WorldWideScience

Sample records for computational geometry electronic

  1. Discrete and computational geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Devadoss, Satyan L

    2011-01-01

    Discrete geometry is a relatively new development in pure mathematics, while computational geometry is an emerging area in applications-driven computer science. Their intermingling has yielded exciting advances in recent years, yet what has been lacking until now is an undergraduate textbook that bridges the gap between the two. Discrete and Computational Geometry offers a comprehensive yet accessible introduction to this cutting-edge frontier of mathematics and computer science. This book covers traditional topics such as convex hulls, triangulations, and Voronoi diagrams, as well as more recent subjects like pseudotriangulations, curve reconstruction, and locked chains. It also touches on more advanced material, including Dehn invariants, associahedra, quasigeodesics, Morse theory, and the recent resolution of the Poincaré conjecture. Connections to real-world applications are made throughout, and algorithms are presented independently of any programming language. This richly illustrated textbook also fe...

  2. Computational synthetic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bokowski, Jürgen

    1989-01-01

    Computational synthetic geometry deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. This research monograph considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It turns out that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain new mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatorics of Grassmann varieties. Finally algebraic varieties characterizing matroids and oriented matroids are introduced providing a new basis for applying computer algebra methods in this field. The necessary background knowledge is reviewed briefly. The text is accessible to stud...

  3. Guide to Computational Geometry Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Gravesen, Jens; Anton, François

    be processed before it is useful. This Guide to Computational Geometry Processing reviews the algorithms for processing geometric data, with a practical focus on important techniques not covered by traditional courses on computer vision and computer graphics. This is balanced with an introduction...... to the theoretical and mathematical underpinnings of each technique, enabling the reader to not only implement a given method, but also to understand the ideas behind it, its limitations and its advantages. Topics and features: Presents an overview of the underlying mathematical theory, covering vector spaces......, metric space, affine spaces, differential geometry, and finite difference methods for derivatives and differential equations Reviews geometry representations, including polygonal meshes, splines, and subdivision surfaces Examines techniques for computing curvature from polygonal meshes Describes...

  4. Computational geometry for reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.B.; Bischoff, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes for simulating particle transport involve three basic computational sections: a geometry package for locating particles and computing distances to regional boundaries, a physics package for analyzing interactions between particles and problem materials, and an editing package for determining event statistics and overall results. This paper describes the computational geometry methods in RACER, a vectorized Monte Carlo code used for reactor physics analysis, so that comparisons may be made with techniques used in other codes. The principal applications for RACER are eigenvalue calculations and power distributions associated with reactor core physics analysis. Successive batches of neutrons are run until convergence and acceptable confidence intervals are obtained, with typical problems involving >10 6 histories. As such, the development of computational geometry methods has emphasized two basic needs: a flexible but compact geometric representation that permits accurate modeling of reactor core details and efficient geometric computation to permit very large numbers of histories to be run. The current geometric capabilities meet these needs effectively, supporting a variety of very large and demanding applications

  5. Fractal geometry and computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Sakas, Georgios; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Englert, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Fractal geometry has become popular in the last 15 years, its applications can be found in technology, science, or even arts. Fractal methods and formalism are seen today as a general, abstract, but nevertheless practical instrument for the description of nature in a wide sense. But it was Computer Graphics which made possible the increasing popularity of fractals several years ago, and long after their mathematical formulation. The two disciplines are tightly linked. The book contains the scientificcontributions presented in an international workshop in the "Computer Graphics Center" in Darmstadt, Germany. The target of the workshop was to present the wide spectrum of interrelationships and interactions between Fractal Geometry and Computer Graphics. The topics vary from fundamentals and new theoretical results to various applications and systems development. All contributions are original, unpublished papers.The presentations have been discussed in two working groups; the discussion results, together with a...

  6. Trends and developments in computational geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, de M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses some trends and achievements in computational geometry during the past five years, with emphasis on problems related to computer graphics. Furthermore, a direction of research in computational geometry is discussed that could help in bringing the fields of computational geometry

  7. Computational geometry algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    de Berg, Mark; Overmars, Mark; Schwarzkopf, Otfried

    1997-01-01

    Computational geometry emerged from the field of algorithms design and anal­ ysis in the late 1970s. It has grown into a recognized discipline with its own journals, conferences, and a large community of active researchers. The suc­ cess of the field as a research discipline can on the one hand be explained from the beauty of the problems studied and the solutions obtained, and, on the other hand, by the many application domains--computer graphics, geographic in­ formation systems (GIS), robotics, and others-in which geometric algorithms play a fundamental role. For many geometric problems the early algorithmic solutions were either slow or difficult to understand and implement. In recent years a number of new algorithmic techniques have been developed that improved and simplified many of the previous approaches. In this textbook we have tried to make these modem algorithmic solutions accessible to a large audience. The book has been written as a textbook for a course in computational geometry, but it can ...

  8. A Whirlwind Tour of Computational Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ron; Yao, Frances

    1990-01-01

    Described is computational geometry which used concepts and results from classical geometry, topology, combinatorics, as well as standard algorithmic techniques such as sorting and searching, graph manipulations, and linear programing. Also included are special techniques and paradigms. (KR)

  9. Second International workshop Geometry and Symbolic Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Paweł; Geometry and its Applications

    2014-01-01

    This volume has been divided into two parts: Geometry and Applications. The geometry portion of the book relates primarily to geometric flows, laminations, integral formulae, geometry of vector fields on Lie groups, and osculation; the articles in the applications portion concern some particular problems of the theory of dynamical systems, including mathematical problems of liquid flows and a study of cycles for non-dynamical systems. This Work is based on the second international workshop entitled "Geometry and Symbolic Computations," held on May 15-18, 2013 at the University of Haifa and is dedicated to modeling (using symbolic calculations) in differential geometry and its applications in fields such as computer science, tomography, and mechanics. It is intended to create a forum for students and researchers in pure and applied geometry to promote discussion of modern state-of-the-art in geometric modeling using symbolic programs such as Maple™ and Mathematica®, as well as presentation of new results. ...

  10. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated that the size-evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters...... is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters. It is shown that the excessive charge essentially affects the optimized geometry...

  11. Geometry of quantum computation with qutrits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Yu, Zu-Huan; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Determining the quantum circuit complexity of a unitary operation is an important problem in quantum computation. By using the mathematical techniques of Riemannian geometry, we investigate the efficient quantum circuits in quantum computation with n qutrits. We show that the optimal quantum circuits are essentially equivalent to the shortest path between two points in a certain curved geometry of SU(3(n)). As an example, three-qutrit systems are investigated in detail.

