the posterior premolar and molar regions. This reduces the available space for dental implantations, negatively affecting implant stability and potentially the integrity of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. Dynamic anatomical changes occur until 21 months. On ethical grounds, using minipigs younger than 21 months in experimental implant dentistry is inadvisable. Paradoxically the measurements of the 12 months old pigs indicate a closer alignment of their mandibular anatomy to that of humans suggesting that they may be better models for implant studies. Given the variability in mandibular canal dimensions in similar age cohorts, the use of imaging techniques is essential for the selection of individual minipigs for dental prosthetic interventions and thus higher success rates.

  4. Microfocal X-ray computed tomography post-processing operations for optimizing reconstruction volumes of stented arteries during 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladisa, John F; Olson, Lars E; Ropella, Kristina M; Molthen, Robert C; Haworth, Steven T; Kersten, Judy R; Warltier, David C; Pagel, Paul S

    2005-08-01

    Restenosis caused by neointimal hyperplasia (NH) remains an important clinical problem after stent implantation. Restenosis varies with stent geometry, and idealized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have indicated that geometric properties of the implanted stent may differentially influence NH. However, 3D studies capturing the in vivo flow domain within stented vessels have not been conducted at a resolution sufficient to detect subtle alterations in vascular geometry caused by the stent and the subsequent temporal development of NH. We present the details and limitations of a series of post-processing operations used in conjunction with microfocal X-ray CT imaging and reconstruction to generate geometrically accurate flow domains within the localized region of a stent several weeks after implantation. Microfocal X-ray CT reconstruction volumes were subjected to an automated program to perform arterial thresholding, spatial orientation, and surface smoothing of stented and unstented rabbit iliac arteries several weeks after antegrade implantation. A transfer function was obtained for the current post-processing methodology containing reconstructed 16 mm stents implanted into rabbit iliac arteries for up to 21 days after implantation and resolved at circumferential and axial resolutions of 32 and 50 microm, respectively. The results indicate that the techniques presented are sufficient to resolve distributions of WSS with 80% accuracy in segments containing 16 surface perturbations over a 16 mm stented region. These methods will be used to test the hypothesis that reductions in normalized wall shear stress (WSS) and increases in the spatial disparity of WSS immediately after stent implantation may spatially correlate with the temporal development of NH within the stented region.

  5. Infra Red 3D Computer Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Anders La-Cour; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    The infra red 3D mouse is a three dimensional input device to a computer. It works by determining the position of an arbitrary object (like a hand) by emitting infra red signals from a number of locations and measuring the reflected intensities. To maximize stability, robustness, and use of bandw......The infra red 3D mouse is a three dimensional input device to a computer. It works by determining the position of an arbitrary object (like a hand) by emitting infra red signals from a number of locations and measuring the reflected intensities. To maximize stability, robustness, and use...

  6. Fractal tomography and its application in 3D vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubochkina, N.

    2018-01-01

    A three-dimensional artistic fractal tomography method that implements a non-glasses 3D visualization of fractal worlds in layered media is proposed. It is designed for the glasses-free 3D vision of digital art objects and films containing fractal content. Prospects for the development of this method in art galleries and the film industry are considered.

  7. Computer-controlled 3-D treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will describe the use of computer-controlled treatment delivery techniques for treatment of patients with sophisticated conformal therapy. In particular, research and implementation issues related to clinical use of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) techniques will be discussed. The possible/potential advantages of CCRT techniques will be highlighted using results from clinical 3-D planning studies. Materials and Methods: In recent years, 3-D treatment planning has been used to develop and implement 3-D conformal therapy treatment techniques, and studies based on these conformal treatments have begun to show the promise of conformal therapy. This work has been followed by the development of commercially-available multileaf collimator and computer control systems for treatment machines. Using these (and other) CCRT devices, various centers are beginning to clinically use complex computer-controlled treatments. Both research and clinical CCRT treatment techniques will be discussed in this presentation. General concepts and requirements for CCRT will be mentioned. Developmental and clinical experience with CCRT techniques from a number of centers will be utilized. Results: Treatment planning, treatment preparation and treatment delivery must be approached in an integrated fashion in order to clinically implement CCRT treatment techniques, and the entire process will be discussed. Various CCRT treatment methodologies will be reviewed from operational, dosimetric, and technical points of view. The discussion will concentrate on CCRT techniques which are likely to see rather wide dissemination over the next several years, including particularly the use of multileaf collimators (MLC), dynamic and segmental conformal therapy, conformal field shaping, and other related techniques. More advanced CCRT techniques, such as the use of individualized intensity modulation of beams or segments, and the use of computer

  8. Axial tomography in 3D live cell microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Verena; Bruns, Sarah; Bruns, Thomas; Piper, Mathis; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Cremer, Christoph; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2017-07-01

    A miniaturized setup for sample rotation on a microscope stage has been developed, combined with light sheet, confocal or structured illumination microscopy and applied to living cells as well as to small organisms. This setup permits axial tomography with improved visualization of single cells or small cell clusters as well as an enhanced effective 3D resolution upon sample rotation.

  9. 3D optical tomography in the presence of void regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, J.; Dehghani, Hamid; Schweiger, Martin; Arridge, Simon R.; Ripoll, Jorge; Nieto-Vesperinas, Manuel

    2000-12-01

    We present an investigation of the effect of a 3D non-scattering gap region on image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography. The void gap is modelled by the Radiosity-Diffusion method and the inverse problem is solved using the adjoint field method. The case of a sphere with concentric spherical gap is used as an example.

  10. Practical algorithms for 3D computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, R Stuart

    2013-01-01

    ""A valuable book to accompany any course that mixes the theory and practice of 3D graphics. The book's web site has many useful programs and code samples.""-Karen Rafferty, Queen's University, Belfast""The topics covered by this book are backed by the OpenFX modeling and animation software. This is a big plus in that it provides a practical perspective and encourages experimentation. … [This] will offer students a more interesting and hands-on learning experience, especially for those wishing to pursue a career in computer game development.""-Naganand Madhavapeddy, GameDeveloper>

  11. Trabecular bone structure parameters from 3D image processing of clinical multi-slice and cone-beam computed tomography data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klintstroem, Eva; Smedby, Oerjan [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); UHL County Council of Oestergoetland, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH)/Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Moreno, Rodrigo [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH)/Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Brismar, Torkel B. [KUS Huddinge, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet and Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-02-15

    Bone strength depends on both mineral content and bone structure. The aim of this in vitro study was to develop a method of quantitatively assessing trabecular bone structure by applying three-dimensional image processing to data acquired with multi-slice and cone-beam computed tomography using micro-computed tomography as a reference. Fifteen bone samples from the radius were examined. After segmentation, quantitative measures of bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number, trabecular nodes, and trabecular termini were obtained. The clinical machines overestimated bone volume and trabecular thickness and underestimated trabecular nodes and number, but cone-beam CT to a lesser extent. Parameters obtained from cone beam CT were strongly correlated with μCT, with correlation coefficients between 0.93 and 0.98 for all parameters except trabecular termini. The high correlation between cone-beam CT and micro-CT suggest the possibility of quantifying and monitoring changes of trabecular bone microarchitecture in vivo using cone beam CT. (orig.)

  12. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.; Davis, J.; Morgan, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray or gamma-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that produces two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without the need to physically section it. CT is also known by the acronym CAT, for computerised axial tomography. This review article presents a brief historical perspective on CT, its current status and the underlying physics. The mathematical fundamentals of computed tomography are developed for the simplest transmission CT modality. A description of CT scanner instrumentation is provided with an emphasis on radiation sources and systems. Examples of CT images are shown indicating the range of materials that can be scanned and the spatial and contrast resolutions that may be achieved. Attention is also given to the occurrence, interpretation and minimisation of various image artefacts that may arise. A final brief section is devoted to the principles and potential of a range of more recently developed tomographic modalities including diffraction CT, positron emission CT and seismic tomography. 57 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs

  13. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, M.; Resnick, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has matured into a reliable and prominent tool for study of the muscoloskeletal system. When it was introduced in 1973, it was unique in many ways and posed a challenge to interpretation. It is in these unique features, however, that its advantages lie in comparison with conventional techniques. These advantages will be described in a spectrum of important applications in orthopedics and rheumatology

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  15. Illustrated computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.

    1983-01-01

    This book provides the following information: basic aspects of computed tomography; atlas of computed tomography of the normal adult; clinical application of computed tomography; and radiotherapy planning and computed tomography

  16. The impact of computed tomography slice thickness on the assessment of stereotactic, 3D conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caivano, R; Fiorentino, A; Pedicini, P; Califano, G; Fusco, V

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate radiotherapy treatment planning accuracy by varying computed tomography (CT) slice thickness and tumor size. CT datasets from patients with primary brain disease and metastatic brain disease were selected. Tumor volumes ranging from about 2.5 to 100 cc and CT scan at different slice thicknesses (1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mm) were used to perform treatment planning (1-, 2-, 4-, 6- and 10-CT, respectively). For any slice thickness, a conformity index (CI) referring to 100, 98, 95 and 90 % isodoses and tumor size was computed. All the CI and volumes obtained were compared to evaluate the impact of CT slice thickness on treatment plans. The smallest volumes reduce significantly if defined on 1-CT with respect to 4- and 6-CT, while the CT slice thickness does not affect target definition for the largest volumes. The mean CI for all the considered isodoses and CT slice thickness shows no statistical differences when 1-CT is compared to 2-CT. Comparing the mean CI of 1- with 4-CT and 1- with 6-CT, statistical differences appear only for the smallest volumes with respect to 100, 98 and 95 % isodoses-the CI for 90 % isodose being not statistically significant for all the considered PTVs. The accuracy of radiotherapy tumor volume definition depends on CT slice thickness. To achieve a better tumor definition and dose coverage, 1- and 2-CT would be suitable for small targets, while 4- and 6-CT are suitable for the other volumes.

  17. Analysis of the of bones through 3D computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, I.; Lopes, R.T.; Oliveira, L.F.; Alves, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This work shows the analysis of the internal structure of the bones samples through 3D micro tomography technique (3D-μTC). The comprehension of the bone structure is particularly important when related to osteoporosis diagnosis because this implies in a deterioration of the trabecular bone architecture, which increases the fragility and the possibility to have bone fractures. Two bone samples (human calcaneous and Wistar rat femur) were used, and the method was a radiographic system in real time with an X Ray microfocus tube. The quantifications parameters are based on stereological principles and they are five: a bone volume fraction, trabecular number, the ratio between surface and bone volume, the trabecular thickness and the trabecular separation. The quantifications were done with a program developed especially for this purpose in Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory - COPPE/UFRJ. This program uses as input the 3D reconstructions images and generates a table with the quantifications. The results of the human calcaneous quantifications are presented in tables 1 and 2, and the 3D reconstructions are illustrated in Figure 5. The Figure 6 illustrate the 2D reconstructed image and the Figure 7 the 3D visualization respectively of the Wistar femur sample. The obtained results show that the 3D-μTC is a powerful technique that can be used to analyze bone microstructures. (author)

  18. Structure from Motion Photogrammetry and Micro X-Ray Computed Tomography 3-D Reconstruction Data Fusion for Non-Destructive Conservation Documentation of Lunar Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, K. R.; Blumenfeld, E. H.; Liddle, D. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Our team is developing a modern, cross-disciplinary approach to documentation and preservation of astromaterials, specifically lunar and meteorite samples stored at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility. Apollo Lunar Sample 60639, collected as part of rake sample 60610 during the 3rd Extra-Vehicular Activity of the Apollo 16 mission in 1972, served as the first NASA-preserved lunar sample to be examined by our team in the development of a novel approach to internal and external sample visualization. Apollo Sample 60639 is classified as a breccia with a glass-coated side and pristine mare basalt and anorthosite clasts. The aim was to accurately register a 3-dimensional Micro X-Ray Computed Tomography (XCT)-derived internal composition data set and a Structure-From-Motion (SFM) Photogrammetry-derived high-fidelity, textured external polygonal model of Apollo Sample 60639. The developed process provided the means for accurate, comprehensive, non-destructive visualization of NASA's heritage lunar samples. The data products, to be ultimately served via an end-user web interface, will allow researchers and the public to interact with the unique heritage samples, providing a platform to "slice through" a photo-realistic rendering of a sample to analyze both its external visual and internal composition simultaneously.

  19. Flat-Panel Detector—Based Volume Computed Tomography: A Novel 3D Imaging Technique to Monitor Osteolytic Bone Lesions in a Mouse Tumor Metastasis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is an important cause of mortality in patients with breast cancer. Hence, animal models, in combination with various imaging techniques, are in high demand for preclinical assessment of novel therapies. We evaluated the applicability of flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT to noninvasive detection of osteolytic bone metastases that develop in severe immunodeficient mice after intracardial injection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A single fpVCT scan at 200-wm isotropic resolution was employed to detect osteolysis within the entire skeleton. Osteolytic lesions identified by fpVCT correlated with Faxitron X-ray analysis and were subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination. Isotropic three-dimensional image data sets obtained by fpVCT were the basis for the precise visualization of the extent of the lesion within the cortical bone and for the measurement of bone loss. Furthermore, fpVCT imaging allows continuous monitoring of growth kinetics for each metastatic site and visualization of lesions in more complex regions of the skeleton, such as the skull. Our findings suggest that fpVCT is a powerful tool that can be used to monitor the occurrence and progression of osteolytic lesions in vivo and can be further developed to monitor responses to antimetastatic therapies over the course of the disease.

  20. Performance evaluation of an improved optical computed tomography polymer gel dosimeter system for 3D dose verification of static and dynamic phantom deliveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Langen, K. M.; Meeks, S. L.; Kupelian, P. A.; Zeidan, O. A.; Maryanski, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a next-generation optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-5X) is characterized in the context of three-dimensional gel dosimetry. Large-volume (2.2 L), muscle-equivalent, radiation-sensitive polymer gel dosimeters (BANG-3) were used. Improvements in scanner design leading to shorter acquisition times are discussed. The spatial resolution, detectable absorbance range, and reproducibility are assessed. An efficient method for calibrating gel dosimeters using the depth-dose relationship is applied, with photon- and electron-based deliveries yielding equivalent results. A procedure involving a preirradiation scan was used to reduce the edge artifacts in reconstructed images, thereby increasing the useful cross-sectional area of the dosimeter by nearly a factor of 2. Dose distributions derived from optical density measurements using the calibration coefficient show good agreement with the treatment planning system simulations and radiographic film measurements. The feasibility of use for motion (four-dimensional) dosimetry is demonstrated on an example comparing dose distributions from static and dynamic delivery of a single-field photon plan. The capability to visualize three-dimensional dose distributions is also illustrated

  1. Optimisation and validation of a 3D reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computed tomography by means of GATE simulation platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitar, Ziad

    2006-12-01

    Although time consuming, Monte-Carlo simulations remain an efficient tool enabling to assess correction methods for degrading physical effects in medical imaging. We have optimized and validated a reconstruction method baptized F3DMC (Fully 3D Monte Carlo) in which the physical effects degrading the image formation process were modelled using Monte-Carlo methods and integrated within the system matrix. We used the Monte-Carlo simulation toolbox GATE. We validated GATE in SPECT by modelling the gamma-camera (Philips AXIS) used in clinical routine. Techniques of threshold, filtering by a principal component analysis and targeted reconstruction (functional regions, hybrid regions) were used in order to improve the precision of the system matrix and to reduce the number of simulated photons as well as the time consumption required. The EGEE Grid infrastructures were used to deploy the GATE simulations in order to reduce their computation time. Results obtained with F3DMC were compared with the reconstruction methods (FBP, ML-EM, MLEMC) for a simulated phantom and with the OSEM-C method for the real phantom. Results have shown that the F3DMC method and its variants improve the restoration of activity ratios and the signal to noise ratio. By the use of the grid EGEE, a significant speed-up factor of about 300 was obtained. These results should be confirmed by performing studies on complex phantoms and patients and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be used in SPECT and also in PET. (author)

  2. Computed Tomography. Chapter 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geleijns, J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    After its clinical introduction in 1971, computed tomography (CT) developed from an X ray modality that was limited to axial imaging of the brain in neuroradiology into a versatile 3-D whole body imaging modality for a wide range of applications, including oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and interventional radiology. CT is applied for diagnosis and follow-up studies of patients, for planning of radiotherapy, and even for screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors.

  3. Sensitivity of 3D gradient recalled echo susceptibility-weighted imaging technique compared to computed tomography angiography for detection of middle cerebral artery thrombus in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at comparing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI with computed tomography angiography (CTA in the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA thrombus in acute stroke. Seventy-nine patients with acute MCA stroke was selected using our search engine software; only the ones showing restricted diffusion in the MCA territory on diffusion-weighted images were included. We finally selected 35 patients who had done both MRI (including SWI and CTA. Twenty random subjects with completely normal MRI (including SWI exam were selected as control. Two neuroradiologists (blinded to the presence or absence of stroke reviewed the SW images and then compared the findings with CT angiogram (in patients with stroke. The number of MCA segments showing thrombus in each patient was tabulated to estimate the thrombus burden. Thrombus was detected on SWI in one or more MCA segments in 30 out of 35 patients, on the first review. Of the 30, SWI showed thrombus in more than one MCA segments in 7 patients. CTA depicted branch occlusion in 31 cases. Thrombus was seen on both SWI and CTA in 28 patients. Thrombus was noted in two patients on SWI only, with no corresponding abnormality seen on CTA. Two patients with acute MCA showed no vascular occlusion or thrombus on either CTA or SWI. Only two case of false-positive thrombus was reported in normal control subjects. Susceptibility-weighted images had sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 90% respectively, with positive predictive value 94%. Sensitivity was 86% for SWI, compared with 89% for CTA, and this difference was statistically insignificant (P>0.05. Of all the positive cases on CTA (31 corresponding thrombus was seen on SWI in 90% of subjects (28 of 31. Susceptibility-weighted imaging has high sensitivity for detection of thrombus in acute MCA stroke. Moreover, SWI is a powerful technique for estimation of thrombus burden, which can be challenging on CTA.

  4. Mathematics of Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, William Grant

    A review of the applications of the Radon transform is presented, with emphasis on emission computed tomography and transmission computed tomography. The theory of the 2D and 3D Radon transforms, and the effects of attenuation for emission computed tomography are presented. The algebraic iterative methods, their importance and limitations are reviewed. Analytic solutions of the 2D problem the convolution and frequency filtering methods based on linear shift invariant theory, and the solution of the circular harmonic decomposition by integral transform theory--are reviewed. The relation between the invisible kernels, the inverse circular harmonic transform, and the consistency conditions are demonstrated. The discussion and review are extended to the 3D problem-convolution, frequency filtering, spherical harmonic transform solutions, and consistency conditions. The Cormack algorithm based on reconstruction with Zernike polynomials is reviewed. An analogous algorithm and set of reconstruction polynomials is developed for the spherical harmonic transform. The relations between the consistency conditions, boundary conditions and orthogonal basis functions for the 2D projection harmonics are delineated and extended to the 3D case. The equivalence of the inverse circular harmonic transform, the inverse Radon transform, and the inverse Cormack transform is presented. The use of the number of nodes of a projection harmonic as a filter is discussed. Numerical methods for the efficient implementation of angular harmonic algorithms based on orthogonal functions and stable recursion are presented. The derivation of a lower bound for the signal-to-noise ratio of the Cormack algorithm is derived.

  5. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  6. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  7. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  8. 3D imaging of nanomaterials by discrete tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, K J; Bals, S; Sijbers, J; Kübel, C; Midgley, P A; Hernandez, J C; Kaiser, U; Encina, E R; Coronado, E A; Van Tendeloo, G

    2009-05-01

    The field of discrete tomography focuses on the reconstruction of samples that consist of only a few different materials. Ideally, a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of such a sample should contain only one grey level for each of the compositions in the sample. By exploiting this property in the reconstruction algorithm, either the quality of the reconstruction can be improved significantly, or the number of required projection images can be reduced. The discrete reconstruction typically contains fewer artifacts and does not have to be segmented, as it already contains one grey level for each composition. Recently, a new algorithm, called discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), has been proposed that can be used effectively on experimental electron tomography datasets. In this paper, we propose discrete tomography as a general reconstruction method for electron tomography in materials science. We describe the basic principles of DART and show that it can be applied successfully to three different types of samples, consisting of embedded ErSi(2) nanocrystals, a carbon nanotube grown from a catalyst particle and a single gold nanoparticle, respectively.

  9. 3D imaging of nanomaterials by discrete tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batenburg, K.J.; Bals, S.; Sijbers, J.; Kuebel, C.; Midgley, P.A.; Hernandez, J.C.; Kaiser, U.; Encina, E.R.; Coronado, E.A.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2009-01-01

    The field of discrete tomography focuses on the reconstruction of samples that consist of only a few different materials. Ideally, a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of such a sample should contain only one grey level for each of the compositions in the sample. By exploiting this property in the reconstruction algorithm, either the quality of the reconstruction can be improved significantly, or the number of required projection images can be reduced. The discrete reconstruction typically contains fewer artifacts and does not have to be segmented, as it already contains one grey level for each composition. Recently, a new algorithm, called discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), has been proposed that can be used effectively on experimental electron tomography datasets. In this paper, we propose discrete tomography as a general reconstruction method for electron tomography in materials science. We describe the basic principles of DART and show that it can be applied successfully to three different types of samples, consisting of embedded ErSi 2 nanocrystals, a carbon nanotube grown from a catalyst particle and a single gold nanoparticle, respectively.

  10. The Devil is in the Details: Using X-Ray Computed Tomography to Develop Accurate 3D Grain Characteristics and Bed Structure Metrics for Gravel Bed Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel, H.; Hodge, R. A.; Leyland, J.; Sear, D. A.; Ahmed, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty for bedload estimates in gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize the arrangement and orientation of the sediment grains within the bed. The characteristics of the surface structure are produced by the water working of grains, which leads to structural differences in bedforms through differential patterns of grain sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. Until recently the technical and logistical difficulties of characterizing the arrangement of sediment in 3D have prohibited a full understanding of how grains interact with stream flow and the feedback mechanisms that exist. Micro-focus X-ray CT has been used for non-destructive 3D imaging of grains within a series of intact sections of river bed taken from key morphological units (see Figure 1). Volume, center of mass, points of contact, protrusion and spatial orientation of individual surface grains are derived from these 3D images, which in turn, facilitates estimates of 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and grain exposure. By aggregating representative samples of grain-scale properties of localized interacting sediment into overall metrics, we can compare and contrast bed stability at a macro-scale with respect to stream bed morphology. Understanding differences in bed stability through representative metrics derived at the grain-scale will ultimately lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty and increased understanding of interactions between grain-scale properties on channel morphology. Figure 1. CT-Scans of a water worked gravel-filled pot. a. 3D rendered scan showing the outer mesh, and b. the same pot with the mesh removed. c. vertical change in porosity of the gravels sampled in 5mm volumes. Values are typical of those measured in the field and lab. d. 2-D slices through the gravels at 20% depth from surface (porosity = 0.35), and e. 75% depth from

  11. 3D reconstruction of radioactive sample utilizing gamma tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoul, David; Zháňal, Pavel

    2018-07-01

    Unique three-dimensional (3D) tomography apparatus was developed and successfully tested at Research Centre Rez, which concentrates at investigation of the degradation of microstructural and mechanical properties of structural materials of nuclear reactors components after a long-term operating exposure. The apparatus allows a 3D view into the interior of low-dimension radioactive samples with a diameter up to several centimeters and a resolution in order of cubic millimeters. It is designed to detect domains with different levels of radioactivity such as cavities, cracks or regions with different chemical composition. The unique collimator design, the use of stepper motors for fine and accurate sample scanning, along with advanced 3D image reconstruction software developed at Research Centre Rez, enables a resolution approaching 1 mm3. Devices working on a similar principle have been used for decades, e.g., in nuclear medicine for the diagnosis of malignant tumors, and are increasingly being applied in the nuclear industry. However, for the first time similar equipment is used for non-destructive testing of low-dimension radioactive samples.

  12. Analysis of Age-Related Changes in Asian Facial Skeletons Using 3D Vector Mathematics on Picture Archiving and Communication System Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, So Jung; Park, Jee Soo; Byun, Sung Wan; Bae, Jung Ho

    2015-09-01

    There are marked differences in facial skeletal characteristics between Asian and Caucasian. However, ethnic differences in age-related facial skeletal changes have not yet been fully established. The aims of this study were to evaluate age-related changes in Asian midfacial skeletons and to explore ethnic differences in facial skeletal structures with aging between Caucasian and Asian. The study included 108 men (aged 20-79 years) and 115 women (aged 20-81 years). Axial CT images with a gantry tilt angle of 0 were analyzed. We measured three-dimensional (3D) coordinates at each point with a pixel lens cursor in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS), and angles and widths between the points were calculated using 3D vector mathematics. We analyzed angular changes in 4 bony regions, including the glabellar, orbital, maxillary, and pyriform aperture regions, and changes in the orbital aperture width (distance from the posterior lacrimal crest to the frontozygomatic suture) and the pyriform width (between both upper margins of the pyriform aperture). All 4 midfacial angles in females and glabellar and maxillary angles in males showed statistically significant decreases with aging. On the other hand, the orbital and pyriform widths did not show statistically significant changes with aging. The results of this study suggest that Asian midfacial skeletons may change continuously throughout life, and that there may be significant differences in the midfacial skeleton between both sexes and between ethnic groups.

  13. Reliability and accuracy of three imaging software packages used for 3D analysis of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Wolff, Jan; de Lange, Jan; van der Stelt, Paul F; Lobbezoo, Frank; Aarab, Ghizlane

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability and accuracy of three different imaging software packages for three-dimensional analysis of the upper airway using CBCT images. To assess the reliability of the software packages, 15 NewTom 5G ® (QR Systems, Verona, Italy) CBCT data sets were randomly and retrospectively selected. Two observers measured the volume, minimum cross-sectional area and the length of the upper airway using Amira ® (Visage Imaging Inc., Carlsbad, CA), 3Diagnosys ® (3diemme, Cantu, Italy) and OnDemand3D ® (CyberMed, Seoul, Republic of Korea) software packages. The intra- and inter-observer reliability of the upper airway measurements were determined using intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland & Altman agreement tests. To assess the accuracy of the software packages, one NewTom 5G ® CBCT data set was used to print a three-dimensional anthropomorphic phantom with known dimensions to be used as the "gold standard". This phantom was subsequently scanned using a NewTom 5G ® scanner. Based on the CBCT data set of the phantom, one observer measured the volume, minimum cross-sectional area, and length of the upper airway using Amira ® , 3Diagnosys ® , and OnDemand3D ® , and compared these measurements with the gold standard. The intra- and inter-observer reliability of the measurements of the upper airway using the different software packages were excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥0.75). There was excellent agreement between all three software packages in volume, minimum cross-sectional area and length measurements. All software packages underestimated the upper airway volume by -8.8% to -12.3%, the minimum cross-sectional area by -6.2% to -14.6%, and the length by -1.6% to -2.9%. All three software packages offered reliable volume, minimum cross-sectional area and length measurements of the upper airway. The length measurements of the upper airway were the most accurate results in all software packages. All

  14. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites . Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  15. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites. Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  16. Evaluation of left atrial function by multidetector computed tomography before left atrial radiofrequency-catheter ablation: Comparison of a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Florian; Ourednicek, Petr; Loewe, Christian; Richter, Bernhard; Goessinger, Heinz David; Gwechenberger, Marianne; Plank, Christina; Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Toepker, Michael; Lammer, Johannes; Feuchtner, Gudrun M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation tool for evaluation of left atrial (LA) function by 64-slice multidetector-CT (MDCT). Methods and materials: In 33 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation a MDCT scan was performed before radiofrequency-catheter ablation. Atrial function (minimal volume (LAmin), maximal volume (LAmax), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF)) was evaluated by two readers using a manual and an automatic tool and measurement time was evaluated. Results: Automated LA volume segmentation failed in one patient due to low LA enhancement (103HU). Mean LAmax, LAmin, SV and EF were 127.7 ml, 93 ml, 34.7 ml, 27.1% by the automated, and 122.7 ml, 89.9 ml, 32.8 ml, 26.3% by the manual method with no significant difference (p > 0.05) and high Pearsons correlation coefficients (r = 0.94, r = 0.94, r = 0.82 and r = 0.85, p < 0.0001), respectively. The automated method was significantly faster (p < 0.001). Interobserver variability was low for both methods with Pearson's correlation coefficients between 0.98 and 0.99 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Evaluation of LA volume and function with 64-slice MDCT is feasible with a very low interobserver variability. The automatic method is as accurate as the manual method but significantly less time consuming permitting a routine use in clinical practice before RF-catheter ablation.

  17. Evaluation of left atrial function by multidetector computed tomography before left atrial radiofrequency-catheter ablation: Comparison of a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Florian, E-mail: florian.wolf@meduniwien.ac.a [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ourednicek, Petr [Philips Medical Systems, Prague (Czech Republic); Loewe, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Bernhard; Goessinger, Heinz David; Gwechenberger, Marianne [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Plank, Christina; Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Toepker, Michael; Lammer, Johannes [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation tool for evaluation of left atrial (LA) function by 64-slice multidetector-CT (MDCT). Methods and materials: In 33 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation a MDCT scan was performed before radiofrequency-catheter ablation. Atrial function (minimal volume (LAmin), maximal volume (LAmax), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF)) was evaluated by two readers using a manual and an automatic tool and measurement time was evaluated. Results: Automated LA volume segmentation failed in one patient due to low LA enhancement (103HU). Mean LAmax, LAmin, SV and EF were 127.7 ml, 93 ml, 34.7 ml, 27.1% by the automated, and 122.7 ml, 89.9 ml, 32.8 ml, 26.3% by the manual method with no significant difference (p > 0.05) and high Pearsons correlation coefficients (r = 0.94, r = 0.94, r = 0.82 and r = 0.85, p < 0.0001), respectively. The automated method was significantly faster (p < 0.001). Interobserver variability was low for both methods with Pearson's correlation coefficients between 0.98 and 0.99 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Evaluation of LA volume and function with 64-slice MDCT is feasible with a very low interobserver variability. The automatic method is as accurate as the manual method but significantly less time consuming permitting a routine use in clinical practice before RF-catheter ablation.

  18. Use of 3D-computed tomography angiography for planning the surgical removal of pineal region meningiomas using Poppen's approach: a report of ten cases and a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several treatment approaches for pineal region meningiomas, such as Poppen's approach, Krause's approach and combinations of the two approaches. We present our experience with the use of 3D-computed tomography angiography for planning the surgical removal of pineal region meningiomas using a suboccipital transtentorial approach (Poppen's approach and evaluate the role of Poppen's approach. Methods During the period from January 2005 to June 2010, ten patients presented to us with pineal region meningioma. MRI was routinely used to define the tumor size, position, and its relevant complications while 3D-CTA was applied to define the blood supply of the tumor and the venous complex (VC shift before operations. Most of the meningiomas had developed at both sides of the tentorial plane and extended laterally with typical characteristics of a pineal region tumor. Results All tumors were completely removed surgically without any injury to the VC. Postoperative intracranial infection occurred in one case who recovered after antibiotics were given. Postoperative intraventricular hemorrhage and pneumocephalus were found in one case, but fully recovered after conservative treatment. In the nine cases of concurrent hydrocephalus, this was gradually relieved in eight patients and the single case that became aggravated was successfully treated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Moreover, the follow-up MRI examinations did not indicate any recurrence of the meningiomas. Conclusion We found that the use of Poppen's approach is strongly supported for the successful removal of pineal region meningiomas without serious complications.

