WorldWideScience

Sample records for computationally guided photothermal

  1. Amphiphilic semiconducting polymer as multifunctional nanocarrier for fluorescence/photoacoustic imaging guided chemo-photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuyan; Cui, Dong; Fang, Yuan; Zhen, Xu; Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2017-11-01

    Chemo-photothermal nanotheranostics has the advantage of synergistic therapeutic effect, providing opportunities for optimized cancer therapy. However, current chemo-photothermal nanotheranostic systems generally comprise more than three components, encountering the potential issues of unstable nanostructures and unexpected conflicts in optical and biophysical properties among different components. We herein synthesize an amphiphilic semiconducting polymer (PEG-PCB) and utilize it as a multifunctional nanocarrier to simplify chemo-photothermal nanotheranostics. PEG-PCB has a semiconducting backbone that not only serves as the diagnostic component for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also acts as the therapeutic agent for photothermal therapy. In addition, the hydrophobic backbone of PEG-PCB provides strong hydrophobic and π-π interactions with the aromatic anticancer drug such as doxorubicin for drug encapsulation and delivery. Such a trifunctionality of PEG-PCB eventually results in a greatly simplified nanotheranostic system with only two components but multimodal imaging and therapeutic capacities, permitting effective NIR fluorescence/PA imaging guided chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer in living mice. Our study thus provides a molecular engineering approach to integrate essential properties into one polymer for multimodal nanotheranostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanoscale Metal-Organic Frameworks Decorated with Graphene Oxide for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Chen, Xiujin; Tian, Yang; Li, Zhongfeng; Zheng, Qingfeng

    2017-12-11

    Imaging-guided photothermal therapy (PTT) provides an attractive way to treat cancer. A composite material of a nanoscale metal-organic framework (NMOF) and graphene oxide (GO) has been prepared for potential use in tumor-guided PTT with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The NMOFs containing Fe 3+ were prefabricated with an octahedral morphology through a solvothermal reaction to offer a strong T 2 -weighted contrast in MRI. Then the NMOFs were decorated with GO nanosheets, which had good photothermal properties. After decoration, zeta-potential characterization shows that the aqueous stability of the composite material is enhanced, UV/Vis and near-infrared (NIR) spectra confirm that NIR absorption is also increased, and photothermal experiments reveal that the composite materials express higher photothermal conversion effects and conversion stability. The fabricated NMOF/GO shows low cytotoxicity, effective T 2 -weighted contrast of MRI, and positive PTT behavior for a tumor model in vitro. The performance of the composite NMOF/GO for MRI and PTT was also tested upon injection into A549 tumor-bearing mice. The studies in vivo revealed that the fabricated NMOF/GO was efficient in T 2 -weighted imaging and ablation of the A549 tumor with low cytotoxicity, which implied that the prepared composite contrast agent was a potential multifunctional nanotheranostic agent. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Photoacoustically-guided photothermal killing of mosquitoes targeted by nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stephen R; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Totten, Daniel C; Beneš, Helen; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2014-07-01

    In biomedical applications, nanoparticles have demonstrated the potential to eradicate abnormal cells in small localized pathological zones associated with cancer or infections. Here, we introduce a method for nanotechnology-based photothermal (PT) killing of whole organisms considered harmful to humans or the environment. We demonstrate that laser-induced thermal, and accompanying nano- and microbubble phenomena, can injure or kill C. elegans and mosquitoes fed carbon nanotubes, gold nanospheres, gold nanoshells, or magnetic nanoparticles at laser energies that are safe for humans. In addition, a photoacoustic (PA) effect was used to control nanoparticle delivery. Through the integration of this technique with molecular targeting, nanoparticle clustering, magnetic capturing and spectral sharpening of PA and PT plasmonic resonances, our laser-based PA-PT nano-theranostic platform can be applied to detection and the physical destruction of small organisms and carriers of pathogens, such as malaria vectors, spiders, bed bugs, fleas, ants, locusts, grasshoppers, phytophagous mites, or other arthropod pests, irrespective of their resistance to conventional treatments. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. “Two-Step” Raman Imaging Technique To Guide Chemo-Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin; Li, Qiujin; Yang, Yang; Omar, Haneen; Tang, Naijun; Zhang, Jianfei; Nie, Zhihong; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide-wrapped gold nanorods (GO@AuNRs) offer efficient drug delivery as well as NIR laser photothermal therapy (PTT) in vitro and in vivo. However, no real-time observation of drug release has been reported to better understand the synergy of chemotherapy and PTT. Herein, surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is employed to guide chemo-photothermal cancer therapy by a two-step mechanism. In the presence of GO as an internal standard, SERS signals of DOX (doxorubicin) loaded onto GO@AuNRs are found to be pH-responsive. Both DOX and GO show strong SERS signals before the DOX@GO@AuNRs are endocytic. However, when the DOX@GO@AuNRs enter acidic microenvironments such as endosomes and/or lysosomes, the DOX signals start decreasing while the GO signals remain the same. This plasmonic antenna could be used to identify the appropriate time to apply the PTT laser during chemo-photothermal therapy.

  5. “Two-Step” Raman Imaging Technique To Guide Chemo-Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin

    2015-08-13

    Graphene oxide-wrapped gold nanorods (GO@AuNRs) offer efficient drug delivery as well as NIR laser photothermal therapy (PTT) in vitro and in vivo. However, no real-time observation of drug release has been reported to better understand the synergy of chemotherapy and PTT. Herein, surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is employed to guide chemo-photothermal cancer therapy by a two-step mechanism. In the presence of GO as an internal standard, SERS signals of DOX (doxorubicin) loaded onto GO@AuNRs are found to be pH-responsive. Both DOX and GO show strong SERS signals before the DOX@GO@AuNRs are endocytic. However, when the DOX@GO@AuNRs enter acidic microenvironments such as endosomes and/or lysosomes, the DOX signals start decreasing while the GO signals remain the same. This plasmonic antenna could be used to identify the appropriate time to apply the PTT laser during chemo-photothermal therapy.

  6. Contrast ultrasound-guided photothermal therapy using gold nanoshelled microcapsules in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shumin [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China); Ordos Center Hospital, Ordos, Inner Mongolia 017000 (China); Dai, Zhifei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ke, Hengte [Nanomedicine and Biosensor Laboratory, School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Qu, Enze [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China); Qi, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Kuo [Department of Laboratory Animal Science, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100019 (China); Wang, Jinrui, E-mail: jinrui_wang@sina.com [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to test whether dual functional gold nano-shelled microcapsules (GNS-MCs) can be used as an ultrasound imaging enhancer and as an optical absorber for photothermal therapy (PTT) in a rodent model of breast cancer. Methods: GNS-MCs were fabricated with an inner air and outer gold nanoshell spherical structure. Photothermal cytotoxicity of GNS-MCs was tested with BT474 cancer cells in vitro and non-obese diabetes-SCID (NOD/SCID) mice with breast cancer. GNS-MCs were injected into the tumor under ultrasound guidance and treated with near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. The photothermal ablative effectiveness of GNS-MCs was evaluated by measuring the surface and internal temperature of the tumor as well as the size of the tumor using histological confirmation. Results: NIR laser irradiation resulted in significant tumor cell death in GNS-MCs-treated BT474 cells in vitro. GNS-MCs were able to serve as an ultrasound enhancer to guide the intratumoral injection of GNS-MCs and ensure their uniform distribution. In vivo studies revealed that NIR laser irradiation increased the intratumoral temperature to nearly 70 °C for 8 min in GNS-MCs-treated mice. Tumor volumes decreased gradually and tumors were completely ablated in 6 out of 7 mice treated with GNS-MCs and laser irradiation by 17 days after treatment. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that ultrasound-guided PTT with theranostic GNS-MCs is a promising technique for in situ treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Bioinspired Multifunctional Melanin-Based Nanoliposome for Photoacoustic/Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Efficient Photothermal Ablation of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Sheng, Danli; Wang, Dong; Yao, Yuanzhi; Yang, Ke; Wang, Zhigang; Deng, Liming; Chen, Yu

    2018-01-01

    Background: The construction of theranostic nanosystems with concurrently high biosafety and therapeutic performance is a challenge but has great significance for the clinical translation of nanomedicine for combating cancer. Methods: Bio-inspired melanin-based nanoliposomes (Lip-Mel) as theranostic agents were constructed for simultaneous photoacoustic (PA) imaging- and T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided photothermal ablation of tumors, which was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The high biosafety of Lip-Mel was also systematically evaluated. Results: The achieved Lip-Mel nanoliposomes demonstrated their imaging capability for both PA and T1-weighted MR imaging (r1 = 0.25 mM-1·s-1) both in vitro and in vivo, providing the potential for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. Importantly, the desirable photothermal-conversion efficiency of the as-prepared Lip-Mel achieved complete eradication of tumors in breast cancer-bearing mice, exhibiting remarkable photothermal-based therapeutic performance. In particular, the efficient encapsulation of melanin into the PEGylated liposome mitigated the potential toxicity of melanin and improved the photothermal performance of the loaded melanin. Systematic in vivo biosafety evaluations demonstrated the high biocompatibility of Lip-Mel at a high dose of 100 mg/kg. Conclusion: In this work, we reported a bioinspired strategy where melanin, a natural product in the human body, is encapsulated into PEGylated nanoliposomes for efficient theranostics with high biocompatibility. This work provides a new strategy for creating desirable theranostic agents with concurrent high biocompatibility and satisfactory theranostic performance through the use of materials that totally originate from biosystems. PMID:29556343

  8. A highly effective in vivo photothermal nanoplatform with dual imaging-guided therapy of cancer based on the charge reversal complex of dye and iron oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Y.; Li, X.; Kong, X.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Tu, L.; Xue, B.; Wu, F.; Cao, D.; Zhao, H.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance the treatment efficiency of photothermal therapy (PTT) with very little light-associated side effect, we have constructed a highly effective PTT nanoplatform for fluorescence and MRI dual imaging-guided PTT of cancer, based on IR806 dye and iron oxide complex functionalized with

  9. Introduction to Computing Course Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Developed to aid intermediate-level teachers and principals in initiating and developing computer literacy programs for their students, this document is a guide for the development of a one-semester course--Introduction to Computing--for the seventh and eighth grades. The course is designed to provide opportunities for students to develop computer…

  10. α-Lipoic acid stabilized DTX/IR780 micelles for photoacoustic/fluorescence imaging guided photothermal therapy/chemotherapy of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, WenTing; Peng, JinRong; Yang, Qian; Chen, LiJuan; Zhang, Lan; Chen, XiaoXin; Qian, ZhiYong

    2018-05-01

    Micellar nanoparticles have unique advantages as carriers for therapeutic or imaging agents, owing to their smaller size and better penetration of tumors. However, some agents, due to their physical or chemical properties, are difficult to load into micelles. IR780 is one of these agents, and is also a promising near-infrared dye for fluorescence imaging (FI)/photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and cancer photothermal therapy (PTT). Its hydrophobic and high crystallization structure results in limited bioavailability in vivo. It is difficult to load into micelles constructed from an amphiphilic block polymer with relatively low molecular weight. In this study, we use computer simulation and introduce another small biomolecule, α-lipoic acid, into the micelles constructed from a mPEG-PCL copolymer, to lower the energy of molecular interaction between MPEG-PCL and IR780, and expect to enhance the loading capacity of the micelles to IR780. The introduction of α-lipoic acid decreases the energy of molecular interaction between MEPG-PCL and IR780 from -46.18 kJ mol-1 to -196.52 kJ mol-1 and increases the loading capacity and stability of the mPEG-PCL micelles to IR780, which also maintains the loading capacity to DTX. We further construct DTX/IR780 co-loaded mPEG-PCL micelles for FI/PAI dual modal imaging guided PTT/chemotherapy of cancer. By FI and PAI evaluation in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that the DTX/IR780 co-loaded micelles can be used as FI and PAI probes. By further evaluating the therapeutic outcome of PTT/chemotherapy co-therapy of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the DTX/IR780 co-loaded mPEG-PCL micelles can serve as promising candidates for FI and PAI guided PTT/chemotherapy of breast cancer.

  11. Standard guide for computed radiography

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides general tutorial information regarding the fundamental and physical principles of computed radiography (CR), definitions and terminology required to understand the basic CR process. An introduction to some of the limitations that are typically encountered during the establishment of techniques and basic image processing methods are also provided. This guide does not provide specific techniques or acceptance criteria for specific end-user inspection applications. Information presented within this guide may be useful in conjunction with those standards of 1.2. 1.2 CR techniques for general inspection applications may be found in Practice E2033. Technical qualification attributes for CR systems may be found in Practice E2445. Criteria for classification of CR system technical performance levels may be found in Practice E2446. Reference Images Standards E2422, E2660, and E2669 contain digital reference acceptance illustrations. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the st...

  12. Guide to Computational Geometry Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Gravesen, Jens; Anton, François

    be processed before it is useful. This Guide to Computational Geometry Processing reviews the algorithms for processing geometric data, with a practical focus on important techniques not covered by traditional courses on computer vision and computer graphics. This is balanced with an introduction...... to the theoretical and mathematical underpinnings of each technique, enabling the reader to not only implement a given method, but also to understand the ideas behind it, its limitations and its advantages. Topics and features: Presents an overview of the underlying mathematical theory, covering vector spaces......, metric space, affine spaces, differential geometry, and finite difference methods for derivatives and differential equations Reviews geometry representations, including polygonal meshes, splines, and subdivision surfaces Examines techniques for computing curvature from polygonal meshes Describes...

  13. An albumin-based theranostic nano-agent for dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy to inhibit lymphatic metastasis of cancer post surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liang, Chao; Wang, Xin; He, Jingkang; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-11-01

    A large variety of cancers are associated with a high incidence of lymph node metastasis, which leads to a high risk of cancer death. Herein, we demonstrate that multimodal imaging guided photothermal therapy can inhibit tumor metastasis after surgery by burning the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) with metastatic tumor cells. A near-infrared dye, IR825, is absorbed onto human serum albumin (HSA), which is covalently linked with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) molecules to chelate gadolinium. The formed HSA-Gd-IR825 nanocomplex exhibits strong fluorescence together with high near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and in the mean time could serve as a T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In vivo bi-modal fluorescence and MR imaging uncovers that HSA-Gd-IR825 after being injected into the primary tumor would quickly migrate into tumor-associated SLNs through lymphatic circulation. Utilizing the strong NIR absorbance of HSA-Gd-IR825, SLNs with metastatic cancer cells can be effectively ablated under exposure to a NIR laser. Such treatment when combined with surgery to remove the primary tumor offers remarkable therapeutic outcomes in greatly inhibiting further metastatic spread of cancer cells and prolonging animal survival. Our work presents an albumin-based theranostic nano-probe with functions of multimodal imaging and photothermal therapy, together with a 'photothermal ablation assisted surgery' strategy, promising for future clinical cancer treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Dual-Modality Imaging-Guided Photothermal and Photodynamic Dual-Therapy with Magnetic Porphyrin-Metal Organic Framework Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yu-Hao; Chen, Yang; Wang, Man-Man; Wang, Xue-Sheng; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2017-03-01

    Phototherapy shows some unique advantages in clinical application, such as remote controllability, improved selectivity, and low bio-toxicity, than chemotherapy. In order to improve the safety and therapeutic efficacy, imaging-guided therapy seems particularly important because it integrates visible information to speculate the distribution and metabolism of the probe. Here we prepare biocompatible core-shell nanocomposites for dual-modality imaging-guided photothermal and photodynamic dual-therapy by the in situ growth of porphyrin-metal organic framework (PMOF) on Fe3O4@C core. Fe3O4@C core was used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) agent. The optical properties of porphyrin were well remained in PMOF, and PMOF was therefore selected for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescence imaging. Fluorescence and MR dual-modality imaging-guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy was confirmed with tumour-bearing mice as model. The high tumour accumulation of Fe3O4@C@PMOF and controllable light excitation at the tumour site achieved efficient cancer therapy, but low toxicity was observed to the normal tissues. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4@C@PMOF was a promising dual-imaging guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy platform for tumour diagnosis and treatment with low cytotoxicity and negligible in vivo toxicity.

  15. A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Moding, Everett J.; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Register, Janna K.; Fales, Andrew M.; Choi, Jaeyeon; Whitley, Melodi J.; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Qi, Yi; Ma, Yan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy. PMID:26155311

  16. pH-Responsive Fe(III)-Gallic Acid Nanoparticles for In Vivo Photoacoustic-Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Yong; Wen, Ling; Chen, Ling; Li, Zhen; Wu, Yongyou; Gao, Mingyuan; Chai, Zhifang

    2016-04-06

    pH-responsive biocompatible Fe(III)-gallic acid nanoparticles with strong near-infrared absorbance are very stable in mild acidic conditions, but easily decomposed in neutral conditions, which enables the nanoparticles to be stable in a tumor and easily metabolized in other organs, thus providing a safe nanoplatform for in vivo photoacoustic imaging/photothermal therapy theranostic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Graphene Oxide and Gadolinium-Chelate Functionalized Poly(lactic acid) Nanocapsules Encapsulating Perfluorooctylbromide for Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Bimodal Imaging Guided Photothermal Ablation of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenglin; Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Miao, Zhaohua; Yue, Xiuli

    2016-03-01

    This paper successfully fabricated a novel multifunctional theranostic agent (PFOB@PLA/GO/Gd-DTPA NCs) by loading perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocapsules (NCs) followed by surface functionalization with graphene oxide (GO) and gadolinium-chelate (Gd-DTPA). It was found that the resulting nanoagent could serve as a contrast agent simultaneously to enhance ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Benefiting from the strong absorption in the near infrared (NIR) region, the nanocapsules could efficiently kill cancer cells under NIR laser irradiation. Thus, such a single theranostic agent with the combination of realtime US imaging and high-resolution MR imaging could achieve great therapeutic effectiveness without systemic damage to the body. In addition, the cytotoxicity assay on HUVEC cells revealed a good biocompatibility of PFOB@PLA/GO/Gd-DTPA NCs, showing that the versatile nanocapsule system may hold great potential as an effective nanoplatform for contrast enhanced imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  18. Introduction to computers: Reference guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligon, F.V.

    1995-04-01

    The ``Introduction to Computers`` program establishes formal partnerships with local school districts and community-based organizations, introduces computer literacy to precollege students and their parents, and encourages students to pursue Scientific, Mathematical, Engineering, and Technical careers (SET). Hands-on assignments are given in each class, reinforcing the lesson taught. In addition, the program is designed to broaden the knowledge base of teachers in scientific/technical concepts, and Brookhaven National Laboratory continues to act as a liaison, offering educational outreach to diverse community organizations and groups. This manual contains the teacher`s lesson plans and the student documentation to this introduction to computer course.

  19. Guide to computing at ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peavler, J. (ed.)

    1979-06-01

    This publication gives details about hardware, software, procedures, and services of the Central Computing Facility, as well as information about how to become an authorized user. Languages, compilers' libraries, and applications packages available are described. 17 tables. (RWR)

  20. Microgravity computing codes. User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Codes used in microgravity experiments to compute fluid parameters and to obtain data graphically are introduced. The computer programs are stored on two diskettes, compatible with the floppy disk drives of the Apple 2. Two versions of both disks are available (DOS-2 and DOS-3). The codes are written in BASIC and are structured as interactive programs. Interaction takes place through the keyboard of any Apple 2-48K standard system with single floppy disk drive. The programs are protected against wrong commands given by the operator. The programs are described step by step in the same order as the instructions displayed on the monitor. Most of these instructions are shown, with samples of computation and of graphics.

  1. Computer modeling of the optical properties and heating of spherical gold and silica-gold nanoparticles for laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovalov, V; Astafyeva, L; Jean, B

    2009-01-01

    Recently, several groups of investigators (Anderson, Halas, Zharov, El-Sayed and their co-workers (Pitsillides et al 2003 Biophys. J. 84 4023-31, Zharov et al 2003 Appl. Phys. Lett. 83 4897-9, Zharov et al 2004 Proc. SPIE 5319 291-9, Loo et al 2005 Nano Lett. 5 709-11, Gobin et al 2007 Nano Lett. 7 1929-34, Fu et al 2008 Nanotechnology 19 045103, Huang et al 2006 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 2115-20, Jain et al 2006 J. Phys. Chem. B 110 7238-48, Jain et al 2007 Nano Today 2 18-29)) demonstrated, through pioneering results, the great potential of laser thermal therapy of cells and tissues conjugated with gold nanoparticles. It was also proposed to use combined diagnostics and therapy on the basis of nanoparticle selection for achievement of efficient contrast for laser imaging applications, as well as for photothermal therapy. However, the current understanding of the relationship between optical properties (absorption, backscattering) of nanoparticles, the efficiency of nanoparticle heating and the possibility to use them for combined imaging and therapy is limited. Here, we report the results of computer modeling of optical absorption and backscattering properties and laser heating of gold and silica-gold spherical nanoparticles for laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment of cells and tissues conjugated with nanoparticles. The efficiencies of nanoparticle heating and backscattering by nanoparticles, depending upon their radii, structure and optical properties of the metal, were investigated. This paper focuses on the analysis and determination of appropriate ranges of nanoparticle sizes for the purposes of laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment. The possibility to use spherical gold and silica-gold nanoparticles in determined ranges of radii for these purposes for laser wavelengths 532 and 800 nm is investigated.

  2. Fractionated photothermal antitumor therapy with multidye nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutwein LG

    2012-01-01

    compared to control treated tumor-bearing mice.Conclusion: Fractionated photothermal therapy for cancer represents a new therapeutic paradigm enabled by the application of novel functional nanomaterials. MDT-NPs may advance clinical treatment of cancer by enabling fractionated real-time image guided photothermal therapy.Keywords: fluorescence, mesoporous silica, biodistribution, photothermal ablation, live animal imaging, near-infrared nanoparticle, breast cancer

  3. First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nolan, Richard; Baker, Marie; Branson, Jake; Hammerstein, Josh; Rush, Kris; Waits, Cal; Schweinsberg, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics expands on the technical material presented in SEI handbook CMU/SEI-2005-HB-001, First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics [Nolan 05...

  4. Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko; Nakamura, Masato

    1995-01-01

    Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopy methods can be effectively applied to the analysis of microparticles in condensed matter. A more violent photothermal conversion phenomenon of a particle, laser breakdown and accompanying plasma and acoustic emission, was applied to individual detection and analysis of ultrafine particles in ultrapure water. Laser-like nonlinear emission from the plasma was observed. (author)

  5. Computer-guided laser for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivukangas, J; Louhisalmi, Y

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of over 40 neurosurgical laser operations, including CO2, Nd-YAG and simultaneous CO2/Nd-YAG laser procedures, a computer-guided system for spatial control of the laser beam has been developed. The pilot laser has several modes: it can direct the neurosurgeon along the central axis of the surgical microscope to stereotactically determined point-like targets or outline selected layers of underlying volume targets onto superficial surfaces such as scalp and cortex and onto the tissue at the appropriate depth. The active treatment laser can be guided by preoperative CT/MRI or intraoperative ultrasound image data for layer-by-layer resection of tumor. The laser system can be connected to the surgical field by rigid stereotactic means or by neuronavigator. In the present system, a special brain surgery adapter coordinates the imaging system and laser to the surgical field. Thus, the laser system can be used for image-guided surgical orientation, for demarcation of lesions and for actual layer-by-layer removal of tumor.

  6. The Guide to Better Hospital Computer Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenfest, Sheldon I.

    1981-01-01

    A soon-to-be-published major study of hospital computer use entitled “The Guide to Better Hospital Computer Decisions” was conducted by my firm over the past 2½ years. The study required over twenty (20) man years of effort at a cost of over $300,000, and the six (6) volume final report provides more than 1,000 pages of data about how hospitals are and will be using computerized medical and business information systems. It describes the current status and future expectations for computer use in major application areas, such as, but not limited to, finance, admitting, pharmacy, laboratory, data collection and hospital or medical information systems. It also includes profiles of over 100 companies and other types of organizations providing data processing products and services to hospitals. In this paper, we discuss the need for the study, the specific objectives of the study, the methodology and approach taken to complete the study and a few major conclusions.

  7. Sensitivity of Computed Tomography‑guided Transthoracic Biopsies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The indications for open biopsies for intrathoracic lesions have become almost negligible. This development was made possible by less invasive maneuvers such as computed tomography‑guided (CT‑guided) biopsy, thoracoscopy or video‑assisted thoracoscopy, and bronchoscopy. CT‑guided percutaneous ...

  8. Introduction to Computing: Lab Manual. Faculty Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Joseph W.

    This lab manual is designed to accompany a college course introducing students to computing. The exercises are designed to be completed by the average student in a supervised 2-hour block of time at a computer lab over 15 weeks. The intent of each lab session is to introduce a topic and have the student feel comfortable with the use of the machine…

  9. Photothermal imaging of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-02-01

    We present photothermal images of melanin using modulation with two laser beams. Strong melanin absorption followed by efficient nonradiative relaxation caused heating and an increase in temperature. This temperature effect was used as an imaging contrast to detect melanin. Melanin from several samples including Sepia officinalis, black human hair, and live zebra fish, were imaged with a high signal-to-noise ratio. For the imaging, we focused two near infrared laser beams (pump and probe) collinearly with different wavelengths and the pump was modulated in amplitude. The thermally induced variations in the refractive index, at the modulation frequency, were detected by the scattering of the probe beam. The Photothermal method brings several imaging benefits including the lack of background interference and the possibility of imaging for an extended period of time without photodamage to the melanin. The dependence of the photothermal signal on the laser power, modulation frequency, and spatial offset of the probe is discussed. The new photothermal imaging method is promising and provides background-free and label-free imaging of melanin and can be implemented with low-cost CW lasers.

  10. Sensitivity of Computed Tomography‑guided Transthoracic Biopsies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... Introduction: The indications for open biopsies for intrathoracic lesions have become almost negligible. This development was made possible by less invasive maneuvers such as computed tomography‑guided (CT‑guided) biopsy, thoracoscopy or video‑assisted thoracoscopy, and bronchoscopy.

  11. Computer Assisted Drafting (CNC) Drawings. Drafting Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Missouri Vocational Instruction Management System instructor's drafting guide has been keyed to the drafting competency profile developed by state industry and education professionals. This unit contains information on computer-assisted drafting drawings. The guide contains a cross-reference table of instructional materials and 20 worksheets.…

  12. Computer methods in physics 250 problems with guided solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Rubin H

    2018-01-01

    Our future scientists and professionals must be conversant in computational techniques. In order to facilitate integration of computer methods into existing physics courses, this textbook offers a large number of worked examples and problems with fully guided solutions in Python as well as other languages (Mathematica, Java, C, Fortran, and Maple). It’s also intended as a self-study guide for learning how to use computer methods in physics. The authors include an introductory chapter on numerical tools and indication of computational and physics difficulty level for each problem.

  13. Study guide to accompany computers data and processing

    CERN Document Server

    Deitel, Harvey M

    1985-01-01

    Study Guide to Accompany Computer and Data Processing provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of computers and computer technology. This book presents the key benefits of using computers.Organized into five parts encompassing 19 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the evolution of modern computing systems from the earliest mechanical calculating devices to microchips. This text then introduces computer hardware and describes the processor. Other chapters describe how microprocessors are made and describe the physical operation of computers. This book discusses as w

  14. Photothermal measurements of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, G.S.; Wu, X.D.; Kapitulnik, A.; Fishman, I.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a new photothermal technique to investigate electronic phase transitions of high temperature superconductors. The phase shift of the thermal wave yields the anisotropic thermal diffusivity coefficient of the sample. The amplitude of the photothermal signal is sensitive to electronic phase transitions of the second kind. The technique is completely noncontacting and nondestructive, and is well suited to measure small and fragile single-crystal high-T c superconductors. The measurements give good agreement with fluctuation theory near the transition temperature. They have studied diffusion in, and superconducting fluctuations of, single crystals of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 . Both systems show fluctuation effects beyond Gaussian fluctuations. While YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ behaves as a three-dimensional anisotropic superconductor, results on Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 indicate strong two-dimensional effects

  15. Guide documentaire pour en savoir plus sur l'informatique (A Documentary Guide to Further Knowledge of Computer Science).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achard-Bayle, Guy

    1985-01-01

    Presents a listing of textbooks, computer program guides, articles, opinion papers, histories, reference works, databases, reviews, bibliographies, organizations, and other information sources concerning computer applications. (MSE)

  16. Security for small computer systems a practical guide for users

    CERN Document Server

    Saddington, Tricia

    1988-01-01

    Security for Small Computer Systems: A Practical Guide for Users is a guidebook for security concerns for small computers. The book provides security advice for the end-users of small computers in different aspects of computing security. Chapter 1 discusses the security and threats, and Chapter 2 covers the physical aspect of computer security. The text also talks about the protection of data, and then deals with the defenses against fraud. Survival planning and risk assessment are also encompassed. The last chapter tackles security management from an organizational perspective. The bo

  17. Atomistic computer simulations a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brazdova, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Many books explain the theory of atomistic computer simulations; this book teaches you how to run them This introductory ""how to"" title enables readers to understand, plan, run, and analyze their own independent atomistic simulations, and decide which method to use and which questions to ask in their research project. It is written in a clear and precise language, focusing on a thorough understanding of the concepts behind the equations and how these are used in the simulations. As a result, readers will learn how to design the computational model and which parameters o

  18. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using magnetic carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardarajan, V.; Gu, L.; Kanneganti, A.; Mohanty, S. K.; Koymen, A. R.

    2011-03-01

    Photothermal therapy offers a solution for the destruction of cancer cells without significant collateral damage to otherwise healthy cells. Several attempts are underway in using carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and nanotubes due to their excellent absorption properties in the near-infrared spectrum of biological window. However, minimizing the required number of injected nanoparticles, to ensure minimal cytotoxicity, is a major challenge. We report on the introduction of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) onto cancer cells, localizing them in a desired region by applying an external magnetic field and irradiating them with a near-infrared laser beam. The MCNPs were prepared in Benzene, using an electric plasma discharge, generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. The CNPs were made ferromagnetic by use of Fe-electrodes to dope the CNPs, as confirmed by magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy measurements showed the size distribution of these MCNPs to be in the range of 5-10 nm. For photothermal irradiation, a tunable continuous wave Ti: Sapphire laser beam was weakly focused on to the cell monolayer under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The response of different cell types to photothermal irradiation was investigated. Cell death in the presence of both MCNPs and laser beam was confirmed by morphological changes and propidium iodide fluorescence inclusion assay. The results of our study suggest that MCNP based photothermal therapy is a promising approach to remotely guide photothermal therapy.

  19. The complete guide to blender graphics computer modeling and animation

    CERN Document Server

    Blain, John M

    2014-01-01

    Smoothly Leads Users into the Subject of Computer Graphics through the Blender GUIBlender, the free and open source 3D computer modeling and animation program, allows users to create and animate models and figures in scenes, compile feature movies, and interact with the models and create video games. Reflecting the latest version of Blender, The Complete Guide to Blender Graphics: Computer Modeling & Animation, 2nd Edition helps beginners learn the basics of computer animation using this versatile graphics program. This edition incorporates many new features of Blender, including developments

  20. Auditing cloud computing a security and privacy guide

    CERN Document Server

    Halpert, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The auditor's guide to ensuring correct security and privacy practices in a cloud computing environment Many organizations are reporting or projecting a significant cost savings through the use of cloud computing-utilizing shared computing resources to provide ubiquitous access for organizations and end users. Just as many organizations, however, are expressing concern with security and privacy issues for their organization's data in the "cloud." Auditing Cloud Computing provides necessary guidance to build a proper audit to ensure operational integrity and customer data protection, among othe

  1. Computing programme SPEGTAR and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altiparmakov, D.; Bosevski, T.

    1974-01-01

    Computer code SPEGTAR is one dimensional multigroup code for calculating neutron transport in multi zone cylindrical geometry. Neutron flux distribution is calculated by solving integral transport equation by the method of first collision probability previously developed for both one-group and multi group cases. According to spatial multigroup distribution of neutron flux, integral values of nuclear constants are determined by numerical integration for all material zones and all energy groups. These results are used for determining the parameters of homogenized reactor cell and condensation of energy groups suitable for reactor overall calculation

  2. Automatic generation of computable implementation guides from clinical information models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscá, Diego; Maldonado, José Alberto; Moner, David; Robles, Montserrat

    2015-06-01

    Clinical information models are increasingly used to describe the contents of Electronic Health Records. Implementation guides are a common specification mechanism used to define such models. They contain, among other reference materials, all the constraints and rules that clinical information must obey. However, these implementation guides typically are oriented to human-readability, and thus cannot be processed by computers. As a consequence, they must be reinterpreted and transformed manually into an executable language such as Schematron or Object Constraint Language (OCL). This task can be difficult and error prone due to the big gap between both representations. The challenge is to develop a methodology for the specification of implementation guides in such a way that humans can read and understand easily and at the same time can be processed by computers. In this paper, we propose and describe a novel methodology that uses archetypes as basis for generation of implementation guides. We use archetypes to generate formal rules expressed in Natural Rule Language (NRL) and other reference materials usually included in implementation guides such as sample XML instances. We also generate Schematron rules from NRL rules to be used for the validation of data instances. We have implemented these methods in LinkEHR, an archetype editing platform, and exemplify our approach by generating NRL rules and implementation guides from EN ISO 13606, openEHR, and HL7 CDA archetypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Computer forensics an essential guide for accountants, lawyers, and managers

    CERN Document Server

    Sheetz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Would your company be prepared in the event of: * Computer-driven espionage * A devastating virus attack * A hacker's unauthorized access * A breach of data security? As the sophistication of computer technology has grown, so has the rate of computer-related criminal activity. Subsequently, American corporations now lose billions of dollars a year to hacking, identity theft, and other computer attacks. More than ever, businesses and professionals responsible for the critical data of countless customers and employees need to anticipate and safeguard against computer intruders and attacks. The first book to successfully speak to the nontechnical professional in the fields of business and law on the topic of computer crime, Computer Forensics: An Essential Guide for Accountants, Lawyers, and Managers provides valuable advice on the hidden difficulties that can blindside companies and result in damaging costs. Written by industry expert Michael Sheetz, this important book provides readers with an honest look at t...

  4. Users' guide to the positron camera DDP516 computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracher, B.H.

    1979-08-01

    This publication is a guide to the operation, use and software for a DDP516 computer system provided by the Data Handling Group primarily for the development of a Positron Camera. The various sections of the publication fall roughly into three parts. (1) Sections forming the Operators Guide cover the basic operation of the machine, system utilities and back-up procedures. Copies of these sections are kept in a 'Nyrex' folder with the computer. (2) Sections referring to the software written particularly for Positron Camera Data Collection describe the system in outline and lead to details of file formats and program source files. (3) The remainder of the guide, describes General-Purpose Software. Much of this has been written over some years by various members of the Data Handling Group, and is available for use in other applications besides the positron camera. (UK)

  5. Basic user guide for the radwaste treatment plant computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1990-07-01

    This guide has been produced as an aid to using the Radwaste Treatment Plant computer system. It is designed to help new users to use the database menu system. Some of the forms can be used in ways different from those explained and more complex queries can be performed. (UK)

  6. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 μm were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO 2 laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m 2 /g at 1087 cm -1 . The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10 -8 cm -1 . The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations

  7. Computer guided pre-operative planning and dental implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Grošelj

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Implants in dentistry are, besides fixed, removable and maxillofacial prosthodontics, one of the reliable possibility to make functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the edentulism. Surgical and prosthodontic implant complications are often an inattentive consequence of wrong diagnosis, planning, and placement. In this article we present a technique using a highly advanced software program along with a rapid prototyping technology named stereolithography. A planning software for implant placement needs basically the high quality computed tomographic scan of one or both jaws for making accurate preoperative diagnostics and 3D preoperative plan. Later individual drill guide is designed and generated based on both the CT images and the preoperative planning. The patient specific drill guide transfers the virtual planning to the patient’s mouth at time of surgery.Conclusions: The advantages of computer guided implantology are the better prepared surgery with visualisation of critical anatomic structures, assessment of available bone and data about bone quality, increased confidence for the surgeon, deceased operative time, less frequent use of bone grafts, higher quality of collaboration between specialists and prosthetic lab and better communication with patients. Radiographic examination of the operation field for computer guided planning for implant placement is due to high costs justified as the most important information source on the areas to be implanted.

  8. A new stereotactic apparatus guided by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huk, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The accurate information provided by computer tomography about existence, shape, and localization of intracranial neoplasms in an early phase and in inaccessible regions have improved the diagnostics greatly, so that these lie far ahead of the therapeutic possibilities for brain tumors. To reduce this wide margin we have developed a new targeting device which makes a stereotactic approach to central lesions under sight-control by computed tomography within the computed tomography-scanner possible. With the help of this simple device we are now able to perform stereotactic procedures for tumor biopsy guided by computed tomography, needling and drainage of abscesses and cysts, and finally for the implantation of radioactive material for the interstitial radiotherapy of inoperable cysts and tumors. (orig.) [de

  9. A Multifunctional Biomaterial with NIR Long Persistent Phosphorescence, Photothermal Response and Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiling; Li, Yang; Qin, Xixi; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-09-20

    There are many reports on long persistent phosphors (LPPs) applied in bioimaging. However, there are few reports on LPPs applied in photothermal therapy (PTT), and an integrated system with multiple functions of diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we fabricate effective multifunctional phosphors Zn3 Ga2 SnO8 : Cr(3+) , Nd(3+) , Gd(3+) with NIR persistent phosphorescence, photothermal response and magnetism. Such featured materials can act as NIR optical biolabels and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for tracking the early cancer cells, but also as photothermal therapeutic agent for killing the cancer cells. This new multifunctional biomaterial is expected to open a new possibility of setting up an advanced imaging-guided therapy system featuring a high resolution for bioimaging and low side effects for the photothermal ablation of tumors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Guide to cloud computing for business and technology managers from distributed computing to cloudware applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Guide to Cloud Computing for Business and Technology Managers: From Distributed Computing to Cloudware Applications unravels the mystery of cloud computing and explains how it can transform the operating contexts of business enterprises. It provides a clear understanding of what cloud computing really means, what it can do, and when it is practical to use. Addressing the primary management and operation concerns of cloudware, including performance, measurement, monitoring, and security, this pragmatic book:Introduces the enterprise applications integration (EAI) solutions that were a first ste

  11. Ultrasound-guided versus computed tomography-scan guided biopsy of pleural-based lung lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Rahul; McLean, Anna W; Smith, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) guided biopsies have long been the standard technique to obtain tissue from the thoracic cavity and is traditionally performed by interventional radiologists. Ultrasound (US) guided biopsy of pleural-based lesions, performed by pulmonologists is gaining popularity and has the advantage of multi-planar imaging, real-time technique, and the absence of radiation exposure to patients. In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy, the time to diagnosis after the initial consult placement, and the complications rates between the two different modalities. A retrospective study of electronic medical records was done of patients who underwent CT-guided biopsies and US-guided biopsies for pleural-based lesions between 2005 and 2014 and the data collected were analyzed for comparing the two groups. A total of 158 patients underwent 162 procedures during the study period. 86 patients underwent 89 procedures in the US group, and 72 patients underwent 73 procedures in the CT group. The overall yield in the US group was 82/89 (92.1%) versus 67/73 (91.8%) in the CT group (P = 1.0). Average days to the procedure was 7.2 versus 17.5 (P = 0.00001) in the US and CT group, respectively. Complication rate was higher in CT group 17/73 (23.3%) versus 1/89 (1.1%) in the US group (P guided biopsy is similar to that of CT-guided biopsy, with a lower complication rate and a significantly reduced time to the procedure.

  12. Photothermal Radiometry for Skin Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal radiometry is an infrared remote sensing technique that has been used for skin and skin appendages research, in the areas of skin hydration, hydration gradient, skin hydration depth profiling, skin thickness measurements, skin pigmentation measurements, effect of topically applied substances, transdermal drug delivery, moisture content of bio-materials, membrane permeation, and nail and hair measurements. Compared with other technologies, photothermal radiometry has the advantages of non-contact, non-destructive, quick to make a measurement (a few seconds, and being spectroscopic in nature. It is also colour blind, and can work on any arbitrary sample surfaces. It has a unique depth profiling capability on a sample surface (typically the top 20 µm, which makes it particularly suitable for skin measurements. In this paper, we present a review of the photothermal radiometry work carried out in our research group. We will first introduce the theoretical background, then illustrate its applications with experimental results.

  13. Development of a guidance guide for dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent questions from users of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated in the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (LCI - IPEN), on how to properly apply the factors indicated in their calibration certificates, a guide was prepared guidance for dosimetry in computed tomography. The guide includes guidance prior knowledge of half value layer (HVL), as it is necessary to know the effective beam energy for application quality for correction factor (kq). The evaluation of HVL in TC scanners becomes a difficult task due to system geometry and therefore a survey was conducted of existing methodologies for the determination of HVL in clinical beams Computed Tomography, taking into account technical, practical and economic factors. In this work it was decided to test a Tandem System consists of absorbing covers made in the workshop of IPEN, based on preliminary studies due to low cost and good response. The Tandem system consists of five cylindrical absorbing layers of 1mm, 3mm, 5mm, 7mm and 10mm aluminum and 3 cylindrical absorbing covers 15mm, 25mm and acrylic 35mm (PMMA) coupled to the ionization chamber of commercial pencil type widely used in quality control tests in dosimetry in clinical beams Computed tomography. Through Tandem curves it was possible to assess HVL values and from the standard curve pencil-type ionization chamber, Kq find the appropriate beam. The elaborate Guide provides information on how to build the calibration curve on the basis of CSR, to find the Kq and information for construction Tandem curve, to find values close to CSR. (author)

  14. Rational Design of Multifunctional Fe@γ-Fe2 O3 @H-TiO2 Nanocomposites with Enhanced Magnetic and Photoconversion Effects for Wide Applications: From Photocatalysis to Imaging-Guided Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meifang; Deng, Kerong; Lü, Wei; Deng, Xiaoran; Li, Kai; Shi, Yanshu; Ding, Binbin; Cheng, Ziyong; Xing, Bengang; Han, Gang; Hou, Zhiyao; Lin, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) has been widely investigated and used in many areas due to its high refractive index and ultraviolet light absorption, but the lack of absorption in the visible-near infrared (Vis-NIR) region limits its application. Herein, multifunctional Fe@γ-Fe 2 O 3 @H-TiO 2 nanocomposites (NCs) with multilayer-structure are synthesized by one-step hydrogen reduction, which show remarkably improved magnetic and photoconversion effects as a promising generalists for photocatalysis, bioimaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). Hydrogenation is used to turn white TiO 2 in to hydrogenated TiO 2 (H-TiO 2 ), thus improving the absorption in the Vis-NIR region. Based on the excellent solar-driven photocatalytic activities of the H-TiO 2 shell, the Fe@γ-Fe 2 O 3 magnetic core is introduced to make it convenient for separating and recovering the catalytic agents. More importantly, Fe@γ-Fe 2 O 3 @H-TiO 2 NCs show enhanced photothermal conversion efficiency due to more circuit loops for electron transitions between H-TiO 2 and γ-Fe 2 O 3 , and the electronic structures of Fe@γ-Fe 2 O 3 @H-TiO 2 NCs are calculated using the Vienna ab initio simulation package based on the density functional theory to account for the results. The reported core-shell NCs can serve as an NIR-responsive photothermal agent for magnetic-targeted photothermal therapy and as a multimodal imaging probe for cancer including infrared photothermal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and photoacoustic imaging. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rotary engine performance computer program (RCEMAP and RCEMAPPC): User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.; Willis, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a user's guide for a computer code that simulates the performance of several rotary combustion engine configurations. It is intended to assist prospective users in getting started with RCEMAP and/or RCEMAPPC. RCEMAP (Rotary Combustion Engine performance MAP generating code) is the mainframe version, while RCEMAPPC is a simplified subset designed for the personal computer, or PC, environment. Both versions are based on an open, zero-dimensional combustion system model for the prediction of instantaneous pressures, temperature, chemical composition and other in-chamber thermodynamic properties. Both versions predict overall engine performance and thermal characteristics, including bmep, bsfc, exhaust gas temperature, average material temperatures, and turbocharger operating conditions. Required inputs include engine geometry, materials, constants for use in the combustion heat release model, and turbomachinery maps. Illustrative examples and sample input files for both versions are included.

  16. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  17. Computed tomography - guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Shin Yu; Deheinzelin, Daniel; Younes, Riad N.; Chojniak, Rubens

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the experience of a radiology department in the use of computed tomography-guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary nodules, by evaluating diagnostic yield and incidence of complications. This is a retrospective analysis of 52 consecutive patients who underwent lung lesion biopsy guided by computed tomography, performed between May 1997 and May 2000. Thirty-five patients were male and 17 were female, with ages ranging from 5 to 85 years (median, 62 years). The size of the lesions ranged from 1.8 to 15 cm (median, 5.4 cm). In a total of 52 biopsies of lung lesions, 51 biopsies (98.1%) supplied appropriate material for histopathological diagnosis, with 9 diagnosed (17.3%) as benign and 42 (80.8%) as malignant lesions. Specific diagnosis was obtained in 44 (84.6%) biopsies: 4 benign (9.1%) and 40 (90.9%) malignant lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the cutting needle biopsies for determining presence of malignancy were 96.8%, 100%, and 97.2%, respectively. Complications occurred in 9 cases (17.3%), including 6 cases (11.5%) of small pneumothorax, 1 (1.9%) of hemoptysis, 1 (1.9%) of pulmonary hematoma, and 1 (1.9%) of thoracic wall hematoma. All had spontaneous resolution. There were no complications requiring subsequent intervention. The high sensitivity and specificity of the method and the low rate of complications have established cutting needle biopsy as an efficient and safe tool for the diagnosis of lung lesions. In our hospital, cutting needle biopsy is considered a reliable procedure for the evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. (author)

  18. Dynamic measurements of flowing cells labeled by gold nanoparticles using full-field photothermal interferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turko, Nir A.; Roitshtain, Darina; Blum, Omry; Kemper, Björn; Shaked, Natan T.

    2017-06-01

    We present highly dynamic photothermal interferometric phase microscopy for quantitative, selective contrast imaging of live cells during flow. Gold nanoparticles can be biofunctionalized to bind to specific cells, and stimulated for local temperature increase due to plasmon resonance, causing a rapid change of the optical phase. These phase changes can be recorded by interferometric phase microscopy and analyzed to form an image of the binding sites of the nanoparticles in the cells, gaining molecular specificity. Since the nanoparticle excitation frequency might overlap with the sample dynamics frequencies, photothermal phase imaging was performed on stationary or slowly dynamic samples. Furthermore, the computational analysis of the photothermal signals is time consuming. This makes photothermal imaging unsuitable for applications requiring dynamic imaging or real-time analysis, such as analyzing and sorting cells during fast flow. To overcome these drawbacks, we utilized an external interferometric module and developed new algorithms, based on discrete Fourier transform variants, enabling fast analysis of photothermal signals in highly dynamic live cells. Due to the self-interference module, the cells are imaged with and without excitation in video-rate, effectively increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Our approach holds potential for using photothermal cell imaging and depletion in flow cytometry.

  19. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 2: Le Chatelier's Principle. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, A. Keith

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on Le Chatelier's principle includes objectives, prerequisites, pretest, instructions for executing the computer program, and…

  20. Split-mouth comparison of the accuracy of computer-generated and conventional surgical guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Nathaniel E; Kennedy, Kelly; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Clelland, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have shown that implant placement is highly predictable with computer-generated surgical guides; however, the reliability of these guides has not been compared to that of conventional guides clinically. This study aimed to compare the accuracy of reproducing planned implant positions with computer-generated and conventional surgical guides using a split-mouth design. Ten patients received two implants each in symmetric locations. All implants were planned virtually using a software program and information from cone beam computed tomographic scans taken with scan appliances in place. Patients were randomly selected for computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM)-guided implant placement on their right or left side. Conventional guides were used on the contralateral side. Patients underwent operative cone beam computed tomography postoperatively. Planned and actual implant positions were compared using three-dimensional analyses capable of measuring volume overlap as well as differences in angles and coronal and apical positions. Results were compared using a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of variance and were further analyzed using a Bartlett test for unequal variance (α = .05). Implants placed with CAD/CAM guides were closer to the planned positions in all eight categories examined. However, statistically significant differences were shown only for coronal horizontal distances. It was also shown that CAD/CAM guides had less variability than conventional guides, which was statistically significant for apical distance. Implants placed using CAD/CAM surgical guides provided greater accuracy in a lateral direction than conventional guides. In addition, CAD/CAM guides were more consistent in their deviation from the planned locations than conventional guides.

  1. Gold nanorods as a theranostic platform for in vitro and in vivo imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jinbao; Peng, Zhiyou; Li, Bo; Ye, Kaichuang; Zhang, Yuxin; Yuan, Fukang; Yang, Xinrui; Huang, Lijia; Hu, Junqing; Lu, Xinwu

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory macrophages play pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Theranostics, a promising approach for local imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages, has drawn increasing attention in biomedical research. In this study, gold nanorods (Au NRs) were synthesized, and their in vitro photothermal effects on the macrophage cell line (Ana-1 cells) under 808 nm near infrared reflection (NIR) were investigated by the CCK8 assay, calcein AM/PI staining, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), silver staining and in vitro micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. These Au NRs were then applied to an apolipoprotein E knockout (Apo E) mouse model to evaluate their effects on in vivo CT imaging and their effectiveness as for the subsequent photothermal therapy of macrophages in femoral artery restenosis under 808 nm laser irradiation. In vitro photothermal ablation treatment using Au NRs exhibited a significant cell-killing efficacy of macrophages, even at relatively low concentrations of Au NRs and low NIR powers. In addition, the in vivo results demonstrated that the Au NRs are effective for in vivo imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages in femoral artery restenosis. This study shows that Au nanorods are a promising theranostic platform for the diagnosis and photothermal therapy of inflammation-associated diseases.Inflammatory macrophages play pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Theranostics, a promising approach for local imaging and photothermal therapy of inflammatory macrophages, has drawn increasing attention in biomedical research. In this study, gold nanorods (Au NRs) were synthesized, and their in vitro photothermal effects on the macrophage cell line (Ana-1 cells) under 808 nm near infrared reflection (NIR) were investigated by the CCK8 assay, calcein AM/PI staining, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), silver staining and in vitro micro-computed tomography

  2. Organic molecule-based photothermal agents: an expanding photothermal therapy universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyo Sung; Verwilst, Peter; Sharma, Amit; Shin, Jinwoo; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2018-04-03

    Over the last decade, organic photothermal therapy (PTT) agents have attracted increasing attention as a potential complement for, or alternative to, classical drugs and sensitizers involving inorganic nanomaterials. In this tutorial review, we provide a structured description of the main classes of organic photothermal agents and their characteristics. Representative agents that have been studied in the context of photothermal therapy since 2000 are summarized and recent advances in using PTT agents to address various cancers indications are highlighted.

  3. Porphyrin-based Nanostructure-Dependent Photodynamic and Photothermal Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng S.

    This thesis presents the investigation of nanostructure-dependent phototherapy. We reviewed the liposomal structures for delivery of photosensitizers, and introduced a novel class of phototransducing liposomes called "porphysomes". Porphysomes are self-assembled from high packing density of pyropheophorbide alpha-conjugated phospholipids, resulting in extreme self-quenching of porphyrin fluorescence and comparable optical absorption to gold nanoparticles for high photothermal efficiency. We demonstrated this self-assembly of porphyrin-lipid conjugates converts a singlet oxygen generating mechanism (photodynamic therapy PDT activity) of porphyrin to photothermal mechanism (photothermal therapy PTT activity). The efficacy of porphysome-enhanced PTT was then evaluated on two pre-clinical animal models. We validated porphysome-enabled focal PTT to treat orthotopic prostate cancer using MRI-guided focal laser placement to closely mimic the current clinic procedure. Furthermore, porphysome-enabled fluorescence-guided transbronchial PTT of lung cancer was demonstrated in rabbit orthotopic lung cancer models, which led to the development of an ultra-minimally invasive therapy for early-stage peripheral lung cancer. On the other hand, the nanostructure-mediated conversion of PDT to PTT can be switched back by nanoparticle dissociation. By incorporating folate-conjugated phospholipids into the formulation, porphysomes were internalized into cells rapidly via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and resulted in efficient disruption of nanostructures, which turned back on the photodynamic activity of densely packed porphyrins, making a closed loop of conversion between PDT and PTT. The multimodal imaging and therapeutic features of porphysome make it ideal for future personalized cancer treatments.