  12. Conformal geometry computational algorithms and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Miao; He, Ying; Wang, Yalin

    2018-01-01

    This book offers an essential overview of computational conformal geometry applied to fundamental problems in specific engineering fields. It introduces readers to conformal geometry theory and discusses implementation issues from an engineering perspective.  The respective chapters explore fundamental problems in specific fields of application, and detail how computational conformal geometric methods can be used to solve them in a theoretically elegant and computationally efficient way. The fields covered include computer graphics, computer vision, geometric modeling, medical imaging, and wireless sensor networks. Each chapter concludes with a summary of the material covered and suggestions for further reading, and numerous illustrations and computational algorithms complement the text.  The book draws on courses given by the authors at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Tsinghua University, and will be of interest to senior undergraduates, gradua...

  13. Learning and geometry computational approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Carl

    1996-01-01

    The field of computational learning theory arose out of the desire to for­ mally understand the process of learning. As potential applications to artificial intelligence became apparent, the new field grew rapidly. The learning of geo­ metric objects became a natural area of study. The possibility of using learning techniques to compensate for unsolvability provided an attraction for individ­ uals with an immediate need to solve such difficult problems. Researchers at the Center for Night Vision were interested in solving the problem of interpreting data produced by a variety of sensors. Current vision techniques, which have a strong geometric component, can be used to extract features. However, these techniques fall short of useful recognition of the sensed objects. One potential solution is to incorporate learning techniques into the geometric manipulation of sensor data. As a first step toward realizing such a solution, the Systems Research Center at the University of Maryland, in conjunction with the C...

  14. Algorithms and file structures for computational geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinrichs, K.; Nievergelt, J.

    1983-01-01

    Algorithms for solving geometric problems and file structures for storing large amounts of geometric data are of increasing importance in computer graphics and computer-aided design. As examples of recent progress in computational geometry, we explain plane-sweep algorithms, which solve various topological and geometric problems efficiently; and we present the grid file, an adaptable, symmetric multi-key file structure that provides efficient access to multi-dimensional data along any space dimension. (orig.)

  15. 3rd International Conference on Computational Mathematics and Computational Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ravindran, Anton

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents original research contributed to the 3rd Annual International Conference on Computational Mathematics and Computational Geometry (CMCGS 2014), organized and administered by Global Science and Technology Forum (GSTF). Computational Mathematics and Computational Geometry are closely related subjects, but are often studied by separate communities and published in different venues. This volume is unique in its combination of these topics. After the conference, which took place in Singapore, selected contributions chosen for this volume and peer-reviewed. The section on Computational Mathematics contains papers that are concerned with developing new and efficient numerical algorithms for mathematical sciences or scientific computing. They also cover analysis of such algorithms to assess accuracy and reliability. The parts of this project that are related to Computational Geometry aim to develop effective and efficient algorithms for geometrical applications such as representation and computati...

  16. Computer research in teaching geometry future bachelors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya V. Bukusheva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of the problem of usage educational studies and experiments in the geometric education of IT specialists. We consider research method applied in teaching Computer Geometry intending Bachelors studying `Mathematics and Computer Science` 02.03.01. Examples of educational and research geometric problems that require usage of computer means in order to be solved are given. These tasks are considered as variations of educational and research tasks creating problems that demand experiments with dynamic models of mathematic objects in order to be solved.

  17. Computational algebraic geometry of epidemic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Vega, Martín.

    2014-06-01

    Computational Algebraic Geometry is applied to the analysis of various epidemic models for Schistosomiasis and Dengue, both, for the case without control measures and for the case where control measures are applied. The models were analyzed using the mathematical software Maple. Explicitly the analysis is performed using Groebner basis, Hilbert dimension and Hilbert polynomials. These computational tools are included automatically in Maple. Each of these models is represented by a system of ordinary differential equations, and for each model the basic reproductive number (R0) is calculated. The effects of the control measures are observed by the changes in the algebraic structure of R0, the changes in Groebner basis, the changes in Hilbert dimension, and the changes in Hilbert polynomials. It is hoped that the results obtained in this paper become of importance for designing control measures against the epidemic diseases described. For future researches it is proposed the use of algebraic epidemiology to analyze models for airborne and waterborne diseases.

  18. Effects of geometry in itinerant electron magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Muro, Y [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Kohara, T [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Shiga, M [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2007-04-11

    The magnetism of quasi-one-dimensional itinerant electron magnets RMn{sub 4}Al{sub 8} is compared with that of the typical frustrated itinerant electron magnet YMn{sub 2}. The possible formation and observation of the spin pseudogap are discussed in connection with the spin-liquid state in strongly correlated itinerant electron systems.

  19. Computational geometry lectures at the morningside center of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ren-Hong

    2003-01-01

    Computational geometry is a borderline subject related to pure and applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering. The book contains articles on various topics in computational geometry, which are based on invited lectures and some contributed papers presented by researchers working during the program on Computational Geometry at the Morningside Center of Mathematics of the Chinese Academy of Science. The opening article by R.-H. Wang gives a nice survey of various aspects of computational geometry, many of which are discussed in more detail in other papers in the volume. The topics include problems of optimal triangulation, splines, data interpolation, problems of curve and surface design, problems of shape control, quantum teleportation, and others.

  20. Multilinear Computing and Multilinear Algebraic Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Laplacians on graphs,” S. Mukherjee (Ed.), Geometry and Topology in Statistical Inference, Proc. Sympos. Appl. Math ., 73, AMS, Providence, RI, 2015...8–12, 2015. • “Fast(est) algorithms for structured matrices via tensor decompositions,” Applied Mathe - matics and Analysis Seminar, Duke University...Durham, NC, April 13, 2015. • “Fast(est) algorithms for structured matrices via tensor decompositions,” Applied Mathe - matics Seminar, Stanford

  1. Towards biochemically relevant QM computations on nucleic acids: controlled electronic structure geometry optimization of nucleic acid structural motifs using penalty restraint functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruse, H.; Šponer, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2015), s. 1399-1410 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Keywords : QUANTUM-CHEMICAL COMPUTATIONS * SUGAR -PHOSPHATE BACKBONE * B-DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015

  2. Geometry of abstraction in quantum computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovic, Dusko; Abramsky, S.; Mislove, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum algorithms are sequences of abstract operations, per­ formed on non-existent computers. They are in obvious need of categorical semantics. We present some steps in this direction, following earlier contribu­ tions of Abramsky, Goecke and Selinger. In particular, we analyze function

  3. Geometry of abstraction in quantum computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovic, Dusko; Abramsky, S.; Mislove, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum algorithms are sequences of abstract operations, per formed on non-existent computers. They are in obvious need of categorical semantics. We present some steps in this direction, following earlier contribu tions of Abramsky, Goecke and Selinger. In particular, we analyze function abstraction

  4. Classical versus Computer Algebra Methods in Elementary Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Computer algebra methods based on results of commutative algebra like Groebner bases of ideals and elimination of variables make it possible to solve complex, elementary and non elementary problems of geometry, which are difficult to solve using a classical approach. Computer algebra methods permit the proof of geometric theorems, automatic…

  5. Electronic Geometry Textbook: A Geometric Textbook Knowledge Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoyu

    2010-01-01

    Electronic Geometry Textbook is a knowledge management system that manages geometric textbook knowledge to enable users to construct and share dynamic geometry textbooks interactively and efficiently. Based on a knowledge base organizing and storing the knowledge represented in specific languages, the system implements interfaces for maintaining the data representing that knowledge as well as relations among those data, for automatically generating readable documents for viewing or printing, ...