  19. 3D CT versus axial helical CT versus conventional tomography in the classification of acetabular fractures: A ROC analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kickuth, Ralph; Laufer, Ulf; Hartung, Guido; Gruening, Christian; Stueckle, Christoph; Kirchner, Johannes

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic power of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT), axial helical computed tomography (CT) and conventional tomography in the classification of acetabular fractures by interdisciplinary review. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Receiver operating characteristics (ROCs) were assessed for two radiologists and two surgeons blinded to the presence of acetabular fractures in an animal model (a total of 62 porcine hips, 40 of them with artificial acetabular fractures). Main target parameter was the diagnostic accuracy in the classification of the artificial fractures following Judet et al. RESULTS: ROC analysis for radiologists showed A z values of 0·83 for 3D CT, 0·81 for axial helical CT, and 0·78 for conventional tomography; differences between the three techniques were not significant (P = 0·46-0·73). A z values for the surgeons were 0·87 for 3D CT, 0·68 for axial helical CT, and 0·60 for conventional tomography; 3D CT was significantly better than axial helical CT (P = 0·01) and conventional tomography (P = 0·001). The differences between axial helical CT and conventional tomography were not significant (P = 0·37). CONCLUSION: Acetabular fractures are best classified by 3D CT, followed by axial helical CT and conventional tomography when assessed by surgeons. 3D CT did not provide any additional significant benefit in the classification performed by radiologists. Kickuth, R. et al. (2002)

  20. Displacement of structures in the thorax from expiration to inspiration as estimated by computed tomography and a 3-D treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garmon, Pamela; Huang, David; Lutz, Steve; Zwicker, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The spread of image based three dimensional treatment planning and conformal radiotherapy have brought new attention to the problems of patient motion during treatment. Recent studies of the effects of breathing on the motion of internal structures have led to the suggestion that gated irradiation might improve the therapeutic benefits of conformal therapy. In the present work we investigate the displacement of tumor and other structures in the thorax with breathing in order to assess further the potential benefit of gating in the treatment of lung tumors. Materials and Methods: Thoracic CT scans were obtained for patients immediately after inspiration and after expiration. Tumor positions were assessed by computing the centers of the outlined volumes for both inspiration and expiration. Effects of breathing motion along the longitudinal direction were evaluated by using a three dimensional treatment planning system to measure the distances between scans where the top of the diaphragm was present. Displacement within the transverse direction was assessed by measuring the positions of the field skin markers, the aorta and the esophagus. Results: Movement of the centers of the tumor volumes as computed by reconstructed volumes was measured to be 0.7-1.2cm. The magnitude of this movement was greatest for tumors in the mid to lower region of the lung and was primarily in the direction of superior to inferior combined with anterior to posterior. Displacement of the diaphragm ranged 1-3 cm with breathing. Displacement of the aorta and esophagus was measured to be 0.2-1.5 cm. Movement of these structures was only analyzed transversely and showed displacement to the patients' left and posterior upon expiration. The magnitude did not appear to correlate with position relative to the diaphragm. Patients with less diaphragm movement also had smaller tidal volumes and conversely, patients with larger diaphragm displacement had greater tidal volumes

  1. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  2. Computer Animation for Articulated 3D Characters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of the computer animation literature, mainly concentrating on articulated characters and at least some degree of interactivity or real time simulation. Advances in dierent techniques such as key-frame, motion capture (also known as mocap), dynamics, inverse kinematics (IK),

  3. Advanced prior modeling for 3D bright field electron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreehari, Suhas; Venkatakrishnan, S. V.; Drummy, Lawrence F.; Simmons, Jeffrey P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Many important imaging problems in material science involve reconstruction of images containing repetitive non-local structures. Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) could in principle exploit such redundancies through the selection of a log prior probability term. However, in practice, determining such a log prior term that accounts for the similarity between distant structures in the image is quite challenging. Much progress has been made in the development of denoising algorithms like non-local means and BM3D, and these are known to successfully capture non-local redundancies in images. But the fact that these denoising operations are not explicitly formulated as cost functions makes it unclear as to how to incorporate them in the MBIR framework. In this paper, we formulate a solution to bright field electron tomography by augmenting the existing bright field MBIR method to incorporate any non-local denoising operator as a prior model. We accomplish this using a framework we call plug-and-play priors that decouples the log likelihood and the log prior probability terms in the MBIR cost function. We specifically use 3D non-local means (NLM) as the prior model in the plug-and-play framework, and showcase high quality tomographic reconstructions of a simulated aluminum spheres dataset, and two real datasets of aluminum spheres and ferritin structures. We observe that streak and smear artifacts are visibly suppressed, and that edges are preserved. Also, we report lower RMSE values compared to the conventional MBIR reconstruction using qGGMRF as the prior model.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  5. 3D electron tomography of biological photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Vieweg, Benito; Knoke, Isabel; Spallek, Stefanie; Spiecker, Erdmann [CENEM, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Schroeder-Turk, Gerd; Mecke, Klaus [Theoretische Physik I, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Photonic crystals, i.e. periodical nanostructures of materials with different dielectric constants, are highly interesting for applications in optics, optoelectronics, and sensing. By tailoring the geometrical parameters radically different and improved optical properties (e.g., optical band-gap structure, extreme refractive indices, or high anisotropy) can be achieved. Naturally occurring photonic crystals, like butterfly scales, exoskeletons of insects (chitin), or seashells (nacre), can serve as model systems for understanding the relationship between structure and optical properties. Butterfly scales are studied by TEM using a FEI Titan{sup 3} 80-300 instrument. An optimized FIB technique or ultramicrotome sectioning were used to prepare the sensitive specimens with desired thickness. Since the periodical structures have dimensions on the sub-{mu}m scale, HAADF-STEM tomography was employed for obtaining extended tilt series under conditions of atomic-number sensitive imaging. Since the solid crystal consists of chemically homogeneous chitin while the pores are unfilled, the distinct contrast in the images can easily be interpreted in terms of the local projected mass density allowing to reconstruct the chitin distribution within the optical unit cell of the scales with high 3D resolution.

  6. 3D Observation of GEMS by Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Junya; Miyake, Akira; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Messenger, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous silicates in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) coming from comets are dominated by glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS). GEMS grains are submicron-sized rounded objects (typically 100-500) nm in diameter) with anaometer-sized (10-50 nm) Fe-Ni metal and sulfide grains embedded in an amorphous silicate matrix. Several formation processes for GEMS grains have been proposed so far, but these models are still being debated [2-5]. Bradley et al. proposed that GEMS grains are interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk and that they are amorphiation products of crystalline silicates in the interstellar medium by sputter-deposition of cosmic ray irradiation, similar to space weathering [2,4]. This consideration is based on the observation of nano-sized crystals (approximately 10 nm) called relict grains in GEMS grains and their shapes are pseudomorphs to the host GEMS grains. On the other hand, Keller and Messenger proposed that most GEMS formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas [3,5]. This model is based on the fact that most GEMS grains have solar isotopic compositions and have extremely heterogeneous and non-solar elemental compositions. Keller and Messenger (2011) also reported that amorphous silicates in GEMS grains are surrounded by sulfide grains, which formed as sulfidization of metallic iron grains located on the GEMS surface. The previous studies were performed with 2D observation by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). In order to understand the structure of GEMS grains described above more clearly, we observed 3D structure of GEMS grains by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL) at Kyoto University. Electron tomography gives not only 3D structures but also gives higher spatial resolution (approximately a few nm) than that in conventional 2D image, which is restricted by

  7. 3D Computer aided treatment planning in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Vissink, Arjan; Ng, Yuan Ling; Gulabivala, Kishor

    2016-02-01

    Obliteration of the root canal system due to accelerated dentinogenesis and dystrophic calcification can challenge the achievement of root canal treatment goals. This paper describes the application of 3D digital mapping technology for predictable navigation of obliterated canal systems during root canal treatment to avoid iatrogenic damage of the root. Digital endodontic treatment planning for anterior teeth with severely obliterated root canal systems was accomplished with the aid of computer software, based on cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) scans and intra-oral scans of the dentition. On the basis of these scans, endodontic guides were created for the planned treatment through digital designing and rapid prototyping fabrication. The custom-made guides allowed for an uncomplicated and predictable canal location and management. The method of digital designing and rapid prototyping of endodontic guides allows for reliable and predictable location of root canals of teeth with calcifically metamorphosed root canal systems. The endodontic directional guide facilitates difficult endodontic treatments at little additional cost. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Design for scalability in 3D computer graphics architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Lund, Hans Erik

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes useful methods and techniques for designing scalable hybrid parallel rendering architectures for 3D computer graphics. Various techniques for utilizing parallelism in a pipelines system are analyzed. During the Ph.D study a prototype 3D graphics architecture named Hybris has...

  9. Contribution of 3-D electrical resistivity tomography for landmines detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Metwaly

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Landmines are a type of inexpensive weapons widely used in the pre-conflicted areas in many countries worldwide. The two main types are the metallic and non-metallic (mostly plastic landmines. They are most commonly investigated by magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR, and metal detector (MD techniques. These geophysical techniques however have significant limitations in resolving the non-metallic landmines and wherever the host materials are conductive. In this work, the 3-D electric resistivity tomography (ERT technique is evaluated as an alternative and/or confirmation detection system for both landmine types, which are buried in different soil conditions and at different depths. This can be achieved using the capacitive resistivity imaging system, which does not need direct contact with the ground surface. Synthetic models for each case have been introduced using metallic and non-metallic bodies buried in wet and dry environments. The inversion results using the L1 norm least-squares optimization method tend to produce robust blocky models of the landmine body. The dipole axial and the dipole equatorial arrays tend to have the most favorable geometry by applying dynamic capacitive electrode and they show significant signal strength for data sets with up to 5% noise. Increasing the burial depth relative to the electrode spacing as well as the noise percentage in the resistivity data is crucial in resolving the landmines at different environments. The landmine with dimension and burial depth of one electrode separation unit is over estimated while the spatial resolutions decrease as the burial depth and noise percentage increase.

  10. What is Computed Tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging What is Computed Tomography? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Chest X ray Image back to top Computed Tomography (CT) Although also based on the variable absorption ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  12. 3-D conformal radiation therapy - Part II: Computer-controlled 3-D treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedick, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will describe the use of computer-controlled treatment delivery techniques for treatment of patients with sophisticated conformal therapy. In particular, research and implementation issues related to clinical use of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) techniques will be discussed. The possible/potential advantages of CCRT techniques will be highlighted using results from clinical 3-D planning studies. Materials and Methods: In recent years, 3-D treatment planning has been used to develop and implement 3-D conformal therapy treatment techniques, and studies based on these conformal treatments have begun to show the promise of conformal therapy. This work has been followed by the development of commercially-available multileaf collimator and computer control systems for treatment machines. Using these (and other) CCRT devices, various centers are beginning to clinically use complex computer-controlled treatments. Both research and clinical CCRT treatment techniques will be discussed in this presentation. General concepts and requirements for CCRT will be mentioned. Developmental and clinical experience with CCRT techniques from a number of centers will be utilized. Results: Treatment planning, treatment preparation and treatment delivery must be approached in an integrated fashion in order to clinically implement CCRT treatment techniques, and the entire process will be discussed. Various CCRT treatment methodologies will be reviewed from operational, dosimetric, and technical points of view. The discussion will concentrate on CCRT techniques which are likely to see rather wide dissemination over the next several years, including particularly the use of multileaf collimators (MLC), dynamic and segmental conformal therapy, conformal field shaping, and other related techniques. More advanced CCRT techniques, such as the use of individualized intensity modulation of beams or segments, and the use of computer

  13. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on computed tomographic (CT) scanning which has improved computer-assisted imaging modalities for radiologic diagnosis. The advantage of this modality is its ability to image thin cross-sectional planes of the body, thus uncovering density information in three dimensions without tissue superposition problems. Because this enables vastly superior imaging of soft tissues in the brain and body, CT scanning was immediately successful and continues to grow in importance as improvements are made in speed, resolution, and cost efficiency. CT scanners are used for general purposes, and the more advanced machines are generally preferred in large hospitals, where volume and variety of usage justifies the cost. For imaging in the abdomen, a scanner with a rapid speed is preferred because peristalsis, involuntary motion of the diaphram, and even cardiac motion are present and can significantly degrade image quality. When contrast media is used in imaging to demonstrate scanner, immediate review of images, and multiformat hardcopy production. A second console is reserved for the radiologist to read images and perform the several types of image analysis that are available. Since CT images contain quantitative information in terms of density values and contours of organs, quantitation of volumes, areas, and masses is possible. This is accomplished with region-of- interest methods, which involve the electronic outlining of the selected region of the television display monitor with a trackball-controlled cursor. In addition, various image- processing options, such as edge enhancement (for viewing fine details of edges) or smoothing filters (for enhancing the detectability of low-contrast lesions) are useful tools

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  15. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Emission Computed Tomography is a technique used for producing single or multiple cross-sectional images of the distribution of radionuclide labelled agents in vivo. The techniques of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are described with particular regard to the function of the detectors used to produce images and the computer techniques used to build up images. (UK)

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  18. Parallel performances of three 3D reconstruction methods on MIMD computers: Feldkamp, block ART and SIRT algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, C.; Chassery, J.M.; Peyrin, F.; Girerd, C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the parallel implementations of reconstruction methods in 3D tomography. 3D tomography requires voluminous data and long computation times. Parallel computing, on MIMD computers, seems to be a good approach to manage this problem. In this study, we present the different steps of the parallelization on an abstract parallel computer. Depending on the method, we use two main approaches to parallelize the algorithms: the local approach and the global approach. Experimental results on MIMD computers are presented. Two 3D images reconstructed from realistic data are showed

  19. 3D tomography of cells in micro-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, S.; Christ, A. F.; Guckenberger, A.; Himbert, S.; Kaestner, L.; Gekle, S.; Wagner, C.

    2017-09-01

    We combine confocal imaging, microfluidics, and image analysis to record 3D-images of cells in flow. This enables us to recover the full 3D representation of several hundred living cells per minute. Whereas 3D confocal imaging has thus far been limited to steady specimens, we overcome this restriction and present a method to access the 3D shape of moving objects. The key of our principle is a tilted arrangement of the micro-channel with respect to the focal plane of the microscope. This forces cells to traverse the focal plane in an inclined manner. As a consequence, individual layers of passing cells are recorded, which can then be assembled to obtain the volumetric representation. The full 3D information allows for a detailed comparison with theoretical and numerical predictions unfeasible with, e.g., 2D imaging. Our technique is exemplified by studying flowing red blood cells in a micro-channel reflecting the conditions prevailing in the microvasculature. We observe two very different types of shapes: "croissants" and "slippers." Additionally, we perform 3D numerical simulations of our experiment to confirm the observations. Since 3D confocal imaging of cells in flow has not yet been realized, we see high potential in the field of flow cytometry where cell classification thus far mostly relies on 1D scattering and fluorescence signals.

  20. Analysis of the of bones through 3D computerized tomography; Analise de estrutura ossea atraves de microtomografia computadorizada 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I.; Lopes, R.T. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Oliveira, L.F. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica; Alves, J.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2009-03-15

    This work shows the analysis of the internal structure of the bones samples through 3D micro tomography technique (3D-{mu}TC). The comprehension of the bone structure is particularly important when related to osteoporosis diagnosis because this implies in a deterioration of the trabecular bone architecture, which increases the fragility and the possibility to have bone fractures. Two bone samples (human calcaneous and Wistar rat femur) were used, and the method was a radiographic system in real time with an X Ray microfocus tube. The quantifications parameters are based on stereological principles and they are five: a bone volume fraction, trabecular number, the ratio between surface and bone volume, the trabecular thickness and the trabecular separation. The quantifications were done with a program developed especially for this purpose in Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory - COPPE/UFRJ. This program uses as input the 3D reconstructions images and generates a table with the quantifications. The results of the human calcaneous quantifications are presented in tables 1 and 2, and the 3D reconstructions are illustrated in Figure 5. The Figure 6 illustrate the 2D reconstructed image and the Figure 7 the 3D visualization respectively of the Wistar femur sample. The obtained results show that the 3D-{mu}TC is a powerful technique that can be used to analyze bone microstructures. (author)

  1. Block matching 3D random noise filtering for absorption optical projection tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumene Feruglio, P; Vinegoni, C; Weissleder, R; Gros, J; Sbarbati, A

    2010-01-01

    Absorption and emission optical projection tomography (OPT), alternatively referred to as optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical-emission computed tomography (optical-ECT), are recently developed three-dimensional imaging techniques with value for developmental biology and ex vivo gene expression studies. The techniques' principles are similar to the ones used for x-ray computed tomography and are based on the approximation of negligible light scattering in optically cleared samples. The optical clearing is achieved by a chemical procedure which aims at substituting the cellular fluids within the sample with a cell membranes' index matching solution. Once cleared the sample presents very low scattering and is then illuminated with a light collimated beam whose intensity is captured in transillumination mode by a CCD camera. Different projection images of the sample are subsequently obtained over a 360 0 full rotation, and a standard backprojection algorithm can be used in a similar fashion as for x-ray tomography in order to obtain absorption maps. Because not all biological samples present significant absorption contrast, it is not always possible to obtain projections with a good signal-to-noise ratio, a condition necessary to achieve high-quality tomographic reconstructions. Such is the case for example, for early stage's embryos. In this work we demonstrate how, through the use of a random noise removal algorithm, the image quality of the reconstructions can be considerably improved even when the noise is strongly present in the acquired projections. Specifically, we implemented a block matching 3D (BM3D) filter applying it separately on each acquired transillumination projection before performing a complete three-dimensional tomographical reconstruction. To test the efficiency of the adopted filtering scheme, a phantom and a real biological sample were processed. In both cases, the BM3D filter led to a signal-to-noise ratio increment of over 30 d

  2. Global and Regional 3D Tomography for Improved Seismic Event Location and Uncertainty in Explosion Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, N.; Begnaud, M. L.; Hipp, J. R.; Ballard, S.; Young, C. S.; Encarnacao, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The SALSA3D global 3D velocity model of the Earth was developed to improve the accuracy and precision of seismic travel time predictions for a wide suite of regional and teleseismic phases. Recently, the global SALSA3D model was updated to include additional body wave phases including mantle phases, core phases, reflections off the core-mantle boundary and underside reflections off the surface of the Earth. We show that this update improves travel time predictions and leads directly to significant improvements in the accuracy and precision of seismic event locations as compared to locations computed using standard 1D velocity models like ak135, or 2½D models like RSTT. A key feature of our inversions is that path-specific model uncertainty of travel time predictions are calculated using the full 3D model covariance matrix computed during tomography, which results in more realistic uncertainty ellipses that directly reflect tomographic data coverage. Application of this method can also be done at a regional scale: we present a velocity model with uncertainty obtained using data obtained from the University of Utah Seismograph Stations. These results show a reduction in travel-time residuals for re-located events compared with those obtained using previously published models.

  3. Compensation of deformations in 3D cone beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbat, L.; Roux, S.; Roux, S.; Grangeat, P.

    2006-01-01

    In dynamic tomography, the measured objects or organs are no-longer supposed to be static in the scanner during the acquisition but are supposed to move or to be deformed. Our approach is the analytic deformation compensation during the reconstruction. Our work concentrates on 3-dimensional cone beam tomography. We introduce a new large class of deformations preserving the 3-dimensional cone beam geometry. We show that deformations from this class can be analytically compensated. We present numerical experiments on phantoms showing the compensation of these deformations in 3-dimensional cone beam tomography. (authors)

  4. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography is regarded by many as a complicated union of sophisticated x-ray equipment and computer technology. This book overcomes these complexities. The rigid technicalities of the machinery and the clinical aspects of computed tomography are discussed including the preparation of patients, both physically and mentally, for scanning. Furthermore, the author also explains how to set up and run a computed tomography department, including advice on how the room should be designed

  5. Results of comparative RBMK neutron computation using VNIIEF codes (cell computation, 3D statics, 3D kinetics). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebennikov, A.N.; Zhitnik, A.K.; Zvenigorodskaya, O.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    In conformity with the protocol of the Workshop under Contract {open_quotes}Assessment of RBMK reactor safety using modern Western Codes{close_quotes} VNIIEF performed a neutronics computation series to compare western and VNIIEF codes and assess whether VNIIEF codes are suitable for RBMK type reactor safety assessment computation. The work was carried out in close collaboration with M.I. Rozhdestvensky and L.M. Podlazov, NIKIET employees. The effort involved: (1) cell computations with the WIMS, EKRAN codes (improved modification of the LOMA code) and the S-90 code (VNIIEF Monte Carlo). Cell, polycell, burnup computation; (2) 3D computation of static states with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes and comparison with results of computation with the NESTLE code (USA). The computations were performed in the geometry and using the neutron constants presented by the American party; (3) 3D computation of neutron kinetics with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes. These computations were performed in two formulations, both being developed in collaboration with NIKIET. Formulation of the first problem maximally possibly agrees with one of NESTLE problems and imitates gas bubble travel through a core. The second problem is a model of the RBMK as a whole with imitation of control and protection system controls (CPS) movement in a core.

  6. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  7. Performance measurements in 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.V.; Cooper, W.A.; Gruber, R.; Schwenn, U.

    1989-10-01

    The 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability code TERPSICHORE has been designed to take advantage of vector and microtasking capabilities of the latest CRAY computers. To keep the number of operations small most efficient algorithms have been applied in each computational step. The program investigates the stability properties of fusion reactor relevant plasma configurations confined by magnetic fields. For a typical 3D HELIAS configuration that has been considered we obtain an overall performance in excess of 1 Gflops on an eight processor CRAY-YMP machine. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs

  8. New computational methodology for large 3D neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmani, M.; Roy, R.; Koclas, J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new computational methodology, based on 3D characteristics method, dedicated to solve very large 3D problems without spatial homogenization. In order to eliminate the input/output problems occurring when solving these large problems, we set up a new computing scheme that requires more CPU resources than the usual one, based on sweeps over large tracking files. The huge capacity of storage needed in some problems and the related I/O queries needed by the characteristics solver are replaced by on-the-fly recalculation of tracks at each iteration step. Using this technique, large 3D problems are no longer I/O-bound, and distributed CPU resources can be efficiently used. (authors)

  9. 3D Cosmic Ray Muon Tomography from an Underground Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardincerri, Elena; Rowe, Charlotte; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily; Roy, Mousumi; George, Nicolas; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey; Durham, Matthew; Morley, Deborah; Plaud-Ramos, Kenie; Poulson, Daniel; Baker, Diane; Bonneville, Alain; Kouzes, Richard

    2017-05-01

    We present an underground cosmic ray muon tomographic experiment imaging 3D density of overburden, part of a joint study with differential gravity. Muon data were acquired at four locations within a tunnel beneath Los Alamos, New Mexico, and used in a 3D tomographic inversion to recover the spatial variation in the overlying rock-air interface, and compared with a priori knowledge of the topography. Densities obtained exhibit good agreement with preliminary results of the gravity modeling, which will be presented elsewhere, and are compatible with values reported in the literature. The modeled rock-air interface matches that obtained from LIDAR within 4 m, our resolution, over much of the model volume. This experiment demonstrates the power of cosmic ray muons to image shallow geological targets using underground detectors, whose development as borehole devices will be an important new direction of passive geophysical imaging.

  10. Efficient Computation of Casimir Interactions between Arbitrary 3D Objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M. T. Homer; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce an efficient technique for computing Casimir energies and forces between objects of arbitrarily complex 3D geometries. In contrast to other recently developed methods, our technique easily handles nonspheroidal, nonaxisymmetric objects, and objects with sharp corners. Using our new technique, we obtain the first predictions of Casimir interactions in a number of experimentally relevant geometries, including crossed cylinders and tetrahedral nanoparticles.

  11. Bone histomorphometric quantification by X-ray phase contrast and transmission 3D SR microcomputed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, L.P.; Pinheiro, C.J.G.; Braz, D.; Oliveira, L.F.; Barroso, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Conventional histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed tomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices. In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. Looking for better resolutions and visualization of soft tissues, X-ray phase contrast imaging technique was developed. The objective of this work was to perform histomorphometric quantification of human cancellous bone using 3D synchrotron X ray computed microtomography, using two distinct techniques: transmission and phase contrast, in order to compare the results and evaluate the viability of applying the same methodology of quantification for both technique. All experiments were performed at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Trieste (Italy). MicroCT data sets were collected using the CT set-up on the SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics) beamline. Results showed that there is a better correlation between histomorphometric parameters of both techniques when morphological filters had been used. However, using these filters, some important information given by phase contrast are lost and they shall be explored by new techniques of quantification

  12. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  13. Optimisation and validation of a 3D reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computed tomography by means of GATE simulation platform; Optimisation et validation d'un algorithme de reconstruction 3D en Tomographie d'Emission Monophotonique a l'aide de la plate forme de simulation GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Bitar, Ziad [Ecole Doctorale des Sciences Fondamentales, Universite Blaise Pascal, U.F.R de Recherches Scientifiques et Techniques, 34, avenue Carnot - BP 185, 63006 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, CNRS/IN2P3, 63177 Aubiere (France)

    2006-12-15

    Although time consuming, Monte-Carlo simulations remain an efficient tool enabling to assess correction methods for degrading physical effects in medical imaging. We have optimized and validated a reconstruction method baptized F3DMC (Fully 3D Monte Carlo) in which the physical effects degrading the image formation process were modelled using Monte-Carlo methods and integrated within the system matrix. We used the Monte-Carlo simulation toolbox GATE. We validated GATE in SPECT by modelling the gamma-camera (Philips AXIS) used in clinical routine. Techniques of threshold, filtering by a principal component analysis and targeted reconstruction (functional regions, hybrid regions) were used in order to improve the precision of the system matrix and to reduce the number of simulated photons as well as the time consumption required. The EGEE Grid infrastructures were used to deploy the GATE simulations in order to reduce their computation time. Results obtained with F3DMC were compared with the reconstruction methods (FBP, ML-EM, MLEMC) for a simulated phantom and with the OSEM-C method for the real phantom. Results have shown that the F3DMC method and its variants improve the restoration of activity ratios and the signal to noise ratio. By the use of the grid EGEE, a significant speed-up factor of about 300 was obtained. These results should be confirmed by performing studies on complex phantoms and patients and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be used in SPECT and also in PET. (author)

  14. 3D radar wavefield tomography of comet interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Paul; Asphaug, Erik

    2018-04-01

    Answering fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of small planetary bodies hinges on our ability to image their surface and interior structure in detail and at high resolution. The interior structure is not easily accessible without systematic imaging using, e.g., radar transmission and reflection data from multiple viewpoints, as in medical tomography. Radar tomography can be performed using methodology adapted from terrestrial exploration seismology. Our feasibility study primarily focuses on full wavefield methods that facilitate high quality imaging of small body interiors. We consider the case of a monostatic system (co-located transmitters and receivers) operated in various frequency bands between 5 and 15 MHz, from a spacecraft in slow polar orbit around a spinning comet nucleus. Using realistic numerical experiments, we demonstrate that wavefield techniques can generate high resolution tomograms of comets nuclei with arbitrary shape and complex interior properties.

  15. 3D data processing with advanced computer graphics tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Ekstrand, Laura; Grieve, Taylor; Eisenmann, David J.; Chumbley, L. Scott

    2012-09-01

    Often, the 3-D raw data coming from an optical profilometer contains spiky noises and irregular grid, which make it difficult to analyze and difficult to store because of the enormously large size. This paper is to address these two issues for an optical profilometer by substantially reducing the spiky noise of the 3-D raw data from an optical profilometer, and by rapidly re-sampling the raw data into regular grids at any pixel size and any orientation with advanced computer graphics tools. Experimental results will be presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. 2D histomorphometric quantification from 3D computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Inaya; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Jesus, Edgar Francisco O. de; Alves, Jose Marcos

    2002-01-01

    In the present article, preliminary results are presented showing the application of the tridimensional computerized microtomographic technique (3D-μCT) to bone tissue characterization, through histomorphometric quantification which are based on stereologic concepts. Two samples of human bone were correctly prepared to be submitted to the tomographic system. The system used to realize that process were a radiographic system with a microfocus X-ray tube. Through these three processes, acquisition, reconstruction and quantification, it was possible to get the good results and coherent to the literature data. From this point, it is intended to compare these results with the information due the conventional method, that is, conventional histomorphometry. (author)

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  18. Parallel Computer System for 3D Visualization Stereo on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oraiqat, Anas M.; Zori, Sergii A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes the organization of a parallel computer system based on Graphic Processors Unit (GPU) for 3D stereo image synthesis. The development is based on the modified ray tracing method developed by the authors for fast search of tracing rays intersections with scene objects. The system allows significant increase in the productivity for the 3D stereo synthesis of photorealistic quality. The generalized procedure of 3D stereo image synthesis on the Graphics Processing Unit/Graphics Processing Clusters (GPU/GPC) is proposed. The efficiency of the proposed solutions by GPU implementation is compared with single-threaded and multithreaded implementations on the CPU. The achieved average acceleration in multi-thread implementation on the test GPU and CPU is about 7.5 and 1.6 times, respectively. Studying the influence of choosing the size and configuration of the computational Compute Unified Device Archi-tecture (CUDA) network on the computational speed shows the importance of their correct selection. The obtained experimental estimations can be significantly improved by new GPUs with a large number of processing cores and multiprocessors, as well as optimized configuration of the computing CUDA network.

  19. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography (3D OCT), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Applied Science Innovations, Inc. proposes a new tool of 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cellular level imaging at video frame rates and dramatically...

  20. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Gullberg, G.T.; Huesman, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the methods of computer assisted tomography for determination of the three-dimensional distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the human body. The major applications of emission computed tomography are in biological research and medical diagnostic procedures. The objectives of these procedures are to make quantitative measurements of in vivo biochemical and hemodynamic functions

  1. 3D-CT vascular setting protocol using computer graphics for the evaluation of maxillofacial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAVALCANTI Marcelo de Gusmão Paraiso

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the aspect of a mandibular giant cell granuloma in spiral computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D-CT reconstructed images using computer graphics, and demonstrate the importance of the vascular protocol in permitting better diagnosis, visualization and determination of the dimensions of the lesion. We analyzed 21 patients with maxillofacial lesions of neoplastic and proliferative origins. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists analyzed the images. The usefulness of interactive 3D images reconstructed by means of computer graphics, especially using a vascular setting protocol for qualitative and quantitative analyses for the diagnosis, determination of the extent of lesions, treatment planning and follow-up, was demonstrated. The technique is an important adjunct to the evaluation of lesions in relation to axial CT slices and 3D-CT bone images.

  2. 3D-CT vascular setting protocol using computer graphics for the evaluation of maxillofacial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, M G; Ruprecht, A; Vannier, M W

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present the aspect of a mandibular giant cell granuloma in spiral computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D-CT) reconstructed images using computer graphics, and demonstrate the importance of the vascular protocol in permitting better diagnosis, visualization and determination of the dimensions of the lesion. We analyzed 21 patients with maxillofacial lesions of neoplastic and proliferative origins. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists analyzed the images. The usefulness of interactive 3D images reconstructed by means of computer graphics, especially using a vascular setting protocol for qualitative and quantitative analyses for the diagnosis, determination of the extent of lesions, treatment planning and follow-up, was demonstrated. The technique is an important adjunct to the evaluation of lesions in relation to axial CT slices and 3D-CT bone images.

  3. 3 D flow computations under a reactor vessel closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, O.; Bonnin, O.; Hofmann, F.; Hecker, M.

    1995-12-01

    The flow under a vessel cover of a pressurised water reactor is investigated by using several computations and a physical model. The case presented here is turbulent, isothermal and incompressible. Computations are made with N3S code using a k-epsilon model. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are on the whole satisfying. Some local improvements are expected either with more sophisticated turbulence models or with mesh refinements automatically computed by using the adaptive meshing technique which has been just implemented in N3S for 3D cases. (authors). 6 refs., 7 figs

  4. 3-D waveform tomography sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    The complications in anisotropic multi-parameter inversion lie in the trade-off between the different anisotropy parameters. We compute the tomographic waveform sensitivity kernels for a VTI acoustic medium perturbation as a tool to investigate

  5. Evaluation of DQA for tomography using 3D volumetric phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic University of Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The study investigates the necessity of 3 dimensional dose distribution evaluation instead of point dose and 2 dimensional dose distribution evaluation. Treatment plans were generated on the RANDO phantom to measure the precise dose distribution of the treatment site 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 cm with the prescribed dose; 1,200 cGy, 5 fractions. Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) of dose distribution was evaluated with gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom. The average error of absolute dose was measured at 0.76±0.59% and 1.37±0.76% in cheese phantom and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. The average passing ratio for 3%/3 mm were 97.72±0.02% and 99.26±0.01% in gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. The average passing ratio for 2%/2 mm were 94.21±0.02% and 93.02±0.01% in gafchromic EBT2 film and ArcCHECK phantom respectively. There was a more accurate dose distribution of 3D volume phantom than cheese phantom in patients DQA using tomotherapy. Therefor it should be evaluated simultaneously 3 dimensional dose evaluation on target and peripheral area in rotational radiotherapy such as tomotherapy.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  8. Automatic detection of flaws in polymer insulators using 3D industrial tomography; Deteccao automatica de vazios em isoladores polimericos por tomografia industrial 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoi, Walmor Cardoso; Swinka-Filho, Vitoldo [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], Emails: walmor@lactec.org.br, vitoldo@lactec.org.br; Geus, Klaus de [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (Copel), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], Email: klaus@copel.com; Silva, Romeu Ricardo da [SENAI-RJ Solda (CTS/Solda), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia], Email: rrdsilva@firjan.org.br

    2009-10-15

    This work presents a methodology for the automatic detection of flaws in polymer insulators using three-dimensional industrial computed tomography (CT), as well as results obtained in the context of power distribution networks. The CT slices were reconstructed using 180 digital radiographs (projections) acquired by a high resolution system (pixel dimension of 50 {mu}m x 50 {mu}m, a-Si). For the reconstruction of 3D CT, 50 {mu}m wide bit map slices were used. The Marching Cubes algorithm was used to perform the 3D reconstruction, using the Visualization Tool kit (VTK) library and the Java programming language (64 Bits Linux platform). Nine features were obtained from the reconstructed three-dimensional objects for the neural networks training. Results showed to be satisfactory. (author)

  9. Imaging multipole gravity anomaly sources by 3D probability tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaia, Raffaele; Patella, Domenico; Mauriello, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    We present a generalized theory of the probability tomography applied to the gravity method, assuming that any Bouguer anomaly data set can be caused by a discrete number of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octopoles. These elementary sources are used to characterize, in an as detailed as possible way and without any a priori assumption, the shape and position of the most probable minimum structure of the gravity sources compatible with the observed data set, by picking out the location of their centres and peculiar points of their boundaries related to faces, edges and vertices. A few synthetic examples using simple geometries are discussed in order to demonstrate the notably enhanced resolution power of the new approach, compared with a previous formulation that used only monopoles and dipoles. A field example related to a gravity survey carried out in the volcanic area of Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy) is presented, aimed at imaging the geometry of the minimum gravity structure down to 8 km of depth bsl

  10. 2-D and 3-D computations of curved accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to save computer memory, a long accelerator magnet may be computed by treating the long central region and the end regions separately. The dipole magnets for the injector synchrotron of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), employ magnet iron consisting of parallel laminations, stacked with a uniform radius of curvature of 33.379 m. Laplace's equation for the magnetic scalar potential has a different form for a straight magnet (x-y coordinates), a magnet with surfaces curved about a common center (r-θ coordinates), and a magnet with parallel laminations like the APS injector dipole. Yet pseudo 2-D computations for the three geometries give basically identical results, even for a much more strongly curved magnet. Hence 2-D (x-y) computations of the central region and 3-D computations of the end regions can be combined to determine the overall magnetic behavior of the magnets. 1 ref., 6 figs

  11. Electrical impedance tomography methods for miniaturised 3D systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canali, Chiara; Aristovich, K.; Ceccarelli, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    chambers (Ø 10 mm), each having eight gold plated needle electrodes vertically integrated along the chamber perimeter. As first method, the adjacent electrode configuration was tested solving the computationally simple back-projection algorithm using Comsol Multiphysics in time-difference EIT (t...