  4. Documentation and user's guide for DOSTOMAN: a pathways computer model of radionuclide movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, R.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This report documents the mathematical development and the computer implementation of the Savannah River Laboratory computer code used to simulate radonuclide movement in the environment. The user's guide provides all the necessary information for the prospective user to input the required data, execute the computer program, and display the results

  5. Computer tomography guided lung biopsy using interactive breath-hold control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Krag-Andersen, Shella; Naqibullah, Matiullah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Interactive breath-hold control (IBC) may improve the accuracy and decrease the complication rate of computed tomography (CT)-guided lung biopsy, but this presumption has not been proven in a randomized study. Methods: Patients admitted for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomized...

  6. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  7. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (HUCAM/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio de Morais. Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2017-03-15

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  8. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens; Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo

    2017-01-01

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  9. Gold Nanoconstructs for Multimodal Diagnostic Imaging and Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Andrew James

    Cancer accounts for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths in the United States, and because conventional treatments are limited by morbidity and off-target toxicities, improvements in cancer management are needed. This thesis further develops nanoparticle-assisted photothermal therapy (NAPT) as a viable treatment option for cancer patients. NAPT enables localized ablation of disease because heat generation only occurs where tissue permissive near-infrared (NIR) light and absorbing nanoparticles are combined, leaving surrounding normal tissue unharmed. Two principle approaches were investigated to improve the specificity of this technique: multimodal imaging and molecular targeting. Multimodal imaging affords the ability to guide NIR laser application for site-specific NAPT and more holistic characterization of disease by combining the advantages of several diagnostic technologies. Towards the goal of image-guided NAPT, gadolinium-conjugated gold-silica nanoshells were engineered and demonstrated to enhance imaging contrast across a range of diagnostic modes, including T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, X-Ray, optical coherence tomography, reflective confocal microscopy, and two-photon luminescence in vitro as well as within an animal tumor model. Additionally, the nanoparticle conjugates were shown to effectively convert NIR light to heat for applications in photothermal therapy. Therefore, the broad utility of gadolinium-nanoshells for anatomic localization of tissue lesions, molecular characterization of malignancy, and mediators of ablation was established. Molecular targeting strategies may also improve NAPT by promoting nanoparticle uptake and retention within tumors and enhancing specificity when malignant and normal tissue interdigitate. Here, ephrinA1 protein ligands were conjugated to nanoshell surfaces for particle homing to overexpressed EphA2 receptors on prostate cancer cells. In vitro, successful targeting and subsequent photothermal ablation of

  10. The NUSS safety guides in design and the use of computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.

    1986-01-01

    After a brief summary of the NUSS programme, the two design guides are discussed which deal with instrumentation and control circuitry. The potential use of computers is covered differently in these guides because of the historical development and more importantly because of the difference in importance to safety of the I and C systems which are dealt with in these papers. The Agency would consider modifications to the existing guides only when sufficient consensus about the use of computers would warrant a revision of the documents. (author)

  11. Digital Workflow for Computer-Guided Implant Surgery in Edentulous Patients: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Hyeon; An, Xueyin; Jeong, Seung-Mi; Choi, Byung-Ho

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a fully digital workflow used to perform computer-guided flapless implant placement in an edentulous patient without the use of conventional impressions, models, or a radiographic guide. Digital data for the workflow were acquired using an intraoral scanner and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The image fusion of the intraoral scan data and CBCT data was performed by matching resin markers placed in the patient's mouth. The definitive digital data were used to design a prosthetically driven implant position, surgical template, and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabricated fixed dental prosthesis. The authors believe this is the first published case describing such a technique in computer-guided flapless implant surgery for edentulous patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Photothermal modification of plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    There is presented a method for geometrically modifying plasmonic structures on a support structure, such as for printing or recording, said method comprising changing a geometry specifically of plasmonic structures, wherein said changing the geometry is carried out by photothermally melting...... at least a portion of each of the plasmonic structures within the second plurality of plasmonic structures by irradiating, the plasmonic structures with incident electromagnetic radiation having an incident intensity in a plane of the second plurality of plasmonic structures, wherein said incident...... intensity is less than an incident intensity required to melt a film of a corresponding material and a corresponding thickness as the plasmonic structures within the second plurality of plasmonic structures....

  13. Enhanced photothermal lens using a photonic crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Longju [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2128 Coover Hall, Iowa State University, Ames,Iowa 50011 (United States); Zhao, Xiangwei [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering,Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211189 (China); Lu, Meng, E-mail: menglu@iastate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2128 Coover Hall, Iowa State University, Ames,Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    A photonic crystal (PC)-enhanced photothermal lens (PTL) is demonstrated for the detection of optically thin light absorption materials. The PC-enhanced PTL system is based on a pump-probe scheme consisting of a PC surface, pump laser beam, and probe laser beam. Heated by the pump beam, light absorption materials on the PC surface generate the PTL and cause a substantial change to the guided-mode resonance supported by the PC structure. The change of the PC resonance is detected using the probe laser beam by measuring its reflectivity from the PC surface. When applied to analyze dye molecules deposited on the PC substrate, the developed system is capable of enhancing the PTL signal by 10-fold and reducing the lowest distinguishable concentration by 8-fold, in comparison to measuring without utilizing the PC resonance. The PC-enhanced PTL was also used to detect gold nanoparticles on the PC surface and exhibited a 20-fold improvement of the lowest distinguishable concentration. The PC-enhanced PTL technology offers a potential tool to obtain the absorption signatures of thin films in a broad spectral range with high sensitivity and inexpensive instrumentation. As a result, this technology will enable a broad range of applications of photothermal spectroscopy in chemical analysis and biomolecule sensing.

  14. Magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring photothermal effects of interstitial laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jessica; Jose, Jessnie; Figueroa, Daniel; Le, Kelvin; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Selective photothermal interaction using dye-assisted non-invasive laser irradiation has limitations when treating deeper tumors or when the overlying skin is heavily pigmented. We developed an interstitial laser irradiation method to induce the desired photothermal effects. An 805-nm near-infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors by placing the active tip of the fiber inside the target tumors. Three different power settings (1.0 to 1.5 watts) were applied to treat animal tumors with an irradiation duration of 10 minutes. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager using proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. Three-dimensional temperature profiles were reconstructed and assessed using PRF. This is the first time a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. This study provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside tumor using interstitial laser irradiation. It also shows that PRF can be used effectively in monitoring photothermal interaction. Our long-term goal is to develop a PRF-guided laser therapy for cancer treatment.

  15. Mirror neurons and imitation: a computationally guided review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztop, Erhan; Kawato, Mitsuo; Arbib, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Neurophysiology reveals the properties of individual mirror neurons in the macaque while brain imaging reveals the presence of 'mirror systems' (not individual neurons) in the human. Current conceptual models attribute high level functions such as action understanding, imitation, and language to mirror neurons. However, only the first of these three functions is well-developed in monkeys. We thus distinguish current opinions (conceptual models) on mirror neuron function from more detailed computational models. We assess the strengths and weaknesses of current computational models in addressing the data and speculations on mirror neurons (macaque) and mirror systems (human). In particular, our mirror neuron system (MNS), mental state inference (MSI) and modular selection and identification for control (MOSAIC) models are analyzed in more detail. Conceptual models often overlook the computational requirements for posited functions, while too many computational models adopt the erroneous hypothesis that mirror neurons are interchangeable with imitation ability. Our meta-analysis underlines the gap between conceptual and computational models and points out the research effort required from both sides to reduce this gap.

  16. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of deep seated bone lesions in two dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Sakaida, M.; Yamada, M.; Akiyama, H.; Takai, Y.; Sakai, H.; Maruo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous core needle biopsies were undertaken for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma in the pelvis (case 1) and myeloma (case 2) in the seventh lumber vertebra which were difficult to targeted by palpation, ultrasound or fluoroscopy. In both cases, enough tissue for pathological diagnosis were obtained without any complication. CT-guided biopsy was thought to be a safe, easy and effective technique for the evaluation of the deep seated bone lesion

  17. The Poor Man's Guide to Computer Networks and their Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin

    2003-01-01

    These notes for DTU course 02220, Concurrent Programming, give an introduction to computer networks, with focus on the modern Internet. Basic Internet protocols such as IP, TCP and UDP are presented, and two Internet application protocols, SMTP and HTTP, are described in some detail. Techniques...

  18. CEL-1 Lighting Computer Program - Programmer’s Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    COMPLETING FORM I REPORT NumeR .2 GOUT ACCESSION NO. 1. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER CR 83.009� 4TITLE (Id Subt.II.) F HIf REOTAPIDCVRD CEL-1 Light...contribution due to the "bright spots" gene - rated in OVLY20 may be considered the "first bounce" effect. The ceiling contribution computed here in

  19. Checklist/Guide to Selecting a Small Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Wilma E.

    This 322-point checklist was designed to help executives make an intelligent choice when selecting a small computer for a business. For ease of use the questions have been divided into ten categories: Display Features, Keyboard Features, Printer Features, Controller Features, Software, Word Processing, Service, Training, Miscellaneous, and Costs.…

  20. Robust localisation of automated guided vehicles for computer-integrated manufacturing environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixon, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As industry moves toward an era of complete automation and mass customisation, automated guided vehicles (AGVs are used as material handling systems. However, the current techniques that provide navigation, control, and manoeuvrability of automated guided vehicles threaten to create bottlenecks and inefficiencies in manufacturing environments that strive towards the optimisation of part production. This paper proposes a decentralised localisation technique for an automated guided vehicle without any non-holonomic constraints. Incorporation of these vehicles into the material handling system of a computer-integrated manufacturing environment would increase the characteristics of robustness, efficiency, flexibility, and advanced manoeuvrability.

  1. Computer-guided total synthesis of natural products: Recent examples and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della-Felice, Franco; Pilli, Ronaldo A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Química; Sarotti, Ariel M., E-mail: pilli@iqm.unicamp.br, E-mail: sarotti@iquir-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional de Rosario-CONICET (Argentina)

    2018-05-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts and coupling constants have been extensively employed in recent years mainly to facilitate structural elucidation of organic molecules. When the results of such calculations are used to determine the most likely structure of a natural product in advance, guiding the subsequent synthetic work, the term 'computer-guided synthesis' could be coined. This review article describes the most relevant examples from recent literature, highlighting the scope and limitations of this merged computational/experimental approach as well. (author)

  2. Computer-guided total synthesis of natural products: Recent examples and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della-Felice, Franco; Pilli, Ronaldo A.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts and coupling constants have been extensively employed in recent years mainly to facilitate structural elucidation of organic molecules. When the results of such calculations are used to determine the most likely structure of a natural product in advance, guiding the subsequent synthetic work, the term 'computer-guided synthesis' could be coined. This review article describes the most relevant examples from recent literature, highlighting the scope and limitations of this merged computational/experimental approach as well. (author)

  3. Determination of thermal and physical properties of port-wine stain lesions using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Jacques, Steven L.; Wright, William H.

    1992-06-01

    A method for quantitative characterization of port wine stain (PWS) is presented. Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) uses a non-invasive infrared radiometry system to measure changes in surface temperature induced by pulsed radiation. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a PWS, an initial temperature jump (T-jump) is seen due to the heating of the epidermis as a result of melanin absorption. Subsequently, heat generated in the subsurface blood vessels due to hemoglobin absorption is detected by PPTR as a delayed thermal wave as the heat diffuses toward the skin surface. The time delay and magnitude of the delayed PPTR signal indicate the depth and thickness of the PWS. In this report, we present an initial clinical study of PPTR measurements on PWS patients. Computer simulations of various classes of PWS illustrate how the PPTR signal depends on the concentration of epidermal melanin, and depth and thickness of the PWS. The goal of this research is to provide a means of characterizing PWS before initiating therapy, guiding laser dosimetry, and advising the patient as to the time course and efficacy of the planned protocol.

  4. Wireless Cloud Computing on Guided Missile Destroyers: A Business Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Cloud Computing Network (WCCN) onboard Guided Missile Destroyers (DDGs) utilizing tablet computers. It compares the life cycle costs of WCCNs utilizing tablet computers over a mixed network of thin clients and desktop computers. Currently, the Consolidated Afloat Networks and Enterprise Services (CANES) program will install both thin clients and desktops on board new and old DDGs to implement the unclassified portion of its network. The main cost benefits of tablets will be realized through energy savings and an increase in productivity. The net present value of tablets is

  5. A computer assisted toolholder to guide surgery in stereotactic space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, C; Pluchino, F; Luzzara, M; Ongania, E; Casolino, D S

    1994-01-01

    A computer assisted toolholder, integrated with an anatomical graphic 3-D rendering programme, is presented. Stereotactic neuroanatomical images are acquired, and the same reference system is employed to represent the position of the toolholder on the monitor. The surgeon can check the orientation of different approach trajectories, moving the toolholder in a situation of virtual reality. Angular values expressed by high precision encoders on the five joints of the toolholder modify "on line" the representation of the configuration of the toolholder within the three dimensional representation of the patient's anatomy.

  6. Practical guide to gender diversity for computer science faculty

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Computer science faces a continuing crisis in the lack of females pursuing and succeeding in the field. Companies may suffer due to reduced product quality, students suffer because educators have failed to adjust to diverse populations, and future generations suffer due to a lack of role models and continued challenges in the environment. In this book, we draw on the latest research in sociology, psychology, and education to first identify why we should be striving for gender diversity (beyond social justice), refuting misconceptions about the differing potentials between females and males. We

  7. Combined photothermal therapy and magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using multifunctional nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Ma, Li L.; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Qu, Min; Joshi, Pratixa; Chen, Raeanna M.; Johnston, Keith P.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2010-02-01

    Photothermal therapy is a laser-based non-invasive technique for cancer treatment. Photothermal therapy can be enhanced by employing metal nanoparticles that absorb the radiant energy from the laser leading to localized thermal damages. Targeting of nanoparticles leads to more efficient uptake and localization of photoabsorbers thus increasing the effectiveness of the treatment. Moreover, efficient targeting can reduce the required dosage of photoabsorbers; thereby reducing the side effects associated with general systematic administration of nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles, due to their small size and response to an external magnetic field gradient have been proposed for targeted drug delivery. In this study, we investigate the applicability of multifunctional nanoparticles (e.g., magneto-plasmonic nanoparticles) and magneto-motive ultrasound imaging for image-guided photothermal therapy. Magneto-motive ultrasound imaging is an ultrasound based imaging technique capable of detecting magnetic nanoparticles indirectly by utilizing a high strength magnetic field to induce motion within the magnetically labeled tissue. The ultrasound imaging is used to detect the internal tissue motion. Due to presence of the magnetic component, the proposed multifunctional nanoparticles along with magneto-motive ultrasound imaging can be used to detect the presence of the photo absorbers. Clearly the higher concentration of magnetic carriers leads to a monotonic increase in magneto-motive ultrasound signal. Thus, magnetomotive ultrasound can determine the presence of the hybrid agents and provide information about their location and concentration. Furthermore, the magneto-motive ultrasound signal can indicate the change in tissue elasticity - a parameter that is expected to change significantly during the photothermal therapy. Therefore, a comprehensive guidance and assessment of the photothermal therapy may be feasible through magneto-motive ultrasound imaging and

  8. Integrated Markov-neural reliability computation method: A case for multiple automated guided vehicle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazlollahtabar, Hamed; Saidi-Mehrabad, Mohammad; Balakrishnan, Jaydeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrated Markovian and back propagation neural network approaches to compute reliability of a system. While states of failure occurrences are significant elements for accurate reliability computation, Markovian based reliability assessment method is designed. Due to drawbacks shown by Markovian model for steady state reliability computations and neural network for initial training pattern, integration being called Markov-neural is developed and evaluated. To show efficiency of the proposed approach comparative analyses are performed. Also, for managerial implication purpose an application case for multiple automated guided vehicles (AGVs) in manufacturing networks is conducted. - Highlights: • Integrated Markovian and back propagation neural network approach to compute reliability. • Markovian based reliability assessment method. • Managerial implication is shown in an application case for multiple automated guided vehicles (AGVs) in manufacturing networks

  9. Steerability Analysis of Tracked Vehicles: Theory and User’s Guide for Computer Program TVSTEER

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    Baladi , Donald E. Barnes, Rebecca P. BergerC oStructures Laboratory NDEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ___ Waterways Experiment Station, Corps of Engineers . U P0 Box...Analysis of Tracked Vehicles: Theory and User’s Guide for Computer Program TVSTEER - 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Baladi , George Y., Barnes, Donald E...mathematical model was formulated by Drs. George Y. Baladi and Behzad Rohani. The logic and computer programming were accomplished by Dr. Baladi and

  10. Interactive Computer Lessons for Introductory Economics: Guided Inquiry-From Supply and Demand to Women in the Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Weil, Gordon

    1986-01-01

    The interactive feature of computers is used to incorporate a guided inquiry method of learning introductory economics, extending the Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) method beyond drills. (Author/JDH)

  11. Aptamer-Targeted Plasmonic Photothermal Therapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga S. Kolovskaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel nanoscale bioconjugates combining unique plasmonic photothermal properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs with targeted delivery using cell-specific DNA aptamers have a tremendous potential for medical diagnostics and therapy of many cell-based diseases. In this study, we demonstrate the high anti-cancer activity of aptamer-conjugated, 37-nm spherical gold nanoparticles toward Ehrlich carcinoma in tumor-bearing mice after photothermal treatment. The synthetic anti-tumor aptamers bring the nanoparticles precisely to the desired cells and selectively eliminate cancer cells after the subsequent laser treatment. To prove tumor eradication, we used positron emission tomography (PET utilizing radioactive glucose and computer tomography, followed by histological analysis of cancer tissue. Three injections of aptamer-conjugated AuNPs and 5 min of laser irradiations are enough to make the tumor undetectable by PET. Histological analysis proves PET results and shows lower damage of healthy tissue in addition to a higher treatment efficiency and selectivity of the gold nanoparticles functionalized with aptamers in comparison to control experiments using free unconjugated nanoparticles.

  12. Development of customized positioning guides using computer-aided design and manufacturing technology for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Chang, Hsin-Wen; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to devise a method for producing customized positioning guides for translating virtual plans to actual orthognathic surgery, and evaluation of the feasibility and validity of the devised method. Patients requiring two-jaw orthognathic surgery were enrolled and consented before operation. Two types of positioning guides were designed and fabricated using computer-aided design and manufacturing technology: One of the guides was used for the LeFort I osteotomy, and the other guide was used for positioning the maxillomandibular complex. The guides were fixed to the medial side of maxilla. For validation, the simulation images and postoperative cone beam computed tomography images were superimposed using surface registration to quantify the difference between the images. The data were presented in root-mean-square difference (RMSD) values. Both sets of guides were experienced to provide ideal fit and maximal contact to the maxillary surface to facilitate their accurate management in clinical applications. The validation results indicated that RMSD values between the images ranged from 0.18 to 0.33 mm in the maxilla and from 0.99 to 1.56 mm in the mandible. The patients were followed up for 6 months or more, and all of them were satisfied with the results. The proposed customized positioning guides are practical and reliable for translation of virtual plans to actual surgery. Furthermore, these guides improved the efficiency and outcome of surgery. This approach is uncomplicated in design, cost-effective in fabrication, and particularly convenient to use.

  13. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  14. Micromechanical photothermal analyser of microfluidic samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a micromechanical photothermal analyser of microfluidic samples comprising an oblong micro-channel extending longitudinally from a support element, the micro-channel is made from at least two materials with different thermal expansion coefficients, wherein...

  15. Crack detection by mobile photothermal probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, R.; Le Blanc, A.; Sellier, J.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with an industrial method for crack detection. The apparatus presented is based on a mobile photothermal probe. It can be used under different modes (sinusoidal, pulsed or scanned excitation). Moreover, the description of the device provided includes theoretical and experimental results. (TEC). 7 refs., 6 figs

  16. Users guide for NRC145-2 accident assessment computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergast, M.M.

    1982-08-01

    An accident assessment computer code has been developed for use at the Savannah River Plant. This computer code is based upon NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145 which provides guidence for accident assessements for power reactors. The code contains many options so that the user may utilize the code for many different assessments. For example the code can be used for non-nuclear assessments such as Sulpher Dioxide which may be required by the EPA. A discription of the code is contained in DP-1646. This document is a compilation of step-by-step instructions on how to use the code on the SRP IBM 3308 computer. This document consists of a number of tables which contain copies of computer listings. Some of the computer listings are copies of input; other listings give examples of computer output

  17. Apps for Angiosperms: The Usability of Mobile Computers and Printed Field Guides for UK Wild Flower and Winter Tree Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated usability of mobile computers and field guide books with adult botanical novices, for the identification of wildflowers and deciduous trees in winter. Identification accuracy was significantly higher for wildflowers using a mobile computer app than field guide books but significantly lower for deciduous trees. User preference…

  18. Calculations of reactor-accident consequences, Version 2. CRAC2: computer code user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Johnson, J.D.; Blond, R.M.

    1983-02-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revision of the Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences computer code, CRAC, developed for the Reactor Safety Study. The CRAC2 computer code incorporates significant modeling improvements in the areas of weather sequence sampling and emergency response, and refinements to the plume rise, atmospheric dispersion, and wet deposition models. New output capabilities have also been added. This guide is to facilitate the informed and intelligent use of CRAC2. It includes descriptions of the input data, the output results, the file structures, control information, and five sample problems

  19. Three-dimensional digitizer (neuronavigator): new equipment for computed tomography-guided stereotaxic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, E; Watanabe, T; Manaka, S; Mayanagi, Y; Takakura, K

    1987-06-01

    A new device was invented as an adjunct for computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotaxic or open neurosurgery. It is composed of a multijoint three-dimensional digitizer (sensor arm) and a microcomputer, which indicates the place of the sensor arm tip on preoperative CT images. Computed tomography scan is performed preoperatively with three markers placed on the nasion and ears. At surgery, after fixing the patient's head and the sensor arm, sampling of the standard points was done to translate the position of the tip of the sensor arm onto the CT images displayed on a computer screen. In this way positional data from conventional preoperative CT scan can be directly transferred into the surgical field. This system has the unique feature of introducing CT-guided stereotaxis into conventional open neurosurgery.

  20. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Jeng Tyng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and Methods In the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results In all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible.

  1. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Almeida, Maria Fernanda Arruda; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Martins, Eduardo Bruno Lobato; Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka Matushita; Chojniak, Rubens; Coimbra, Felipe Jose Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and methods: in the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results: in all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion: Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible. (author)

  2. [Guided and computer-assisted implant surgery and prosthetic: The continuous digital workflow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, D; Vaysse, J

    2016-02-01

    New continuous digital workflow protocols of guided and computer-assisted implant surgery improve accuracy of implant positioning. The design of the future prosthesis is based on the available prosthetic space, gingival height and occlusal relationship with the opposing and adjacent teeth. The implant position and length depend on volume, density and bone quality, gingival height, tooth-implant and implant-implant distances, implant parallelism, axis and type of the future prosthesis. The crown modeled on the software will therefore serve as a guide to the future implant axis and not the reverse. The guide is made by 3D printing. The software determines surgical protocol with the drilling sequences. The unitary or plural prosthesis, modeled on the software and built before surgery, is loaded directly after implant placing, if needed. These protocols allow for a full continuity of the digital workflow. The software provides the surgeon and the dental technician a total freedom for the prosthetic-surgery guide design and the position of the implants. The prosthetic project, occlusal and aesthetic, taking the bony and surgical constraints into account, is optimized. The implant surgery is simplified and becomes less "stressful" for the patient and the surgeon. Guided and computer-assisted surgery with continuous digital workflow is becoming the technique of choice to improve the accuracy and quality of implant rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Green synthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles for photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Sajid; Jayasree, Aswathy; Sasidharan, Sisini; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-06-11

    Nanoparticles of varying composition, size, shape, and architecture have been explored for use as photothermal agents in the field of cancer nanomedicine. Among them, gold nanoparticles provide a simple platform for thermal ablation owing to its biocompatibility in vivo. However, the synthesis of such gold nanoparticles exhibiting suitable properties for photothermal activity involves cumbersome routes using toxic chemicals as capping agents, which can cause concerns in vivo. Herein, gold nanoparticles, synthesized using green chemistry routes possessing near-infrared (NIR) absorbance facilitating photothermal therapy, would be a viable alternative. In this study, anisotropic gold nanoparticles were synthesized using an aqueous route with cocoa extract which served both as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The as-prepared gold nanoparticles were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to maximize its NIR absorption in the wavelength range of 800-1000 nm. The particles also showed good biocompatibility when tested in vitro using A431, MDA-MB231, L929, and NIH-3T3 cell lines up to concentrations of 200 μg/mL. Cell death induced in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells upon irradiation with a femtosecond laser at 800 nm at a low power density of 6 W/cm(2) proved the suitability of green synthesized NIR absorbing anisotropic gold nanoparticles for photothermal ablation of cancer cells. These gold nanoparticles also showed good X-ray contrast when tested using computed tomography (CT), proving their feasibility for use as a contrast agent as well. This is the first report on green synthesized anisotropic and cytocompatible gold nanoparticles without any capping agents and their suitability for photothermal therapy.

  4. Accuracy of computer-guided implantation in a human cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatzkair, Gustavo; Cheng, Alice; Brodie, Stan; Raviv, Eli; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-10-01

    To examine the accuracy of computer-guided implantation using a human cadaver model with reduced experimental variability. Twenty-eight (28) dental implants representing 12 clinical cases were placed in four cadaver heads using a static guided implantation template. All planning and surgeries were performed by one clinician. All radiographs and measurements were performed by two examiners. The distance of the implants from buccal and lingual bone and mesial implant or tooth was analyzed at the apical and coronal levels, and measurements were compared to the planned values. No significant differences were seen between planned and implanted measurements. Average deviation of an implant from its planning radiograph was 0.8 mm, which is within the range of variability expected from CT analysis. Guided implantation can be used safely with a margin of error of 1 mm. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Oral Implants Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a guide tube in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, F.; Archambeau, F.; Chaize, C.

    2000-01-01

    Security in nuclear power plants demands severe limitations of the maximal drop time of rod cluster control assemblies. In February 1995, several assemblies of the Chinese plant in Daya Bay failed to comply with these requirements. Electricite De France undertook a research program to get a better insight of this problem since the plant has been built by French and also because the French new four-loops N4 reactor was equipped with the same guide tubes. This paper is limited to a numerical study of the influence of the pressure forces applied to control rods and due to flow circulation through the guide tubes. After a validation test case, a first calculation has been carried out on a simplified N4 guide tube. The sensitivity of the pressure forces to transverse flow and to modifications of the geometry has been determined. The program has been extended to guide tubes used in 1300-MW reactors and similar computations have been done. To make simulations more representative, a global computation of the flow in the whole upper internals plenum (UIP) will be achieved to provide accurate boundary conditions for local calculations with better resolution.

  6. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a guide tube in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, F.; Archambeau, F.

    1997-01-01

    Security in nuclear power plants demands severe limitations of the maximal drop time of rod cluster control assemblies. In February 1995, several assemblies of the Chinese plant in DAYA BAY failed to comply with these requirements. Electricite de France undertook a research program to get a better insight of this problem since the plant has been built by French and also because the French new 4 loops N4 reactor was equipped with the same guide tubes. This paper is limited to a numerical study of the influence of the pressure forces applied to control rods and due to flow circulation through the guide tubes. After a validation test-case, a first calculation has been carried out on a simplified N4 guide tube. The sensitivity of the pressure forces to transverse flow and to modifications of the geometry has been determined. The program has been extended to guide tubes used in 1300 MW reactors and similar computations have been done. To make simulations more representative, a global computation of the flow in the whole upper internals plenum (UIP) will be achieved to provide accurate boundary conditions for local calculations with better resolution. (author)

  7. A computational fluid dynamics modeling study of guide walls for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A partial-depth, impermeable guidance structure (or guide wall) for downstream fish passage is typically constructed as a series of panels attached to a floating boom and anchored across a water body (e.g. river channel, reservoir, or power canal). The downstream terminus of the wall is generally located nearby to a fish bypass structure. If guidance is successful, the fish will avoid entrainment in a dangerous intake structure (i.e. turbine intakes) while passing from the headpond to the tailwater of a hydroelectric facility through a safer passage route (i.e. the bypass). The goal of this study is to determine the combination of guide wall design parameters that will most likely increase the chance of surface-oriented fish being successfully guided to the bypass. To evaluate the flow field immediately upstream of a guide wall, a parameterized computational fluid dynamics model of an idealized power canal was constructed in © ANSYS Fluent v 14.5 (ANSYS Inc., 2012). The design parameters investigated were the angle and depth of the guide wall and the average approach velocity in the power canal. Results call attention to the importance of the downward to sweeping flow ratio and demonstrate how a change in guide wall depth and angle can affect this important hydraulic cue to out-migrating fish. The key findings indicate that a guide wall set at a small angle (15° is the minimum in this study) and deep enough such that sweeping flow dominant conditions prevail within the expected vertical distribution of fish approaching the structure will produce hydraulic conditions that are more likely to result in effective passage.

  8. Cranial radiotherapy guided by computed tomography with or without fields conformation in pediatric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Diego; Caussa, Lucas; Murina, Patricia; Zunino, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Many malignancies in children can be cured by radiotherapy, acute toxicity and the significant effect of delayed treatment are worrying for the patient, family and society. Therefore, the end of the pediatric radiotherapy is to maintain or improve the cure rate of cancer, diminishing the aftermath of treatment. The goal of this study is to measure differences in doses to the healthy tissue of the central nervous system with two radiotherapy techniques, both guided by computed tomography [es

  9. Reliability of computer designed surgical guides in six implant rehabilitations with two years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Mauro; Ausiello, Pietro; Martorelli, Massimo; Sorrentino, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the reliability and accuracy of computer-designed surgical guides in osseointegrated oral implant rehabilitation. Six implant rehabilitations, with a total of 17 implants, were completed with computer-designed surgical guides, performed with the master model developed by muco-compressive and muco-static impressions. In the first case, the surgical guide had exclusively mucosal support, in the second case exclusively dental support. For all six cases computer-aided surgical planning was performed by virtual analyses with 3D models obtained by dental scan DICOM data. The accuracy and stability of implant osseointegration over two years post surgery was then evaluated with clinical and radiographic examinations. Radiographic examination, performed with digital acquisitions (RVG - Radio Video graph) and parallel techniques, allowed two-dimensional feedback with a margin of linear error of 10%. Implant osseointegration was recorded for all the examined rehabilitations. During the clinical and radiographic post-surgical assessments, over the following two years, the peri-implant bone level was found to be stable and without appearance of any complications. The margin of error recorded between pre-operative positions assigned by virtual analysis and the post-surgical digital radiographic observations was as low as 0.2mm. Computer-guided implant surgery can be very effective in oral rehabilitations, providing an opportunity for the surgeon: (a) to avoid the necessity of muco-periosteal detachments and then (b) to perform minimally invasive interventions, whenever appropriate, with a flapless approach. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. IC3 Internet and Computing Core Certification Global Standard 4 study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Rusen, Ciprian Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Hands-on IC3 prep, with expert instruction and loads of tools IC3: Internet and Computing Core Certification Global Standard 4 Study Guide is the ideal all-in-one resource for those preparing to take the exam for the internationally-recognized IT computing fundamentals credential. Designed to help candidates pinpoint weak areas while there's still time to brush up, this book provides one hundred percent coverage of the exam objectives for all three modules of the IC3-GS4 exam. Readers will find clear, concise information, hands-on examples, and self-paced exercises that demonstrate how to per

  11. Computational Modeling for Enhancing Soft Tissue Image Guided Surgery: An Application in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miga, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    With the recent advances in computing, the opportunities to translate computational models to more integrated roles in patient treatment are expanding at an exciting rate. One area of considerable development has been directed towards correcting soft tissue deformation within image guided neurosurgery applications. This review captures the efforts that have been undertaken towards enhancing neuronavigation by the integration of soft tissue biomechanical models, imaging and sensing technologies, and algorithmic developments. In addition, the review speaks to the evolving role of modeling frameworks within surgery and concludes with some future directions beyond neurosurgical applications.

  12. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of lung lesions: an oncology center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: marcosduarte@yahoo.com.b [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz de [Hospital Alianca, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Gross, Jefferson Luiz [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Chest Surgery

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study is aimed at describing the experience of an oncology center with computed tomography guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 97 computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions performed in the period between 1996 and 2004 in a Brazilian reference oncology center (Hospital do Cancer - A.C. Camargo). Information regarding material appropriateness and the specific diagnoses were collected and analyzed. Results: Among 97 lung biopsies, 94 (96.9%) supplied appropriate specimens for histological analyses, with 71 (73.2%) cases being diagnosed as malignant lesions and 23 (23.7%) diagnosed as benign lesions. Specimens were inappropriate for analysis in three cases. The frequency of specific diagnosis was 83 (85.6%) cases, with high rates for both malignant lesions with 63 (88.7%) cases and benign lesions with 20 (86.7%). As regards complications, a total of 12 cases were observed as follows: 7 (7.2%) cases of hematoma, 3 (3.1%) cases of pneumothorax and 2 (2.1%) cases of hemoptysis. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of lung lesions demonstrated high rates of material appropriateness and diagnostic specificity, and low rates of complications in the present study. (author)

  13. Accelerated Testing Of Photothermal Degradation Of Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty Hing; Tsay, Fun-Dow

    1989-01-01

    Electron-spin-resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Arrhenius plots used to determine maximum safe temperature for accelerated testing of photothermal degradation of polymers. Aging accelerated by increasing illumination, temperature, or both. Results of aging tests at temperatures higher than those encountered in normal use valid as long as mechanism of degradation same throughout range of temperatures. Transition between different mechanisms at some temperature identified via transition between activation energies, manifesting itself as change in slope of Arrhenius plot at that temperature.

  14. Software for computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Computer based systems are of increasing importance to safety in nuclear power plants as their use in both new and older plants is rapidly increasing. They are used both in safety related applications, such as some functions of the process control and monitoring systems, as well as in safety critical applications, such as reactor protection or actuation of safety features. The dependability of computer based systems important to safety is therefore of prime interest and should be ensured. With current technology, it is possible in principle to develop computer based instrumentation and control systems for systems important to safety that have the potential for improving the level of safety and reliability with sufficient dependability. However, their dependability can be predicted and demonstrated only if a systematic, fully documented and reviewable engineering process is followed. Although a number of national and international standards dealing with quality assurance for computer based systems important to safety have been or are being prepared, internationally agreed criteria for demonstrating the safety of such systems are not generally available. It is recognized that there may be other ways of providing the necessary safety demonstration than those recommended here. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are provided in the Requirements for Design issued in the IAEA Safety Standards Series.The IAEA has issued a Technical Report to assist Member States in ensuring that computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants are safe and properly licensed. The report provides information on current software engineering practices and, together with relevant standards, forms a technical basis for this Safety Guide. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the collection of evidence and preparation of documentation to be used in the safety demonstration for the software for computer based

  15. Software for computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Computer based systems are of increasing importance to safety in nuclear power plants as their use in both new and older plants is rapidly increasing. They are used both in safety related applications, such as some functions of the process control and monitoring systems, as well as in safety critical applications, such as reactor protection or actuation of safety features. The dependability of computer based systems important to safety is therefore of prime interest and should be ensured. With current technology, it is possible in principle to develop computer based instrumentation and control systems for systems important to safety that have the potential for improving the level of safety and reliability with sufficient dependability. However, their dependability can be predicted and demonstrated only if a systematic, fully documented and reviewable engineering process is followed. Although a number of national and international standards dealing with quality assurance for computer based systems important to safety have been or are being prepared, internationally agreed criteria for demonstrating the safety of such systems are not generally available. It is recognized that there may be other ways of providing the necessary safety demonstration than those recommended here. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are provided in the Requirements for Design issued in the IAEA Safety Standards Series.The IAEA has issued a Technical Report to assist Member States in ensuring that computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants are safe and properly licensed. The report provides information on current software engineering practices and, together with relevant standards, forms a technical basis for this Safety Guide. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the collection of evidence and preparation of documentation to be used in the safety demonstration for the software for computer based

  16. Software for computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Computer based systems are of increasing importance to safety in nuclear power plants as their use in both new and older plants is rapidly increasing. They are used both in safety related applications, such as some functions of the process control and monitoring systems, as well as in safety critical applications, such as reactor protection or actuation of safety features. The dependability of computer based systems important to safety is therefore of prime interest and should be ensured. With current technology, it is possible in principle to develop computer based instrumentation and control systems for systems important to safety that have the potential for improving the level of safety and reliability with sufficient dependability. However, their dependability can be predicted and demonstrated only if a systematic, fully documented and reviewable engineering process is followed. Although a number of national and international standards dealing with quality assurance for computer based systems important to safety have been or are being prepared, internationally agreed criteria for demonstrating the safety of such systems are not generally available. It is recognized that there may be other ways of providing the necessary safety demonstration than those recommended here. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are provided in the Requirements for Design issued in the IAEA Safety Standards Series.The IAEA has issued a Technical Report to assist Member States in ensuring that computer based systems important to safety in nuclear power plants are safe and properly licensed. The report provides information on current software engineering practices and, together with relevant standards, forms a technical basis for this Safety Guide. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the collection of evidence and preparation of documentation to be used in the safety demonstration for the software for computer based

  17. Plasmonic photothermal heating of intraperitoneal tumors through the use of an implanted near-infrared source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Alexander F; Hill, Samuel; Rogers, Gary S; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2013-09-24

    Plasmonic nanomaterials including gold nanorods are effective agents for inducing heating in tumors. Because near-infrared (NIR) light has traditionally been delivered using extracorporeal sources, most applications of plasmonic photothermal therapy have focused on isolated subcutaneous tumors. For more complex models of disease such as advanced ovarian cancer, one of the primary barriers to gold nanorod-based strategies is the adequate delivery of NIR light to tumors located at varying depths within the body. To address this limitation, a series of implanted NIR illumination sources are described for the specific heating of gold nanorod-containing tissues. Through computational modeling and ex vivo studies, a candidate device is identified and validated in a model of orthotopic ovarian cancer. As the therapeutic, imaging, and diagnostic applications of plasmonic nanomaterials progress, effective methods for NIR light delivery to challenging anatomical regions will complement ongoing efforts to advance plasmonic photothermal therapy toward clinical use.

  18. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions: rate of diagnostic success and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Macello Jose Sampaio; Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Chung, Wu Tu; Chojniak, Rubens

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the rates of diagnostic success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions suspected for malignancy. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study including 186 cases of CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of bone lesions in the period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. All the specimens were obtained with 8-10 gauge needles. The following data were collected: demographics, previous history of malignancy, data related to the lesion, to the procedure, and to histological results. Results: Most patients were women (57%), and the mean age was 53.0 ± 16.4 years. In 139 cases (74.6%), there was diagnostic suspicion of metastasis and the most common primary tumors were breast (32.1%) and prostate (11.8%). The bones most commonly involved were spine (36.0%), hip (32.8%) and long bones (18.3%). Complications occurred in only three cases (1.6%) including bone fracture, paraesthesia with functional impairment, and needle breakage requiring surgical removal. The specimens collected from 183 lesions (98.4%) were considered appropriate for diagnosis. Malignant results were more frequently found in patients who had a suspected secondary lesion and history of known malignancy (p < 0.001), and in patients who underwent PET/CT-guided procedures (p = 0.011). Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for the diagnosis of suspicious bone lesions. (author)

  19. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions: rate of diagnostic success and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, Macello Jose Sampaio; Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Chung, Wu Tu; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: macellomaciel@me.com [A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: To determine the rates of diagnostic success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions suspected for malignancy. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study including 186 cases of CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of bone lesions in the period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. All the specimens were obtained with 8-10 gauge needles. The following data were collected: demographics, previous history of malignancy, data related to the lesion, to the procedure, and to histological results. Results: Most patients were women (57%), and the mean age was 53.0 ± 16.4 years. In 139 cases (74.6%), there was diagnostic suspicion of metastasis and the most common primary tumors were breast (32.1%) and prostate (11.8%). The bones most commonly involved were spine (36.0%), hip (32.8%) and long bones (18.3%). Complications occurred in only three cases (1.6%) including bone fracture, paraesthesia with functional impairment, and needle breakage requiring surgical removal. The specimens collected from 183 lesions (98.4%) were considered appropriate for diagnosis. Malignant results were more frequently found in patients who had a suspected secondary lesion and history of known malignancy (p < 0.001), and in patients who underwent PET/CT-guided procedures (p = 0.011). Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for the diagnosis of suspicious bone lesions. (author)

  20. Computed tomographic fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic needle biopsy for diagnosis of pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Takashi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Machida, Suguru; Tominaga, Keigo; Yokoi, Kohei; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic needle biopsy (TTNB) with an 18-gauge automatic biopsy gun for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules. Between March 1996 and January 1998, 50 patients in whom pulmonary lesions could not be diagnosed cytopathologically with fiberoptic bronchoscopy or were not clearly visualized with fluoroscopy underwent CT fluoroscopy-guided TTNB. Final pathological diagnoses were 23 lung carcinomas, five pulmonary metastases and 22 benign lesions. Sufficient tissue for analysis was obtained from 48 of the 50 lesions (96%). The overall diagnostic yield of CT fluoroscopy-guided TTNB was 90%. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for malignancy were 89%, 100% and 94%, respectively. In 20 of the 22 cases (91%) of benign lesions, histological analysis yielded correct and specific diagnoses. Complications occurred in 22 of the 50 cases (44%). The most common complication was pneumothorax, which occurred in 21 of the 50 cases (42%). Chest tube insertion was required in 6 (12%). Although CT fluoroscopy could not decrease the complication rate, CT fluoroscopy-guided TTNB with an automatic biopsy gun appears to be a promising technique for diagnosing pulmonary lesions, particularly benign lesions. (author)

  1. Classifier-guided sampling for discrete variable, discontinuous design space exploration: Convergence and computational performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backlund, Peter B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shahan, David W. [HRL Labs., LLC, Malibu, CA (United States); Seepersad, Carolyn Conner [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-04-22

    A classifier-guided sampling (CGS) method is introduced for solving engineering design optimization problems with discrete and/or continuous variables and continuous and/or discontinuous responses. The method merges concepts from metamodel-guided sampling and population-based optimization algorithms. The CGS method uses a Bayesian network classifier for predicting the performance of new designs based on a set of known observations or training points. Unlike most metamodeling techniques, however, the classifier assigns a categorical class label to a new design, rather than predicting the resulting response in continuous space, and thereby accommodates nondifferentiable and discontinuous functions of discrete or categorical variables. The CGS method uses these classifiers to guide a population-based sampling process towards combinations of discrete and/or continuous variable values with a high probability of yielding preferred performance. Accordingly, the CGS method is appropriate for discrete/discontinuous design problems that are ill-suited for conventional metamodeling techniques and too computationally expensive to be solved by population-based algorithms alone. In addition, the rates of convergence and computational properties of the CGS method are investigated when applied to a set of discrete variable optimization problems. Results show that the CGS method significantly improves the rate of convergence towards known global optima, on average, when compared to genetic algorithms.

  2. Laser speckle imaging based on photothermally driven convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Caitlin; Choi, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is an interferometric technique that provides information about the relative speed of moving scatterers in a sample. Photothermal LSI overcomes limitations in depth resolution faced by conventional LSI by incorporating an excitation pulse to target absorption by hemoglobin within the vascular network. Here we present results from experiments designed to determine the mechanism by which photothermal LSI decreases speckle contrast. We measured the impact of mechanical properties on speckle contrast, as well as the spatiotemporal temperature dynamics and bulk convective motion occurring during photothermal LSI. Our collective data strongly support the hypothesis that photothermal LSI achieves a transient reduction in speckle contrast due to bulk motion associated with thermally driven convection. The ability of photothermal LSI to image structures below a scattering medium may have important preclinical and clinical applications.

  3. Uncommon primary tumors of the orbit diagnosed by computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Amoedo, Mauricio Kauark; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: almirgvb@yahoo.com.br [A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem; Neves, Flavia Branco Cerqueira Serra [Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Oftalmologia

    2014-11-15

    Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective alternative method for evaluating selected intra-orbital lesions where the preoperative diagnosis is important for the therapeutic planning. The authors describe two cases of patients with uncommon primary orbital tumors whose diagnosis was obtained by means of computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy, with emphasis on the technical aspects of the procedure. (author)

  4. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Lung Biopsy: A Valuable Alternative to Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurban, L.A.; Gomersall, L.; Weir, J.; Wade, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy nowadays is the most preferred method of guidance to perform percutaneous lung biopsy of pulmonary masses. Conventional fluoroscopy is an increasingly forgotten technique that still can be used to perform lung biopsies, with many advantages. Purpose: To compare the accuracy, safety, and effective dose (ED) of conventional fluoroscopy-guided needle lung biopsy (FNLB) with CT-guided needle lung biopsy procedures (CTNLB) reported in the literature. Material and Methods: 100 consecutive patients who underwent FNLB were reviewed retrospectively. Using the final histological diagnoses and the clinical and radiological course of the disease as references, the accuracy and sensitivity of FNLB were calculated. The complication rates of FNLB were assessed. Using computer software (XDOSE), the ED was calculated. The accuracy, complication rates, and the ED of FNLB were compared with CTNLB reported in the literature. Results: The overall accuracy rate and sensitivity of FNLB were both 87%, which are comparable to the range of accuracies reported in the literature for CTNLB (74-97%). The complication rates of FNLB were also comparable to the complication rates reported for CTNLB. The commonest complication was pneumothorax, at a rate of 25%. The ED of FNLB was small, significantly lower than reported in the literature for CT-guided procedures. The mean ED of FNLB was 0.029 mSv, which is approximately equivalent to one chest X-ray. Conclusion: Conventional fluoroscopy is an accurate, safe, and low-dose alternative modality to CT to obtain an image-guided histological diagnosis of pulmonary lesions

  5. Calibrating the photo-thermal response of magneto-fluorescent gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Nrusingh C; Ayala-Orzoco, Ciceron; Halas, Naomi J; Joshi, Amit

    2011-01-01

    We report the photothermal response and Near Infrared (NIR) imaging sensitivities of magneto-fluorescent silica core gold nanocomplexes designed for molecular image guided thermal therapy of cancer. Approximately 160 nm Silica core gold nanoshells were designed to provide NIR fluorescent and Magnetic Resonance (MR) contrast by incorporating FDA approved dye indocyanine green (ICG) and iron-oxide within an outer silica epilayer. The imaging and therapeutic sensitivity, and the stability of fluorescence contrast for 12 microliters of suspension (containing approximately 7.9 × 10(8) or 1.3 femtoMole nanoshells) buried at depths of 2-8 mm in tissue mimicking scattering media is reported.

  6. A Guide to Axial-Flow Turbine Off-Design Computer Program AXOD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2014-01-01

    A Users Guide for the axial flow turbine off-design computer program AXOD2 is composed in this paper. This Users Guide is supplementary to the original Users Manual of AXOD. Three notable contributions of AXOD2 to its predecessor AXOD, both in the context of the Guide or in the functionality of the code, are described and discussed in length. These are: 1) a rational representation of the mathematical principles applied, with concise descriptions of the formulas implemented in the actual coding. Their physical implications are addressed; 2) the creation and documentation of an Addendum Listing of input namelist-parameters unique to AXOD2, that differ from or are in addition to the original input-namelists given in the Manual of AXOD. Their usages are discussed; and 3) the institution of proper stoppages of the code execution, encoding termination messaging and error messages of the execution to AXOD2. These measures are to safe-guard the integrity of the code execution, such that a failure mode encountered during a case-study would not plunge the code execution into indefinite loop, or cause a blow-out of the program execution. Details on these are discussed and illustrated in this paper. Moreover, this computer program has since been reconstructed substantially. Standard FORTRAN Langue was instituted, and the code was formatted in Double Precision (REAL*8). As the result, the code is now suited for use in a local Desktop Computer Environment, is perfectly portable to any Operating System, and can be executed by any FORTRAN compiler equivalent to a FORTRAN 9095 compiler. AXOD2 will be available through NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Software Repository.

  7. Guide for licensing evaluations using CRAC2: A computer program for calculating reactor accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.E.; Roussin, R.W.; Gilpin, H.

    1988-12-01

    A version of the CRAC2 computer code applicable for use in analyses of consequences and risks of reactor accidents in case work for environmental statements has been implemented for use on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Data General MV/8000 computer system. Input preparation is facilitated through the use of an interactive computer program which operates on an IBM personal computer. The resulting CRAC2 input deck is transmitted to the MV/8000 by using an error-free file transfer mechanism. To facilitate the use of CRAC2 at NRC, relevant background material on input requirements and model descriptions has been extracted from four reports - ''Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences,'' Version 2, NUREG/CR-2326 (SAND81-1994) and ''CRAC2 Model Descriptions,'' NUREG/CR-2552 (SAND82-0342), ''CRAC Calculations for Accident Sections of Environmental Statements, '' NUREG/CR-2901 (SAND82-1693), and ''Sensitivity and Uncertainty Studies of the CRAC2 Computer Code,'' NUREG/CR-4038 (ORNL-6114). When this background information is combined with instructions on the input processor, this report provides a self-contained guide for preparing CRAC2 input data with a specific orientation toward applications on the MV/8000. 8 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Book Review: Guide to computer forensics and investigations (3rd ed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyu Jiang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Nelson, B., Phillips, A., Enfinger, F., & Steuart, C. (2008. Guide to computer forensics and investigations (3rd ed.. New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc. 693 pages, ISBN: 1-4180-6733-4 (paper.Reviewed by Keyu Jiang (kjiang@fhsu.edu and Ruifeng Xuan (r_xuan@scatcat.fhsu.edu, Department of Information Networking and Telecommunications, Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS 67601Nelson, Phillips, Enfinger, and Steuart’s book is about the science of computer forensics and its implications in crime investigations. This book is not intended to provide comprehensive training in computer forensics, but introduce the science the science of computer forensics and its implications in crime investigations.  It focused on establishing a solid foundation for those who are new to this field.  Nelson, Philips, Enfiger, and Steuart are experienced experts in different areas of computer forensics.  Different expertise makes this book could benefit many groups of people at different educational level and industrial background.(see PDF for full review

  9. Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacture-Derived Needle Guide for Injection of Botulinum Toxin into the Lateral Pterygoid Muscle in Patients with Oromandibular Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin administration into the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle of patients with jaw opening dystonia by using a computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM)-derived needle guide. A total of 17 patients with jaw opening dystonia were enrolled. After the patient's computed tomography (CT) scan was imported and fused with a scan of a plaster cast model of the maxilla, the optimal needle insertion site over the lateral pterygoid muscle was determined using the NobelClinician software. A total of 13 patients were injected both with and without the guide, and 4 patients underwent guided injection alone. The therapeutic effects of botulinum toxin injection and its associated complications were statistically compared between the guided and unguided procedures using paired t test. Botulinum toxin therapy was performed 42 and 32 times with and without the guides, respectively. The needle was easily inserted without any complications in all procedures. There was a significant difference (P < .001) between the mean comprehensive improvements observed with (66.3%) and without (54.4%) the guides. The findings suggest that the use of needle guides during the injection of botulinum toxin into the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle is very useful for aiding the accurate and safe administration of botulinum toxin therapy for jaw opening dystonia.

  10. Analyzing Engineered Nanoparticles using Photothermal Infrared Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Shoko

    . To facilitate occupational safety and health there is a need to develop instruments to monitor and analyze nanoparticles in the industry, research and urban environments. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to develop new sensors that can analyze engineered nanoparticles. Two sensors were studied: (i......) a miniaturized toxicity sensor based on electrochemistry and (ii) a photothermal spectrometer based on tensile-stressed mechanical resonators (string resonators). Miniaturization of toxicity sensor targeting engineered nanoparticles was explored. This concept was based on the results of the biodurability test...