  6. Computational modeling of geometry dependent phonon transport in silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Drew A.

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that thermal properties of semiconductor nanostructures depend on nanostructure boundary geometry. Phonons are quantized mechanical vibrations that are the dominant carrier of heat in semiconductor materials and their aggregate behavior determine a nanostructure's thermal performance. Phonon-geometry scattering processes as well as waveguiding effects which result from coherent phonon interference are responsible for the shape dependence of thermal transport in these systems. Nanoscale phonon-geometry interactions provide a mechanism by which nanostructure geometry may be used to create materials with targeted thermal properties. However, the ability to manipulate material thermal properties via controlling nanostructure geometry is contingent upon first obtaining increased theoretical understanding of fundamental geometry induced phonon scattering processes and having robust analytical and computational models capable of exploring the nanostructure design space, simulating the phonon scattering events, and linking the behavior of individual phonon modes to overall thermal behavior. The overall goal of this research is to predict and analyze the effect of nanostructure geometry on thermal transport. To this end, a harmonic lattice-dynamics based atomistic computational modeling tool was created to calculate phonon spectra and modal phonon transmission coefficients in geometrically irregular nanostructures. The computational tool is used to evaluate the accuracy and regimes of applicability of alternative computational techniques based upon continuum elastic wave theory. The model is also used to investigate phonon transmission and thermal conductance in diameter modulated silicon nanowires. Motivated by the complexity of the transmission results, a simplified model based upon long wavelength beam theory was derived and helps explain geometry induced phonon scattering of low frequency nanowire phonon modes.

  7. A short course in computational geometry and topology

    CERN Document Server

    Edelsbrunner, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to bring the subject of Computational Geometry and Topology closer to the scientific audience, this book is written in thirteen ready-to-teach sections organized in four parts: tessellations, complexes, homology, persistence. To speak to the non-specialist, detailed formalisms are often avoided in favor of lively 2- and 3-dimensional illustrations. The book is warmly recommended to everybody who loves geometry and the fascinating world of shapes.

  8. Computational commutative and non-commutative algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Cojocaru, S; Ufnarovski, V

    2005-01-01

    This publication gives a good insight in the interplay between commutative and non-commutative algebraic geometry. The theoretical and computational aspects are the central theme in this study. The topic is looked at from different perspectives in over 20 lecture reports. It emphasizes the current trends in commutative and non-commutative algebraic geometry and algebra. The contributors to this publication present the most recent and state-of-the-art progresses which reflect the topic discussed in this publication. Both researchers and graduate students will find this book a good source of information on commutative and non-commutative algebraic geometry.

  9. Photogrammetric computer vision statistics, geometry, orientation and reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Förstner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This textbook offers a statistical view on the geometry of multiple view analysis, required for camera calibration and orientation and for geometric scene reconstruction based on geometric image features. The authors have backgrounds in geodesy and also long experience with development and research in computer vision, and this is the first book to present a joint approach from the converging fields of photogrammetry and computer vision. Part I of the book provides an introduction to estimation theory, covering aspects such as Bayesian estimation, variance components, and sequential estimation, with a focus on the statistically sound diagnostics of estimation results essential in vision metrology. Part II provides tools for 2D and 3D geometric reasoning using projective geometry. This includes oriented projective geometry and tools for statistically optimal estimation and test of geometric entities and transformations and their rela­tions, tools that are useful also in the context of uncertain reasoning in po...

  10. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE EFFICIENCY IN GENERAL TOKAMAK GEOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIN-LUI, Y.R; CHAN, V.S; PRATER, R.

    2003-01-01

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves

  11. Computational information geometry for image and signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Critchley, Frank; Dodson, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the application and development of information geometric methods in the analysis, classification and retrieval of images and signals. It provides introductory chapters to help those new to information geometry and applies the theory to several applications. This area has developed rapidly over recent years, propelled by the major theoretical developments in information geometry, efficient data and image acquisition and the desire to process and interpret large databases of digital information. The book addresses both the transfer of methodology to practitioners involved in database analysis and in its efficient computational implementation.

  12. Digital Geometry Algorithms Theoretical Foundations and Applications to Computational Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barneva, Reneta

    2012-01-01

    Digital geometry emerged as an independent discipline in the second half of the last century. It deals with geometric properties of digital objects and is developed with the unambiguous goal to provide rigorous theoretical foundations for devising new advanced approaches and algorithms for various problems of visual computing. Different aspects of digital geometry have been addressed in the literature. This book is the first one that explicitly focuses on the presentation of the most important digital geometry algorithms. Each chapter provides a brief survey on a major research area related to the general volume theme, description and analysis of related fundamental algorithms, as well as new original contributions by the authors. Every chapter contains a section in which interesting open problems are addressed.

  13. Protonated serotonin: Geometry, electronic structures and photophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Amanollahi, Zohreh; Azimi, Gholamhassan

    2017-07-01

    The geometry and electronic structures of protonated serotonin have been investigated by the aim of MP2 and CC2 methods. The relative stabilities, transition energies and geometry of sixteen different protonated isomers of serotonin have been presented. It has been predicted that protonation does not exhibit essential alteration on the S1 ← S0 electronic transition energy of serotonin. Instead, more complicated photophysical nature in respect to its neutral analogue is suggested for protonated system owing to radiative and non-radiative deactivation pathways. In addition to hydrogen detachment (HD), hydrogen/proton transfer (H/PT) processes from ammonium to indole ring along the NH+⋯ π hydrogen bond have been predicted as the most important photophysical consequences of SERH+ at S1 excited state. The PT processes is suggested to be responsible for fluorescence of SERH+ while the HD driving coordinate is proposed for elucidation of its nonradiative deactivation mechanism.

  14. Electrostatic stability of electron-positron plasmas in dipole geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Mishchenko, Alexey; Plunk, Gabriel; Helander, Per

    2017-01-01

    The electrostatic stability of electron-positron plasmas is investigated in the point-dipole and Z-pinch limits of dipole geometry. The kinetic dispersion relation for sub-bounce-frequency instabilities is derived and solved. For the zero-Debye-length case, the stability diagram is found to exhibit singular behavior. However, when the Debye length is non-zero, a fluid mode appears, which resolves the observed singularity, and also demonstrates that both the temperature and density gradients c...