  12. 3D computer visualization and animation of CANDU reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, T.; Echlin, M.; Tonner, P.; Sur, B.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer visualization and animation models of typical CANDU reactor cores (Darlington, Point Lepreau) have been developed using world-wide-web (WWW) browser based tools: JavaScript, hyper-text-markup language (HTML) and virtual reality modeling language (VRML). The 3D models provide three-dimensional views of internal control and monitoring structures in the reactor core, such as fuel channels, flux detectors, liquid zone controllers, zone boundaries, shutoff rods, poison injection tubes, ion chambers. Animations have been developed based on real in-core flux detector responses and rod position data from reactor shutdown. The animations show flux changing inside the reactor core with the drop of shutoff rods and/or the injection of liquid poison. The 3D models also provide hypertext links to documents giving specifications and historical data for particular components. Data in HTML format (or other format such as PDF, etc.) can be shown in text, tables, plots, drawings, etc., and further links to other sources of data can also be embedded. This paper summarizes the use of these WWW browser based tools, and describes the resulting 3D reactor core static and dynamic models. Potential applications of the models are discussed. (author)

  13. Computer tomography in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of design and the action of computer tomography which was applied also for the diagnosis of nose, ear and throat diseases are discussed. Computer tomography makes possible visualization of the structures of the nose, nasal sinuses and facial skeleton in transverse and eoronal planes. The method enables an accurate evaluation of the position and size of neoplasms in these regions and differentiation of inflammatory exudates against malignant masses. In otology computer tomography is used particularly in the diagnosis of pontocerebellar angle tumours and otogenic brain abscesses. Computer tomography of the larynx and pharynx provides new diagnostic data owing to the possibility of obtaining transverse sections and visualization of cartilage. Computer tomograms of some cases are presented. (author)

  14. New generation of 3D desktop computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerjanc, Robert; Pastoor, Siegmund

    1997-05-01

    Today's computer interfaces use 2-D displays showing windows, icons and menus and support mouse interactions for handling programs and data files. The interface metaphor is that of a writing desk with (partly) overlapping sheets of documents placed on its top. Recent advances in the development of 3-D display technology give the opportunity to take the interface concept a radical stage further by breaking the design limits of the desktop metaphor. The major advantage of the envisioned 'application space' is, that it offers an additional, immediately perceptible dimension to clearly and constantly visualize the structure and current state of interrelations between documents, videos, application programs and networked systems. In this context, we describe the development of a visual operating system (VOS). Under VOS, applications appear as objects in 3-D space. Users can (graphically connect selected objects to enable communication between the respective applications. VOS includes a general concept of visual and object oriented programming for tasks ranging from, e.g., low-level programming up to high-level application configuration. In order to enable practical operation in an office or at home for many hours, the system should be very comfortable to use. Since typical 3-D equipment used, e.g., in virtual-reality applications (head-mounted displays, data gloves) is rather cumbersome and straining, we suggest to use off-head displays and contact-free interaction techniques. In this article, we introduce an autostereoscopic 3-D display and connected video based interaction techniques which allow viewpoint-depending imaging (by head tracking) and visually controlled modification of data objects and links (by gaze tracking, e.g., to pick, 3-D objects just by looking at them).

  15. Inverse problems in vision and 3D tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamad-Djafari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concept of an inverse problem is a familiar one to most scientists and engineers, particularly in the field of signal and image processing, imaging systems (medical, geophysical, industrial non-destructive testing, etc.) and computer vision. In imaging systems, the aim is not just to estimate unobserved images, but also their geometric characteristics from observed quantities that are linked to these unobserved quantities through the forward problem. This book focuses on imagery and vision problems that can be clearly written in terms of an inverse problem where an estimate for the image a

  16. Evaluation of the Possibility of Applying Spatial 3D Imaging Using X-Ray Computed Tomography Reconstruction Methods for Quantitative Analysis of Multiphase Materials / Rentgenowska Analiza Ilościowa Materiałów Wielofazowych Z Wykorzystaniem Przestrzennego Obrazowania (3D Przy Użyciu Metod Rekonstrukcji Tomografii Komputerowej

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matysik P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the possibility of using X-ray computed tomography (CT in quantitative metallographic studies of homogeneous and composite materials is presented. Samples of spheroidal cast iron, Fe-Ti powder mixture compact and epoxy composite reinforced with glass fibers, were subjected to comparative structural tests. Volume fractions of each of the phase structure components were determined by conventional methods with the use of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD quantitative analysis methods. These results were compared with those obtained by the method of spatial analysis of the reconstructed CT image. Based on the comparative analysis, taking into account the selectivity of data verification methods and the accuracy of the obtained results, the authors conclude that the method of computed tomography is suitable for quantitative analysis of several types of structural materials.

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  6. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  7. Computer-aided segmentation system for 3D chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Tae; Komagata, Takanobu; Ogura, Takashi; Iwao, Yuma; Goto, Toshiyuki; Asakura, Akira; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    We will introduce the quantitative analysis of the chest CT images using computer-assisted segmentation system (Gaussian Histogram Normalized Correlation; GHNC). This system can divide the lung into several patterns, for example, normal, emphysema and fibrous lesion, and measure each lesion volume quantitatively. We analyzed 3D-CT images of 20 patients with lung cancer. GHNC could measure the volumes of emphysema and fibrosis lesions, respectively. GHNC analysis will be feasible for preoperative CT evaluation, especially in the patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. (author)

  8. Magnetic field computations for ISX using GFUN-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between measured magnetic fields and the magnetic fields calculated by the three-dimensional computer program GFUN-3D for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX). Several iron models are considered ranging in sophistication from 50 to 222 tetrahedra iron elements. The effects of air gaps and the efforts made to simulate effects of grain orientation and packing factor are detailed. The results obtained are compared with the measured magnetic fields, and explanations are presented to account for the variations which occur

  9. 3-D computer graphics based on integral photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemura, T; Yoshida, T; Harashima, H

    2001-02-12

    Integral photography (IP), which is one of the ideal 3-D photographic technologies, can be regarded as a method of capturing and displaying light rays passing through a plane. The NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories have developed a real-time IP system using an HDTV camera and an optical fiber array. In this paper, the authors propose a method of synthesizing arbitrary views from IP images captured by the HDTV camera. This is a kind of image-based rendering system, founded on the 4-D data space Representation of light rays. Experimental results show the potential to improve the quality of images rendered by computer graphics techniques.

  10. Wavefront picking for 3D tomography and full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-09-08

    We have developed an efficient approach for picking firstbreak wavefronts on coarsely sampled time slices of 3D shot gathers. Our objective was to compute a smooth initial velocity model for multiscale full-waveform inversion (FWI). Using interactive software, first-break wavefronts were geometrically modeled on time slices with a minimal number of picks. We picked sparse time slices, performed traveltime tomography, and then compared the predicted traveltimes with the data in-between the picked slices. The picking interval was refined with iterations until the errors in traveltime predictions fell within the limits necessary to avoid cycle skipping in early arrivals FWI. This approach was applied to a 3D ocean-bottom-station data set. Our results indicate that wavefront picking has 28% fewer data slices to pick compared with picking traveltimes in shot gathers. In addition, by using sparse time samples for picking, data storage is reduced by 88%, and therefore allows for a faster visualization and quality control of the picks. Our final traveltime tomogram is sufficient as a starting model for early arrival FWI. © 2016 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. Integrated computer-aided forensic case analysis, presentation, and documentation based on multimodal 3D data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornik, Alexander; Urschler, Martin; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Bischof, Horst; Krauskopf, Astrid; Schwark, Thorsten; Scheurer, Eva; Yen, Kathrin

    2018-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crime scene documentation using 3D scanners and medical imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are increasingly applied in forensic casework. Together with digital photography, these modalities enable comprehensive and non-invasive recording of forensically relevant information regarding injuries/pathologies inside the body and on its surface. Furthermore, it is possible to capture traces and items at crime scenes. Such digitally secured evidence has the potential to similarly increase case understanding by forensic experts and non-experts in court. Unlike photographs and 3D surface models, images from CT and MRI are not self-explanatory. Their interpretation and understanding requires radiological knowledge. Findings in tomography data must not only be revealed, but should also be jointly studied with all the 2D and 3D data available in order to clarify spatial interrelations and to optimally exploit the data at hand. This is technically challenging due to the heterogeneous data representations including volumetric data, polygonal 3D models, and images. This paper presents a novel computer-aided forensic toolbox providing tools to support the analysis, documentation, annotation, and illustration of forensic cases using heterogeneous digital data. Conjoint visualization of data from different modalities in their native form and efficient tools to visually extract and emphasize findings help experts to reveal unrecognized correlations and thereby enhance their case understanding. Moreover, the 3D case illustrations created for case analysis represent an efficient means to convey the insights gained from case analysis to forensic non-experts involved in court proceedings like jurists and laymen. The capability of the presented approach in the context of case analysis, its potential to speed up legal procedures and to ultimately enhance legal certainty is demonstrated by introducing a number of

  12. Computational Modelling of Piston Ring Dynamics in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dlugoš Jozef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced computational models of a piston assembly based on the level of virtual prototypes require a detailed description of piston ring behaviour. Considering these requirements, the piston rings operate in regimes that cannot, in general, be simplified into an axisymmetric model. The piston and the cylinder liner do not have a perfect round shape, mainly due to machining tolerances and external thermo-mechanical loads. If the ring cannot follow the liner deformations, a local loss of contact occurs resulting in blow-by and increased consumption of lubricant oil in the engine. Current computational models are unable to implement such effects. The paper focuses on the development of a flexible 3D piston ring model based on the Timoshenko beam theory using the multibody system (MBS. The MBS model is compared to the finite element method (FEM solution.

  13. Computation of 3D form factors in complex environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, N.

    1989-01-01

    The calculation of radiant interchange among opaque surfaces in a complex environment poses the general problem of determining the visible and hidden parts of the environment. In many thermal engineering applications, surfaces are separated by radiatively non-participating media and may be idealized as diffuse emitters and reflectors. Consenquently the net radiant energy fluxes are intimately related to purely geometrical quantities called form factors, that take into account hidden parts: the problem is reduced to the form factor evaluation. This paper presents the method developed for the computation of 3D form factors in the finite-element module of the system TRIO, which is a general computer code for thermal and fluid flow analysis. The method is derived from an algorithm devised for synthetic image generation. A comparison is performed with the standard contour integration method also implemented and suited to convex geometries. Several illustrative examples of finite-element thermal calculations in radiating enclosures are given

  14. 3D computer model of the VINCY cyclotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    The VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field simulation was performed with the help of the three-dimensional (3D) software. The following aspects of the system were considered: 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the median plane, 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the extraction region, 3D calculation of the stray magnetic field. 8 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Multi-Spacecraft 3D differential emission measure tomography of the solar corona: STEREO results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, A. M.; Frazin, R. A.

    We have recently developed a novel technique (called DEMT) for the em- pirical determination of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the so- lar corona differential emission measure through multi-spacecraft solar ro- tational tomography of extreme-ultaviolet (EUV) image time series (like those provided by EIT/SOHO and EUVI/STEREO). The technique allows, for the first time, to develop global 3D empirical maps of the coronal elec- tron temperature and density, in the height range 1.0 to 1.25 RS . DEMT constitutes a simple and powerful 3D analysis tool that obviates the need for structure specific modeling.

  16. 3D first-arrival traveltime tomography with modified total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenbin; Zhang, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic surveys have become a major tool in the exploration and exploitation of hydrocarbons. 3D seismic first-arrival traveltime tomography is a robust method for near-surface velocity estimation. A common approach for stabilizing the ill-posed inverse problem is to apply Tikhonov regularization to the inversion. However, the Tikhonov regularization method recovers smooth local structures while blurring the sharp features in the model solution. We present a 3D first-arrival traveltime tomography method with modified total variation (MTV) regularization to preserve sharp velocity contrasts and improve the accuracy of velocity inversion. To solve the minimization problem of the new traveltime tomography method, we decouple the original optimization problem into two following subproblems: a standard traveltime tomography problem with the traditional Tikhonov regularization and a L2 total variation problem. We apply the conjugate gradient method and split-Bregman iterative method to solve these two subproblems, respectively. Our synthetic examples show that the new method produces higher resolution models than the conventional traveltime tomography with Tikhonov regularization. We apply the technique to field data. The stacking section shows significant improvements with static corrections from the MTV traveltime tomography.

  17. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Miura, Ken-ichi; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  18. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Miura, Ken-ichi; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide [University of Tsukba, Institute of Applied Physics, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan)], E-mail: yatagai@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2008-11-01

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  19. A hybrid method for the computation of quasi-3D seismograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The development of powerful computer clusters and efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) made possible the computation of seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous 3D earth. However, the cost of theses computations is still problematic for global scale tomography that requires hundreds of such simulations. Part of the ongoing research effort is dedicated to the development of faster modeling methods based on the spectral element method. Capdeville et al. (2002) proposed to couple SEM simulations with normal modes calculation (C-SEM). Nissen-Meyer et al. (2007) used 2D SEM simulations to compute 3D seismograms in a 1D earth model. Thanks to these developments, and for the first time, Lekic et al. (2011) developed a 3D global model of the upper mantle using SEM simulations. At the local and continental scale, adjoint tomography that is using a lot of SEM simulation can be implemented on current computers (Tape, Liu et al. 2009). Due to their smaller size, these models offer higher resolution. They provide us with images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. In an attempt to teleport such local adjoint tomographic inversions into the deep earth, we are developing a hybrid method where SEM computation are limited to a region of interest within the earth. That region can have an arbitrary shape and size. Outside this region, the seismic wavefield is extrapolated to obtain synthetic data at the Earth's surface. A key feature of the method is the use of a time reversal mirror to inject the wavefield induced by distant seismic source into the region of interest (Robertsson and Chapman 2000). We compute synthetic seismograms as follow: Inside the region of interest, we are using regional spectral element software RegSEM to compute wave propagation in 3D. Outside this region, the wavefield is extrapolated to the surface by convolution with the Green's functions from the mirror to the seismic stations. For now, these

  20. Measurement of 3D refractive index distribution by optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Weining; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie; Rong, Lu; Yuan, Yuanyuan

    2018-01-01

    Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT), as a novel 3D imaging technique, can obtain a 3D refractive index (RI) distribution to reveal the important optical properties of transparent samples. According to the theory of ODT, an optical diffraction tomography setup is built based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The propagation direction of object beam is controlled by a 2D translation stage, and 121 holograms based on different illumination angles are recorded by a Charge-coupled Device (CCD). In order to prove the validity and accuracy of the ODT, the 3D RI profile of microsphere with a known RI is firstly measured. An iterative constraint algorithm is employed to improve the imaging accuracy effectively. The 3D morphology and average RI of the microsphere are consistent with that of the actual situation, and the RI error is less than 0.0033. Then, an optical element fabricated by laser with a non-uniform RI is taken as the sample. Its 3D RI profile is obtained by the optical diffraction tomography system.

  1. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex.

  2. Protein 3D structure computed from evolutionary sequence variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora S Marks

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by its function. Collections of sequence homologs record the outcomes of millions of evolutionary experiments in which the protein evolves according to these constraints. Deciphering the evolutionary record held in these sequences and exploiting it for predictive and engineering purposes presents a formidable challenge. The potential benefit of solving this challenge is amplified by the advent of inexpensive high-throughput genomic sequencing.In this paper we ask whether we can infer evolutionary constraints from a set of sequence homologs of a protein. The challenge is to distinguish true co-evolution couplings from the noisy set of observed correlations. We address this challenge using a maximum entropy model of the protein sequence, constrained by the statistics of the multiple sequence alignment, to infer residue pair couplings. Surprisingly, we find that the strength of these inferred couplings is an excellent predictor of residue-residue proximity in folded structures. Indeed, the top-scoring residue couplings are sufficiently accurate and well-distributed to define the 3D protein fold with remarkable accuracy.We quantify this observation by computing, from sequence alone, all-atom 3D structures of fifteen test proteins from different fold classes, ranging in size from 50 to 260 residues, including a G-protein coupled receptor. These blinded inferences are de novo, i.e., they do not use homology modeling or sequence-similar fragments from known structures. The co-evolution signals provide sufficient information to determine accurate 3D protein structure to 2.7-4.8 Å C(α-RMSD error relative to the observed structure, over at least two-thirds of the protein (method called EVfold, details at http://EVfold.org. This discovery provides insight into essential interactions constraining protein evolution and will facilitate a comprehensive survey of the universe of

  3. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes

  4. A 3D computer graphics approach to brachytherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Frank; Wawro, Martin; Wilke, Carsten

    2004-06-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) can significantly reduce the risk of restenosis after interventional treatment of stenotic arteries, if planned and applied correctly. In order to facilitate computer-based IVB planning, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the stenotic artery based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) sequences is desirable. For this purpose, the frames of the IVUS sequence are properly aligned in space, possible gaps inbetween the IVUS frames are filled by interpolation with radial basis functions known from scattered data interpolation. The alignment procedure uses additional information which is obtained from biplane X-ray angiography performed simultaneously during the capturing of the IVUS sequence. After IVUS images and biplane angiography data are acquired from the patient, the vessel-wall borders and the IVUS catheter are detected by an active contour algorithm. Next, the twist (relative orientation) between adjacent IVUS frames is determined by a sequential triangulation method. The absolute orientation of each frame is established by a stochastic analysis based on anatomical landmarks. Finally, the reconstructed 3D vessel model is visualized by methods of combined volume and polygon rendering. The reconstruction is then used for the computation of the radiation-distribution within the tissue, emitted from a beta-radiation source. All these steps are performed during the percutaneous intervention.

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related ...

  9. Computed tomography in traumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.; Jend, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    This volume offers a critical review and assessment of new avenues opened up by computed tomography in traumatology. Over 200 illustrations, including numerous CT scans, aid the physician engaged emergency care and postoperative treatment of accident victims. Technical prerequisites, special techniques of investigation, pathomorphology of organ changes conditioned by trauma, diagnostic leading symptoms and signs, and diagnostics of iatrogenic injuries and lesions are presented

  10. Computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, T.W.; Blake, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to computed tomography and is particularly concerned with determining the CT numbers of zones of interest in an image displayed on a cathode ray tube which zones lie in the so-called level or center of the gray scale window. (author)

  11. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  14. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is directed towards giving radiographers an introduction to and basic knowledge of computerized tomography. The technical section discusses gantries and x-ray production, computer and disc drive image display, storage, artefacts quality assurance and design of departments. The clinical section includes patient preparation, radiotherapy planning, and interpretation of images from various areas of the anatomy. (U.K.)

  15. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Moeller, Knut; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT. (paper)

  16. Wavefront picking for 3D tomography and full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient approach for picking firstbreak wavefronts on coarsely sampled time slices of 3D shot gathers. Our objective was to compute a smooth initial velocity model for multiscale full-waveform inversion (FWI). Using

  17. CROSSPLOT-3/CON-3D, 3-D and Stereoscopic Computer-Aided Design Graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotch, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Description of program or function: CROSSPLOT3 is a general three- dimensional point plotting program which generates scatterplots of a data matrix from any user-specified viewpoint. Images can be rotated for a movie-like effect enhancing stereo perception. A number of features can be invoked by the user including: color, class distinction, flickering, sectioning, projections to grid surfaces, and drawing a plane. Plots may be viewed in real time as they are generated. CON3D generates three-dimensional surfaces plus contours on a lower plane from either data on a rectangular grid or an analytical function z=f(x,y). The user may choose any viewing perspective. Plots may be generated in color with many refinements under user control

  18. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  19. Computationally efficient storage of 3D particle intensity and position data for use in 3D PIV and 3D PTV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, C; Buchmann, N A; Soria, J

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volumetric velocity measurement techniques, such as tomographic or holographic particle image velocimetry (PIV), rely upon the computationally intensive formation, storage and localized interrogation of multiple 3D particle intensity fields. Calculation of a single velocity field typically requires the extraction of particle intensities into tens of thousands of 3D sub-volumes or discrete particle clusters, the processing of which can significantly affect the performance of 3D cross-correlation based PIV and 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). In this paper, a series of popular and customized volumetric data formats are presented and investigated using synthetic particle volumes and experimental data arising from tomographic PIV measurements of a turbulent boundary layer. Results show that the use of a sub-grid ordered non-zero intensity format with a sub-grid size of 16 × 16 × 16 points provides the best performance for cross-correlation based PIV analysis, while a particle clustered non-zero intensity format provides the best format for PTV applications. In practical tomographic PIV measurements the sub-grid ordered non-zero intensity format offered a 29% improvement in reconstruction times, while providing a 93% reduction in volume data requirements and a 28% overall improvement in cross-correlation based velocity analysis and validation times. (paper)

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  1. Characterization of the coating and tablet core roughness by means of 3D optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, Daniel; Wahl, Patrick; Pichler, Heinz; Sacher, Stephan; Khinast, Johannes G

    2018-01-30

    This study demonstrates the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to simultaneously characterize the roughness of the tablet core and coating of pharmaceutical tablets. OCT is a high resolution non-destructive and contactless imaging methodology to characterize structural properties of solid dosage forms. Besides measuring the coating thickness, it also facilitates the analysis of the tablet core and coating roughness. An automated data evaluation algorithm extracts information about coating thickness, as well as tablet core and coating roughness. Samples removed periodically from a pan coating process were investigated, on the basis of thickness and profile maps of the tablet core and coating computed from about 480,000 depth measurements (i.e., 3D data) per sample. This data enables the calculation of the root mean square deviation, the skewness and the kurtosis of the assessed profiles. Analyzing these roughness parameters revealed that, for the given coating formulation, small valleys in the tablet core are filled with coating, whereas coarse features of the tablet core are still visible on the final film-coated tablet. Moreover, the impact of the tablet core roughness on the coating thickness is analyzed by correlating the tablet core profile and the coating thickness map. The presented measurement method and processing could be in the future transferred to in-line OCT measurements, to investigate core and coating roughness during the production of film-coated tablets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Weight prediction of broiler chickens using 3D computer vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anders Krogh; Lisouski, Pavel; Ahrendt, Peter

    2016-01-01

    a platform weigher which may also include ill birds. In the current study, a fully-automatic 3D camera-based weighing system for broilers have been developed and evaluated in a commercial production environment. Specifically, a low-cost 3D camera (Kinect) that directly returned a depth image was employed...

  3. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdeu, Anthony; Momey, Fabien; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Allier, Cédric

    2017-02-01

    New microscopes are needed to help reaching the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies by gathering large quantitative and systematic data over extended periods of time while preserving the integrity of the living sample. In order to reconstruct large volumes while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose new imaging platforms based on lens-free microscopy, a technic which is addressing these needs in the context of 2D cell culture, providing label-free and non-phototoxic acquisition of large datasets. We built lens-free diffractive tomography setups performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid cultures embedded in Matrigel and developed dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithms based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. Nonetheless, holographic setups do not record the phase of the incident wave front and the biological samples in Petri dish strongly limit the angular coverage. These limitations introduce numerous artefacts in the sample reconstruction. We developed several methods to overcome them, such as multi-wavelength imaging or iterative phase retrieval. The most promising technic currently developed is based on a regularised inverse problem approach directly applied on the 3D volume to reconstruct. 3D reconstructions were performed on several complex samples such as 3D networks or spheroids embedded in capsules with large reconstructed volumes up to 25 mm3 while still being able to identify single cells. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an inverse problem approach is implemented in the context of lens-free diffractive tomography enabling to reconstruct large fully 3D volumes of unstained biological samples.

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  5. Computed Tomography Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  6. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristovich, K Y; Khan, S H

    2010-01-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  7. 3D observation of the solidified structures by x-ray micro computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Hideyuki; Ohnaka, Itsuo; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakano, Tsukasa; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    The high flux density of the monochromatized and well-collimated X-ray and the high-resolution detector provide a new 3D observation tool for microstructures of metallic alloys and ceramics. The X-ray micro computerized tomography in BL47XU of SPring-8 (SP-μCT) was applied to observe microstructures produced through the eutectic reaction for Sn-based alloys and an Al 2 O 3 -Y 2 O 3 oxide system. The constituent phases in the eutectic structures were three-dimensionally identified, in which the lamellar spacing ranged from several to 10 μm. Since the 3D structure of the unidirectionally solidified specimens contains history of the eutectic structure formation, the 3D structure obtained by SP-μCT gives useful information to consider the microstructure evolution. (author)

  8. Human cardiac telocytes: 3D imaging by FIB-SEM tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretoiu, D; Hummel, E; Zimmermann, H; Gherghiceanu, M; Popescu, L M

    2014-11-01

    Telocyte (TC) is a newly identified type of cell in the cardiac interstitium (www.telocytes.com). TCs are described by classical transmission electron microscopy as cells with very thin and long telopodes (Tps; cellular prolongations) having podoms (dilations) and podomers (very thin segments). TCs' three-dimensional (3D) morphology is still unknown. Cardiac TCs seem to be particularly involved in long and short distance intercellular signalling and, therefore, their 3D architecture is important for understanding their spatial connections. Using focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) we show, for the first time, the whole ultrastructural anatomy of cardiac TCs. 3D reconstruction of cardiac TCs by FIB-SEM tomography confirms that they have long, narrow but flattened (ribbon-like) telopodes, with humps generated by the podoms. FIB-SEM tomography also confirms the network made by TCs in the cardiac interstitium through adherens junctions. This study provides the first FIB-SEM tomography of a human cell type. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. A novel 3D absorption correction method for quantitative EDX-STEM tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdet, Pierre; Saghi, Z.; Filippin, A.N.; Borrás, A.; Midgley, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel 3D method to correct for absorption in energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis of heterogeneous samples of unknown structure and composition. By using STEM-based tomography coupled with EDX, an initial 3D reconstruction is used to extract the location of generated X-rays as well as the X-ray path through the sample to the surface. The absorption correction needed to retrieve the generated X-ray intensity is then calculated voxel-by-voxel estimating the different compositions encountered by the X-ray. The method is applied to a core/shell nanowire containing carbon and oxygen, two elements generating highly absorbed low energy X-rays. Absorption is shown to cause major reconstruction artefacts, in the form of an incomplete recovery of the oxide and an erroneous presence of carbon in the shell. By applying the correction method, these artefacts are greatly reduced. The accuracy of the method is assessed using reference X-ray lines with low absorption. - Highlights: • A novel 3D absorption correction method is proposed for 3D EDX-STEM tomography. • The absorption of X-rays along the path to the surface is calculated voxel-by-voxel. • The method is applied on highly absorbed X-rays emitted from a core/shell nanowire. • Absorption is shown to cause major artefacts in the reconstruction. • Using the absorption correction method, the reconstruction artefacts are greatly reduced.

  10. A novel 3D absorption correction method for quantitative EDX-STEM tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdet, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.burdet@a3.epfl.ch [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road 27, Cambridge CB3 0FS, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Saghi, Z. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road 27, Cambridge CB3 0FS, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Filippin, A.N.; Borrás, A. [Nanotechnology on Surfaces Laboratory, Materials Science Institute of Seville (ICMS), CSIC-University of Seville, C/ Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Midgley, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Charles Babbage Road 27, Cambridge CB3 0FS, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents a novel 3D method to correct for absorption in energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis of heterogeneous samples of unknown structure and composition. By using STEM-based tomography coupled with EDX, an initial 3D reconstruction is used to extract the location of generated X-rays as well as the X-ray path through the sample to the surface. The absorption correction needed to retrieve the generated X-ray intensity is then calculated voxel-by-voxel estimating the different compositions encountered by the X-ray. The method is applied to a core/shell nanowire containing carbon and oxygen, two elements generating highly absorbed low energy X-rays. Absorption is shown to cause major reconstruction artefacts, in the form of an incomplete recovery of the oxide and an erroneous presence of carbon in the shell. By applying the correction method, these artefacts are greatly reduced. The accuracy of the method is assessed using reference X-ray lines with low absorption. - Highlights: • A novel 3D absorption correction method is proposed for 3D EDX-STEM tomography. • The absorption of X-rays along the path to the surface is calculated voxel-by-voxel. • The method is applied on highly absorbed X-rays emitted from a core/shell nanowire. • Absorption is shown to cause major artefacts in the reconstruction. • Using the absorption correction method, the reconstruction artefacts are greatly reduced.

  11. 3D Printing device adaptable to Computer Numerical Control (CNC)

    OpenAIRE

    GARDAN , Julien; Danesi , F.; Roucoules , Lionel; Schneider , A.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the development of a 3D printing device for the additive manufacturing adapted to a CNC machining. The application involves the integration of a specific printing head. Additive manufacturing technology is most commonly used for modeling, prototyping, tooling through an exclusive machine or 3D printer. A global review and analysis of technologies show the additive manufacturing presents little independent solutions [6][9]. The problem studied especially the additive manu...

  12. tomo3d: a new 3-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography code for active-source seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    We present the development state of tomo3d, a code for three-dimensional refraction and reflection travel-time tomography of wide-angle seismic data based on the previous two-dimensional version of the code, tomo2d. The core of both forward and inverse problems is inherited from the 2-D version. The ray tracing is performed by a hybrid method combining the graph and bending methods. The graph method finds an ordered array of discrete model nodes, which satisfies Fermat's principle, that is, whose corresponding travel time is a global minimum within the space of discrete nodal connections. The bending method is then applied to produce a more accurate ray path by using the nodes as support points for an interpolation with beta-splines. Travel time tomography is formulated as an iterative linearized inversion, and each step is solved using an LSQR algorithm. In order to avoid the singularity of the sensitivity kernel and to reduce the instability of inversion, regularization parameters are introduced in the inversion in the form of smoothing and damping constraints. Velocity models are built as 3-D meshes, and velocity values at intermediate locations are obtained by trilinear interpolation within the corresponding pseudo-cubic cell. Meshes are sheared to account for topographic relief. A floating reflector is represented by a 2-D grid, and depths at intermediate locations are calculated by bilinear interpolation within the corresponding square cell. The trade-off between the resolution of the final model and the associated computational cost is controlled by the relation between the selected forward star for the graph method (i.e. the number of nodes that each node considers as its neighbors) and the refinement of the velocity mesh. Including reflected phases is advantageous because it provides a better coverage and allows us to define the geometry of those geological interfaces with velocity contrasts sharp enough to be observed on record sections. The code also

  13. Preoperative assessment of pleural adhesion by Four-Dimensional Ultra-Low-Dose Computed Tomography (4D-ULDCT) with Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three-Dimensional processing (AIDR-3D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masayuki; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Oshio, Yasuhiko; Nitta, Norihisa; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Ushio, Noritoshi; Mayumi, Masayuki; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Igarashi, Tomoyuki; Yoshigoe, Makoto; Iwai, Kyohei; Tanaka, Koki; Sato, Shigetaka; Sonoda, Akinaga; Otani, Hideji; Murata, Kiyoshi; Hanaoka, Jun

    2018-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of Four-Dimensional Ultra-Low-Dose Computed Tomography (4D-ULDCT) for distinguishing pleural aspects with localized pleural adhesion (LPA) from those without. Twenty-seven patients underwent 4D-ULDCT during a single respiration with a 16cm-coverage of the body axis. The presence and severity of LPA was confirmed by their intraoperative thoracoscopic findings. A point on the pleura and a corresponding point on the outer edge of the costal bone were placed in identical axial planes at end-inspiration. The distance of the two points (PCD), traced by automatic tracking functions respectively, was calculated at each respiratory phase. The maximal and average change amounts in PCD (PCD MCA and PCD ACA ) were compared among 110 measurement points (MPs) without LPA, 16MPs with mild LPA and 10MPs with severe LPA in upper lung field cranial to the bronchial bifurcation (ULF), and 150MPs without LPA, 17MPs with mild LPA and 9MPs with severe LPA in lower lung field caudal to the bronchial bifurcation (LLF) using the Mann-Whitney U test. In the LLF, PCD ACA as well as PCD MCA demonstrated a significant difference among non-LPA, mild LPA and severe LPA (18.1±9.2, 12.3±6.2 and 5.0±3.3mm) (p<0.05). Also in the ULF, PCD ACA showed a significant difference among three conditions (9.2±5.5, 5.7±2.8 and 2.2±0.4mm, respectively) (p<0.05), whereas PCD MCA for mild LPA was similar to that for non-LPA (12.3±5.9 and 17.5±11.0mm). Four D-ULDCT could be a useful non-invasive preoperative assessment modality for the detection of the presence or severity of LPA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; Peterson, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented especially of the ball bearing races used in the rotation. (U.K.)