  11. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy investigations of uranium electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, R.E.; Rudnicki, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) has been successfully applied to the study of uranium oxide electrochemistry. A brief description of PDS and preliminary results that demonstrate the technique are presented. Concentration gradients formed at the electrode surface are measured by this technique. The gradients give insight into the reaction mechanisms. There is some evidence of the initiation of non-electrochemical dissolution of the uranium oxide. Optical absorption by the uranium oxide is measured by PDS and the first results indicate that the absorption of the surface does not change during electrochemical experiments. This result is contrary to literature measurements of bulk samples that indicate that the optical absorption should be strongly changing

  12. Numerical study on visualization method for material distribution using photothermal effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moo Joong; Yoo, Jai Suk; Kim, Dong Kwon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Visualization and imaging techniques have become increasingly essential in a wide range of industrial fields. A few imaging methods such as X-ray imaging, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been developed for medical applications to materials that are basically transparent or X-ray penetrable; however, reliable techniques for optically opaque materials such as semiconductors or metallic circuits have not been suggested yet. The photothermal method has been developed mainly for the measurement of thermal properties using characteristics that exhibit photothermal effects depending on the thermal properties of the materials. This study attempts to numerically investigate the feasibility of using photothermal effects to visualize or measure the material distribution of opaque substances. For this purpose, we conducted numerical analyses of various intaglio patterns with approximate sizes of 1.2-6 mm in stainless steel 0.5 mm below copper. In addition, images of the intaglio patterns in stainless steel were reconstructed by two-dimensional numerical scanning. A quantitative comparison of the reconstructed results and the original geometries showed an average difference of 0.172 mm and demonstrated the possibility of application to experimental imaging.

  13. Computer aided virtual manufacturing using Creo parametric easy to learn step by step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Kanife, Paul Obiora

    2016-01-01

    Providing a step-by-step guide for the implementation of virtual manufacturing using Creo Parametric software (formerly known as Pro-Engineer), this book creates an engaging and interactive learning experience for manufacturing engineering students. Featuring graphic illustrations of simulation processes and operations, and written in accessible English to promote user-friendliness, the book covers key topics in the field including: the engraving machining process, face milling, profile milling, surface milling, volume rough milling, expert machining, electric discharge machining (EDM), and area turning using the lathe machining process. Maximising reader insights into how to simulate material removal processes, and how to generate cutter location data and G-codes data, this valuable resource equips undergraduate, postgraduate, BTech and HND students in the fields of manufacturing engineering, computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided engineering (CAE) with transferable skills and knowledge. This book is...

  14. From curve fitting to machine learning an illustrative guide to scientific data analysis and computational intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Zielesny, Achim

    2016-01-01

    This successful book provides in its second edition an interactive and illustrative guide from two-dimensional curve fitting to multidimensional clustering and machine learning with neural networks or support vector machines. Along the way topics like mathematical optimization or evolutionary algorithms are touched. All concepts and ideas are outlined in a clear cut manner with graphically depicted plausibility arguments and a little elementary mathematics. The major topics are extensively outlined with exploratory examples and applications. The primary goal is to be as illustrative as possible without hiding problems and pitfalls but to address them. The character of an illustrative cookbook is complemented with specific sections that address more fundamental questions like the relation between machine learning and human intelligence. All topics are completely demonstrated with the computing platform Mathematica and the Computational Intelligence Packages (CIP), a high-level function library developed with M...

  15. A preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic guided microwave ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Guo-Bao; Xiang, Zhan-Wang; Yang, Bin; Xue, Jing-Bing; Mo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhong, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Fan, Wei-Jun

    2016-05-03

    This study sought to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and safety of a preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic(CT) guided microwave(MW) ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors. This mathematic model was a regular cylinder quantifying appropriate puncture routes from the bottom up. A total of 103 patients with hepatic dome tumors were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups based on whether this model was used or not: Group A (using the model; n = 43) versus Group B (not using the model; n = 60). All tumors were treated by CT-guided MW ablation and follow-up contrast CT were reviewed. The average number of times for successful puncture, average ablation time, and incidence of right shoulder pain were less in Group A than Group B (1.4 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; 8.8 vs. 11.1 minutes, P = 0.003; and 4.7% vs. 20%, P = 0.039). The technical success rate was higher in Group A than Group B (97.7% vs. 85.0%, P = 0.032). There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary and secondary technique efficacy rates (97.7% vs. 88.3%, P = 0.081; 90.0% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.314). No major complications occurred in both groups. The mathematic model of regular cylinder is feasible and safe for CT-guided MW ablation in treating hepatic dome tumors.

  16. Computed tomography fluoroscopy-guided placement of iliosacral screws in patients with unstable posterior pelvic fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Ogawa, Ken-Ichi; Doi, Takeshi; Munetomo, Kazuo; Miyasho, Koji; Hiraki, Takao; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of the computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided placement of iliosacral screws in patients with unstable posterior pelvic fractures. Six patients (four women and two men; mean age 55.8 years; range 35-77 years) with unstable posterior pelvic fractures underwent iliosacral screw placement under CT fluoroscopy guidance between November 2007 and August 2008. Unstable pelvic ring injury (AO types B and C) was the indication for this procedure. In all the six patients except one, CT fluoroscopy-guided placement had been technically successful. In one patient, a second screw had been inserted, with a tilt to the caudal site, and slightly advanced into the extrasacral body; afterward, it could be exchanged safely for a shorter screw. Five patients and one patient underwent placement of two screws and one screw, respectively. The mean duration of the procedure was 15.0 min (range 9-30 min) per screw; the duration was 12.3 min and 18.2 min for the first and second screws, respectively. No complications requiring treatment occurred during or after the procedure. The mean clinical and radiologic follow-up period was 14 months (range 6-21 months). All pelvic injuries had healed satisfactorily, without complication, and all patients are now doing well clinically and can walk. CT fluoroscopy-guided placement of iliosacral screws is a safe and effective treatment in patients with unstable posterior pelvic fractures. (orig.)

  17. Computer Simulation Surgery for Mandibular Reconstruction Using a Fibular Osteotomy Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Shik Jeong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fibular osteotomy guide based on a computer simulation was applied to a patient who had undergone mandibular segmental ostectomy due to oncological complications. This patient was a 68-year-old woman who presented to our department with a biopsy-proven squamous cell carcinoma on her left gingival area. This lesion had destroyed the cortical bony structure, and the patient showed attenuation of her soft tissue along the inferior alveolar nerve, indicating perineural spread of the tumor. Prior to surgery, a three-dimensional computed tomography scan of the facial and fibular bones was performed. We then created a virtual computer simulation of the mandibular segmental defect through which we segmented the fibular to reconstruct the proper angulation in the original mandible. Approximately 2-cm segments were created on the basis of this simulation and applied to the virtually simulated mandibular segmental defect. Thus, we obtained a virtual model of the ideal mandibular reconstruction for this patient with a fibular free flap. We could then use this computer simulation for the subsequent surgery and minimize the bony gaps between the multiple fibular bony segments.

  18. Comparison of the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and medical computed tomography: implications for clinical diagnostics with guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Marcus; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Orentlicher, Gary; Wahl, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and medical-grade CT in the context of evaluating the diagnostic value and accuracy of fiducial marker localization for reference marker-based guided surgery systems. Cadaver mandibles with attached radiopaque gutta-percha markers, as well as glass balls and composite cylinders of known dimensions, were measured manually with a highly accurate digital caliper. The objects were then scanned using a medical-grade CT scanner (Philips Brilliance 64) and five different CBCT scanners (Sirona Galileos, Morita 3D Accuitomo 80, Vatech PaX-Reve3D, 3M Imtech Iluma, and Planmeca ProMax 3D). The data were then imported into commercially available software, and measurements were made of the scanned markers and objects. CT and CBCT measurements were compared to each other and to the caliper measurements. The difference between the CBCT measurements and the caliper measurements was larger than the difference between the CT measurements and the caliper measurements. Measurements of the cadaver mandible and the geometric reference markers were highly accurate with CT. The average absolute errors of the human mandible measurements were 0.03 mm for CT and 0.23 mm for CBCT. The measurement errors of the geometric objects based on CT ranged between 0.00 and 0.12 mm, compared to an error range between 0.00 and 2.17 mm with the CBCT scanners. CT provided the most accurate images in this study, closely followed by one CBCT of the five tested. Although there were differences in the distance measurements of the hard tissue of the human mandible between CT and CBCT, these differences may not be of clinical significance for most diagnostic purposes. The fiducial marker localization error caused by some CBCT scanners may be a problem for guided surgery systems.

  19. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  20. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [UCLA Health System, Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  1. Photothermally activated motion and ignition using aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abboud, Jacques E.; Chong Xinyuan; Zhang Mingjun; Zhang Zhili; Jiang Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) are demonstrated to serve as active photothermal media, to enhance and control local photothermal energy deposition via the photothermal effect activated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and amplified by Al NPs oxidation. The activation source is a 2-AA-battery-powered xenon flash lamp. The extent of the photothermally activated movement of Al NPs can be ∼6 mm. Ignition delay can be ∼0.1 ms. Both scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements of motion-only and after-ignition products confirm significant Al oxidation occurs through sintering and bursting after the flash exposure. Simulations suggest local heat generation is enhanced by LSPR. The positive-feedback effects from the local heat generation amplified by Al oxidation produce a large increase in local temperature and pressure, which enhances movement and accelerates ignition.

  2. Photothermal lesions in soft tissue induced by optical fiber microheaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Domínguez, Reinher; Moreno-Álvarez, Paola; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Chavarría, Anahí; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Photothermal therapy has shown to be a promising technique for local treatment of tumors. However, the main challenge for this technique is the availability of localized heat sources to minimize thermal damage in the surrounding healthy tissue. In this work, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber microheaters for inducing thermal lesions in soft tissue. The proposed devices incorporate carbon nanotubes or gold nanolayers on the tips of optical fibers for enhanced photothermal effects and heating of ex vivo biological tissues. We report preliminary results of small size photothermal lesions induced on mice liver tissues. The morphology of the resulting lesions shows that optical fiber microheaters may render useful for delivering highly localized heat for photothermal therapy.

  3. Computed Tomographic Window Setting for Bronchial Measurement to Guide Double-Lumen Tube Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Hwa; Bae, Jinyoung; Paik, Hyesun; Koo, Chang-Hoon; Bahk, Jae-Hyon

    2018-04-01

    The bronchial diameter measured on computed tomography (CT) can be used to guide double-lumen tube (DLT) sizes objectively. The bronchus is known to be measured most accurately in the so-called bronchial CT window. The authors investigated whether using the bronchial window results in the selection of more appropriately sized DLTs than using the other windows. CT image analysis and prospective randomized study. Tertiary hospital. Adults receiving left-sided DLTs. The authors simulated selection of DLT sizes based on the left bronchial diameters measured in the lung (width 1,500 Hounsfield unit [HU] and level -700 HU), bronchial (1,000 HU and -450 HU), and mediastinal (400 HU and 25 HU) CT windows. Furthermore, patients were randomly assigned to undergo imaging with either the bronchial or mediastinal window to guide DLT sizes. Using the underwater seal technique, the authors assessed whether the DLT was appropriately sized, undersized, or oversized for the patient. On 130 CT images, the bronchial diameter (9.9 ± 1.2 mm v 10.5 ± 1.3 mm v 11.7 ± 1.3 mm) and the selected DLT size were different in the lung, bronchial, and mediastinal windows, respectively (p study, oversized tubes were chosen less frequently in the bronchial window than in the mediastinal window (6/110 v 23/111; risk ratio 0.38; 95% CI 0.19-0.79; p = 0.003). No tubes were undersized after measurements in these two windows. The bronchial measurement in the bronchial window guided more appropriately sized DLTs compared with the lung or mediastinal windows. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Computed tomography guided needle biopsy: experience from 1,300 procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Isberner, Rony Klaus; Viana, Luciana Marinho; Yu, Liao Shin; Aita, Alessandro Amorim; Soares, Fernando Augusto [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia e Patologia

    2006-01-15

    Context and objective: computed tomography (CT) guided biopsy is widely accepted as effective and safe for diagnosis in many settings. Accuracy depends on target organ and needle type. Cutting needles present advantages over fine needles. This study presents experience from CT guided biopsies performed at an oncology center. Design and setting: retrospective study at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo.Methods: 1,300 consecutive CT guided biopsies performed between July 1994 and February 2000 were analyzed. Nodules or masses were suspected as primary malignancy in 845 cases (65%) or metastatic lesion in 455 (35%). 628 lesions were thoracic, 281 abdominal, 208 retroperitoneal, 134 musculoskeletal and 49 head/neck. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist or under his supervision: 765 (59%) with 22-gauge fine-needle/aspiration technique and 535 (41%) with automated 16 or 18-gauge cutting-needle biopsy. Results: adequate samples were obtained in 70-92% of fine-needle and 93-100% of cutting-needle biopsies. The specific diagnosis rates were 54-67% for fine-needle and 82-100% for cutting-needle biopsies, according to biopsy site. For any site, sample adequacy and specific diagnosis rate were always better for cutting-needle biopsy. Among 530 lung biopsies, there were 84 pneumothorax (16%) and two hemothorax (0.3%) cases, with thoracic drainage in 24 (4.9%). Among abdominal and retroperitoneal biopsies, there were two cases of major bleeding and one of peritonitis. Conclusion: both types of needle showed satisfactory results, but cutting-needle biopsy should be used when specific diagnosis is desired without greater incidence of complications. (author)

  5. Requirements about the photothermal quotient use for yield explanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleury, A.; Leterme, P.

    1987-01-01

    Climatic analysis of growth and development gives to photothermal quotient a large diagnosis value. Its use for the interpretation of rapeseed data shows its relevance but also its limits. By the analysis of Geslin's data it was possible to find again the photothermal quotient, corrected by a coefficient depending on temperature and radiation. Applied to rapeseed data, a similar correction proved to be essential to treat the situations with low temperature (near growth and development zero)

  6. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous catheter drainage of primary and secondary iliopsoas abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantasdemir, M.; Kara, B.; Cebi, D.; Selcuk, N.D.; Numan, F.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) of iliopsoas abscesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-two iliopsoas abscesses in 21 patients (11 women, 10 men) aged between 18 and 66 years (mean 36 years) were treated with PCD. Abdominal CT demonstrated the iliopsoas abscesses, which were definitively determined by Gram staining and aspirate cultures. Twenty of the 22 iliopsoas abscesses were primary and two were secondary. All PCD procedures were performed under local anaesthesia using a single-step trocar technique (n=19) or Seldinger technique (n=3). RESULTS: PCD was an effective treatment in 21 out of the 22 iliopsoas abscesses. Recurrence was seen in three abscesses as minimal residual collections. Two of them resolved spontaneously with anti-tuberculous regimen. One required percutaneous needle aspiration. The procedure failed in a diabetic patient with a secondary abscess, who died due to sepsis. The length of time that catheters remained in place ranged from 21 to 75 days (mean 59.7 days). Complications included catheter dislocation in four abscesses, which required removal of dislocated catheters and indwelling new ones. CONCLUSION: CT-guided PCD is a safe and effective front-line treatment of iliopsoas abscesses. Surgery should be reserved for failure of PCD and presence of contraindications to PCD

  7. Computer tomography urography assisted real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy on renal calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, You-Qiang; Wu, Jie-Ying; Li, Teng-Cheng; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Liang, Guan-Can; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Hong, Xiao-Bin; Cai, Wei-Zhong; Zang, Zhi-Jun; Di, Jin-Ming

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of pre-designed route on computer tomography urography (CTU) in the ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus.From August 2013 to May 2016, a total of 100 patients diagnosed with complex renal calculus in our hospital were randomly divided into CTU group and control group (without CTU assistance). CTU was used to design a rational route for puncturing in CTU group. Ultrasound was used in both groups to establish a working trace in the operation areas. Patients' perioperative parameters and postoperative complications were recorded.All operations were successfully performed, without transferring to open surgery. Time of channel establishment in CTU group (6.5 ± 4.3 minutes) was shorter than the control group (10.0 ± 6.7 minutes) (P = .002). In addition, there was shorter operation time, lower rates of blood transfusion, secondary operation, and less establishing channels. The incidence of postoperative complications including residual stones, sepsis, severe hemorrhage, and perirenal hematoma was lower in CTU group than in control group.Pre-designing puncture route on CTU images would improve the puncturing accuracy, lessen establishing channels as well as improve the security in the ultrasound-guided PCNL for complex renal calculus, but at the cost of increased radiation exposure.

  8. Efficacy of computed tomography guided radiofrequency ablation forosteoid osteomas in 31 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Eu Gene; Oh, Joo Han; Cho, Hwan Seong; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To present the clinical outcome of computed tomography (CT) guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for osteoid osteoma. Thirty-one patients (M:F = 23:8, mean age: 20 years, range: 4-54 years) who underwent RFA for clinically suspected osteoid osteoma from May 2004 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. RFA was done in all cases under CT guidance by one of three radiologists in our department. Electronic medical records and images were retrospectively reviewed in all patients. Lesions were located in femur (n = 20), tibia (n = 5), fibula (n = 2), humerus (n = 3), talus (n = 2), and calcaneus (n = 1). On discharge, 27 of 33 cases showed complete remission of pain (82%). One major complication (compartment syndrome) and 2 minor complications (reactive synovitis, minimal skin burn at electrode insertion site) were observed. On the last follow-up (0-78 months, mean: 12.6 months) 27 of 33 cases were successfully treated (82%) and had no more complaints. 3 cases presented remaining pain (9%). In 3 cases relapse occurred (9%) and RFA was repeated in 1 case. The repeated treatment was successful. CT-guided RFA is an effective method for the treatment of osteoid osteoma.

  9. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  10. Computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of lung lesions in fourteen cats and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Mori, T.; Yamada, M.; Sakaida, M.; Yonemaru, K.; Murakami, M.; Sakai, H.; Maruo, K.

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided fine-needle aspirates (FNA) or core biopsies of lung lesions were performed in nine dogs and five cats. A clinical diagnosis was obtained in twelve of fourteen animals (85%), namely 80% FNA and 100% core biopsies. Eight animals had other mass (es) apart from the lung, and five were diagnosed to metastases. In only one case, the lung mass was histopathologically diagnosed as a malignant primary tumor. Iatrogenic complications through the lung biopsies were noted in four animals, and three showed mild pneumothorax on CT images and one was bleeding from the needle. However, between fifteen and thirty minutes after the biopsy, no animal indicated signs of pneumothorax or hemorrhage

  11. Development of a theory-guided pan-European computer-assisted safer sex intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöstlinger, Christiana; Borms, Ruth; Dec-Pietrowska, Joanna; Dias, Sonia; Rojas, Daniela; Platteau, Tom; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-12-01

    HIV is a growing public health problem in Europe, with men-having-sex-with-men and migrants from endemic regions as the most affected key populations. More evidence on effective behavioral interventions to reduce sexual risk is needed. This article describes the systematic development of a theory-guided computer-assisted safer sex intervention, aiming at supporting people living with HIV in sexual risk reduction. We applied the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol to develop this counseling intervention in the framework of a European multicenter study. We conducted a needs assessment guided by the information-motivation-behavioral (IMB) skills model, formulated change objectives and selected theory-based methods and practical strategies, i.e. interactive computer-assisted modules as supporting tools for provider-delivered counseling. Theoretical foundations were the IMB skills model, social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model, complemented by dual process models of affective decision making to account for the specifics of sexual behavior. The counseling approach for delivering three individual sessions was tailored to participants' needs and contexts, adopting elements of motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavioral therapy. We implemented and evaluated the intervention using a randomized controlled trial combined with a process evaluation. IM provided a useful framework for developing a coherent intervention for heterogeneous target groups, which was feasible and effective across the culturally diverse settings. This article responds to the need for transparent descriptions of the development and content of evidence-based behavior change interventions as potential pillars of effective combination prevention strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Sedlmair, Martin; Ritter, Christine; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 × 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner’s isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at ≥150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r 2 = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

  13. First-in-Man Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Revascularization of Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion Using a Wearable Computer: Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolski, Maksymilian P; Debski, Artur; Borucki, Bartosz A; Szpak, Marcin; Staruch, Adam D; Kepka, Cezary; Witkowski, Adam

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of successful computed tomography-guided percutaneous revascularization of a chronically occluded right coronary artery using a wearable, hands-free computer with a head-mounted display worn by interventional cardiologists in the catheterization laboratory. The projection of 3-dimensional computed tomographic reconstructions onto the screen of virtual reality glass allowed the operators to clearly visualize the distal coronary vessel, and verify the direction of the guide wire advancement relative to the course of the occluded vessel segment. This case provides proof of concept that wearable computers can improve operator comfort and procedure efficiency in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. EnCE EnCase computer forensics : the official EnCase certified examiner : study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Bunting, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The official, Guidance Software-approved book on the newest EnCE exam! The EnCE exam tests that computer forensic analysts and examiners have thoroughly mastered computer investigation methodologies, as well as the use of Guidance Software's EnCase Forensic 7. The only official Guidance-endorsed study guide on the topic, this book prepares you for the exam with extensive coverage of all exam topics, real-world scenarios, hands-on exercises, up-to-date legal information, and sample evidence files, flashcards, and more. Guides readers through preparation for the newest EnCase Certified Examiner

  15. Photothermal and biodegradable polyaniline/porous silicon hybrid nanocomposites as drug carriers for combined chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Wang, Bin; Shi, Jisen; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Zhenyu; Li, Jiachen

    2017-03-15

    To develop photothermal and biodegradable nanocarriers for combined chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer, polyaniline/porous silicon hybrid nanocomposites had been successfully fabricated via surface initiated polymerization of aniline onto porous silicon nanoparticles in our experiments. As-prepared polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites could be well dispersed in aqueous solution without any extra hydrophilic surface coatings, and showed a robust photothermal effect under near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. Especially, after an intravenous injection into mice, these biodegradable porous silicon-based nanocomposites as non-toxic agents could be completely cleared in body. Moreover, these polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites as drug carriers also exhibited an efficient loading and dual pH/NIR light-triggered release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a model anticancer drug). Most importantly, assisted with NIR laser irradiation, polyaniline/PSiNPs nanocomposites with loading DOX showed a remarkable synergistic anticancer effect combining chemotherapy with photothermal therapy, whether in vitro or in vivo. Therefore, based on biodegradable PSiNPs-based nanocomposites, this combination approach of chemo-photothermal therapy would have enormous potential on clinical cancer treatments in the future. Considering the non-biodegradable nature and potential long-term toxicity concerns of photothermal nanoagents, it is of great interest and importance to develop biodegradable and photothermal nanoparticles with an excellent biocompatibility for their future clinical applications. In our experiments, we fabricated porous silicon-based hybrid nanocomposites via surface initiated polymerization of aniline, which showed an excellent photothermal effect, aqueous dispersibility, biodegradability and biocompatibility. Furthermore, after an efficient loading of DOX molecules, polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites exhibited the remarkable synergistic anticancer

  16. Guided Endodontic Access in Maxillary Molars Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Computer-aided Design/Computer-aided Manufacturing System: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Mendes, Sônia T de O; Barbosa, Camila de Freitas M; Santa-Rosa, Caroline C; Machado, Vinícius C

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a guided endodontic technique that facilitates access to root canals of molars presenting with pulp calcifications. A 61-year-old woman presented to our service with pain in the upper left molar region. The second and third left molars showed signs of apical periodontitis confirmed by the cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans brought to us by the patient at the initial appointment. Conventional endodontic treatment was discontinued given the difficulty in locating the root canals. Intraoral scanning and the CBCT scans were used to plan the access to the calcified canals by means of implant planning software. Guides were fabricated through rapid prototyping and allowed for the correct orientation of a cylindrical drill used to provide access through the calcifications. Second to that, the root canals were prepared with reciprocating endodontic instruments and rested for 2 weeks with intracanal medication. Subsequently, canals were packed with gutta-percha cones using the hydraulic compression technique. Permanent restorations of the access cavities were performed. By comparing the tomographic images, the authors observed a drastic reduction of the periapical lesions as well as the absence of pain symptoms after 3 months. This condition was maintained at the 1-year follow-up. The guided endodontic technique in maxillary molars was shown to be a fast, safe, and predictable therapy and can be regarded as an excellent option for the location of calcified root canals, avoiding failures in complex cases. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computed Tomography Number Changes Observed During Computed Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Mei; Yang, Cungeng; Chen, Xiaojian; Xu, Shouping; Moraru, Ion; Lang, Jinyi; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate CT number (CTN) changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ at risk (OAR) according to daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography scans acquired using a CT-on-rails during daily CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for 15 patients with stage II to IVa squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were analyzed. The GTV, parotid glands, spinal cord, and nonspecified tissue were generated on each selected daily CT. The changes in CTN distributions and the mean and mode values were collected. Pearson analysis was used to assess the correlation between the CTN change, organ volume reduction, and delivered radiation dose. Results: Volume and CTN changes for GTV and parotid glands can be observed during radiation therapy delivery for HNC. The mean (±SD) CTNs in GTV and ipsi- and contralateral parotid glands were reduced by 6 ± 10, 8 ± 7, and 11 ± 10 Hounsfield units, respectively, for all patients studied. The mean CTN changes in both spinal cord and nonspecified tissue were almost invisible (<2 Hounsfield units). For 2 patients studied, the absolute mean CTN changes in GTV and parotid glands were strongly correlated with the dose delivered (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). For the correlation between CTN reductions and delivered isodose bins for parotid glands, the Pearson coefficient varied from −0.98 (P<.001) in regions with low-dose bins to 0.96 (P<.001) in high-dose bins and were patient specific. Conclusions: The CTN can be reduced in tumor and parotid glands during the course of radiation therapy for HNC. There was a fair correlation between CTN reduction and radiation doses for a subset of patients, whereas the correlation between CTN reductions and volume reductions in GTV and parotid glands were weak. More studies are needed to understand the mechanism for the radiation-induced CTN changes

  18. Secondary Maxillary and Orbital Floor Reconstruction With a Free Scapular Flap Using Cutting and Fixation Guides Created by Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Daiki; Numajiri, Toshiaki; Tsujiko, Shoko; Nakamura, Hiroko; Yamochi, Ryo; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Yasuda, Makoto; Hirano, Shigeru

    2017-11-01

    Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) guides are now widely used in maxillofacial reconstruction. However, there are few reports of CAD/CAM guides being used for scapular flaps. The authors performed the secondary maxillary and orbital floor reconstruction using a free latissimus dorsi muscle, cutaneous tissue, and scapular flap designed using CAD/CAM techniques in a 72-year-old man who had undergone partial maxillectomy four years previously. The patient had diplopia, the vertical dystopia of eye position, and a large oral-nasal-cutaneous fistula. After the operation, the authors confirmed that the deviation between the postoperative and preoperative planning three-dimensional images was less than 2 mm. Because scapular guides require 3 cutting surfaces, the shape of the scapular guide is more complex than that of a conventional fibular guide. In orbital floor reconstruction, the use of a CAM technique such as that used to manufacture the authors' fixation guide is as necessary for accurate, safe, and easy reconstruction as is preoperative CAD planning. The production of a fixation guide as well as a cutting guide is particularly useful because it is difficult to determine the angle for reconstructing the orbital floor by freehand techniques. In this case, the orbital floor was reconstructed based on a mirror image of the healthy side to avoid overcompression of the orbital tissue. Although the patient's vertical dystopia of eye position was improved, diplopia was not improved because, for greater safety, the authors did not plan overcorrection of the orbital volume.

  19. Test and control computer user's guide for a digital beam former test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexovich, Robert E.; Mallasch, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A Digital Beam Former Test System was developed to determine the effects of noise, interferers and distortions, and digital implementations of beam forming as applied to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite 2 (TDRS 2) architectures. The investigation of digital beam forming with application to TDRS 2 architectures, as described in TDRS 2 advanced concept design studies, was conducted by the NASA/Lewis Research Center for NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. A Test and Control Computer (TCC) was used as the main controlling element of the digital Beam Former Test System. The Test and Control Computer User's Guide for a Digital Beam Former Test System provides an organized description of the Digital Beam Former Test System commands. It is written for users who wish to conduct tests of the Digital Beam forming Test processor using the TCC. The document describes the function, use, and syntax of the TCC commands available to the user while summarizing and demonstrating the use of the commands wtihin DOS batch files.

  20. Prior image constrained scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen; Nett, Brian E; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-02-21

    X-ray scatter is a significant problem in cone-beam computed tomography when thicker objects and larger cone angles are used, as scattered radiation can lead to reduced contrast and CT number inaccuracy. Advances have been made in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by incorporating a high quality prior image into the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we extend this idea to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT image-guided radiation therapy. Specifically, this paper presents a new scatter correction algorithm which uses a prior image with low scatter artifacts to reduce shading artifacts in cone-beam CT images acquired under conditions of high scatter. The proposed correction algorithm begins with an empirical hypothesis that the target image can be written as a weighted summation of a series of basis images that are generated by raising the raw cone-beam projection data to different powers, and then, reconstructing using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The weight for each basis image is calculated by minimizing the difference between the target image and the prior image. The performance of the scatter correction algorithm is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated through phantom studies using a Varian 2100 EX System with an on-board imager. Results show that the proposed scatter correction algorithm using a prior image with low scatter artifacts can substantially mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in both full-fan and half-fan modes.

  1. Computer-guided facility for the study of single crystals at the gamma diffractometer GADI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heer, H.; Bleichert, H.; Gruhn, W.; Moeller, R.

    1984-10-01

    In the study of solid-state properties it is in many cases necessary to work with single crystals. The increased requirement in the industry and research as well as the desire for better characterization by means of γ-diffractometry made it necessary to improve and to modernize the existing instrument. The advantages of a computer-guided facility against the conventional, semiautomatic operation are manifold. Not only the process guidance, but also the data acquisition and evaluation are performed by the computer. By a remote control the operator is able to find quickly a reflex and to drive the crystal in every desired measuring position. The complete protocollation of all important measuring parameters, the convenient data storage, as well as the automatic evaluation are much useful for the user. Finally the measuring time can be increased to practically 24 hours per day. By this the versed characterization by means of γ-diffractometry is put on a completely new level. (orig.) [de

  2. A guide for the selection of computer assisted mapping (CAM) and facilities informations systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslin, S.; Baxter, P.; Jarvis, L.

    1980-12-01

    Many distribution engineers are now aware that computer assisted mapping (CAM) and facilities informations systems are probably the most significant breakthrough to date in computer applications for distribution engineering. The Canadian Electrical Asociation (CEA) recognized this and requested engineers of B.C. Hydro make a study of the state of the art in Canadian utilities and the progress of CAM systems on an international basis. The purpose was to provide a guide to assist Canadian utility distribution engineers faced with the problem of studying the application of CAM systems as an alternative to present methods, consideration being given to the long-term and other benefits that were perhaps not apparent for those approaching this field for the first time. It soon became apparent that technology was developing at a high rate and competition in the market was very strong. Also a number of publications were produced by other sources which adequately covered the scope of this study. This report is thus a collection of references to reports, manuals, and other documents with a few considerations provided for those companies interested in exploring further the use of interactive graphics. 24 refs.

  3. Commentary: Photothermal effects of laser tissue soldering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menovsky, T.; Beek, J.F.; Gemert, M.J.C. van

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Laser tissue welding is the process of using laser energy to join tissues without sutures or with a reduced number of sutures. Recently, diode lasers have been added to the list of fusion lasers (Lewis and Uribe 1993, Reali et al 1993). Typically, for tissue welding, deep penetrating diode lasers emitting at 800-810 nm are used, in combination with a strong absorbing protein solder containing the dye indocyanine green. Indocyanine green has a maximum absorption coefficient at 805 nm and binds preferentially with proteins (Sauda et al 1986). The greatest advantage of diode lasers is their compact size, easy use and low cost. In this issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology (pp 983-1002, 'Photothermal effects of laser tissue soldering'), in an in vitro study, McNally et al investigate the optimal laser settings and welding temperatures in relation to the tensile strength and thermal damage of bovine aorta specimens. An interesting statement in their introduction is that the low strength of laser produced anastomoses can lead to aneurysm formation. The increased chance of aneurysm formation may merely be due to the thermal effect of the laser on the vascular wall, especially on the adventitia and media layers, which become necrotic after thermal injury. Subsequent haemodynamic stress exerted on a damaged vascular wall is a significant contributing factor for aneurysmal initiation. Also interesting is the remark that 'by the application of wavelength-specific chromophores in tissue welding ... the requirement for precise focusing and aiming of the laser beam may be removed'. Though perhaps not yet fully justified, this statement, if true, would facilitate surgical procedures. While the experiments are conducted in a proper manner, the use of bovine aorta specimens, which were stored at -70 deg. C and subsequently thawed for the tissue welding experiments, may not be the most appropriate for studying tissue effects or tensile strength measurements, as the

  4. Enhancing Next-Generation Sequencing-Guided Cancer Care Through Cognitive Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirali M; Michelini, Vanessa V; Snell, Jeff M; Balu, Saianand; Hoyle, Alan P; Parker, Joel S; Hayward, Michele C; Eberhard, David A; Salazar, Ashley H; McNeillie, Patrick; Xu, Jia; Huettner, Claudia S; Koyama, Takahiko; Utro, Filippo; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Norel, Raquel; Bilal, Erhan; Royyuru, Ajay; Parida, Laxmi; Earp, H Shelton; Grilley-Olson, Juneko E; Hayes, D Neil; Harvey, Stephen J; Sharpless, Norman E; Kim, William Y

    2018-02-01

    Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to guide cancer therapy has created challenges in analyzing and reporting large volumes of genomic data to patients and caregivers. Specifically, providing current, accurate information on newly approved therapies and open clinical trials requires considerable manual curation performed mainly by human "molecular tumor boards" (MTBs). The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of cognitive computing as performed by Watson for Genomics (WfG) compared with a human MTB. One thousand eighteen patient cases that previously underwent targeted exon sequencing at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and subsequent analysis by the UNCseq informatics pipeline and the UNC MTB between November 7, 2011, and May 12, 2015, were analyzed with WfG, a cognitive computing technology for genomic analysis. Using a WfG-curated actionable gene list, we identified additional genomic events of potential significance (not discovered by traditional MTB curation) in 323 (32%) patients. The majority of these additional genomic events were considered actionable based upon their ability to qualify patients for biomarker-selected clinical trials. Indeed, the opening of a relevant clinical trial within 1 month prior to WfG analysis provided the rationale for identification of a new actionable event in nearly a quarter of the 323 patients. This automated analysis took potentially improve patient care by providing a rapid, comprehensive approach for data analysis and consideration of up-to-date availability of clinical trials. The results of this study demonstrate that the interpretation and actionability of somatic next-generation sequencing results are evolving too rapidly to rely solely on human curation. Molecular tumor boards empowered by cognitive computing can significantly improve patient care by providing a fast, cost-effective, and comprehensive approach for data analysis in the delivery of precision medicine. Patients and physicians who

  5. Year 2000 (Y2K) computer compliance guide; guidance for FDA personnel. Food and Drug Administration. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a new compliance policy guide (CPG) entitled "Year 2000 (Y2K) Computer Compliance" (section 160-800). This guidance document represents the agency's current thinking on the manufacturing and distribution of domestic and imported products regulated by FDA using computer systems that may not perform properly before, or during, the transition to the year 2000 (Y2K). The text of the CPG is included in this notice. This compliance guidance document is an update to the Compliance Policy Guides Manual (August 1996 edition). It is a new CPG, and it will be included in the next printing of the Compliance Policy Guides Manual. This CPG is intended for FDA personnel, and it is available electronically to the public.

  6. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Liver Cancer Using Respiratory-Correlated Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Mueller, Gerd; Sauer, Otto; Flentje, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) technique in stereotactic body RT for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 13 intrahepatic tumors, a respiratory-correlated 4D computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired at treatment planning. The target was defined using CT series reconstructed at end-inhalation and end-exhalation. The liver was delineated on these two CT series and served as a reference for image guidance. A cone-beam CT scan was acquired after patient positioning; the blurred diaphragm dome was interpreted as a probability density function showing the motion range of the liver. Manual contour matching of the liver structures from the planning 4D CT scan with the cone-beam CT scan was performed. Inter- and intrafractional uncertainties of target position and motion range were evaluated, and interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was tested. Results: The workflow of 4D-IGRT was successfully practiced in all patients. The absolute error in the liver position and error in relation to the bony anatomy was 8 ± 4 mm and 5 ± 2 mm (three-dimensional vector), respectively. Margins of 4-6 mm were calculated for compensation of the intrafractional drifts of the liver. The motion range of the diaphragm dome was reproducible within 5 mm for 11 of 13 lesions, and the interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was small (standard deviation, 1.5 mm). In 4 patients, the position of the intrahepatic lesion was directly verified using a mobile in-room CT scanner after application of intravenous contrast. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D image guidance using liver contour matching between respiratory-correlated CT and cone-beam CT scans increased the accuracy compared with stereotactic positioning and compared with IGRT without consideration of breathing motion

  7. PREDICTING ATTENUATION OF VIRUSES DURING PERCOLATION IN SOILS: 2. USER'S GUIDE TO THE VIRULO 1.0 COMPUTER MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the EPA document Predicting Attenuation of Viruses During Percolation in Soils 1. Probabilistic Model the conceptual, theoretical, and mathematical foundations for a predictive screening model were presented. In this current volume we present a User's Guide for the computer mo...

  8. USER'S GUIDE TO THE PERSONAL COMPUTER VERSION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (PC-BEIS2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document is a user's guide for an updated Personal Computer version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS2), allowing users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and soil nitrogen oxide emissions for any county in the contig...

  9. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic bloc...

  10. The using of megavoltage computed tomography in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Janla-or, Suwapim; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Supawongwattana, Bongkot; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Division of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan M. [Faculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrecht University (Campus Kiel), Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    We present a case of cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. In radiation therapy part, the combination of the whole pelvic helical tomotherapy plus image-guided brachytherapy with megavoltage computed tomography of helical tomotherapy was performed. We propose this therapeutic approach could be considered in a curative setting in some problematic situation as our institution.

  11. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  12. Feasibility and impact of a computer-guided consultation on guideline-based management of COPD in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Robert M; Thompson, Elizabeth B; Davies, Lisa; Trusdale, Ann; Hodgson, Chris; McKnight, Eddie; Davies, Andrew; Pearson, Mike G

    2012-12-01

    Applying guidelines is a universal challenge that is often not met. Intelligent software systems that facilitate real-time management during a clinical interaction may offer a solution. To determine if the use of a computer-guided consultation that facilitates the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence-based chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) guidance and prompts clinical decision-making is feasible in primary care and to assess its impact on diagnosis and management in reviews of COPD patients. Practice nurses, one-third of whom had no specific respiratory training, undertook a computer-guided review in the usual consulting room setting using a laptop computer with the screen visible to them and to the patient. A total of 293 patients (mean (SD) age 69.7 (10.1) years, 163 (55.6%) male) with a diagnosis of COPD were randomly selected from GP databases in 16 practices and assessed. Of 236 patients who had spirometry, 45 (19%) did not have airflow obstruction and the guided clinical history changed the primary diagnosis from COPD in a further 24 patients. In the 191 patients with confirmed COPD, the consultations prompted management changes including 169 recommendations for altered prescribing of inhalers (addition or discontinuation, inhaler dose or device). In addition, 47% of the 55 current smokers were referred for smoking cessation support, 12 (6%) for oxygen assessment, and 47 (24%) for pulmonary rehabilitation. Computer-guided consultations are practicable in general practice. Primary care COPD databases were confirmed to contain a significant proportion of incorrectly assigned patients. They resulted in interventions and the rationalisation of prescribing in line with recommendations. Only in 22 (12%) of those fully assessed was no management change suggested. The introduction of a computer-guided consultation offers the prospect of comprehensive guideline quality management.

  13. Computed-tomography-guided anatomic standardization for quantitative assessment of dopamine transporter SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Kota [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Integrative Brain Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan); Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Integrative Brain Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan); Sumida, Kaoru; Sone, Daichi; Kimura, Yukio; Sato, Noriko [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Mukai, Youhei; Murata, Miho [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    For the quantitative assessment of dopamine transporter (DAT) using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (DaTscan), anatomic standardization is preferable for achieving objective and user-independent quantification of striatal binding using a volume-of-interest (VOI) template. However, low accumulation of DAT in Parkinson's disease (PD) would lead to a deformation error when using a DaTscan-specific template without any structural information. To avoid this deformation error, we applied computed tomography (CT) data obtained using SPECT/CT equipment to anatomic standardization. We retrospectively analyzed DaTscan images of 130 patients with parkinsonian syndromes (PS), including 80 PD and 50 non-PD patients. First we segmented gray matter from CT images using statistical parametric mapping 12 (SPM12). These gray-matter images were then anatomically standardized using the diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm. Next, DaTscan images were warped with the same parameters used in the CT anatomic standardization. The target striatal VOIs for decreased DAT in PD were generated from the SPM12 group comparison of 20 DaTscan images from each group. We applied these VOIs to DaTscan images of the remaining patients in both groups and calculated the specific binding ratios (SBRs) using nonspecific counts in a reference area. In terms of the differential diagnosis of PD and non-PD groups using SBR, we compared the present method with two other methods, DaTQUANT and DaTView, which have already been released as software programs for the quantitative assessment of DaTscan images. The SPM12 group comparison showed a significant DAT decrease in PD patients in the bilateral whole striatum. Of the three methods assessed, the present CT-guided method showed the greatest power for discriminating PD and non-PD groups, as it completely separated the two groups. CT-guided anatomic standardization using

  14. Simple D-A-D Structural Bisbithiophenyl Diketopyrrolopyrrole (TDPP) as Efficient Bioimaging and Photothermal Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shan; Wang, Xin; Lin, Wenhai; Liu, Shi; Zhang, Wei

    2018-06-20

    Design and synthesis of biocompatible and multi-functional photothermal agents is crucial for effective cancer phototherapy. In order to achieve this ambition, simple D-A-D structural bisbithiophenyl diketopyrrolopyrrole (TDPP) was fabricated. In this molecule, the donor, 2-thiophenylboric acid, was conjugated via Suzuki coupling reaction, which could expand the emission wavelength to the red region of the spectrum. TDPP could self-assemble into stable and uniform nanoparticles (TDPP NPs) in the assistant of amphiphilic Pluronic F-127 polymer. Exposing the TDPP NPs (100 µg/mL) aqueous dispersion to 638 nm (0.61 W/cm2) laser irradiation resulted in a temperature elevation of approximately 30 oC within 5 min, which is high enough for inducing the cytotoxicity and tumor inhibition. Because of the bathochromic shift absorption of TDPP NPs in water, TDPP NPs could also act as a contrast agent for near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) to visualize the drug distribution in vivo. Coupled with the infrared thermal imaging properties of the photothermal agent, TDPP NPs were proved to be a multifunctional theranostic agent for dual-modal imaging-guided phototherapy.

  15. Surgical positioning of orthodontic mini-implants with guides fabricated on models replicated with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Hun; Choi, Yong-Suk; Hwang, Eui-Hwan; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Nelson, Gerald

    2007-04-01

    This article illustrates a new surgical guide system that uses cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to replicate dental models; surgical guides for the proper positioning of orthodontic mini-implants were fabricated on the replicas, and the guides were used for precise placement. The indications, efficacy, and possible complications of this method are discussed. Patients who were planning to have orthodontic mini-implant treatment were recruited for this study. A CBCT system (PSR 9000N, Asahi Roentgen, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire virtual slices of the posterior maxilla that were 0.1 to 0.15 mm thick. Color 3-dimensional rapid prototyping was used to differentiate teeth, alveolus, and maxillary sinus wall. A surgical guide for the mini-implant was fabricated on the replica model. Proper positioning for mini-implants on the posterior maxilla was determined by viewing the CBCT images. The surgical guide was placed on the clinical site, and it allowed precise pilot drilling and accurate placement of the mini-implant. CBCT imaging allows remarkably lower radiation doses and thinner acquisition slices compared with medical computed tomography. Virtually reproduced replica models enable precise planning for mini-implant positions in anatomically complex sites.

  16. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  17. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  18. Essential Means for Urban Computing : Specification of Web-Based Computing Platforms for Urban Planning, a Hitchhiker’s Guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nourian, P.; Martinez-Ortiz, Carlos; Arroyo Ohori, G.A.K.

    2018-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the specifications of web-based computing platforms for urban data analytics and computational urban planning practice. There are currently a variety of tools and platforms that can be used in urban computing practices, including scientific computing languages,

  19. Creating vascular models by postprocessing computed tomography angiography images: a guide for anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govsa, Figen; Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Sirinturk, Suzan; Eraslan, Cenk; Alagoz, Ahmet Kemal

    2017-08-01

    A new application of teaching anatomy includes the use of computed tomography angiography (CTA) images to create clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D) printed models. The purpose of this article is to review recent innovations on the process and the application of 3D printed models as a tool for using under and post-graduate medical education. Images of aortic arch pattern received by CTA were converted into 3D images using the Google SketchUp free software and were saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model mode polylactic acid material was printed. A two-vessel left aortic arch was identified consisting of the brachiocephalic trunk and left subclavian artery. The life-like 3D models were rotated 360° in all axes in hand. The early adopters in education and clinical practices have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D printed anatomical models for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between the anatomical structures. Printed vascular models are used to assist in preoperative planning, develop intraoperative guidance tools, and to teach patients surgical trainees in surgical practice.

  20. [Fluoroscopy dose reduction of computed tomography guided chest interventional radiology using real-time iterative reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Mihara, Yoshiyuki; Ino, Kenji; Sato, Jiro

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction to patients and radiologists in computed tomography (CT) guided examinations for the thoracic region using CT fluoroscopy. Image quality evaluation of the real-time filtered back-projection (RT-FBP) images and the real-time adaptive iterative dose reduction (RT-AIDR) images was carried out on noise and artifacts that were considered to affect the CT fluoroscopy. The image standard deviation was improved in the fluoroscopy setting with less than 30 mA on 120 kV. With regard to the evaluation of artifact visibility and the amount generated by the needle attached to the chest phantom, there was no significant difference between the RT-FBP images with 120 kV, 20 mA and the RT-AIDR images with low-dose conditions (greater than 80 kV, 30 mA and less than 120 kV, 20 mA). The results suggest that it is possible to reduce the radiation dose by approximately 34% at the maximum using RT-AIDR while maintaining image quality equivalent to the RT-FBP images with 120 V, 20 mA.

  1. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided ethanol injection in aldosterone-producing adrenocortical adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, R.; Savastano, S.; Tommaselli, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility, safety and effectiveness of percutaneous computed tomography-guided ethanol injection (PEI-CT) was investigated in a patient affected by aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). A 42-year-old male patient with typical features of hyperaldosteronism presented a solitary left adrenal adenoma measuring 2 cm, with a normal contralateral gland, evidenced by both CT scan and adrenal [ 75 Se-19]-nor-cholesterol scintigraphy. After normalization of potassium plasma levels, 4 ml of sterile 95% ethanol with 0.5 ml of 80% iothalamate sodium was injected. The procedure was completed in about 30 min. No severe pain or local complication was noted. Five hour after PEI, a fourfold and a twofold increase in aldosterone and cortisol plasma levels were observed, respectively. After 11 days on a normal sodium and potassium diet, normal potassium plasma levels and reduced aldosterone plasma levels were present, with reappearance of an aldosterone postural response. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone plasma levels normalized 1 month later, with reappearance also of a plasma renin activity postural response and maintenance of normal potassium plasma levels on a high sodium and normal potassium diet. The patient has remained hypertensive, although lower antihypertensive drug dosages have been employed. After 17 months, normal biochemical, hormonal and morphological findings were present. The authors suggested PEI-CT as a further alternative approach to surgery in the management of carefully selected patients with APA. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Essential Means for Urban Computing: Specification of Web-Based Computing Platforms for Urban Planning, a Hitchhiker’s Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Pirouz Nourian; Carlos Martinez-Ortiz; Ken Arroyo Ohori

    2018-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the specifications of web-based computing platforms for urban data analytics and computational urban planning practice. There are currently a variety of tools and platforms that can be used in urban computing practices, including scientific computing languages, interactive web languages, data sharing platforms and still many desktop computing environments, e.g., GIS software applications. We have reviewed a list of technologies considering their potential ...

  3. Preliminary Results of Emergency Computed Tomography-Guided Ventricular Drain Placement-Precision for the Most Difficult Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Andreas; Wagner, Franca; Söll, Nicole; Hakim, Arsany; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, Andreas; Z'Graggen, Werner J

    2018-04-05

    External ventricular drainage (EVD) catheter placement is one of the most commonly performed neurosurgical procedures. The study's objective was to compare a computed tomography (CT) bolt scan-guided approach for the placement of EVDs with conventional landmark-based insertion. In this retrospective case-control study, we analyzed patients undergoing bolt-kit EVD catheter placement, either CT-guided or landmark-based, between 2013 and 2016. The CT bolt scan-guided approach was based on a dose-reduced CT scan after bolt fixation with immediate image reconstruction along the axis of the bolt to evaluate the putative insertion axis. If needed, angulation of the bolt was corrected and the procedure repeated before the catheter was inserted. Primary endpoint was the accuracy of insertion. Secondary endpoints were the overall number of attempts, duration of intervention, complication rates, and cumulative radiation dose. In total, 34 patients were included in the final analysis. In the group undergoing CT-guided placement, the average ventricle width was significantly smaller (P = 0.04) and average midline shift significantly more pronounced (P = 0.01). CT-guided placement resulted in correct positioning of the catheter in the ipsilateral frontal horn in all 100% of the cases compared with landmark-guided insertion (63%; P = 0.01). Application of the CT-guided approach increased the number of total CT scans (3.6 ± 1.9) and the overall radiation dose (3.34 ± 1.61 mSv) compared with the freehand insertion group (1.84 ± 2.0 mSv and 1.55 ± 1.66 mSv). No differences were found for the other secondary outcome parameters. CT-guided bolt-kit EVD catheter placement is feasible and accurate in the most difficult cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photothermal imaging of skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomimatsu, Toru; Miyazaki, Jun; Kano, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2017-06-01

    The morphology and topology of mitochondria provide useful information about the physiological function of skeletal muscle. Previous studies of skeletal muscle mitochondria are based on observation with transmission, scanning electron microscopy or fluorescence microscopy. In contrast, photothermal (PT) microscopy has advantages over the above commonly used microscopic techniques because of no requirement for complex sample preparation by fixation or fluorescent-dye staining. Here, we employed the PT technique using a simple diode laser to visualize skeletal muscle mitochondria in unstained and stained tissues. The fine mitochondrial network structures in muscle fibers could be imaged with the PT imaging system, even in unstained tissues. PT imaging of tissues stained with toluidine blue revealed the structures of subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria and the swelling behavior of mitochondria in damaged muscle fibers with sufficient image quality. PT image analyses based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) and Grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were performed to derive the characteristic size of mitochondria and to discriminate the image patterns of normal and damaged fibers.

  5. Computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling (CAD/CAM) generated surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants: Which indications in orthognathic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolozzi, P

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present report was to describe our indications, results and complications of computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling CAD/CAM surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants in orthognathic surgery. We analyzed the clinical and radiological data of ten consecutive patients with dentofacial deformities treated using a CAD/CAM technique. Four patients had surgical splints and cutting guides for correction of maxillomandibular asymmetries, three had surgical cutting guides and customized internal distractors for correction of severe maxillary deficiencies and three had custom-made implants for additional chin contouring and/or mandibular defects following bimaxillary osteotomies and sliding genioplasty. We recorded age, gender, dentofacial deformity, surgical procedure and intra- and postoperative complications. All of the patients had stable cosmetic results with a high rate of patient satisfaction at the 1-year follow-up examination. No intra- and/or postoperative complications were encountered during any of the different steps of the procedure. This study demonstrated that the application of CAD/CAM patient-specific surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants in orthognathic surgery allows for a successful outcome in the ten patients presented in this series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Infrared characterization of environmental samples by pulsed photothermal spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, W.; Foerstendorf, H.; Heise, K.H.; Nicolai, R.; Schamlott, A.; Ortega, J.M.; Glotin, F.; Prazeres, R.