  15. Electronics and computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Yuzo

    1980-01-01

    The requirement for the data collection and handling system of TRISTAN is discussed. In April, 1979, the first general meeting was held at KEK to organize the workshop on the future electronics for large scale, high energy experiments. Three sub-groups were formed, and those are the Group 1 for the study of fast logics, the Group 2 for the pre-processing and temporary storage of data, and the Group 3 for the data acquisition system. The general trends of the future system are the reduction of data size and the reduction of trigger rate. The important points for processing the fast data are fast block transfer, parallel processing and pre-processing. The U.S. Fast System Design Group has proposed some features for the future system called Fastbus. The Time Projection Chamber proposed for a PEP Facility gives a typical example of the future detectors for colliding beam machines. It is a large drift chamber in a solenoidal magnetic field. The method of data processing is interesting. By extrapolating the past experiences, the requirements for the host computer for the data acquisition system can be made. (Kato, T.)

  16. Prime factorization using quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Raouf; Alghassi, Hedayat

    2017-02-01

    We investigate prime factorization from two perspectives: quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry, specifically Gröbner bases. We present a novel autonomous algorithm which combines the two approaches and leads to the factorization of all bi-primes up to just over 200000, the largest number factored to date using a quantum processor. We also explain how Gröbner bases can be used to reduce the degree of Hamiltonians.

  17. Prime factorization using quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Dridi, Raouf; Alghassi, Hedayat

    2017-01-01

    We investigate prime factorization from two perspectives: quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry, specifically Gr?bner bases. We present a novel autonomous algorithm which combines the two approaches and leads to the factorization of all bi-primes up to just over 200000, the largest number factored to date using a quantum processor. We also explain how Gr?bner bases can be used to reduce the degree of Hamiltonians.

  18. Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Sossinsky, A B

    2012-01-01

    The book is an innovative modern exposition of geometry, or rather, of geometries; it is the first textbook in which Felix Klein's Erlangen Program (the action of transformation groups) is systematically used as the basis for defining various geometries. The course of study presented is dedicated to the proposition that all geometries are created equal--although some, of course, remain more equal than others. The author concentrates on several of the more distinguished and beautiful ones, which include what he terms "toy geometries", the geometries of Platonic bodies, discrete geometries, and classical continuous geometries. The text is based on first-year semester course lectures delivered at the Independent University of Moscow in 2003 and 2006. It is by no means a formal algebraic or analytic treatment of geometric topics, but rather, a highly visual exposition containing upwards of 200 illustrations. The reader is expected to possess a familiarity with elementary Euclidean geometry, albeit those lacking t...

  19. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.G.; Teo, A.C.Y.

    1999-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyro fluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  20. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.; Teo, A.C-Y.

    2001-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyrofluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  1. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In the previous article we looked at the origins of synthetic and analytic geometry. More practical minded people, the builders and navigators, were studying two other aspects of geometry- trigonometry and integral calculus. These are actually ...

  2. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Prasolov, V V

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic introduction to various geometries, including Euclidean, affine, projective, spherical, and hyperbolic geometries. Also included is a chapter on infinite-dimensional generalizations of Euclidean and affine geometries. A uniform approach to different geometries, based on Klein's Erlangen Program is suggested, and similarities of various phenomena in all geometries are traced. An important notion of duality of geometric objects is highlighted throughout the book. The authors also include a detailed presentation of the theory of conics and quadrics, including the theory of conics for non-Euclidean geometries. The book contains many beautiful geometric facts and has plenty of problems, most of them with solutions, which nicely supplement the main text. With more than 150 figures illustrating the arguments, the book can be recommended as a textbook for undergraduate and graduate-level courses in geometry.

  3. Introduction to electronic analogue computers

    CERN Document Server

    Wass, C A A

    1965-01-01

    Introduction to Electronic Analogue Computers, Second Revised Edition is based on the ideas and experience of a group of workers at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, Hants. This edition is almost entirely the work of Mr. K. C. Garner, of the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield. As various advances have been made in the technology involving electronic analogue computers, this book presents discussions on the said progress, including some acquaintance with the capabilities of electronic circuits and equipment. This text also provides a mathematical background including simple differen

  4. Geometry, electronic structures and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tao; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Using a first principles approach, we investigated the geometry, electronic structures, and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs). Two possible 1D configurations, the so-called α-PNTs and β-PNTs, are proposed, which are structurally related to blue and black phosphorus monolayers, respectively. Hereby, we predict that both armchair and zigzag geometries can be synthesized in α-PNTs, but the zigzag form of β-PNT is highly unfavorable because of large strain and conformation energies. The band gap of α-PNTs is expected to be ∼2.67 eV, and this is insensitive to the chirality when the tube’s inner diameter is larger than 1.3 nm, while the armchair β-PNTs have a much smaller band gap. Interestingly, we find nearly flat band structures in the zigzag α-PNT system. This may indicate that an excited particle–hole pair has a huge effective mass. We also find asymmetric optical properties with respect to the polarization direction. The armchair α-PNT for parallel polarization shows a large refractive index of 2.6 near the ultraviolet wavelength, and also we find that the refractive index can be even smaller than 1 in certain frequency ranges. The zigzag tubes show very weak reflectivity for parallel polarization, while the armchair tube displays high reflectivity. (paper)

  5. Engineering flat electronic bands in quasiperiodic and fractal loop geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Atanu, E-mail: atanunandy1989@gmail.com; Chakrabarti, Arunava, E-mail: arunava_chakrabarti@yahoo.co.in

    2015-11-06

    Exact construction of one electron eigenstates with flat, non-dispersive bands, and localized over clusters of various sizes is reported for a class of quasi-one-dimensional looped networks. Quasiperiodic Fibonacci and Berker fractal geometries are embedded in the arms of the loop threaded by a uniform magnetic flux. We work out an analytical scheme to unravel the localized single particle states pinned at various atomic sites or over clusters of them. The magnetic field is varied to control, in a subtle way, the extent of localization and the location of the flat band states in energy space. In addition to this we show that an appropriate tuning of the field can lead to a re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of the electron in a band, with a periodic flip in its sign. - Highlights: • Exact construction of eigenstates with flat and dispersive bands is reported. • Competition between translational order and growth of aperiodicity is discussed. • The effect of magnetic field on the location of flat band states is shown. • Flux tunable re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of electron is studied.