  15. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.T.; Hein, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  16. An electron tomography algorithm for reconstructing 3D morphology using surface tangents of projected scattering interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, T. C.; Ringer, S. P.

    2010-03-01

    range. The algorithm does not solve the tomographic back-projection problem but rather reconstructs the local 3D morphology of surfaces defined by varied scattering densities. Solution method: Reconstruction using differential geometry applied to image analysis computations. Restrictions: The code has only been tested with square images and has been developed for only single-axis tilting. Running time: For high quality reconstruction, 5-15 min

  17. Development of Adjustable 3D computational phantoms for breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emam, Zohal Alnour Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy has become an essential part of breast cancer treatment and it was given a great concern during last decades due to aspects of managing breast cancer successfully, reducing recurrence and breast cancer mortality. Monte Carlo simulation has been used heavily in this issue. To use monte Carlo the suitable data set must be found to perform the study. This process is not straight forward and difficult to achieve and an effort is needed to obtain it. In this work we aimed to develop a methodology for obtaining 3D adjustable computational phantoms with different breast sizes to treat this problem. At first make human software was used to generate outer surfaces models with desired anthropomorphic features for our purpose. Three breasts cup sizes have been developed: small (A), medium (C) and large (D) according to European standardization system of dress, then blender software was used to join skeleton and internal organs outer surfaces of the body models in correct anatomical positions and the results were poly mesh anthropomorphic phantom has three breast sizes easy to manipulate positioning and modifying, the prepared models have been voxelised in 3D matrixes (256*256*256) using Binvox software, then voxelised models prepared in suitable formats for Gate (mhd/raw) in 70 axial slice with voxel dimension of 1.394*1.394*5 mm 3 for width, depth and length respectively. Gate monte Carlo was used to simulate the irradiation of virtual tumor bed site in left breasts with direct field electron beam, each breast size was treated with five energies 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV by field size 5*5 cm 2 , and 100 cm source surface distance (SSD). The results were studied to evaluate the effect of breast size variation on dose distribution. According to criteria of tumor bed coverage by 100% 90% normalised maximum dose and minimum dose to heart and lug which are considering the organs at risks, results show the energy 6 MeV give under cover to tumor bed in the small, medium

  18. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    interpretation. Geometry and location of ERT profiles on the Puy de Dôme volcano allow to compute 3D inversion models of the electrical resistivity distribution with a new inversion code. This code uses tetrahedrons to discretize the 3D model and uses also a conventional Gauss-Newton inversion scheme combined to an Occam regularisation to process the data. It allows to take into account all the data information and prevents the construction of 3D artefacts present in conventional 2D inversion results. Inversion results show a strong electrical resistivity heterogeneity of the entire dome. Underlying volcanic edifices are clearly identified below the lava dome. Generally speaking, the flanks of the volcano show high resistivity values, and the summit part is more conductive but also very heterogeneous.

  19. VirtoScan - a mobile, low-cost photogrammetry setup for fast post-mortem 3D full-body documentations in x-ray computed tomography and autopsy suites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Sören; Ebert, Lars C; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Braun, Marcel; Thali, Michael J; Gascho, Dominic

    2017-03-01

    Injuries such as bite marks or boot prints can leave distinct patterns on the body's surface and can be used for 3D reconstructions. Although various systems for 3D surface imaging have been introduced in the forensic field, most techniques are both cost-intensive and time-consuming. In this article, we present the VirtoScan, a mobile, multi-camera rig based on close-range photogrammetry. The system can be integrated into automated PMCT scanning procedures or used manually together with lifting carts, autopsy tables and examination couch. The VirtoScan is based on a moveable frame that carries 7 digital single-lens reflex cameras. A remote control is attached to each camera and allows the simultaneous triggering of the shutter release of all cameras. Data acquisition in combination with the PMCT scanning procedures took 3:34 min for the 3D surface documentation of one side of the body compared to 20:20 min of acquisition time when using our in-house standard. A surface model comparison between the high resolution output from our in-house standard and a high resolution model from the multi-camera rig showed a mean surface deviation of 0.36 mm for the whole body scan and 0.13 mm for a second comparison of a detailed section of the scan. The use of the multi-camera rig reduces the acquisition time for whole-body surface documentations in medico-legal examinations and provides a low-cost 3D surface scanning alternative for forensic investigations.

  20. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield

  1. Preclinical, fluorescence and diffuse optical tomography: non-contact instrumentation, modeling and time-resolved 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouizi, F.

    2011-09-01

    Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-DOT) is a new non-invasive imaging technique increasingly used in the clinical and preclinical fields. It yields optical absorption and scattering maps of the explored organs, and related physiological parameters. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-FDOT) is based on the detection of fluorescence photons. It provides spatio-temporal maps of fluorescent probe concentrations and life times, and allows access to metabolic and molecular imaging which is important for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, particularly in oncology. The main goal of this thesis was to reconstruct 3D TR-DOT/TR-FDOT images of small animals using time-resolved optical technology. Data were acquired using optical fibers fixed around the animal without contact with its surface. The work was achieved in four steps: 1)- Setting up an imaging device to record the 3D coordinates of an animal's surface; 2)- Modeling the no-contact approach to solve the forward problem; 3)- Processing of the measured signals taking into account the impulse response of the device; 4)- Implementation of a new image reconstruction method based on a selection of carefully chosen points. As a result, good-quality 3D optical images were obtained owing to reduced cross-talk between absorption and scattering. Moreover, the computation time was cut down, compared to full-time methods using whole temporal profiles. (author)

  2. 3D Computer aided treatment planning in endodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J.; Vissink, Arjan; Ng, Yuan Ling; Gulabivala, Kishor

    Objectives: Obliteration of the root canal system due to accelerated dentinogenesis and dystrophic calcification can challenge the achievement of root canal treatment goals. This paper describes the application of 3D digital mapping technology for predictable navigation of obliterated canal systems

  3. 3D site specific sample preparation and analysis of 3D devices (FinFETs) by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambham, Ajay Kumar; Kumar, Arul; Gilbert, Matthieu; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2013-09-01

    With the transition from planar to three-dimensional device architectures such as Fin field-effect-transistors (FinFETs), new metrology approaches are required to meet the needs of semiconductor technology. It is important to characterize the 3D-dopant distributions precisely as their extent, positioning relative to gate edges and absolute concentration determine the device performance in great detail. At present the atom probe has shown its ability to analyze dopant distributions in semiconductor and thin insulating materials with sub-nm 3D-resolution and good dopant sensitivity. However, so far most reports have dealt with planar devices or restricted the measurements to 2D test structures which represent only limited challenges in terms of localization and site specific sample preparation. In this paper we will discuss the methodology to extract the dopant distribution from real 3D-devices such as a 3D-FinFET device, requiring the sample preparation to be carried out at a site specific location with a positioning accuracy ∼50 nm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Towards automated electron holographic tomography for 3D mapping of electrostatic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.Wolf@Triebenberg.de [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lubk, Axel; Lichte, Hannes [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Friedrich, Heiner [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Electron-holographic tomography (EHT), that is, the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, was successfully applied for the quantitative 3D mapping of electrostatic potentials at the nanoscale. Here we present the first software package (THOMAS) for semi-automated acquisition of holographic tilt series, a prerequisite for efficient data collection. Using THOMAS, the acquisition time for a holographic tilt series, consisting of object and reference holograms, is reduced by a factor of five on average, compared to the previous, completely manual approaches. Moreover, the existing software packages for retrieving amplitude and phase information from electron holograms have been extended, now including a one-step procedure for holographic tilt series reconstruction. Furthermore, a modified SIRT algorithm (WSIRT) was implemented for the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the electrostatic potential from the aligned phase tilt series. Finally, the application of EHT to a polystyrene latex sphere test-specimen and a pn-doped Ge 'needle'-shaped specimen are presented, illustrating the quantitative character of EHT. For both specimens the mean inner potential (MIP) values were accurately determined from the reconstructed 3D potential. For the Ge specimen, additionally the 'built-in' voltage across the pn junction of 0.5 V was obtained.

  5. Development of a 3D muon disappearance algorithm for muon scattering tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, T. B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Upon passing through a material, muons lose energy, scatter off nuclei and atomic electrons, and can stop in the material. Muons will more readily lose energy in higher density materials. Therefore multiple muon disappearances within a localized volume may signal the presence of high-density materials. We have developed a new technique that improves the sensitivity of standard muon scattering tomography. This technique exploits these muon disappearances to perform non-destructive assay of an inspected volume. Muons that disappear have their track evaluated using a 3D line extrapolation algorithm, which is in turn used to construct a 3D tomographic image of the inspected volume. Results of Monte Carlo simulations that measure muon disappearance in different types of target materials are presented. The ability to differentiate between different density materials using the 3D line extrapolation algorithm is established. Finally the capability of this new muon disappearance technique to enhance muon scattering tomography techniques in detecting shielded HEU in cargo containers has been demonstrated.

  6. Reducing disk storage of full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) through lossy online compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Peter; Chen, Po; Lee, En-Jui

    2016-08-01

    Full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) is the latest seismic tomography technique that can assimilate broadband, multi-component seismic waveform observations into high-resolution 3D subsurface seismic structure models. The main drawback in the current F3DT implementation, in particular the scattering-integral implementation (F3DT-SI), is the high disk storage cost and the associated I/O overhead of archiving the 4D space-time wavefields of the receiver- or source-side strain tensors. The strain tensor fields are needed for computing the data sensitivity kernels, which are used for constructing the Jacobian matrix in the Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm. In this study, we have successfully integrated a lossy compression algorithm into our F3DT-SI workflow to significantly reduce the disk space for storing the strain tensor fields. The compressor supports a user-specified tolerance for bounding the error, and can be integrated into our finite-difference wave-propagation simulation code used for computing the strain fields. The decompressor can be integrated into the kernel calculation code that reads the strain fields from the disk and compute the data sensitivity kernels. During the wave-propagation simulations, we compress the strain fields before writing them to the disk. To compute the data sensitivity kernels, we read the compressed strain fields from the disk and decompress them before using them in kernel calculations. Experiments using a realistic dataset in our California statewide F3DT project have shown that we can reduce the strain-field disk storage by at least an order of magnitude with acceptable loss, and also improve the overall I/O performance of the entire F3DT-SI workflow significantly. The integration of the lossy online compressor may potentially open up the possibilities of the wide adoption of F3DT-SI in routine seismic tomography practices in the near future.

  7. Computed tomography device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhashi, A.

    1985-01-01

    A computed tomography device comprising a subtraction unit which obtains differential data strings representing the difference between each time-serial projection data string of a group of projection data strings corresponding to a prospective reconstruction image generated by projection data strings acquired by a data acquisition system, a convolution unit which convolves each time-serial projection data string of the group of projection data strings corresponding to the prospective reconstruction image, and a back-projection unit which back-projects the convolved data strings

  8. Method for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    1980-01-01

    In transversal computer tomography apparatus, in which the positioning zone in which the patient can be positioned is larger than the scanning zone in which a body slice can be scanned, reconstruction errors are liable to occur. These errors are caused by incomplete irradiation of the body during examination. They become manifest not only as an incorrect image of the area not irradiated, but also have an adverse effect on the image of the other, completely irradiated areas. The invention enables reduction of these errors

  9. Dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Blanco, S.; Buzzia, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The amount of computed tomography (CT) studies that are performed each year in the world is growing exponentially mainly due to the incorporation of multislice CT that allows studies in a few seconds. But, despite the benefit received by patients with the diagnosis, radiation dose is a concern in the professional community and it has be reduced as much as reasonably possible. This article describes the main dosimetric CT units used in order to work with this practice easily, using the values that provide modern equipment and internationally known reference levels. (authors) [es

  10. 3D imaging and characterisation of strengthening particles in inconel 718 using FIB tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruk, Adam; Gruszczynski, Adam; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, Aleksandra [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    The Inconel 718 is a commercial nickel-base superalloy, widely used for critical pieces in turbine engines. Its microstructure consists of the {gamma} matrix and strengthening coherent nanoparticles {gamma}' and {gamma}''. In the present work FIB tomography technique was used for imaging and characterisation of strengthening particles. FIB tomography is based on a serial sectioning procedure using a FIB/SEM dual beam workstation. Repeated removal of layers as thin as several nm for some hundred times allows to investigate at total a volume of some {mu}m3 with a voxel size as 2.5 nm x 2.5 nm x 2.5 nm. 3D mapping of nanoparticles with high Z-resolution by serial FIB slicing (in a distance of about 2.5 nm) and SEM imaging was performed. Ga ion beam at 30 kV was used to perform a precise in-situ milling. The SEM images at accelerating voltage 1.5 kV were taken with using ESB detector. The real 3D-data of precipitates obtained by FIB tomography, open a new possibility for microstructure analysis of materials for industrial applications.

  11. Lung nodule detection performance in five observers on computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three-dimensional processing (AIDR 3D) in a Japanese multicenter study: Comparison between ultra-low-dose CT and low-dose CT by receiver-operating characteristic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yukihisa; Moriya, Hiroshi; Noma, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-07-01

    To compare lung nodule detection performance (LNDP) in computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three dimensional processing (AIDR3D) between ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) and low dose CT (LDCT). This was part of the Area-detector Computed Tomography for the Investigation of Thoracic Diseases (ACTIve) Study, a multicenter research project being conducted in Japan. Institutional Review Board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-three subjects (body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.2) underwent chest CT at 6 institutions using identical scanners and protocols. In a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120 and 20 mA (3.52, 1.74 and 0.29 mSv, respectively). Axial CT images with 2-mm thickness/increment were reconstructed using AIDR3D. Standard of reference (SOR) was determined based on CT images at 240 mA by consensus reading of 2 board-certificated radiologists as to the presence of lung nodules with the longest diameter (LD) of more than 3mm. Another 5 radiologists independently assessed and recorded presence/absence of lung nodules and their locations by continuously-distributed rating in CT images at 20 mA (ULDCT) and 120 mA (LDCT). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate LNDP of both methods in total and also in subgroups classified by LD (>4, 6 and 8 mm) and nodular characteristics (solid and ground glass nodules). For SOR, 161 solid and 60 ground glass nodules were identified. No significant difference in LNDP for entire solid nodules was demonstrated between both methods, as area under ROC curve (AUC) was 0.844 ± 0.017 in ULDCT and 0.876 ± 0.026 in LDCT (p=0.057). For ground glass nodules with LD 8mm or more, LNDP was similar between both methods, as AUC 0.899 ± 0.038 in ULDCT and 0.941 ± 0.030 in LDCT. (p=0.144). ULDCT using AIDR3D with an equivalent radiation dose to chest x-ray could have comparable LNDP to LDCT with AIDR3D except for smaller ground

  12. Automatic Plant Annotation Using 3D Computer Vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael

    In this thesis 3D reconstruction was investigated for application in precision agriculture where previous work focused on low resolution index maps where each pixel represents an area in the field and the index represents an overall crop status in that area. 3D reconstructions of plants would allow...... reconstruction in occluded areas. The trinocular setup was used for both window correlation based and energy minimization based algorithms. A novel adaption of symmetric multiple windows algorithm with trinocular vision was developed. The results were promising and allowed for better disparity estimations...... on steep sloped surfaces. Also, a novel adaption of a well known graph cut based disparity estimation algorithm with trinocular vision was developed and tested. The results were successful and allowed for better disparity estimations on steep sloped surfaces. After finding the disparity maps each...

  13. Computed Tomography evaluation of maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Natraj Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The maxillofacial region, a complex anatomical structure, can be evaluated by conventional (plain films, Tomography, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography, Orthopantomogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The study was conducted with objective of describing various forms of maxillofacial injuries, imaging features of different types of maxillofacial fractures and the advantage of using Three- Dimensional Computed Tomography reconstructed image. Materials & Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients during April 2014 to September 2016 using Toshiba Aquilion Prime 160 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography scanner.Results: The maxillofacial fractures were significantly higher in male population (88% than female population (12 %. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury others being physical assault and fall from height. It was most common in 31-40 years (26% and 21-30 (24% years age group. Maxillary sinus was the commonest fracture (36% followed by nasal bone and zygomatic bone (30%, mandible and orbital bones (28%. Soft tissue swelling was the commonest associated finding. Three dimensional images (3 D compared to the axial scans missed some fractures. However, the extension of the complex fracture lines and degree of displacement were more accurately assessed. Complex fractures found were Le fort (6% and naso-orbito-ethmoid (4% fractures.Conclusion: The proper evaluation of complex anatomy of the facial bones requires Multidetector Computed Tomography which offers excellent spatial resolution enabling multiplanar reformations and three dimensional reconstructions for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning.

  14. Full 3D Microwave Tomography enhanced GPR surveys: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco; Affinito, Antonio; Hugenschmidt, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) systems are well assessed non-invasive diagnostic tools capable of providing high resolution images of the inner structure of the probed spatial region. Owing to this capability, GPR systems are nowadays more and more considered in the frame of civil engineering surveys since they may give information on constructive details as well as on the aging and risk factors affecting the healthiness of an infrastructure. In this frame, accurate, reliable and easily interpretable images of the probed scenarios are mandatory in order to support the management of maintenance works and assure the safety of structures. Such a requirement motivates the use of different and sophisticated data processing approaches in order to compare more than one image of the same scene, thus improving the reliability and objectiveness of the GPR survey results. Among GPR data processing procedures, Microwave Tomography approaches based on the Born approximation face the imaging as the solution of a linear inverse problem, which is solved by using the Truncated Singular Value Decomposition as a regularized inversion scheme [1]. So far, an approach exploiting a 2D scalar model of the scattering phenomenon have been adopted to process GPR data gathered along a single scan. In this case, 3D images are obtained by interpolating 2D reconstructions (this is referred commonly as pseudo 3D imaging). Such an imaging approach have provided valuable results in several real cases dealing with not only surveys for civil engineering but also archeological prospection, subservice monitoring, security surveys and so on [1-4]. These encouraging results have motivated the development of a full 3D Microwave Tomography approach capable of accounting for the vectorial nature of the wave propagation. The reconstruction capabilities of this novel approach have been assessed mainly against experimental data collected in laboratory controlled conditions. The obtained results corroborate

  15. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2017-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. A fast rebinning algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography using John's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrise, Michel; Liu, Xuan

    1999-08-01

    Volume imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) requires the inversion of the three-dimensional (3D) x-ray transform. The usual solution to this problem is based on 3D filtered-backprojection (FBP), but is slow. Alternative methods have been proposed which factor the 3D data into independent 2D data sets corresponding to the 2D Radon transforms of a stack of parallel slices. Each slice is then reconstructed using 2D FBP. These so-called rebinning methods are numerically efficient but are approximate. In this paper a new exact rebinning method is derived by exploiting the fact that the 3D x-ray transform of a function is the solution to the second-order partial differential equation first studied by John. The method is proposed for two sampling schemes, one corresponding to a pair of infinite plane detectors and another one corresponding to a cylindrical multi-ring PET scanner. The new FORE-J algorithm has been implemented for this latter geometry and was compared with the approximate Fourier rebinning algorithm FORE and with another exact rebinning algorithm, FOREX. Results with simulated data demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy compared to FORE, while the reconstruction time is doubled. Compared to FOREX, the FORE-J algorithm is slightly less accurate but more than three times faster.

  17. Coupling of the computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX with the 3D neutron kinetic core model DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.; Grahn, A.; Rohde, U.; Schuetze, J.; Frank, Th.

    2010-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX has been coupled with the neutron-kinetic core model DYN3D. ANSYS CFX calculates the fluid dynamics and related transport phenomena in the reactors coolant and provides the corresponding data to DYN3D. In the fluid flow simulation of the coolant, the core itself is modeled within the porous body approach. DYN3D calculates the neutron kinetics and the fuel behavior including the heat transfer to the coolant. The physical data interface between the codes is the volumetric heat release rate into the coolant. In the prototype that is currently available, the coupling is restricted to single-phase flow problems. In the time domain an explicit coupling of the codes has been implemented so far. Steady-state and transient verification calculations for two small-size test problems confirm the correctness of the implementation of the prototype coupling. The first test problem was a mini-core consisting of nine real-size fuel assemblies with quadratic cross section. Comparison was performed with the DYN3D stand-alone code. In the steady state, the effective multiplication factor obtained by the DYN3D/ANSYS CFX codes hows a deviation of 9.8 pcm from the DYN3D stand-alone solution. This difference can be attributed to the use of different water property packages in the two codes. The transient test case simulated the withdrawal of the control rod from the central fuel assembly at hot zero power in the same mini-core. Power increase during the introduction of positive reactivity and power reduction due to fuel temperature increase are calculated in the same manner by the coupled and the stand-alone codes. The maximum values reached during the power rise differ by about 1 MW at a power level of 50 MW. Beside the different water property packages, these differences are caused by the use of different flow solvers. The same calculations were carried for a mini-core with seven real-size fuel assemblies with hexagonal cross section in

  18. Tracking Solid Oxide Cell Microstructure Evolution by High Resolution 3D Nano-Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Angelis, Salvatore

    . The degradation processes are mainly attributed to morphological changes occurring within the electrodes microstructure. Therefore, precise tracking of 3D microstructural evolution during operation is considered crucial to understanding the complex relationship between microstructure and performance. In this work......, X-ray ptychographic tomography is applied to SOC materials, demonstrating unprecedented spatial resolution and data quality. The eect of a complete redox cycle on the same Ni-YSZ microstructure is visualized ex-situ in 3D, showing major rearrangement of the nickel network after reduction......, the formation of cracks in the YSZ, and void formation in nickel oxide after oxidation. Capitalizing on the high resolution of ptychography, the eect of nickel coarsening on the Ni-YSZ microstructure evolution is studied ex-situ in three dimensions, while the sample is repeatedly scanned and treated at high...

  19. Mesenteric panniculitis: computed tomography aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Alves, Jose Ricardo Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Pinheiro, Ricardo Andrade; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Noro, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is an inflammatory process that represents the second stage of a rare progressive disease involving the adipose tissue of the mesentery. Imaging methods used in the diagnosis of mesenteric panniculitis include barium studies, ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Computed tomography is important for both, diagnosis and evaluation of the extension of the disease and treatment monitoring. Computed tomography findings may vary according to the stage of the disease and the amount of inflammatory material or fibrosis. There is also good correlation between the computed tomography and anatomical pathology findings. The authors studied 10 patients with mesenteric panniculitis submitted to computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in one patient. In all patients, computed tomography revealed a heterogeneous mass in the mesentery with density of fat, interspersed with areas of soft tissue density and dilated vessels. (author)

  20. The neutron computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.; Krata, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of computer tomography (CT) was applied for neutrons instead of X-rays. The neutron radiography image of samples was scanned by microphotometer to get the transmission data. This process was so time-consuming that the number of incident angles to samples could not be increased. The transmission data was processed by FACOM computer and CT image was gained. In the experiment at the Japan Research Reactor No. 4 at Tokai-mura with 18 projection angles, the resolution of paraffin in the aluminum block was less than 0.8 mm. In the experiment at Van de Graaf accelerator of Nagoya University, this same resolution was 1.2 mm because of the angle distribution of neutron beam. This experiment is the preliminary one, the facility which utilizes neutron television and video-recorder will be necessary for the next stage. (Auth.)

  1. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; O'Dell, W.R.; Brook, R.F.; Hein, P.W.; Brandt, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. A failsafe, solenoid brake is described which can lock the shaft against rotation. The gantry also contains a hoist mechanism which aids maintenance of the heavy X-ray tube and/or detector arrays. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  2. In situ evidence of mineral physical protection and carbon stabilization revealed by nanoscale 3-D tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Tse; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Cheng-Cheng; Tsai, Heng; Song, Yen-Fang; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Liang, Biqing

    2018-05-01

    An approach for nanoscale 3-D tomography of organic carbon (OC) and associated mineral nanoparticles was developed to illustrate their spatial distribution and boundary interplay, using synchrotron-based transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). The proposed 3-D tomography technique was first applied to in situ observation of a laboratory-made consortium of black carbon (BC) and nanomineral (TiO2, 15 nm), and its performance was evaluated using dual-scan (absorption contrast and phase contrast) modes. This novel tool was then successfully applied to a natural OC-mineral consortium from mountain soil at a spatial resolution of 60 nm, showing the fine structure and boundary of OC, the distribution of abundant nano-sized minerals, and the 3-D organo-mineral association in situ. The stabilization of 3500-year-old natural OC was mainly attributed to the physical protection of nano-sized iron (Fe)-containing minerals (Fe oxyhydroxides including ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite), and the strong organo-mineral complexation. In situ evidence revealed an abundance of mineral nanoparticles, in dense thin layers or nano-aggregates/clusters, instead of crystalline clay-sized minerals on or near OC surfaces. The key working minerals for C stabilization were reactive short-range-order (SRO) mineral nanoparticles and poorly crystalline submicron-sized clay minerals. Spectroscopic analyses demonstrated that the studied OC was not merely in crisscross co-localization with reactive SRO minerals; there could be a significant degree of binding between OC and the minerals. The ubiquity and abundance of mineral nanoparticles on the OC surface, and their heterogeneity in the natural environment may have been severely underestimated by traditional research approaches. Our in situ description of organo-mineral interplay at the nanoscale provides direct evidence to substantiate the importance of mineral physical protection for the long-term stabilization of OC. This high-resolution 3-D

  3. Damage evolution in TWIP and standard austenitic steel by means of 3D X ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrègue, D., E-mail: damien.fabregue@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, CNRS, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon, MATEIS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Landron, C. [Université de Lyon, CNRS, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon, MATEIS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Bouaziz, O. [ArcelorMittal Research, Voie Romaine-BP30320, F-57283 Maizières les Metz (France); Maire, E. [Université de Lyon, CNRS, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); INSA-Lyon, MATEIS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2013-09-01

    The evolution of ductile damage of Fe–22Mn–0.6C austenitic TWIP steel by means of 3D X ray tomography in-situ tensile tests is reported for the first time. The comparison with another fully austenitic steel (316 stainless steel) is also carried out. The damage process of TWIP steel involves intense nucleation of small voids combined with the significant growth of the biggest cavities whereas macroscopical triaxiality remains constant. Due to this high nucleation rate, the average cavity diameter remains constant unlike the 316 stainless steel.

  4. Diffraction Contrast Tomography: A Novel 3D Polycrystalline Grain Imaging Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuettner, Lindsey Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) is a non-destructive way of imaging microstructures of polycrystalline materials such as metals or crystalline organics. It is a useful technique to map 3D grain structures as well as providing crystallographic information such as crystal orientation, grain shape, and strain. Understanding the internal microstructure of a material is important in understanding the bulk material properties. This report gives a general overview of the similar techniques, DCT data acquisition, and analysis processes. Following the short literature review, potential work and research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is discussed.

  5. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella in a quiescent state revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Daniela; McIntosh, J. Richard; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    We have used cryo-electron tomography to investigate the 3D structure and macromolecular organization of intact, frozen-hydrated sea urchin sperm flagella in a quiescent state. The tomographic reconstructions provide information at a resolution better than 6 nm about the in situ arrangements of macromolecules that are key for flagellar motility. We have visualized the heptameric rings of the motor domains in the outer dynein arm complex and determined that they lie parallel to the plane that contains the axes of neighboring flagellar microtubules. Both the material associated with the central pair of microtubules and the radial spokes display a plane of symmetry that helps to explain the planar beat pattern of these flagella. Cryo-electron tomography has proven to be a powerful technique for helping us understand the relationships between flagellar structure and function and the design of macromolecular machines in situ. PMID:16246999

  6. Overview of 3D-TRACE, a NASA Initiative in Three-Dimensional Tomography of the Aerosol-Cloud Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony; Diner, David; Yanovsky, Igor; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Bal, Guillaume; Schechner, Yoav; Aides, Amit; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    microphysical properties, can be reconstructed from multi-angle/multi-spectral imaging radiometry and, more and more, polarimetry. Specific technologies of interest are computed tomography (reconstruction from projections), optical tomography (using cross-pixel radiation transport in the diffusion limit), stereoscopy (depth/height retrievals), blind source and scale separation (signal unmixing), and disocclusion (information recovery in the presence of obstructions). Later on, these potentially powerful inverse problem solutions will be fully integrated in a versatile satellite data analysis toolbox. At present, we can report substantial progress at the component level. Specifically, we will focus on the most elementary problems in atmospheric tomography with an emphasis on the vastly under-exploited class of multi-pixel techniques. One basic problem is to infer the outer shape and mean opacity of 3D clouds, along with a bulk measure of cloud particle size. Another is to separate high and low cloud layers based on their characteristically different spatial textures. Yet another is to reconstruct the 3D spatial distribution of aerosol density based on passive imaging. This suite of independent feasibility studies amounts to a compelling proofof- concept for the ambitious 3D-Tomographic Reconstruction of the Aerosol-Cloud Environment (3D-TRACE) project as a whole.

  7. Use of computational simulation for evaluation of 3D printed phantoms for application in clinical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeriano, Caio César Santos

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of a phantom is to represent the change in the radiation field caused by absorption and scattering in a given tissue or organ of interest. Its geometrical characteristics and composition should be as close as possible to the values associated with its natural analogue. Anatomical structures can be transformed into 3D virtual objects by medical imaging techniques (e.g. Computed Tomography) and printed by rapid prototyping using materials, for example, polylactic acid. Its production for specific patients requires fulfilling requirements such as geometric accuracy with the individual's anatomy and tissue equivalence, so that usable measurements can be made, and be insensitive to the radiation effects. The objective of this work was to evaluate the behavior of 3D printed materials when exposed to different photon beams, with emphasis on the quality of radiotherapy (6 MV), aiming its application in clinical dosimetry. For this, 30 thermoluminescent dosimeters of LiF:Mg,Ti were used. The equivalence between the PMMA and the printed PLA for the thermoluminescent response of 30 dosimeters of CaSO 4 : Dy was also analyzed. The irradiations with radiotherapy photon beams were simulated using the Eclipse TM treatment planning system,with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm and the Acuros ® XB Advanced Dose Calculation algorithm. In addition to the use of Eclipse TM and dosimetric tests, computational simulations were realized using the MCNP5 code. Simulations with the MCNP5 code were performed to calculate the attenuation coefficient of printed plates exposed to different radiodiagnosis X-rays qualities and to develop a computational model of 3D printed plates. (author)

  8. NURBS-based 3-d anthropomorphic computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models used in the evaluation of absorbed dose distributions within the human body. Currently, two classes of the computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilised for dosimetry calculation: (1) stylized (equation-based) and (2) voxel (image-based) phantoms describing human anatomy through the use of mathematical surface equations and 3-D voxel matrices, respectively. However, stylized phantoms have limitations in defining realistic organ contours and positioning as compared to voxel phantoms, which are themselves based on medical images of human subjects. In turn, voxel phantoms that have been developed through medical image segmentation have limitations in describing organs that are presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography image. The present paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of these existing classes of computational phantoms and introduces a hybrid approach to a computational phantom construction based on non-uniform rational B-Spline (NURBS) surface animation technology that takes advantage of the most desirable features of the former two phantom types. (authors)

  9. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  10. Computer-Aided Manufacturing of 3D Workpieces

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Victoria Anghel Drugarin; Mihaela Dorica Stroia

    2017-01-01

    Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) assumes to use dedicated software for controlling machine tools and similar devices in the process of workpieces manufacturing. CAM is, in fact, an application technology that uses computer software and machinery to simplify and automate manufacturing processes. CAM is the inheritor of computer-aided engineering (CAE) and is often used conjunctively with computer-aided design (CAD). Advanced CAM solutions are forthcoming and have a large ...

  11. Electrical impedance tomography in 3D using two electrode planes: characterization and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Justin; Adler, Andy

    2016-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) uses body surface electrical stimulation and measurements to create conductivity images; it shows promise as a non-invasive technology to monitor the distribution of lung ventilation. Most applications of EIT have placed electrodes in a 2D ring around the thorax, and thus produced 2D cross-sectional images. These images are unable to distinguish out-of-plane contributions, or to image volumetric effects. Volumetric EIT can be calculated using multiple electrode planes and a 3D reconstruction algorithm. However, while 3D reconstruction algorithms are available, little has been done to understand the performance of 3D EIT in terms of the measurement configurations available. The goal of this paper is to characterize the phantom and in vivo performance of 3D EIT with two electrode planes. First, phantom measurements are used to measure the reconstruction characteristics of seven stimulation and measurement configurations. Measurements were then performed on eight healthy volunteers as a function of body posture, postures, and with various electrode configurations. Phantom results indicate that 3D EIT using two rings of electrodes provides reasonable resolution in the electrode plane but low vertical resolution. For volunteers, functional EIT images are created from inhalation curve features to analyze the effect of posture (standing, sitting, supine and decline) on regional lung behaviour. An ability to detect vertical changes in lung volume distribution was shown for two electrode configurations. Based on tank and volunteer results, we recommend the use of the 'square' stimulation and measurement pattern for two electrode plane EIT.