    2004-01-01

    Low concentration of toxic radioactive metals in environmental samples often limits the interpretation of results of infrared studies investigating the interaction processes between the metal ions and environmental compartments. For the first time, we could show that photothermal infrared spectroscopy performed with a pulsed free electron laser can provide reliable infrared spectra throughout a distinct spectral range of interest. In this model investigation, we provide vibrational absorption spectra of a rare earth metal salt dissolved in a KBr matrix and a natural calcite sample obtained by photothermal beam deflection (PTBD) technique and FT-IR (Fourier-transform infrared) spectroscopy, respectively. General agreement was found between all spectra of the different recording techniques. Spectral deviations were observed with samples containing low concentration of the rare earth metal salt indicating a lower detection limit of the photothermal method as compared to conventional FT-IR spectroscopy. (authors)

  7. Multifunctional Fe3O4 @ Au core/shell nanostars: a unique platform for multimode imaging and photothermal therapy of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Wang, Ruizhi; Wang, Shige; Ding, Ling; Li, Jingchao; Luo, Yu; Wang, Xiaolin; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the development of multifunctional folic acid (FA)-targeted Fe3O4 @ Au nanostars (NSs) for targeted multi-mode magnetic resonance (MR)/computed tomography (CT)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of tumors. In this present work, citric acid-stabilized Fe3O4/Ag composite nanoparticles prepared by a mild reduction route were utilized as seeds and exposed to the Au growth solution to induce the formation of Fe3O4 @ Au core/shell NSs. Followed by successive decoration of thiolated polyethyleneimine (PEI-SH), FA via a polyethylene glycol spacer, and acetylation of the residual PEI amines, multifunctional Fe3O4 @ Au NSs were formed. The designed multifunctional NSs possess excellent colloidal stability, good cytocompatibility in a given concentration range, and specific recognition to cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors. Due to co-existence of Fe3O4 core and star-shaped Au shell, the NSs can be used for MR and CT imaging of tumors, respectively. Likewise, the near infrared plasmonic absorption feature also enables the NSs to be used for PA imaging and PTT of tumors. Our study clearly demonstrates a unique theranostic nanoplatform that can be used for high performance multi-mode imaging-guided PTT of tumors, which may be extendable for theranostics of different diseases in translational medicine. PMID:27325015

  8. Photocurrent and photothermal current of polypyrrole (PPy) film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Chongjun; Wang Haihong; Jiang Zhiyu

    2003-02-28

    The photoelectrochemical properties of polypyrrole (PPy) film in aqueous solutions in the potential region of -0.7 to 0.5 V (versus Ag/AgCl) were investigated by using photocurrent, photothermal and photothermal current methods under the irradiation of laser beams with wavelength of 532 and 632.8 nm, respectively. It was found that the photocurrent at more negative potential was caused by the p-type semiconductor properties, while the photocurrent at more positive potential was caused by the local temperature rather than the semiconductor properties of the films. The effect of the film thickness on the photocurrent of PPy films was studied in detail.

  9. Photocurrent and photothermal current of polypyrrole (PPy) film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Chongjun; Wang Haihong; Jiang Zhiyu

    2003-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical properties of polypyrrole (PPy) film in aqueous solutions in the potential region of -0.7 to 0.5 V (versus Ag/AgCl) were investigated by using photocurrent, photothermal and photothermal current methods under the irradiation of laser beams with wavelength of 532 and 632.8 nm, respectively. It was found that the photocurrent at more negative potential was caused by the p-type semiconductor properties, while the photocurrent at more positive potential was caused by the local temperature rather than the semiconductor properties of the films. The effect of the film thickness on the photocurrent of PPy films was studied in detail

  10. Simulation of temperature distribution in tumor Photothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiyang; Qiu, Shaoping; Wu, Shulian; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    The light transmission in biological tissue and the optical properties of biological tissue are important research contents of biomedical photonics. It is of great theoretical and practical significance in medical diagnosis and light therapy of disease. In this paper, the temperature feedback-controller was presented for monitoring photothermal treatment in realtime. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo (MC) and diffuse approximation were compared and analyzed. The results demonstrated that diffuse approximation using extrapolated boundary conditions by finite element method is a good approximation to MC simulation. Then in order to minimize thermal damage, real-time temperature monitoring was appraised by proportional-integral-differential (PID) controller in the process of photothermal treatment.

  11. Trace gas detection by laser intracavity photothermal spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, K.H.; Lin, H.h.

    1986-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photothermal detector is described. In this scheme, sample absorption of the pump laser power takes place within the cavity of a probe He-Ne laser causing modulation in the gain and in turn the output power. Comparison of this intracavity detector with two other photothermal techniques, namely, phase fluctuation optical heterodyne spectroscopy and thermal beam deflection, is made in terms of practicality and sensitivity. For in situ measurements, sensitivity of 0.5 x 10 -7 cm -1 for a probe length of 3 cm has been achieved

  12. Photothermal depth profiling for multilayered Structures by particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z J; Fang, J W; Zhang, S Y

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method to reconstruct thermal conductivity depth profile of a layered medium using noisy photothermal data. The method tries to obtain an accurate reconstruction of discontinuous profile using particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and total variation (TV) regularization. The reconstructions of different thermal conductivity profiles have been tested on simulated photothermal data. The simulation results show that the method can find accurately the locations of discontinuities, and the reconstructed profiles are in agreement with the original ones. Moreover, the results also show the method has good robustness and anti-noise capability.

  13. Feature-guided analysis for reduction of false positives in CAD of polyps for computed tomographic colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeppi, Janne; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of our novel technique of feature-guided analysis of polyps on the reduction of false-positive (FP) findings generated by our computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for the detection of polyps from computed tomography colonographic data sets. The detection performance obtained by use of feature-guided analysis in the segmentation and feature analysis of polyp candidates was compared with that obtained by use of our previously employed fuzzy clustering technique. We also evaluated the effect of a feature called modified gradient concentration (MGC) on the detection performance. A total of 144 data sets, representing prone and supine views of 72 patients that included 14 patients with 21 colorectal polyps 5-25 mm in diameter, were used in the evaluation. At a 100% by-patient (95% by-polyp) detection sensitivity, the FP rate of our CAD scheme with feature-guided analysis based on round-robin evaluation was 1.3 (1.5) FP detections per patient. This corresponds to a 70-75 % reduction in the number of FPs obtained by use of fuzzy clustering at the same sensitivity levels. Application of the MGC feature instead of our previously used gradient concentration feature did not improve the detection result. The results indicate that feature-guided analysis is useful for achieving high sensitivity and a low FP rate in our CAD scheme

  14. Value of computed tomography for evaluating the injection site in endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Nishio, Takeshi; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Yasuda, Chikao; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    Endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) safely and effectively relieves pain associated with intra-abdominal malignancies when the neurolytic is accurately injected. We applied contrast medium to evaluate the ethanol injection sites in patients who received EUS-CPN due to abdominal pain caused by malignancies. We injected, under the guidance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), ethanol containing 10% contrast medium into the celiac plexus of patients with intra-abdominal pain due to malignancies. Immediately after the endoscopic therapy, patients underwent computed tomography (CT) to confirm the injection site. Images of distribution of injected solutions were classified into three groups. Injected solution dispersed in unilateral and bilateral anterocrural space was defined as ''unilateral injection'' or bilateral injection'', respectively. Injected solution located out of the anterocrural space was defined as ''inappropriate injection''. Pre- and postprocedure pain was assessed using a standard analog scale. Before and 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the procedure, pain scores were evaluated. From April 2003 to May 2005, 13 patients were enrolled in this study. Improvement of pain score in the ''bilateral injection'' and ''unilateral injection'' groups was significantly superior to the change in the ''inappropriate injection'' group. Although EUS-CPN was effective in eight of 13 patients (61.5%), additional EUS-CPN to the ''inappropriate injection group'' increased the response rate to 84.6%. Injection of ethanol to the anterocrural space by EUS-CPN produced adequate pain relief. Immediate examination by CT for confirmation of injection sites after EUS-CPN would increase the likelihood of induction of pain relief. (author)

  15. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  16. Computed tomographic-guided iodine-125 interstitial implants for malignant thoracic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qiming [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); The Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 34 Zhongshan Bei Road, Quanzhou 362000 (China); Chen, Jin; Chen, Qunlin [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Lai, Qingquan; Cai, Siqing [The Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 34 Zhongshan Bei Road, Quanzhou 362000 (China); Luo, Kaidong [The Department of Radiology, Longyan Hosptial of Traditional Chinese Medical, 59 Longteng Middle Road, Longyan 364000 (China); Lin, Zhengyu, E-mail: linsinlan@yahoo.com.cn [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy using iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) radioactive seeds under computed tomographic (CT) guidance for malignant thoracic tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients (34 males, 7 females; 18–90 years; mean, 63.7 years) with 77 lesions (3 in the mediastinum, 7 in the chest wall, 67 in the lung) underwent percutaneous interstitial implantation of {sup 125}I radioactive seeds under CT guidance. A treatment planning system (TPS) was employed to calculate the number and distribution of seeds preoperatively. An 18-G needle was inserted into the lesions under CT guidance and send the seeds according to TPS. Two patients with mediastinal lesions undergoing seed implantation received an artificial pneumothorax. One patient with lung carcinoma adjacent to the anterior mediastinum underwent seed implantation through the sternum. Follow-up CT was done every 2 months postoperatively. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients. No major procedure-associated death occurred. The mean duration of follow-up was 19.4 ± 1.3 months (3–49 months). A complete response (CR) was seen in 49 lesions (63.6%), partial response (PR) in 9 lesions (11.7%), stable disease (SD) in 12 lesions (12.8%), and progressive disease (PD) in 7 lesions (7.4%). The overall response rate (CR + PR) was 75.3%; the local control rate (CR + PR + SD) was 90.9%. The 1-, 2- and 3-year progression-free rates for local tumors were 91%, 88% and 88%, respectively. The 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 87%, 74% and 68%, respectively. Conclusion: Implantation of CT-guided {sup 125}I seeds is feasible and effective for patients with malignant thoracic tumors.

  17. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  18. Estimation of biomedical optical properties by simultaneous use of diffuse reflectometry and photothermal radiometry: investigation of light propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, E. S. R.; de Jesus, M. E. P.

    2007-07-01

    The estimation of optical properties of highly turbid and opaque biological tissue is a difficult task since conventional purely optical methods rapidly loose sensitivity as the mean photon path length decreases. Photothermal methods, such as pulsed or frequency domain photothermal radiometry (FD-PTR), on the other hand, show remarkable sensitivity in experimental conditions that produce very feeble optical signals. Photothermal Radiometry is primarily sensitive to absorption coefficient yielding considerably higher estimation errors on scattering coefficients. Conversely, purely optical methods such as Local Diffuse Reflectance (LDR) depend mainly on the scattering coefficient and yield much better estimates of this parameter. Therefore, at moderate transport albedos, the combination of photothermal and reflectance methods can improve considerably the sensitivity of detection of tissue optical properties. The authors have recently proposed a novel method that combines FD-PTR with LDR, aimed at improving sensitivity on the determination of both optical properties. Signal analysis was performed by global fitting the experimental data to forward models based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Although this approach is accurate, the associated computational burden often limits its use as a forward model. Therefore, the application of analytical models based on the diffusion approximation offers a faster alternative. In this work, we propose the calculation of the diffuse reflectance and the fluence rate profiles under the δ-P I approximation. This approach is known to approximate fluence rate expressions better close to collimated sources and boundaries than the standard diffusion approximation (SDA). We extend this study to the calculation of the diffuse reflectance profiles. The ability of the δ-P I based model to provide good estimates of the absorption, scattering and anisotropy coefficients is tested against Monte-Carlo simulations over a wide range of scattering to

  19. Combustion of hydrogen-air jets in local chemical equilibrium: A guide to the CHARNAL computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, D. B.; Launder, B. E.; Morse, A. P.; Maples, G.

    1974-01-01

    A guide to a computer program, written in FORTRAN 4, for predicting the flow properties of turbulent mixing with combustion of a circular jet of hydrogen into a co-flowing stream of air is presented. The program, which is based upon the Imperial College group's PASSA series, solves differential equations for diffusion and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and also of the R.M.S. fluctuation of hydrogen concentration. The effective turbulent viscosity for use in the shear stress equation is computed. Chemical equilibrium is assumed throughout the flow.

  20. Essential Means for Urban Computing: Specification of Web-Based Computing Platforms for Urban Planning, a Hitchhiker’s Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirouz Nourian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of the specifications of web-based computing platforms for urban data analytics and computational urban planning practice. There are currently a variety of tools and platforms that can be used in urban computing practices, including scientific computing languages, interactive web languages, data sharing platforms and still many desktop computing environments, e.g., GIS software applications. We have reviewed a list of technologies considering their potential and applicability in urban planning and urban data analytics. This review is not only based on the technical factors such as capabilities of the programming languages but also the ease of developing and sharing complex data processing workflows. The arena of web-based computing platforms is currently under rapid development and is too volatile to be predictable; therefore, in this article we focus on the specification of the requirements and potentials from an urban planning point of view rather than speculating about the fate of computing platforms or programming languages. The article presents a list of promising computing technologies, a technical specification of the essential data models and operators for geo-spatial data processing, and mathematical models for an ideal urban computing platform.

  1. Photothermal probing of plasmonic hotspots with nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Wu, Kaiyu; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures (hotspots) are key components e.g. in plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy, plasmonic solar cells, or as nano heat sources. The characterization of single hotspots is still challenging due to a lack of experimental tools. We present the direct photothermal probing and mapping...

  2. Photothermal measurements of high T/sub c/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanton, J.T.; Mitzi, D.B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Kino, G.S.; Gazit, D.; Feigelson, R.S.; Center for Materials Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4085)

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate a photothermal method for making point measurements of the thermal conductivities of high T/sub c/ superconductors. Images made at room temperature on polycrystalline materials show the thermal inhomogeneities. Measurements on single-crystal Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O/sub x/ compounds reveal a very large anisotropy of about 7:1 in the thermal conductivity

  3. Laser photothermal spectroscopy of light-induced absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skvortsov, L A [Institute of Cryptography, Communications and Informatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-31

    Basic methods of laser photothermal spectroscopy, which are used to study photoinduced absorption in various media, are briefly considered. Comparative analysis of these methods is performed and the latest results obtained in this field are discussed. Different schemes and examples of their practical implementation are considered. (review)

  4. Study on the Energetic Parameters in a Photothermic Sensor with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study on the Energetic Parameters in a Photothermic Sensor with Black Polymeric Film. ... The evolution of incidental solar illumination on the horizontal plan of sensor and the temperature distribution are studied. Results showed that the ... Keywords: film, solar energy, greenhouse effect, design, radiation, illumination.

  5. Plasmonic photo-thermal therapy (PPTT) | Huang | Alexandria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photo-thermal therapy (PTT) is a minimally-invasive therapy in which photon energy is converted into heat to kill cancer. Gold nanoparticles absorb light strongly and convert photon energy into heat quickly and efficiently, thereby making them superior contrast agents for PTT. This gold nanoparticle-assisted PTT called ...

  6. In vivo photoacoustic monitoring of anti-obesity photothermal lipolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghyun; Lee, Jung Ho; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Chulhong

    2018-02-01

    Obesity with a body mass index is greater than 30 kg/m2 is one of the rapidly growing diseases in advanced societies and can lead to stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart failure. Common methods of removing subcutaneous adipose tissues are liposuction and laser treatment. In this study, we used photoacoustic imaging to monitor the anti-obesity photothermal degradation process. To improve the photothermal lipid degradation efficiency without any invasive methods, we synthesized hyaluronic acid hollow hold nanosphere adipocyte targeting sequence peptide (HA-HAuNS-ATS) conjugates. The conjugate enhanced the skin penetration ability and biodegradability of the nanoparticles using hyaluronate and enhanced the targeting effect on adipose tissue with adipocyte targeting sequence peptide. Thus, the conjugate can be delivered to the adipose tissue by simply spreading the conjugate on the skin without any invasive method. Then, the photothermal lipolysis and delivery of the conjugate were photoacoustically monitored in vivo. These results demonstrate the potential for photoacoustic method to be applied for photothermal lipolysis monitoring.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of rope-guided conveyances in two typical kinds of shaft layouts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyuan Wu

    Full Text Available The behavior of rope-guided conveyances is so complicated that the rope-guided hoisting system hasn't been understood thoroughly so far. In this paper, with user-defined functions loaded, ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 was employed to simulate lateral motion of rope-guided conveyances in two typical kinds of shaft layouts. With rope-guided mine elevator and mine cages taken into account, results show that the lateral aerodynamic buffeting force is much larger than the Coriolis force, and the side aerodynamic force have the same order of magnitude as the Coriolis force. The lateral aerodynamic buffeting forces should also be considered especially when the conveyance moves along the ventilation air direction. The simulation shows that the closer size of the conveyances can weaken the transverse aerodynamic buffeting effect.

  8. Computational investigations on a catenary-shaped double-reflecting neutron guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priesmeyer, H.G.

    1983-01-01

    The results of Monte-Carlo calculations of the neutron transmission of a vertical catenary-shaped neutron guide are presented. A two-dimensional problem was considered. Focussing and special coatings are investigated. (orig.) [de

  9. C-arm cone beam computed tomography needle path overlay for fluoroscopic guided vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alda L; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Chinndurai, Ponraj; Rohm, Esther; Hall, Andrew F; Wallace, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Retrospective review. To report our early clinical experience using C-arm cone beam computed tomography (C-arm CBCT) with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. C-arm CBCT is advanced three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat panel based angiography systems. The imaging information provided by C-arm CBCT allows for the acquisition and reconstruction of "CT-like" images in flat panel based angiography/interventional suites. As part of the evolution of this technology, enhancements allowing the overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real time fluoroscopy. We report our early clinical experience with C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 10 consecutive oncology patients who underwent vertebroplasty of 13 vertebral levels using C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance from November 2007 to December 2008. Procedural data including vertebral level, approach (transpedicular vs. extrapedicular), access (bilateral vs. unilateral) and complications were recorded. Technical success with the overlay technology was assessed based on accuracy which consisted of 4 measured parameters: distance from target to needle tip, distance from planned path to needle tip, distance from midline to needle tip, and distance from the anterior 1/3 of the vertebral body to needle tip. Success within each parameter required that the distance between the needle tip and parameter being evaluated be no more than 5 mm on multiplanar CBCT or fluoroscopy. Imaging data for 12 vertebral levels was available for review. All vertebral levels were treated using unilateral access and 9 levels were treated with an extrapedicular approach. Technical success rates were 92% for both distance from planned path and distance from midline to final needle tip, 100% when distance from needle tip to the anterior 1

  10. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogo, Takeshi, E-mail: ogo.takeshi.hp@mail.ncvc.go.jp [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Department of Advanced Mediccal Research for Pulmonary Hypertension, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, Tetsuya [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Sanda, Yoshihiro [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Morita, Yoshiaki [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Yasuda, Satoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  11. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  12. PEGylated (NH4)xWO3 nanorods as efficient and stable multifunctional nanoagents for simultaneous CT imaging and photothermal therapy of tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, Daniel K; Tian, Qiyun; Chen, Liang; Sun, Yingqi; Yu, Nuo; He, Chuanglong; Wang, Han; Chen, Zhigang

    2017-09-01

    The simultaneous imaging and photothermal therapy of tumors have attracted much attention, and a prerequisite is to obtain multifunctional nanomaterials. Ideally, one kind of nanoparticles with single component can be used as both imaging agent and photothermal agent. Herein, we have developed the PEGylated (NH 4 ) x WO 3 (denoted as (NH 4 ) x WO 3 -PEG) nanorods as multifunctional nanoparticles with single semiconductor component. (NH 4 ) x WO 3 -PEG nanorods with about 30nm diameter and length of several hundred nanometers have been obtained through a solvothermal synthesis-PEGylation two-step route. Under the irradiation of 980-nm laser with intensity of 0.72Wcm -2 , aqueous dispersion of (NH 4 ) x WO 3 -PEG nanorods (0.67-5.44mmol/L) displays high elevation (17.6-34.5°C) of temperature in 400s, accompanied by an excellent long-term photothermal stability. Furthermore, (NH 4 ) x WO 3 -PEG nanorods exhibit as high as 6 times X-ray attenuation ability compared to that of the clinically used iodine-based X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agent (Iopromide). More importantly, after PBS solution of (NH 4 ) x WO 3 -PEG nanorods is injected into the tumor of mice, the tumor can be effectively detected by CT imaging. Moreover, cancer cells in vivo can be further destroyed by the photothermal effects of (NH 4 ) x WO 3 -PEG nanorods, under the irradiation of 980-nm laser with the safe intensity of 0.72Wcm -2 for 10min. Therefore, (NH 4 ) x WO 3 -PEG nanorods can be used as a new kind of stable and efficient multifunctional nanoagent with single component for simultaneous CT imaging and photothermal therapy of tumor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Design of a Nanoscale, CMOS-Integrable, Thermal-Guiding Structure for Boolean-Logic and Neuromorphic Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M; Chong, Tow-Chong; Elliott, Stephen R

    2016-12-21

    One of the requirements for achieving faster CMOS electronics is to mitigate the unacceptably large chip areas required to steer heat away from or, more recently, toward the critical nodes of state-of-the-art devices. Thermal-guiding (TG) structures can efficiently direct heat by "meta-materials" engineering; however, some key aspects of the behavior of these systems are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate control of the thermal-diffusion properties of TG structures by using nanometer-scale, CMOS-integrable, graphene-on-silica stacked materials through finite-element-methods simulations. It has been shown that it is possible to implement novel, controllable, thermally based Boolean-logic and spike-timing-dependent plasticity operations for advanced (neuromorphic) computing applications using such thermal-guide architectures.

  14. Complex Osteotomies of Tibial Plateau Malunions Using Computer-Assisted Planning and Patient-Specific Surgical Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürnstahl, Philipp; Vlachopoulos, Lazaros; Schweizer, Andreas; Fucentese, Sandro F; Koch, Peter P

    2015-08-01

    The accurate reduction of tibial plateau malunions can be challenging without guidance. In this work, we report on a novel technique that combines 3-dimensional computer-assisted planning with patient-specific surgical guides for improving reliability and accuracy of complex intraarticular corrective osteotomies. Preoperative planning based on 3-dimensional bone models was performed to simulate fragment mobilization and reduction in 3 cases. Surgical implementation of the preoperative plan using patient-specific cutting and reduction guides was evaluated; benefits and limitations of the approach were identified and discussed. The preliminary results are encouraging and show that complex, intraarticular corrective osteotomies can be accurately performed with this technique. For selective patients with complex malunions around the tibia plateau, this method might be an attractive option, with the potential to facilitate achieving the most accurate correction possible.

  15. Feasibility of Computed Tomography-Guided Methods for Spatial Normalization of Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Hanna; Choi, Jae Yong; Lee, Seung Ha; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Lee, Myung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Spatial normalization is a prerequisite step for analyzing positron emission tomography (PET) images both by using volume-of-interest (VOI) template and voxel-based analysis. Magnetic resonance (MR) or ligand-specific PET templates are currently used for spatial normalization of PET images. We used computed tomography (CT) images acquired with PET/CT scanner for the spatial normalization for [18F]-N-3-fluoropropyl-2-betacarboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (FP-CIT) PET images and compared target-to-cerebellar standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) values with those obtained from MR- or PET-guided spatial normalization method in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We included 71 healthy controls and 56 patients with PD who underwent [18F]-FP-CIT PET scans with a PET/CT scanner and T1-weighted MR scans. Spatial normalization of MR images was done with a conventional spatial normalization tool (cvMR) and with DARTEL toolbox (dtMR) in statistical parametric mapping software. The CT images were modified in two ways, skull-stripping (ssCT) and intensity transformation (itCT). We normalized PET images with cvMR-, dtMR-, ssCT-, itCT-, and PET-guided methods by using specific templates for each modality and measured striatal SUVR with a VOI template. The SUVR values measured with FreeSurfer-generated VOIs (FSVOI) overlaid on original PET images were also used as a gold standard for comparison. The SUVR values derived from all four structure-guided spatial normalization methods were highly correlated with those measured with FSVOI (P normalization methods provided reliable striatal SUVR values comparable to those obtained with MR-guided methods. CT-guided methods can be useful for analyzing dopamine transporter PET images when MR images are unavailable.

  16. Guide to making time-lapse graphics using the facilities of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, J.K. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The advent of large, fast computers has opened the way to modeling more complex physical processes and to handling very large quantities of experimental data. The amount of information that can be processed in a short period of time is so great that use of graphical displays assumes greater importance as a means of displaying this information. Information from dynamical processes can be displayed conveniently by use of animated graphics. This guide presents the basic techniques for generating black and white animated graphics, with consideration of aesthetic, mechanical, and computational problems. The guide is intended for use by someone who wants to make movies on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) CDC-7600. Problems encountered by a geographically remote user are given particular attention. Detailed information is given that will allow a remote user to do some file checking and diagnosis before giving graphics files to the system for processing into film in order to spot problems without having to wait for film to be delivered. Source listings of some useful software are given in appendices along with descriptions of how to use it. 3 figures, 5 tables

  17. Conventional multi-slice computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) for computer-aided implant placement. Part II: reliability of mucosa-supported stereolithographic guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisan, Volkan; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Pişkin, Bülent; Özdemir, Tayfun

    2013-12-01

    Deviations of implants that were placed by conventional computed tomography (CT)- or cone beam CT (CBCT)-derived mucosa-supported stereolithographic (SLA) surgical guides were analyzed in this study. Eleven patients were randomly scanned by a multi-slice CT (CT group) or a CBCT scanner (CBCT group). A total of 108 implants were planned on the software and placed using SLA guides. A new CT or CBCT scan was obtained and merged with the planning data to identify the deviations between the planned and placed implants. Results were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and multiple regressions (p < .05). Mean angular and linear deviations in the CT group were 3.30° (SD 0.36), and 0.75 (SD 0.32) and 0.80 mm (SD 0.35) at the implant shoulder and tip, respectively. In the CBCT group, mean angular and linear deviations were 3.47° (SD 0.37), and 0.81 (SD 0.32) and 0.87 mm (SD 0.32) at the implant shoulder and tip, respectively. No statistically significant differences were detected between the CT and CBCT groups (p = .169 and p = .551, p = .113 for angular and linear deviations, respectively). Implant placement via CT- or CBCT-derived mucosa-supported SLA guides yielded similar deviation values. Results should be confirmed on alternative CBCT scanners. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Ryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Kim, Joshua P.; Zheng, Weili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Glide-Hurst, Carri, E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0

  19. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Ryan G.; Kim, Joshua P.; Zheng, Weili; Chetty, Indrin J.; Glide-Hurst, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0

  20. Development of a guidance guide for dosimetry in computed tomography; Desenvolvimento de um guia orientativo para dosimetria em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Due to frequent questions from users of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated in the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (LCI - IPEN), on how to properly apply the factors indicated in their calibration certificates, a guide was prepared guidance for dosimetry in computed tomography. The guide includes guidance prior knowledge of half value layer (HVL), as it is necessary to know the effective beam energy for application quality for correction factor (kq). The evaluation of HVL in TC scanners becomes a difficult task due to system geometry and therefore a survey was conducted of existing methodologies for the determination of HVL in clinical beams Computed Tomography, taking into account technical, practical and economic factors. In this work it was decided to test a Tandem System consists of absorbing covers made in the workshop of IPEN, based on preliminary studies due to low cost and good response. The Tandem system consists of five cylindrical absorbing layers of 1mm, 3mm, 5mm, 7mm and 10mm aluminum and 3 cylindrical absorbing covers 15mm, 25mm and acrylic 35mm (PMMA) coupled to the ionization chamber of commercial pencil type widely used in quality control tests in dosimetry in clinical beams Computed tomography. Through Tandem curves it was possible to assess HVL values and from the standard curve pencil-type ionization chamber, Kq find the appropriate beam. The elaborate Guide provides information on how to build the calibration curve on the basis of CSR, to find the Kq and information for construction Tandem curve, to find values close to CSR. (author)

  1. Computer-Aided Authoring System (AUTHOR) User's Guide. Volume I. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitard, Charles R.

    This user's guide for AUTHOR, an automatic authoring system which produces programmed texts for teaching symbol recognition, provides detailed instructions to help the user construct and enter the information needed to create the programmed text, run the AUTHOR program, and edit the automatically composed paper. Major sections describe steps in…

  2. Methodology of Computer-Aided Design of Variable Guide Vanes of Aircraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaleev, Sergei V.; Melentjev, Vladimir S.; Gvozdev, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology which helps to avoid a great amount of costly experimental research. This methodology includes thermo-gas dynamic design of an engine and its mounts, the profiling of compressor flow path and cascade design of guide vanes. Employing a method elaborated by Howell, we provide a theoretical solution to the task of…

  3. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1year after BPA. Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A DPL model of photo-thermal interaction in an infinite semiconductor material containing a spherical hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiny, Aatef D.; Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2018-01-01

    The dual phase lag (DPL) heat transfer model is applied to study the photo-thermal interaction in an infinite semiconductor medium containing a spherical hole. The inner surface of the cavity was traction free and loaded thermally by pulse heat flux. By using the eigenvalue approach methodology and Laplace's transform, the physical variable solutions are obtained analytically. The numerical computations for the silicon-like semiconductor material are obtained. The comparison among the theories, i.e., dual phase lag (DPL), Lord and Shulman's (LS) and the classically coupled thermoelastic (CT) theory is presented graphically. The results further show that the analytical scheme can overcome mathematical problems by analyzing these problems.

  5. Numerical Modeling of the Photothermal Processing for Bubble Forming around Nanowire in a Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Chaari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate computation of the temperature is an important factor in determining the shape of a bubble around a nanowire immersed in a liquid. The study of the physical phenomenon consists in solving a photothermic coupled problem between light and nanowire. The numerical multiphysic model is used to study the variations of the temperature and the shape of the created bubble by illumination of the nanowire. The optimization process, including an adaptive remeshing scheme, is used to solve the problem through a finite element method. The study of the shape evolution of the bubble is made taking into account the physical and geometrical parameters of the nanowire. The relation between the sizes and shapes of the bubble and nanowire is deduced.

  6. Numerical Modeling of the Photothermal Processing for Bubble Forming around Nanowire in a Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Anis; Giraud-Moreau, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    An accurate computation of the temperature is an important factor in determining the shape of a bubble around a nanowire immersed in a liquid. The study of the physical phenomenon consists in solving a photothermic coupled problem between light and nanowire. The numerical multiphysic model is used to study the variations of the temperature and the shape of the created bubble by illumination of the nanowire. The optimization process, including an adaptive remeshing scheme, is used to solve the problem through a finite element method. The study of the shape evolution of the bubble is made taking into account the physical and geometrical parameters of the nanowire. The relation between the sizes and shapes of the bubble and nanowire is deduced. PMID:24795538

  7. Osteoid osteomas in common and in technically challenging locations treated with computed tomography-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylona, Sophia; Patsoura, Sofia; Karapostolakis, Georgios; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Anastasia; Thanos, Loukas

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the treatment of osteoid osteomas in common and in technically challenging locations. Twenty-three patients with osteoid osteomas in common (nine cases) and technically challenging [14 cases: intra-articular (n = 7), spinal (n = 5), metaphyseal (n = 2)] positions were treated with CT-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed under conscious sedation with a seven-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 C and power of 90-110 W. The patients went home under instruction. A brief pain inventory (BPI) score was calculated before and after (1 day, 4 weeks, 6 months and 1 year) treatment. All procedures were technically successful. Primary clinical success was 91.3% (21 of total 23 patients), despite the lesions' locations. BPI score was dramatically reduced after the procedure, and the decrease in BPI score was significant (P < 0.001, paired t-test; n - 1 = 22) for all periods during follow up. Two patients had persistent pain after 1 month and were treated successfully with a second procedure (secondary success rate 100%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. CT-guided RF ablation is safe and highly effective for treatment of osteoid osteomas, even in technically difficult positions. (orig.)

  8. Computed tomography-guided interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy for centrally located liver tumours: a single institution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, Nikolaos; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Kolotas, Christos [Hirslanden Medical Center, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau (Switzerland); Milickovic, Natasa; Baltas, Dimos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial (IRT) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BRT) in the treatment of unresectable primary and secondary liver malignancies. This report updates and expands our previously described experience with this treatment technique. Forty-one patients with 50 tumours adjacent to the liver hilum and bile duct bifurcation were treated in 59 interventions of CT-guided IRT HDR BRT. The tumours were larger than 4 cm with a median volume of 84 cm{sup 3} (38-1,348 cm{sup 3}). The IRT HDR BRT delivered a median total physical dose of 20.0 Gy (7.0-32.0 Gy) in twice daily fractions of median 7.0 Gy (4.0-10.0 Gy) in 19 patients and in once daily fractions of median 8.0 Gy (7.0-14.0 Gy) in 22 patients. With a median follow-up of 12.4 months, the local control for metastatic hepatic tumours was 89 %, 73 % and 63 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. The local control for primary hepatic tumours was 90 %, 81 % and 50 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. Severe side effects occurred in 5.0 % of interventions with no treatment-related deaths. CT-guided IRT HDR BRT is a promising procedure for the radiation treatment of centrally located liver malignancies. (orig.)

  9. 3D artificial bones for bone repair prepared by computed tomography-guided fused deposition modeling for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Ye, Xiaojian; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Yuyun; Xu, Guohua; He, Dannong

    2014-09-10

    The medical community has expressed significant interest in the development of new types of artificial bones that mimic natural bones. In this study, computed tomography (CT)-guided fused deposition modeling (FDM) was employed to fabricate polycaprolactone (PCL)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and PCL 3D artificial bones to mimic natural goat femurs. The in vitro mechanical properties, in vitro cell biocompatibility, and in vivo performance of the artificial bones in a long load-bearing goat femur bone segmental defect model were studied. All of the results indicate that CT-guided FDM is a simple, convenient, relatively low-cost method that is suitable for fabricating natural bonelike artificial bones. Moreover, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones prepared by CT-guided FDM have more close mechanics to natural bone, good in vitro cell biocompatibility, biodegradation ability, and appropriate in vivo new bone formation ability. Therefore, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones could be potentially be of use in the treatment of patients with clinical bone defects.

  10. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors: results and correlation with surgical specimen analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Grigio, Henrique Ramos; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Pinto, Paula Nicole Vieira; Tyng, Chiang J.; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Aguiar Junior, Samuel; Lopes, Ademar, E-mail: chojniak@uol.com.br [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors in obtaining appropriate samples for histological analysis, and compare its diagnosis with the results of the surgical pathology as available. Materials and Methods: The authors reviewed medical records, imaging and histological reports of 262 patients with soft-tissue tumors submitted to CT-guided core needle biopsy in an oncologic reference center between 2003 and 2009. Results: Appropriate samples were obtained in 215 (82.1%) out of the 262 patients. The most prevalent tumors were sarcomas (38.6%), metastatic carcinomas (28.8%), benign mesenchymal tumors (20.5%) and lymphomas (9.3%). Histological grading was feasible in 92.8% of sarcoma patients, with the majority of them (77.9%) being classified as high grade tumors. Out of the total sample, 116 patients (44.3%) underwent surgical excision and diagnosis confirmation. Core biopsy demonstrated 94.6% accuracy in the identification of sarcomas, with 96.4% sensitivity and 89.5% specificity. A significant intermethod agreement about histological grading was observed between core biopsy and surgical resection (p < 0.001; kappa = 0.75). Conclusion: CT-guided core needle biopsy demonstrated a high diagnostic accuracy in the evaluation of soft tissue tumors as well as in the histological grading of sarcomas, allowing an appropriate therapeutic planning (author)

  11. Synthesis of photothermal nanocomposites and their application to antibacterial assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Wang, Chun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Lidong

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we report a novel gold nanorod (AuNR)-based nanocomposite that shows strong binding to bacterium and high antibacterial efficiency. The AuNRs were used as a photothermal material to transform near-infrared radiation (NIR) into heat. We selected poly (acrylic acid) to modify the surface of the AuNRs based on a simple self-assembly method. After conjugation of the bacterium-binding molecule vancomycin, the nanocomposites were capable of efficiently gathering on the cell walls of bacteria. The nanocomposites exhibited a high bacterial inhibition capability owing to NIR-induced heat generation in situ. Therefore, the prepared photothermal nanocomposites show great potential for use in antibacterial assays.

  12. Estimation of optimal hologram recording modes on photothermal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhamankyzov, Nasipbek Kurmanalievich; Ismanov, Yusupzhan Khakimzhanovich; Zhumaliev, Kubanychbek Myrzabekovich; Alymkulov, Samsaly Amanovich

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the hologram recording process on photothermal media to estimate the required laser radiation power for the information recording as the function of the spatial frequency and radiation exposure duration is considered. Results of the analysis showed that materials with a low thermal diffusivity are necessary to increase the recording density in these media and the recording should be performed with short pulses to minimize the thermal diffusion length. A solution for the heat conduction equation for photothermal materials heated by an interference laser field was found. The solution obtained allows one to determine the required value of the recording temperature for given spatial frequencies, depending on the thermal physical parameters of the medium and on the power and duration of the heating radiation.

  13. On the Need for Research Evidence to Guide the Design of Computer Games for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Computer games for learning (also called video games or digital games) have potential to improve education. This is the intriguing idea that motivates this special issue of the "Educational Psychologist" on "Psychological Perspectives on Digital Games and Learning." Computer games for learning are games delivered via computer…

  14. Image-guided interventions and computer-integrated therapy: Quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terry M; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-10-01

    Significant efforts have been dedicated to minimizing invasiveness associated with surgical interventions, most of which have been possible thanks to the developments in medical imaging, surgical navigation, visualization and display technologies. Image-guided interventions have promised to dramatically change the way therapies are delivered to many organs. However, in spite of the development of many sophisticated technologies over the past two decades, other than some isolated examples of successful implementations, minimally invasive therapy is far from enjoying the wide acceptance once envisioned. This paper provides a large-scale overview of the state-of-the-art developments, identifies several barriers thought to have hampered the wider adoption of image-guided navigation, and suggests areas of research that may potentially advance the field. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Stampi: a message passing library for distributed parallel computing. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Toshiyuki; Koide, Hiroshi; Takemiya, Hiroshi

    1998-11-01

    A new message passing library, Stampi, has been developed to realize a computation with different kind of parallel computers arbitrarily and making MPI (Message Passing Interface) as an unique interface for communication. Stampi is based on MPI2 specification. It realizes dynamic process creation to different machines and communication between spawned one within the scope of MPI semantics. Vender implemented MPI as a closed system in one parallel machine and did not support both functions; process creation and communication to external machines. Stampi supports both functions and enables us distributed parallel computing. Currently Stampi has been implemented on COMPACS (COMplex PArallel Computer System) introduced in CCSE, five parallel computers and one graphic workstation, and any communication on them can be processed on. (author)

  16. Automatic path proposal computation for CT-guided percutaneous liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helck, A; Schumann, C; Aumann, J; Thierfelder, K; Strobl, F F; Braunagel, M; Niethammer, M; Clevert, D A; Hoffmann, R T; Reiser, M; Sandner, T; Trumm, C

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate feasibility of automatic software-based path proposals for CT-guided percutaneous biopsies. Thirty-three patients (60 [Formula: see text] 12 years) referred for CT-guided biopsy of focal liver lesions were consecutively included. Pre-interventional CT and dedicated software (FraunhoferMeVis Pathfinder) were used for (semi)automatic segmentation of relevant structures. The software subsequently generated three path proposals in downward quality for CT-guided biopsy. Proposed needle paths were compared with consensus proposal of two experts (comparable, less suitable, not feasible). In case of comparable results, equivalent approach to software-based path proposal was used. Quality of segmentation process was evaluated (Likert scale, 1 [Formula: see text] best, 6 [Formula: see text] worst), and time for processing was registered. All biopsies were performed successfully without complications. In 91 % one of the three automatic path proposals was rated comparable to experts' proposal. None of the first proposals was rated not feasible, and 76 % were rated comparable to the experts' proposal. 7 % automatic path proposals were rated not feasible, all being second choice ([Formula: see text]) or third choice ([Formula: see text]). In 79 %, segmentation at least was good. Average total time for establishing automatic path proposal was 42 [Formula: see text] 9 s. Automatic software-based path proposal for CT-guided liver biopsies in the majority provides path proposals that are easy to establish and comparable to experts' insertion trajectories.

  17. Photothermal modulation of the gap distance in scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, N.M.; Skumanich, A.; Ripple, D.

    1986-01-01

    We have employed the photothermal effect to modulate the gap distance in a tunneling microscope. In this approach, optical heating induces the expansion and buckling of laser-illuminated sample surface. The surface displacement can be modulated over a wide frequency range, and its height (typically <1 A-circle) can be varied by changing the illumination intensity and modulation frequency. This novel method provides an alternative means for performing tunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and for determining work functions of materials

  18. Reliability of implant placement with stereolithographic surgical guides generated from computed tomography: clinical data from 94 implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Ahmet Ersan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Ozan, Oguz; McGlumphy, Edwin A

    2008-08-01

    Dental implant placement requires precise planning with regard to anatomic limitations and restorative goals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the match between the positions and axes of the planned and placed implants using stereolithographic (SLA) surgical guides. Ninety-four implants were placed using SLA surgical guides generated from computed tomography (CT) between 2005 and 2006. Radiographic templates were used for all subjects during CT imaging. After obtaining three-dimensional CT images, each implant was virtually placed on the CT images. SLA surgical guides, fabricated using an SLA machine with a laser beam to polymerize the liquid photo-polymerized resin, were used during implant placement. A new CT scan was taken for each subject following implant placement. Special software was used to fuse the images of the planned and placed implants, and the locations and axes were compared. Compared to the planned implants, the placed implants showed angular deviation of 4.9 degrees+/-2.36 degrees, whereas the mean linear deviation was 1.22+/-0.85 mm at the implant neck and 1.51+/-1 mm at the implant apex. Compared to the implant planning, the angular deviation and linear deviation at the neck and apex of the placed maxillary implants were 5.31 degrees+/-0.36 degrees, 1.04+/-0.56 mm, and 1.57+/-0.97 mm, respectively, whereas corresponding figures for placed mandibular implants were 4.44 degrees+/-0.31 degrees, 1.42+/-1.05 mm, and 1.44+/-1.03 mm, respectively. SLA surgical guides using CT data may be reliable in implant placement and make flapless implant placement possible.

  19. Evaluation of the setup margins for cone beam computed tomography–guided cranial radiosurgery: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo Ortega, Juan Francisco, E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain); Wunderink, Wouter [Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delgado, David; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the setup margins from the clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments guided by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). We designed an end-to-end (E2E) test using a skull phantom with an embedded 6mm tungsten ball (target). A noncoplanar plan was computed (E2E plan) to irradiate the target. The CBCT-guided positioning of the skull phantom on the linac was performed. Megavoltage portal images were acquired after 15 independent deliveries of the E2E plan. The displacement 2-dimensional (2D) vector between the centers of the square field and the ball target on each portal image was used to quantify the isocenter accuracy. Geometrical margins on each patient's direction (left-right or LR, anterior-posterior or AP, superior-inferior or SI) were calculated. Dosimetric validation of the margins was performed in 5 real SRS cases: 3-dimesional (3D) isocenter deviations were mimicked, and changes in CTV dose coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) dosage were analyzed. The CTV-PTV margins of 1.1 mm in LR direction, and 0.7 mm in AP and SI directions were derived from the E2E tests. The dosimetric analysis revealed that a 1-mm uniform margin was sufficient to ensure the CTV dose coverage, without compromising the OAR dose tolerances. The effect of isocenter uncertainty has been estimated to be 1 mm in our CBCT-guided SRS approach.

  20. Photothermal investigation of local and depth dependent magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzl, J; Meckenstock, R

    2010-01-01

    To achieve a spatially resolved measurement of magnetic properties two different photothermal approaches are used which rely on heat dissipated by magnetic resonance absorption or thermal modulation of the magnetic properties, respectively. The heat produced by modulated microwave absorption is detected by the classical photothermal methods such as photoacoustic effect and mirage effect. Examples comprise depth resolution of the magnetization of layered tapes and visualisation of magnetic excitations in ferrites. The second photothermal technique relies on the local modulation of magnetic properties by a thermal wave generated with an intensity modulated laser beam incident on the sample. This technique has a higher spatial resolution and sensitivity and has been used to characterize lateral magnetic properties of multilayers and spintronic media. To extend the lateral resolution of the ferromagnetic resonance detection into the nm-range techniques have been developed which are based on the detection of the modulated thermal microwave response by the thermal probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) or by detection the thermal expansion of the magnetic sample in the course of the resonant microwave absorption with an AFM or tunnelling microscope. These thermal near field based techniques in ferromagnetic resonance have been successfully applied to image magnetic inhomogeneities around nano-structures and to measure the ferromagnetic resonance from magnetic nano-dots.

  1. Prussian Blue Nanoparticles as a Versatile Photothermal Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Dacarro

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Prussian blue (PB is a coordination polymer studied since the early 18th century, historically known as a pigment. PB can be prepared in colloidal form with a straightforward synthesis. It has a strong charge-transfer absorption centered at ~700 nm, with a large tail in the Near-IR range. Irradiation of this band results in thermal relaxation and can be exploited to generate a local hyperthermia by irradiating in the so-called bio-transparent Near-IR window. PB nanoparticles are fully biocompatible (PB has already been approved by FDA and biodegradable, this making them ideal candidates for in vivo use. While papers based on the imaging, drug-delivery and absorbing properties of PB nanoparticles have appeared and have been reviewed in the past decades, a very recent interest is flourishing with the use of PB nanoparticles as photothermal agents in biomedical applications. This review summarizes the syntheses and the optical features of PB nanoparticles in relation to their photothermal use and describes the state of the art of PB nanoparticles as photothermal agents, also in combination with diagnostic techniques.

  2. The photothermal camera - a new non destructive inspection tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piriou, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Photothermal Camera, developed by the Non-Destructive Inspection Department at AREVA NP's Technical Center, is a device created to replace penetrant testing, a method whose drawbacks include environmental pollutants, industrial complexity and potential operator exposure. We have already seen how the Photothermal Camera can work alongside or instead of conventional surface inspection techniques such as penetrant, magnetic particle or eddy currents. With it, users can detect without any surface contact ligament defects or openings measuring just a few microns on rough oxidized, machined or welded metal parts. It also enables them to work on geometrically varied surfaces, hot parts or insulating (dielectric) materials without interference from the magnetic properties of the inspected part. The Photothermal Camera method has already been used for in situ inspections of tube/plate welds on an intermediate heat exchanger of the Phenix fast reactor. It also replaced the penetrant method for weld inspections on the ITER vacuum chamber, for weld crack detection on vessel head adapter J-welds, and for detecting cracks brought on by heat crazing. What sets this innovative method apart from others is its ability to operate at distances of up to two meters from the inspected part, as well as its remote control functionality at distances of up to 15 meters (or more via Ethernet), and its emissions-free environmental cleanliness. These make it a true alternative to penetrant testing, to the benefit of operator and environmental protection. (author) [fr

  3. Distributed computing methodology for training neural networks in an image-guided diagnostic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagianakos, V P; Magoulas, G D; Vrahatis, M N

    2006-03-01

    Distributed computing is a process through which a set of computers connected by a network is used collectively to solve a single problem. In this paper, we propose a distributed computing methodology for training neural networks for the detection of lesions in colonoscopy. Our approach is based on partitioning the training set across multiple processors using a parallel virtual machine. In this way, interconnected computers of varied architectures can be used for the distributed evaluation of the error function and gradient values, and, thus, training neural networks utilizing various learning methods. The proposed methodology has large granularity and low synchronization, and has been implemented and tested. Our results indicate that the parallel virtual machine implementation of the training algorithms developed leads to considerable speedup, especially when large network architectures and training sets are used.

  4. Computer systems experiences of users with and without disabilities an evaluation guide for professionals

    CERN Document Server

    Borsci, Simone; Federici, Stefano; Mele, Maria Laura

    2013-01-01

    This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. The book creates an evaluation process that is able to assess the user's satisfaction with a developed system. Presenting a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons, it takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process.

  5. A canonical perturbation method for computing the guiding-center motion in magnetized axisymmetric plasma columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratreau, P.

    1987-01-01

    The motion of charged particles in a magnetized plasma column, such as that of a magnetic mirror trap or a tokamak, is determined in the framework of the canonical perturbation theory through a method of variation of constants which preserves the energy conservation and the symmetry invariance. The choice of a frame of coordinates close to that of the magnetic coordinates allows a relatively precise determination of the guiding-center motion with a low-ordered approximation in the adiabatic parameter. A Hamiltonian formulation of the motion equations is obtained

  6. Fatal paradoxical pulmonary air embolism complicating percutaneous computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Rajesh; Singh, Virendra; Isaac, Rethish; John, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with left upper zone haziness on chest X-ray and an infiltrative lesion with a pleural mass in the left upper lobe on CT scan was scheduled for CT-guided percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy. During the procedure, the patient had massive haemoptysis and cardiorespiratory arrest and could not be revived. Post-mortem CT showed air in the right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary artery and also in the left atrium and aorta. A discussion on paradoxical air embolism following percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy is presented Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  7. Stampi: a message passing library for distributed parallel computing. User's guide, second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Toshiyuki; Koide, Hiroshi; Takemiya, Hiroshi

    2000-02-01

    A new message passing library, Stampi, has been developed to realize a computation with different kind of parallel computers arbitrarily and making MPI (Message Passing Interface) as an unique interface for communication. Stampi is based on the MPI2 specification, and it realizes dynamic process creation to different machines and communication between spawned one within the scope of MPI semantics. Main features of Stampi are summarized as follows: (i) an automatic switch function between external- and internal communications, (ii) a message routing/relaying with a routing module, (iii) a dynamic process creation, (iv) a support of two types of connection, Master/Slave and Client/Server, (v) a support of a communication with Java applets. Indeed vendors implemented MPI libraries as a closed system in one parallel machine or their systems, and did not support both functions; process creation and communication to external machines. Stampi supports both functions and enables us distributed parallel computing. Currently Stampi has been implemented on COMPACS (COMplex PArallel Computer System) introduced in CCSE, five parallel computers and one graphic workstation, moreover on eight kinds of parallel machines, totally fourteen systems. Stampi provides us MPI communication functionality on them. This report describes mainly the usage of Stampi. (author)

  8. Three-dimensional computed tomography-guided monotherapeutic pararectal brachytherapy of prostate cancer with seminal vesicle invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutrouvelis, Panos; Lailas, Niko; Hendricks, Fred; Gil-Montero, Guillermo; Sehn, James; Katz, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To treat patients with prostate cancer and seminal vesicle invasion with monotherapeutic three dimensional computed tomography (3-DCT)-guided posterior pararectal brachytherapy. Methods and materials: Three hundred and sixty two patients with clinical stage T1 a,b or T2 a,b of prostate cancer were referred for 3-DCT-guided brachytherapy. Each underwent further staging with 3-D CT-guided pararectal biopsy of the seminal vesicles under local anesthesia during the pre-treatment CT-planning. Forty-three patients (12%) were upstaged to T3 cNoMo disease. In the set of 43 patients, Eight had Gleason's score≤6, 24 Gleason's score=7, and 11 patients ≥8. Initial PSA was 20 in 18 patients. Of the 43 patients, 37 patients were treated monotherapeutically with 3-D CT-guided brachytherapy. No patients received hormone therapy after the implant. The prescribed dosage to the seminal vesicles and prostate is 120 Gy with Pd-103 seeds and 144 Gy with 1-125 seeds. Results: The prescribed dosage was achieved in all 37 patient's throughout the seminal vesicles whose range of target radiation extended 5-10 mm outside the target in the adjacent fat as calculated with post-implant CT-dosimetry with Varian Brachy Vision or MMS software. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) outcome data were available in 34 patients treated with monotherapy and follow up ranged from 12-56 months (median, 24 months). Decreased PSA levels were stratified into six groups based on the presenting Gleason's score and initial PSA. In the first group (with Gleason's score≤6 and initial PSA 20 ng/ml), PSA decreased to less than 0.5 ng/ml in four out of eight patients (50%). All of the patients in the fourth group (with Gleason's score≥8 and initial PSA 20 ng/ml). There were no patients with Gleason's score of 1-6 and greater than 20 ng/ml initial PSA. Patients, irrespective of the Gleason's score and PSA, had an overall response of decreased PSA (less than 1 ng/ml) of 79%. Conclusion: 3-D CT-guided

  9. Aware Computing in Spatial Language Understanding Guided by Cognitively Inspired Knowledge Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Yokota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental image directed semantic theory (MIDST has proposed an omnisensory mental image model and its description language Lmd. This language is designed to represent and compute human intuitive knowledge of space and can provide multimedia expressions with intermediate semantic descriptions in predicate logic. It is hypothesized that such knowledge and semantic descriptions are controlled by human attention toward the world and therefore subjective to each human individual. This paper describes Lmd expression of human subjective knowledge of space and its application to aware computing in cross-media operation between linguistic and pictorial expressions as spatial language understanding.