  6. Electrostatic stability of electron-positron plasmas in dipole geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Alexey; Plunk, Gabriel G.; Helander, Per

    2018-04-01

    The electrostatic stability of electron-positron plasmas is investigated in the point-dipole and Z-pinch limits of dipole geometry. The kinetic dispersion relation for sub-bounce-frequency instabilities is derived and solved. For the zero-Debye-length case, the stability diagram is found to exhibit singular behaviour. However, when the Debye length is non-zero, a fluid mode appears, which resolves the observed singularity, and also demonstrates that both the temperature and density gradients can drive instability. It is concluded that a finite Debye length is necessary to determine the stability boundaries in parameter space. Landau damping is investigated at scales sufficiently smaller than the Debye length, where instability is absent.

  7. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pedoe, Dan

    1988-01-01

    ""A lucid and masterly survey."" - Mathematics Gazette Professor Pedoe is widely known as a fine teacher and a fine geometer. His abilities in both areas are clearly evident in this self-contained, well-written, and lucid introduction to the scope and methods of elementary geometry. It covers the geometry usually included in undergraduate courses in mathematics, except for the theory of convex sets. Based on a course given by the author for several years at the University of Minnesota, the main purpose of the book is to increase geometrical, and therefore mathematical, understanding and to he

  8. Computer electronics made simple computerbooks

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdillon, J F B

    1975-01-01

    Computer Electronics: Made Simple Computerbooks presents the basics of computer electronics and explains how a microprocessor works. Various types of PROMs, static RAMs, dynamic RAMs, floppy disks, and hard disks are considered, along with microprocessor support devices made by Intel, Motorola and Zilog. Bit slice logic and some AMD bit slice products are also described. Comprised of 14 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the fundamentals of hardware design, followed by a discussion on the basic building blocks of hardware (NAND, NOR, AND, OR, NOT, XOR); tools and equipment that

  9. Electronic Computer Originated Mail Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Takao

    Electronic mail originated by computer is exactly a new communication media which is a product of combining traditional mailing with electrical communication. Experimental service of this type of mailing started in June 10, 1985 at Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications. Its location in various communication media, its comparison with facsimile type electronic mailing, and status quo of electronic mailing in foreign countries are described. Then, this mailing is briefed centering around the system organization and the services. Additional services to be executed in near future are also mentioned.

  10. SU-E-I-12: Flexible Geometry Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, R [East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The concept separates the mechanical connection between the radiation source and detector. This design allows the trajectory and orientation of the radiation source/detector to be customized to the object that is being imaged. This is in contrast to the formulaic rotation-translation image acquisition of conventional computed tomography(CT).Background/significance:CT devices that image a full range of: anatomy, patient populations, and imaging procedures are large. The root cause of the expanding size of comprehensive CT is due to the commitment to helical geometry that is hardwired into the image reconstruction. FGCT extends the application of alternative reconstruction techniques, i.e. tomosynthesis, by separating the two main components— radiation source and detector— and allow for 6 degrees of freedom motion for radiation source, detector, or both. The image acquisition geometry is then tailored to how the patient/object is positioned. This provides greater flexibility on the position and location that the patient/object is being imaged. Additionally, removing the need of a rotating gantry reduces the footprint so that CT is more mobile and more available to move to where the patient/object is at, instead of the other way around. Methods: As proof-of-principle, a reconstruction algorithm is designed to produce FGCT images. Using simulated detector data, voxels intersecting a line drawn between the radiation source and an individual detector are traced and modified using the detector signal. The detector signal is modified to compensate for changes in the source to detector distance. Adjacent voxels are modified in proportion to the detector signal, providing a simple image filter. Results: Image-quality from the proposed FGCT reconstruction technique is proving to be a challenge, producing hardily recognizable images from limited projections angles. Conclusion: Preliminary assessment of the reconstruction technique demonstrates the inevitable

  11. Self-consistent electronic-structure calculations for interface geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.C.; Gonis, A.; MacLaren, J.M.; Zhang, X.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for computing self-consistent electronic structures and total energies of planar defects, such as interfaces, which are embedded in an otherwise perfect crystal. As in the Layer Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker approach, the solid is treated as a set of coupled layers of atoms, using Bloch's theorem to take advantage of the two-dimensional periodicity of the individual layers. The layers are coupled using the techniques of the Real-Space Multiple-Scattering Theory, avoiding artificial slab or supercell boundary conditions. A total-energy calculation on a Cu crystal, which has been split apart at a (111) plane, is used to illustrate the method

  12. Development and Verification of Body Armor Target Geometry Created Using Computed Tomography Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-13

    Computed Tomography Scans by Autumn R Kulaga, Kathryn L Loftis, and Eric Murray Approved for public release; distribution is...Army Research Laboratory Development and Verification of Body Armor Target Geometry Created Using Computed Tomography Scans by Autumn R Kulaga...Development and Verification of Body Armor Target Geometry Created Using Computed Tomography Scans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  13. Foundations of computer vision computational geometry, visual image structures and object shape detection

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, James F

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamentals of computer vision (CV), with a focus on extracting useful information from digital images and videos. Including a wealth of methods used in detecting and classifying image objects and their shapes, it is the first book to apply a trio of tools (computational geometry, topology and algorithms) in solving CV problems, shape tracking in image object recognition and detecting the repetition of shapes in single images and video frames. Computational geometry provides a visualization of topological structures such as neighborhoods of points embedded in images, while image topology supplies us with structures useful in the analysis and classification of image regions. Algorithms provide a practical, step-by-step means of viewing image structures. The implementations of CV methods in Matlab and Mathematica, classification of chapter problems with the symbols (easily solved) and (challenging) and its extensive glossary of key words, examples and connections with the fabric of C...

  14. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  15. CIF2Cell: Generating geometries for electronic structure programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Torbjörn

    2011-05-01

    The CIF2Cell program generates the geometrical setup for a number of electronic structure programs based on the crystallographic information in a Crystallographic Information Framework (CIF) file. The program will retrieve the space group number, Wyckoff positions and crystallographic parameters, make a sensible choice for Bravais lattice vectors (primitive or principal cell) and generate all atomic positions. Supercells can be generated and alloys are handled gracefully. The code currently has output interfaces to the electronic structure programs ABINIT, CASTEP, CPMD, Crystal, Elk, Exciting, EMTO, Fleur, RSPt, Siesta and VASP. Program summaryProgram title: CIF2Cell Catalogue identifier: AEIM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 691 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 74 933 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Computer: Any computer that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Operating system: Any operating system that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Classification: 7.3, 7.8, 8 External routines: PyCIFRW [1] Nature of problem: Generate the geometrical setup of a crystallographic cell for a variety of electronic structure programs from data contained in a CIF file. Solution method: The CIF file is parsed using routines contained in the library PyCIFRW [1], and crystallographic as well as bibliographic information is extracted. The program then generates the principal cell from symmetry information, crystal parameters, space group number and Wyckoff sites. Reduction to a primitive cell is then performed, and the resulting cell is output to suitably named files along with documentation of the information source generated from any bibliographic information contained in the CIF

  16. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaozheng Ji

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening

  17. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shaozheng; Piazza, Luca; Cao, Gaolong; Park, Sang Tae; Reed, Bryan W; Masiel, Daniel J; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2017-09-01

    Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM) that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening shows a close to

  18. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  19. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  20. Excitation of lower hybrid waves by electron beams in finite geometry plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucri, M.m.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The quasi-static lower hybrid eigenmodes of a plasma column in a cylindrical waveguide are determined, and their linear excitation by a small density electron beam is discussed for the cases of a hot electron beam as well as for a cold electron beam. It is shown that under certain conditions, finite geometry effects introduce important quantitative and qualitative differences with respect to the results obtained in an infinite geometry. (author)

  1. Geometric calculus: a new computational tool for Riemannian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiaux, A.; Tombal, P.