  12. Computation of transient 3-D eddy current in nonmagnetic conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to solve transient three-dimensional (3-D) eddy current problems for nonmagnetic conductor. Integral equation formulation in terms of vector potential is used to simplify the matching of boundary conditions. The resulting equations and their numerical approximation were shown to be singular and to require special handling. Several types of symmetries were introduced. They not only reduce the number of algebraic equations to be solved, but also modify the nature of the equations and render them nonsingular. Temporal behavior was obtained with the Runge-Kutta method. The program is tested in several examples of eddy currents for its spatial and temporal profiles, shielding, boundary surface effects, and application of various symmetry options

  13. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  14. Positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regional mycardial blood flow and substrate metabolism can be non-invasively evaluated and quantified with positron emission computed tomography (Positron-CT). Tracers of exogenous glucose utilization and fatty acid metabolism are available and have been extensively tested. Specific tracer kinetic models have been developed or are being tested so that glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be measured quantitatively by Positron-CT. Tracers of amino acid and oxygen metabolism are utilized in Positron-CT studies of the brain and development of such tracers for cardiac studies are in progress. Methods to quantify regional myocardial blood flow are also being developed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of Positron-/CT to document myocardial infarction. Experimental and clinical studies have begun to identify metabolic markers of reversibly ischemic myocardium. The potential of Positron-CT to reliably detect potentially salvageable myocardium and, hence, to identify appropriate therapeutic interventions is one of the most exciting applications of the technique

  15. A novel PFIB sample preparation protocol for correlative 3D X-ray CNT and FIB-TOF-SIMS tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priebe, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.priebe@gmail.com [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2017-02-15

    We present a novel sample preparation method that allows correlative 3D X-ray Computed Nano-Tomography (CNT) and Focused Ion Beam Time-Of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (FIB-TOF-SIMS) tomography to be performed on the same sample. In addition, our invention ensures that samples stay unmodified structurally and chemically between the subsequent experiments. The main principle is based on modifying the topography of the X-ray CNT experimental setup before FIB-TOF-SIMS measurements by incorporating a square washer around the sample. This affects the distribution of extraction field lines and therefore influences the trajectories of secondary ions that are now guided more efficiently towards the detector. As the result, secondary ion detection is significantly improved and higher, i.e. statistically better, signals are obtained. - Highlights: • Novel sample preparation for correlative 3D X-ray CNT and FIB-TOF-SIMS is presented. • Two experiments are conducted on exactly the same sample without any modifications. • Introduction of a square washer around the sample leads to increased ion detection.

  16. From 3D to 4D seismic tomography at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Yeguas, A.; Koulakov, I.; Jakovlev, A.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we are going to show the advantages of a dynamic tomography 4D, versus a static image 3D related with a volcanic reactivation and eruption at El Hierro island (Canary Islands, Spain). In this process a high number of earthquakes before and during the eruptive processes have been registered. We are going to show a 3D image as an average of the velocity structure and then the characteristics and physical properties on the medium, including the presence or not of magma. This image will be complemented with its evolution along the time, observing its volcanic dynamic and its influence over the medium properties, including its power as an important element on early warnings protocols. After more than forty years of quiet at Canary Islands, since 1971 with Teneguía eruption at La Palma Island, and more than 200 years on El Hierro Island (The last eruption known at El Hierro took place in 1793, volcán de Lomo Negro), on 19th July on 2011 the Spanish seismic national network, administered by IGN (Instituto Geográfico Nacional), detected an increase of local seismic activity below El Hierro island (Canary Islands, Spain). Since this moment an intense swarm took place, with more than 11000 events, until 11th December, with magnitudes (MLg) from 0.2 to 4.4. In this period two eruptive processes have been declared in front of the South coast of El Hierro island, and they have not finished yet. This seismic swarm has allowed carrying out a 3D seismic tomography, using P and S waves traveltimes. It has showed a low velocity from the North to the South. On the other hand, we have performed a 4D seismic tomography, taking the events occurred at different intervals of time. We can observe the evolution of the negative anomaly along the time, from the North to the South, where has taken place La Restinga submarine eruption. 4D seismic tomography is an innovative and powerful tool able to show the evolution in time of a volcanic process.

  17. Lung nodule detection performance in five observers on computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three-dimensional processing (AIDR 3D) in a Japanese multicenter study: Comparison between ultra-low-dose CT and low-dose CT by receiver-operating characteristic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro, E-mail: yatsushi@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673, Aichi (Japan); Yamashiro, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Miyara, Tetsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Department of Radiology, Okinawa Prefectural Yaeyama Hospital, Ishigaki 907-0022, Okinawa (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki 569-8686, Osaka (Japan); Sato, Yukihisa [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center of Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Moriya, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Noma, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Tenri Hospital, Tenri 632-8552, Nara (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Using AIDR 3D, ULDCT showed comparable LND of solid nodules to LDCT. • Using AIDR 3D, LND of smaller GGN in ULDCT was inferior to that in LDCT. • Effective dose in ULDCT was about only twice of that in chest X-ray. • BMI values in study population were mostly in the normal range body habitus. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare lung nodule detection performance (LNDP) in computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three dimensional processing (AIDR3D) between ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) and low dose CT (LDCT). Materials and methods: This was part of the Area-detector Computed Tomography for the Investigation of Thoracic Diseases (ACTIve) Study, a multicenter research project being conducted in Japan. Institutional Review Board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-three subjects (body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.2) underwent chest CT at 6 institutions using identical scanners and protocols. In a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120 and 20 mA (3.52, 1.74 and 0.29 mSv, respectively). Axial CT images with 2-mm thickness/increment were reconstructed using AIDR3D. Standard of reference (SOR) was determined based on CT images at 240 mA by consensus reading of 2 board-certificated radiologists as to the presence of lung nodules with the longest diameter (LD) of more than 3 mm. Another 5 radiologists independently assessed and recorded presence/absence of lung nodules and their locations by continuously-distributed rating in CT images at 20 mA (ULDCT) and 120 mA (LDCT). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate LNDP of both methods in total and also in subgroups classified by LD (>4, 6 and 8 mm) and nodular characteristics (solid and ground glass nodules). Results: For SOR, 161 solid and 60 ground glass nodules were identified. No significant difference in LNDP for entire solid nodules was demonstrated between both methods, as area under ROC

  18. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions

  19. 3D visualization of the initial Yersinia ruckeri infection route in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by optical projection tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    2014-01-01

    , optical projection tomography (OPT), a novel three-dimensional (3D) bio-imaging technique, was applied. OPT not only enables the visualization of Y. ruckeri on mucosal surfaces but also the 3D spatial distribution in whole organs, without sectioning. Rainbow trout were infected by bath challenge exposure...

  20. Computer tomography of the neurocranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliequist, B; Forssell, A

    1976-07-01

    The experience with computer tomography of the neurocranium in 300 patients submitted for computer tomography of the brain is reported. The more appropriate projections which may be obtained with the second generation of scanners in combination with an elaborated reconstruction technique seem to constitute a replacement of conventional skull films.

  1. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature...... that compares the diagnostic accuracy of multi-detector row computed tomography with that of coronary angiography Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4/6...

  2. 3D automatic segmentation method for retinal optical coherence tomography volume data using boundary surface enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankui Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, much larger image datasets are routinely acquired compared to what was possible using the previous generation of time-domain OCT. Thus, there is a critical need for the development of three-dimensional (3D segmentation methods for processing these data. We present here a novel 3D automatic segmentation method for retinal OCT volume data. Briefly, to segment a boundary surface, two OCT volume datasets are obtained by using a 3D smoothing filter and a 3D differential filter. Their linear combination is then calculated to generate new volume data with an enhanced boundary surface, where pixel intensity, boundary position information, and intensity changes on both sides of the boundary surface are used simultaneously. Next, preliminary discrete boundary points are detected from the A-Scans of the volume data. Finally, surface smoothness constraints and a dynamic threshold are applied to obtain a smoothed boundary surface by correcting a small number of error points. Our method can extract retinal layer boundary surfaces sequentially with a decreasing search region of volume data. We performed automatic segmentation on eight human OCT volume datasets acquired from a commercial Spectralis OCT system, where each volume of datasets contains 97 OCT B-Scan images with a resolution of 496×512 (each B-Scan comprising 512 A-Scans containing 496 pixels; experimental results show that this method can accurately segment seven layer boundary surfaces in normal as well as some abnormal eyes.

  3. Soft computing approach to 3D lung nodule segmentation in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, P; Pietka, E

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel, multilevel approach to the segmentation of various types of pulmonary nodules in computed tomography studies. It is based on two branches of computational intelligence: the fuzzy connectedness (FC) and the evolutionary computation. First, the image and auxiliary data are prepared for the 3D FC analysis during the first stage of an algorithm - the masks generation. Its main goal is to process some specific types of nodules connected to the pleura or vessels. It consists of some basic image processing operations as well as dedicated routines for the specific cases of nodules. The evolutionary computation is performed on the image and seed points in order to shorten the FC analysis and improve its accuracy. After the FC application, the remaining vessels are removed during the postprocessing stage. The method has been validated using the first dataset of studies acquired and described by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and by its latest release - the LIDC-IDRI (Image Database Resource Initiative) database. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The 3d International Workshop on Computational Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, Stephen M.

    1994-09-01

    The Third International Workshop on Computational Electronics (IWCE) was held at the Benson Hotel in downtown Portland, Oregon, on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994. The workshop was devoted to a broad range of topics in computational electronics related to the simulation of electronic transport in semiconductors and semiconductor devices, particularly those which use large computational resources. The workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Naval Research and the Army Research Office, as well as local support from the Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering and the Oregon Center for Advanced Technology Education. There were over 100 participants in the Portland workshop, of which more than one quarter represented research groups outside of the United States from Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. There were a total 81 papers presented at the workshop, 9 invited talks, 26 oral presentations and 46 poster presentations. The emphasis of the contributions reflected the interdisciplinary nature of computational electronics with researchers from the Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Physics communities participating in the workshop.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  6. Fast Eigensolver for Computing 3D Earth's Normal Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J.; De Hoop, M. V.; Li, R.; Xi, Y.; Saad, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel parallel computational approach to compute Earth's normal modes. We discretize Earth via an unstructured tetrahedral mesh and apply the continuous Galerkin finite element method to the elasto-gravitational system. To resolve the eigenvalue pollution issue, following the analysis separating the seismic point spectrum, we utilize explicitly a representation of the displacement for describing the oscillations of the non-seismic modes in the fluid outer core. Effectively, we separate out the essential spectrum which is naturally related to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. We introduce two Lanczos approaches with polynomial and rational filtering for solving this generalized eigenvalue problem in prescribed intervals. The polynomial filtering technique only accesses the matrix pair through matrix-vector products and is an ideal candidate for solving three-dimensional large-scale eigenvalue problems. The matrix-free scheme allows us to deal with fluid separation and self-gravitation in an efficient way, while the standard shift-and-invert method typically needs an explicit shifted matrix and its factorization. The rational filtering method converges much faster than the standard shift-and-invert procedure when computing all the eigenvalues inside an interval. Both two Lanczos approaches solve for the internal eigenvalues extremely accurately, comparing with the standard eigensolver. In our computational experiments, we compare our results with the radial earth model benchmark, and visualize the normal modes using vector plots to illustrate the properties of the displacements in different modes.

  7. Computational 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are developing a comprehensive, morphologically-realistic computational model of the human respiratory system that can be used to study the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of contaminants, while being adaptable for age, race, gender, and health/disease status. The model ...

  8. Automatic Grading of 3D Computer Animation Laboratory Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Paravati, Gianluca; Carlevaris, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is a delicate task in the overall teaching process because it may require significant time and may be prone to subjectivity. Subjectivity is especially true for disciplines in which perceptual factors play a key role in the evaluation. In previous decades, computer-based assessment techniques were developed to address the…

  9. 3D Reconstruction of the Glycocalyx Structure in Mammalian Capillaries using Electron Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arkill, Kp; Neal, Cr; Mantell, Jm

    2012-01-01

    of the proteoglycan components of the glycocalyx layer (fundamental spacing about 20 nm), but require a large sample number. Attempts to visualise the glycocalyx face-on (i.e. in a direction perpendicular to the endothelial cell layer in the lumen and directly applicable for permeability modelling) has had limited...... success (e.g. freeze fracture). A new approach is therefore needed. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of using the relatively novel electron microscopy technique of 3D electron tomography ontwo differently stained preparations to reveal details of the architecture of the glycocalyx just above...... the endothelial cell layer. One preparation uses the novel staining technique using Lanthanum Dysprosium Glycosamino Glycan adhesion (the LaDy GAGa method). © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd....

  10. Monitoring CO2 migration in a shallow sand aquifer using 3D crosshole electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xianjin; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crosshole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, western Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for detection of small electrical conductivity (EC) changes during the first 2....... The combined HBB and VBB data sets were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for cancellation of coherent noises and enhanced resolution of small changes. ERT detected the small bulk EC changes (resistive gaseous CO2. The primary factors that control...... bulk EC changes may be caused by limited and variable ERT resolution, low ERT sensitivity to resistive anomalies and uncalibrated CO2 gas saturation. ERT data show a broader CO2 plume while water sample EC had higher fine-scale variability. Our ERT electrode configuration can be optimized for more...

  11. Quantitative 3D imaging of yeast by hard X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ting; Li, Wenjie; Guan, Yong; Song, Xiangxia; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yangchao

    2012-05-01

    Full-field hard X-ray tomography could be used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale structures of biological samples. The image of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, was clearly visualized based on Zernike phase contrast imaging technique and heavy metal staining method at a spatial resolution better than 50 nm at the energy of 8 keV. The distributions and shapes of the organelles during the cell cycle were clearly visualized and two types of organelle were distinguished. The results for cells during various phases were compared and the ratios of organelle volume to cell volume can be analyzed quantitatively. It showed that the ratios remained constant between growth and division phase and increased strongly in stationary phase, following the shape and size of two types of organelles changes. Our results demonstrated that hard X-ray microscopy was a complementary method for imaging and revealing structural information for biological samples. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. 2D and 3D reconstructions in acousto-electric tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter; Kunyansky, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    We propose and test stable algorithms for the reconstruction of the internal conductivity of a biological object using acousto-electric measurements. Namely, the conventional impedance tomography scheme is supplemented by scanning the object with acoustic waves that slightly perturb the conductivity and cause the change in the electric potential measured on the boundary of the object. These perturbations of the potential are then used as the data for the reconstruction of the conductivity. The present method does not rely on 'perfectly focused' acoustic beams. Instead, more realistic propagating spherical fronts are utilized, and then the measurements that would correspond to perfect focusing are synthesized. In other words, we use synthetic focusing. Numerical experiments with simulated data show that our techniques produce high-quality images, both in 2D and 3D, and that they remain accurate in the presence of high-level noise in the data. Local uniqueness and stability for the problem also hold. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. 2D and 3D reconstructions in acousto-electric tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter

    2011-04-18

    We propose and test stable algorithms for the reconstruction of the internal conductivity of a biological object using acousto-electric measurements. Namely, the conventional impedance tomography scheme is supplemented by scanning the object with acoustic waves that slightly perturb the conductivity and cause the change in the electric potential measured on the boundary of the object. These perturbations of the potential are then used as the data for the reconstruction of the conductivity. The present method does not rely on \\'perfectly focused\\' acoustic beams. Instead, more realistic propagating spherical fronts are utilized, and then the measurements that would correspond to perfect focusing are synthesized. In other words, we use synthetic focusing. Numerical experiments with simulated data show that our techniques produce high-quality images, both in 2D and 3D, and that they remain accurate in the presence of high-level noise in the data. Local uniqueness and stability for the problem also hold. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. GPS tomography: validation of reconstructed 3-D humidity fields with radiosonde profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shangguan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor plays an important role in meteorological applications; GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ therefore developed a tomographic system to derive 3-D distributions of the tropospheric water vapor above Germany using GPS data from about 300 ground stations. Input data for the tomographic reconstructions are generated by the Earth Parameter and Orbit determination System (EPOS software of the GFZ, which provides zenith total delay (ZTD, integrated water vapor (IWV and slant total delay (STD data operationally with a temporal resolution of 2.5 min (STD and 15 min (ZTD, IWV. The water vapor distribution in the atmosphere is derived by tomographic reconstruction techniques. The quality of the solution is dependent on many factors such as the spatial coverage of the atmosphere with slant paths, the spatial distribution of their intersections and the accuracy of the input observations. Independent observations are required to validate the tomographic reconstructions and to get precise information on the accuracy of the derived 3-D water vapor fields. To determine the quality of the GPS tomography, more than 8000 vertical water vapor profiles at 13 German radiosonde stations were used for the comparison. The radiosondes were launched twice a day (at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC in 2007. In this paper, parameters of the entire profiles such as the wet refractivity, and the zenith wet delay have been compared. Before the validation the temporal and spatial distribution of the slant paths, serving as a basis for tomographic reconstruction, as well as their angular distribution were studied. The mean wet refractivity differences between tomography and radiosonde data for all points vary from −1.3 to 0.3, and the root mean square is within the range of 6.5–9. About 32% of 6803 profiles match well, 23% match badly and 45% are difficult to classify as they match only in parts.

  15. GPS tomography. Validation of reconstructed 3-D humidity fields with radiosonde profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shangguan, M.; Bender, M.; Ramatschi, M.; Dick, G.; Wickert, J. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), Potsdam (Germany); Raabe, A. [Leipzig Institute for Meteorology (LIM), Leipzig (Germany); Galas, R. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. for Geodesy and Geoinformation Sciences

    2013-11-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in meteorological applications; GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) therefore developed a tomographic system to derive 3-D distributions of the tropospheric water vapor above Germany using GPS data from about 300 ground stations. Input data for the tomographic reconstructions are generated by the Earth Parameter and Orbit determination System (EPOS) software of the GFZ, which provides zenith total delay (ZTD), integrated water vapor (IWV) and slant total delay (STD) data operationally with a temporal resolution of 2.5 min (STD) and 15 min (ZTD, IWV). The water vapor distribution in the atmosphere is derived by tomographic reconstruction techniques. The quality of the solution is dependent on many factors such as the spatial coverage of the atmosphere with slant paths, the spatial distribution of their intersections and the accuracy of the input observations. Independent observations are required to validate the tomographic reconstructions and to get precise information on the accuracy of the derived 3-D water vapor fields. To determine the quality of the GPS tomography, more than 8000 vertical water vapor profiles at 13 German radiosonde stations were used for the comparison. The radiosondes were launched twice a day (at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC) in 2007. In this paper, parameters of the entire profiles such as the wet refractivity, and the zenith wet delay have been compared. Before the validation the temporal and spatial distribution of the slant paths, serving as a basis for tomographic reconstruction, as well as their angular distribution were studied. The mean wet refractivity differences between tomography and radiosonde data for all points vary from -1.3 to 0.3, and the root mean square is within the range of 6.5-9. About 32% of 6803 profiles match well, 23% match badly and 45% are difficult to classify as they match only in parts.

  16. 3D topology of orientation columns in visual cortex revealed by functional optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Yu; Kalatsky, Valery A; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Sato, Takayuki; Rajagopalan, Uma Maheswari; Tanifuji, Manabu

    2018-04-01

    Orientation tuning is a canonical neuronal response property of six-layer visual cortex that is encoded in pinwheel structures with center orientation singularities. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals enables us to map these surface two-dimensional (2D) structures, whereas lack of appropriate techniques has not allowed us to visualize depth structures of orientation coding. In the present study, we performed functional optical coherence tomography (fOCT), a technique capable of acquiring a 3D map of the intrinsic signals, to study the topology of orientation coding inside the cat visual cortex. With this technique, for the first time, we visualized columnar assemblies in orientation coding that had been predicted from electrophysiological recordings. In addition, we found that the columnar structures were largely distorted around pinwheel centers: center singularities were not rigid straight lines running perpendicularly to the cortical surface but formed twisted string-like structures inside the cortex that turned and extended horizontally through the cortex. Looping singularities were observed with their respective termini accessing the same cortical surface via clockwise and counterclockwise orientation pinwheels. These results suggest that a 3D topology of orientation coding cannot be fully anticipated from 2D surface measurements. Moreover, the findings demonstrate the utility of fOCT as an in vivo mesoscale imaging method for mapping functional response properties of cortex in the depth axis. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We used functional optical coherence tomography (fOCT) to visualize three-dimensional structure of the orientation columns with millimeter range and micrometer spatial resolution. We validated vertically elongated columnar structure in iso-orientation domains. The columnar structure was distorted around pinwheel centers. An orientation singularity formed a string with tortuous trajectories inside the cortex and connected clockwise and counterclockwise

  17. Computed tomography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    In fan-beam computed tomography apparatus, timing reference pulses, normally occurring at intervals t, for data transfer and reset of approx. 500 integrators in the signal path from the detector array, are generated from the scan displacement, e.g. using a graticule and optical sensor to relate the measurement paths geometrically to the body section. Sometimes, a slow scan rate is required to provide a time-averaged density image, e.g. for planning irradiation therapy, and then the sensed impulses will occur at extended intervals and can cause integrator overload. An improvement is described which provides a pulse generator which responds to a reduced scan rate by generating a succession of further transfer and reset pulses at intervals approximately equal to t starting a time t after each timing reference pulse. Then, using an adding device and RAM, all the transferred signals integrated in the interval t' between two successive slow scan reference pulses are accumulated in order to form a corresponding measurement signal. (author)

  18. Computed tomography intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, S.; Murray, W.; Wilson, P.

    1997-01-01

    Indications for direct visualization of the bile ducts include bile duct dilatation demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scanning, where the cause of the bile duct dilatation is uncertain or where the anatomy of bile duct obstruction needs further clarification. Another indication is right upper quadrant pain, particularly in a post-cholecystectomy patient, where choledocholithiasis is suspected. A possible new indication is pre-operative evaluation prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The bile ducts are usually studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), or, less commonly, trans-hepatic cholangiography. The old technique of intravenous cholangiography has fallen into disrepute because of inconsistent bile-duct opacification. The advent of spiral CT scanning has renewed interest in intravenous cholangiography. The CT technique is very sensitive to the contrast agent in the bile ducts, and angiographic and three-dimensional reconstructions of the biliary tree can readily be obtained using the CT intravenous cholangiogram technique (CT IVC). Seven patients have been studied using this CT IVC technique, between February 1995 and June 1996, and are the subject of the present report. Eight further studies have since been performed. The results suggest that CT IVC could replace ERCP as the primary means of direct cholangiography, where pancreatic duct visualization is not required. (authors)

  19. Noncontact 3-D Speckle Contrast Diffuse Correlation Tomography of Tissue Blood Flow Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Zhao, Mingjun; Shang, Yu; Agochukwu, Nneamaka; Wong, Lesley; Yu, Guoqiang

    2017-10-01

    Recent advancements in near-infrared diffuse correlation techniques and instrumentation have opened the path for versatile deep tissue microvasculature blood flow imaging systems. Despite this progress there remains a need for a completely noncontact, noninvasive device with high translatability from small/testing (animal) to large/target (human) subjects with trivial application on both. Accordingly, we discuss our newly developed setup which meets this demand, termed noncontact speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography (nc_scDCT). The nc_scDCT provides fast, continuous, portable, noninvasive, and inexpensive acquisition of 3-D tomographic deep (up to 10 mm) tissue blood flow distributions with straightforward design and customization. The features presented include a finite-element-method implementation for incorporating complex tissue boundaries, fully noncontact hardware for avoiding tissue compression and interactions, rapid data collection with a diffuse speckle contrast method, reflectance-based design promoting experimental translation, extensibility to related techniques, and robust adjustable source and detector patterns and density for high resolution measurement with flexible regions of interest enabling unique application-specific setups. Validation is shown in the detection and characterization of both high and low contrasts in flow relative to the background using tissue phantoms with a pump-connected tube (high) and phantom spheres (low). Furthermore, in vivo validation of extracting spatiotemporal 3-D blood flow distributions and hyperemic response during forearm cuff occlusion is demonstrated. Finally, the success of instrument feasibility in clinical use is examined through the intraoperative imaging of mastectomy skin flap.

  20. An Algorithm for Fast Computation of 3D Zernike Moments for Volumetric Images

    OpenAIRE

    Hosny, Khalid M.; Hafez, Mohamed A.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm was proposed for very fast and low-complexity computation of three-dimensional Zernike moments. The 3D Zernike moments were expressed in terms of exact 3D geometric moments where the later are computed exactly through the mathematical integration of the monomial terms over the digital image/object voxels. A new symmetry-based method was proposed to compute 3D Zernike moments with 87% reduction in the computational complexity. A fast 1D cascade algorithm was also employed to add m...

  1. Computed tomography of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmannskog, F.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Aakhus, T.; Bergan, A.; Fausa, O.; Elgjo, K.

    1980-01-01

    The findings by computed tomography in 203 cases of suspected pancreatic tumours, pancreatitis or peripancreatic abnormalities were evaluated. The appearances of the normal and the diseased pancreas are described. Computed tomography is highly accurate in detecting pancreatic masses, but can not differentiate neoplastic from inflammatory disease. The only reliable signs of pancreatic carcinoma are a focal mass in the pancreas, together with liver metastasis. When a pancreatic mass is revealed by computed tomography, CT-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas is recommended. Thus the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures and explorative laparotomy may be avoided in some patients. (Auth.)

  2. CudaPre3D: An Alternative Preprocessing Algorithm for Accelerating 3D Convex Hull Computation on the GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEI, G.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the calculating of convex hulls for point sets, a preprocessing procedure that is to filter the input points by discarding non-extreme points is commonly used to improve the computational efficiency. We previously proposed a quite straightforward preprocessing approach for accelerating 2D convex hull computation on the GPU. In this paper, we extend that algorithm to being used in 3D cases. The basic ideas behind these two preprocessing algorithms are similar: first, several groups of extreme points are found according to the original set of input points and several rotated versions of the input set; then, a convex polyhedron is created using the found extreme points; and finally those interior points locating inside the formed convex polyhedron are discarded. Experimental results show that: when employing the proposed preprocessing algorithm, it achieves the speedups of about 4x on average and 5x to 6x in the best cases over the cases where the proposed approach is not used. In addition, more than 95 percent of the input points can be discarded in most experimental tests.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... is used to evaluate: complications from infections such as pneumonia a tumor that arises in the lung ...

  4. Computed tomography of drill cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.

    1985-08-01

    A preliminary computed tomography evaluation of drill cores of granite and sandstone has generated geologically significant data. Density variations as small as 4 percent and fractures as narrow as 0.1 mm were easily detected

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  6. Improvement of 2D ERT measurements conducted along a small earth-filled dyke using 3D topographic data and 3D computation of geometric factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bièvre, Grégory; Oxarango, Laurent; Günther, Thomas; Goutaland, David; Massardi, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In the framework of earth-filled dykes characterization and monitoring, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) turns out to be a commonly used method. 2D sections are generally acquired along the dyke crest thus putting forward the question of 3D artefacts in the inversion process. This paper proposes a methodology based on 3D direct numerical simulations of the ERT acquisition using a realistic topography of the study site. It allows computing ad hoc geometrical factors which can be used for the inversion of experimental ERT data. The method is first evaluated on a set of synthetic dyke configurations. Then, it is applied to experimental static and time-lapse ERT data set acquired before and after repair works carried out on a leaking zone of an earth-filled canal dyke in the centre of France. The computed geometric factors are lower than the analytic geometric factors in a range between -8% and - 18% for measurements conducted on the crest of the dyke. They exhibit a maximum under-estimation for intermediate electrode spacings in the Wenner and Schlumberger configurations. In the same way, for measurements conducted on the mid-slope of the dyke, the computed geometric factors are higher for short electrode spacings (+18%) and lower for lower for large electrode spacings (-8%). The 2D inversion of the synthetic data with these computed geometric factors provides a significant improvement of the agreement with the original resistivity. Two experimental profiles conducted on the same portion of the dyke but at different elevations also reveal a better agreement using this methodology. The comparison with apparent resistivity from EM31 profiling along the stretch of the dyke also supports this evidence. In the same way, some spurious effects which affected the time-lapse data were removed and improved the global readability of the time-lapse resistivity sections. The benefit on the structural interpretation of ERT images remains moderate but allows a better

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for ... Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top ... Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  11. Using Videos and 3D Animations for Conceptual Learning in Basic Computer Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakiroglu, Unal; Yilmaz, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on a one-semester study to investigate the effect of videos and 3D animations on students' conceptual understandings about basic computer units. A quasi-experimental design was carried out in two classrooms; videos and 3D animations were used in classroom activities in one group and those were used for homework in the other…

  12. Applications of 3-D reconstruction and 3-D image analysis using computer graphics in surgery of the oral and maxillofacial regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Yamauchi, Asanori; Madachi, Fujio; Furuta, Isao

    1988-12-01

    Using the 2-D data provided by CT-Tomography and MRI-tomography of oral and maxillofacial diseases (cyst, benign tumor, primary tumor and regional lymphnodes of malignant tumor), 3-D images were reconstructed and spatial analysis was attempted. We report the general concepts. The hardware used consisted of the Hewlett-Packard HP-9000/300, which utilizes a 16-bit CPU. A digitizer was used to construct 3-D images from serial CT-tomography and MRI-tomography images. Output was displayed on a color monitor and photographs. The 3 cases on which we used this technique included a 19-year-old male with plunging ranula, a 50-year-old male with maxillary pleomorphic adenoma, and a 58-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (T/sub 3/N/sub 3/M/sub 0/). As 3-D reconstruction can be done in any arbitrary direction or cross section, it is possible to spatially determine the position of the disease inside the body, its progression, and its relationship with adjacent organs. Through image analysis, it is possible to better understand the volume and surface area of the disease. 3-D image reconstruction is an effective tool in the determination of diagnosis, therapeutic guidelines, and surgical indications, as well as effectiveness of treatment.

  13. Applications of 3-D reconstruction and 3-D image analysis using computer graphics in surgery of the oral and maxillofacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Yamauchi, Asanori; Madachi, Fujio; Furuta, Isao

    1988-01-01

    Using the 2-D data provided by CT-Tomography and MRI-tomography of oral and maxillofacial diseases (cyst, benign tumor, primary tumor and regional lymphnodes of malignant tumor), 3-D images were reconstructed and spatial analysis was attempted. We report the general concepts. The hardware used consisted of the Hewlett-Packard HP-9000/300, which utilizes a 16-bit CPU. A digitizer was used to construct 3-D images from serial CT-tomography and MRI-tomography images. Output was displayed on a color monitor and photographs. The 3 cases on which we used this technique included a 19-year-old male with plunging ranula, a 50-year-old male with maxillary pleomorphic adenoma, and a 58-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (T 3 N 3 M 0 ). As 3-D reconstruction can be done in any arbitrary direction or cross section, it is possible to spatially determine the position of the disease inside the body, its progression, and its relationship with adjacent organs. Through image analysis, it is possible to better understand the volume and surface area of the disease. 3-D image reconstruction is an effective tool in the determination of diagnosis, therapeutic guidelines, and surgical indications, as well as effectiveness of treatment. (author)

  14. Access to the kinematic information for the velocity model determination by 3-D reflexion tomography; Acces a l'information cinematique pour la determination du modele de vitesse par tomographie de reflexion 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broto, K.

    1999-04-01

    The access to a reliable image of the subsurface requires a kinematically correct velocity depth model.Reflection tomography allows to meet this requirement if a complete and coherent pre-stack kinematic database can be provided. However, in case of complex sub-surfaces, wave propagation may lead to hardly interpretable seismic events in the time data. The SMART method is a sequential method that relies on reflection tomography for updating the velocity model and on the pre-stack depth migrated domain for extracting kinematic information that is not readily accessible in the time domain. For determining 3-D subsurface velocity models in case of complex structures, we propose the seriated SMART 2-D method as an alternative to the currently inconceivable SMART 3-D method. In order to extract kinematic information from a 3-D pre-stack data set, we combine detours through the 2-D pre-stack depth domain for a number of selected lines of the studied 3-D survey and 3-D reflection tomography for updating the velocity model. The travel-times from the SMART method being independent of the velocity model used for passing through the pre-stack depth migrated domain, the access to 3-D travel-times is ensured, even if they have been obtained via a 2-D domain. Besides, we propose to build a kinematical guide for ensuring the coherency of the seriated 2-D pre-stack depth interpretations and the access to a complete 3-D pre-stack kinematic database when dealing with structures associated with 3-D wave propagation. We opt for a blocky representation of the velocity model in order to be able to cope with complex structures. This representation leads us to define specific methodological rules for carrying out the different steps of the seriated SMART 2-D method. We also define strategies, built from the analysis of first inversion results, for an efficient application of reflection tomography. Besides, we discuss the problem of uncertainties to be assigned to travel-times obtained

  15. High resolution 3-D shear wave velocity structure in South China from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, S.; Guo, Z.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    Using continuous data from a total of 638 seismic stations, including 484 from CEArray between 2008 and 2013 and 154 from SINOPROBE between 2014 and 2015, we perform both ambient noise and earthquake Rayleigh wave tomography across South China. Combining Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 6and 40s periods from ambient noise tomography and Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 20and 140s from teleseismic two-plane-wave tomography, we obtain phase velocity maps between 6 and140 s periods. We then invert Rayleigh wave phase velocity to construct a 3-D shear wave velocity structure of South China by Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Similar to other inversion results, our results correspond topography well. Moreover, our results also reveal that velocity structure of the eastern South China in mantle depth is similar to eastern North China, the core of the western South China, Sichuan Block (SB),still exists thick lithosphere. However, owing to much more data employed and some data quality control techniques in this research, our results reveal more detailed structures. Along Qinling-Dabie Orogenic Belt (QDOB), North-South Gravity Lineament (NSGL) and the Sichuan-Yunnan Rhombic Block (SYRB), there are obvious high speed anomalies in depths of 10-20 km, which possibly imply ancient intrusions. Moreover, it seems that Tancheng-Lujiang Fault Zone (TLFZ) has already cut through QDOB, forming a deep fracture cutting through the crust of the whole China continent. Although SB still exists thick lithosphere, there are indications for thermal erosion. At the same time, the lithosphere of the central SYRB seems to be experiencing delamination process, obviously forming a barrier to prevent the hot Tibetan Plateau (TP) mantle material from flowing further southeast. Upwelling hot mantle material possibly triggered by this delamination process might be the cause of the Emeishan Large Igneous Province. There exists an intercontinental low velocity layer in the crust of the TP

  16. Polycapillary based μXRF station for 3D colour tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampai, D.; Cherepennikov, Yu. M.; Liedl, A.; Cappuccio, G.; Capitolo, E.; Iannarelli, M.; Azzutti, C.; Gladkikh, Yu. P.; Marcelli, A.; Dabagov, S. B.