  10. Four-dimensional volume-of-interest reconstruction for cone-beam computed tomography-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moiz; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu

    2011-10-01

    Data sufficiency are a major problem in four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) on linear accelerator-integrated scanners for image-guided radiotherapy. Scan times must be in the range of 4-6 min to avoid undersampling artifacts. Various image reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to accommodate undersampled data acquisitions, but these algorithms are computationally expensive, may require long reconstruction times, and may require algorithm parameters to be optimized. The authors present a novel reconstruction method, 4D volume-of-interest (4D-VOI) reconstruction which suppresses undersampling artifacts and resolves lung tumor motion for undersampled 1-min scans. The 4D-VOI reconstruction is much less computationally expensive than other 4D-CBCT algorithms. The 4D-VOI method uses respiration-correlated projection data to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) image inside a VOI containing the moving tumor, and uncorrelated projection data to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) image outside the VOI. Anatomical motion is resolved inside the VOI and blurred outside the VOI. The authors acquired a 1-min. scan of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing a moving water-filled sphere. The authors also used previously acquired 1-min scans for two lung cancer patients who had received CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The same raw data were used to test and compare the 4D-VOI reconstruction with the standard 4D reconstruction and the McKinnon-Bates (MB) reconstruction algorithms. Both the 4D-VOI and the MB reconstructions suppress nearly all the streak artifacts compared with the standard 4D reconstruction, but the 4D-VOI has 3-8 times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than the MB reconstruction. In the dynamic chest phantom study, the 4D-VOI and the standard 4D reconstructions both resolved a moving sphere with an 18 mm displacement. The 4D-VOI reconstruction shows a motion blur of only 3 mm, whereas the MB reconstruction shows a motion blur of 13 mm

  11. PROACT user's guide: how to use the pallet recovery opportunity analysis computer tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Bradley Hager; A.L. Hammett; Philip A. Araman

    2003-01-01

    Pallet recovery projects are environmentally responsible and offer promising business opportunities. The Pallet Recovery Opportunity Analysis Computer Tool (PROACT) assesses the operational and financial feasibility of potential pallet recovery projects. The use of project specific information supplied by the user increases the accuracy and the validity of the...

  12. Press Play for Learning: A Framework to Guide Serious Computer Game Use in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, Erica; Budd, Janene; Smith, Shamus

    2017-01-01

    Computer gaming is a global phenomenon and there has been rapid growth in "serious" games for learning. An emergent body of evidence demonstrates how serious games can be used in primary and secondary school classrooms. Despite the popularity of serious games and their pedagogical potential, there are few specialised frameworks to guide…

  13. The no-nonsense guide to legal issues in web 2.0 and cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Oppenheim, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Offers an advice on getting the most out of web 2.0 and cloud computing. This book features practical working tool that makes the relevant legal principles simple to understand for those with little or no experience and common problems quick to solve when you're struggling with daily deadlines.

  14. Percutaneous transthoracic computed tomography-guided AICD insertion in a patient with extracardiac Fontan conduit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Darra T

    2011-02-01

    Percutaneous pulmonary venous atrial puncture was performed under computed tomography guidance to successfully place an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator into a 26-year-old patient with extracardiac Fontan conduit who had presented with two out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. The procedure avoided the need for lead placement at thoracotomy.

  15. Computer System for Monitoring Environmental Campaigns. User's Guide. Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailador, M.A.; Barcala, M.; Blanco, F.; Gonzalez, C.; Perez, J. M.; Sanchez, A.; Sanchez, E.; Willmot, C.

    2012-01-01

    CIEMAT has an environmental mobile unit to carry out the execution of environmental measures at diverse environments. During the last years, this unit has been involved in changes relative to its instrumentation, being necessary to developed an informatics system, SiSCA Informatics System for the monitoring of environmental campaigns, that is able to: Acquiring in a synchronized way the data from the environmental mobile unit instruments. Showing in a georrefential way these data by means of GIS technology. Transmitting in a secure way and in real time the data to a centralized data base repository This document is the user guide that picks up all the necessary information to use SiSCA when UMA environmental campaigns are carrying out. (Author)

  16. Diagnostic yield and complications of transthoracic computed tomography-guided biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Pedersen, Malene Roland Vils; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2016-01-01

    , the tissue material was found to be sufficient. In 32% of the biopsies, a complication arose, mostly pneumothorax (30%), but chest drainage was needed in only 15% of the 520 cases. Patients with more than ten cigarette pack-years had a complication risk that was twice as high at that of patients with fewer...... packyears. We found that the risk of pneumothorax increased the further the lesion was from the skin surface, the smaller the lesions were and when the patient was biopsied in a lateral position. We also found a higher risk of complications in females than in males. CONCLUSIONS: CT-guided biopsy...... is an excellent tool for analysing pulmonary lesions. The present study clearly shows that the risk of developing a pneumothorax is significantly increased among smokers and former smokers with more than ten pack-years....

  17. Users' guide for a personal-computer-based nuclear power plant fire data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheelis, W.T.

    1986-08-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Fire Data Base has been developed for use with an IBM XT (or with a compatible system). Nuclear power plant fire data is located in many diverse references, making it both costly and time-consuming to obtain. The purpose of this Fire Data Base is to collect and to make easily accessible nuclear power plant fire data. This users' guide discusses in depth the specific features and capabilities of the various options found in the data base. Capabilities include the ability to search several database fields simultaneously to meet user-defined conditions, display basic plant information, and determine the operating experience (in years) for several nuclear power plant locations. Step-by-step examples are included for each option to allow the user to learn how to access the data

  18. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Research Institute, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Boileau, Pascal [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nice (France)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements {+-} SD decreased from 7.8 {+-} 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 {+-} 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 {+-} 17.2 to 15.1 {+-} 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  19. Chest Computed Tomography (CT) Immediately after CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Aspiration Biopsy as a Predictor of Overt Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Tae June; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kang, Young Ae; Kwon, Sung-Youn; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Jae Ho

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims This study examined the correlation between pneumothorax detected by immediate post-transthoracic needle aspiration-biopsy (TTNB) chest computed tomography (CT) and overt pneumothorax detected by chest PA, and investigated factors that might influence the correlation. Methods Adult patients who had undergone CT-guided TTNB for lung lesions from May 2003 to June 2007 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital were included. Immediate post-TTNB CT and chest PA follow-up at 4 and 16 hours after CT-guided TTNB were performed in 934 patients. Results Pneumothorax detected by immediate chest CT (CT-pneumothorax) was found in 237 (25%) and overt pneumothorax was detected by chest PA follow-up in 92 (38.8%) of the 237 patients. However, overt pneumothorax was found in 18 (2.6%) of the 697 patients without CT-pneumothorax. The width and depth of CT-pneumothorax were predictive risk factors for overt pneumothorax. Conclusions CT-pneumothorax is very sensitive for predicting overt pneumothorax, and the width and depth on CT-pneumothorax are reliable risk factors for predicting overt pneumothorax. PMID:19949733

  20. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-10-28

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery.

  1. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline; Hauger, Olivier; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Boileau, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements ± SD decreased from 7.8 ± 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 ± 17.2 to 15.1 ± 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  2. A Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Biopsy and Positron Emission Tomography with Integrated Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Vilmann, P; Krasnik, K

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Exact staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important to improve selection of resectable and curable patients for surgery. Positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle...... aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) are new and promising methods, but indications in lung cancer staging are controversial. Only few studies have compared the 2 methods. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic values of PET/CT and EUS-FNA for diagnosing advanced lung cancer in patients, who...... had both procedures performed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 27 patients considered to be potential candidates for resection of NSCLC underwent PET/CT and EUS-FNA. Diagnoses were confirmed either by open thoracotomy, mediastinoscopy or clinical follow-up. Advanced lung cancer was defined as tumour...

  3. User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

    1982-05-01

    SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

  4. Photothermal depth profiling: Comparison between genetic algorithms and thermal wave backscattering (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Voti, R.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.

    2003-01-01

    Photothermal depth profiling has been the subject of many papers in the last years. Inverse problems on different kinds of materials have been identified, classified, and solved. A first classification has been done according to the type of depth profile: the physical quantity to be reconstructed is the optical absorption in the problems of type I, the thermal effusivity for type II, and both of them for type III. Another classification may be done depending on the time scale of the pump beam heating (frequency scan, time scan), or on its geometrical symmetry (one- or three-dimensional). In this work we want to discuss two different approaches, the genetic algorithms (GA) [R. Li Voti, C. Melchiorri, C. Sibilia, and M. Bertolotti, Anal. Sci. 17, 410 (2001); R. Li Voti, Proceedings, IV Int. Workshop on Advances in Signal Processing for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials, Quebec, August 2001] and the thermal wave backscattering (TWBS) [R. Li Voti, G. L. Liakhou, S. Paoloni, C. Sibilia, and M. Bertolotti, Anal. Sci. 17, 414 (2001); J. C. Krapez and R. Li Voti, Anal. Sci. 17, 417 (2001)], showing their performances and limits of validity for several kinds of photothermal depth profiling problems: The two approaches are based on different mechanisms and exhibit obviously different features. GA may be implemented on the exact heat diffusion equation as follows: one chromosome is associated to each profile. The genetic evolution of the chromosome allows one to find better and better profiles, eventually converging towards the solution of the inverse problem. The main advantage is that GA may be applied to any arbitrary profile, but several disadvantages exist; for example, the complexity of the algorithm, the slow convergence, and consequently the computer time consumed. On the contrary, TWBS uses a simplified theoretical model of heat diffusion in inhomogeneous materials. According to such a model, the photothermal signal depends linearly on the thermal effusivity

  5. A user's guide to the POPFOOD computer code for evaluating ingestion collective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.; Palamountain, J.

    1980-09-01

    A complete description is given of the wide range of user options available for running the POPFOOD computer code, which was developed for the calculation of annual ingestion collective doses from routine atmospheric discharges of radioactivity in the UK. The various options have been depicted pictorially to allow the prospective user to obtain a rapid appreciation of their scope. Facilities for modifying temporarily the library and input data are also described. In addition, input and output data for a sample test case, covering broad range of the various available options, are provided to facilitate programme testing. POPFOOD is written in Fortran IV (level H). The programme is compiled under release 20.6, OPT=2 on the IBM 370/165 computer. (author)

  6. User's guide for vectorized code EQUIL for calculating equilibrium chemistry on Control Data STAR-100 computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A vectorized code, EQUIL, was developed for calculating the equilibrium chemistry of a reacting gas mixture on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. The code provides species mole fractions, mass fractions, and thermodynamic and transport properties of the mixture for given temperature, pressure, and elemental mass fractions. The code is set up for the electrons H, He, C, O, N system of elements. In all, 24 chemical species are included.

  7. From E-commerce to Social Commerce: A Framework to Guide Enabling Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Baghdadi, Youcef

    2013-01-01

    Social commerce is doing commerce in a collaborative and participative way, by using social media, through an enterprise interactive interface that enables social interactions. Technologies such as Web 2.0, Cloud Computing and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) enable social commerce. Yet, a framework for social commerce, putting Enterprise Social Interactions as central entities, would provide a strong business justification for social commerce design and adoption with these enabling techno...

  8. Computation of solution equilibria: A guide to methods in potentiometry, extraction, and spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meloun, M.; Havel, J.; Hogfeldt, E.

    1988-01-01

    Although this book contains a very good review of computation methods applicable to equilibrium systems, most of the book is dedicated to the description and evaluation of computer programs available for doing such calculations. As stated in the preface, the authors (two computniks and a user of graphical and computer methods) have joined forces in order to present the reader with the points of view of both the creator and user of modern computer program tools available for the study of solution equilibria. The successful presentation of such a complicated amalgamation of concepts is greatly aided by the structure of the book, which begins with a brief but thorough discussion of equilibrium concepts in general, followed by an equally brief discussion of experimental methods used to study equilibria with potentiometric, extraction, and spectroscopic methods. These sections would not be sufficient to teach these topics to the beginner but offer an informative presentation of concepts in relation to one another to those already familiar with basic equilibrium concepts. The importance of evaluating and analyzing the suitability of data for further analysis is then presented before an in depth (by a chemist's standards) look at the individual parts that make up a detailed equilibrium analysis program. The next one-third of the book is an examination of specific equilibrium problems and the programs available to study them. These are divided into chapters devoted to potentiometric, extraction, and spectroscopic methods. The format is to discuss a variety of programs, one at a time, including the parts of the program, the types of problems to which it has been applied, and the program's limitations. A number of problems are then presented, which are representative of the type of questions that are normally addressed by research projects in the area

  9. MPSalsa a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 2 - user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinger, A.; Devine, K.; Hennigan, G.; Moffat, H. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This manual describes the use of MPSalsa, an unstructured finite element (FE) code for solving chemically reacting flow problems on massively parallel computers. MPSalsa has been written to enable the rigorous modeling of the complex geometry and physics found in engineering systems that exhibit coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and detailed reactions. In addition, considerable effort has been made to ensure that the code makes efficient use of the computational resources of massively parallel (MP), distributed memory architectures in a way that is nearly transparent to the user. The result is the ability to simultaneously model both three-dimensional geometries and flow as well as detailed reaction chemistry in a timely manner on MT computers, an ability we believe to be unique. MPSalsa has been designed to allow the experienced researcher considerable flexibility in modeling a system. Any combination of the momentum equations, energy balance, and an arbitrary number of species mass balances can be solved. The physical and transport properties can be specified as constants, as functions, or taken from the Chemkin library and associated database. Any of the standard set of boundary conditions and source terms can be adapted by writing user functions, for which templates and examples exist.

  10. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Berbeco, Ross I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nishioka, Seiko [Department of Radiology, NTT Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki, E-mail: maristophanous@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion

  11. Programmer's guide for the CC3 computer models of the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is assessing a concept for disposing of CANDU reactor fuel waste in a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program called the Systems Variability Analysis Code (SYVAC) was developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure (long-term) assessment of the concept, and for environmental assessments of other systems. SYVAC3, the third generation of the code, is an executive program that directs repeated simulation of the disposal system, which is described by the CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3) model. The CC3 model is comprised of the disposal vault submodel, the local geosphere submodel and the biosphere submodel. The CC3 Proarammer's Guide describes the programming philosophy and programming conventions not covered in the project standards. The guide includes a description of the overall logic for the CC3 vault, geosphere, and biosphere submodels. Each of the CC3 submodels is also isolated from the other two submbdels to create autonomous or 'stand-alone' submodels. The techniques used to isolate a CC3 submodel, and in particular to determine the submodells input and output data interface, are described. Structure charts are provided for the CC3 model and stand-alone submodels. This guide is meant as a companion document to the CC3 User's Manual. This guide does not describe how to use the CC3 software. The user should consult the CC3 User's Manual to determine how to configure, compile, link, and run the CC3 source code, as well as how to modify the data in the input files. It is intended that the CC3 code version CC305 be executed with SYVAC3 version SV309 and the Modelling Algorithm Library (ML3) version ML303, both developed for the assessment of the concept. SYVAC3-CC3-ML3 (also referred to as 'SC3') can be run on any platform containing an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compliant compiler. Recommended hardware environments are specified in the CC3 User's Manual. (author)

  12. Curves and surfaces for computer-aided geometric design a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Farin, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    A leading expert in CAGD, Gerald Farin covers the representation, manipulation, and evaluation of geometric shapes in this the Third Edition of Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Geometric Design. The book offers an introduction to the field that emphasizes Bernstein-Bezier methods and presents subjects in an informal, readable style, making this an ideal text for an introductory course at the advanced undergraduate or graduate level.The Third Edition includes a new chapter on Topology, offers new exercises and sections within most chapters, combines the material on Geometric Continuity i

  13. Simple steps to data encryption a practical guide to secure computing

    CERN Document Server

    Loshin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Everyone wants privacy and security online, something that most computer users have more or less given up on as far as their personal data is concerned. There is no shortage of good encryption software, and no shortage of books, articles and essays that purport to be about how to use it. Yet there is precious little for ordinary users who want just enough information about encryption to use it safely and securely and appropriately--WITHOUT having to become experts in cryptography. Data encryption is a powerful tool, if used properly. Encryption turns ordinary, readable data into what

  14. A fascinating country in the world of computing your guide to automated reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Wos, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This book shows you - through examples and puzzles and intriguing questions - how to make your computer reason logically. To help you, the book includes a CD-ROM with OTTER, the world's most powerful general-purpose reasoning program. The automation of reasoning has advanced markedly in the past few decades, and this book discusses some of the remarkable successes that automated reasoning programs have had in tackling challenging problems in mathematics, logic, program verification, and circuit design. Because the intended audience includes students and teachers, the book provides many exercis

  15. Thermal diffusivity measurement by lock-in photothermal shadowgraph method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifuentes, A. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico); Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alvarado, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico); Laboratory for Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee B-3001 (Belgium); Cabrera, H. [Centro Multidisciplinario de Ciencias, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, IVIC, Mérida 5101, Venezuela and SPIE-ICTP Anchor Research in Optics Program Lab, International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Strada Costiera 11, Trieste (Italy); Calderón, A.; Marín, E., E-mail: emarinm@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico)

    2016-04-28

    Here, we present a novel application of the shadowgraph technique for obtaining the thermal diffusivity of an opaque solid sample, inspired by the orthogonal skimming photothermal beam deflection technique. This new variant utilizes the shadow projected by the sample when put against a collimated light source. The sample is then heated periodically by another light beam, giving rise to thermal waves, which propagate across it and through its surroundings. Changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media due to the heating distort the shadow. This phenomenon is recorded and lock-in amplified in order to determine the sample's thermal diffusivity.

  16. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Hamaoui, Georges; Fleming, Austin; Ban, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  17. Photothermal Superheating of Water with Ion-Implanted Silicon Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roder, Paden B.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Smith, Bennett E.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Shutthanandan, V.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-07-21

    Nanoparticle-mediated photothermal (PT) cancer therapy has been a major focus in nanomedicine due to its potential as an effective, non-invasive, and targeted alternative to traditional cancer therapy based on small-molecule pharmaceuticals[1,2]. Gold nanocrystals have been a primary focus of PT research[3], which can be attributed to their size tunability[4], well understood conjugation chemistry[5], and efficient absorption of NIR radiation in the tissue transparency window (800 nm – 1 μm) due to their size-dependent localized surface plasmon resonances[6].

  18. Thin transparent film characterization by photothermal reflectance (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Voti, R.; Wright, O. B.; Matsuda, O.; Larciprete, M. C.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.

    2003-01-01

    Photothermal reflectance methods have been intensively applied to the nondestructive testing of opaque thin films [D. P. Almond and P. M. Patel, Photothermal Science and Techniques (Chapman and Hall, London, 1996); C. Bento and D. P. Almond, Meas. Sci. Technol. 6, 1022 (1995); J. Opsal, A. Rosencwaig, and D. Willenborg, Appl. Opt. 22, 3169 (1983)]. The basic principle is based on thermal wave interferometry: the opaque specimen is illuminated by a laser beam, periodically chopped at the frequency f, so as to generate a plane thermal wave in the surface region. This wave propagates in the film, approaches the rear interface (film-bulk), is partially reflected back, reaches the front surface, is again partially reflected back and so on, giving rise to thermal wave interference. A consequence of this interference is that the surface temperature may be enhanced (constructive interference) or reduced (destructive interference) by simply scanning the frequency f (that is, the thermal diffusion length μ=√D/πf ), so as to observe damped oscillations as a function of f; in practice only the first oscillation may be clearly resolved and used to measure either the film thickness d or the film thermal diffusivity D, and this situation occurs when μ≈d. In general, photothermal reflectance does not measure directly the surface temperature variation, but rather a directly related signal determined by the thermo-optic coefficients and the sample geometry; for detection it is common to monitor the optical reflectivity variation of a probe beam normally incident on the sample. If the thin film is partially transparent to the probe, the theory becomes more difficult [O. Matsuda and O. B. Wright, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B (in press)] and one should consider the probe beam multiple reflections in the thin film. The probe modulation is optically inhomogeneous due to the temperature-induced changes in refractive index. Although in the past the complexity of the analysis has impeded

  19. Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography to Guide Management of Patients With Coronary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michelle C.; Hunter, Amanda; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Assi, Valentina; Lewis, Stephanie; Smith, Joel; Berry, Colin; Boon, Nicholas A.; Clark, Elizabeth; Flather, Marcus; Forbes, John; McLean, Scott; Roditi, Giles; van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Timmis, Adam D.; Newby, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 4,146 patients were randomized to receive standard care or standard care plus coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore the consequences of CCTA-assisted diagnosis on invasive coronary angiography, preventive treatments, and clinical outcomes. Methods In post hoc analyses, we assessed changes in invasive coronary angiography, preventive treatments, and clinical outcomes using national electronic health records. Results Despite similar overall rates (409 vs. 401; p = 0.451), invasive angiography was less likely to demonstrate normal coronary arteries (20 vs. 56; hazard ratios [HRs]: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23 to 0.68]; p coronary artery disease (283 vs. 230; HR: 1.29 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.55]; p = 0.005) in those allocated to CCTA. More preventive therapies (283 vs. 74; HR: 4.03 [95% CI: 3.12 to 5.20]; p coronary heart disease, CCTA leads to more appropriate use of invasive angiography and alterations in preventive therapies that were associated with a halving of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. (Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART Trial [SCOT-HEART]; NCT01149590) PMID:27081014

  20. MELCOR computer code manuals: Primer and user's guides, Version 1.8.3 September 1994. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L.; Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR's phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users' Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package

  1. Computed tomography-guided bupivacaine and corticosteroid injection for the treatment of symptomatic calcification in the great toe tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatoprak O

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Omer Karatoprak,1 Sinan Karaca,2 Mehmet Nuri Erdem,3 Ozgur Karaman,2 Azmi Hamzaoglu41Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital Atasehir, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Kolan International Hospital Sisli, Istanbul, Turkey; 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Istanbul Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul TurkeyBackground: Calcification in the great toe tendon is a rare disorder that is characterized by the deposition of calcium on degenerative collagen fibrils.Case presentations: In this report, we present two cases of calcific tendonitis: one in the adductor hallucis and the other in the flexor hallucis longus tendon. We preferred computed tomography-guided steroid injection in our cases because of pain unresponsive to conservative treatment. Patients were free of symptoms at the follow-up visit, 4 weeks after injection.Conclusion: Calcification of the hallux tendons is a rare disorder. Treatment of tendonitis consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Local anesthetic and steroid injection may be considered in cases unresponsive to conservative treatment. Because of the anatomic location of tendons, injection could be difficult. Computed tomography guidance may improve the success rate of injections.Keywords: bupivacaine, calcification, great toe tendons, corticosteroid injection

  2. Photothermally Activated Pyroelectric Polymer Films for Harvesting of Solar Heat with a Hybrid Energy Cell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Teahoon; Na, Jongbeom; Kim, Byeonggwan; Kim, Younghoon; Shin, Haijin; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2015-12-22

    Photothermal effects in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)s (PEDOTs) were explored for pyroelectric conversion. A poled ferroelectric film was coated on both sides with PEDOT via solution casting polymerization of EDOT, to give highly conductive and effective photothermal thin films of PEDOT. The PEDOT films not only provided heat source upon light exposure but worked as electrodes for the output energy from the pyroelectric layer in an energy harvester hybridized with a thermoelectric layer. Compared to a bare thermoelectric system under NIR irradiation, the photothermal-pyro-thermoelectric device showed more than 6 times higher thermoelectric output with the additional pyroelectric output. The photothermally driven pyroelectric harvesting film provided a very fast electric output with a high voltage output (Vout) of 15 V. The pyroelectric effect was significant due to the transparent and high photothermal PEDOT film, which could also work as an electrode. A hybrid energy harvester was assembled to enhance photoconversion efficiency (PCE) of a solar cell with a thermoelectric device operated by the photothermally generated heat. The PCE was increased more than 20% under sunlight irradiation (AM 1.5G) utilizing the transmitted light through the photovoltaic cell as a heat source that was converted into pyroelectric and thermoelectric output simultaneously from the high photothermal PEDOT electrodes. Overall, this work provides a dynamic and static hybrid energy cell to harvest solar energy in full spectral range and thermal energy, to allow solar powered switching of an electrochromic display.

  3. Implant-Supported PMMA Monolithic Full-Arch Rehabilitation with Surgical Computer-Planned Guide and Immediate Provisional: A Case Report with One Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Luca Zizzari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case report is to describe the surgical and prosthetic procedures to achieve maxillary and mandibular implant-supported PMMA monolithic full-arch rehabilitation (PMFR with surgical computer-planned guide and immediate provisional. In such cases, the correct planning of dental implants’ position, length, and diameter and the prosthetic phases via computer-aided design are very important to achieve good aesthetic and functional long-lasting results.

  4. Implant-Supported PMMA Monolithic Full-Arch Rehabilitation with Surgical Computer-Planned Guide and Immediate Provisional: A Case Report with One Year Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Tacconelli, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the surgical and prosthetic procedures to achieve maxillary and mandibular implant-supported PMMA monolithic full-arch rehabilitation (PMFR) with surgical computer-planned guide and immediate provisional. In such cases, the correct planning of dental implants’ position, length, and diameter and the prosthetic phases via computer-aided design are very important to achieve good aesthetic and functional long-lasting results.

  5. Computed tomography-guided cryoablation of local recurrence after primary resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pusceddu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimal management of local recurrences after primary resection of pancreatic cancer still remains to be clarified. A 58-yearold woman developed an isolated recurrence of pancreatic cancer six year after distal pancreatectomy. Re-resection was attempted but the lesion was deemed unresectable at surgery. Then chemotherapy was administrated without obtaining a reduction of the tumor size nor an improvement of the patient’s symptoms. Thus the patient underwent percutaneous cryoablation under computed tomography (CT-guidance obtaining tumor necrosis and a significant improvement in the quality of life. A CT scan one month later showed a stable lesion with no contrast enhancement. While the use of percutaneous cryoblation has widened its applications in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, it has never been described for the treatment of local pancreatic cancer recurrence after primary resection. Percutaneous cryoablation deserves further studies in the multimodality treatment of local recurrence after primary pancreatic surgery.

  6. Forecasting Outcomes of Multilateral Negotiations: Computer Programs. Volume 2. Guide for Programmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    In -Tor DISTRIBUTION LIST: .... National Defense University .. 1 Armed Forces Staff College Department of Defense Computer Institute - . U.S...AND !1I~OR UICTIONARy nO 500 Jmlo-NMAJ RfrAI(LIN, 8) MAJUR , (TITLE(J),.Jz1,6),NMIN WRITE(LOUTo9) MAJOR, (TITLE(J)PJ:1*6) DO0 450 IIzlsJMIN RE A1)(L I N...5XtI4,2Xp6A8) 21 FORfMATC1H1,* LI1ST OF L :TTEREU THEHLS IN NUMUI~CAL OPD)ER*I/) 22 FORMATCI~EAl,6At8). 23 F0RMAT(5X,I5,Als2H**,6A8). 24 FORMIAT (1X,’ MAJUR

  7. Multiphase integral reacting flow computer code (ICOMFLO): User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    A copyrighted computational fluid dynamics computer code, ICOMFLO, has been developed for the simulation of multiphase reacting flows. The code solves conservation equations for gaseous species and droplets (or solid particles) of various sizes. General conservation laws, expressed by elliptic type partial differential equations, are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, species, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Associated phenomenological submodels of the code include integral combustion, two parameter turbulence, particle evaporation, and interfacial submodels. A newly developed integral combustion submodel replacing an Arrhenius type differential reaction submodel has been implemented to improve numerical convergence and enhance numerical stability. A two parameter turbulence submodel is modified for both gas and solid phases. An evaporation submodel treats not only droplet evaporation but size dispersion. Interfacial submodels use correlations to model interfacial momentum and energy transfer. The ICOMFLO code solves the governing equations in three steps. First, a staggered grid system is constructed in the flow domain. The staggered grid system defines gas velocity components on the surfaces of a control volume, while the other flow properties are defined at the volume center. A blocked cell technique is used to handle complex geometry. Then, the partial differential equations are integrated over each control volume and transformed into discrete difference equations. Finally, the difference equations are solved iteratively by using a modified SIMPLER algorithm. The results of the solution include gas flow properties (pressure, temperature, density, species concentration, velocity, and turbulence parameters) and particle flow properties (number density, temperature, velocity, and void fraction). The code has been used in many engineering applications, such as coal-fired combustors, air

  8. Plasmon-resonant nanorods as multimodal agents for two-photon luminescent imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry B.; Hansen, Matthew N.; Tong, Ling; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Zweifel, Daniel A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Wei, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods have outstanding potential as multifunctional agents for image-guided therapies. Nanorods have large absorption cross sections at near-infrared (NIR) frequencies, and produce two-photon luminescence (TPL) when excited by fs-pulsed laser irradiation. The TPL signals can be detected with single-particle sensitivity, enabling nanorods to be imaged in vivo while passing through blood vessels at subpicomolar concentrations. Furthermore, cells labeled with nanorods become highly susceptible to photothermal damage when irradiated at plasmon resonance, often resulting in a dramatic blebbing of the cell membrane. However, the straightforward application of gold nanorods for cell-specific labeling is obstructed by the presence of CTAB, a cationic surfactant carried over from nanorod synthesis which also promotes their nonspecific uptake into cells. Careful exchange and replacement of CTAB can be achieved by introducing oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) units capable of chemisorption onto nanorod surfaces by in situ dithiocarbamate formation, a novel method of surface functionalization. Nanorods with a dense coating of methyl-terminated OEG chains are shielded from nonspecific cell uptake, whereas nanorods functionalized with folate-terminated OEG chains accumulate on the surface of tumor cells overexpressing their cognate receptor, with subsequent delivery of photoinduced cell damage at low laser fluence.

  9. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for Staging of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer without Mediastinal Involvement at Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naur, Therese Maria Henriette; Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staging of lung cancer is essential to the treatment, which is curative only in cases of localized disease. Previous studies have suggested that endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is unnecessary when positron emission tomography-computed tomog...

  10. Numerical simulation of dynamics of brushless dc motors for aerospace and other applications. Volume 2: User's guide to computer EMA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdash, N. A. O.; Nehl, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    A description and user's guide of the computer program developed to simulate the dynamics of an electromechanical actuator for aerospace applications are presented. The effects of the stator phase currents on the permanent magnets of the rotor are examined. The voltage and current waveforms present in the power conditioner network during the motoring, regenerative braking, and plugging modes of operation are presented and discussed.

  11. A novel approach for computer-assisted template-guided autotransplantation of teeth with custom 3d designed/printed surgical tooling. An ex vivo proof of concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anssari Moin, D.; Derksen, W.; Verweij, J.P.; van Merkesteyn, R.; Wismeijer, D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to introduce a novel method for accurate autotransplantation with computer-assisted guided templates and assembled custom-designed surgical tooling and to test the feasibility and accuracy of this method ex vivo. Materials and Methods: A partially edentulous human

  12. Accuracy of computer-assisted template-guided autotransplantation of teeth with custom three-dimensional designed/printed surgical tooling : A cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anssari Moin, D.; Verweij, J.P.; Waars, H.; van Merkesteyn, R.; Wismeijer, D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present cadaveric study was to assess the accuracy of computer-assisted template-guided autotransplantation of teeth with custom 3-dimensional (3D) designed/printed surgical tooling. Materials and Methods: Ten partially edentulous human mandibular cadavers were scanned using

  13. Computed-tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, Federico, E-mail: federico.collettini@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Singh, Anju [Department of Medical Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Schnapauff, Dirk [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Powerski, Maciej Janusz [Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate technical feasibility and clinical outcome of computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate-brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum. Materials and methods: Between November 2007 and May 2012, 32 consecutive patients with 34 metastases adjacent to the liver hilum (common bile duct or hepatic bifurcation ≤5 mm distance) were treated with CT-HDRBT. Treatment was performed by CT-guided applicator placement and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. MRI follow-up was performed 6 weeks and every 3 months post intervention. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Results: Patients were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up time of 18.75 months (range: 3–56 months). Mean tumor diameter was 4.3 cm (range: 1.3–10.7 cm). One major complication was observed. Four (11.8%) local recurrences were observed after a local tumor control of 5, 8, 9 and 10 months, respectively. Twenty-two patients (68.75%) experienced a systemic tumor progression during the follow up period. Mean TTP was 12.9 months (range: 2–56 months). Nine patients died during the follow-up period. Median OS was 20.24 months. Conclusion: Minimally invasive CT-HDRBT is a safe and effective option also for unresectable liver metastases adjacent to the liver hilum that would have been untreatable by thermal ablation.

  14. An application of commercial data averaging techniques in pulsed photothermal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozescu, I.V.; Moksin, M.M.; Wahab, Z.A.; Yunus, W.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    We present an application of data averaging technique commonly implemented in many commercial digital oscilloscopes or waveform digitizers. The technique was used for transient data averaging in the pulsed photothermal radiometry experiments. Photothermal signals are surrounded by an important amount of noise which affect the precision of the measurements. The effect of the noise level on photothermal signal parameters in our particular case, fitted decay time, is shown. The results of the analysis can be used in choosing the most effective averaging technique and estimating the averaging parameter values. This would help to reduce the data acquisition time while improving the signal-to-noise ratio

  15. Virtual reality using guided imagery to create Kanji or Hiragana by computer graphics: I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigame, Masaaki; Miura, Nozomu; Hosaka, Akiko

    1997-04-01

    We have been studying a kind of word-processor that is able to create Japanese characters, Kanji or Hiragana strings in the cursive style, using an electronic writing brush model. Int his paper, we describe in detail the operation characteristics of the electronic writing brush which we have proposed. We defined a touch shape pattern of the electronic writing brush as a form which is projected as a circle and a cone. The brush goes on certain points of the skeleton of the character figure which is given as skeleton data. The thickness of the line is determined by a diametric variable brush pressure. Our progressive action model can rotate the direction of the writing brush tip corresponding to the difference angle between the direction of brush tip and the direction of the brush movement, and also the softness of the writing brush to express the writing brush method called the side writing brush. The front side and back side of the writing brush can be expressed in a calligraphic drawing. With our technique we can draw characters in actual stroke order on a virtual computer plane as if they are written by an actual writing brush.

  16. Control and characterization of ceramics materials by photothermic radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egee, P.

    1993-01-01

    This work studies, by photothermal radiometry, semi-transparent and scattering ceramic coatings with a model in an axisymetrical geometry. The equation of the radiative transfer is solved thanks to a ten flux-model in order to calculate the luminance field, the radiative flux and the source term with a method by finite differences or the Fourier transform. The term of the source is introduced into the heat equation to calculate the temperature field. Theoretical simulations show the influence of the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the sample. The optical properties, which are necessary for the preceding model, are determined by adjusting measures of hemispherical directional reflectivity and transmissivity. The samples are then analyzed by photothermal radiometry under random noise excitation, which allows us to determine their harmonic response (amplitude and phase) in a large range of modulation frequencies. The confrontation between theory and experimental presents a good agreement. The process allows us to characterize the properties of the coating, and to determine the thermal resistance equivalent to a flaw at the interface. (author). 105 refs., 112 figs., 11 annexes

  17. Computed tomography-guided needle aspiration and biopsy of pulmonary lesions - A single-center experience in 1000 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulou, Loukia S.; Tsagouli, Paraskevi; Thanos, Loukas [Dept. of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' , Athens (Greece)], e-mail: ploukia@hotmail.com; Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Program of Outcomes Research, Div. of Infectious Diseases, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown Univ., RI, and Div. of Infectious Diseases, Rhode Island Hospital, Rhode Island (United States); Politi, Dimitra [Dept. of Cythopathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece); Trigidou, Rodoula [Dept. of Pathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Computed tomography (CT)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) and biopsies are well-established, minimally invasive diagnostic tools for pulmonary lesions. Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of 1000 consecutive lung CT-guided FNA and/or core needle biopsies (CNB), the main outcome measures being diagnostic yield, and complication rates. Material and Methods: Patients considered eligible were those referred to our department for lung lesions. The choice of FNA, CNB, or both was based upon the radiologist's judgment. Diagnostic yield was defined as the probability of having a definite result by cytology/histology. Results: The study included 733 male patients and 267 female patients, with a mean (SD) age of 66.4 (11.4) years. The mean (SD) lesion size was 3.7 (2.4) cm in maximal diameter. Six hundred and forty-one (64%) patients underwent an FNA procedure, 245 (25%) a CNB, and 114 (11%) had been subjected to both. The diagnostic yield was 960/994 (96.6%); this decreased significantly with the use of CNB only (odds ratio [OR] 0.32; 95% CI 0.12 - 0.88; P = 0.03), while it increased with lesion size (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.03 - 1.79; P = 0.03 per cm increase). In 506 patients (52.7%), a malignant process was diagnosed by cytopathology/histology. The complication rate reached 97/1000 (9.7%); complications included: hemorrhage, 62 (6.2%); pneumothorax, 28 (2.8%); hemorrhage and pneumothorax, 5 (0.5%); and hemoptysis, 2 (0.2%). It was not significantly affected by the type of procedure or localization of the lesion. The overall risk for complications was three times higher for lesions <4 cm (OR 3.26; 95% CI 1.96 - 5.42; P < 0.001). Conclusion: CT-guided lung biopsy has a high diagnostic yield using FNA, CNB, or both. The CNB procedure alone will not suffice. Complication rates were acceptable and correlated inversely with lesion size, not localization or type of procedure.

  18. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  19. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin; Ansell, Steve; Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Zadeh, Gelareh; Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark; Jaffray, David A.; Chung, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  20. Individualized treatment of craniovertebral junction malformation guided by intraoperative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianfeng; Wang, Peng; Chen, LiFeng; Ma, Xiaodong; Bu, Bo; Yu, Xinguang

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to report our preliminary experience of intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) using a mobile scanner with integrated neuronavigation system (NNS). The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and potential utility of iCT with integrated NNS in individualized treatment of craniovertebral junction malformation (CVJM). The surgical management of congenital craniovertebral anomalies is complex due to the relative difficulty in accessing the region, critical relationships of neurovascular structures, and the intricate biomechanical issues involved. We reported our first 19 complex CVJM cases including 11 male and 8 female patients from January, 2009 to June, 2009 (mean age, 33.9 y; age range, 13 to 58 y). A sliding gantry 40-slice CT scanner was installed in a preexisting operating room. Image data was transferred directly from the scanner into the NNS using an automated registration system. We applied this technology to transoral odontoidectomy in 17 patients. Moreover, with the extra help of iCT integrated with NNS, odontoidectomy through posterior midline approach, and transoral atlantal lateral mass resection were, for the first time, performed for treatment of complex CVJM. NNS was found to correlate well with the intraoperative findings, and the recalibration was uneven in all cases with an accuracy of 1.6 mm (1.6: 1.2 to 2.0). All patients were clinically evaluated by Nurick grade criteria, and neurological deficits were monitored after 3 months of surgery. Fifteen patients (79%) were improved by at least 1 Nurick grade, whereas the grade did not change in 4 patients (21%). iCT scanning with integrated NNS was both feasible and beneficial for the surgical management of complex CVJM. In this unusual patient population, the technique seemed to be valuable in negotiating complex anatomy and achieving a safe and predictable decompression.

  1. User's Guide to Handlens - A Computer Program that Calculates the Chemistry of Minerals in Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    HandLens is a computer program, written in Excel macro language, that calculates the chemistry of minerals in mineral mixtures (for example, in rocks, soils and sediments) for related samples from inputs of quantitative mineralogy and chemistry. For best results, the related samples should contain minerals having the same chemical compositions; that is, the samples should differ only in the proportions of minerals present. This manual describes how to use the program, discusses the theory behind its operation, and presents test results of the program's accuracy. Required input for HandLens includes quantitative mineralogical data, obtained, for example, by RockJock analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and quantitative chemical data, obtained, for example, by X-ray florescence (XRF) analysis of the same samples. Other quantitative data, such as sample depth, temperature, surface area, also can be entered. The minerals present in the samples are selected from a list, and the program is started. The results of the calculation include: (1) a table of linear coefficients of determination (r2's) which relate pairs of input data (for example, Si versus quartz weight percents); (2) a utility for plotting all input data, either as pairs of variables, or as sums of up to eight variables; (3) a table that presents the calculated chemical formulae for minerals in the samples; (4) a table that lists the calculated concentrations of major, minor, and trace elements in the various minerals; and (5) a table that presents chemical formulae for the minerals that have been corrected for possible systematic errors in the mineralogical and/or chemical analyses. In addition, the program contains a method for testing the assumption of constant chemistry of the minerals within a sample set.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography: A Guide for the General Radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadsmoore, Clare; Newman, David; MacIver, Duncan; Pawaroo, Davina

    2015-11-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in Canada and worldwide. Whilst advances in anatomical imaging to detect and monitor malignant disease have continued over the last few decades, limitations remain. Functional imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET), has improved the sensitivity and specificity in detecting malignant disease. In combination with computed tomography (CT), PET is now commonly used in the oncology setting and is an integral part of many cancer patients' pathways. Although initially the CT component of the study was purely for attenuation of the PET imaging and to provide anatomical coregistration, many centers now combine the PET study with a diagnostic quality contrast enhanced CT to provide one stop staging, thus refining the patient's pathway. The commonest tracer used in everyday practice is FDG (F18-fluorodeoxyglucose). There are many more tracers in routine clinical practice and those with emerging roles, such as 11C-choline, useful in the imaging of prostate cancer; 11C-methionine, useful in imaging brain tumours; C11-acetate, used in imaging hepatocellular carcinomas; 18F-FLT, which can be used as a marker of cellular proliferation in various malignancies; and F18-DOPA and various 68Ga-somatostatin analogues, used in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. In this article we concentrate on FDG PETCT as this is the most commonly available and widely utilised tracer now used to routinely stage a number of cancers. PETCT alters the stage in approximately one-third of patients compared to anatomical imaging alone. Increasingly, PETCT is being used to assess early metabolic response to treatment. Metabolic response can be seen much earlier than a change in the size/volume of the disease which is measured by standard CT imaging. This can aid treatment decisions in both in terms of modifying therapy and in addition to providing important prognostic information. Furthermore, it is helpful in patients with distorted anatomy from surgery

  3. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection; Biopsia percutanea de massas pancreaticas guiada por tomografia computadorizada com pneumodisseccao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Almeida, Maria Fernanda Arruda; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Martins, Eduardo Bruno Lobato; Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka Matushita; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: chiangjengtyng@gmail.com [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem; Coimbra, Felipe Jose Fernandez [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia Abdominal

    2013-05-15

    Objective: to describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and methods: in the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results: in all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion: Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible. (author)

  4. Computer-assisted orthognathic surgery: waferless maxillary positioning, versatility, and accuracy of an image-guided visualisation display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Max J; Mischkowski, Robert A; Dreiseidler, Timo; Thamm, Oliver C; Rothamel, Daniel; Zöller, Joachim E

    2013-12-01

    There may well be a shift towards 3-dimensional orthognathic surgery when virtual surgical planning can be applied clinically. We present a computer-assisted protocol that uses surgical navigation supplemented by an interactive image-guided visualisation display (IGVD) to transfer virtual maxillary planning precisely. The aim of this study was to analyse its accuracy and versatility in vivo. The protocol consists of maxillofacial imaging, diagnosis, planning of virtual treatment, and intraoperative surgical transfer using an IGV display. The advantage of the interactive IGV display is that the virtually planned maxilla and its real position can be completely superimposed during operation through a video graphics array (VGA) camera, thereby augmenting the surgeon's 3-dimensional perception. Sixteen adult class III patients were treated with by bimaxillary osteotomy. Seven hard tissue variables were chosen to compare (ΔT1-T0) the virtual maxillary planning (T0) with the postoperative result (T1) using 3-dimensional cephalometry. Clinically acceptable precision for the surgical planning transfer of the maxilla (orthognathic planning. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational study: The influence of omni-directional guide vane on the flow pattern characteristic around Savonius wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, Yoga Arob; Tjahjana, D. D. D. P.

    2017-01-01

    Standart Savonius wind turbine have a low performance such as low coefficient of power and low coefficient of torque compared with another type of wind turbine. This phenomenon occurs because the wind stream can cause the negative pressure at the returning rotor. To solve this problem, standard Savonius combined with Omni Directional Guide Vane (ODGV) proposed. The aim of this research is to study the influence of ODGV on the flow pattern characteristic around of Savonius wind turbine. The numerical model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations with the standard k-ɛ turbulent model. This equation solved by a finite volume discretization method. This case was analyzed by commercial computational fluid dynamics solver such as SolidWorks Flow Simulations. Simulations were performed at the different wind directions; there are 0°, 30°,60° at 4 m/s wind speed. The numerical method validated with the past experimental data. The result indicated that the ODGV able to augment air flow to advancing rotor and decrease the negative pressure in the upstream of returning rotor compared to the bare Savonius wind turbine.

  6. Image Guided Virtual Autopsy: An Adjunct with Radiographic and Computed Tomography Modalities - An Important Tool in Forensic Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The forensic examination of dead bodies is very helpful in order to identify the person, cause of death, gender, and solving the mysterious cases. It includes a number of techniques, out of which autopsy is the primary investigation that is performed in every medicolegal case. Because of mutilation technologies, traditional autopsy technique is most disturbing in terms of emotions and rituals of relatives. The use of radiology in forensic science comprises performance, interpretation, and reporting of radiographs that is helpful in detecting those changes that are not clinically visible. Forensic radiology plays an important role for identification of humans in mass disasters, criminal investigations, and evaluation of cause of death. The introduction of radiological modalities in autopsy techniques is a complementary tool for forensic identification and is known as virtual autopsy. The advance imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is used in virtual autopsy in order to visualize and reconstruct the internal organs to know the site, type, and depth of injury. This review elaborates the role of maxillofacial imaging in image-guided virtual autopsy.

  7. User's guide to GASPAR code (a computer program for calculating radiation exposure to man from routine air releases of nuclear reactor effluents). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Congel, F.J.; Roecklein, A.K.; Pasciak, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    The document is a user's guide for the GASPAR code, a computer program written for the evaluation of radiological impacts due to the release of radioactive material to the atmosphere during normal operation of light water reactors. The GASPAR code implements the radiological impact models of NRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, Revision 1, for atmospheric releases. The code is currently used by NRC in reactor licensing evaluations to estimate (1) the collective or population dose to the population within a 50-mile radius of a facility, (2) the total collective dose to the U.S. population, and (3) the maximum individual doses at selected locations in the vicinity of the plant

  8. snoSeeker: an advanced computational package for screening of guide and orphan snoRNA genes in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Chen; Huang, Zhan-Peng; Zhou, Hui; Huang, Mian-Bo; Zhang, Shu; Chen, Yue-Qin; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2006-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) represent an abundant group of non-coding RNAs in eukaryotes. They can be divided into guide and orphan snoRNAs according to the presence or absence of antisense sequence to rRNAs or snRNAs. Current snoRNA-searching programs, which are essentially based on sequence complementarity to rRNAs or snRNAs, exist only for the screening of guide snoRNAs. In this study, we have developed an advanced computational package, snoSeeker, which includes CDseeker and ACAseeker ...

  9. 3D computations of flow field in a guide vane blading designed by means of 2D model for a low head hydraulic turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzemianowski, Z; Puzyrewski, R

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the main parameters of the flow field behind the guide vane cascade designed by means of 2D inverse problem and following check by means of 3D commercial program ANSYS/Fluent applied for a direct problem. This approach of using different models reflects the contemporary design procedure for non-standardized turbomachinery stage. Depending on the model, the set of conservation equation to be solved differs, although the physical background remains the same. The example of computations for guide vane cascade for a low head hydraulic turbine is presented.

  10. Prosthesis-guided implant restoration of an auricular defect using computed tomography and 3-dimensional photographic imaging technologies: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuming; Leng, Xu; Zheng, Yaqi; Zhang, Dapeng; Wu, Guofeng

    2015-02-01

    The concept of prosthesis-guided implantation has been widely accepted for intraoral implant placement, although clinicians do not fully appreciate its use for facial defect restoration. In this clinical report, multiple digital technologies were used to restore a facial defect with prosthesis-guided implantation. A simulation surgery was performed to remove the residual auricular tissue and to ensure the correct position of the mirrored contralateral ear model. The combined application of computed tomography and 3-dimensional photography preserved the position of the mirrored model and facilitated the definitive implant-retained auricular prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Millisecond photo-thermal process on significant improvement of supercapacitor’s performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kui; Wang, Jixiao; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Song; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Shichang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A high way for charge transfer is created by a millisecond photo-thermal process which could decrease contact resistance among nanomaterials and improve the electrochemical performances. - Highlights: • Improve conductivity among nanomaterials with a millisecond photo-thermal process. • The specific capacitance can increase about 25% with an photo-thermal process. • The circle stability and rate capability can be improved above 10% with photo-thermal process. • Provide a new way that create electron path to improve electrochemical performance. - Abstract: Supercapacitors fabricated with nanomaterials usually have high specific capacitance and excellent performance. However, the small size of nanomaterials renders a considerable limitation of the contact area among nanomaterials, which is harmful to charge carrier transfer. This fact may hinder the development and application of nanomaterials in electrochemical storage systems. Here, a millisecond photo-thermal process was introduced to create a charge carries transfer path to decrease the contact resistance among nanomaterials, and enhance the electrochemical performance of supercapacitors. Polyaniline (PANI) nanowire, as a model nanomaterial, was used to modify electrodes under different photo-thermal process conditions. The modified electrodes were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the results were analysed by equivalent circuit simulation. These results demonstrate that the photo-thermal process can alter the morphology of PANI nanowires, lower the charge transfer resistances and thus improve the performance of electrodes. The specific capacitance increase of the modified electrodes is about 25%. The improvement of the circle stability and rate capability are above 10%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt on research the effect of photo-thermal process on the conductivity

  12. Photothermal beam deflection calorimetry in solution photochemistry: recent progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvey, D E

    1997-01-01

    Photothermal beam deflection (PBD) calorimetry is a technique that measures changes in the solvent's refractive index that accompanies photothermal heating. This method is capable of extracting both kinetic and thermodynamic information from photochemical reactions. A qualitative description of physical basis of time-resolved PBD is presented. Several recent examples of its application to photochemical and photobiological problems are discussed. Finally, the advantages and limitations of PBD are described.

  13. Guide to federal water quality programs and information: A guide with computer software developed by the interagency work group on water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The publication makes key Federal information on water quality available to environmental analysts. The Guide includes information on (1) underlying demographic pressures; (2) the use of land, water, and resources; (3) pollutant loadings; (4) ambient water quality; (5) other effects of water pollution; and (6) a listing of programs established to preserve, protect and restore water quality

  14. Highly Selective Photothermal Therapy by a Phenoxylated-Dextran-Functionalized Smart Carbon Nanotube Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seungmin; Kwon, Taeyun; Um, Jo-Eun; Haam, Seungjoo; Kim, Woo-Jae

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) photothermal therapy using biocompatible single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is advantageous because as-produced SWNTs, without additional size control, both efficiently absorb NIR light and demonstrate high photothermal conversion efficiency. In addition, covalent attachment of receptor molecules to SWNTs can be used to specifically target infected cells. However, this technique interrupts SWNT optical properties and inevitably lowers photothermal conversion efficiency and thus remains major hurdle for SWNT applications. This paper presents a smart-targeting photothermal therapy platform for inflammatory disease using newly developed phenoxylated-dextran-functionalized SWNTs. Phenoxylated dextran is biocompatible and efficiently suspends SWNTs by noncovalent π-π stacking, thereby minimizing SWNT bundle formations and maintaining original SWNT optical properties. Furthermore, it selectively targets inflammatory macrophages by scavenger-receptor binding without any additional receptor molecules; therefore, its preparation is a simple one-step process. Herein, it is experimentally demonstrated that phenoxylated dextran-SWNTs (pD-SWNTs) are also biocompatible, selectively penetrate inflammatory macrophages over normal cells, and exhibit high photothermal conversion efficiency. Consequently, NIR laser-triggered macrophage treatment can be achieved with high accuracy by pD-SWNT without damaging receptor-free cells. These smart targeting materials can be a novel photothermal agent candidate for inflammatory disease. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Erik W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV, absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. Results With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. Conclusion The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on

  16. Substantial dose reduction in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT)-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, G.; Fasser, M.; Jaschke, W.; Bale, R.; Schullian, P.; Zangerl, A.; Puelacher, W.; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction of the radiation exposure involved in image-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery is an important goal. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of low-dose protocols in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on target registration errors (TREs). Materials and Methods: An anthropomorphic skull phantom with target markers at the craniofacial bone and the anterior skull base was scanned in Sensation Open (40-slice), LightSpeed VCT (64-slice) and Definition Flash (128-slice). Identical baseline protocols (BP) at 120 kV/100 mAs were compared to the following low-dose protocols (LD) in care dose/dose modulation: (LD-I) 100 kV/35ref. mAs, (LD-II) 80 kV/40 - 41ref. mAs, and (LD-III) 80 kV/15 - 17ref. mAs. CTDIvol and DLP were obtained. TREs using an optical navigation system were calculated for all scanners and protocols. Results were statistically analyzed in SPSS and compared for significant differences (p ≤ 0.05). Results: CTDIvol for the Sensation Open/LightSpeed VCT/Definition Flash showed: (BP) 22.24 /32.48 /14.32 mGy; (LD-I) 4.61 /3.52 /1,62 mGy; (LD-II) 3.15 /2.01 /0.87 mGy; and (LD-III) na/0.76 /0.76 mGy. Differences between the BfS (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz) reference CTDIvol of 9 mGy and the lowest CTDIvol were approximately 3-fold for Sensation Open, and 12-fold for the LightSpeed VCT and Definition Flash. A total of 33 registrations and 297 TRE measurements were performed. In all MSCT scanners, the TREs did not significantly differ between the low-dose and the baseline protocols. Conclusion: Low-dose protocols in modern MSCT provided substantial dose reductions without significant influence on TRE and should be strongly considered in image-guided surgery. (orig.)