    1988-01-01

    We compare geometric calculus applied to Riemannian geometry with Cartan's exterior calculus method. The correspondence between the two methods is clearly established. The results obtained by a package written in an algebraic language and doing general manipulations on multivectors are compared. We see that the geometric calculus is as powerful as exterior calculus

  2. Effect of interior geometry on local climate inside an electronic device enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshy, Salil; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Electronic enclosure design and the internal arrangement of PCBs and components influence microclimate inside the enclosure. This work features a general electronic unit with parallel PCBs. One of the PCB is considered to have heat generating components on it. The humidity and temperature profiles...... geometry of the device and related enclosure design parameters on the humidity and temperature profiles inside the electronic device enclosure....

  3. Parallelism, fractal geometry and other aspects of computational mathematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchhouse, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    In some fields such as meteorology, theoretical physics, quantum chemistry and hydrodynamics there are problems which involve so much computation that computers of the power of a thousand times a Cray 2 could be fully utilised if they were available. Since it is unlikely that uniprocessors of such power will be available, such large scale problems could be solved by using systems of computers running in parallel. This approach, of course, requires to find appropriate algorithms for the solution of such problems which can efficiently make use of a large number of computers working in parallel. 11 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  4. Univolatility curves in ternary mixtures: geometry and numerical computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shcherbakova, Nataliya; Rodriguez-Donis, Ivonne; Abildskov, Jens

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new non-iterative numerical algorithm allowing computation of all univolatility curves in homogeneous ternary mixtures independently of the presence of the azeotropes. The key point is the concept of generalized univolatility curves in the 3D state space, which allows the main comput...

  5. Geometric computations with interval and new robust methods applications in computer graphics, GIS and computational geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschek, H

    2003-01-01

    This undergraduate and postgraduate text will familiarise readers with interval arithmetic and related tools to gain reliable and validated results and logically correct decisions for a variety of geometric computations plus the means for alleviating the effects of the errors. It also considers computations on geometric point-sets, which are neither robust nor reliable in processing with standard methods. The authors provide two effective tools for obtaining correct results: (a) interval arithmetic, and (b) ESSA the new powerful algorithm which improves many geometric computations and makes th

  6. [Geometry, analysis, and computation in mathematics and applied science]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.

    1994-02-01

    The principal investigators` work on a variety of pure and applied problems in Differential Geometry, Calculus of Variations and Mathematical Physics has been done in a computational laboratory and been based on interactive scientific computer graphics and high speed computation created by the principal investigators to study geometric interface problems in the physical sciences. We have developed software to simulate various physical phenomena from constrained plasma flow to the electron microscope imaging of the microstructure of compound materials, techniques for the visualization of geometric structures that has been used to make significant breakthroughs in the global theory of minimal surfaces, and graphics tools to study evolution processes, such as flow by mean curvature, while simultaneously developing the mathematical foundation of the subject. An increasingly important activity of the laboratory is to extend this environment in order to support and enhance scientific collaboration with researchers at other locations. Toward this end, the Center developed the GANGVideo distributed video software system and software methods for running lab-developed programs simultaneously on remote and local machines. Further, the Center operates a broadcast video network, running in parallel with the Center`s data networks, over which researchers can access stored video materials or view ongoing computations. The graphical front-end to GANGVideo can be used to make ``multi-media mail`` from both ``live`` computing sessions and stored materials without video editing. Currently, videotape is used as the delivery medium, but GANGVideo is compatible with future ``all-digital`` distribution systems. Thus as a byproduct of mathematical research, we are developing methods for scientific communication. But, most important, our research focuses on important scientific problems; the parallel development of computational and graphical tools is driven by scientific needs.

  7. DMG-α--a computational geometry library for multimolecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczelina, Robert; Murzyn, Krzysztof

    2014-11-24

    The DMG-α library grants researchers in the field of computational biology, chemistry, and biophysics access to an open-sourced, easy to use, and intuitive software for performing fine-grained geometric analysis of molecular systems. The library is capable of computing power diagrams (weighted Voronoi diagrams) in three dimensions with 3D periodic boundary conditions, computing approximate projective 2D Voronoi diagrams on arbitrarily defined surfaces, performing shape properties recognition using α-shape theory and can do exact Solvent Accessible Surface Area (SASA) computation. The software is written mainly as a template-based C++ library for greater performance, but a rich Python interface (pydmga) is provided as a convenient way to manipulate the DMG-α routines. To illustrate possible applications of the DMG-α library, we present results of sample analyses which allowed to determine nontrivial geometric properties of two Escherichia coli-specific lipids as emerging from molecular dynamics simulations of relevant model bilayers.

  8. Have Computer, Will Not Travel: Meeting Electronically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Norman D.

    1983-01-01

    Beginning with two different scenarios depicting a face-to-face conference on the one hand and, on the other, a computer or electronic conference, the author argues the advantages of electronic conferencing and describes some of its uses. (JBM)

  9. Calculation of beam source geometry of electron accelerator for radiation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balalykin, N.I.; Derendyaev, Yu.S.; Dolbilov, G.V.; Karlov, A.A.; Korenev, S.A.; Petrov, V.A.; Smolyakova, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    ELLIPT and GRAFOR programmes written in FORTRAN language were developed to calculate the geometry of an electron source. The programmes enable calculation of electromagnetic field of the source and electron trajectories in the source under preset boundary and initial conditions. The GRAFOR programme allows to display electric field curves and calculated trajectories of large particles. 4 refs., 1 fig

  10. Geometry and computation of Houndstooth (Pied-de-poule)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijs, L.M.G.; Bosch, Robert; McKenna, Douglas; Sarhangi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    We apply a variety of geometric and computational tools to improve our understanding of the Houndstooth (Pied de poule) pattern. Although the pattern must have been known for centuries, it was made famous mostly by Christian Dior and is still frequently used in many variations. It is a

  11. CONTRIBUTIONS FOR DEVELOPING OF A COMPUTER AIDED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonescu Ion

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the authors’ contributions for developing a computer code for teaching of descriptive geometry using the computer aided learning techniques. The program was implemented using the programming interface and the 3D modeling capabilities of the AutoCAD system.