    2018-04-01

    The "Rainbow X-Ray" (RXR) experimental station at XLab Frascati of the Frascati's National Laboratories (LNF) INFN is a dedicated station for X-ray fluorescence studies based on the use of polycapillary lenses in a confocal geometry. The flexible RXR layout allows investigating specimens of the dimensions ranging from several millimeters up to half meter and weighting up to several tens of kilograms. Compared to similar existing XRF stations, apart of the possibility for investigating large samples, the main advantage of this equipment is the detection system with two spectrometers optimized to work separately at high and at low X-ray energies. The confocal geometry combined with a 3-axes fine motion system makes possible 3D μXRF elemental tomographic acquisitions (colour tomography). At present this station in operation at high XRF energies is used for cultural heritage and geological applications. We present and discuss here the analytical performances of this experimental station pointing out the advantages in different application areas.

  17. Passive 3D imaging of nuclear waste containers with Muon Scattering Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomay, C.; Velthuis, J.; Poffley, T.; Baesso, P.; Cussans, D.; Frazão, L.

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive imaging of dense objects is of particular interest in the context of nuclear waste management, where it is important to know the contents of waste containers without opening them. Using Muon Scattering Tomography (MST), it is possible to obtain a detailed 3D image of the contents of a waste container on reasonable timescales, showing both the high and low density materials inside. We show the performance of such a method on a Monte Carlo simulation of a dummy waste drum object containing objects of different shapes and materials. The simulation has been tuned with our MST prototype detector performance. In particular, we show that both a tungsten penny of 2 cm radius and 1 cm thickness, and a uranium sheet of 0.5 cm thickness can be clearly identified. We also show the performance of a novel edge finding technique, by which the edges of embedded objects can be identified more precisely than by solely using the imaging method.

  18. Dual matrix ordered subsets reconstruction for accelerated 3D scatter compensation in single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamphuis, C.; Beekman, F.J.; Van Rijk, P.P.; Viergever, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithms for single-photon emission tomography (SPET) are capable of correcting image-degrading effects of non-uniform attenuation, distance-dependent camera response and patient shape-dependent scatter. However, the resulting improvements in quantitation, resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are obtained at the cost of a huge computational burden. This paper presents a new acceleration method for ML-EM: dual matrix ordered subsets (DM-OS). DM-OS combines two acceleration methods: (a) different matrices for projection and back-projection and (b) ordered subsets of projections. DM-OS was compared with ML-EM on simulated data and on physical thorax phantom data, for both 180 and 360 orbits. Contrast, normalized standard deviation and mean squared error were calculated for the digital phantom experiment. DM-OS resulted in similar image quality to ML-EM, even for speed-up factors of 200 compared to ML-EM in the case of 120 projections. The thorax phantom data could be reconstructed 50 times faster (60 projections) using DM-OS with preservation of image quality. ML-EM and DM-OS with scatter compensation showed significant improvement of SNR compared to ML-EM without scatter compensation. Furthermore, inclusion of complex image formation models in the computer code is simplified in the case of DM-OS. It is thus shown that DM-OS is a fast and relatively simple algorithm for 3D iterative scatter compensation, with similar results to conventional ML-EM, for both 180 and 360 acquired data. (orig.)

  19. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann, H.J.; Weinrich, W.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions

  20. Validation of the Gate simulation platform in single photon emission computed tomography and application to the development of a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithm; Validation de la plate-forme de simulation GATE en tomographie a emission monophotonique et application au developpement d'un algorithme de reconstruction 3D complete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, D

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently considered in nuclear medical imaging as a powerful tool to design and optimize detection systems, and also to assess reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for degrading physical effects. Among the many simulators available, none of them is considered as a standard in nuclear medical imaging: this fact has motivated the development of a new generic Monte Carlo simulation platform (GATE), based on GEANT4 and dedicated to SPECT/PET (single photo emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography) applications. We participated during this thesis to the development of the GATE platform within an international collaboration. GATE was validated in SPECT by modeling two gamma cameras characterized by a different geometry, one dedicated to small animal imaging and the other used in a clinical context (Philips AXIS), and by comparing the results obtained with GATE simulations with experimental data. The simulation results reproduce accurately the measured performances of both gamma cameras. The GATE platform was then used to develop a new 3-dimensional reconstruction method: F3DMC (fully 3-dimension Monte-Carlo) which consists in computing with Monte Carlo simulation the transition matrix used in an iterative reconstruction algorithm (in this case, ML-EM), including within the transition matrix the main physical effects degrading the image formation process. The results obtained with the F3DMC method were compared to the results obtained with three other more conventional methods (FBP, MLEM, MLEMC) for different phantoms. The results of this study show that F3DMC allows to improve the reconstruction efficiency, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio with a satisfactory quantification of the images. These results should be confirmed by performing clinical experiments and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be applied in SPECT but also in PET. (author)

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to ...

  6. Automated 3-D method for the correction of axial artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Antony (Bhavna); M.D. Abràmoff (Michael); L. Tang (Li); W.D. Ramdas (Wishal); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); K. Lee (Kyungmoo); Y.H. Kwon (Young); M. Sonka (Milan); M.K. Garvin (Mona)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe 3-D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of the retina often do not reflect the true shape of the retina and are distorted differently along the x and y axes. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that uses thin-plate splines in two stages to estimate

  7. Automated 3-D method for the correction of axial artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antony, Bhavna; Abramoff, Michael D.; Tang, Li; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Lee, Kyungmoo; Kwon, Young H.; Sonka, Milan; Garvin, Mona K.

    2011-01-01

    The 3-D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of the retina often do not reflect the true shape of the retina and are distorted differently along the x and y axes. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that uses thin-plate splines in two stages to estimate and correct

  8. Automated 3-D method for the correction of axial artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Bhavna; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Tang, Li; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Lee, Kyungmoo; Kwon, Young H.; Sonka, Milan; Garvin, Mona K.

    2011-01-01

    The 3-D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of the retina often do not reflect the true shape of the retina and are distorted differently along the x and y axes. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that uses thin-plate splines in two stages to estimate and correct the distinct axial artifacts in SD-OCT images. The method was quantitatively validated using nine pairs of OCT scans obtained with orthogonal fast-scanning axes, where a segmented surface was compared after both datasets had been corrected. The mean unsigned difference computed between the locations of this artifact-corrected surface after the single-spline and dual-spline correction was 23.36 ± 4.04 μm and 5.94 ± 1.09 μm, respectively, and showed a significant difference (p < 0.001 from two-tailed paired t-test). The method was also validated using depth maps constructed from stereo fundus photographs of the optic nerve head, which were compared to the flattened top surface from the OCT datasets. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were noted between the artifact-corrected datasets and the original datasets, where the mean unsigned differences computed over 30 optic-nerve-head-centered scans (in normalized units) were 0.134 ± 0.035 and 0.302 ± 0.134, respectively. PMID:21833377

  9. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebled, J.M.; Yedra, Ll.; Estrade, S.; Portillo, J.; Peiro, F.

    2011-01-01

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49 o to -61 o at intervals of 2 o and with a precession angle of 0.6 o in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: → Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. → Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. → Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. → Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  10. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebled, J.M. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Yedra, Ll. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Estrade, S.; Portillo, J. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT-UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Peiro, F., E-mail: francesca.peiro@ub.edu [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49{sup o} to -61{sup o} at intervals of 2{sup o} and with a precession angle of 0.6{sup o} in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: {yields} Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. {yields} Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. {yields} Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. {yields} Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  11. Computed tomography in renal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, W.; Eisenberger, F.; Buck, J.

    1981-01-01

    In a group of 19 patients suffering from flank trauma and gross hematuria the diagnostic value of angiography was compared with that of computed tomography. The cases that underwent both tests were found to have the some diagnosis of rupture of the kidney. Typical CT-findings in kidney rupture are demonstrated. Whereas angiography presents an exact picture of the arterial system of the kidney, including its injures computed tomography reveals the extent of organ lesons by showing extra- and intrarenal hematomas. If surgery is planned angiography is still mandatory, whereby the indication is largely determined by the clinical findings. Computed tomography as a non-invasive method is equally suitable for follow-ups. (orig.) [de

  12. Association of achondroplasia with Down syndrome: difficulty in prenatal diagnosis by sonographic and 3-D helical computed tomographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Akimune; Murotsuki, Jun; Kamimura, Miki; Kimura, Masato; Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Kanno, Junko; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2015-05-01

    Achondroplasia and Down syndrome are relatively common conditions individually. But co-occurrence of both conditions in the same patient is rare and there have been no reports of fetal analysis of this condition by prenatal sonographic and three-dimensional (3-D) helical computed tomography (CT). Prenatal sonographic findings seen in persons with Down syndrome, such as a thickened nuchal fold, cardiac defects, and echogenic bowel were not found in the patient. A prenatal 3-D helical CT revealed a large head with frontal bossing, metaphyseal flaring of the long bones, and small iliac wings, which suggested achondroplasia. In a case with combination of achondroplasia and Down syndrome, it may be difficult to diagnose the co-occurrence prenatally without typical markers of Down syndrome. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  13. Computer-assisted diagnostic system for neurodegenerative dementia using brain SPECT and 3D-SSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kazunari; Kanda, Tomonori; Uemura, Takafumi; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Yoshikawa, Toshiki; Shimada, Kenichi; Ohkawa, Shingo; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    To develop a computer-assisted automated diagnostic system to distinguish among Alzheimer disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other degenerative disorders in patients with mild dementia. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images with injection of N-Isopropyl-p-[ 123 I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained from patients with mild degenerative dementia. First, datasets from 20 patients mild AD, 15 patients with dementia with DLB, and 17 healthy controls were used to develop an automated diagnosing system based on three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP). AD- and DLB-specific regional templates were created using 3D-SSP, and critical Z scores in the templates were established. Datasets from 50 AD patients, 8 DLB patients, and 10 patients with non-AD/DLB type degenerative dementia (5 with frontotemporal dementia and 5 with progressive supranuclear palsy) were then used to test the diagnostic accuracy of the optimized automated system in comparison to the diagnostic interpretation of conventional IMP-SPECT images. These comparisons were performed to differentiate AD and DLB from non-AD/DLB and to distinguish AD from DLB. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The area under the ROC curve (Az) and the accuracy of the automated diagnosis system were 0.89 and 82%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 65%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The mean Az and the accuracy of the visual inspection were 0.84 and 77%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 65%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The mean Az and the accuracy of the combination of visual inspection and this system were 0.96 and 91%, respectively, for AD/DLB vs. non-AD/DLB patients, and 0.70 and 66%, respectively, for AD vs. DLB patients. The system developed in the present study achieved as good discrimination of AD, DLB, and other degenerative disorders in patients with mild dementia

  14. 3D Electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of an artificial tracer injected within the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzé, Clémence; Pessel, Marc; Durand, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    Due to the high complexity level of hyporheic flow paths, hydrological and biogeochemical processes which occur in this mixing place are not fully understood yet. Some previous studies made in flumes show that hyporheic flow is strongly connected to the streambed morphology and sediment heterogeneity . There is still a lack of practical field experiment considering a natural environment and representation of natural streambed heterogeneities will be always limited in laboratories. The purpose of this project is to propose an innovative method using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring of an artificial tracer injection directly within the streambed sediments in order to visualize the water pathways within the hyporheic zone. Field experiment on a small stream was conducted using a plastic tube as an injection piezometer and home-made electrodes strips arranged in a rectangular form made of 180 electrodes (15 strips of 12 electrodes each). The injection of tracer (NaCl) lasted approximatively 90 minutes, and 24h monitoring with increasing step times was performed. The physical properties of the water are controlled by CTD probes installed upstream and downstream within the river. Inverse time-lapse tomographs show development and persistence of a conductive water plume around the injection point. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments (clay and overlying loess), the tracer movement is barely visible, as it dilutes gradually in the pore water. Impact of boundary conditions on inversion results can lead to significant differences on images, especially in the shallow part of the profiles. Preferential paths of transport are not highlighted here, but this experiment allows to follow spatially and temporarily the evolution of the tracer in a complex natural environment .

  15. South Ilan Plain High-Resolution 3-D S-Wave Velocity from Ambient Noise Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Xun Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ilan Plain in northeastern Taiwan is located at a pivotal point where the Ryukyu trench subduction zone, the northern Taiwan crustal stretching zone, and the ongoing arc-continent collision zone converge. In contrast to the North Ilan Plain, the South Ilan Plain exhibits a thin unconsolidated sedimentary layer with depths ranging from 0 - 1 km, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements relative to Penghu island. We deployed a dense network of 43 short-period vertical component Texan instruments from June to November 2013 in this study, covering most of the South Ilan Plain and its vicinity. We then used the ambient noise tomography method for simultaneous phase and group Rayleigh wave velocity measurements to invert a high-resolution 3-D S-wave for shallow structures (up to a depth of 2.5 km in the South Ilan Plain. We used the fast marching method for ray tracing to deal with ray bending in an inhomogeneous medium. The resulting rays gradually bend toward high velocity zones with increasing number of iterations. The high velocity zone results are modified by more iterations and the resolutions become higher because ray crossings are proportional to ray densities for evenly distributed stations. The final results agreed well with known sedimentary basement thickness patterns. We observed nearly EW trending fast anomalies beneath the mountainous terrain abutting to the South Ilan Plain. The Chingshui location consistently exhibited a low S-wave velocity zone to a depth of 1.5 km.

  16. Application of advanced virtual reality and 3D computer assisted technologies in tele-3D-computer assisted surgery in rhinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapan, Ivica; Vranjes, Zeljko; Prgomet, Drago; Lukinović, Juraj

    2008-03-01

    The real-time requirement means that the simulation should be able to follow the actions of the user that may be moving in the virtual environment. The computer system should also store in its memory a three-dimensional (3D) model of the virtual environment. In that case a real-time virtual reality system will update the 3D graphic visualization as the user moves, so that up-to-date visualization is always shown on the computer screen. Upon completion of the tele-operation, the surgeon compares the preoperative and postoperative images and models of the operative field, and studies video records of the procedure itself Using intraoperative records, animated images of the real tele-procedure performed can be designed. Virtual surgery offers the possibility of preoperative planning in rhinology. The intraoperative use of computer in real time requires development of appropriate hardware and software to connect medical instrumentarium with the computer and to operate the computer by thus connected instrumentarium and sophisticated multimedia interfaces.

  17. Application of computer virtual simulation technology in 3D animation production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Can

    2017-11-01

    In the continuous development of computer technology, the application system of virtual simulation technology has been further optimized and improved. It also has been widely used in various fields of social development, such as city construction, interior design, industrial simulation and tourism teaching etc. This paper mainly introduces the virtual simulation technology used in 3D animation. Based on analyzing the characteristics of virtual simulation technology, the application ways and means of this technology in 3D animation are researched. The purpose is to provide certain reference for the 3D effect promotion days after.

  18. GPU-based cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Peter B; Walczak, Alan M; Xu, Jinhui; Corso, Jason J; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Schafer, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is growing in the clinical arena due to its ability to provide 3D information during interventions, its high diagnostic quality (sub-millimeter resolution), and its short scanning times (60 s). In many situations, the short scanning time of CBCT is followed by a time-consuming 3D reconstruction. The standard reconstruction algorithm for CBCT data is the filtered backprojection, which for a volume of size 256(3) takes up to 25 min on a standard system. Recent developments in the area of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) make it possible to have access to high-performance computing solutions at a low cost, allowing their use in many scientific problems. We have implemented an algorithm for 3D reconstruction of CBCT data using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) provided by NVIDIA (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, California), which was executed on a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280. Our implementation results in improved reconstruction times from minutes, and perhaps hours, to a matter of seconds, while also giving the clinician the ability to view 3D volumetric data at higher resolutions. We evaluated our implementation on ten clinical data sets and one phantom data set to observe if differences occur between CPU and GPU-based reconstructions. By using our approach, the computation time for 256(3) is reduced from 25 min on the CPU to 3.2 s on the GPU. The GPU reconstruction time for 512(3) volumes is 8.5 s. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An Algorithm for Fast Computation of 3D Zernike Moments for Volumetric Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Hosny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm was proposed for very fast and low-complexity computation of three-dimensional Zernike moments. The 3D Zernike moments were expressed in terms of exact 3D geometric moments where the later are computed exactly through the mathematical integration of the monomial terms over the digital image/object voxels. A new symmetry-based method was proposed to compute 3D Zernike moments with 87% reduction in the computational complexity. A fast 1D cascade algorithm was also employed to add more complexity reduction. The comparison with existing methods was performed, where the numerical experiments and the complexity analysis ensured the efficiency of the proposed method especially with image and objects of large sizes.

  20. X-ray tomography: Biological cells in 3-D at better than 50 nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larabell, C.; Le Gros, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: X-ray microscopy can be used to image whole, hydrated, specimens with a spatial resolution 5-10 times better than that obtained using visible light microscopy. X-ray imaging at photon energies below the K- absorption edge of oxygen, referred to as the water window, exploits the strong natural contrast for organic material embedded in a mostly water matrix. With a transmission X-ray microscope using Fresnel zone plate optics, specimens up to 10 microns thick can be examined. The highest X-ray transmission in hydrated samples is obtained at a wavelength of 2.4 nm but, due to the low numerical aperture of zone plate lenses operated in st order diffraction mode the structures resolved are much larger than the X-ray wavelength. Because of the low NA of X-ray lenses (NA=0.05), combined with the effect of polychromatic illumination and a wavelength dependant focal length, the effective depth of ld is large (6-10 microns). The experiments presented here were performed at the Advanced Light Source using the full ld transmission X-ray microscope, XM-1. This microscope employs a bend magnet X-ray source and zone plate condenser and objective lenses. The condenser zone plate acts as a monochromator and the X-ray images are recorded directly on a cooled, back-thinned 1024x1024 pixel CCD camera. The sample holder was a rotationally symmetric glass tube; the region containing the sample was 10 microns in diameter with a wall thickness of 200 nm. Live yeast cells were loaded into the tube, rapidly frozen by a blast of liquid nitrogen-cooled helium gas, and maintained at 140 deg C by a steady flow of cold helium. The image sequence spanned 180 deg and consisted of 45 images spaced by 4 deg. The images were aligned to a common axis and computed tomographic reconstruction was used to obtain the 3-D X-ray linear absorption coefficient. Volume rendering and animation of reconstructed data was performed using the 3-D program, Amira. Acquisition time for 90 images was 3 min

  1. Novel 3-D Computer Model Can Help Predict Pathogens’ Roles in Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand how bacterial and viral infections contribute to human cancers, four NCI at Frederick scientists turned not to the lab bench, but to a computer. The team has created the world’s first—and currently, only—3-D computational approach for studying interactions between pathogen proteins and human proteins based on a molecular adaptation known as interface mimicry.

  2. Computed tomography of pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hajime; Honda, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Chikashi; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Nakayama, Takashi

    1983-01-01

    We have evaluated the value of computed tomography (CT) in distinguishing benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. CT was performed on 30 cases of solitary pulmonary nodules consisting of 17 primary lung cancers, 3 metastatic tumors and 10 benign nodules. The CT number was calculated for each lesion. Three benign nodules showed CT numbers well above the range of malignant nodules, and only in one of them was calcification visible on conventional tomography. In 6 benign nodules, the CT numbers overlapped those of malignant lesion and could not be differentiated. Thus the measurement of CT number can be useful to confirm the benign nature of certain nodules when calcification is unclear or not visible on conventional tomography. As for the morphological observation of the nodule, CT was not superior to conventional tomography and its value seems to be limited. (author)

  3. 3D-SoftChip: A Novel Architecture for Next-Generation Adaptive Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Mike Myung-Ok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel architecture for next-generation adaptive computing systems, which we term 3D-SoftChip. The 3D-SoftChip is a 3-dimensional (3D vertically integrated adaptive computing system combining state-of-the-art processing and 3D interconnection technology. It comprises the vertical integration of two chips (a configurable array processor and an intelligent configurable switch through an indium bump interconnection array (IBIA. The configurable array processor (CAP is an array of heterogeneous processing elements (PEs, while the intelligent configurable switch (ICS comprises a switch block, 32-bit dedicated RISC processor for control, on-chip program/data memory, data frame buffer, along with a direct memory access (DMA controller. This paper introduces the novel 3D-SoftChip architecture for real-time communication and multimedia signal processing as a next-generation computing system. The paper further describes the advanced HW/SW codesign and verification methodology, including high-level system modeling of the 3D-SoftChip using SystemC, being used to determine the optimum hardware specification in the early design stage.

  4. Clinical application analysis of 3D-CRT methods using tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kang Chul; Kyum, Hun Kyum; Kim, Joo Ho; Ahn, Seung Kwon; Lee, Sang Kyoo; Yoon, Jong Won; Cho, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Seok; Yoo, Beong Gyu [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study investigates the case of clinical application for TomoDirect 3D-CRT(TD-3D) and TomoHelical 3D-CRT(TH-3D) with evaluating dose distribution for clinical application in each case. Treatment plans were created for 8 patients who had 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy using TD-3D and TH-3D mode. Each patients were treated for sarcoma, CSI(craniospinal irradiation), breast, brain, pancreas, spine metastasis, SVC syndrome and esophagus. DVH(dose volume histogram) and isodose curve were used for comparison of each treatment modality. TD-3D shows better dose distribution over the irradiation field without junction effect because TD-3D was not influenced by target length for sarcoma and CSI case. In breast case, dosimetric results of CTV, the average value of D 99%, D 95% were 49.2±0.4 Gy, 49.9±0.4 Gy and V 105%, V 110% were 0%, respectively. TH-3D with the dosimetric block decreased dose of normal organ in brain, pancreas, spine metastasis case. SCV syndrome also effectively decreased dose of normal organ by using dose block to the critical organs(spinal cord <38 Gy). TH-3D combined with other treatment modalities was possible to boost irradiation and was total dose was reduced to spinal cord in esophagus case(spinal cord <45 Gy, lung V 20 <20%). 3D-CRT using Tomotherapy could overcomes some dosimetric limitations, when we faced Conventional Linac based CRT and shows clinically proper dose distribution. In conclusion, 3D-CRT using Tomotherapy will be one of the effective 3D-CRT techniques.

  5. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Although there are many common aspects to x-ray transmission and radionuclide emission (ECT) computerized tomography, there are added difficulties and a number of particular factors which form the basis of ECT. The relationship between the physical factors, system design, methodologic approach and assumptions of ECT is discussed. The instrumentation design and application strategies in ECT at this time are diverse and in a rapid stage of development. The approaches are divided into two major categories of Single Photon Counting (SPC) employing scanner and camera concepts with radionuclides of 99 /sup m/Tc, 201 Tl, 123 I etc., and Annihilation Coincidence Detection (ACD) of positron-emitting radionuclides. Six systems in the former and ten systems in the latter category, with examples of typical studies, illustrate the different approaches

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose sinusitis . evaluate sinuses that are filled with fluid or thickened sinus membranes . detect the presence of ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... of the Sinuses? CT is usually the first test ordered when a sinus tumor is suspected. If ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications must be taken 12 hours prior to ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications must be taken 12 hours prior to ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... to you, revolve around you during the imaging process. You will be alone in the exam room ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... artifacts on the images. This loss of image quality can resemble the blurring seen on a photograph ...

  8. Constrained non-linear optimization in 3D reflexion tomography; Problemes d'optimisation non-lineaire avec contraintes en tomographie de reflexion 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbos, F.

    2004-11-01

    Reflexion tomography allows the determination of a subsurface velocity model from the travel times of seismic waves. The introduction of a priori information in this inverse problem can lead to the resolution of a constrained non-linear least-squares problem. The goal of the thesis is to improve the resolution techniques of this optimization problem, whose main difficulties are its ill-conditioning, its large scale and an expensive cost function in terms of CPU time. Thanks to a detailed study of the problem and to numerous numerical experiments, we justify the use of a sequential quadratic programming method, in which the tangential quadratic programs are solved by an original augmented Lagrangian method. We show the global linear convergence of the latter. The efficiency and robustness of the approach are demonstrated on several synthetic examples and on two real data cases. (author)

  9. Constrained non-linear optimization in 3D reflexion tomography; Problemes d'optimisation non-lineaire avec contraintes en tomographie de reflexion 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbos, F

    2004-11-01

    Reflexion tomography allows the determination of a subsurface velocity model from the travel times of seismic waves. The introduction of a priori information in this inverse problem can lead to the resolution of a constrained non-linear least-squares problem. The goal of the thesis is to improve the resolution techniques of this optimization problem, whose main difficulties are its ill-conditioning, its large scale and an expensive cost function in terms of CPU time. Thanks to a detailed study of the problem and to numerous numerical experiments, we justify the use of a sequential quadratic programming method, in which the tangential quadratic programs are solved by an original augmented Lagrangian method. We show the global linear convergence of the latter. The efficiency and robustness of the approach are demonstrated on several synthetic examples and on two real data cases. (author)

  10. The value of unenhanced multi-detector computed tomography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Unenhanced computed tomography (CT) is used to detect urinary tract calculi with high accuracy. The development of multi-detector CT (MDCT) allows reconstructions in coronal, sagittal and oblique directions. Objective: To compare MDCT with three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) imaging in evaluating ...

  11. A reduced-order filtering approach for 3D dynamical electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voutilainen, A; Lehikoinen, A; Vauhkonen, M; Kaipio, J P

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the state estimation approach to process tomography can provide estimates that are significantly better than (a sequence of) conventional stationary snapshot estimates. One of the main obstacles of the adoption of the recursive state estimation algorithms, most commonly different versions of the Kalman filter, is the computational complexity. This is due to both the required large dimension for the state variable and the need to use iterative versions of the Kalman filter in such cases in which there are large contrasts or varying background. In this paper, we propose to use a reduced-order representation for the state variable. In particular, we propose to use the proper orthogonal decomposition-related basis for the state. We consider a simulation study with fluctuating background conductivity, and, in particular, with fluctuating contact impedances. We compare the proposed approach to three different versions of the Kalman filter having different computational complexities. We show that this approach allows the reduction of the dimension of the problem approximately by an order of magnitude and yields essentially as accurate estimates as the most accurate traditional Kalman filter version, the iterated extended Kalman filter

  12. A multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system for real-time 2D and 3D imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunjie; Jia, Jiabin

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a configurable, fast multi-frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography (mfEIT) system for real-time 2D and 3D imaging, particularly for biomedical imaging. The system integrates 32 electrode interfaces and the current frequency ranges from 10 kHz to 1 MHz. The system incorporates the following novel features. First, a fully adjustable multi-frequency current source with current monitoring function is designed. Second, a flexible switching scheme is developed for arbitrary sensing configuration and a semi-parallel data acquisition architecture is implemented for high-frame-rate data acquisition. Furthermore, multi-frequency digital quadrature demodulation is accomplished in a high-capacity Field Programmable Gate Array. At last, a 3D imaging software, visual tomography, is developed for real-time 2D and 3D image reconstruction, data analysis, and visualization. The mfEIT system is systematically tested and evaluated from the aspects of signal to noise ratio (SNR), frame rate, and 2D and 3D multi-frequency phantom imaging. The highest SNR is 82.82 dB on a 16-electrode sensor. The frame rate is up to 546 fps at serial mode and 1014 fps at semi-parallel mode. The evaluation results indicate that the presented mfEIT system is a powerful tool for real-time 2D and 3D imaging.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about radiation dose. There always is a risk of complications from general anesthesia or sedation. Every measure will be taken to ... in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Anesthesia Safety Children and Radiation Safety ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  14. Computed tomography in hepatic echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choliz, J.D.; Olaverri, F.J.L.; Casas, T.F.; Zubieta, S.O.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 50 cases of hydatid disease of the liver. It was definite in 49 cases and negative in one case. Pre- and postcontrast scans were performed. CT may reveal the exact location and extension of cysts and possible complications. However, a false-negative case was found in a hydatid cyst located in a fatty liver

  15. Computer tomography in Caisson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, F.; Csobaly, S.; Institute for Advanced Training of Physicians, Budapest

    1981-01-01

    Computer tomography was performed on 20 patients with the early stages of Caisson osteoarthropathy, as well as in other patients with chronic bone infarcts. From their results the authors have formed the opinion that CT is valuable, not only in the diagnosis of early cases, but that it can provide significant information concerning the osteopathy and bone infarcts. (orig.) [de

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  17. Laryngopyocele: signs on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazaroglu, Hasan E-mail: hnazarog@dicle.edu.tr; Oezates, Mustafa; Uyar, Asur; Deger, Emin; Simsek, Masum

    2000-01-01

    A laryngocele is an air-filled dilation of the saccule of the larynx. An infected laryngocele is called a laryngopyocele. Our experience with a case of laryngopyocele with signs on computed tomography before and after antibiotic therapy is presented since laryngopyocele is more unusual.

  18. Laryngopyocele: signs on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroglu, Hasan; Oezates, Mustafa; Uyar, Asur; Deger, Emin; Simsek, Masum

    2000-01-01

    A laryngocele is an air-filled dilation of the saccule of the larynx. An infected laryngocele is called a laryngopyocele. Our experience with a case of laryngopyocele with signs on computed tomography before and after antibiotic therapy is presented since laryngopyocele is more unusual

  19. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  20. Industrial applications of computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Kruth, J. -P.

    2014-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of Computed Tomography(CT) is large and rapidly increasing. After a brief market overview, the paper gives a survey of state of the art and upcoming CT technologies, covering types of CT systems, scanning capabilities, and technological advances. The paper...

  1. Positron computed tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervouet, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Lamy, T.; Le Gouil, S.; Devillers, A.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Ansquer, C.; Cheze-le Rest, C.; Metges, J.P.; Teyton, P.; Lozach, P.; Volant, A.; Bizais, Y.; Visvikis, D.; Morel, O.; Girault, S.; Soulie, P.; Dupoiron, D.; Berthelot, C.; Lorimier, G.; Jallet, P.; Garin, E.; Prigent, F.; Lesimple, T.; Barge, M.L.; Rousseau, C.; Devillers, A.; Bernard, A.M.; Bouriel, C.; Bridji, B.; Resche, R.; Banayan, S.; Claret, M.; Ninet, J.; Janier, M.; Billotey, C.; Garin, E.; Devillers, A.; Becker, S.; Lecloirec, J.; Boucher, E.; Raoul, J.L.; Rolland, V.; Oudoux, A.; Valette, F.; Dupas, B.; Moreau, P.; Champion, L.; Anract, P.; Wartski, M.; Laurence, V.; Goldwasser, F.; Pecking, A.P.; Alberini, J.L.; Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Allal, B.; Zerdoud, S.; Gansel, M.G.; Thomas, F.; Dierrickx, L.; Delord, J.P.; Marchand, C.; Resche, I.; Mahe, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Several oral communications present the interest of positron computed tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose in the detection of cancers, or for the follow up of cancers treatments in order to detect early possible relapses.PET FDG is also used to optimize the definition of target volume in order to avoid side effects and to get a better control of the illness. (N.C.)

  2. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  3. Meta!Blast computer game: a pipeline from science to 3D art to education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, William; Campbell, P. J.; Bassham, Diane; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2012-03-01

    Meta!Blast (http://www.metablast.org) is designed to address the challenges students often encounter in understanding cell and metabolic biology. Developed by faculty and students in biology, biochemistry, computer science, game design, pedagogy, art and story, Meta!Blast is being created using Maya (http://usa.autodesk.com/maya/) and the Unity 3D (http://unity3d.com/) game engine, for Macs and PCs in classrooms; it has also been exhibited in an immersive environment. Here, we describe the pipeline from protein structural data and holographic information to art to the threedimensional (3D) environment to the game engine, by which we provide a publicly-available interactive 3D cellular world that mimics a photosynthetic plant cell.