  17. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V; Maduro, John H; Korevaar, Erik W; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2008-01-01

    The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D)-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT)-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV), absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on clinical data confirming tumour control probability and normal

  18. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Material transport is an important mechanism in microfluidics and drug delivery. The methods and solutions found in literature involve passively diffusing structures, microneedles and chemically fueled structures. In this work, we make use of optically actuated microtools with embedded metal layer...... as heating element for controlled loading and release. The new microtools take advantage of the photothermal-induced convection current to load and unload cargo. We also discuss some challenges encountered in realizing a self-contained polymerized microtool. Microfluidic mixing, fluid flow control...... and convection currents have been demonstrated both experimentally and numerically for static metal thin films or passively floating nanoparticles. Here we show an integration of aforementioned functionalities in an opticallyfabricated and actuated microtool. As proof of concept, we demonstrate loading...

  19. A new approach for a pump-probe photothermal experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcano O, A.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the signal, observed in a pump-probe photo-thermal experimental, are performed using a close field nonlinear geometrical optics approximation. Dependence of the thermo-optical signal from the position of the detector and magnitude of the beams spots size is studied. It is shown that the possibilities of the thermo-optical experiment, as a highly sensitive technique for light detection, can be substantially improved by increasing the probe beam spot size and varying the position of the detector in the vicinity of the sample cell. preliminary experimental results are shown for the situation of weak absorbing liquids. A good qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is obtained. (author)

  20. Photothermally controlled Marangoni flow around a micro bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namura, Kyoko; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Suzuki, Motofumi

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the control of Marangoni flow around a micro bubble using photothermal conversion. Using a focused laser spot acting as a highly localized heat source on Au nanoparticles/dielectric/Ag mirror thin film enables us to create a micro bubble and to control the temperature gradient around the bubble at a micrometer scale. When we irradiate the laser next to the bubble, a strong main flow towards the bubble and two symmetric rotation flows on either side of it develop. The shape of this rotation flow shows a significant transformation depending on the relative position of the bubble and the laser spot. Using this controllable rotation flow, we have demonstrated sorting of the polystyrene spheres with diameters of 2 μm and 0.75 μm according to their size

  1. Photothermally controlled Marangoni flow around a micro bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namura, Kyoko; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Suzuki, Motofumi

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the control of Marangoni flow around a micro bubble using photothermal conversion. Using a focused laser spot acting as a highly localized heat source on Au nanoparticles/dielectric/Ag mirror thin film enables us to create a micro bubble and to control the temperature gradient around the bubble at a micrometer scale. When we irradiate the laser next to the bubble, a strong main flow towards the bubble and two symmetric rotation flows on either side of it develop. The shape of this rotation flow shows a significant transformation depending on the relative position of the bubble and the laser spot. Using this controllable rotation flow, we have demonstrated sorting of the polystyrene spheres with diameters of 2 μm and 0.75 μm according to their size.

  2. Photothermally Driven Refreshable Microactuators Based on Graphene Oxide Doped Paraffin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sichao; Wang, Miao; Guo, Shouwu; Su, Ming

    2017-08-09

    Actuators based on phase change materials (paraffin) can simultaneously produce large stroke length and large force due to thermal expansion, but the low thermal conductivity of paraffin requires high power input and long actuation time. The graphene oxide (GO) doped paraffin dynamic actuator addresses the key challenges in the design of thermal phase change actuators: Thermal conductivity and light absorbing are increased, and the response time is reduced compared to the standard phase change actuator designed with metal heating resistors. The thermal properties of GO-paraffin composites with varied loading amount are characterized to confirm the optimal loading amount of 1.0%. A multicell phase change actuator was integrated into a digital micromirror controlled optical system. A series of photothermally driven refreshable patterns were generated and confirmed with infrared imaging.

  3. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Ruiting; Shen, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions

  4. Photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy of a photosensitive polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Dongkyu; Jung, Namchul; Jeon, Sangmin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seonghwan; Chae, Inseok; Thundat, Thomas [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2012-05-14

    The mechanical and chemical information of a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film on a microcantilever were simultaneously acquired by photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy as a function of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation time. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectra from the PMMA-coated microcantilever agreed well with the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of PMMA on gold-coated silicon wafer. The decreasing intensities of nanomechanical IR peaks represent chemical as well as mechanical information of UV radiation-induced photodegradation processes in the PMMA which cannot be obtained by a conventional FTIR technique. The observed decrease in the resonance frequency of the microcantilever is related to the change in the Young's modulus of the PMMA under UV exposure.

  5. Proposal of a technical guide for the evaluation and management of the solitary pulmonary nodule in function of the radiological characteristics obtained by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinton Hidalgo, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    A guide is proposed to guide clinical personnel in early diagnosis, assessment and management of the solitary pulmonary nodule, with high potential of to develop lung cancer, in function of the radiological characteristics obtained by computed tomography. The management of patients with diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule is standardized with the purpose of to unify diagnostic criteria in a multidisciplinary and institutional environment. Tomographic radiological characteristics are described to allow the suspicion of the solitary pulmonary nodule benignity or malignity. A flow diagram is developed to guide the physician to an adequate monitoring, control and eventual therapeutic treatment. A clear and structured perspective of the diagnostic and therapeutic process is provided to the treating physician and patient [es

  6. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous trephine removal of the nidus in osteoid osteoma patients: experience of a single center in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrilli, Marcelo; Senerchia, Andreza Almeida; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Garcia Filho, Reynaldo Jesus, E-mail: andrezasenerchia@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Oncologia Pediatrica

    2015-07-15

    Objective: to report the results of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous resection of the nidus in 18 cases of osteoid osteoma. Materials and methods: the medical records of 18 cases of osteoid osteoma in children, adolescents and young adults, who underwent CT-guided removal of the nidus between November, 2004 and March, 2009 were reviewed retrospectively for demographic data, lesion site, clinical outcome and complications after procedure. Results: clinical follow-up was available for all cases at a median of 29 months (range 6-60 months). No persistence of pre-procedural pain was noted on 17 patients. Only one patient experienced recurrence of symptoms 12 months after percutaneous resection, and was successfully retreated by the same technique, resulting in a secondary success rate of 18/18 (100%). Conclusion: CT-guided removal or destruction of the nidus is a safe and effective alternative to surgical resection of the osteoid osteoma nidus. (author)

  7. COATING ALTERNATIVES GUIDE (CAGE) USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The guide provides instructions for using the Coating Alternatives GuidE (CAGE) software program, version 1.0. It assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) under the Microsoft disk operating system (MS-DOS). CAGE...

  8. An analysis of brachytherapy with computed tomography-guided permanent implantation of Iodine-125 seeds for recurrent nonkeratin nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen X

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xinying Shen,1,2 Yong Li,2 Yanfang Zhang,2 Jian Kong,2 Yanhao Li1 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Interventional Radiology, Shenzhen People’s Hospital, The Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China Background: 125I seed implantation is a new method in treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, and it is worthwhile to evaluate its feasibility. In this study, we performed brachytherapy with computed tomography (CT-guided permanent implantation of 125I seeds in the treatment of patients with the recurrence of NPC.Methods: A total 30 patients (20 male and ten female at the median age of 55 (range 25–80 years were diagnosed with recurrent nonkeratin NPC, with a total 38 lesions and a short disease-free interval (median ~11 months after primary radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Patients received CT scan, starting from 2 months after the treatment. Follow-up was conducted for ~2–38 months to observe the local control rate and overall survival rate. We also analyzed the possible correlation between survival periods and the status of recurrent tumors.Results: The local control rates at 6, 12, 24, 30, and 36 months after the procedure of 125I seed implantation were 86.8%, 73.7%, 26.3%, 15.8%, and 5.3%, respectively. The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 80.0% (24/30, 30.0% (9/30, and 6.7% (2/30, respectively, with a median survival period of 18 months (17.6±8.6 months. Interestingly, the survival periods of the patients who had primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy were 15.8±7.9 and 24.3±7.9 months, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated that χ2 (log rank was 7.555, with very significant difference (P<0.01. The survival periods of patients in tumor stages I, II, III, and IV were 25.4±8.7, 19.8±9.4, 16.1±4.5, and 12.8±7.8 months, respectively, with

  9. Modelling and characterization of photothermal effects assisted with gold nanorods in ex vivo samples and in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamela Rivera, Horacio; Rodríguez Jara, Félix; Cunningham, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    We discuss in this article the implementation of a laser-tissue interaction and bioheat-transfer 2-D finite-element model for Photothermal Therapy assisted with Gold Nanorods. We have selected Gold Nanorods as absorbing nanostructures in order to improve the efficiency of using compact diode lasers because of their high opto-thermal conversion efficiency at 808 and 850 nm. The goal is to model the distribution of the optical energy among the tissue including the skin absorption effects and the tissue thermal response, with and without the presence of Gold Nanorods. The heat generation due to the optical energy absorption and the thermal propagation will be computationally modeled and optimized. The model has been evaluated and compared with experimental ex-vivo data in fresh chicken muscle samples and in-vivo BALB/c mice animal model.

  10. Polydopamine-coated gold nanostars for CT imaging and enhanced photothermal therapy of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du; Shi, Xiangyang; Jin, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of biocompatible nanoplatforms with dual functionalities of diagnosis and therapeutics is strongly demanded in biomedicine in recent years. In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of polydopamine (pD)-coated gold nanostars (Au NSs) for computed tomography (CT) imaging and enhanced photothermal therapy (PTT) of tumors. Au NSs were firstly formed via a seed-mediated growth method and then stabilized with thiolated polyethyleneimine (PEI-SH), followed by deposition of pD on their surface. The formed pD-coated Au NSs (Au-PEI@pD NSs) were well characterized. We show that the Au-PEI@pD NSs are able to convert the absorbed near-infrared laser light into heat, and have strong X-ray attenuation property. Due to the co-existence of Au NSs and the pD, the light to heat conversion efficiency of the NSs can be significantly enhanced. These very interesting properties allow their uses as a powerful theranostic nanoplatform for efficient CT imaging and enhanced phtotothermal therapy of cancer cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo. With the easy functionalization nature enabled by the coated pD shell, the developed pD-coated Au NSs may be developed as a versatile nanoplatform for targeted CT imaging and PTT of different types of cancer.

  11. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument ('Canary') development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, R J; Sivagurunathan, K; Garcia, J; Matvienko, A; Mandelis, A [Center for Advanced Diffusion Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G8 (Canada); Abrams, S, E-mail: mandelis@mie.utoronto.c [Quantum Dental Technologies, 748 Briar Hill Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M6B 1L3 (Canada)

    2010-03-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  12. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument (Canary) development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, R J; Sivagurunathan, K; Garcia, J; Matvienko, A; Mandelis, A; Abrams, S

    2010-01-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  13. Reconstruction of a Severely Atrophied Alveolar Ridge by Computer-Aided Gingival Simulation and 3D-Printed Surgical Guide: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Seok; Lee, Mi-Ran; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Lee, Ui-Lyong

    Dental implants positioned in severely atrophied anterior maxillae require esthetic or functional compromises. This case report describes the rehabilitation of a severely atrophied alveolar ridge with a three-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) surgical guide. A 50-year-old woman had a severely atrophied anterior maxilla with unfavorably positioned dental implants. Functional and esthetic prosthodontic restoration was difficult to achieve. An anterior segmental osteotomy was planned to reposition the dental implants. A 3D surgical guide was designed for precise relocation of the segment. The surgical guide firmly grasped the impression copings of the dental implants, minimizing surgical errors. Three-dimensional gingival simulation was used preoperatively to estimate the appropriate position of the gingiva. Rigid fixation to the surrounding bone allowed immobilization of the implant-bone segment. Satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes were attained 6 months after surgery. Finally, a severely atrophied alveolar ridge with unfavorably positioned dental implants was recovered with minimal esthetic and functional deterioration using gingival simulation and a 3D CAD/CAM surgical guide.

  14. Frequency and Risk Factors of Various Complications After Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Tomohisa; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To retrospectively determine the frequency and risk factors of various side effects and complications after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. Methods. We reviewed and analyzed records of 112 treatment sessions in 57 of our patients (45 men and 12 women) with unresectable lung tumors treated by ablation. Risk factors, including sex, age, tumor diameter, tumor location, history of surgery, presence of pulmonary emphysema, electrode gauge, array diameter, patient position, maximum power output, ablation time, and minimum impedance during ablation, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Total rates of side effects and minor and major complications occurred in 17%, 50%, and 8% of treatment sessions, respectively. Side effects, including pain during ablation (46% of sessions) and pleural effusion (13% of sessions), occurred with RF ablation. Minor complications, including pneumothorax not requiring chest tube drainage (30% of sessions), subcutaneous emphysema (16% of sessions), and hemoptysis (9% of sessions) also occurred after the procedure. Regarding major complications, three patients developed fever >38.5 deg. C; three patients developed abscesses; two patients developed pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion; and one patient had air embolism and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that a lesion located ≤1 cm of the chest wall was significantly related to pain (p < 0.01, hazard index 5.76). Risk factors for pneumothorax increased significantly with previous pulmonary surgery (p < 0.05, hazard index 6.1) and presence of emphysema (p <0.01, hazard index 13.6). Conclusion. The total complication rate for all treatment sessions was 58%, and 25% of patients did not have any complications after RF ablation. Although major complications can occur, RF ablation of lung tumors can be considered a safe and minimally invasive

  15. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, Natalya V.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Qi, X. Sharon; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  16. Prognostic Factors Influencing the Development of an Iatrogenic Pneumothorax for Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Upper Renal Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B.K.; Kim, C.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of upper renal tumors is considered a minimally invasive treatment, but this technique may cause pneumothorax. Purpose: To assess retrospectively the prognostic factors influencing the development of iatrogenic pneumothorax for RF ablation of upper renal tumors. Material and Methods: Computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation was performed in 24 patients (21 men, three women; age range 31-77 years, mean age 53.3 years) with 28 upper renal tumors. Various factors for pneumothorax-complicated (PC) upper renal tumors and non-pneumothoracic (NP) upper renal tumors were compared during RF ablation to determine which of the factors were involved in the development of pneumothorax. Results: Among 28 upper renal tumors in 24 patients, a pneumothorax occurred accidentally in six patients with eight tumors and intentionally in two patients with two tumors. This complication was treated with conservative management, instead of tube drainage. PC upper renal tumors had shorter distance from the lung or from the costophrenic line to the tumor, a larger angle between the costophrenic line and the tumor, and a higher incidence of intervening lung tissue than NP upper renal tumors (P<0.01). Intervening lung tissue was more frequently detected on CT images obtained with the patient in the prone position than on CT images obtained with the patient in the supine position. Conclusion: The presence of intervening lung tissue and the close proximity between an upper renal tumor and the lung are high risk factors for developing an iatrogenic pneumothorax. Pre-ablation CT scan should be performed in the prone position to exactly evaluate intervening lung tissue

  17. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Natalya V.; Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Qi, X. Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  18. Preoperative Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Hookwire Localization of Metallic Marker Clips in the Breast with a Radial Approach: Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, T.; Kasami, M.; Uchida, Y.; Sanuki, J.; Kimura, K.; Tanaka, K.; Takahashi, K. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Pathology, and Dept. of Breast Surgery, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Background: Hookwire localization is the current standard technique for radiological marking of nonpalpable breast lesions. Stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (SVAB) is of sufficient sensitivity and specificity to replace surgical biopsy. Wire localization for metallic marker clips placed after SVAB is needed. Purpose: To describe a method for performing computed tomography (CT)-guided hookwire localization using a radial approach for metallic marker clips placed percutaneously after SVAB. Material and Methods: Nineteen women scheduled for SVAB with marker-clip placement, CT-guided wire localization of marker clips, and, eventually, surgical excision were prospectively entered into the study. CT-guided wire localization was performed with a radial approach, followed by placement of a localizing marker-clip surgical excision. Feasibility and reliability of the procedure and the incidence of complications were examined. Results: CT-guided wire localization surgical excision was successfully performed in all 19 women without any complications. The mean total procedure time was 15 min. The median distance on CT image from marker clip to hookwire was 2 mm (range 0-3 mm). Conclusion: CT-guided preoperative hookwire localization with a radial approach for marker clips after SVAB is technically feasible.

  19. Preoperative computed tomography-guided percutaneous hookwire localization of metallic marker clips in the breast with a radial approach: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, T; Kasami, M; Uchida, Y; Sanuki, J; Kimura, K; Tanaka, K; Takahashi, K

    2007-06-01

    Hookwire localization is the current standard technique for radiological marking of nonpalpable breast lesions. Stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (SVAB) is of sufficient sensitivity and specificity to replace surgical biopsy. Wire localization for metallic marker clips placed after SVAB is needed. To describe a method for performing computed tomography (CT)-guided hookwire localization using a radial approach for metallic marker clips placed percutaneously after SVAB. Nineteen women scheduled for SVAB with marker-clip placement, CT-guided wire localization of marker clips, and, eventually, surgical excision were prospectively entered into the study. CT-guided wire localization was performed with a radial approach, followed by placement of a localizing marker-clip surgical excision. Feasibility and reliability of the procedure and the incidence of complications were examined. CT-guided wire localization surgical excision was successfully performed in all 19 women without any complications. The mean total procedure time was 15 min. The median distance on CT image from marker clip to hookwire was 2 mm (range 0-3 mm). CT-guided preoperative hookwire localization with a radial approach for marker clips after SVAB is technically feasible.

  20. Application of digital diagnostic impression, virtual planning, and computer-guided implant surgery for a CAD/CAM-fabricated, implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Brandon M; Lin, Wei-Shao; Ntounis, Athanasios; Harris, Bryan T; Morton, Dean

    2014-09-01

    This clinical report demonstrated the use of an implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis fabricated with a contemporary digital approach. The digital diagnostic data acquisition was completed with a digital diagnostic impression with an intraoral scanner and cone-beam computed tomography with a prefabricated universal radiographic template to design a virtual prosthetically driven implant surgical plan. A surgical template fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) was used to perform computer-guided implant surgery. The definitive digital data were then used to design the definitive CAD/CAM-fabricated fixed dental prosthesis. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2-CuxS double-shelled hollow spheres for enhanced chemo-/photothermal anti-cancer therapy and dual-modal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Yang, Guixin; Wang, Xingmei; Lv, Ruichan; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; Gulzar, Arif; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional composites have gained significant interest due to their unique properties which show potential in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the design of an efficient combination of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic modes is still a challenge. In this contribution, Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2 double-shelled hollow spheres (DSHSs) with up-conversion fluorescence have been successfully prepared through a facile integrated sacrifice template method, followed by a calcination process. It is found that the double-shelled structure with large specific surface area and uniform shape is composed of an inner shell of luminescent Y2O3:Yb,Er and an outer mesoporous silica shell. Ultra small CuxS nanoparticles (about 2.5 nm) served as photothermal agents, and a chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin, DOX) was then attached onto the surface of mesoporous silica, forming a DOX-DSHS-CuxS composite. The composite exhibits high anti-cancer efficacy due to the synergistic photothermal therapy (PTT) induced by the attached CuxS nanoparticles and the enhanced chemotherapy promoted by the heat from the CuxS-based PTT when irradiated by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) light. Moreover, the composite shows excellent in vitro and in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) and up-conversion fluorescence (UCL) imaging properties owing to the doped rare earth ions, thus making it possible to achieve the target of imaging-guided synergistic therapy.Multifunctional composites have gained significant interest due to their unique properties which show potential in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the design of an efficient combination of multiple diagnostic and therapeutic modes is still a challenge. In this contribution, Y2O3:Yb,Er@mSiO2 double-shelled hollow spheres (DSHSs) with up-conversion fluorescence have been successfully prepared through a facile integrated sacrifice template method, followed by a calcination process. It is found that the double-shelled structure with large

  2. Accuracy of Computer-Assisted Template-Guided Autotransplantation of Teeth With Custom Three-Dimensional Designed/Printed Surgical Tooling: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anssari Moin, David; Verweij, Jop Pieter; Waars, Hugo; van Merkesteyn, Richard; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present cadaveric study was to assess the accuracy of computer-assisted template-guided autotransplantation of teeth with custom 3-dimensional (3D) designed/printed surgical tooling. Ten partially edentulous human mandibular cadavers were scanned using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system and an intraoral scanning system. The 3D data of these cadavers were imported to specialized software and used to analyze the region of the recipient sites, and the donor teeth were selected. Subsequently, congruent to the donor teeth, custom surgical tooling and surgical-guided templates were designed and 3D printed. The guided osteotomies were performed and the donor teeth transplanted. To evaluate the planned donor teeth positions compared with the transplanted donor teeth positions, the mandibles were scanned again using the CBCT system, and software matching was applied to measure the accuracy of the procedure. The mean angular deflection of the transplanted donor teeth with the planned donor teeth positions was 5.6 ± 5.4°. Comparing the 3D positions of the shoulders, a mean deviation of 3.15 ± 1.16 mm and a mean apical deviation of 2.61 ± 0.78 mm were found. The described method of computer-assisted template-guided autotransplantation of teeth with custom 3D designed/printed surgical tooling could potentially provide a relatively accurate alternative for the currently available treatment approaches. Further research should focus on improving the accuracy of this technique and evaluating the clinical success and advantages of this method. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accurate pre-surgical determination for self-drilling miniscrew implant placement using surgical guides and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Ken; Kawaguchi, Misuzu; Tabuchi, Masako; Goto, Shigemi

    2010-12-01

    Miniscrew implants have proven to be effective in providing absolute orthodontic anchorage. However, as self-drilling miniscrew implants have become more popular, a problem has emerged, i.e. root contact, which can lead to perforation and other root injuries. To avoid possible root damage, a surgical guide was fabricated and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to incorporate guide tubes drilled in accordance with the planned direction of the implants. Eighteen patients (5 males and 13 females; mean age 23.8 years; minimum 10.7, maximum 45.5) were included in the study. Forty-four self-drilling miniscrew implants (diameter 1.6, and length 8 mm) were placed in interradicular bone using a surgical guide procedure, the majority in the maxillary molar area. To determine the success rates, statistical analysis was undertaken using Fisher's exact probability test. CBCT images of post-surgical self-drilling miniscrew implant placement showed no root contact (0/44). However, based on CBCT evaluation, it was necessary to change the location or angle of 52.3 per cent (23/44) of the guide tubes prior to surgery in order to obtain optimal placement. If orthodontic force could be applied to the screw until completion of orthodontic treatment, screw anchorage was recorded as successful. The total success rate of all miniscrews was 90.9 per cent (40/44). Orthodontic self-drilling miniscrew implants must be inserted carefully, particularly in the case of blind placement, since even guide tubes made on casts frequently require repositioning to avoid the roots of the teeth. The use of surgical guides, fabricated using CBCT images, appears to be a promising technique for placement of orthodontic self-drilling miniscrew implants adjacent to the dental roots and maxillary sinuses.

  4. Novel Cs-Based Upconversion Nanoparticles as Dual-Modal CT and UCL Imaging Agents for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxin; Li, Luoyuan; Guo, Quanwei; Wang, Lu; Liu, Dongdong; Wei, Ziwei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide-based contrast agents have attracted increasing attention for their unique properties and potential applications in cancer theranostics. To date, many of these agents have been studied extensively in cells and small animal models. However, performance of these theranostic nanoparticles requires further improvement. In this study, a novel CsLu2F7:Yb,Er,Tm-based visual therapeutic platform was developed for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy. Due to the presence of the heavy alkali metal Cesium (Cs) in host lattice, the nanoplatform can provide a higher resolution X-ray CT imaging than many other reported lanthanide-based CT contrast agents. Furthermore, by using the targeted RGD motif, chemotherapy drug alpha-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), and photothermal coupling agent ICG, this nanoplatform simultaneously provides multifunctional imaging and targeted synergistic therapy. To demonstrate the theranostic performance of this novel nanoplatform in vivo, visual diagnosis in the small animal model was realized by UCL/CT imaging which was further integrated with targeted chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. These results provided evidence for the successful construction of a novel lanthanide-based nanoplatform coupled with multimodal imaging diagnosis and potential application in synergistic cancer theranostics.

  5. Evaluation of every other day-cone beam computed tomography in image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byoung Suk; Ahn, Jong Ho; Kim, Jong Sik; Song, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography(CBCT) in Image Guided Radiation Therapy(IGRT), Set-up error can be reduced but exposure dose of the patient due to CBCT will increase. Through this study, we are to evaluate by making a scenario with the implementation period of CBCT as every other day. Of prostate cancer patients, 9 patients who got a Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy(IMRT) with CBCT in IGRT were analyzed. Based on values corrected by analyzing set-up error by using CBCT every day during actual treatment, we created a scenario that conducts CBCT every other day. After applying set-up error values of the day not performing CBCT in the scenario to the treatment planning system(Pinnacle 9.2, Philips, USA) by moving them from the treatment iso-center during actual treatment, we established re-treatment plan under the same conditions as actual treatment. Based on this, the dose distribution of normal organs and Planning Target Volume(PTV) was compared and analyzed. In the scenario that performs CBCT every other day based on set-up error values when conducting CBCT every day, average X-axis : 0.2±0.73 mm , Y-axis : 0.1±0.58 mm , Z-axis : -1.3±1.17 mm difference was shown. This was applied to the treatment planning to establish re-treatment plan and dose distribution was evaluated and as a result, Dmean : -0.17 Gy, D99% : -0.71 Gy of PTV difference was shown in comparison with the result obtained when carrying out CBCT every day. As for normal organs, V66 : 1.55% of rectal wall, V66 : -0.76% of bladder difference was shown. In case of a CBCT perform every other day could reduce exposure dose and additional treatment time. And it is thought to be able to consider the application depending on the condition of the patient because the difference in the dose distribution of normal organs, PTV is not large

  6. The clinical feasibility and effect of online cone beam computer tomography-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin; Bai Sen; Chen Nianyong; Xu Feng; Jiang Xiaoqin; Li Yan; Xu Qingfeng; Shen Yali; Zhang Hong; Gong Youling; Zhong Renming; Jiang Qingfeng

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Online adaptive correction in image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy appeared to be a promising approach for precision radiation treatment in head and neck tumors. This protocol was designed to evaluate the clinical feasibility and effect of online cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance in IMRT of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Methods and materials: The Elekta Synergy system, which integrates an X-ray volumetric imager (XVI), was used to deliver radiation treatment for 22 cases of NPC. The acquired CBCT was registered to the planning CT for online and offline analysis. The systematic and random setup errors, as well as planning target volume (PTV) margin, were calculated at different correction threshold levels. The impact of online setup correction on dosimetry was evaluated by simulation of pre-correction errors. Results: The correction-of-setup-errors frequencies for 1, 2 and 3 mm thresholds were 41.3-53.9%, 12.7-21.2% and 6.3-10.3%, respectively. Online correction was effective at the 2 mm threshold level for all three axes. The pre-correction systematic errors for the whole group ranged 1.1-1.3 mm, and the random errors were also 1.1-1.3 mm. After online correction, the systematic and random errors ranged 0.4-0.5 mm and 0.7-0.8 mm, respectively, in the three directions. The PTV margins for the pre-correction, pretreatment and post-treatment positions were 3.5-4.2 mm, 1.6-1.8 mm and 2.5-3.2 mm, respectively, in three directions. Analysis of hypothetical dosimetric change due to a translational isocenter shift of 3 mm showed that if no correction was applied, the mean maximum dose to both the brain stem and spinal cord would be increased by 10 Gy, the mean dose to the left and right parotids would be increased by 7.8 and 8.5 Gy, respectively, and the dose to target volumes would be decreased: 4 Gy for 95% GTV and 5.6 Gy for 95% CTV 60. Conclusions: CBCT-based online correction increased the accuracy of IMRT for NPC and

  7. Priori mask guided image reconstruction (p-MGIR) for ultra-low dose cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C.; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren L.; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the compressed sensing (CS) based iterative reconstruction method has received attention because of its ability to reconstruct cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with good quality using sparsely sampled or noisy projections, thus enabling dose reduction. However, some challenges remain. In particular, there is always a tradeoff between image resolution and noise/streak artifact reduction based on the amount of regularization weighting that is applied uniformly across the CBCT volume. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel low-dose CBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called priori mask guided image reconstruction (p-MGIR) that allows reconstruction of high-quality low-dose CBCT images while preserving the image resolution. In p-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume was mathematically modeled as a combination of two regions: (1) where anatomical structures are complex, and (2) where intensities are relatively uniform. The priori mask, which is the key concept of the p-MGIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes between the two separate CBCT regions where the resolution needs to be preserved and where streak or noise needs to be suppressed. We then alternately updated each part of image by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively, where one minimization was focused on preserving the edge information of the first part while the other concentrated on the removal of noise/artifacts from the latter part. To evaluate the performance of the p-MGIR algorithm, a numerical head-and-neck phantom, a Catphan 600 physical phantom, and a clinical head-and-neck cancer case were used for analysis. The results were compared with the standard Feldkamp-Davis-Kress as well as conventional CS-based algorithms. Examination of the p-MGIR algorithm showed that high-quality low-dose CBCT images can be reconstructed without compromising the image resolution. For both phantom and the patient cases, the p-MGIR is able to achieve a clinically

  8. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous ozone injection of the Gasserian ganglion for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An JX

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian-Xiong An,1,2 Hui Liu,1 Ruo-Wen Chen,1,2 Yong Wang,1 Wen-Xing Zhao,1 Derek Eastwood,3 John P Williams4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine & Critical Care Medicine, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University & Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Weifang Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pain Services, Wirral University Teaching Hospital, Wirral, Merseyside, UK; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of computed tomography (CT-guided percutaneous ozone injection for refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Design: A retrospective evaluation was performed in the study. Setting: The study was conducted at a university hospital pain center. Patients and methods: A total of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of refractory trigeminal neuralgia were enrolled. All patients were treated with a percutaneous ozone injection and one patient was excluded. There were 21 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (group A and seven patients with painful trigeminal neuropathy caused by post-herpetic neuralgia (group B. The percutaneous injection was an oxygen–ozone mixture at an ozone concentration of 30 mg/­mL into the Gasserian ganglion performed under CT guidance. The number of ­procedures performed varied from one to as many as 16. Outcomes were evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS pain scores. Results: The combined VAS scores were 7.11 ± 1.23 pretreatment, 2.86 ± 1.69 posttreatment (P < 0.05 and 3.25 ± 2.01 after 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05. In group A, the VAS scores were 7.10 ± 1.04 pretreatment and 2.90 ± 1.84 posttreatment (P < 0.05. In group B, the VAS scores were 7.14 ± 1.77 pretreatment and 2.71 ± 1.25 posttreatment (P < 0.05. After 6-months follow-up, the VAS score was 3.38

  9. Personalized Assessment of kV Cone Beam Computed Tomography Doses in Image-guided Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yibao [Beijing Key Lab of Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Yan Yulong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Bao Shanglian [Beijing Key Lab of Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative method for the estimation of kV cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) doses in pediatric patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-two children were retrospectively analyzed in subgroups of different scanned regions: one group in the head-and-neck and the other group in the pelvis. Critical structures in planning CT images were delineated on an Eclipse treatment planning system before being converted into CT phantoms for Monte Carlo simulations. A benchmarked EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions of kVCBCT scans with full-fan high-quality head or half-fan pelvis protocols predefined by the manufacturer. Based on planning CT images and structures exported in DICOM RT format, occipital-frontal circumferences (OFC) were calculated for head-and-neck patients using DICOMan software. Similarly, hip circumferences (HIP) were acquired for the pelvic group. Correlations between mean organ doses and age, weight, OFC, and HIP values were analyzed with SigmaPlot software suite, where regression performances were analyzed with relative dose differences (RDD) and coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: kVCBCT-contributed mean doses to all critical structures decreased monotonically with studied parameters, with a steeper decrease in the pelvis than in the head. Empirical functions have been developed for a dose estimation of the major organs at risk in the head and pelvis, respectively. If evaluated with physical parameters other than age, a mean RDD of up to 7.9% was observed for all the structures in our population of 42 patients. Conclusions: kVCBCT doses are highly correlated with patient size. According to this study, weight can be used as a primary index for dose assessment in both head and pelvis scans, while OFC and HIP may serve as secondary indices for dose estimation in corresponding regions. With the proposed empirical functions, it is possible

  10. Mapping photothermally induced gene expression in living cells and tissues by nanorod-locked nucleic acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Li, Na; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-04-22

    The photothermal effect of plasmonic nanostructures has numerous applications, such as cancer therapy, photonic gene circuit, large cargo delivery, and nanostructure-enhanced laser tweezers. The photothermal operation can also induce unwanted physical and biochemical effects, which potentially alter the cell behaviors. However, there is a lack of techniques for characterizing the dynamic cell responses near the site of photothermal operation with high spatiotemporal resolution. In this work, we show that the incorporation of locked nucleic acid probes with gold nanorods allows photothermal manipulation and real-time monitoring of gene expression near the area of irradiation in living cells and animal tissues. The multimodal gold nanorod serves as an endocytic delivery reagent to transport the probes into the cells, a fluorescence quencher and a binding competitor to detect intracellular mRNA, and a plasmonic photothermal transducer to induce cell ablation. We demonstrate the ability of the gold nanorod-locked nucleic acid complex for detecting the spatiotemporal gene expression in viable cells and tissues and inducing photothermal ablation of single cells. Using the gold nanorod-locked nucleic acid complex, we systematically characterize the dynamic cellular heat shock responses near the site of photothermal operation. The gold nanorod-locked nucleic acid complex enables mapping of intracellular gene expressions and analyzes the photothermal effects of nanostructures toward various biomedical applications.

  11. Emerging investigator series: the rise of nano-enabled photothermal materials for water evaporation and clean water production by sunlight

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Solar driven water evaporation and distillation is an ancient technology, but has been rejuvenated by nano-enabled photothermal materials in the past 4 years. The nano-enabled state-of-the-art photothermal materials are able to harvest a full solar

  12. One-step synthesis of soy protein/graphene nanocomposites and their application in photothermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xuejiao; Li, Zhao; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin, E-mail: chenx@fudan.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    Photothermal therapy, due to its security and effectiveness, has recently become a promising cancer treatment after surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. In this article, soy protein isolate/reduced graphene oxide (SPI/rGO) nanocomposites are prepared via a simple and green process. That is, GO is reduced in situ and stabilized by SPI, an abundant, low-cost, sustainable natural material, and simultaneously forms SPI/rGO nanocomposites. The resulting SPI/rGO nanocomposites disperse in water very well and exhibit good biocompatibility due to the attachment of SPI to the surface of rGO. Such SPI/rGO nanocomposites demonstrate an excellent photothermal capacity and are able to kill HeLa cells efficiently with near-infrared irradiation (808 nm). The results in this work suggest that such a SPI/rGO hybrid material could be a promising candidate for future applications of photothermal therapy. - Highlights: • Soy protein/graphene nanocomposites are prepared via a simple and green process. • Soy protein is used as both the reducing and the stabilizing agent to graphene oxide. • Soy protein/graphene nanocomposites disperse in water well and exhibit good biocompatibility. • The nanocomposites demonstrate excellent photothermal capacity and kill HeLa cells efficiently. • Such nanocomposites can be a promising candidate for photothermal therapy in future application.

  13. Role of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death induced by nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattani, Varun P.; Shah, Jay; Atalis, Alexandra; Sharma, Anirudh; Tunnell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Current cancer therapies can cause significant collateral damage due to a lack of specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, we explored the cell death pathway response to gold nanorod (GNR)-mediated photothermal therapy as a highly specific cancer therapeutic to understand the role of apoptosis and necrosis during intense localized heating. By developing this, we can optimize photothermal therapy to induce a maximum of ‘clean’ cell death pathways, namely apoptosis, thereby reducing external damage. GNRs were targeted to several subcellular localizations within colorectal tumor cells in vitro, and the cell death pathways were quantitatively analyzed after photothermal therapy using flow cytometry. In this study, we found that the cell death response to photothermal therapy was dependent on the GNR localization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nanorods targeted to the perinuclear region irradiated at 37.5 W/cm 2 laser fluence rate led to maximum cell destruction with the ‘cleaner’ method of apoptosis, at similar percentages as other anti-cancer targeted therapies. We believe that this indicates the therapeutic potential for GNR-mediated photothermal therapy to treat cancer effectively without causing damage to surrounding tissue

  14. Red blood cell membrane-camouflaged melanin nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qin; Luo, Zimiao; Men, Yongzhi; Yang, Peng; Peng, Haibao; Guo, Ranran; Tian, Ye; Pang, Zhiqing; Yang, Wuli

    2017-10-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) has represented a promising noninvasive approach for cancer treatment in recent years. However, there still remain challenges in developing non-toxic and biodegradable biomaterials with high photothermal efficiency in vivo. Herein, we explored natural melanin nanoparticles extracted from living cuttlefish as effective photothermal agents and developed red blood cell (RBC) membrane-camouflaged melanin (Melanin@RBC) nanoparticles as a platform for in vivo antitumor PTT. The as-obtained natural melanin nanoparticles demonstrated strong absorption at NIR region, higher photothermal conversion efficiency (∼40%) than synthesized melanin-like polydopamine nanoparticles (∼29%), as well as favorable biocompatibility and biodegradability. It was shown that RBC membrane coating on melanin nanoparticles retained their excellent photothermal property, enhanced their blood retention and effectively improved their accumulation at tumor sites. With the guidance of their inherited photoacoustic imaging capability, optimal accumulation of Melanin@RBC at tumors was achieved around 4 h post intravenous injection. Upon irradiation by an 808-nm laser, the developed Melanin@RBC nanoparticles exhibited significantly higher PTT efficacy than that of bare melanin nanoparticles in A549 tumor-bearing mice. Given that both melanin nanoparticles and RBC membrane are native biomaterials, the developed Melanin@RBC platform could have great potential in clinics for anticancer PTT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death induced by nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattani, Varun P., E-mail: varun.pattani@utexas.edu; Shah, Jay; Atalis, Alexandra; Sharma, Anirudh; Tunnell, James W. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Current cancer therapies can cause significant collateral damage due to a lack of specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, we explored the cell death pathway response to gold nanorod (GNR)-mediated photothermal therapy as a highly specific cancer therapeutic to understand the role of apoptosis and necrosis during intense localized heating. By developing this, we can optimize photothermal therapy to induce a maximum of ‘clean’ cell death pathways, namely apoptosis, thereby reducing external damage. GNRs were targeted to several subcellular localizations within colorectal tumor cells in vitro, and the cell death pathways were quantitatively analyzed after photothermal therapy using flow cytometry. In this study, we found that the cell death response to photothermal therapy was dependent on the GNR localization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nanorods targeted to the perinuclear region irradiated at 37.5 W/cm{sup 2} laser fluence rate led to maximum cell destruction with the ‘cleaner’ method of apoptosis, at similar percentages as other anti-cancer targeted therapies. We believe that this indicates the therapeutic potential for GNR-mediated photothermal therapy to treat cancer effectively without causing damage to surrounding tissue.

  16. Near-infrared light-responsive inorganic nanomaterials for photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Bao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel nanomaterials and advanced nanotechnologies prompt the fast development of new protocols for biomedical application. The unique light-to-heat conversion property of nanoscale materials can be utilized to produce novel and effective therapeutics for cancer treatment. In particular, near-infrared (NIR photothermal therapy (PTT has gained popularity and very quickly developed in recent years due to minimally invasive treatments for patients. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art in the development of inorganic nanocomposites for photothermal cancer therapy. The current states of the design, synthesis, the cellular uptake behavior, the cellular cytotoxicity and both in vivo and in vitro nanoparticle assisted photothermal treatments of inorganic photothermal therapy agents (PTA are described. Finally, the perspective and challenges of PTT development are presented and some proposals are suggested for its further development and exploration. This summary should provide improved understanding of cancer treatment with photothermal nanomaterials and push nanoscience and nanotechnology one step at a time toward clinical applications.

  17. Computer-designed surgical guide template compared with free-hand operation for mesiodens extraction in premaxilla using “trapdoor” method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying Kai; Xie, Qian Yang; Yang, Chi; Xu, Guang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to introduce a novel method of mesiodens extraction using a vascularized pedicled bone flap by piezosurgery and to compare the differences between a computer-aided design surgical guide template and free-hand operation. A total of 8 patients with mesiodens, 4 with a surgical guide (group I), and 4 without it (group II) were included in the study. The surgical design was to construct a trapdoor pedicle on the superior mucoperiosteal attachment with application of piezosurgery. The bone lid was repositioned after mesiodens extraction. Group I patients underwent surgeries based on the preoperative planning with surgical guide templates, while group II patients underwent free-hand operation. The outcome variables were success rate, intraoperative time, anterior nasal spine (ANS) position, changes of nasolabial angle (NLA), and major complications. Data from the 2 groups were compared by SPSS 17.0, using Wilcoxon test. The operative time was significantly shorter in group I patients. All the mesiodentes were extracted successfully and no obvious differences of preoperative and postoperative ANS position and NLA value were found in both groups. The patients were all recovered uneventfully. Surgical guide templates can enhance clinical accuracy and reduce operative time by facilitating accurate osteotomies. PMID:28658139

  18. ANDOSE: a computer code for calculating annual doses to man from routine releases of LWR effluents for the purpose of evaluating compliance with JAEC's guide for doseobjectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Toshinori; Shiraishi, Tadao

    1979-10-01

    For environmental doses from routine releases of LWRs effluents to meet the Criterion 'As Low As is Practicable (ALAP)', Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) established a series of guides, the first for 'Dose Objectives' (May 1975), the second for models and parameters for calculating the environmental doses to compare with the 'Dose Objectives' (September 1976), and the third providing onsite meteorological programs, statistics of the data obtained and atmospheric dispersion models (June 1977). JAERI has developed a computer code, designated as ANDOSE, for calculating annual releases of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents and, then, total body doses and thyroid doses to individuals around sites on the basis of these guides. The total body doses are from radioactive noble gases as well as from radioactive materials taken with marine food. For the calculation of thyroid doses are taken into account exposure pathways via inhalation and ingestion of leafy vegetables, cow's milk and marine food. The age-specific thyroid doses are evaluated. The doses are summed up when multisource or multisite conditions need to be evaluated (Nuclear Safety Bureau's requirement). In the present report, are described source-term models, environmental transport models and dose models used in the code, of which most are provided in the guides but some are complemented by the authors, the functions of ANDOSE and the manual for users of the code. The program lists and the latter two guides mentioned above are included in the appendices. (author)

  19. User's guide for the implementation of level one of the proposed American National Standard Specifications for an information interchange data descriptive file on control data 6000/7000 series computers

    CERN Document Server

    Wiley, R A

    1977-01-01

    User's guide for the implementation of level one of the proposed American National Standard Specifications for an information interchange data descriptive file on control data 6000/7000 series computers

  20. A Facile Strategy to Prepare Dendrimer-stabilized Gold Nanorods with Sub-10-nm Size for Efficient Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Hanling; Wang, Yitong; Yu, Xiangtong; Zhang, Sanjun; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-03-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles are promising photothermal agents with the potential of clinical translation. However, the safety concerns of Au photothermal agents including the potential toxic compositions such as silver and copper elements in their structures and the relative large size-caused retention and accumulation in the body post-treatment are still questionable. In this article, we successfully synthesized dendrimer-stabilized Au nanorods (DSAuNRs) with pure Au composition and a sub-10-nm size in length, which represented much higher photothermal effect compared with dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoparticles due to their significantly enhanced absorption in the near-infrared region. Furthermore, glycidol-modified DSAuNRs exhibited the excellent biocompatibility and further showed the high photothermal efficiency of killing cancer cells in vitro and retarding tumor growth in vivo. The investigation depicted an optimal photothermal agent with the desirable size and safe composition.

  1. Computed tomography guided navigation assisted percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteoma in a 7-year-old patient: the low dose approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Tappero, Carlo; Bogdanovic, Daniel; Stamm, Anna-Christina [Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Ziebarth, Kai [Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bern (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign tumour that can cause severe pain and functional limitation to children and young adults; the treatment of choice is image-guided ablation. Due to the very small size of the lesion, detection and accurate needle placement may be challenging. Computed tomography (CT) offers very detailed imaging of the skeleton and is the modality of choice for the detection of small OO and for ablation guidance. Nevertheless, CT-guided positioning of the ablation applicator is linked to significant radiation exposure, particularly for the paediatric population. This case describes the successful use of a novel CT-based navigation system that offers the possibility of accurate ablation with only minimal radiation exposure in a paediatric patient. (orig.)

  2. Laser-induced photo-thermal strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Changhoon; Ahn, Joongho; Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Chulhong

    2018-02-01

    Vulnerable plaque is the one of the leading causes of cardiovascular disease occurrence. However, conventional intravascular imaging techniques suffer from difficulty in finding vulnerable plaque due to limitation such as lack of physiological information, imaging depth, and depth sensitivity. Therefore, new techniques are needed to help determine the vulnerability of plaque, Thermal strain imaging (TSI) is an imaging technique based on ultrasound (US) wave propagation speed that varies with temperature of medium. During temperature increase, strain occurs in the medium and its variation tendency is depending on the type of tissue, which makes it possible to use for tissue differentiation. Here, we demonstrate laser-induced photo-thermal strain imaging (pTSI) to differentiate tissue using an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheter and a 1210-nm continuous-wave laser for heating lipids intensively. During heating, consecutive US images were obtained from a custom-made phantom made of porcine fat and gelatin. A cross correlation-based speckle-tracking algorithm was then applied to calculate the strain of US images. In the strain images, the positive strain produced in lipids (porcine fat) was clearly differentiated from water-bearing tissue (gelatin). This result shows that laser-induced pTSI could be a new method to distinguish lipids in the plaque and can help to differentiate vulnerability of plaque.

  3. Infrared photothermal imaging of trace explosives on relevant substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Borchert, James; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2013-06-01

    We are developing a technique for the stand-off detection of trace explosives on relevant substrate surfaces using photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more compact IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect small increases in thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. The ability to detect trace analytes on relevant substrates is critical for stand-off applications, but is complicated by the optical and thermal analyte/substrate interactions. This manuscript describes recent PT-IRIS experimental results and analysis for traces of RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate (AN) and sucrose on relevant substrates (steel, polyethylene, glass and painted steel panels). We demonstrate that these analytes can be detected on these substrates at relevant surface mass loadings (10 μg/cm2 to 100 μg/cm2) even at the single pixel level.

  4. Distributed gas sensing with optical fibre photothermal interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuechuan; Liu, Fei; He, Xiangge; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Min; Yang, Fan; Ho, Hoi Lut; Tan, Yanzhen; Gu, Lijuan

    2017-12-11

    We report the first distributed optical fibre trace-gas detection system based on photothermal interferometry (PTI) in a hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre (HC-PBF). Absorption of a modulated pump propagating in the gas-filled HC-PBF generates distributed phase modulation along the fibre, which is detected by a dual-pulse heterodyne phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) system. Quasi-distributed sensing experiment with two 28-meter-long HC-PBF sensing sections connected by single-mode transmission fibres demonstrated a limit of detection (LOD) of ∼10 ppb acetylene with a pump power level of 55 mW and an effective noise bandwidth (ENBW) of 0.01 Hz, corresponding to a normalized detection limit of 5.5ppb⋅W/Hz. Distributed sensing experiment over a 200-meter-long sensing cable made of serially connected HC-PBFs demonstrated a LOD of ∼ 5 ppm with 62.5 mW peak pump power and 11.8 Hz ENBW, or a normalized detection limit of 312ppb⋅W/Hz. The spatial resolution of the current distributed detection system is limited to ∼ 30 m, but it is possible to reduce down to 1 meter or smaller by optimizing the phase detection system.

  5. Photothermal Transport of DNA in Entropy-Landscape Plasmonic Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold

    2017-01-01

    landscapes. Separately, a range of plasmonic configurations have demonstrated active manipulation of nano-objects by harnessing concentrated electric fields. The integration of these two independent techniques promises a range of sophisticated and complementary functions to handle, for example, DNA...... photothermal transport of DNA through the losses of plasmonic modes. The propulsive forces, assisted by in-coupling to propagating channel plasmon polaritons, extend along the V-grooves with a directed motion up to ≈0.5 μm·mW-1 away from the input beam and λ-DNA velocities reaching ≈0.2 μm·s-1·mW-1....... The entropic trapping enables the V-grooves to be flexibly loaded and unloaded with DNA by variation of transverse fluid flow, a process that is selective to biopolymers versus fixed-shape objects and also allows the technique to address the challenges of nanoscale interaction volumes. Our self-aligning, light...

  6. A study of the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods on a glucose biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huiyu; Yang Liuqing; Ren Xiangling; Tang Fangqiong; Ren Jun; Chen Dong

    2010-01-01

    A new glucose biosensor based on the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods (GNRs) is reported here. The biosensor was prepared by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) on a platinum (Pt) electrode by a composite film consisting of GNRs, polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and glutaraldehyde. GNRs were synthesized by a gold seed-mediated cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant-assisted approach. The fabrication, characterization and analytical performance of the glucose biosensor based on GNRs are described in this paper. Moreover, the modulation of the biosensor by the photothermal effect based on the unique surface plasma resonance (SPR) property of GNRs was investigated for the first time. The results show that the current response of a glucose biosensor can significantly increase, induced by the electrical conductivity and photothermal effect of GNRs.

  7. Non-linear operation of nanomechnical systems combining photothermal excitation and magneto-motive detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Daniel R; Metzger, Constanze; Camerer, Stephan; Kotthaus, Joerg P

    2006-01-01

    We present a non-linear operation of a nanomechanical beam resonator by photothermal excitation at 4 K. The resonators dimensions are 10 μm in length, 200 nm in width, and 200 nm in height. The actuation mechanism is based on a pulsed diode laser focused onto the centre of the beam resonator. Thermally induced stress caused by the different thermal expansion coefficients of the bi-layer system periodically deflects the resonator. Magnetomotively detected amplitudes up to 150 nm are reached at the fundamental resonance mode at a frequency of 8.9 MHz. Furthermore, the third eigenmode of the resonator at a frequency 36 MHz is also excited. We conclude that the photothermal excitation at 4 K should be applicable up to the GHz regime, the operation in the non-linear regime can be used for performance enhancement of nanomechanical systems, and the combination of photothermal excitation and magneto-motive detection avoids undesired cross talk

  8. Photothermal Investigation of Micro-Uniformity Problems Caused by Different Scan Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiler, Hans; Brand, Klaus; Selle, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    To study beam scanning and beam profiling effects low energy implants of Boron (25 keV) and high energy implants of Helium (5.4 MeV) were carried out by use of different scanning systems including mechanical, electrostatic and hybrid scanning. The sensitivity of photothermal measurement by use of the excess carrier wave in the depth up to 50 μm is proved for buried damage detection and compared with the effect in shallow damage profiles. The micro-mapping capability of the photothermal techniques allows the detection of dose variations in a sub-mm-scale without Moire effects from mapping steps. Conclusion for advanced dose monitoring by multi-frequency photothermal methods will be derived.

  9. Evaluation of a novel Seldinger-needle for computed tomography guided interventions: initial experiences; Evaluierung einer neuen Seldinger-Nadel fuer computertomografisch gesteuerte Interventionen: Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumhans, C.; Mahnken, A.; Iwa, R.; Behrendt, F.F.; Sebastian, K.; Guenther, R.W.; Honnef, D. [Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate a new Seldinger puncture device for computed tomography-guided interventions under difficult conditions, to analyze applicability, and to investigate assets and drawbacks. From November 2007 to March 2008, we performed CT-guided interventions in 16 patients (7 women, 9 men; mean age 62 years old) using a new 20G-Seldinger needle (Sika-Med, Wiehl, Germany). This novel needle serves as a guide for many different interventional devices due to a guide wire welded on the proximal needle end. It allows continuous application of anesthesia via four tiny holes at the distal needle end until the region of interest is reached. Each intervention was subject to difficult interventional conditions. The indications for intervention were drainage (n = 7), Trucut biopsy of tumor (n = 8) and radiofrequency ablation (n = 1). Handling, success, advantages, drawbacks, complications and patient tolerance were noted after each procedure. A pain scale from 1 - 10 was used to grade the pain level during the intervention. All interventions were performed successfully and no severe complications were observed. Patient tolerance was very good resulting in a mean pain score of 2 {+-} 1. Regions with dangerous and difficult access were successfully reached with the new Seldinger needle in 15 of 16 cases by dilatation of the puncture tract and continuous administration of local anesthesia via the system. Furthermore, different devices such as Trucut systems and a drainage catheter were able to be inserted without complication via the needle. With a proximal removable luer-lock connection, liquid material was able to be aspirated in six cases. Under difficult interventional conditions, the use of a Seldinger needle as a reliable technique for CT-guided interventions can provide a safe and successful procedure. (orig.)