  12. Interplay of electronic and geometry shell effects in properties of neutral and charged Sr clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2007-01-01

    that the size evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters......The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral, singly, and doubly charged strontium clusters have been investigated using ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral, singly, and doubly...... charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, the gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated...

  13. Accurate marker-free alignment with simultaneous geometry determination and reconstruction of tilt series in electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Hanspeter; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2006-01-01

    An image alignment method for electron tomography is presented which is based on cross-correlation techniques and which includes a simultaneous refinement of the tilt geometry. A coarsely aligned tilt series is iteratively refined with a procedure consisting of two steps for each cycle: area matching and subsequent geometry correction. The first step, area matching, brings into register equivalent specimen regions in all images of the tilt series. It determines four parameters of a linear two-dimensional transformation, not just translation and rotation as is done during the preceding coarse alignment with conventional methods. The refinement procedure also differs from earlier methods in that the alignment references are now computed from already aligned images by reprojection of a backprojected volume. The second step, geometry correction, refines the initially inaccurate estimates of the geometrical parameters, including the direction of the tilt axis, a tilt angle offset, and the inclination of the specimen with respect to the support film or specimen holder. The correction values serve as an indicator for the progress of the refinement. For each new iteration, the correction values are used to compute an updated set of geometry parameters by a least squares fit. Model calculations show that it is essential to refine the geometrical parameters as well as the accurate alignment of the images to obtain a faithful map of the original structure

  14. An Analog Computer for Electronic Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, A. L.; Iu, H. H. C.; Lu, D. D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a compact analog computer and proposes its use in electronic engineering teaching laboratories to develop student understanding of applications in analog electronics, electronic components, engineering mathematics, control engineering, safe laboratory and workshop practices, circuit construction, testing, and maintenance. The…

  15. Partial safety factor calibration from stochastic finite element computation of welded joint with random geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoefs, Franck; Chevreuil, Mathilde; Pasqualini, Olivier; Cazuguel, Mikaël

    2016-01-01

    Welded joints are used in various structures and infrastructures like bridges, ships and offshore structures, and are submitted to cyclic stresses. Their fatigue behaviour is an industrial key issue to deal with and still offers original research subjects. One of the available methods relies on the computing of the stress concentration factor. Even if some studies were previously driven to evaluate this factor onto some cases of welded structures, the shape of the weld joint is generally idealized through a deterministic parametric geometry. Previous experimental works however have shown that this shape plays a key role in the lifetime assessment. We propose in this paper a methodology for computing the stress concentration factor in presence of random geometries of welded joints. In view to make the results available by engineers, this method merges stochastic computation and semi-probabilistic analysis by computing partial safety factors with a dedicated method. - Highlights: • Numerical computation of stress concentration factor with random geometry of weld. • Real data are used for probabilistic modelling. • Identification of partial safety factor from SFEM computation in case of random geometries.

  16. Electron correlation effects on geometries and 19F shieldings of fluorobenzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.; Karadakov, P.B.; England, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    In order to include the effects of electron correlation in ab initio molecular orbital calculations it is necessary to go beyond the single determinant Hartree-Fock (HF) level of theory. In the present investigation the influences of both dynamic and non-dynamic correlation effects on the optimised geometries and 19 F nuclear shielding calculations of the twelve fluorobenzenes are reported.The non-dynamic electron correlation effects are represented by complete-active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. Second- and fourth-order Moller-Plesset (MP2 and MP4) calculations are used to describe the dynamic electron correlation effects. Some density-functional (DFT) results are also reported which do not distinguish between dynamic and non-dynamic electron correlation. Following the correlated geometry optimisations 19 F nuclear shielding calculations were performed using the gauge-included atomic orbitals (GIAO) procedure, these were undertaken with wave functions which include various levels of electron correlation including HF, CASSCF and MP2. For the calculations of the optimised geometries, and some of the nuclear shieldings the 6-13G** basis set s used whereas the locally-dense [6-13G** on C and H and 6-311++G(2d,2p) on F] set is used for some of the shielding calculations. A comparison of the results of HF shielding calculations using other basis sets is included. Comparison of the calculated geometry and shielding results with relevant, reported, experimental data is made. (author)

  17. Effect of electron temperature on small-amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves in non-planar geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sona; Aggarwal, Munish; Gill, Tarsem Singh

    2018-04-01

    Effects of electron temperature on the propagation of electron acoustic solitary waves in plasma with stationary ions, cold and superthermal hot electrons is investigated in non-planar geometry employing reductive perturbation method. Modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived in the small amplitude approximation limit. The analytical and numerical calculations of the KdV equation reveal that the phase velocity of the electron acoustic waves increases as one goes from planar to non planar geometry. It is shown that the electron temperature ratio changes the width and amplitude of the solitary waves and when electron temperature is not taken into account,our results completely agree with the results of Javidan & Pakzad (2012). It is found that at small values of τ , solitary wave structures behave differently in cylindrical ( {m} = 1), spherical ( {m} = 2) and planar geometry ( {m} = 0) but looks similar at large values of τ . These results may be useful to understand the solitary wave characteristics in laboratory and space environments where the plasma have multiple temperature electrons.

  18. PENTrack-a simulation tool for ultracold neutrons, protons, and electrons in complex electromagnetic fields and geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, W.; Kikawa, T.; Losekamm, M. J.; Paul, S.; Picker, R.

    2017-06-01

    Modern precision experiments trapping low-energy particles require detailed simulations of particle trajectories and spin precession to determine systematic measurement limitations and apparatus deficiencies. We developed PENTrack, a tool that allows to simulate trajectories of ultracold neutrons and their decay products-protons and electrons-and the precession of their spins in complex geometries and electromagnetic fields. The interaction of ultracold neutrons with matter is implemented with the Fermi-potential formalism and diffuse scattering using Lambert and microroughness models. The results of several benchmark simulations agree with STARucn v1.2, uncovered several flaws in Geant4 v10.2.2, and agree with experimental data. Experiment geometry and electromagnetic fields can be imported from commercial computer-aided-design and finite-element software. All simulation parameters are defined in simple text files allowing quick changes. The simulation code is written in C++ and is freely available at github.com/wschreyer/PENTrack.git.

  19. Solid-state nanopores of controlled geometry fabricated in a transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Egerton, Ray F.

    2017-11-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography were applied to in situ studies of the formation, shape, and diameter of nanopores formed in a silicon nitride membrane in a transmission electron microscope. The nanopore geometry was observed in three dimensions by electron tomography. Drilling conditions, such as probe current, beam convergence angle, and probe position, affect the formation rate and the geometry of the pores. With a beam convergence semi-angle of α = 22 mrad, a conical shaped nanopore is formed but at α = 45 mrad, double-cone (hourglass-shaped) nanopores were produced. Nanopores with an effective diameter between 10 nm and 1.8 nm were fabricated by controlling the drilling time.