  4. The use of 3D computer graphics in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal vascular malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Keisuke; Kin, Taichi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Iijima, Akira; Shojima, Masaaki; Nishido, Hajime; Saito, Nobuhito

    2011-12-01

    Digital subtraction (DS) angiography is the gold standard for diagnosing spinal vascular malformations. Recently, multidetectorrow spiral CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiography have been introduced as screening examinations before DS angiography. These methods, however, do not always determine the accurate location of an arteriovenous shunt because the resulting images lack information about the spinal cord or the dura mater. Between April 2009 and December 2010, 13 patients underwent imaging evaluations for spinal vascular malformations at the authors' university hospital. This group included 8 patients with spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), 3 with perimedullary AVFs, and 2 with intramedullary arteriovenous malformations. Using data from these patients, the authors attempted to develop 3D computer graphics (CG) based upon the fusion of 3D rotational angiography and postmyelographic CT. They subsequently verified the accuracy of this imaging method. Ten of these 13 patients underwent surgical treatment for their lesions (11 AVFs), and for these 11 lesions the authors compared the diagnoses obtained using 3D CG with those obtained using conventional DS angiography. In all 13 cases, 3D CG images of the spinal lesions were successfully developed using the patients' actual data. Four (36%) of 11 AVFs were correctly identified using DS angiography, whereas 10 (91%) were correctly identified using 3D CG. Results from 3D CG of spinal AVFs corresponded well with operative findings, and 3D CG was significantly better than conventional DS angiography at predicting AVF location (p = 0.024, Fisher exact test). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case series in which 3D CG of spinal vascular malformations was used to provide simultaneous, stereoscopic visualization of the spinal vascular system, spinal cord, dura mater, and bone. The 3D CG method provides precise visual images for the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions.

  5. Computation of 3D neutron fluxes in one pin hexagonal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabha, Hem; Marleau, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Computations of 3D neutron fluxes in one pin hexagonal cell is performed by Carlvik’s method of collision probability. ► Carlvik’s method requires computation of track lengths in the geometry. ► Equations are developed to compute tracks, in 2D and 3D, in hexagons and are implemented in a program HX7. ► The program HX7 is implemented in NXT module of the code DRAGON, where tracks in pins are computed. ► The tracks are plotted and fluxes are compared with the EXCELT module of the code DRAGON. - Abstract: In this paper we are presenting the method of computation of three dimensional (3D) neutron fluxes in one pin hexagonal cell. Carlvik’s collision probability method of solving neutron transport equation for computing fluxes has been used here. This method can consider exact geometrical details of the given geometry. While using this method, track length computations are required to be done. We have described here the method of computing tracks in one 3D hexagon. A program HX7 has been developed for this purpose. This program has been implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON, where tracks in the pins are computed. For computing tracks in 3D, first we use the tracks computed in the two dimensions (2D) and then we project them in the third dimension. We have developed equations for this purpose. In both the regions, fuel pin as well as in the moderator surrounding the pin the fluxes are assumed to be uniform. A uniform source is assumed in the moderator region. Reflecting boundary conditions are applied on all the sides as well as on the top and bottom surfaces. One group 2D and 3D fluxes are compared with the respective results obtained by the EXCELT module of DRAGON. To check the computations, tracks are plotted and errors in the computations are obtained. It is observed by using both the modules EXCELT and NXT that the fluxes in the pins converge faster and in the moderator region fluxes converge very slowly

  6. 3D shear wave velocity structure revealed with ambient noise tomography on a DAS array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.

    2017-12-01

    An 8700-m Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) cable was deployed at Brady's Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016 in a 1.5 by 0.5 km study area. The layout of the DAS array was designed with a zig-zag geometry to obtain relatively uniform areal and varied angular coverage, providing very dense coverage with a one-meter channel spacing. This array continuously recorded signals of a vibroseis truck, earthquakes, and traffic noise during the 15-day deployment. As shown in a previous study (Zeng et al., 2017), ambient noise tomography can be applied to DAS continuous records to image shear wave velocity structure in the near surface. To avoid effects of the vibroseis truck operation, only continuous data recorded during the nighttime was used to compute noise cross-correlation functions for channel pairs within a given linear segment. The frequency band of whitening was set at 5 to 15 Hz and the length of the cross-correlation time window was set to 60 second. The phase velocities were determined using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) methodology. The phase velocity dispersion curve was then used to invert for shear wave velocity profiles. A preliminarily velocity model at Brady's Hot Springs (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 2015) was used as the starting model and the sensitivity kernels of Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities were computed with this model. As the sensitivity kernel shows, shear wave velocity in the top 200 m can be constrained with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities in our frequency band. With the picked phase velocity data, the shear wave velocity structure can be obtained via Occam's inversion (Constable et al., 1987; Lai 1998). Shear wave velocity gradually increases with depth and it is generally faster than the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (2015) model. Furthermore, that model has limiting constraints at shallow depth. The strong spatial variation is interpreted to reflect the different sediments and

  7. Development of 3-D Radiosurgery Planning System Using IBM Personal Computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Tae Suk; Park, Charn Il; Ha, Sung Whan; Kang, Wee Saing; Suh, Doug Young; Park, Sung Hun

    1993-01-01

    Recently, stereotactic radiosurgery plan is required with the information of 3-D image and dose distribution. A project has been doing if developing LINAC based stereotactic radiosurgery since April 1991. The purpose of this research is to develop 3-D radiosurgery planning system using personal computer. The procedure of this research is based on two steps. The first step is to develop 3-D localization system, which input the image information of the patient, coordinate transformation, the position and shape of target, and patient contour into computer system using CT image and stereotactic frame. The second step is to develop 3-D dose planning system, which compute dose distribution on image plane, display on high resolution monitor both isodose distribution and patient image simultaneously and develop menu-driven planning system. This prototype of radiosurgery planning system was applied recently for several clinical cases. It was shown that our planning system is fast, accurate and efficient while making it possible to handle various kinds of image modalities such as angiography, CT and MRI. It makes it possible to develop general 3-D planning system using beam eye view or CT simulation in radiation therapy in future

  8. Cranial computed tomography in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkai, P.; Bogerts, B.

    1993-01-01

    Computed tomography has gained importance as a diagnostic tool in psychiatry to exclude structural brain pathology, but has passed on its role in research to magnetic resonance tomography. It helps to distinguish between senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. The enlargement of the ventricular system and cortical sulci is well established in schizophrenic and affective psychosis. Some alcohol addicts show a considerable degree of cerebral atrophy, only exceeded by demented patients, but this condition is potentially reversible. To screen psychiatric patients by CT is recommendable, as 2-10% of hospitalized psychiatric patients have structural brain disease. (orig.) [de

  9. Introduction of the ASP3D Computer Program for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP3D code is the result of a decade of developmental work on improvements to the small perturbation formulation, performed while the author was employed as a Senior Research Scientist in the Configuration Aerodynamics Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The ASP3D code is a significant improvement to the state-of-the-art for transonic aeroelastic analyses over the CAP-TSD code (Computational Aeroelasticity Program Transonic Small Disturbance), which was developed principally by the author in the mid-1980s. The author is in a unique position as the developer of both computer programs to compare, contrast, and ultimately make conclusions regarding the underlying formulations and utility of each code. The paper describes the salient features of the ASP3D code including the rationale for improvements in comparison with CAP-TSD. Numerous results are presented to demonstrate the ASP3D capability. The general conclusion is that the new ASP3D capability is superior to the older CAP-TSD code because of the myriad improvements developed and incorporated.

  10. Computational and experimental analysis of supersonic air ejector: Turbulence modeling and assessment of 3D effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzelli, Federico; Little, Adrienne B.; Garimella, Srinivas; Bartosiewicz, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational and experimental assessment of computational techniques for ejector flows. • Comparisons to 2D/3D (k–ε, k–ε realizable, k–ω SST, and stress–ω RSM) turbulence models. • k–ω SST model performs best while ε-based models more accurate at low motive pressures. • Good on-design agreement across 2D and 3D models; off-design needs 3D simulations. - Abstract: Numerical and experimental analyses are performed on a supersonic air ejector to evaluate the effectiveness of commonly-used computational techniques when predicting ejector flow characteristics. Three series of experimental curves at different operating conditions are compared with 2D and 3D simulations using RANS, steady, wall-resolved models. Four different turbulence models are tested: k–ε, k–ε realizable, k–ω SST, and the stress–ω Reynolds Stress Model. An extensive analysis is performed to interpret the differences between numerical and experimental results. The results show that while differences between turbulence models are typically small with respect to the prediction of global parameters such as ejector inlet mass flow rates and Mass Entrainment Ratio (MER), the k–ω SST model generally performs best whereas ε-based models are more accurate at low motive pressures. Good agreement is found across all 2D and 3D models at on-design conditions. However, prediction at off-design conditions is only acceptable with 3D models, making 3D simulations mandatory to correctly predict the critical pressure and achieve reasonable results at off-design conditions. This may partly depend on the specific geometry under consideration, which in the present study has a rectangular cross section with low aspect ratio.

  11. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Adam K; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W; Gladstone, David J

    2015-07-01

    To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp-Davis-Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm(3) volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%-99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  13. Soft tissue segmentation and 3D display from computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, R.T.; Trivedi, S.S.; Fellingham, L.L.; Gamboa-Aldeco, A.; Hedgcock, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Volume calculation and 3D display of human anatomy facilitate a physician's diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation. Accurate segmentation of soft tissue structures is a prerequisite for such volume calculations and 3D displays, but segmentation by hand-outlining structures is often tedious and time-consuming. In this paper, methods based on analysis of statistics of image gray level are applied to segmentation of soft tissue in medical images, with the goal of making segmentation automatic or semi-automatic. The resulting segmented images, volume calculations, and 3D displays are analyzed and compared with results based on physician-drawn outlines as well as actual volume measurements

  14. Novel fully integrated computer system for custom footwear: from 3D digitization to manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Pascal-Simon; Beaulieu, Eric; Liu, Zhaoheng

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a recently developed custom footwear system, which integrates 3D digitization technology, range image fusion techniques, a 3D graphical environment for corrective actions, parametric curved surface representation and computer numerical control (CNC) machining. In this system, a support designed with the help of biomechanics experts can stabilize the foot in a correct and neutral position. The foot surface is then captured by a 3D camera using active ranging techniques. A software using a library of documented foot pathologies suggests corrective actions on the orthosis. Three kinds of deformations can be achieved. The first method uses previously scanned pad surfaces by our 3D scanner, which can be easily mapped onto the foot surface to locally modify the surface shape. The second kind of deformation is construction of B-Spline surfaces by manipulating control points and modifying knot vectors in a 3D graphical environment to build desired deformation. The last one is a manual electronic 3D pen, which may be of different shapes and sizes, and has an adjustable 'pressure' information. All applied deformations should respect a G1 surface continuity, which ensure that the surface can accustom a foot. Once the surface modification process is completed, the resulting data is sent to manufacturing software for CNC machining.

  15. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Toki; Kin, Taichi; Nakagawa, Daichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications.

  16. Research Summary 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Model Of The Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethnicity,...

  17. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid dyn...

  18. The Effects of 3D Computer Simulation on Biology Students' Achievement and Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Tavasuria; Ismail, Zurida

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was conducted for six weeks to determine the effectiveness of two different 3D computer simulation based teaching methods, that is, realistic simulation and non-realistic simulation on Form Four Biology students' achievement and memory retention in Perak, Malaysia. A sample of 136 Form Four Biology students in Perak,…

  19. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  20. Postinfarct VSD management using 3D computer printing assisted percutaneous closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Lazkani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Postinfarct VSD (PIVSD carries a grim prognosis. The mainstay of management has been surgical repair. The advent of septal occluder devices has offered an attractive alternative to surgical repair. Most PIVSD have serpiginous tracts with necrotic tissue, which makes assessing the defect challenging. 3D computer printing has become useful in preprocedure planning of complex surgical procedures in multiple subspecialties.

  1. Protean appearance of craniopharyngioma on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danziger, A.; Price, H.I.

    1979-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas present a diverse appearance on computed tomography. Histological diagnosis is not always possible, but computed tomography is of great assistance in the delineation of the tumour as well as of the degree of associated hydrocephalus. Computed tomography also enables rapid non-invasive follow-up after surgery or radiotherapy, or both

  2. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zacharias Fourie; Janalt Damstra; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years.Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines,particularly in the fields of orthodontics,maxillofacial surgery,plastic and reconstructive surgery,neurosurgery and forensic sciences.In most cases,3D facial imaging overcomes the limitations of traditional 2D methods and provides the clinician with more accurate information regarding the soft-tissues and the underlying skeleton.The aim of this study was to review the types of imaging methods used for facial imaging.It is important to realize the difference between the types of 3D imaging methods as application and indications thereof may differ.Since 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging will play an increasingly importanl role in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery,special emphasis should be placed on discussing CBCT applications in facial evaluations.

  3. 3-D computations and measurements of accelerator magnets for the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), requires dipole, quadrupole, sextupole, and corrector magnets for each of its circular accelerator systems. Three-dimensional (3-D) field computations are needed to eliminate unwanted multipole fields from the ends of long quadrupole and dipole magnets and to guarantee that the flux levels in the poles of short magnets will not cause saturation. Measurements of the magnets show good agreement with the computations

  4. Computer assisted determination of acetabular cup orientation using 2D-3D image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan

    2010-01-01

    2D-3D image-based registration methods have been developed to measure acetabular cup orientation after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These methods require registration of both the prosthesis and the CT images to 2D radiographs and compute implant position with respect to a reference. The application of these methods is limited in clinical practice due to two limitations: (1) the requirement of a computer-aided design (CAD) model of the prosthesis, which may be unavailable due to the proprietary concerns of the manufacturer, and (2) the requirement of either multiple radiographs or radiograph-specific calibration, usually unavailable for retrospective studies. In this paper, we propose a new method to address these limitations. A new formulation for determination of post-operative cup orientation, which couples a radiographic measurement with 2D-3D image matching, was developed. In our formulation, the radiographic measurement can be obtained with known methods so that the challenge lies in the 2D-3D image matching. To solve this problem, a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining a landmark-to-ray 2D-3D alignment with a robust intensity-based 2D-3D registration was used. The hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme allows computing both the post-operative cup orientation with respect to an anatomical reference and the pelvic tilt and rotation with respect to the X-ray imaging table/plate. The method was validated using 2D adult cadaver hips. Using the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme, our method showed a mean accuracy of 1.0 ± 0.7 (range from 0.1 to 2.0 ) for inclination and 1.7 ± 1.2 (range from 0.0 to 3.9 ) for anteversion, taking the measurements from post-operative CT images as ground truths. Our new solution formulation and the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme facilitate estimation of post-operative cup orientation and measurement of pelvic tilt and rotation. (orig.)

  5. TOMOGRAFÍA DE RESISTIVIDAD ELÉCTRICA 3D EN LA CATEDRAL DE MORELIA, MÉXICO (3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography in Morelia Cathedral, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Cifuentes-Nava

    2017-12-01

    results from survey using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (TRE-3D carried out in 2014, 2016 and 2017, in Morelia Cathedral and along its northern front. The survey identified the location of deep structures which cannot be explained by geological context, suggesting the existence of a variety of subterranean structures of anthropogenic origin. The TRE-3D used in this study combines conventional and unconventional methodologies to offer insights into the distribution of subterranean structures at Morelia Cathedral, in accordance with both oral traditions and documented history.

  6. Efficient 3D geometric and Zernike moments computation from unstructured surface meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, José María; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates a fast exact algorithm and a series of faster approximate algorithms for the computation of 3D geometric moments from an unstructured surface mesh of triangles. Being based on the object surface reduces the computational complexity of these algorithms with respect to volumetric grid-based algorithms. In contrast, it can only be applied for the computation of geometric moments of homogeneous objects. This advantage and restriction is shared with other proposed algorithms based on the object boundary. The proposed exact algorithm reduces the computational complexity for computing geometric moments up to order N with respect to previously proposed exact algorithms, from N(9) to N(6). The approximate series algorithm appears as a power series on the rate between triangle size and object size, which can be truncated at any desired degree. The higher the number and quality of the triangles, the better the approximation. This approximate algorithm reduces the computational complexity to N(3). In addition, the paper introduces a fast algorithm for the computation of 3D Zernike moments from the computed geometric moments, with a computational complexity N(4), while the previously proposed algorithm is of order N(6). The error introduced by the proposed approximate algorithms is evaluated in different shapes and the cost-benefit ratio in terms of error, and computational time is analyzed for different moment orders.

  7. High-contrast differentiation resolution 3D imaging of rodent brain by X-ray computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikmund, T.; Novotná, M.; Kavková, M.; Tesařová, M.; Kaucká, M.; Szarowská, B.; Adameyko, I.; Hrubá, E.; Buchtová, M.; Dražanová, E.; Starčuk, Z.; Kaiser, J.

    2018-02-01

    The biomedically focused brain research is largely performed on laboratory mice considering a high homology between the human and mouse genomes. A brain has an intricate and highly complex geometrical structure that is hard to display and analyse using only 2D methods. Applying some fast and efficient methods of brain visualization in 3D will be crucial for the neurobiology in the future. A post-mortem analysis of experimental animals' brains usually involves techniques such as magnetic resonance and computed tomography. These techniques are employed to visualize abnormalities in the brains' morphology or reparation processes. The X-ray computed microtomography (micro CT) plays an important role in the 3D imaging of internal structures of a large variety of soft and hard tissues. This non-destructive technique is applied in biological studies because the lab-based CT devices enable to obtain a several-micrometer resolution. However, this technique is always used along with some visualization methods, which are based on the tissue staining and thus differentiate soft tissues in biological samples. Here, a modified chemical contrasting protocol of tissues for a micro CT usage is introduced as the best tool for ex vivo 3D imaging of a post-mortem mouse brain. This way, the micro CT provides a high spatial resolution of the brain microscopic anatomy together with a high tissue differentiation contrast enabling to identify more anatomical details in the brain. As the micro CT allows a consequent reconstruction of the brain structures into a coherent 3D model, some small morphological changes can be given into context of their mutual spatial relationships.

  8. Pulmonary lobar volumetry using novel volumetric computer-aided diagnosis and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, Shingo; Kitano, Mariko; Matsuo, Keiji; Kawakami, Kenichi; Koike, Wataru; Kishimoto, Mariko; Inoue, Tsutomu; Li, Yuanzhong; Naganawa, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the accuracy of pulmonary lobar volumetry using the conventional number of segments method and novel volumetric computer-aided diagnosis using 3D computed tomography images. METHODS We acquired 50 consecutive preoperative 3D computed tomography examinations for lung tumours reconstructed at 1-mm slice thicknesses. We calculated the lobar volume and the emphysematous lobar volume volumetry computer-aided diagnosis system could more precisely measure lobar volumes than the conventional number of segments method. Because semi-automatic computer-aided diagnosis and automatic computer-aided diagnosis were complementary, in clinical use, it would be more practical to first measure volumes by automatic computer-aided diagnosis, and then use semi-automatic measurements if automatic computer-aided diagnosis failed. PMID:23526418

  9. Quantifying uncertainties on the solution model of seismic tomography; Quelle confiance accorder au modele solution de la tomographie de reflexion 3D?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffet, C.

    2004-12-01

    Reflection tomography allows the determination of a velocity model that fits the travel time data associated with reflections of seismic waves propagating in the subsurface. A least-square formulation is used to compare the observed travel times and the travel times computed by the forward operator based on a ray tracing. This non-linear optimization problem is solved classically by a Gauss-Newton method based on successive linearization of the forward operator. The obtained solution is only one among many possible models. Indeed, the uncertainties on the observed travel times (resulting from an interpretative event picking on seismic records) and more generally the under-determination of the inverse problem lead to uncertainties on the solution. An a posteriori uncertainty analysis is then crucial to delimit the range of possible solutions that fit, with the expected accuracy, the data and the a priori information. A linearized a posteriori analysis is possible by an analysis of the a posteriori covariance matrix, inverse of the Gauss-Newton approximation of the matrix. The computation of this matrix is generally expensive (the matrix is huge for 3D problems) and the physical interpretation of the results is difficult. Then we propose a formalism which allows to compute uncertainties on relevant geological quantities for a reduced computational time. Nevertheless, this approach is only valid in the vicinity of the solution model (linearized framework) and complex cases may require a non-linear approach. An experimental approach consists in solving the inverse problem under constraints to test different geological scenarios. (author)

  10. Industrial applications of computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Kanglong; Qiang Yujun; Yang Fujia

    1992-01-01

    Industrial computer tomography (CT) and its application is a rapidly developing field of high technology. CT systems have been playing important roles in nondestructive testing (NDT) of products and equipment for a number of industries. Recently, the technique has advanced into the area of industrial process control, bringing even greater benefit to mankind. The basic principles and typical structure of an industrial CT system Descriptions are given of some successful CT systems for either NDT application or process control purposes

  11. Computed tomography of projectile injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, A.J.; Rutty, G.N.; Robinson, C.; Morgan, B.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a gold standard in clinical imaging but forensic professions have been slow to embrace radiological advances. Forensic applications of CT are now exponentially expanding, replacing other imaging methods. As post-mortem cross-sectional imaging increases, radiologists will fall under increasing pressure to interpret complex forensic cases involving both living and deceased patients. This review presents a wide variety of weapon and projectile types aiding interpretation of projectile injuries both in forensic and clinical practice

  12. Computed tomography in osteoid osteoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, J.L.; Aubspin, D.; Buchon, R.; Schoenenberger, P.; Flageat, J.

    1989-01-01

    Four cases of suspected osteoid osteoma were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). The role of CT was related, as a key diagnostic tool: radionuclide imaging is helpful in directing subsequent CT scans, which allows the study of complex anatomical sites (spine) or the analysis of atypical lesions (invisible nidus, sclerosis or lytic lesions, double nidus...). CT provides the surgeon with the exact location and extent of the lesion, and thus, CT may allow a more limited surgical resection of the involved bone [fr

  13. Histomorphometric quantification of human pathological bones from synchrotron radiation 3D computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Liebert P.; Braz, Delson

    2011-01-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify pathological samples of human bone. Samples of human bones were cut into small blocks (8 mm x 8 mm x 10 mm) with a precision saw and then imaged. The computed microtomographies were obtained at SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Italy). The obtained 3D images yielded excellent resolution and details of intra-trabecular bone structures, including marrow present inside trabeculae. Histomorphometric quantification was compared to literature as well. (author)

  14. Fast precalculated triangular mesh algorithm for 3D binary computer-generated holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kaczorowski, Andrzej; Wilkinson, Tim D

    2014-12-10

    A new method for constructing computer-generated holograms using a precalculated triangular mesh is presented. The speed of calculation can be increased dramatically by exploiting both the precalculated base triangle and GPU parallel computing. Unlike algorithms using point-based sources, this method can reconstruct a more vivid 3D object instead of a "hollow image." In addition, there is no need to do a fast Fourier transform for each 3D element every time. A ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator is used to display the binary hologram within our experiment and the hologram of a base right triangle is produced by utilizing just a one-step Fourier transform in the 2D case, which can be expanded to the 3D case by multiplying by a suitable Fresnel phase plane. All 3D holograms generated in this paper are based on Fresnel propagation; thus, the Fresnel plane is treated as a vital element in producing the hologram. A GeForce GTX 770 graphics card with 2 GB memory is used to achieve parallel computing.

  15. The value of computed tomography in ''sciatica''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm-Jurkovic, H.; Hammer, B.

    1981-01-01

    13 cases of therapy-resistant lumboischialgia without herniated disk, caused in 12 cases by a tumour and in 1 case by an abscess, were examined by computed tomography of the lumbar and pelvic region. This method is indicated immediately after insufficient results of conventional X-ray methods (including tomography) and of lumbosacral radiculography. The computed tomography is indispensable also in patients with ''sciatica'' with a known malignoma. The information given by computed tomography is essential for the therapy planning. (author)

  16. Using the CAVE virtual-reality environment as an aid to 3-D electromagnetic field computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Levine, D.; Huang, M.; Papka, M.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major problems in three-dimensional (3-D) field computation is visualizing the resulting 3-D field distributions. A virtual-reality environment, such as the CAVE, (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) is helping to overcome this problem, thus making the results of computation more usable for designers and users of magnets and other electromagnetic devices. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the CAVE, the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW), an insertion device being designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now being commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), wa made visible, along with its fields and beam orbits. Other uses of the CAVE in preprocessing and postprocessing computation for electromagnetic applications are also discussed

  17. Computed tomography of the ossicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakeres, D.W.; Weider, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Otologists and otolaryngologists have described in detail the disorders which are unique to the ossicles. However the anatomy and spectrum of pathology and anatomy of the ossicles are not familiar to most radiologists. Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) and a systematic approach to evaluation now allow accurate identification of even subtle abnormalities of the ossicles. We present the normal anatomy, ossicular abnormalities, and indications for computed tomographic study. Because of the greater diagnostic capability of CT, the radiologist's role has increased in evaluation and treatment planning of patients with suspected ossicular abnormalities. (orig.)

  18. Interactive virtual simulation using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Yajima, Naoki; Sato, Yosuke; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the authors' advanced presurgical interactive virtual simulation technique using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery. The authors performed interactive virtual simulation prior to surgery in 26 patients with trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm. The 3D computer graphics models for interactive virtual simulation were composed of the brainstem, cerebellum, cranial nerves, vessels, and skull individually created by the image analysis, including segmentation, surface rendering, and data fusion for data collected by 3-T MRI and 64-row multidetector CT systems. Interactive virtual simulation was performed by employing novel computer-aided design software with manipulation of a haptic device to imitate the surgical procedures of bone drilling and retraction of the cerebellum. The findings were compared with intraoperative findings. In all patients, interactive virtual simulation provided detailed and realistic surgical perspectives, of sufficient quality, representing the lateral suboccipital route. The causes of trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm determined by observing 3D computer graphics models were concordant with those identified intraoperatively in 25 (96%) of 26 patients, which was a significantly higher rate than the 73% concordance rate (concordance in 19 of 26 patients) obtained by review of 2D images only (p computer graphics model provided a realistic environment for performing virtual simulations prior to MVD surgery and enabled us to ascertain complex microsurgical anatomy.

  19. 3D Tomography of a Mesa Using Cosmic Ray Muons Detected in an Underground Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardincerri, E.; Rowe, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    The LANL Mini Muon Tracker (MMT) is a muon tracking detector made of sealed aluminum drift tubes. The MMT was operated at four locations inside a tunnel under the Los Alamos town site mesa between November 2015 and February 2016 and it collected cosmic ray muons attenuated by the tunnel overburden. The data were analyzed and used to obtain a 3D tomographic image of the mesa and will be later combined with gravity data collected around the same location. We describe here the muon data taking and their analysis, and we show the resulting 3D image.

  20. The dynamic micro computed tomography at SSRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Xu, L.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Xie, H.; Xiao, T.

    2018-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT) is a critical technique for quantitative characterizing the 3D internal structure of samples, recently the dynamic SR-μCT has been attracting vast attention since it can evaluate the three-dimensional structure evolution of a sample. A dynamic μCT method, which is based on monochromatic beam, was developed at the X-ray Imaging and Biomedical Application Beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, by combining the compressed sensing based CT reconstruction algorithm and hardware upgrade. The monochromatic beam based method can achieve quantitative information, and lower dose than the white beam base method in which the lower energy beam is absorbed by the sample rather than contribute to the final imaging signal. The developed method is successfully used to investigate the compression of the air sac during respiration in a bell cricket, providing new knowledge for further research on the insect respiratory system.

  1. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  2. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paoli Alessandro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast and preoperative (radiographic template models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology.

  3. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast) and preoperative (radiographic template) models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology. PMID:21338504

  4. Helical computed tomography and the workstation: introduction to a symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Santos, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We do a brief introduction to the possibilities of an helical computed tomography system when it is associated with a powerful workstation. The fast and volumetric way of acquisition constitutes, basically, the main advantage of this sort of computed tomography. The anatomical and radio pathological study, in a workstation, of the acquired information (thanks to multiplanar and 3D reconstruction), increases significantly our capacity of analysis in each patient. Only the clinical and radiological experience will tell us which is the right place that this symbiosis occupies within our diagnosis tools. (Author) 11 refs

  5. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Han, Seung Ho

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology

  6. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Ho [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology.

  7. Development of a 3-D flow analysis computer program for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, H. Y.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. K.; Whang, Y. D.; Kim, H. C.

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D computational fluid dynamics program TASS-3D is being developed for the flow analysis of primary coolant system consists of complex geometries such as SMART. A pre/post processor also is being developed to reduce the pre/post processing works such as a computational grid generation, set-up the analysis conditions and analysis of the calculated results. TASS-3D solver employs a non-orthogonal coordinate system and FVM based on the non-staggered grid system. The program includes the various models to simulate the physical phenomena expected to be occurred in the integral reactor and will be coupled with core dynamics code, core T/H code and the secondary system code modules. Currently, the application of TASS-3D is limited to the single phase of liquid, but the code will be further developed including 2-phase phenomena expected for the normal operation and the various transients of the integrator reactor in the next stage

  8. A substructure method to compute the 3D fluid-structure interaction during blowdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, D.; Axisa, F.; Gantenbein, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1983-08-01

    The waves generated by a sudden rupture of a PWR primary pipe have an important mechanical effect on the internal structures of the vessel. This fluid-structure interaction has a strong 3D aspect. 3D finite element explicit methods can be applied. These methods take into account the non linearities of the problem but the calculation is heavy and expensive. We describe in this paper another type of method based on a substructure procedure: the vessel, internals and contained fluid are axisymmetrically described (AQUAMODE computer code). The pipes and contained fluid are monodimensionaly described (TEDEL-FLUIDE Computer Code). These substructures are characterized by their natural modes. Then, they are connected to another (connection of both structural and fluid nodes) the TRISTANA Computer Code. This method allows to compute correctly and cheaply the 3D fluid-structure effects. The treatment of certain non linearities is difficult because of the modal characterization of the substructures. However variations of contact conditions versus time can be introduced. We present here some validation tests and comparison with experimental results of the litterature

  9. Extraction of the 3D local orientation of myocytes in human cardiac tissue using X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography and multi-scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varray, François; Mirea, Iulia; Langer, Max; Peyrin, Françoise; Fanton, Laurent; Magnin, Isabelle E

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology to access the 3D local myocyte arrangements in fresh human post-mortem heart samples. We investigated the cardiac micro-structure at a high and isotropic resolution of 3.5 µm in three dimensions using X-ray phase micro-tomography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We then processed the reconstructed volumes to extract the 3D local orientation of the myocytes using a multi-scale approach with no segmentation. We created a simplified 3D model of tissue sample made of simulated myocytes with known size and orientations, to evaluate our orientation extraction method. Afterwards, we applied it to 2D histological cuts and to eight 3D left ventricular (LV) cardiac tissue samples. Then, the variation of the helix angles, from the endocardium to the epicardium, was computed at several spatial resolutions ranging from 3.6 3  mm 3 to 112 3  µm 3 . We measure an increased range of 20° to 30° from the coarsest resolution level to the finest level in the experimental samples. This result is in line with the higher values measured from histology. The displayed tractography demonstrates a rather smooth evolution of the transmural helix angle in six LV samples and a sudden discontinuity of the helix angle in two septum samples. These measurements bring a new vision of the human heart architecture from macro- to micro-scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, V. D.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there.

  11. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borman, V D; Bogovalov, S V; Borisevich, V D; Tronin, I V; Tronin, V N

    2016-01-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there. (paper)

  12. PID - 3D: a software to develop mathematical human phantoms for use in computational dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Filho, Jose de Melo; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The PID-3D software, written in Visual C++, contains tools developed for building and editing of three-dimensional geometric figures formed of voxels (volume pixels). These tools were projected to be used, together with those already developed by the Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq), such as the FANTOMAS and DIP software, in computational dosimetry of ionizing radiation. The main objective of this paper is to develop various voxel-based geometric solids to build voxel phantoms (meaning models), anthropomorphic or not. The domain of this technique of development of geometric solids is important for the GDN/CNPq, because it allows the use of just one Monte Carlo code to simulate the transportation, interaction and deposition of radiation in tomographic and mathematical phantoms. Building a particular geometric solid the user needs to inform to the PID-3D software, the location and the size of the parallelepiped that involves it. Each built solid can be saved in a binary file of the type SGI (file containing the size and the numeric values that constitutes the 3D matrix that represents the solid, commonly used by GDN/CNPq). The final mathematical phantom is built starting from these SGI files and the SGI file resulting constitutes a voxel phantom. With this approach the software's user does not have to manipulate the equations and inequalities of the solids that represent the organs and tissues of the phantom. The 3D-PID software, associated with the FANTOMAS and DIP software are tools produced by GDN/CNPq, providing a new technique for building of 3D scenes in dosimetric evaluations using voxel phantoms. To validate the PID-3D software one built, step by step, a phantom similar to the MIRD-5 stylized phantom. (author)

  13. The possible usability of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography in dental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, I.; Rizal, M. F.; Kiswanjaya, B.

    2017-08-01

    The innovations and advantages of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography (3D CBCT) are continually growing for its potential use in dental research. Imaging techniques are important for planning research in dentistry. Newly improved 3D CBCT imaging systems and accessory computer programs have recently been proven effective for use in dental research. The aim of this study is to introduce 3D CBCT and open a window for future research possibilities that should be given attention in dental research.