  10. The combined use of computer-guided, minimally invasive, flapless corticotomy and clear aligners as a novel approach to moderate crowding: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Michele; Altieri, Federica; Pandolfi, Stefano; Giansanti, Matteo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe an innovative orthodontic treatment method that combined surgical and orthodontic techniques. The novel method was used to achieve a positive result in a case of moderate crowding by employing a computer-guided piezocision procedure followed by the use of clear aligners. A 23-year-old woman had a malocclusion with moderate crowding. Her periodontal indices, oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), and treatment time were evaluated. The treatment included interproximal corticotomy cuts extending through the entire thickness of the cortical layer, without a full-thickness flap reflection. This was achieved with a three-dimensionally printed surgical guide using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing. Orthodontic force was applied to the teeth immediately after surgery by using clear appliances for better control of tooth movement. The total treatment time was 8 months. The periodontal indices improved after crowding correction, but the oral health impact profile showed a slight deterioration of OHRQoL during the 3 days following surgery. At the 2-year retention follow-up, the stability of treatment was excellent. The reduction in surgical time and patient discomfort, increased periodontal safety and patient acceptability, and accurate control of orthodontic movement without the risk of losing anchorage may encourage the use of this combined technique in appropriate cases.

  11. Fabrication of silica-coated gold nanorods and investigation of their property of photothermal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inose, Tomoya; Oikawa, Takahiro; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Tokunaga, Masayuki; Hatoyama, Keiichiro; Nakashima, Kouichi; Kamei, Takashi; Gonda, Kohsuke; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    This study described the preparation of silica-coated Au nanorods (AuNR/SiO 2 ) in a colloidal solution, assessed their property of photothermal conversion, and investigated their ability to kill cancer cells using photothermal conversion. Au-seed nanoparticles were produced by reducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl 4 ) with sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ) in aqueous n-hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solution. AuNRs were then fabricated by reducing HAuCl 4 and silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ) with L-ascorbic acid in the aqueous CTAB solution in the presence of Au-seed nanoparticles. The as-prepared AuNRs were washed by a process composed mainly of centrifugation to remove the CTAB. The washed AuNRs were coated with silica by mixing the AuNR colloidal solution, an aqueous solution of (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and tetraethylorthosilicate/ethanol solution with a water/ethanol solution. We found that the addition of AuNR/SiO 2 in water, in mice, and in a culture medium with cancer cells, followed by irradiation with a laser, cause an increase in temperature, demonstrating that AuNR/SiO 2 have the ability of photothermal conversion. In addition, the cancer cells in the culture medium were found to be killed due to the increase in temperature caused by the photothermal conversion. - Highlights: • This study described the preparation of silica-coated Au nanorods (AuNR/SiO 2 ) colloidal solution. • The AuNR/SiO 2 had the ability of photothermal conversion. • The AuNR/SiO 2 also had the ability to kill cancer cells using the photothermal conversion.

  12. Nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy: a comparative study of heating for different particle types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattani, Varun P; Tunnell, James W

    2012-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) absorbing plasmonic nanoparticles enhance photothermal therapy of tumors. In this procedure, systemically delivered gold nanoparticles preferentially accumulate at the tumor site and when irradiated using laser light, produce localized heat sufficient to damage tumor cells. Gold nanoshells and nanorods have been widely studied for this purpose, and while both exhibit strong NIR absorption, their overall absorption and scattering properties differ widely due to their geometry. In this paper, we compared the photothermal response of both nanoparticle types including the heat generation and photothermal efficiency. Tissue simulating phantoms, with varying concentrations of gold nanoparticles, were irradiated with a near-infrared diode laser while concurrently monitoring the surface temperature with an infrared camera. We calculated nanoshell and nanorod optical properties using the Mie solution and the discrete dipole approximation, respectively. In addition, we measured the heat generation of nanoshells and nanorods at the same optical density to determine the photothermal transduction efficiency for both nanoparticle types. We found that the gold nanoshells produced more heat than gold nanorods at equivalent number densities (# of nanoparticles/ml), whereas the nanorods generated more heat than nanoshells at equivalent extinction values at the irradiance wavelength. To reach an equivalent heat generation, we found that it was necessary to have ∼36× more nanorods than nanoshells. However, the gold nanorods were found to have two times the photothermal transduction efficiency than the gold nanoshells. For the nanoparticles tested, the nanoshells generated more heat, per nanoparticle, than nanorods, primarily due to their overall larger geometric cross-section. Conversely, we found that the gold nanorods had a higher photothermal efficiency than the gold nanoshells. In conclusion, the ideal choice of plasmonic nanoparticle requires not only per

  13. Dual-wavelength photothermal optical coherence tomography for blood oxygen saturation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Biwei; Kuranov, Roman V.; McElroy, Austin B.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2013-03-01

    We report design and demonstration of a dual wavelength photothermal (DWP) optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for imaging of a phantom microvessel and measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) level. The DWP-OCT system contains a swept-source (SS) two-beam phase-sensitive (PhS) OCT system (1060 nm) and two intensity modulated photothermal excitation lasers (770 nm and 800 nm). The PhS-OCT probe beam (1060 nm) and photothermal excitation beams are combined into one single-mode optical fiber. A galvanometer based two-dimensional achromatic scanning system is designed to provide 14 μm lateral resolution for the PhS-OCT probe beam (1060 nm) and 13 μm lateral resolution for photothermal excitation beams. DWP-OCT system's sensitivity is 102 dB, axial resolution is 13 μm in tissue and uses a real-time digital dispersion compensation algorithm. Noise floor for optical pathlength measurements is 300 pm in the signal frequency range (380-400 Hz) of photothermal modulation frequencies. Blood SO2 level is calculated from measured optical pathlength (op) signal in a 300 μm diameter microvessel phantom introduced by the two photothermal excitation beams. En-face and B-scan images of a phantom microvessel are recorded, and six blood samples' SO2 levels are measured using DWP-OCT and compared with values provided by a commercial blood oximeter. A mathematical model indicates thermal diffusion introduces a systematic artifact that over-estimates SO2 values and is consistent with measured data.

  14. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Justin C; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm ‘the common mask guided image reconstruction’ (c-MGIR).In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and ‘well’ solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the

  15. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-12-07

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm 'the common mask guided image reconstruction' (c-MGIR).In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and 'well' solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the algorithm

  16. OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY OF ADIPOSE TISSUE AT PHOTODYNAMIC/PHOTOTHERMAL TREATMENT IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA YU. YANINA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporal changes in structure and refractive-index distribution of adipose tissue at photodynamic/photothermal treatment were studied with OCT in vitro. Ethanol–water solutions of indocyanine green (ICG and brilliant green (BG were used for fat tissue staining. CW laser diode (808 nm and LED light source (442 and 597 nm were used for irradiation of stained tissue slices. The data received supporting the hypothesis that photodynamic/photothermal treatment, induces fat cell lipolysis during a certain period of time after light exposure.

  17. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-04

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  18. Multi-parameter-fitting procedure for photothermal infrared radiometry on multilayered and bulk-absorbing solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, Peter; Gruss, Christian

    2001-01-01

    Photothermal infrared radiometry has been used for the measurement of thermophysical, optical, and geometrical properties of multilayered samples of paint on a metallic substrate. A special data normalization is applied to reduce the number of sensitive parameters which makes the identification task for the remaining parameters easier. The normalization stabilizes the evaluation of the photothermal signal and makes the infrared radiometry more attractive for applications in the industrial environment. It is shown that modeling and multi-parameter-fitting can be applied successfully to the normalized data for the determination of layer thicknesses. As a side product we can calculate some other physical properties of the sample. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  19. Laser photothermal diagnostics of genuine and counterfeit British and United States banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othonos, Andreas; Mandelis, Andreas; Nestoros, Marios; Christofides, Constantinos

    1997-02-01

    Laser-induced, frequency-scanned IR photothermal radiometry was used to investigate the thermophysical properties of the paper on which several genuine and counterfeit British (10 pounds) and U.S. ($DOL50, $DOL100) currency bills were printed. The radiometric photothermal amplitudes and phases were further compared with a theoretical model, which yielded simultaneous quantitative measurements of the thermal diffusivities and conductivities of the bills. Both statistical and single-specimen results demonstrated the excellent thermophysical resolution of the technique with prospects for its use in the nonintrusive, on-line identification of counterfeit banknotes.

  20. A study of photothermal laser ablation of various polymers on microsecond time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Kappes, Ralf S; Schönfeld, Friedhelm; Li, Chen; Golriz, Ali A; Nagel, Matthias; Lippert, Thomas; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the photothermal ablation of polymers, we designed a temperature measurement setup based on spectral pyrometry. The setup allows to acquire 2D temperature distributions with 1 μm size and 1 μs time resolution and therefore the determination of the center temperature of a laser heating process. Finite element simulations were used to verify and understand the heat conversion and heat flow in the process. With this setup, the photothermal ablation of polystyrene, poly(α-methylstyrene...

  1. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    CT (CBCT) can be used for MRI-only image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and for verifying the correctness of the corresponding pCT. Material and methods. Six patients receiving palliative cranial RT were included in the study. Each patient had three-dimensional (3D) T1W MRI, a CBCT and a CT for reference...

  2. A Research-Inspired and Computer-Guided Clinical Interview for Mathematics Assessment: Introduction, Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Herbert P.; Lee, Young-Sun; Pappas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Formative assessment involves the gathering of information that can guide the teaching of individual or groups of children. This approach requires a sound understanding of children's thinking and learning, as well as an effective method for gaining the information. We propose that formative assessment should employ a version of clinical…

  3. Teacher's Guide for Computational Models of Animal Behavior: A Computer-Based Curriculum Unit to Accompany the Elementary Science Study Guide "Behavior of Mealworms." Artificial Intelligence Memo No. 432.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Hal; Goldenberg, Paul

    This experimental curriculum unit suggests how dramatic innovations in classroom content may be achieved through use of computers. The computational perspective is viewed as one which can enrich and transform traditional curricula, act as a focus for integrating insights from diverse disciplines, and enable learning to become more active and…

  4. How to stop e-mail spam, spyware, malware, computer viruses, and hackers from ruining your computer or network the complete guide for your home and work

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    It seems like everywhere you go on the Internet, there is spam, spyware, and the risk of viruses infecting your computer and ruining your online experience. In businesses alone, according to Nucleus Research Inc. spam costs more than 712 per employee each year in productivity and computing resources and the estimation on money lost by businesses due to computer viruses ranges between 100 million and 2 billion annually depending on how the total is calculated. This complete, revolutionary book has compiled all of the vital information you need to make sure that you are able to combat the risk

  5. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  6. Computed Tomography-Guided Core-Needle Biopsy Specimens Demonstrate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations in Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.M.; Chang, J.W.C.; Cheung, Y.C.; Lin, G.; Hsieh, J.J.; Hsu, T.; Huang, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Target therapy with a new class of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors shows improved clinical response in EGFR gene-mutated lung cancers. Purpose: To evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT)-guided core-needle biopsy specimens for the assessment of EGFR gene mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and Methods: Seventeen (nine males, eight females) patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent CT-guided core-needle biopsy of the lung tumor prior to treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib. There were no life-threatening complications of biopsy. The specimens were sent fresh-frozen for EGFR mutation analysis and histopathological study. Results: There were 12 (70.6%) EGFR gene mutants and five (29.4%) nonmutants. The objective response rate to gefitinib therapy was 73.3% (11 of 15 patients), with 91.7% (11 of 12 mutants) for the mutant group and 0% for the nonmutant group. Conclusion: CT-guided core-needle biopsy of advanced NSCLC enables the acquisition of sufficient tissue for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  7. Short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer: A multi-center retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Min; Ye, Xin; Yang, Xia; Zheng, Aimin; Huang, Guang Hui; Wei, Zhigang [Dept. of Oncology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated with Shandong University, Jinan (China); Fan, Wei Jun [Imaging and Interventional Center, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Kaixian [Dept. of Oncology, Teng Zhou Central People' s Hospital Affiliated with Jining Medical College, Tengzhou (China); Bi, Jing Wang [Dept. of Oncology, Jinan Military General Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Jinan (China)

    2016-11-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer. From May 2010 to April 2014, 31 patients with unilateral adrenal metastasis from lung cancer who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous MWA were enrolled. This study was conducted with approval from local Institutional Review Board. Clinical outcomes and complications of MWA were assessed. Their tumors ranged from 1.5 to 5.4 cm in diameter. After a median follow-up period of 11.1 months, primary efficacy rate was 90.3% (28/31). Local tumor progression was detected in 7 (22.6%) of 31 cases. Their median overall survival time was 12 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 44.3%. Median local tumor progression-free survival time was 9 months. Local tumor progression-free survival rate was 77.4%. Of 36 MWA sessions, two (5.6%) had major complications (hypertensive crisis). CT-guided percutaneous MWA may be fairly safe and effective for treating solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer.

  8. Doxorubicin-loaded magnetic nanoparticle clusters for chemo-photothermal treatment of the prostate cancer cell line PC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weibing; Zheng, Xinmin [Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Shen, Shun [School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, No. 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai, 201203 (China); Wang, Xinghuan, E-mail: xinghuanwang9@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China)

    2015-10-16

    In addition to the conventional cancer treatment such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgical management, nanomedicine-based approaches have attracted widespread attention in recent years. In this paper, a promising nanocarrier, magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) as porous materials which provided enough room on the surface, was developed for loading chemotherapeutic agent of doxorubicin (DOX). Moreover, MNCs are a good near-infrared (NIR) photothermal mediator. Thus, MNCs have great potential both in photothermal therapy (PTT) and drug delivery for chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer. We firstly explored the destruction of prostate cancer in vitro by the combination of PTT and chemotherapy using DOX@MNCs. Upon NIR irradiation at 808 nm, more cancer cells were killed when PC3 cells incubated with DOX@MNCs, owing to both MNCs-mediated photothermal ablation and cytotoxicity of light-triggered DOX release. Compared with PTT or chemotherapy alone, the chemo-photothermal therapy by DOX@MNCs showed a synergistically higher therapeutic efficacy. - Highlights: • MNCs have great potential both in photothermal therapy and drug delivery. • DOX@MNCs were used for chemo-photothermal therapy of prostate cancer cells. • DOX@MNCs showed a synergistically higher therapeutic efficacy.

  9. SiC-C Composite as A Highly Stable and Easily Regenerable Photothermal Material for Practical Water Evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Le

    2018-05-26

    Solar-driven water distillation by photothermal materials is emerging as a promising way of renewable energy-driven clean water production. In designing photothermal materials, light absorption, photo-to-thermal conversion efficiency, and ability to localize thermal energy at the water-air interface are three important considerations. However, one additional consideration, regenerability, has so far slipped out of the photothermal material designs at status quo. This work reveals that there is a fouling layer formed during photothermal evaporation of real seawater (Red Sea water) and domestic wastewater, which once formed, would be difficult to remove. Herein, we synthesize a SiC-C composite monolith as an effective photothermal material where carbon acts as photothermal component and SiC serves as a heat conductor and strong structural support. The high mechanical strength of the monolithic composite makes it able to withstand repeatedly high strength physical cleaning by brush scrubbing and sonication and the anti-carbon-loss mechanism generates zero carbon loss during the physical cleaning. In the case of the domestic wastewater evaporation, the bio- and organic foulants on the SiC-C composite monolith can be totally removed by annealing at 1000 oC in N2 atmosphere. We believe that the SiC-C composite monoliths are promising photothermal materials in practical solar-driven water evaporation applications thanks to their highly stable and easily regenerable properties and therefore more research efforts are warranted to further improve their performances.

  10. Guide to improving the performance of a manipulator system for nuclear fuel handling through computer controls. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.M. Jr.; Albus, J.S.; Barbera, A.J.; Rosenthal, R.; Truitt, W.B.

    1975-11-01

    The Office of Developmental Automation and Control Technology of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology of the National Bureau of Standards provides advising services, standards and guidelines on interface and computer control systems, and performance specifications for the procurement and use of computer controlled manipulators and other computer based automation systems. These outputs help other agencies and industry apply this technology to increase productivity and improve work quality by removing men from hazardous environments. In FY 74 personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory visited NBS to discuss the feasibility of using computer control techniques to improve the operation of remote control manipulators in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Subsequent discussions led to an agreement for NBS to develop a conceptual design for such a computer control system for the PaR Model 3000 manipulator in the Thorium Uranium Recycle Facility (TURF) at ORNL. This report provides the required analysis and conceptual design. Complete computer programs are included for testing of computer interfaces and for actual robot control in both point-to-point and continuous path modes

  11. Photothermal therapy of melanoma tumor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Zahra; Behnam, Mohammad Ali; Emami, Farzin; Dehghanian, Amirreza; Jamhiri, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a therapeutic method in which photon energy is transformed into heat rapidly via different operations to extirpate cancer. Nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional optical absorbance in visible and near infrared spectra. Therefore, they could be a good converter to induce hyperthermia in PTT technique. In our study, for improving the dispersibility of multiwalled CNTs in water, the CNTs were oxidized (O-CNTs) and then polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used for wrapping the surface of nanotubes. The formation of a thin layer of PEG around the nanotubes was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis, and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Results of thermogravimetric analysis showed that the amount of PEG component in the O-CNT-PEG was approximately 80% (w/w). Cell cytotoxicity study showed that O-CNT was less cytotoxic than pristine multiwalled nanotubes, and O-CNT-PEG had the lowest toxicity against HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. The effect of O-CNT-PEG in reduction of melanoma tumor size after PTT was evaluated. Cancerous mice were exposed to a continuous-wave near infrared laser diode (λ=808 nm, P =2 W and I =8 W/cm 2 ) for 10 minutes once in the period of the treatment. The average size of tumor in mice receiving O-CNT-PEG decreased sharply in comparison with those that received laser therapy alone. Results of animal studies indicate that O-CNT-PEG is a powerful candidate for eradicating solid tumors in PTT technique.

  12. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using novel hollow gold nanoflowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Han,1 Jinru Li,1 Wenfeng Jia,1 Liangming Yao,2 Xiaoqin Li,1 Long Jiang,1 Yong Tian21Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: This article presents a new strategy for fabricating large gold nanoflowers (AuNFs that exhibit high biological safety under visible light and very strong photothermal cytotoxicity to HeLa cells under irradiation with near-infrared (NIR light. This particular type of AuNF was constructed using vesicles produced from a multiamine head surfactant as a template followed by depositing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and growing their crystallites on the surface of vesicles. The localized surface plasmon-resonance spectrum of this type of AuNF can be easily modulated to the NIR region by controlling the size of the AuNFs. When the size of the AuNFs increased, biosafety under visible light improved and cytotoxicity increased under NIR irradiation. Experiments in vitro with HeLa cells and in vivo with small mice have been carried out, with promising results. The mechanism for this phenomenon is based on the hypothesis that it is difficult for larger AuNFs to enter the cell without NIR irradiation, but they enter the cell easily at the higher temperatures caused by NIR irradiation. We believe that these effects will exist in other types of noble metallic NPs and cancer cells. In addition, the affinity between AuNPs and functional biomolecules, such as aptamers and biomarkers, will make this type of AuNF a good recognition device in cancer diagnosis and therapy.Keywords: HeLa cells, endocytosis, cytotoxicity, AuNFs, NIR, cancer therapy

  13. Modeling photothermal and acoustical induced microbubble generation and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovitski, Boris; Kislev, Hanoch; Kimmel, Eitan

    2007-12-01

    Previous experimental studies showed that powerful heating of nanoparticles by a laser pulse using energy density greater than 100 mJ/cm(2), could induce vaporization and generate microbubbles. When ultrasound is introduced at the same time as the laser pulse, much less laser power is required. For therapeutic applications, generation of microbubbles on demand at target locations, e.g. cells or bacteria can be used to induce hyperthermia or to facilitate drug delivery. The objective of this work is to develop a method capable of predicting photothermal and acoustic parameters in terms of laser power and acoustic pressure amplitude that are needed to produce stable microbubbles; and investigate the influence of bubble coalescence on the thresholds when the microbubbles are generated around nanoparticles that appear in clusters. We develop and solve here a combined problem of momentum, heat and mass transfer which is associated with generation and growth of a microbubble, filled with a mixture of non-vaporized gas (air) and water vapor. The microbubble's size and gas content vary as a result of three mechanisms: gas expansion or compression, evaporation or condensation on the bubble boundary, and diffusion of dissolved air in the surrounding water. The simulations predict that when ultrasound is applied relatively low threshold values of laser and ultrasound power are required to obtain a stable microbubble from a single nanoparticle. Even lower power is required when microbubbles are formed by coalescence around a cluster of 10 nanoparticles. Laser pulse energy density of 21 mJ/cm(2) is predicted for instance together with acoustic pressure of 0.1 MPa for a cluster of 10 or 62 mJ/cm(2) for a single nanoparticle. Those values are well within the safety limits, and as such are most appealing for targeted therapeutic purposes.

  14. Pulsed photothermal depth profiling of tattoos undergoing laser removal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanic, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2012-02-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of temperature depth profiles induced by pulsed laser irradiation of strongly scattering biological tissues and organs, including human skin. In present study, we evaluate the potential of this technique for investigational characterization and possibly quantitative evaluation of laser tattoo removal. The study involved 5 healthy volunteers (3 males, 2 females), age 20-30 years, undergoing tattoo removal treatment using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. There were four measurement and treatment sessions in total, separated by 2-3 months. Prior to each treatment, PPTR measurements were performed on several tattoo sites and one nearby healthy site in each patient, using a 5 ms Nd:YAG laser at low radiant exposure values and a dedicated radiometric setup. The laser-induced temperature profiles were then reconstructed by applying a custom numerical code. In addition, each tatoo site was documented with a digital camera and measured with a custom colorimetric system (in tristimulus color space), providing an objective evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy to be correlated with our PPTR results. The results show that the laser-induced temperature profile in untreated tattoos is invariably located at a subsurface depth of 300 μm. In tattoo sites that responded well to laser therapy, a significant drop of the temperature peak was observed in the profiles obtained from PPTR record. In several sites that appeared less responsive, as evidenced by colorimetric data, a progressive shift of the temperature profile deeper into the dermis was observed over the course of consecutive laser treatments, indicating that the laser tattoo removal was efficient.

  15. Starpc: a library for communication among tools on a parallel computer cluster. User's and developer's guide to Starpc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemiya, Hiroshi; Yamagishi, Nobuhiro

    2000-02-01

    We report on a RPC(Remote Procedure Call)-based communication library, Starpc, for a parallel computer cluster. Starpc supports communication between Java Applets and C programs as well as between C programs. Starpc has the following three features. (1) It enables communication between Java Applets and C programs on an arbitrary computer without security violation, although Java Applets are supposed to communicate only with programs on the specific computer (Web server) in subject to a restriction on security. (2) Diverse network communication protocols are available on Starpc, because of using Nexus communication library developed at Argonne National Laboratory. (3) It works on many kinds of computers including eight parallel computers and four WS servers. In this report, the usage of Starpc and the development of applications using Starpc are described. (author)

  16. Developing an automated database for monitoring ultrasound- and computed tomography-guided procedure complications and diagnostic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Jones, Lisa P; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W; Kolansky, Ana S; Hilton, Susan; Zafar, Hanna M

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring complications and diagnostic yield for image-guided procedures is an important component of maintaining high quality patient care promoted by professional societies in radiology and accreditation organizations such as the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Joint Commission. These outcome metrics can be used as part of a comprehensive quality assurance/quality improvement program to reduce variation in clinical practice, provide opportunities to engage in practice quality improvement, and contribute to developing national benchmarks and standards. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and successful implementation of an automated web-based software application to monitor procedural outcomes for US- and CT-guided procedures in an academic radiology department. The open source tools PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) and MySQL were used to extract relevant procedural information from the Radiology Information System (RIS), auto-populate the procedure log database, and develop a user interface that generates real-time reports of complication rates and diagnostic yield by site and by operator. Utilizing structured radiology report templates resulted in significantly improved accuracy of information auto-populated from radiology reports, as well as greater compliance with manual data entry. An automated web-based procedure log database is an effective tool to reliably track complication rates and diagnostic yield for US- and CT-guided procedures performed in a radiology department.

  17. Indocyanine Green-Loaded Polydopamine-Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites with Amplifying Photoacoustic and Photothermal Effects for Cancer Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Jingnan; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Cui, Haodong; Cai, Lintao

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) as light-induced theranostic platforms have been attracted much attention in recent years. However, the development of highly efficient and integrated phototheranostic nanoagents for amplifying PA imaging and PTT treatments poses great challenges. Here, we report a novel phototheranostic nanoagent using indocyanine green-loaded polydopamine-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites (ICG-PDA-rGO) with amplifying PA and PTT effects for cancer theranostics. The results demonstrate that the PDA layer coating on the surface of rGO could effectively absorb a large number of ICG molecules, quench ICG's fluorescence, and enhance the PDA-rGO's optical absorption at 780 nm. The obtained ICG-PDA-rGO exhibits stronger PTT effect and higher PA contrast than that of pure GO and PDA-rGO. After PA imaging-guided PTT treatments, the tumors in 4T1 breast subcutaneous and orthotopic mice models are suppressed completely and no treatment-induced toxicity being observed. It illustrates that the ICG-PDA-rGO nanocomposites constitute a new class of theranostic nanomedicine for amplifying PA imaging and PTT treatments.

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  19. Highly Flexible and Washable Nonwoven Photothermal Cloth for Efficient and Practical Solar Steam Generation

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Yong; Chang, Jian; Shi, Yusuf; Shi, Le; Hong, Seunghyun; Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    -photothermal-component-loss property and is highly flexible and mechanically strong, chemically stable in various harsh environment such as strong acid, alkaline, organic solvent and salty water. It can be hand-washed for more than 100 times without degrading its performance and thus

  20. Phase lag deduced information in photo-thermal actuation for nano-mechanical systems characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijster, R.J.F.; Vreugd, J. de; Sadeghian Marnani, H.

    2014-01-01

    In photo-thermal actuation, heat is added locally to a micro-cantilever by means of a laser. A fraction of the irradiation is absorbed, yielding thermal stresses and deformations in the structure. Harmonic modulation of the laser power causes the cantilever to oscillate. Moreover, a phase lag is

  1. Solar-Assisted Fast Cleanup of Heavy Oil Spill by a Photothermal Sponge

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Jian; Shi, Yusuf; Wu, Mengchun; Li, Renyuan; Shi, Le; Jin, Yong; Qing, Weihua; Tang, Chuyang; Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    of the photothermal effect to heating the heavy oil by using sunlight as energy source to significantly reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil and thus to achieve a fast heavy oil cleanup. A carbon nanotube (CNT) modified polyurethane sponge was fabricated

  2. White light photothermal lens spectrophotometer for the determination of absorption in scattering samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano, Aristides; Alvarado, Salvador; Meng, Junwei; Caballero, Daniel; Moares, Ernesto Marín; Edziah, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We developed a pump-probe photothermal lens spectrophotometer that uses a broadband arc-lamp and a set of interference filters to provide tunable, nearly monochromatic radiation between 370 and 730 nm as the pump light source. This light is focused onto an absorbing sample, generating a photothermal lens of millimeter dimensions. A highly collimated monochromatic probe light from a low-power He-Ne laser interrogates the generated lens, yielding a photothermal signal proportional to the absorption of light. We measure the absorption spectra of scattering dye solutions using the device. We show that the spectra are not affected by the presence of scattering, confirming that the method only measures the absorption of light that results in generation of heat. By comparing the photothermal spectra with the usual absorption spectra determined using commercial transmission spectrophotometers, we estimate the quantum yield of scattering of the sample. We discuss applications of the device for spectroscopic characterization of samples such as blood and gold nanoparticles that exhibit a complex behavior upon interaction with light.

  3. Highly Flexible and Washable Nonwoven Photothermal Cloth for Efficient and Practical Solar Steam Generation

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Yong

    2018-03-29

    Solar-driven water evaporation is emerging as a promising solar-energy utilization process. In the present work, highly stable, flexible and washable nonwoven photothermal cloth is prepared by electrospinning for efficient and durable solar steam evaporation. The cloth is composed of polymeric nanofibers as matrix and inorganic carbon black nanoparticles encapsulated inside the matrix as light absorbing component. The photothermal cloth with an optimized carbon loading shows a desirable underwater black property, absorbing 94% of the solar spectrum and giving rise to a state-of-the-art solar energy utilization efficiency of 83% during pure water evaporation process. Owing to its compositions and special structural design, the cloth possesses anti-photothermal-component-loss property and is highly flexible and mechanically strong, chemically stable in various harsh environment such as strong acid, alkaline, organic solvent and salty water. It can be hand-washed for more than 100 times without degrading its performance and thus offers a potential mechanism for foulant cleaning during practical solar steam generation and distillation processes. The results of this work stimulate more research in durable photothermal materials aiming at real world applications.

  4. A model for photothermal responses of flowering in rice. II. Model evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Kropff, M.J.; Nakagawa, H.; Horie, T.; Goudriaan, J.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed nonlinear model, the 3s-Beta model, for photothermal responses of flowering in rice (Oryza sativa L.) was evaluated for predicting rice flowering date in field conditions. This model was compared with other three models: a three-plane linear model and two nonlinear models, viz, the

  5. Experimental Study on GFRP Surface Cracks Detection Using Truncated-Correlation Photothermal Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Junyan; Mohummad, Oliullah; Wang, Yang

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, truncated-correlation photothermal coherence tomography (TC-PCT) was used as a nondestructive inspection technique to evaluate glass-fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite surface cracks. Chirped-pulsed signal that combines linear frequency modulation and pulse excitation was proposed as an excitation signal to detect GFRP composite surface cracks. The basic principle of TC-PCT and extraction algorithm of the thermal wave signal feature was described. The comparison experiments between lock-in thermography, thermal wave radar imaging and chirped-pulsed photothermal radar for detecting GFRP artificial surface cracks were carried out. Experimental results illustrated that chirped-pulsed photothermal radar has the merits of high signal-to-noise ratio in detecting GFRP composite surface cracks. TC-PCT as a depth-resolved photothermal imaging modality was employed to enable three-dimensional visualization of GFRP composite surface cracks. The results showed that TC-PCT can effectively evaluate the cracks depth of GFRP composite.

  6. Refreshing Rubbers as Customized Photothermal Conversion Materials through Post-Darkening Modeling Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiting; Wang, Zhen; Han, Peng; He, Yonglin; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yapei

    2017-12-19

    Organic conjugated polymers with low energy bandgaps are emerging as a particular class of near-infrared (NIR) photothermal conversion materials. However, these polymers routinely possess high phase transition temperatures due to the rigid skeleton and strong intermolecular interactions. Conjugated polymers can rarely be thermally processed at low temperature, especially below 100 °C. This work formulates a concept of post-darkening modeling production (p-DMP) by which the thermoplastic non-conjugated trans-polyisoprene (TPI) is refreshed into a photothermal conversion material with high light use efficiency. Two steps, including the customizable shaping at low temperature and iodine vapor-tailored "darkening", ensure the ease of preparing photothermal conversion devices with desirable topologies. A few characterizations, with the combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, provide reasonable explanations for understanding the "darkening" process of TPI in iodine atmosphere. In particular, the p-DMP is successfully extended to three-dimension (3D) printing, opening an avenue to fabricate personalized photothermal products, for example, a sunlight-directed physiotherapy device for healthcare of articular tissues. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Photothermal experiments on condensed phase samples of agricultural interest : optical and thermal characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favier, J.P.

    1997-01-01


    A rapidly increasing number of photothermal (PT) techniques has had a considerable impact on agriculture and environmental sciences in the last decade. It was the purpose of the work described here to develop and apply new PT techniques in this specific field of research.

    Chapter

  8. Influence of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets on photothermal effect of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi R

    2016-12-15

    Herein we present a successful strategy for enhancement of photothermal efficiency of hydroxyapatite (HAP) by its conjugation with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanosheets (GR). Owing to excellent biocompatibility with human body and its non-toxicity, implementation of HAP based nanomaterials in photothermal therapy (PTT) provides non-replaceable benefits over PTE agents. Therefore, in this report, it has been experimentally exploited that the photothermal effect (PTE) of HAP has significantly improved by its assembly with CNTs and GR. It is found that the type of carbon nanomaterial used to conjugate with HAP has influence on its PTE in such a way that the photothermal efficiency of GR-HAP was higher than CNTs-COOH-HAP under exposure to 980nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The temperature attained by aqueous dispersions of both CNTs-COOH-HAP and GR-HAP after illuminating to NIR radiations for 7min was found to be above 50°C, which is beyond the temperature tolerance of cancer cells. So that the rise in temperature shown by both CNTs-COOH-HAP and GR-HAP is enough to induce the death of tumoral or cancerous cells. Overall, this approach in modality of HAP with CNTs and GR provide a great potential for development of future nontoxic PTE agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Monolayers of gold nanostars with two Near-IR LSPR capable of additive photothermal response

    KAUST Repository

    Pallavicini, Piersandro; Basile, Simone; Chirico, Giuseppe; Dacarro, Giacomo; D'Alfonso, Laura; Donà , Alice; Patrini, Maddalena; Falqui, Andrea; Sironi, Laura; Taglietti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Monolayers of photothermally responsive gold nanostars on PEI-coated surfaces display two Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances (LSPR) in the near-IR region that can be laser-irradiated either separately, obtaining two different T jumps, or simultaneously, obtaining a T jump equal to the sum of what obtained with separate irradiations

  10. Monolayers of gold nanostars with two Near-IR LSPR capable of additive photothermal response

    KAUST Repository

    Pallavicini, Piersandro

    2015-07-06

    Monolayers of photothermally responsive gold nanostars on PEI-coated surfaces display two Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances (LSPR) in the near-IR region that can be laser-irradiated either separately, obtaining two different T jumps, or simultaneously, obtaining a T jump equal to the sum of what obtained with separate irradiations

  11. Thermal diffusivity measurements with a photothermal method of fusion solid breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Fabri, L.; Ferrari, A.; Sibilia, C.; Alvani, C.; Casadio, S.

    1989-01-01

    The Photothermal Deflection method is employed in thermal diffusivity measurements. A theoretical analysis is performed to reduce the influence of arbitrary parameters. Measurements on gamma-lithium aluminate samples as a function of temperatures are performed. (author). 5 refs.; 4 figs

  12. GeoT User’s Guide, A Computer Program for Multicomponent Geothermometry and Geochemical Speciation, Version 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Peiffer, Loic [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Finsterle, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sonnenthal, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-06-06

    GeoT implements the multicomponent geothermometry method developed by Reed and Spycher (1984, Geochim. Cosmichim. Acta 46 513–528) into a stand-alone computer program, to ease the application of this method and to improve the prediction of geothermal reservoir temperatures using full and integrated chemical analyses of geothermal fluids. Reservoir temperatures are estimated from statistical analyses of mineral saturation indices computed as a function of temperature. The reconstruction of the deep geothermal fluid compositions, and geothermometry computations, are all implemented into the same computer program, allowing unknown or poorly constrained input parameters to be estimated by numerical optimization using existing parameter estimation software, such as iTOUGH2, PEST, or UCODE. This integrated geothermometry approach presents advantages over classical geothermometers for fluids that have not fully equilibrated with reservoir minerals and/or that have been subject to processes such as dilution and gas loss.

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  16. Computed Tomographic-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Recurrent or Residual Hepatocellular Carcinomas around Retained Iodized Oil after Transarterial Chemoembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Young Hwan [Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon-Il [Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ju [Department of Radiology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy, safety, and risk factors influencing local tumor progression, following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of recurrent or residual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), around iodized oil retention. Sixty-four patients (M : F = 51 : 13, 65.0 ± 8.2 years old) with recurrent or residual HCC (75 index tumors, size = 14.0 ± 4.6 mm) had been treated by CT-guided RFA, using retained iodized oil as markers for targeting. The technical success, technique effectiveness rate and complications of RFA were then assessed. On pre-ablative and immediate follow-up CT after RFA, we evaluated the size of enhancing index tumors and iodized oil retention, presence of abutting vessels, completeness of ablation of iodized oil retention, and the presence of ablative margins greater than 5 mm. Also, the time interval between transarterial chemoembolization and RFA was assessed. The cumulative local tumor progression rate was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Cox proportional hazards model was adopted, to clarify the independent factors affecting local tumor progression. The technical success and technique effectiveness rate was 100% and 98.7%, respectively. Major complications were observed in 5.6%. The cumulative rates of local tumor progression at 1 and 2 years were 17.5% and 37.5%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, partial ablation of the targeted iodized oil retention was the sole independent predictor of a higher local tumor progression rate. CT-guided RFA of HCC around iodized oil retention was effective and safe. Local tumor progression can be minimized by complete ablation of not only index tumors, but targeted iodized oil deposits as well.

  17. Microprocessors & their operating systems a comprehensive guide to 8, 16 & 32 bit hardware, assembly language & computer architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, R C

    1989-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive guide to all of the major microprocessor families (8, 16 and 32 bit). The hardware aspects and software implications are described, giving the reader an overall understanding of microcomputer architectures. The internal processor operation of each microprocessor device is presented, followed by descriptions of the instruction set and applications for the device. Software considerations are expanded with descriptions and examples of the main high level programming languages (BASIC, Pascal and C). The book also includes detailed descriptions of the three main operatin

  18. Oral Rehabilitation of a Patient With Ectodermal Dysplasia Treated With Fresh-Frozen Bone Allografts and Computer-Guided Implant Placement: A Clinical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorana, Carlo; Poli, Pier Paolo; Poggio, Carlo; Barbieri, Paola; Beretta, Mario

    2017-05-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is an inherited disorder characterized by abnormality of ectodermally derived structures. A recurrent oral finding is oligodontia, which in turn leads to a severely hypotrophic alveolar process with typical knife-edge morphology and adverse ridge contours. This unfavorable anatomy can seriously hamper proper implant placement. Fresh-frozen bone (FFB) allografts recently have been proposed to augment the residual bone volume for implant placement purposes; however, scientific evidence concerning the use of FFB to treat ED patients is absent. Similarly, data reporting computer-aided template-guided implant placement in medically compromised patients are limited. Thus the purpose of this report is to illustrate the oral rehabilitation of a female patient affected by ED and treated with appositional FFB block grafts and consecutive computer-guided flapless implant placement in a 2-stage procedure. Fixed implant-supported dental prostheses were finally delivered to the patient, which improved her self-esteem and quality of life. During the follow-up recall 1 year after the prosthetic loading, the clinical examination showed healthy peri-implant soft tissues with no signs of bleeding on probing or pathologic probing depths. The panoramic radiograph confirmed the clinical stability of the result. Peri-implant marginal bone levels were radiographically stable with neither pathologic bone loss at the mesial and distal aspects of each implant nor peri-implant radiolucency. Within the limitations of this report, the use of FFB allografts in association with computer-aided flapless implant surgery might be considered a useful technique in patients affected by ED. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved Treatment of Photothermal Cancer by Coating TiO2 on Porous Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Kil Ju; Park, Gye-Choon

    2016-02-01

    In present society, the technology in various field has been sharply developed and advanced. In medical technology, especially, photothermal therapy and photodynamic therapy have had limelight for curing cancers and diseases. The study investigates the photothermal therapy that reduces side effects of existing cancer treatment, is applied to only cancer cells, and dose not harm any other normal cells. The photothermal properties of porous silicon for therapy are analyzed in order to destroy cancer cells that are more weak at heat than normal ones. For improving performance of porous silicon, it also analyzes the properties when irradiating the near infrared by heterologously junction TiO2 and TiO2NW, photocatalysts that are very stable and harmless to the environment and the human body, to porous silicon. Each sample of Si, PSi, TiO2/Psi, and TiO2NW/PSi was irradiated with 808 nm near-IR of 300, 500, and 700 mW/cm2 light intensity, where the maximum heating temperature was 43.8, 61.6, 67.9, and 61.9 degrees C at 300 mW/cm2; 54.1, 64.3, 78.8, and 68.9 degrees C at 500 mW/cm2; and 97.3, 102.8, 102.5, and 95 0C at 700 mW/cm2. The time required to reach the maximum temperature was less than 10 min for every case. The results indicate that TiO2/PSi thin film irradiated with a single near-infrared wavelength of 808 nm, which is known to have the best human permeability, offers the potential of being the most successful photothermal cancer therapy agent. It maximizes the photo-thermal characteristics within the shortest time, and minimizes the adverse effects on the human body.

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  1. User's guide for SAMMY: a computer model for multilevel r-matrix fits to neutron data using Bayes' equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, N.M.; Perey, F.G.

    1980-11-01

    A method is described for determining the parameters of a model from experimental data based upon the utilization of Bayes' theorem. This method has several advantages over the least-squares method as it is commonly used; one important advantage is that the assumptions under which the parameter values have been determined are more clearly evident than in many results based upon least squares. Bayes' method has been used to develop a computer code which can be utilized to analyze neutron cross-section data by means of the R-matrix theory. The required formulae from the R-matrix theory are presented, and the computer implementation of both Bayes' equations and R-matrix theory is described. Details about the computer code and compelte input/output information are given

  2. Photothermal therapy of melanoma tumor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobhani Z

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Zahra Sobhani,1,2 Mohammad Ali Behnam,3 Farzin Emami,3 Amirreza Dehghanian,4 Iman Jamhiri5 1Quality Control Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, 2Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 3Opto-Electronic Research Center, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Shiraz University of Technology, 4Pathology Department, 5Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Abstract: Photothermal therapy (PTT is a therapeutic method in which photon energy is transformed into heat rapidly via different operations to extirpate cancer. Nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs have exceptional optical absorbance in visible and near infrared spectra. Therefore, they could be a good converter to induce hyperthermia in PTT technique. In our study, for improving the dispersibility of multiwalled CNTs in water, the CNTs were oxidized (O-CNTs and then polyethylene glycol (PEG was used for wrapping the surface of nanotubes. The formation of a thin layer of PEG around the nanotubes was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis, and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Results of thermogravimetric analysis showed that the amount of PEG component in the O-CNT-PEG was approximately 80% (w/w. Cell cytotoxicity study showed that O-CNT was less cytotoxic than pristine multiwalled nanotubes, and O-CNT-PEG had the lowest toxicity against HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. The effect of O-CNT-PEG in reduction of melanoma tumor size after PTT was evaluated. Cancerous mice were exposed to a continuous-wave near infrared laser diode (λ=808 nm, P=2 W and I=8 W/cm2 for 10 minutes once in the period of the treatment. The average size of tumor in mice receiving O-CNT-PEG decreased sharply in comparison with those that received laser therapy alone. Results of animal studies indicate that O-CNT-PEG is a powerful candidate for

  3. Dye-sensitized solar cell module realized photovoltaic and photothermal highly efficient conversion via three-dimensional printing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qi-Zhang; Zhu Yan-Qing; Shi Ji-Fu; Wang Lei-Lei; Zhong Liu-Wen; Xu Gang

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is employed to improve the photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) module. The 3D-printed concentrator is optically designed and improves the photovoltaic efficiency of the DSC module from 5.48% to 7.03%. Additionally, with the 3D-printed microfluidic device serving as water cooling, the temperature of the DSC can be effectively controlled, which is beneficial for keeping a high photovoltaic conversion efficiency for DSC module. Moreover, the 3D-printed microfluidic device can realize photothermal conversion with an instantaneous photothermal efficiency of 42.1%. The integrated device realizes a total photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of 49% at the optimal working condition. (paper)

  4. Dye-sensitized solar cell module realized photovoltaic and photothermal highly efficient conversion via three-dimensional printing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Zhang Huang; Yan-Qing Zhu; Ji-Fu Shi; Lei-Lei Wang; Liu-Wen Zhong; Gang Xu

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is employed to improve the photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) module.The 3D-printed concentrator is optically designed and improves the photovoltaic efficiency of the DSC module from 5.48% to 7.03%.Additionally,with the 3D-printed microfluidic device serving as water cooling,the temperature of the DSC can be effectively controlled,which is beneficial for keeping a high photovoltaic conversion efficiency for DSC module.Moreover,the 3D-printed microfluidic device can realize photothermal conversion with an instantaneous photothermal efficiency of 42.1%.The integrated device realizes a total photovoltaic and photothermal conversion efficiency of 49% at the optimal working condition.

  5. Self-assembled lipoprotein based gold nanoparticles for detection and photothermal disaggregation of β-amyloid aggregates

    KAUST Repository

    Martins, P. A. T.; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Julfakyan, Khachatur; Nie, Z.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a reconstituted lipoprotein-based nanoparticle platform comprising a curcumin fluorescent motif and an NIR responsive gold core. This multifunctional nanosystem is successfully used for aggregation-dependent fluorescence detection and photothermal disassembly of insoluble amyloid aggregates.

  6. Self-assembled lipoprotein based gold nanoparticles for detection and photothermal disaggregation of β-amyloid aggregates

    KAUST Repository

    Martins, P. A. T.

    2017-01-10

    We present a reconstituted lipoprotein-based nanoparticle platform comprising a curcumin fluorescent motif and an NIR responsive gold core. This multifunctional nanosystem is successfully used for aggregation-dependent fluorescence detection and photothermal disassembly of insoluble amyloid aggregates.

  7. SiC-C Composite as A Highly Stable and Easily Regenerable Photothermal Material for Practical Water Evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Le; Shi, Yusuf; Li, Renyuan; Chang, Jian; Zaouri, Noor A.; Ahmed, Elaf Ali; Jin, Yong; Zhang, Chenlin; Zhuo, Sifei; Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    to localize thermal energy at the water-air interface are three important considerations. However, one additional consideration, regenerability, has so far slipped out of the photothermal material designs at status quo. This work reveals that there is a

  8. Handheld single photon emission computed tomography (handheld SPECT) navigated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery of computer tomography-guided radioactively marked pulmonary lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Joachim; Putora, Paul Martin; Schneider, Tino; Zeisel, Christoph; Brutsche, Martin; Baty, Florent; Markus, Alexander; Kick, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Radioactive marking can be a valuable extension to minimally invasive surgery. The technique has been clinically applied in procedures involving sentinel lymph nodes, parathyroidectomy as well as interventions in thoracic surgery. Improvements in equipment and techniques allow one to improve the limits. Pulmonary nodules are frequently surgically removed for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons; here video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is the preferred technique. VATS might be impossible with nodules that are small or located deep in the lung. In this study, we examined the clinical application and safety of employing the newly developed handheld single photon emission tomography (handheld SPECT) device in combination with CT-guided radioactive marking of pulmonary nodules. In this pilot study, 10 subjects requiring surgical resection of a pulmonary nodule were included. The technique involved CT-guided marking of the target nodule with a 20-G needle, with subsequent injection of 25-30 MBq (effective: 7-14 MBq) Tc-99m MAA (Macro Albumin Aggregate). Quality control was made with conventional SPECT-CT to confirm the correct localization and exclude possible complications related to the puncture procedure. VATS was subsequently carried out using the handheld SPECT to localize the radioactivity intraoperatively and therefore the target nodule. A 3D virtual image was superimposed on the intraoperative visual image for surgical guidance. In 9 of the 10 subjects, the radioactive application was successfully placed directly in or in the immediate vicinity of the target nodule. The average size of the involved nodules was 9 mm (range 4-15). All successfully marked nodules were subsequently completely excised (R0) using VATS. The procedure was well tolerated. An asymptomatic clinically insignificant pneumothorax occurred in 5 subjects. Two subjects were found to have non-significant discrete haemorrhage in the infiltration canal of the needle. In a single subject, the

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  11. A smart drug: a pH-responsive photothermal ablation agent for Golgi apparatus activated cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fengfeng; Wen, Ying; Wei, Peng; Gao, Yilin; Zhou, Zhiguo; Xiao, Shuzhang; Yi, Tao

    2017-06-13

    We report a pH-responsive photothermal ablation agent (pH-PTT) based on cyanine dyes for photothermal therapy (PTT). The nanoparticles formed by BSA and pH-PTT preferentially accumulated in the Golgi apparatus of cancer cells compared to normal cells, and thus can be specifically activated by the acidic Golgi apparatus in cancer cells for effective PTT both ex vivo and in vivo.

  12. Non-real-time computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol injection therapy for heapocellular carcinoma undetectable by ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazushige; Ohkawara, Tohru; Minami, Masahito; Sawa, Yoshihiko; Morinaga, Osamu; Kohli, Yoshihiro; Ohkawara, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of non-real-time CT-guided percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, 37 lesions) untreatable by ultrasonography-guided (US)-PEIT. The HCC lesion was localized on the lipiodol CT image with a graduated grid system. We advanced a 21 G or 22 G needle in a stepwise fashion with intermittent localization scans using a tandem method to position the tip of the needle in the lesion. Ethanol containing contrast medium was injected with monitoring scans obtained after incremental volumes of injection, until perfusion of the lesion was judged to be complete. A total of 44 CT-PEIT procedures were performed. The average number of needle passes from the skin to the liver in each CT-PEIT procedure was 2.3, the average amount of ethanol injected was 14.4 ml, and the average time required was 49.3 minutes. Complete perfusion of the lesion by ethanol on monitoring CT images was achieved in all lesions with only a single or double CT-PEIT procedure without severe complication. Local recurrence was detected only in 5 lesions. At present, it is more time-consuming to perform CT-PEIT than US-PEIT because conventional CT guidance is not real-time imaging. However, it is expected that this limitation of CT-PEIT will be overcome in the near future with the introduction of CT fluoroscopy. In conclusion, CT-PEIT should prove to be a feasible, acceptable treatment for challenging cases of HCC undetectable by US. (author)

  13. Experimental and Computational Studies on the Scattering of an Edge-Guided Wave by a Hidden Crack on a Racecourse Shaped Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vien, Benjamin Steven; Rose, Louis Raymond Francis; Chiu, Wing Kong

    2017-07-01

    Reliable and quantitative non-destructive evaluation for small fatigue cracks, in particular those in hard-to-inspect locations, is a challenging problem. Guided waves are advantageous for structural health monitoring due to their slow geometrical decay of amplitude with propagating distance, which is ideal for rapid wide-area inspection. This paper presents a 3D laser vibrometry experimental and finite element analysis of the interaction between an edge-guided wave and a small through-thickness hidden edge crack on a racecourse shaped hole that occurs, in practice, as a fuel vent hole. A piezoelectric transducer is bonded on the straight edge of the hole to generate the incident wave. The excitation signal consists of a 5.5 cycle Hann-windowed tone burst of centre frequency 220 kHz, which is below the cut-off frequency for the first order Lamb wave modes (SH1). Two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation (2D FFT) is applied to the incident and scattered wave field along radial lines emanating from the crack mouth, so as to identify the wave modes and determine their angular variation and amplitude. It is shown experimentally and computationally that mid-plane symmetric edge waves can travel around the hole's edge to detect a hidden crack. Furthermore, the scattered wave field due to a small crack length, a , (compared to the wavelength λ of the incident wave) is shown to be equivalent to a point source consisting of a particular combination of body-force doublets. It is found that the amplitude of the scattered field increases quadratically as a function of a/λ , whereas the scattered wave pattern is independent of crack length for small cracks a < λ . This study of the forward scattering problem from a known crack size provides a useful guide for the inverse problem of hidden crack detection and sizing.

  14. Computed-Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsies of Suspected Malignant Lymphomas: Impact of Biopsy, Lesion, and Patient Parameters on Diagnostic Yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, V.; Zaehringer, M.; Krug, B.; Wesselmann, C.; Haferkamp, K.; Wickenhauser, C.; Lackner, K.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic yield of core needle biopsy in patients with malignant lymphoma. Material and Methods: Computed-tomography-guided core needle biopsies in patients with malignant lymphoma performed in the period 1996 to 2001 were evaluated retrospectively. A biopsy was considered as 'fully diagnostic' if a histological diagnosis, including the histologic subtype in the event of malignant lymphoma, was achieved and the clinical course and CT follow-up of at least 6 months confirmed the biopsy results. A biopsy was regarded as 'partly diagnostic' if histological work-up defined malignant lymphoma but not the histological subtype, and if histological diagnosis bore therapeutic relevance. Diagnostic yield was correlated with features such as size of specimen, location and depth of the target lesion, and experience of the investigator. Results: 45 biopsies were performed in 40 patients. With respect to definite histopathological diagnosis, 31 biopsies (68.9%) were diagnostic and 14 (31.1%) non-diagnostic. In 4 cases (8.8%), biopsies yielded partly diagnostic results, since therapy could be scheduled after biopsy without final sub-classification. Statistical analysis of biopsy parameters revealed that sample sizes were significantly larger in the diagnostic group. Conclusion: CT-guided biopsy can be considered as an alternative for lymphoma diagnosis and should be the first interventional procedure. The most important parameter for diagnostic success is the size of the specimen

  15. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57–93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 ± 13 (SD) min (range 24–78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7–812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  16. Radiation Exposure of Interventional Radiologists During Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Renal Cryoablation and Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: Direct Measurement in a Clinical Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yusuke, E-mail: wckyh140@yahoo.co.jp; Hiraki, Takao, E-mail: takaoh@tc4.so-net.ne.jp; Gobara, Hideo, E-mail: gobara@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Iguchi, Toshihiro, E-mail: i10476@yahoo.co.jp; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu, E-mail: hirofujiwar@gmail.com; Kawabata, Takahiro, E-mail: tkhr-kwbt@yahoo.co.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Yamauchi, Takatsugu, E-mail: me9248@hp.okayama-u.ac.jp; Yamaguchi, Takuya, E-mail: me8738@hp.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Hospital, Central Division of Radiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu, E-mail: susumu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    IntroductionComputed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation and lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have received increasing attention as promising cancer therapies. Although radiation exposure of interventional radiologists during these procedures is an important concern, data on operator exposure are lacking.Materials and MethodsRadiation dose to interventional radiologists during CT fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation (n = 20) and lung RFA (n = 20) was measured prospectively in a clinical setting. Effective dose to the operator was calculated from the 1-cm dose equivalent measured on the neck outside the lead apron, and on the left chest inside the lead apron, using electronic dosimeters. Equivalent dose to the operator’s finger skin was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeter rings.ResultsThe mean (median) effective dose to the operator per procedure was 6.05 (4.52) μSv during renal cryoablation and 0.74 (0.55) μSv during lung RFA. The mean (median) equivalent dose to the operator’s finger skin per procedure was 2.1 (2.1) mSv during renal cryoablation, and 0.3 (0.3) mSv during lung RFA.ConclusionRadiation dose to interventional radiologists during renal cryoablation and lung RFA were at an acceptable level, and in line with recommended dose limits for occupational radiation exposure.

  17. Radiation Exposure of Interventional Radiologists During Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Renal Cryoablation and Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: Direct Measurement in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Kawabata, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Takatsugu; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation and lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have received increasing attention as promising cancer therapies. Although radiation exposure of interventional radiologists during these procedures is an important concern, data on operator exposure are lacking. Radiation dose to interventional radiologists during CT fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation (n = 20) and lung RFA (n = 20) was measured prospectively in a clinical setting. Effective dose to the operator was calculated from the 1-cm dose equivalent measured on the neck outside the lead apron, and on the left chest inside the lead apron, using electronic dosimeters. Equivalent dose to the operator's finger skin was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeter rings. The mean (median) effective dose to the operator per procedure was 6.05 (4.52) μSv during renal cryoablation and 0.74 (0.55) μSv during lung RFA. The mean (median) equivalent dose to the operator's finger skin per procedure was 2.1 (2.1) mSv during renal cryoablation, and 0.3 (0.3) mSv during lung RFA. Radiation dose to interventional radiologists during renal cryoablation and lung RFA were at an acceptable level, and in line with recommended dose limits for occupational radiation exposure.

  18. Combine TV-L1 model with guided image filtering for wide and faint ring artifacts correction of in-line x-ray phase contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dongjiang; Qu, Gangrong; Hu, Chunhong; Zhao, Yuqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    In practice, mis-calibrated detector pixels give rise to wide and faint ring artifacts in the reconstruction image of the In-line phase-contrast computed tomography (IL-PC-CT). Ring artifacts correction is essential in IL-PC-CT. In this study, a novel method of wide and faint ring artifacts correction was presented based on combining TV-L1 model with guided image filtering (GIF) in the reconstruction image domain. The new correction method includes two main steps namely, the GIF step and the TV-L1 step. To validate the performance of this method, simulation data and real experimental synchrotron data are provided. The results demonstrate that TV-L1 model with GIF step can effectively correct the wide and faint ring artifacts for IL-PC-CT.

  19. User guide programmer's reference. NUDOS: A computer programme for assessing the consequences of airborne releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grupa, J.

    1996-10-01

    NUDOS is a computer program that can be used to evaluate the consequences of airborne releases of radioactive materials. The consequences evaluated are individual dose and associated radiological risk, collective dose and the contamination of land. The code is capable of dealing with both routine and accidental releases. For accidental releases both deterministic and probabilistic calculations can be performed and the impact and effectiveness of emergency actions can be evaluated. (orig.)

  20. User's guide to HEATRAN: a computer program for three-dimensional transient fluid-flow and heat-transfer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.N.C.; Cheng, S.K.; Todreas, N.E.

    1982-01-01

    This report provides the HEATRAN user with programming and input information. HEATRAN is a computer program which is written to analyze the transient three dimensional single phase incompressible fluid flow and heat transfer problem. In this report, the programming information is given first. This information includes details concerning the code and structure. The description of the required input variables is presented next. Following the input description, the sample problems are described and HEATRAN's results are presented

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  5. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  8. Photothermal ablation of inflammatory breast cancer tumor emboli using plasmonic gold nanostars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford BM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bridget M Crawford,1,2,* Ronnie L Shammas,3,* Andrew M Fales,1,2 David A Brown,4 Scott T Hollenbeck,4 Tuan Vo-Dinh,1,2,5 Gayathri R Devi6,7 1Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke University, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 3Duke University School of Medicine, 4Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, 5Department of Chemistry, Duke University, 6Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Sciences, 7Duke Cancer Institute, Women’s Cancer Program, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is rare, but it is the most aggressive subtype of breast cancer. IBC has a unique presentation of diffuse tumor cell clusters called tumor emboli in the dermis of the chest wall that block lymph vessels causing a painful, erythematous, and edematous breast. Lack of effective therapeutic treatments has caused mortality rates of this cancer to reach 20%–30% in case of women with stage III–IV disease. Plasmonic nanoparticles, via photothermal ablation, are emerging as lead candidates in next-generation cancer treatment for site-specific cell death. Plasmonic gold nanostars (GNS have an extremely large two-photon luminescence cross-section that allows real-time imaging through multiphoton microscopy, as well as superior photothermal conversion efficiency with highly concentrated heating due to its tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. To effectively study the use of GNS as a clinically plausible treatment of IBC, accurate three-dimensional (3D preclinical models are needed. Here, we demonstrate a unique in vitro preclinical model that mimics the tumor emboli structures assumed by IBC in vivo using IBC cell lines SUM149 and SUM190. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GNS are endocytosed into multiple cancer cell lines irrespective of receptor status or drug resistance and that

  9. ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY GUIDED FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATION CYTOLOGY IN DIAGNOSING INTRA-ABDOMINAL LESIONS- A 6-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE STUDY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN MANIPUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Konjengbam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC is a widely used method, which is accurate and safe in a readily palpable masses. But, in those inaccessible lesions and deeper organs are safely aspirated using fine needle radiological procedure like ultrasound or computed tomography guided. The aim of the study is to assess the utility of FNAC in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal lesions and different pattern of lesions in particular to the sites. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study was done in the Department of Pathology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS, Imphal, between June 2010 and June 2016. The study included 128 intra-abdominal masses. Giemsa and Papanicolaou’s stains were used. The cytological diagnosis was correlated with clinical and radiological data to arrive at a final diagnosis. RESULTS Reports on FNAC smears were retrospectively analysed, which had been done in various anatomic sites- liver (70 cases, colon (19 cases, gallbladder (17 cases, mesenteric lymph nodes (12 cases, ovary (3 cases, adrenals (2 cases and 1 case each of pancreas, peritoneal wall, pelvic, suprapubic and flank masses. The mean age was 42.16 years with M:F of 1.3:1. The diagnostic yield was 85.2% in combination for Ultrasound Guided (USG and Computed Tomography (CT guided aspiration. The smears were classified as benign neoplastic, malignant neoplastic, non-neoplastic, inconclusive and unsatisfactory for interpretation. There were 79 (61.7% malignant neoplastic lesion, 5 (3.9% benign neoplastic lesion, 25 (19.5% non-neoplastic lesion, one (0.7% inconclusive lesions and 18 (14.1% unsatisfactory smears. The liver and the colon were the most common sites. Adenocarcinomas and Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC were the most common malignant lesions comprising of 35 (44.3% and 25 (31.6% of the total malignant lesions diagnosed. CONCLUSION Intra-abdominal FNA is a simple, economical and a safe procedure with high sensitivity, specificity and

  10. Computing observables in curved multifield models of inflation—A guide (with code) to the transport method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Mafalda; Seery, David [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Frazer, Jonathan, E-mail: m.dias@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: j.frazer@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: a.liddle@sussex.ac.uk [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, 48040 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    We describe how to apply the transport method to compute inflationary observables in a broad range of multiple-field models. The method is efficient and encompasses scenarios with curved field-space metrics, violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes and models with quasi-single-field dynamics. In this note we focus on practical issues. It is accompanied by a Mathematica code which can be used to explore suitable models, or as a basis for further development.

  11. Computing observables in curved multifield models of inflation—A guide (with code) to the transport method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Mafalda; Seery, David; Frazer, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    We describe how to apply the transport method to compute inflationary observables in a broad range of multiple-field models. The method is efficient and encompasses scenarios with curved field-space metrics, violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes and models with quasi-single-field dynamics. In this note we focus on practical issues. It is accompanied by a Mathematica code which can be used to explore suitable models, or as a basis for further development

  12. User's guide to program MAD: a computer program for the organization and manipulation of magnetic tape directories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.H.

    1979-05-01

    MAD is a computer program for the organization and manipulation of the information contained in magnetic tape directories. Program MAD creates, updates, and interrogates a set of four random access files collectively called the MAD unified data base. Although program MAD was originally intended as an information compression mechanism, it has evolved into an organization system with the added feature of an approximately 60% reduction in the space required to store the data. This program is easy to use, relatively fast, efficient in its use of disk space, and available to all users of the Fusion Energy Division DECsystem-10

  13. Dendrimer-Stabilized Gold Nanostars as a Multifunctional Theranostic Nanoplatform for CT Imaging, Photothermal Therapy, and Gene Silencing of Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ping; Chen, Jingwen; Hu, Yong; Li, Xin; Wang, Han; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2016-12-01

    Development of versatile nanomaterials combining diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities within one single nanoplatform is extremely important for tumor theranostics. In this work, the authors report the synthesis of a gold nanostar (Au NS)-based theranostic platform stabilized with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) peptide-modified amine-terminated generation 3 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers. The formed RGD-modified dendrimer-stabilized Au NSs (RGD-Au DSNSs) are used as a gene delivery vector to complex small interfering RNA (siRNA) for computed tomography (CT) imaging, thermal imaging, photothermal therapy (PTT), and gene therapy of tumors. The results show that the RGD-Au DSNSs are able to compact vascular endothelial growth factor siRNA and specifically deliver siRNA to cancer cells overexpressing α v β 3 integrin. Under near-infrared laser irradiation, the viability of cancer cells is only 20.2% after incubation with the RGD-Au DSNS/siRNA polyplexes, which is much lower than that of cells after single PTT or gene therapy treatment. Furthermore, in vivo results show that the RGD-Au DSNS/siRNA polyplexes enable tumor CT imaging, thermal imaging, PTT, and gene therapy after intratumoral injection. These results indicate that the developed multifunctional nanoconstruct is a promising platform for tumor imaging and combinational PTT and gene therapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Prostate contouring uncertainty in megavoltage computed tomography images acquired with a helical tomotherapy unit during image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, William Y.; Chiu, Bernard; Bauman, Glenn S.; Lock, Michael; Rodrigues, George; Ash, Robert; Lewis, Craig; Fenster, Aaron; Battista, Jerry J.; Van Dyk, Jake

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the image-guidance capabilities of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT), this article compares the interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty in kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) used for radiotherapy planning with MVCT acquired with helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Five prostate-cancer patients were evaluated. Each patient underwent a KVCT and an MVCT study, a total of 10 CT studies. For interobserver variability analysis, four radiation oncologists, one physicist, and two radiation therapists (seven observers in total) contoured the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) in the 10 studies. The intraobserver variability was assessed by asking all observers to repeat the contouring of 1 patient's KVCT and MVCT studies. Quantitative analysis of contour variations was performed by use of volumes and radial distances. Results: The interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty was larger in MVCT compared with KVCT. Observers consistently segmented larger volumes on MVCT where the ratio of average prostate and SV volumes was 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. On average (interobserver and intraobserver), the local delineation variability, in terms of standard deviations [Δσ = √(σ 2 MVCT - σ 2 KVCT )], increased by 0.32 cm from KVCT to MVCT. Conclusions: Although MVCT was inferior to KVCT for prostate delineation, the application of MVCT in prostate radiotherapy remains useful

  15. Poster — Thur Eve — 69: Computational Study of DVH-guided Cancer Treatment Planning Optimization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomi, Pooyan Shirvani; Zinchenko, Yuriy [University of Calgary, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To compare methods to incorporate the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) curves into the treatment planning optimization. Method: The performance of three methods, namely, the conventional Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) model, a convex moment-based constrained optimization approach, and an unconstrained convex moment-based penalty approach, is compared using anonymized data of a prostate cancer patient. Three plans we generated using the corresponding optimization models. Four Organs at Risk (OARs) and one Tumor were involved in the treatment planning. The OARs and Tumor were discretized into total of 50,221 voxels. The number of beamlets was 943. We used commercially available optimization software Gurobi and Matlab to solve the models. Plan comparison was done by recording the model runtime followed by visual inspection of the resulting dose volume histograms. Conclusion: We demonstrate the effectiveness of the moment-based approaches to replicate the set of prescribed DVH curves. The unconstrained convex moment-based penalty approach is concluded to have the greatest potential to reduce the computational effort and holds a promise of substantial computational speed up.

  16. User`s guide for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), Version 2.0 software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, P.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horak, K.E.; Evanko, D.A. [Excel Tactical Staffing, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1998-04-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams (inspectors) and Inspected Parties (hosts). Traditional training techniques include lectures, table-top inspections, and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT is used for training both inspectors and hosts to conduct a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). The training covers the entire sequence of events in the challenge inspection regime, from initial notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities. The primary emphasis of the training tool is on conducting the inspection itself, and in particular, implementing the concept of managed access. (Managed access is a technique used to assure the inspectors that the facility is in compliance with the CWC, while at the same time protecting sensitive information unrelated to the CWC.) Information for all of the activities is located in the electronic {open_quotes}Exercise Manual.{close_quotes} In addition, interactive menus are used to negotiate access to each room and to alternate information during the simulated inspection. ACE-IT also demonstrates how various inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information.

  17. A guide through the computational analysis of isotope-labeled mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics data: an application study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haußmann Ute

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has reached a stage where it is possible to comprehensively analyze the whole proteome of a cell in one experiment. Here, the employment of stable isotopes has become a standard technique to yield relative abundance values of proteins. In recent times, more and more experiments are conducted that depict not only a static image of the up- or down-regulated proteins at a distinct time point but instead compare developmental stages of an organism or varying experimental conditions. Results Although the scientific questions behind these experiments are of course manifold, there are, nevertheless, two questions that commonly arise: 1 which proteins are differentially regulated regarding the selected experimental conditions, and 2 are there groups of proteins that show similar abundance ratios, indicating that they have a similar turnover? We give advice on how these two questions can be answered and comprehensively compare a variety of commonly applied computational methods and their outcomes. Conclusions This work provides guidance through the jungle of computational methods to analyze mass spectrometry-based isotope-labeled datasets and recommends an effective and easy-to-use evaluation strategy. We demonstrate our approach with three recently published datasets on Bacillus subtilis 12 and Corynebacterium glutamicum 3. Special focus is placed on the application and validation of cluster analysis methods. All applied methods were implemented within the rich internet application QuPE 4. Results can be found at http://qupe.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de.

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  5. Modeling of complex melting and solidification behavior in laser-irradiated materials [a description and users guide to the LASER8 computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, G.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1985-11-01

    The conceptual foundation of a computational model and a computer program based on it have been developed for treating various aspects of the complex melting and solidification behavior observed in pulsed laser-irradiated materials. A particularly important feature of the modeling is the capability of allowing melting and solidification to occur at temperatures other than the thermodynamic phase change temperatures. As a result, interfacial undercooling and overheating can be introduced and various types of nucleation events can be simulated. Calculations on silicon with the model have shown a wide variety of behavior, including the formation and propagation of multiple phase fronts. Although originally developed as a tool for studying certain problems arising in the field of laser annealing of semiconductors, the program should be useful in treating many types of systems in which phase changes and nucleation phenomena play important roles. This report describes the underlying physical and mathematical ideas and the basic relations used in LASER8. It also provides enough specific and detailed information on the program to serve as a guide for its use; a listing of one version of the program is given

  6. Au-Nanomaterials as a Superior Choice for Near-Infrared Photothermal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmida Jabeen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal therapy (PPT is a platform to fight cancer by using multiplexed interactive plasmonic nanomaterials as probes in combination with the excellent therapeutic performance of near-infrared (NIR light. With recent rapid developments in optics and nanotechnology, plasmonic materials have potential in cancer diagnosis and treatment, but there are some concerns regarding their clinical use. The primary concerns include the design of plasmonic nanomaterials which are taken up by the tissues, perform their function and then clear out from the body. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs can be developed in different morphologies and functionalized to assist the photothermal therapy in a way that they have clinical value. This review outlines the diverse Au morphologies, their distinctive characteristics, concerns and limitations to provide an idea of the requirements in the field of NIR-based therapeutics.

  7. Low-Power Photothermal Probing of Single Plasmonic Nanostructures with Nanomechanical String Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Wu, Kaiyu; Larsen, Peter Emil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the direct photothermal probing and mapping of single plasmonic nanostructures via the temperature-induced detuning of nanomechanical string resonators. Single Au nanoslits and nanorods are illuminated with a partially polarized focused laser beam (λ = 633 nm) with irradiances...... in the range of 0.26–38 μW/μm2. Photothermal heating maps with a resolution of ∼375 nm are obtained by scanning the laser over the nanostructures. Based on the string sensitivities, absorption efficiencies of 2.3 ± 0.3 and 1.1 ± 0.7 are extracted for a single nanoslit (53 nm × 1 μm) and nanorod (75 nm × 185 nm......). Our results show that nanomechanical resonators are a unique and robust analysis tool for the low-power investigation of thermoplasmonic effects in plasmonic hot spots....

  8. Plasmonic resonance-enhanced local photothermal energy deposition by aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Xinyuan; Jiang Naibo; Zhang Zhili; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Local energy deposition of aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) by localized surface plasmon resonance-enhanced photothermal effects is demonstrated. Low-power light stimuli are efficiently and locally concentrated to trigger the oxidation reactions of Al NPs because of the large ohmic absorption and high reactivity of the Al. Numerical simulations show that both ultraviolet and visible light are more efficient than infrared light for photothermal energy coupling. The natural oxidation layer of alumina is found to have minimum impact on the energy deposition because of its negligible dielectric losses. The near-field distributions of the electric field indicate that slight aggregation induces much higher local enhancement, especially at the interface region of multiple contacting nanoparticles.

  9. Photothermal Activation of Metal-Organic Frameworks Using a UV-Vis Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espín, Jordi; Garzón-Tovar, Luis; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2018-03-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) usually require meticulous removal of the solvent molecules to unlock their potential porosity. Herein, we report a novel one-step method for activating MOFs based on the photothermal effect induced by directly irradiating them with a UV-vis lamp. The localized light-to-heat conversion produced in the MOF crystals upon irradiation enables a very fast solvent removal, thereby significantly reducing the activation time to as low as 30 min and suppressing the need for time-consuming solvent-exchange procedures and vacuum conditions. This approach is successful for a broad range of MOFs, including HKUST-1, UiO-66-NH 2 , ZIF-67, CPO-27-M (M = Zn, Ni, and Mg), Fe-MIL-101-NH 2 , and IRMOF-3, all of which exhibit absorption bands in the light emission range. In addition, we anticipate that this photothermal activation can also be used to activate covalent organic frameworks (COFs).

  10. Frequency-modulated impulse response photothermal detection through optical reflectance. 2: Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, J F; Mandelis, A

    1988-08-15

    A fast thermoreflectance impulse response photothermal imager was assembled and tested with several solid materials [quartz, stainless steel, and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF)I. The instrument was found to yield quantitative data in agreement with Green's function theoretical models of time domain heat conduction. The FM chirp laser intensity modulation technique used in these experiments gave wide bandwidth photothermal signals and was found to be only limited by the FFT instrumentation frequency response (100 kHz). Thermal diffusivities were calculated, while thermal lensing and thermoelastic effects were further observed. The imager was thus shown to be capable of replacing pulsed laser devices for truly nondestructive applications with materials with low damage threshold to optical pulses.

  11. Quantum limits of photothermal and radiation pressure cooling of a movable mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard, M; Dantan, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a general quantum-mechanical theory for the cooling of a movable mirror in an optical cavity when both radiation pressure self-cooling and photothermal cooling effects are present, and show that these two mechanisms may bring the oscillator close to its quantum ground state, although in quite different regimes. Self-cooling caused by coherent exchange of excitations between the cavity mode and the mirror vibrational mode is shown to dominate in the good-cavity regime-when the mechanical resonance frequency is larger than the cavity decay rate, whereas photothermal-induced cooling can be made predominant in the bad-cavity limit. Both situations are compared, and the relevant physical quantities to be optimized in order to reach the lowest final excitation number states are extracted.

  12. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography of endogenous and exogenous contrast agents in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre-Landry, Maryse; Gordon, Andrew Y; Penn, John S; Skala, Melissa C

    2017-08-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become a standard-of-care in retinal imaging. OCT allows non-invasive imaging of the tissue structure but lacks specificity to contrast agents that could be used for in vivo molecular imaging. Photothermal OCT (PT-OCT) is a functional OCT-based technique that has been developed to detect absorbers in a sample. We demonstrate in vivo PT-OCT in the eye for the first time on both endogenous (melanin) and exogenous (gold nanorods) absorbers. Pigmented mice and albino mice (n = 6 eyes) were used to isolate the photothermal signal from the melanin in the retina. Pigmented mice with laser-induced choroidal neovascularization lesions (n = 7 eyes) were also imaged after a systemic injection of gold nanorods to observe their passive accumulation in the retina. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of PT-OCT to image the distribution of both endogenous and exogenous absorbers in the mouse retina.

  13. Memory-dependent derivatives for photothermal semiconducting medium in generalized thermoelasticity with two-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, K.; Sarkar, N.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a novel generalized model of photothermal theory with two-temperature thermoelasticity theory based on memory-dependent derivative (MDD) theory is performed. A one-dimensional problem for an elastic semiconductor material with isotropic and homogeneous properties has been considered. The problem is solved with a new model (MDD) under the influence of a mechanical force with a photothermal excitation. The Laplace transform technique is used to remove the time-dependent terms in the governing equations. Moreover, the general solutions of some physical fields are obtained. The surface taken into consideration is free of traction and subjected to a time-dependent thermal shock. The numerical Laplace inversion is used to obtain the numerical results of the physical quantities of the problem. Finally, the obtained results are presented and discussed graphically.

  14. Photothermal tomography for the functional and structural evaluation, and early mineral loss monitoring in bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiplavil, Sreekumar; Mandelis, Andreas; Wang, Xueding; Feng, Ting

    2014-08-01

    Salient features of a new non-ionizing bone diagnostics technique, truncated-correlation photothermal coherence tomography (TC-PCT), exhibiting optical-grade contrast and capable of resolving the trabecular network in three dimensions through the cortical region with and without a soft-tissue overlayer are presented. The absolute nature and early demineralization-detection capability of a marker called thermal wave occupation index, estimated using the proposed modality, have been established. Selective imaging of regions of a specific mineral density range has been demonstrated in a mouse femur. The method is maximum-permissible-exposure compatible. In a matrix of bone and soft-tissue a depth range of ~3.8 mm has been achieved, which can be increased through instrumental and modulation waveform optimization. Furthermore, photoacoustic microscopy, a comparable modality with TC-PCT, has been used to resolve the trabecular structure and for comparison with the photothermal tomography.

  15. Microfluidic Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Photothermal Biodegradable Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Isabel; Prieto, Martín; Mendoza, Gracia; Alejo, Teresa; Irusta, Silvia; Sebastian, Victor; Arruebo, Manuel

    2016-08-24

    The continuous synthesis of biodegradable photothermal copper sulfide nanoparticles has been carried out with the aid of a microfluidic platform. A comparative physicochemical characterization of the resulting products from the microreactor and from a conventional batch reactor has been performed. The microreactor is able to operate in a continuous manner and with a 4-fold reduction in the synthesis times compared to that of the conventional batch reactor producing nanoparticles with the same physicochemical requirements. Biodegradation subproducts obtained under simulated physiological conditions have been identified, and a complete cytotoxicological analysis on different cell lines was performed. The photothermal effect of those nanomaterials has been demonstrated in vitro as well as their ability to generate reactive oxygen species.

  16. Pulsed photothermal profiling of water-based samples using a spectrally composite reconstruction approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majaron, B; Milanic, M

    2010-01-01

    Pulsed photothermal profiling involves reconstruction of temperature depth profile induced in a layered sample by single-pulse laser exposure, based on transient change in mid-infrared (IR) emission from its surface. Earlier studies have indicated that in watery tissues, featuring a pronounced spectral variation of mid-IR absorption coefficient, analysis of broadband radiometric signals within the customary monochromatic approximation adversely affects profiling accuracy. We present here an experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal profiling in layered agar gel samples utilizing a spectrally composite kernel matrix vs. the customary approach. By utilizing a custom reconstruction code, the augmented approach reduces broadening of individual temperature peaks to 14% of the absorber depth, in contrast to 21% obtained with the customary approach.

  17. A simple theoretical extension to the analysis of photothermal deflection signal for low thermal diffusivity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, Jyotsna; Lekshmi, S.; Nair, K.P.R.; Rasheed, T.M.A

    2004-01-01

    A modified amplitude method to analyze the photothermal probe beam deflection signal for the determination of low thermal diffusivity values of materials is proposed. This simple theoretical model, which is an extension of the amplitude method proposed by Quelin et al., takes into account the dependence of the photothermal signal on the height of the probe beam above the sample surface which affects mirage measurements when the thermal diffusivity of the coupling medium is greater than that of the sample. The present work is similar to the modification to the phase method proposed by Bertolotti et al. for determination of low thermal diffusivity. The method can be applied irrespective of whether the sample is optically transparent or optically opaque and is independent of thickness

  18. User's guide for simplified computer models for the estimation of long-term performance of cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plansky, L.E.; Seitz, R.R.

    1994-02-01

    This report documents user instructions for several simplified subroutines and driver programs that can be used to estimate various aspects of the long-term performance of cement-based barriers used in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The subroutines are prepared in a modular fashion to allow flexibility for a variety of applications. Three levels of codes are provided: the individual subroutines, interactive drivers for each of the subroutines, and an interactive main driver, CEMENT, that calls each of the individual drivers. The individual subroutines for the different models may be taken independently and used in larger programs, or the driver modules can be used to execute the subroutines separately or as part of the main driver routine. A brief program description is included and user-interface instructions for the individual subroutines are documented in the main report. These are intended to be used when the subroutines are used as subroutines in a larger computer code

  19. Metal-filled carbon nanotubes as a novel class of photothermal nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossella, Francesco; Bellani, Vittorio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' A. Volta' ' and CNISM, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Soldano, Caterina [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Brescia, Via Valotti 9, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Tommasini, Matteo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' ' G. Natta' ' , Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-08

    Metal-filled carbon nanotubes represent a novel class of photothermal nanomaterials: when illuminated by visible light they exhibit a strong enhancement of the temperature at the metal sites, due to the enhanced plasmonic light absorption at the metal surface, which behaves as a heat radiator. Potential applications include nanomedicine, heat-assisted magnetic recording, and light-activated thermal gradient-driven devices. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Layered tin monoselenide as advanced photothermal conversion materials for efficient solar energy-driven water evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiandong; Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Yang, Guowei

    2018-02-08

    Solar energy-driven water evaporation lays a solid foundation for important photothermal applications such as sterilization, seawater desalination, and electricity generation. Due to the strong light-matter coupling, broad absorption wavelength range, and prominent quantum confinement effect, layered tin monoselenide (SnSe) holds a great potential to effectively harness solar irradiation and convert it to heat energy. In this study, SnSe is successfully deposited on a centimeter-scale nickel foam using a facile one-step pulsed-laser deposition approach. Importantly, the maximum evaporation rate of SnSe-coated nickel foam (SnSe@NF) reaches 0.85 kg m -2 h -1 , which is even 21% larger than that obtained with the commercial super blue coating (0.7 kg m -2 h -1 ) under the same condition. A systematic analysis reveals that its good photothermal conversion capability is attributed to the synergetic effect of multi-scattering-induced light trapping and the optimal trade-off between light absorption and phonon emission. Finally, the SnSe@NF device is further used for seawater evaporation, demonstrating a comparable evaporation rate (0.8 kg m -2 h -1 ) to that of fresh water and good stability over many cycles of usage. In summary, the current contribution depicts a facile one-step scenario for the economical and efficient solar-enabled SnSe@NF evaporation devices. More importantly, an in-depth analysis of the photothermal conversion mechanism underneath the layered materials depicts a fundamental paradigm for the design and application of photothermal devices based on them in the future.

  1. EGF Functionalized Polymer-Coated Gold Nanoparticles Promote EGF Photostability and EGFR Internalization for Photothermal Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Oliveira Silva

    Full Text Available The application of functionalized nanocarriers on photothermal therapy for cancer ablation has wide interest. The success of this application depends on the therapeutic efficiency and biocompatibility of the system, but also on the stability and biorecognition of the conjugated protein. This study aims at investigating the hypothesis that EGF functionalized polymer-coated gold nanoparticles promote EGF photostability and EGFR internalization, making these conjugated particles suitable for photothermal therapy. The conjugated gold nanoparticles (100-200 nm showed a plasmon absorption band located within the near-infrared range (650-900 nm, optimal for photothermal therapy applications. The effects of temperature, of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles and of UVB light (295nm on the fluorescence properties of EGF have been investigated with steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence properties of EGF, including the formation of Trp and Tyr photoproducts, is modulated by temperature and by the intensity of the excitation light. The presence of polymeric-coated gold nanoparticles reduced or even avoided the formation of Trp and Tyr photoproducts when EGF is exposed to UVB light, protecting this way the structure and function of EGF. Cytotoxicity studies of conjugated nanoparticles carried out in normal-like human keratinocytes showed small, concentration dependent decreases in cell viability (0-25%. Moreover, conjugated nanoparticles could activate and induce the internalization of overexpressed Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in human lung carcinoma cells. In conclusion, the gold nanoparticles conjugated with Epidermal Growth Factor and coated with biopolymers developed in this work, show a potential application for near infrared photothermal therapy, which may efficiently destroy solid tumours, reducing the damage of the healthy tissue.

  2. A cryostatic setup for the low-temperature measurement of thermal diffusivity with the photothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Liakhou, G.; Li Voti, R.; Paoloni, S.; Sibilia, C.; Sparvieri, N.

    1995-01-01

    A cryostatic setup is described to perform photothermal deflection measurements from room temperature to 77 K. The setup uses gaseous nitrogen as a medium where the photodeflection is produced. The ability of the system to work is demonstrated presenting some measurements of thermal diffusivity of high-temperature superconductor samples and of yttrium-iron garnets with variable aluminum content. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  3. Photothermal experiments on condensed phase samples of agricultural interest : optical and thermal characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Favier, J.P.

    1997-01-01


    A rapidly increasing number of photothermal (PT) techniques has had a considerable impact on agriculture and environmental sciences in the last decade. It was the purpose of the work described here to develop and apply new PT techniques in this specific field of research.

    Chapter I is a general introduction with an overview of PT techniques used in this research. Two different photoacoustic (PA) techniques used for optical characterization of a variety of condensed phase sa...

  4. EGF Functionalized Polymer-Coated Gold Nanoparticles Promote EGF Photostability and EGFR Internalization for Photothermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Catarina Oliveira; Petersen, Steffen B.; Reis, Catarina Pinto; Rijo, Patrícia; Molpeceres, Jesús; Fernandes, Ana Sofia; Gonçalves, Odete; Gomes, Andreia C.; Correia, Isabel; Vorum, Henrik; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The application of functionalized nanocarriers on photothermal therapy for cancer ablation has wide interest. The success of this application depends on the therapeutic efficiency and biocompatibility of the system, but also on the stability and biorecognition of the conjugated protein. This study aims at investigating the hypothesis that EGF functionalized polymer-coated gold nanoparticles promote EGF photostability and EGFR internalization, making these conjugated particles suitable for photothermal therapy. The conjugated gold nanoparticles (100–200 nm) showed a plasmon absorption band located within the near-infrared range (650–900 nm), optimal for photothermal therapy applications. The effects of temperature, of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles and of UVB light (295nm) on the fluorescence properties of EGF have been investigated with steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence properties of EGF, including the formation of Trp and Tyr photoproducts, is modulated by temperature and by the intensity of the excitation light. The presence of polymeric-coated gold nanoparticles reduced or even avoided the formation of Trp and Tyr photoproducts when EGF is exposed to UVB light, protecting this way the structure and function of EGF. Cytotoxicity studies of conjugated nanoparticles carried out in normal-like human keratinocytes showed small, concentration dependent decreases in cell viability (0–25%). Moreover, conjugated nanoparticles could activate and induce the internalization of overexpressed Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in human lung carcinoma cells. In conclusion, the gold nanoparticles conjugated with Epidermal Growth Factor and coated with biopolymers developed in this work, show a potential application for near infrared photothermal therapy, which may efficiently destroy solid tumours, reducing the damage of the healthy tissue. PMID:27788212

  5. Intra-operative computer navigation guided cervical pedicle screw insertion in thirty-three complex cervical spine deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rajasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical pedicle screw fixation is challenging due to the small osseous morphometrics and the close proximity of neurovascular elements. Computer navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. There are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. Also cervical pedicle screw insertion in children has not been described before. We evaluated the safety and accuracy of Iso-C 3D-navigated pedicle screws in the deformed cervical spine. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients including 15 children formed the study group. One hundred and forty-five cervical pedicle screws were inserted using Iso-C 3D-based computer navigation in patients undergoing cervical spine stabilization for craniovertebral junction anomalies, cervico-thoracic deformities and cervical instabilities due to trauma, post-surgery and degenerative disorders. The accuracy and containment of screw placement was assessed from postoperative computerized tomography scans. Results: One hundred and thirty (89.7% screws were well contained inside the pedicles. Nine (6.1% Type A and six (4.2% Type B pedicle breaches were observed. In 136 levels, the screws were inserted in the classical description of pedicle screw application and in nine deformed vertebra, the screws were inserted in a non-classical fashion, taking purchase of the best bone stock. None of them had a critical breach. No patient had any neurovascular complications. Conclusion: Iso-C navigation improves the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw insertion and is not only successful in achieving secure pedicle fixation but also in identifying the best available bone stock for three-column bone fixation in altered anatomy. The advantages conferred by cervical pedicle screws can be extended to the pediatric population also.

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  7. Safe zones and a technical guide for cerclage wiring of the femur: a computed topographic angiogram (CTA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apivatthakakul, Theerachai; Siripipattanamongkol, P; Oh, Chang-Wug; Sananpanich, K; Phornphutkul, C

    2018-01-01

    Cerclage wiring for reduction of complex femoral shaft fractures can create iatrogenic vascular injury. To describe the anatomical relation of blood vessels to the femur and develop a technical guide for safe passage of cerclage wire. CT lower-limb angiographs (CTA) of 80 patients were reviewed and analysed to identify the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and the deep femoral artery (DFA) as well as the relation of those arteries to the femoral cortex. The total length of the femur was measured and divided into eight equal segments (seven levels). At each level, the medial half of the femur was divided into eight sectors labelled A through H and the position of the SFA and DFA was recorded. The shortest distance between the femoral cortex and the SFA and DFA at each level was measured. The data was analysed using STATA version 10.0. The average total femoral length from the tip of greater trochanter to lateral joint line was 402.98 ± 26.16 cm. The average distances from the SFA to the femur (d1) for levels 1 through 7 were 37.20 ± 5.0, 32.09 ± 4.74, 27.13 ± 4.19, 27.71 ± 5.46, 23.71 ± 4.40, 13.63 ± 3.59 and 10.08 ± 3.09 mm, respectively. The average distances between the DFA and the femur (d2) for levels 1 through 3 were 26.70 ± 4.13, 14.76 ± 3.27 and 9.58 ± 3.79 mm, respectively. The position of the SFA is located in sectors B through E at levels 1-3 and in sectors E through H at levels 4-7 and the position of the DFA located in sectors B through F at levels 1-3. Cerclage wiring should be started from the posterior intermuscular septum at the linea aspera. The safe area is the proximal half (midshaft) of the femur where the SFA and DFA lie at a safe distance from the femur. Between the midshaft and the distal 1/4, insertion of the passer must be done meticulously with the tip kept close to posteromedial cortex. Below the distal 1/4, the tip of the passer should be kept close to the posterior cortex to avoid injury to the SFA and

  8. Laser generated gold nanocorals with broadband plasmon absorption for photothermal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Annamaria; Fracasso, Giulio; Conti, Giamaica; Pilot, Roberto; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles with efficient plasmon absorption in the visible and near infrared (NIR) regions, biocompatibility and easy surface functionalization are of interest for photothermal applications. Herein we describe the synthesis and photothermal properties of gold ``nanocorals'' (AuNC) obtained by laser irradiation of Au nanospheres (AuNS) dispersed in liquid solution. AuNC are formed in two stages: by photofragmentation of AuNS, followed by spontaneous unidirectional assembly of gold nanocrystals. The whole procedure is performed without chemicals or templating compounds, hence the AuNC can be coated with thiolated molecules in one step. We show that AuNC coated with thiolated polymers are easily dispersed in an aqueous environment or in organic solvents and can be included in polymeric matrixes to yield a plasmonic nanocomposite. AuNC dispersions exhibit flat broadband plasmon absorption ranging from the visible to the NIR and unitary light-to-heat conversion. Besides, in vitro biocompatibility experiments assessed the absence of cytotoxic effects even at a dose as high as 100 μg mL-1. These safe-by-designed AuNC are promising for use in various applications such as photothermal cancer therapy, light-triggered drug release, antimicrobial substrates, optical tomography, obscurant materials and optical coatings.

  9. Influence of the photothermal effect of a gold nanorod cluster on biofilm disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Wonjin; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate a method for biofilm disinfection by raising biofilm temperature using the photothermal effect of a gold nanorod cluster. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are capable of generating enough heat to lyse bacteria by heating biofilm via laser irradiation. To test this, GNRs are synthesized using wet chemistry and a single GNR cluster is fabricated using photo-lithography technique. The GNR cluster is directly applied to the biofilm and its effects on bacteria are measured before and after laser irradiation. The photothermal effect of GNRs on the biofilm structure results in a considerable reduction of cell viability and biofilm thickness. Several quantitative measurements of bacterial mortality and biofilm destruction show an increase in efficacy with increasing durations of laser irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy images of the irradiated bacteria show obvious morphological damage such as rupture or collapse of the bacterial cell membrane in the biofilm. These results indicate that GNRs are useful and a potential material for use in photothermal treatments, particularly biofilm disinfection. (paper)

  10. Solar-Assisted Fast Cleanup of Heavy Oil Spill by a Photothermal Sponge

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Jian

    2018-04-16

    Rapid cleanup of heavy oil spill is always considered as a great challenge because the conventional porous oil sorbents cannot efficiently remove them due to the high viscosity of the oil (>1000 mPa·s). In this work, we take advantage of the photothermal effect to heating the heavy oil by using sunlight as energy source to significantly reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil and thus to achieve a fast heavy oil cleanup. A carbon nanotube (CNT) modified polyurethane sponge was fabricated as photothermal sorbent that exhibited superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity, as well as outstanding absorption capacity of heavy oil. Thanks to the excellent photothermal effect of CNTs, the modified sponge achieved nearly full sunlight absorption (99%). The resulting solar heating effectively reduced the viscosity of the heavy oil, which enabled the modified sponge to quickly absorb heavy oil of 20 times its own weight under sun illumination. This solar-assisted heavy oil sorbent design is promising for future remediation of viscous oil-spills.

  11. Magnetic field enhanced photothermal effect of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Pengfei; Lin, Yawen; Gan, Zhixing; Luo, Xiaobin; Zhou, Weiping; Zhang, Ning

    2018-03-01

    Photothermal and magnetothermal effects are promising in hyperthermia for cancer therapy. However, the development of safe treatments with limited side-effects requires a relatively-high thermal efficiency triggered by mild near-infrared (NIR) light and alternating magnetic field (HAC), which remains a formidable challenge. In this work, a magnetic field enhanced photothermal effect (MFEP) of Fe3O4 nanoparticles is proposed and investigated systematically. The results suggest remarkable temperature increments of 9.59 to 36.90 °C under irradiation of NIR with different light power densities (808 nm, 0-6.98 W/cm2) combined with a certain magnetic field (HAC = 1.5 kA/m at 90 kHz). The rise of temperature induced by MFEP is substantially larger than the sum of isolated photothermal and magnetothermal effects, which is attributed to the hot-phonon bottleneck effect. The MFEP of Fe3O4 nanoparticles could serve as an effective treatment for cancer therapy in the future.

  12. Spatially Probed Plasmonic Photothermic Nanoheater Enhanced Hybrid Polymeric-Metallic PVDF-Ag Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liow, Chi Hao; Lu, Xin; Tan, Chuan Fu; Chan, Kwok Hoe; Zeng, Kaiyang; Li, Shuzhou; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2018-02-01

    Surface plasmon-based photonics offers exciting opportunities to enable fine control of the site, span, and extent of mechanical harvesting. However, the interaction between plasmonic photothermic and piezoresponse still remains underexplored. Here, spatially localized and controllable piezoresponse of a hybrid self-polarized polymeric-metallic system that correlates to plasmonic light-to-heat modulation of the local strain is demonstrated. The piezoresponse is associated to the localized plasmons that serve as efficient nanoheaters leading to self-regulated strain via thermal expansion of the electroactive polymer. Moreover, the finite-difference time-domain simulation and linear thermal model also deduce the local strain to the surface plasmon heat absorption. The distinct plasmonic photothermic-piezoelectric phenomenon mediates not only localized external stimulus light response but also enhances dynamic piezoelectric energy harvesting. The present work highlights a promising surface plasmon coordinated piezoelectric response which underpins energy localization and transfer for diversified design of unique photothermic-piezotronic technology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Clean Photothermal Heating and Controlled Release From Near Infrared Dye Doped Nanoparticles Without Oxygen Photosensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Spence, Graeme T.; Roland, Felicia M.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    The photothermal heating and release properties of biocompatible organic nanoparticles, doped with a near-infrared croconaine (Croc) dye, were compared with analogous nanoparticles doped with the common near-infrared dyes ICG and IR780. Separate formulations of lipid-polymer-hybrid nanoparticles and liposomes, each containing Croc dye, absorbed strongly at 808 nm and generated clean laser-induced heating (no production of 1O2 and no photobleaching of the dye). In contrast, laser-induced heating of nanoparticles containing ICG or IR780 produced reactive 1O2 leading to bleaching of the dye and also decomposition of co-encapsulated payload such as the drug Doxorubicin. Croc dye was especially useful as a photothermal agent for laser controlled release of chemically sensitive payload from nanoparticles. Solution state experiments demonstrated repetitive fractional release of water soluble fluorescent dye from the interior of thermosensitive liposomes. Additional experiments used a focused laser beam to control leakage from immobilized liposomes with very high spatial and temporal precision. The results indicate that fractional photothermal leakage from nanoparticles doped with Croc dye is a promising method for a range of controlled release applications. PMID:26149326

  14. Multistage Targeting Strategy Using Magnetic Composite Nanoparticles for Synergism of Photothermal Therapy and Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wei, Guoqing; Zhang, Xiaobin; Huang, Xuehui; Zhao, Jingya; Guo, Xing; Zhou, Shaobing

    2018-03-01

    Mitochondrial-targeting therapy is an emerging strategy for enhanced cancer treatment. In the present study, a multistage targeting strategy using doxorubicin-loaded magnetic composite nanoparticles is developed for enhanced efficacy of photothermal and chemical therapy. The nanoparticles with a core-shell-SS-shell architecture are composed of a core of Fe 3 O 4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters, an inner shell of polydopamine (PDA) functionalized with triphenylphosphonium (TPP), and an outer shell of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) linked to the PDA by disulfide bonds. The magnetic core can increase the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site for the first stage of tumor tissue targeting. After the nanoparticles enter the tumor cells, the second stage of mitochondrial targeting is realized as the mPEG shell is detached from the nanoparticles by redox responsiveness to expose the TPP. Using near-infrared light irradiation at the tumor site, a photothermal effect is generated from the PDA photosensitizer, leading to a dramatic decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Simultaneously, the loaded doxorubicin can rapidly enter the mitochondria and subsequently damage the mitochondrial DNA, resulting in cell apoptosis. Thus, the synergism of photothermal therapy and chemotherapy targeting the mitochondria significantly enhances the cancer treatment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The inflammation markers in serum of tumor-bearing rats after plasmonic photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Afanasyeva, Galina A.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Zakharova, Natalia B.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2018-02-01

    We report on plasmonic photothermal therapy of rats with inoculated cholangiocarcinoma through the intratumoral injection of PEG-coated gold nanorods followed by CW laser light irradiation. The length and diameter of gold nanorods were 41+/-8 nm and 10+/-2 nm, respectively; the particle mass-volume concentration was 400 μg/mL, which corresponds to the optical density of 20 at the wavelength 808 nm. The tumor-bearing rats were randomly divided into three groups: (1) without any treatment (control); (2) with only laser irradiation of tumor; (3) with intratumoral administration of gold nanorods and laser irradiation of tumors. An hour before laser irradiation, the animals were injected intratumorally with gold nanorod solutions in the amount of 30% of the tumor volume. The infrared 808-nm laser with power density of 2.3 W/cm2 was used for plasmonic photothermal therapy (PTT). The withdraw of animals from the experiment was performed 24 h after laser exposure. The content of lipid peroxidation products and molecular markers of inflammation (TNF-α, IGF-1, VEGF-C) was determined by ELISA test in serum of rats. The standard histological techniques with hematoxylin and eosin staining were used for morphological examination of tumor tissues. It was revealed that the significant necrotic changes were noted in tumor tissue after plasmonic photothermal therapy, which were accompanied by formation of inflammatory reaction with release of proinflammatory cytokines and lipid peroxidation products into the bloodstream

  16. Thermal conductivity of organic semi-conducting materials using 3omega and photothermal radiometry techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reisdorffer Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic semiconductors for opto-electronic devices show several defects which can be enhanced while increasing the operating temperature. Their thermal management and especially the reduction of their temperature are of great interest. For the heat transfer study, one has to measure the thermal conductivity of thin film organic materials. However the major difficulty for this measurement is the very low thickness of the films which needs the use of very specific techniques. In our work, the 3-omega and photothermal radiometric methods were used to measure the thermal conductivity of thin film organic semiconducting material (Alq3. The measurements were performed as function of the thin film thickness from 45 to 785 nm and also of its temperature from 80 to 350 K. With the 3 omega method, a thermal conductivity value of 0.066 W.m−1K−1 was obtained for Alq3 thin film of 200 nm at room temperature, in close agreement with the photothermal value. Both techniques appear to be complementary: the 3 omega method is easier to implement for large temperature range and small thicknesses down to a few tens of nanometers whereas the photothermal method is more suitable for thicknesses over 200nm since it provides additional information such as the thin film volumetric heat capacity.

  17. Luminescent nanoprobes for thermal bio-sensing: Towards controlled photo-thermal therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaque, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.jaque@uam.es [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos (GFFC), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil); Jacinto, Carlos [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos (GFFC), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Photo-thermal therapies, based on the light-induced local heating of cancer tumors and tissues, are nowadays attracting an increasing attention due to their effectiveness, universality, and low cost. In order to avoid undesirable collateral damage in the healthy tissues surrounding the tumors, photo-thermal therapies should be achieved while monitoring tumor’s temperature in such a way that thermal therapy could be stopped before reaching the damage limit. Measuring tumor temperature is not an easy task at all and novel strategies should be adopted. In this work it is demonstrated how luminescent nanoparticles, in particular Neodymium doped LaF{sub 3} nanoparticles, could be used as multi-functional agents capable of simultaneous heating and thermal sensing. Advantages and disadvantages of such nanoparticles are discussed and the future perspectives are briefly raised. - Highlights: • Thermal control is essential in novel photo-thermal therapies. • Thermal control and heating can be achieved by Neodymium doped nanoparticles. • Perspectives of Neodymium doped nanoparticles in potential in vivo applications are discussed.

  18. On the use of photothermal techniques for the characterization of solar-selective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rincón, J. A.; Ares-Muzio, O.; Macias, J. D.; Estrella-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Lizama-Tzec, F. I.; Oskam, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2018-03-01

    The efficiency of the conversion of solar energy into thermal energy is determined by the optical and thermal properties of the selective coating, in particular, the solar absorptance and thermal emittance at the desired temperature of the specific application. Photothermal techniques are the most appropriate methods to explore these properties, however, a quantitative determination using photothermal radiometry, which is based on the measurement of emitted radiation caused by the heating generated by a modulated light source, has proven to be elusive. In this work, we present experimental results for selective coatings based on electrodeposited black nickel-nickel on both stainless steel and copper substrates, as well as for commercial TiNOX coatings on aluminum, illustrating that the radiation emitted by the surface depends on the optical absorption, thermal emissivity and on the light-into-heat energy conversion efficiency (quantum efficiency). We show that a combination of photothermal radiometry and photoacoustic spectroscopy can successfully account for these parameters, and provide values for the emissivity in agreement with values obtained by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

  19. A 3D Photothermal Structure toward Improved Energy Efficiency in Solar Steam Generation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yusuf

    2018-04-18

    Summary The energy efficiency in solar steam generation by 2D photothermal materials has approached its limit. In this work, we fabricated 3D cylindrical cup-shaped structures of mixed metal oxide as solar evaporator, and the 3D structure led to a high energy efficiency close to 100% under one-sun illumination due to the capability of the cup wall to recover the diffuse reflectance and thermal radiation heat loss from the 2D cup bottom. Additional heat was gained from the ambient air when the 3D structure was exposed under one-sun illumination, leading to an extremely high steam generation rate of 2.04 kg m−2 h−1. The 3D structure has a high thermal stability and shows great promise in practical applications including domestic wastewater volume reduction and seawater desalination. The results of this work inspire further research efforts to use 3D photothermal structures to break through the energy efficiency limit of 2D photothermal materials.

  20. Ultracompact on-chip photothermal power monitor based on silicon hybrid plasmonic waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Hao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate an ultracompact on-chip photothermal power monitor based on a silicon hybrid plasmonic waveguide (HPWG, which consists of a metal strip, a silicon core, and a silicon oxide (SiO2 insulator layer between them. When light injected to an HPWG is absorbed by the metal strip, the temperature increases and the resistance of the metal strip changes accordingly due to the photothermal and thermal resistance effects of the metal. Therefore, the optical power variation can be monitored by measuring the resistance of the metal strip on the HPWG. To obtain the electrical signal for the resistance measurement conveniently, a Wheatstone bridge circuit is monolithically integrated with the HPWG on the same chip. As the HPWG has nanoscale light confinement, the present power monitor is as short as ~3 μm, which is the smallest photothermal power monitor reported until now. The compactness helps to improve the thermal efficiency and the response speed. For the present power monitor fabricated with simple fabrication processes, the measured responsivity is as high as about 17.7 mV/mW at a bias voltage of 2 V and the power dynamic range is as large as 35 dB.