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of 3-D computerized tomography colonography versus optical colonoscopy for imaging symptomatic gastroenterology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Manuel; Aldridge, Robert W; Wylie, Peter; Bell, James; Epstein, Owen

    2013-04-01

    When symptomatic gastroenterology patients have an indication for colonic imaging, clinicians have a choice between optical colonoscopy (OC) and computerized tomography colonography with three-dimensional reconstruction (3-D CTC). 3-D CTC provides a minimally invasive and rapid evaluation of the entire colon, and it can be an efficient modality for diagnosing symptoms. It allows for a more targeted use of OC, which is associated with a higher risk of major adverse events and higher procedural costs. A case can be made for 3-D CTC as a primary test for colonic imaging followed if necessary by targeted therapeutic OC; however, the relative long-term costs and benefits of introducing 3-D CTC as a first-line investigation are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the cost effectiveness of 3-D CTC versus OC for colonic imaging of symptomatic gastroenterology patients in the UK NHS. We used a Markov model to follow a cohort of 100,000 symptomatic gastroenterology patients, aged 50 years or older, and estimate the expected lifetime outcomes, life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs (£, 2010-2011) associated with 3-D CTC and OC. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of the base-case cost-effectiveness results to variation in input parameters and methodological assumptions. 3D-CTC provided a similar number of LYs (7.737 vs 7.739) and QALYs (7.013 vs 7.018) per individual compared with OC, and it was associated with substantially lower mean costs per patient (£467 vs £583), leading to a positive incremental net benefit. After accounting for the overall uncertainty, the probability of 3-D CTC being cost effective was around 60 %, at typical willingness-to-pay values of £20,000-£30,000 per QALY gained. 3-D CTC is a cost-saving and cost-effective option for colonic imaging of symptomatic gastroenterology patients compared with OC.

  15. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 19,2016 What is Computerized Tomography (CT)? CT is a noninvasive test that uses ...

  16. Full 3-D OCT-based pseudophakic custom computer eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Pérez-Merino, P.; Martinez-Enriquez, E.; Velasco-Ocana, M.; Marcos, S.

    2016-01-01

    We compared measured wave aberrations in pseudophakic eyes implanted with aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) with simulated aberrations from numerical ray tracing on customized computer eye models, built using quantitative 3-D OCT-based patient-specific ocular geometry. Experimental and simulated aberrations show high correlation (R = 0.93; poptical geometrical and surgically-related factors to image quality, and are an excellent tool for characterizing and improving cataract surgery. PMID:27231608

  17. The history of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, J.

    1980-01-01

    New scientific discoveries are often made by the synthetising of other discoveries. Computed tomography is such an example. The three necessary elements were: 1/ the fact that certain simple crystals scintillate when exposed to X-rays, 2/ the advent of electronics and 3/ that of computers. The fact that X-rays cause crystals to scintillate was learnt very shortly after Roentgen's discovery, electronics and computers coming very much later. To put all these together and apply them to diagnostic radiology, and at the same time dismiss the concept so firmly ingrained in everyone's mind that an X-ray picture must be produced on photographic film, required a genius. (orig./VJ) [de

  18. Comparison of traditional methods with 3D computer models in the instruction of hepatobiliary anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Alexander W; Durack, Jeremy C; Sandhu, Parmbir; Chen, Eric M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Breiman, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether an interactive three-dimensional presentation depicting liver and biliary anatomy is more effective for teaching medical students than a traditional textbook format presentation of the same material. Forty-six medical students volunteered for participation in this study. Baseline demographic information, spatial ability, and knowledge of relevant anatomy were measured. Participants were randomized into two groups and presented with a computer-based interactive learning module comprised of animations and still images to highlight various anatomical structures (3D group), or a computer-based text document containing the same images and text without animation or interactive features (2D group). Following each teaching module, students completed a satisfaction survey and nine-item anatomic knowledge post-test. The 3D group scored higher on the post-test than the 2D group, with a mean score of 74% and 64%, respectively; however, when baseline differences in pretest scores were accounted for, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.33). Spatial ability did not statistically significantly correlate with post-test scores for the 3D group or the 2D group. In the post-test satisfaction survey the 3D group expressed a statistically significantly higher overall satisfaction rating compared to students in the 2D control group (4.5 versus 3.7 out of 5, P = 0.02). While the interactive 3D multimedia module received higher satisfaction ratings from students, it neither enhanced nor inhibited learning of complex hepatobiliary anatomy compared to an informationally equivalent traditional textbook style approach. . Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography for plasma physics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moseev, Dmitry; Alpers, Andreas; Gritzmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    tomography algorithm is efficient for data from two projection directions and exact. The non-uniqueness can be detected and tracked individually. The algorithm performance is proportional to N3 on average where N is the number of particles in the reconstruction. There is a room for further improvement...

  20. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  1. Investigation of gas–solids flow in a circulating fluidized bed using 3D electrical capacitance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Mingxu; Ye, Jiamin; Wang, Haigang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2016-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of gas–solids flow in the bottom of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) are complicated. Three-dimensional (3D) electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) has been used to investigate the hydrodynamics in risers of different shapes. Four different ECT sensors with 12 electrodes each are designed according to the dimension of risers, including two circular ECT sensors, a square ECT sensor and a rectangular ECT sensor. The electrodes are evenly arranged in three planes to obtain capacitance in different heights and to reconstruct the 3D images by linear back projection (LBP) algorithm. Experiments were carried out on the four risers using sands as the solids material. The capacitance and differential pressure are measured under the gas superficial velocity from 0.6 m s −1 to 3.0 m s −1 with a step of 0.2 m s −1 . The flow regime is investigated according to the solids concentration and differential pressure. The dynamic property of bubbling flows is analyzed theoretically and the performance of the 3D ECT sensors is evaluated. The experimental results show that 3D ECT can be used in the CFB with different risers to predict the hydrodynamics of gas–solids bubbling flows. (paper)

  2. A computational modeling approach for the characterization of mechanical properties of 3D alginate tissue scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K; Yan, K C; Sun, W

    2008-01-01

    Scaffold guided tissue engineering is an innovative approach wherein cells are seeded onto biocompatible and biodegradable materials to form 3-dimensional (3D) constructs that, when implanted in the body facilitate the regeneration of tissue. Tissue scaffolds act as artificial extracellular matrix providing the environment conducive for tissue growth. Characterization of scaffold properties is necessary to understand better the underlying processes involved in controlling cell behavior and formation of functional tissue. We report a computational modeling approach to characterize mechanical properties of 3D gellike biomaterial, specifically, 3D alginate scaffold encapsulated with cells. Alginate inherent nonlinearity and variations arising from minute changes in its concentration and viscosity make experimental evaluation of its mechanical properties a challenging and time consuming task. We developed an in silico model to determine the stress-strain relationship of alginate based scaffolds from experimental data. In particular, we compared the Ogden hyperelastic model to other hyperelastic material models and determined that this model was the most suitable to characterize the nonlinear behavior of alginate. We further propose a mathematical model that represents the alginate material constants in Ogden model as a function of concentrations and viscosity. This study demonstrates the model capability to predict mechanical properties of 3D alginate scaffolds.

  3. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic. (orig.)

  4. Duodenal diverticulitis. computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.; Martin, S.; Garcia, J.; Dominguez, A.

    2001-01-01

    Duodenal diverticular occur very frequently among the general public. However, duodenal diverticulitis is a very uncommon clinical entity, the diagnosis of which requires radiological studies since the clinical signs cam mimic a great number of disease processes with different treatments. We present a case of duodenal diverticulitis in which the diagnosis according to ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) studies was confirmed intraoperatively. We also review the few cases of this entity reported in the literature. The CT findings are highly suggestive of duodenal diverticulitis given their similarity to those associated with diverticulitis at other sites. (Author) 5 refs,

  5. Mathematical foundations of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.T.; Keinert, F.

    1985-01-01

    Along with a review of some of the mathematical foundations of computed tomography, the article contains new results on derivation of reconstruction formulas in a general setting encompassing all standard formulas; discussion and examples of the role of the point spread function with recipes for producing suitable ones; formulas for, and examples of, the reconstruction of certain functions of the attenuation coefficient, e.g., sharpened versions of it, some of them with the property that reconstruction at a point requires only the attenuation along rays meeting a small neighborhood of the point

  6. High speed computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maydan, D.; Shepp, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray generation and detection apparatus for use in a computer assisted tomography system which permits relatively high speed scanning. A large x-ray tube having a circular anode (3) surrounds the patient area. A movable electron gun (8) orbits adjacent to the anode. The anode directs into the patient area xrays which are delimited into a fan beam by a pair of collimating rings (21). After passing through the patient, x-rays are detected by an array (22) of movable detectors. Detector subarrays (23) are synchronously movable out of the x-ray plane to permit the passage of the fan beam

  7. Brain metastases: computed tomography assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, Victoria; Yagual, Glenda; Vinueza, Clayreth

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial metastatic tumor is relatively frequent in patients with cancer from other origin. Its location and type of metastasis varies in relation to its linage from the primary tumor. And the sequence goes from the most frequent: lung and breast cancer, melanoma, GU tract, leukemia, GI tract, head and neck tumor. Computed tomography findings are extremely varied and non specific, so there are no radiologic characteristics even from the primary tumor. We reviewed 29 TC studies in the Radiology department of ION-SOLCA, from patients with diagnosis of brain metastasis, our findings showed the great variability in the radio-diagnosis imaging. (The author)

  8. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic

  9. Whole-body computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegener, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    The vast literature on whole-body CT is presented in this bibliography which is published as a self-contained supplement to the monography entitled whole-body CT. For this documentation, the following journals have been scanned back to the year 1980: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography (JCAT), Fortschritte auf dem Gebiet der Roentgenstrahlen (RoeFo), Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), Der Radiologe, Neuroradiology, and American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR). The supplement includes keyword indexes that can be searched for terms indicating body organs, body regions, or certain lesions. The author index offers an additional access to the publication wanted. (orig./MG) [de

  10. 3D fast adaptive correlation imaging for large-scale gravity data based on GPU computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Meng, X.; Guo, L.; Liu, G.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, large scale gravity data sets have been collected and employed to enhance gravity problem-solving abilities of tectonics studies in China. Aiming at the large scale data and the requirement of rapid interpretation, previous authors have carried out a lot of work, including the fast gradient module inversion and Euler deconvolution depth inversion ,3-D physical property inversion using stochastic subspaces and equivalent storage, fast inversion using wavelet transforms and a logarithmic barrier method. So it can be say that 3-D gravity inversion has been greatly improved in the last decade. Many authors added many different kinds of priori information and constraints to deal with nonuniqueness using models composed of a large number of contiguous cells of unknown property and obtained good results. However, due to long computation time, instability and other shortcomings, 3-D physical property inversion has not been widely applied to large-scale data yet. In order to achieve 3-D interpretation with high efficiency and precision for geological and ore bodies and obtain their subsurface distribution, there is an urgent need to find a fast and efficient inversion method for large scale gravity data. As an entirely new geophysical inversion method, 3D correlation has a rapid development thanks to the advantage of requiring no a priori information and demanding small amount of computer memory. This method was proposed to image the distribution of equivalent excess masses of anomalous geological bodies with high resolution both longitudinally and transversely. In order to tranform the equivalence excess masses into real density contrasts, we adopt the adaptive correlation imaging for gravity data. After each 3D correlation imaging, we change the equivalence into density contrasts according to the linear relationship, and then carry out forward gravity calculation for each rectangle cells. Next, we compare the forward gravity data with real data, and

  11. 3D Mapping Of Density And Crack Propagation Through Sintering Of Catalysis Tablets By X-Ray Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest; Puig-Molina, A.; Dalskov, N.

    2016-01-01

    sintering of the rejected tabletized support material are studied by 3D X-ray tomography. This is a powerful technique, which due to its nondestructive nature is suitable to study the development of internal cracks in the tablets during sintering. Cracks could be identified in the green tablet (before...... properly, cracks may arise and propagate during the sintering of the tablets. This can lead to weak sintered tablets that get rejected in the quality control. For this work, crack-containing samples of rejected tabletized support were provided. The formation, growth and closure of internal cracks during...

  12. 3-D heat transfer computer calculations of the performance of the IAEA's air-bath calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Kaizermann, S.; Perry, R.B.; Fiarman, S.

    1989-01-01

    A three dimensional (3-D) heat transfer computer code was developed to study and optimize the design parameters and to better understand the performance characteristics of the IAEA's air-bath calorimeters. The computer model accounts for heat conduction and radiation in the complex materials of the calorimeter and for heat convection and radiation at its outer surface. The temperature servo controller is modelled as an integral part of the heat balance equations in the system. The model predictions will be validated against test data using the ANL bulk calorimeter. 11 refs., 6 figs

  13. Tri-Dimensional Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT-3D) Technique, an Efficient Tool to Unveil the Subsoil of Archaeological Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, R. E.; Vargas, D.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J. E.; Tejero, A.

    2014-12-01

    Three-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography techniques (ERT-3D) have demonstrated to be an efficient tool to study the subsurface of areas of archaeological interest by special arrays designed to 'illuminate' the subsoil beneath the structure under study. 'L'- and 'Corner'-arrays are applied to design alternative electrode geometries, which attempt to cover the subsurface with enough resistivity observations underneath the studied target. Two examples are presented where novel geometries can be applied to investigate the subsoil of two important pyramids in Mexico. First, the archaeological site of Cuicuilco is studied. The area is found towards the southern portion of the Mexican Basin. This pyramid presents a circular structure of 110 m in diameter and a total height of 25 m. The region is partially covered by the lava flows that came from an eruptive event form the Xitle Volcano 1500 years ago. The geophysical study was carried out at the base of the pyramid. 48 electrodes were deployed along a circular transect, with an electrode separation of 5.4 m. A total of 1716 apparent resistivity observations were measured. The inverted model computed is obtained with an investigation depth of 30 m, approximately (Figure 1, in color). A resistive anomaly can be observed towards the central portion of the model. This anomaly can be associated to a burial chamber, excavated by the archaeologists. The second example corresponds to the pyiramid El Castillo, located in the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, in the southern lowlands of Mexico, within the Yucatan Peninsula. Previous GPR studies carried out within the pyramid's Plaza provided evidences of a buried tunnel excavated within the limestone rocks. Such feature seemed to run beneath the eastern flank of the pyramide. The geophysical study was carried out by employing 96 flat-surface electrodes, which surrounded the edifice forming a square geometry. A total of 5,350 apparent resistivity observations were

  14. 3D visualization of subcellular structures of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by hard X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Li, W; Liu, G; Zhang, X; Chen, J; Wu, W; Guan, Y; Xiong, Y; Tian, Y; Wu, Z

    2010-10-01

    Cellular structures of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, were examined by using hard X-ray tomography. Since cells are nearly transparent to hard X-rays, Zernike phase contrast and heavy metal staining were introduced to improve image contrast. Through using such methods, images taken at 8 keV displayed sufficient contrast for observing cellular structures. The cell wall, the intracellular organelles and the entire structural organization of the whole cells were visualized in three-dimensional at a resolution better than 100 nm. Comparison between phase contrast and absorption contrast was also made, indicating the obvious advantage of phase contrast for cellular imaging at this energy. Our results demonstrate that hard X-ray tomography with Zernike phase contrast is suitable for cellular imaging. Its unique abilities make it have potential to become a useful tool for revealing structural information from cells, especially thick eukaryotic cells. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Noninvasive 3D Structural Analysis of Arthropod by Synchrotron X-Ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S.; Zong, Y.; Fan, J.; Sun, Z.; Jiang, H.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques significantly advanced our understanding of materials and biology, among which phase contrast X-ray microscopy has obvious advantages in imaging biological specimens which have low contrast by conventional absorption contrast microscopy. In this paper, three-dimensional microstructure of arthropod with high contrast has been demonstrated by synchrotron X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography. The external morphology and internal structures of an earthworm were analyzed based upon tomographic reconstructions with and without phase retrieval. We also identified and characterized various fine structural details such as the musculature system, the digestive system, the nervous system, and the circulatory system. This work exhibited the high efficiency, high precision, and wide potential applications of synchrotron X-ray phase contrast tomography in nondestructive investigation of low-density materials and biology.

  16. Laser interference fringe tomography: a novel 3D imaging technique for pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Haylock, Thomas M.; Chifman, Lev M.; Hajian, Arsen R.; Behr, Bradford B.; Cenko, Andrew T.; Meade, Jeff T.; Hendrikse, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Laser interference fringe tomography (LIFT) is within the class of optical imaging devices designed for in vivo and ex vivo medical imaging applications. LIFT is a very simple and cost-effective three-dimensional imaging device with performance rivaling some of the leading three-dimensional imaging devices used for histology. Like optical coherence tomography (OCT), it measures the reflectivity as a function of depth within a sample and is capable of producing three-dimensional images from optically scattering media. LIFT has the potential capability to produce high spectral resolution, full-color images. The optical design of LIFT along with the planned iterations for improvements and miniaturization are presented and discussed in addition to the theoretical concepts and preliminary imaging results of the device.

  17. 3D handheld endoscope for optical coherence tomography of the human oral mucosa in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Schnabel, Christian; Ebert, Nadja; Baumann, Michael; Koch, Edmund

    2017-07-01

    The early non-invasive diagnosis of epithelial tissue alterations in daily clinical routine is still challenging. Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows the potential to differentiate between benign and malignant tissue of primal endothelium, OCT could be beneficial for the early diagnosis of malignancies in routine health checks. In this research, a new handheld endoscopic scanning unit was designed and connected to a spectral domain OCT system of our workgroup for the in vivo imaging of the human oral mucosa.

  18. OpenCL-based vicinity computation for 3D multiresolution mesh compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachicha, Soumaya; Elkefi, Akram; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2017-03-01

    3D multiresolution mesh compression systems are still widely addressed in many domains. These systems are more and more requiring volumetric data to be processed in real-time. Therefore, the performance is becoming constrained by material resources usage and an overall reduction in the computational time. In this paper, our contribution entirely lies on computing, in real-time, triangles neighborhood of 3D progressive meshes for a robust compression algorithm based on the scan-based wavelet transform(WT) technique. The originality of this latter algorithm is to compute the WT with minimum memory usage by processing data as they are acquired. However, with large data, this technique is considered poor in term of computational complexity. For that, this work exploits the GPU to accelerate the computation using OpenCL as a heterogeneous programming language. Experiments demonstrate that, aside from the portability across various platforms and the flexibility guaranteed by the OpenCL-based implementation, this method can improve performance gain in speedup factor of 5 compared to the sequential CPU implementation.

  19. 3D histomorphometric quantification of trabecular bones by computed microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Barroso, R C; Oliveira, L F; Pinheiro, C J G; Dreossi, D; Tromba, G

    2010-12-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-invasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify the bone structure at different skeletal sites as well as to investigate the effects of bone diseases on quantitative understanding of bone architecture. The images were obtained at Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility, Italy. Concerning the obtained results for normal and pathological bones from same skeletal sites and individuals, from our results, a certain declining bone volume fraction was achieved. The results obtained could be used in forming the basis for comparison of the bone microarchitecture and can be a valuable tool for predicting bone fragility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional cranio-facial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi Muccelli, R.; Stagul, F.; Pozzi Muccelli, F.; Zuiani, C.; Smathers, R.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography allows today to reconstruct three-dimensional (eD) images fram axial scans. The authors report their experience in cranio-facial pathology achived in two Departments of Radiology (University of Trieste, Italy and University of Standford, California). 3D images have been realized using two different softwares, one of which allows to reconstruct both soft tissue and bone structures. The application in maxillo-facial traumas, cranio-facial malformations and head tumours are disscussed. 3D images turned out to be very useful for the optimal visualization and for the spatial demostration of the lesion and have potential applications in cranio-facial surgery and radiotherapy

  1. Three-dimensional cranio-facial computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi Muccelli, R; Stagul, F; Pozzi Muccelli, F; Zuiani, C; Smathers, R

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography allows today to reconstruct three-dimensional (eD) images fram axial scans. The authors report their experience in cranio-facial pathology achived in two Departments of Radiology (University of Trieste, Italy and University of Standford, California). 3D images have been realized using two different softwares, one of which allows to reconstruct both soft tissue and bone structures. The application in maxillo-facial traumas, cranio-facial malformations and head tumours are disscussed. 3D images turned out to be very useful for the optimal visualization and for the spatial demostration of the lesion and have potential applications in cranio-facial surgery and radiotherapy.

  2. Dose determination in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, C.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Germanier, A.

    2011-10-01

    In the last years the methodologies to determine the dose in computed tomography have been revised. In this work was realized a dosimetric study about the exploration protocols used for simulation of radiotherapy treatments. The methodology described in the Report No. 111 of the American Association of Medical Physiques on a computed tomograph of two cuts was applied. A cylindrical phantom of water was used with dimensions: 30 cm of diameter and 50 cm of longitude that simulates the absorption and dispersion conditions of a mature body of size average. The doses were determined with ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosimetry. The results indicate that the dose information that provides the tomograph underestimates the dose between 32 and 35%.

  3. Computed tomography of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, I.; Antoun, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Until the advent of Computed Tomography (CT), axial studies of the spine were limited in the main to gross bony anatomy and to conventional transaxial tomography (TAT). Others studied the upper cervical cord in transverse section during gas myelography and encephalography. The potential role of CT in the evaluation of spinal anatomy and disease was recognized, however, at an early stage in the development of the general purpose CT scanner. CT is not organ specific and therefore provides a uniformly thin (1.5-13 mm) axial section displaying detailed spinal topographical anatomy against a background of paravertebral muscles, vascular structures and body cavity organs. The relationships of the apophyseal joints to the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina are particularly well displayed. The study of neural tissue and pathology within the spinal canal is facilitated by the use of a non-ionic water-soluble contrast medium (viz. metrizamide) in the subarachnoid spaces. The high sensitivity of CT to very small changes in X-ray attenuation permits studies to be continued over several hours. The digital derivation of the sequential CT transaxial sections enables not only interrogation of data and quantitative studies to be made but also makes possible computer-generated reconstructions in other planes

  4. The fabrication of bioresorbable implants for bone defects replacement using computer tomogram and 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. G.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Goreninskii, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Popkov, A. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the possibility of production of personalized implants from bioresorbable polymers designed for replacement of bone defects. The stages of creating a personalized implant are described, which include the obtaining of 3D model from a computer tomogram, development of the model with respect to shape of bone fitment bore using Autodesk Meshmixer software, and 3D printing process from bioresorbable polymers. The results of bioresorbable polymer scaffolds implantation in pre-clinical tests on laboratory animals are shown. The biological properties of new bioresorbable polymers based on poly(lactic acid) were studied during their subcutaneous, intramuscular, bone and intraosseous implantation in laboratory animals. In all cases, there was a lack of a fibrous capsule formation around the bioresorbable polymer over time. Also, during the performed study, conclusions were made on osteogenesis intensity depending on the initial state of bone tissue.

  5. The current status of the development of the technology on 3D computer simulation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Park, Seung Kook; Chung, Un Soo; Jung, Ki Jung

    2002-05-01

    The development background and property of the COSIDA, which is the 3D computer simulation system for the analysis on the dismantling procedure of the nuclear facilities in Japan was reviewed. The function of the visualization on the work area, Kinematics analysis and dismantling scenario analysis, which are the sub systems of the COSIDA, has been investigated. The physical, geometrical and radiological properties were modelled in 2D or 3D in the sub system of the visualization of the work area. In the sub system of the kinematics analysis, the command set on the basic work procedure for the control of the motion of the models at a cyber space was driven. The suitability of the command set was estimated by the application of COSIDA to the programming on the motion of the remote dismantling tools for dismantling the components of the nuclear facilities at cyber space

  6. Motion artifacts in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.K.

    1979-01-01

    In the year 1972, the first Computed Tomography Scanner (or CT) was introduced and caused a revolution in the field of Diagnostic Radiology. A tomogram is a cross-sectional image of a three-dimensional object obtained through non-invasive measurements. The image that is presented is very similar to what would be seen if a thin cross-sectional slice of the patient was examined. In Computed Tomography, x-rays are passed through the body of a patient in many different directions and their attenuation is detected. By using some mathematical theorems, the attenuation information can be converted into the density of the patient along the x-ray path. Combined with modern sophisticated computer signal processing technology, a cross-sectional image can be generated and displayed on a TV monitor. Usually a good CT image relies on the patient not moving during the x-ray scanning. However, for some unconscious or severely ill patients, this is very difficult to achieve. Thus, the motion during the scan causes the so-called motion artifacts which distort the displayed image and sometimes these motion artifacts make diagnosis impossible. Today, to remove or avoid motion artifacts is one of the major efforts in developing new scanner systems. In this thesis, a better understanding of the motion artifacts problem in CT scaning is gained through computer simulations, real scanner experiments and theoretical analyses. The methods by which the distorted image can be improved are simulated also. In particular, it is assumed that perfect knowledge of the patient motion is known since this represents the theoretical limit on how well the distorted image can be improved

  7. Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7681 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt, Chris M...Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt and Matthew S Bratcher Weapons and Materials Research...values to account for projectile variability in the ballistic evaluation of armor. 15. SUBJECT TERMS computed tomography , CT, BS41, projectiles

  8. 3D streamers simulation in a pin to plane configuration using massively parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, J.-M.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Dessante, P.; Jacobs, C.; Renon, N.; Yousfi, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper concerns the 3D simulation of corona discharge using high performance computing (HPC) managed with the message passing interface (MPI) library. In the field of finite volume methods applied on non-adaptive mesh grids and in the case of a specific 3D dynamic benchmark test devoted to streamer studies, the great efficiency of the iterative R&B SOR and BiCGSTAB methods versus the direct MUMPS method was clearly demonstrated in solving the Poisson equation using HPC resources. The optimization of the parallelization and the resulting scalability was undertaken as a function of the HPC architecture for a number of mesh cells ranging from 8 to 512 million and a number of cores ranging from 20 to 1600. The R&B SOR method remains at least about four times faster than the BiCGSTAB method and requires significantly less memory for all tested situations. The R&B SOR method was then implemented in a 3D MPI parallelized code that solves the classical first order model of an atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air. The 3D code capabilities were tested by following the development of one, two and four coplanar streamers generated by initial plasma spots for 6 ns. The preliminary results obtained allowed us to follow in detail the formation of the tree structure of a corona discharge and the effects of the mutual interactions between the streamers in terms of streamer velocity, trajectory and diameter. The computing time for 64 million of mesh cells distributed over 1000 cores using the MPI procedures is about 30 min ns-1, regardless of the number of streamers.

  9. High-contrast differentiation resolution 3D imaging of rodent brain by X-ray computed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zikmund, T.; Novotná, M.; Kavková, M.; Tesařová, M.; Kaucká, M.; Szarowská, B.; Idameyko, I.; Hrubá, Eva; Buchtová, Marcela; Dražanová, Eva; Starčuk, Zenon; Kaiser, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2018), č. článku C02039. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-37368G Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68081731 Keywords : computerized tomography * computed radiography * MRI Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Technologies involving the manipulation of cells, tissues, organs or the whole organism (assisted reproduction) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  10. Toward functional imaging using the optoacoustic 3D whole-body tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, R.; Brecht, H.-P.; Ermilov, S. A.; Nadvoretsky, V.; Conjusteau, A.; Oraevsky, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    In this report we demonstrate improved three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography in test samples. High quality tomographic data and images were obtained from phantom of mice being 2.5 cm in diameter. Capillaries filled with cupric sulfate, ferrous sulfate and nickel sulfate solutions, and immersed in a scattering medium were used for these tests. The brightness of reconstructed phantom images was found to match accurately the absorption profiles of test solutions. Hence, optoacoustic imaging can be applied in preclinical research to perform in vivo absorptivity measurements to deduce functional information on blood oxygen levels or concentration of contrast agents.

  11. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Scarfe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics.

  12. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  13. Computed tomography on renal masses in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazoe, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Fumihito; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Takeuchi, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on renal tumors (Wilms' tumor and renal cell carcinoma) and renal cysts in dogs and cats. CT images in renal tumors were well correlated with macroscopic findings, and contrast CT images were quite useful in differentiating tumoral regions from non-tumoral ones. On renal cysts, intravenous pyelography and ultrasonography were as effective as CT images in morphological diagnosis, but CT was considered to be superior for evaluating three-dimensional (3-D) relationships in complicated lesions. (author)

  14. Seeing a Mycobacterium-Infected Cell in Nanoscale 3D: Correlative Imaging by Light Microscopy and FIB/SEM Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Marianne Sandvold; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Sikorski, Pawel; Skogaker, Nan Tostrup

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria pose a threat to the world health today, with pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria causing tuberculosis and non-tuberculous disease in large parts of the population. Much is still unknown about the interplay between bacteria and host during infection and disease, and more research is needed to meet the challenge of drug resistance and inefficient vaccines. This work establishes a reliable and reproducible method for performing correlative imaging of human macrophages infected with mycobacteria at an ultra-high resolution and in 3D. Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is applied, together with confocal fluorescence microscopy for localization of appropriately infected cells. The method is based on an Aclar poly(chloro-tri-fluoro)ethylene substrate, micropatterned into an advantageous geometry by a simple thermomoulding process. The platform increases the throughput and quality of FIB/SEM tomography analyses, and was successfully applied to detail the intracellular environment of a whole mycobacterium-infected macrophage in 3D. PMID:26406896

  15. Comparative evaluation of scatter correction techniques in 3D positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H

    2000-01-01

    Much research and development has been concentrated on the scatter compensation required for quantitative 3D PET. Increasingly sophisticated scatter correction procedures are under investigation, particularly those based on accurate scatter models, and iterative reconstruction-based scatter compensation approaches. The main difference among the correction methods is the way in which the scatter component in the selected energy window is estimated. Monte Carlo methods give further insight and might in themselves offer a possible correction procedure. Methods: Five scatter correction methods are compared in this paper where applicable. The dual-energy window (DEW) technique, the convolution-subtraction (CVS) method, two variants of the Monte Carlo-based scatter correction technique (MCBSC1 and MCBSC2) and our newly developed statistical reconstruction-based scatter correction (SRBSC) method. These scatter correction techniques are evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation studies, experimental phantom measurements...

  16. Measuring Weld Profiles By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Noncontacting, nondestructive computer tomography system determines internal and external contours of welded objects. System makes it unnecessary to take metallurgical sections (destructive technique) or to take silicone impressions of hidden surfaces (technique that contaminates) to inspect them. Measurements of contours via tomography performed 10 times as fast as measurements via impression molds, and tomography does not contaminate inspected parts.

  17. 3D-characterization of the veneer-zirconia interface using FIB nano-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Douillard, Thierry; Gremillard, Laurent; Sadoun, Michaël J; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    The phenomena occurring during zirconia frameworks veneering process are not yet fully understood. In particular the study of zirconia behavior at the interface with the veneer remains a challenge. However this interface has been reported to act on residual stress in the veneering ceramic, which plays a significant role in clinical failures such as chipping. The objective of this study was thus to investigate the veneer-zirconia interface using a recent 3D-analysis tool and to confront these observations to residual stress measurements in the veneering ceramic. Two cross-sectioned bilayered disc samples (veneer on zirconia), exhibiting different residual stress profiles in the veneering ceramic, were investigated using 2D and 3D imaging (respectively Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Focused Ion Beam nanotomography (FIB-nt), associated with chemical analysis by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The observations did not reveal any structural change in the bulk of zirconia layer of both samples. However the presence of structural alterations and sub-surface microcracks were highlighted in the first micrometer of zirconia surface, exclusively for the sample exhibiting interior tensile stress in the veneering ceramic. No interdiffusion phenomena were observed. FIB nanotomography was proven to be a powerful technique to study the veneer-zirconia interface. The determination of the origin and the nature of zirconia alterations need to be further studied. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that zirconia surface property changes could be involved in the development of tensile stress in the veneering ceramic, increasing the risk of chipping. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and

  19. Computer tomography of large dust clouds in complex plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killer, Carsten; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André

    2014-01-01

    The dust density is a central parameter of a dusty plasma. Here, a tomography setup for the determination of the three-dimensionally resolved density distribution of spatially extended dust clouds is presented. The dust clouds consist of micron-sized particles confined in a radio frequency argon plasma, where they fill almost the entire discharge volume. First, a line-of-sight integrated dust density is obtained from extinction measurements, where the incident light from an LED panel is scattered and absorbed by the dust. Performing these extinction measurements from many different angles allows the reconstruction of the 3D dust density distribution, analogous to a computer tomography in medical applications

  20. Multi-hole seismic modeling in 3-D space and cross-hole seismic tomography analysis for boulder detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Liu, Jiangping; Wang, Jing; Zong, Yuquan; Yu, Mingyu

    2016-11-01

    A boulder stone, a common geological feature in south China, is referred to the remnant of a granite body which has been unevenly weathered. Undetected boulders could adversely impact the schedule and safety of subway construction when using tunnel boring machine (TBM) method. Therefore, boulder detection has always been a key issue demanded to be solved before the construction. Nowadays, cross-hole seismic tomography is a high resolution technique capable of boulder detection, however, the method can only solve for velocity in a 2-D slice between two wells, and the size and central position of the boulder are generally difficult to be accurately obtained. In this paper, the authors conduct a multi-hole wave field simulation and characteristic analysis of a boulder model based on the 3-D elastic wave staggered-grid finite difference theory, and also a 2-D imaging analysis based on first arrival travel time. The results indicate that (1) full wave field records could be obtained from multi-hole seismic wave simulations. Simulation results describe that the seismic wave propagation pattern in cross-hole high-velocity spherical geological bodies is more detailed and can serve as a basis for the wave field analysis. (2) When a cross-hole seismic section cuts through the boulder, the proposed method provides satisfactory cross-hole tomography results; however, when the section is closely positioned to the boulder, such high-velocity object in the 3-D space would impact on the surrounding wave field. The received diffracted wave interferes with the primary wave and in consequence the picked first arrival travel time is not derived from the profile, which results in a false appearance of high-velocity geology features. Finally, the results of 2-D analysis in 3-D modeling space are comparatively analyzed with the physical model test vis-a-vis the effect of high velocity body on the seismic tomographic measurements.