  20. Power Block Geometry Applied to the Building of Power Electronics Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, E. C., Jr.; da Silva, E. R. C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology, Power Block Geometry (PBG), for the presentation of power electronics topologies that process ac voltage. PBG's strategy uses formal methods based on a geometrical representation with particular rules and defines a universe with axioms and conjectures to establish a formation law. It allows power…

  1. On a class of O(n²) problems in computational geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gajentaan, A.; Overmars, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    There are many problems in computational geometry for which the best know algorithms take time (n2) (or more) in the worst case while only very low lower bounds are known. In this paper we describe a large class of problems for which we prove that they are all at least as dicult as the following

  2. Slant Path Distances Through Cells in Cylindrical Geometry and an Application to the Computation of Isophotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Whitaker

    2007-12-17

    In computer programs involving two-dimensional cylindrical geometry, it is often necessary to calculate the slant path distance in a given direction from a point to the boundary of a mesh cell. A subroutine, HOWFAR, has been written that accomplishes this, and is very economical in computer time. An example of its use is given in constructing the isophotes for a low altitude nuclear fireball.

  3. Computational Nanotechnology Molecular Electronics, Materials and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation covers research being performed on computational nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes at the NASA Ames Research Center. Topics cover include: nanomechanics of nanomaterials, nanotubes and composite materials, molecular electronics with nanotube junctions, kinky chemistry, and nanotechnology for solid-state quantum computers using fullerenes.

  4. A sampler of useful computational tools for applied geometry, computer graphics, and image processing foundations for computer graphics, vision, and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Or, Daniel; Ju, Tao; Mitra, Niloy J; Shamir, Ariel; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Zhang, Hao (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    A Sampler of Useful Computational Tools for Applied Geometry, Computer Graphics, and Image Processing shows how to use a collection of mathematical techniques to solve important problems in applied mathematics and computer science areas. The book discusses fundamental tools in analytical geometry and linear algebra. It covers a wide range of topics, from matrix decomposition to curvature analysis and principal component analysis to dimensionality reduction.Written by a team of highly respected professors, the book can be used in a one-semester, intermediate-level course in computer science. It

  5. Parallel computation of electrostatic potentials and fields in technical geometries on SUPRENUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alef, M.

    1990-02-01

    The programs EPOTZR und EFLDZR have been developed in order to compute electrostatic potentials and the corresponding fields in technical geometries (example: Diode geometry for optimum focussing of ion beams in pulsed high-current ion diodes). The Poisson equation is discretized in a two-dimensional boundary-fitted grid in the (r,z)-plane and solved using multigrid methods. The z- and r-components of the field are determined by numerical differentiation of the potential. This report contains the user's guide of the SUPRENUM versions EPOTZR-P and EFLDZR-P. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Effect of tip geometry on photo-electron-emission from nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teki, Ranganath; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2009-03-01

    We show in this paper the strong effect of tip geometry on the photo-electron-emission behavior of nanostructured surfaces. To study the effect of tip geometry we compared the photo-emissivity of Ru and Pt nanorods with pyramidal shaped tips to that of carbon nanorods that display flat top (planar) tips. Flat top architectures gave no significant increase in the emission current, while nanostructures with pyramidal shaped tips showed 3-4 fold increase in photo-emission compared to a thin film of the same material. Pyramidal tip geometries increase the effective surface area that is exposed to the incident photon-flux thereby enhancing the photon-collection probability of the system. Such nano-structured surfaces show promise in a variety of device applications such as photo-detectors, photon counters and photo-multiplier tubes.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics in three dimensional angiography: Preliminary hemodynamic results of various proximal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ha Youn; Park, Sung Tae; Bae, Won Kyoung; Goo, Dong Erk [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We studied the influence of proximal geometry on the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). We made five models of different proximal geometry from three dimensional angiography of 63-year-old women with intracranial aneurysm. CFD results were analyzed as peak systolic velocity (PSV) at inlet and outlet as well as flow velocity profile at proximal level of internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm. Modified model of cavernous one with proximal tubing showed faster PSV at outlet than that at inlet. The PSV of outlets of other models were slower than that of inlets. The flow velocity profiles at immediate proximal to ICA aneurysm showed similar patterns in all models, suggesting that proximal vessel geometries could affect CFD results.

  8. A computational non-commutative geometry program for disordered topological insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Prodan, Emil

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a computational program based on the principles of non-commutative geometry and showcases several applications to topological insulators. Noncommutative geometry has been originally proposed by Jean Bellissard as a theoretical framework for the investigation of homogeneous condensed matter systems. Recently, this approach has been successfully applied to topological insulators, where it facilitated many rigorous results concerning the stability of the topological invariants against disorder. In the first part of the book the notion of a homogeneous material is introduced and the class of disordered crystals defined together with the classification table, which conjectures all topological phases from this class. The manuscript continues with a discussion of electrons’ dynamics in disordered crystals and the theory of topological invariants in the presence of strong disorder is briefly reviewed. It is shown how all this can be captured in the language of noncommutative geometry using the co...

  9. Comparative study of auxetic geometries by means of computer-aided design and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez Elipe, Juan Carlos; Díaz Lantada, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Auxetic materials (or metamaterials) are those with a negative Poisson ratio (NPR) and display the unexpected property of lateral expansion when stretched, as well as an equal and opposing densification when compressed. Such geometries are being progressively employed in the development of novel products, especially in the fields of intelligent expandable actuators, shape morphing structures and minimally invasive implantable devices. Although several auxetic and potentially auxetic geometries have been summarized in previous reviews and research, precise information regarding relevant properties for design tasks is not always provided. In this study we present a comparative study of two-dimensional and three-dimensional auxetic geometries carried out by means of computer-aided design and engineering tools (from now on CAD–CAE). The first part of the study is focused on the development of a CAD library of auxetics. Once the library is developed we simulate the behavior of the different auxetic geometries and elaborate a systematic comparison, considering relevant properties of these geometries, such as Poisson ratio(s), maximum volume or area reductions attainable and equivalent Young’s modulus, hoping it may provide useful information for future designs of devices based on these interesting structures. (paper)

  10. Solving the neutron diffusion equation on combinatorial geometry computational cells for reactor physics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y. Y.

    2004-01-01

    An approach is developed for solving the neutron diffusion equation on combinatorial geometry computational cells, that is computational cells composed by combinatorial operations involving simple-shaped component cells. The only constraint on the component cells from which the combinatorial cells are assembled is that they possess a legitimate discretization of the underlying diffusion equation. We use the Finite Difference (FD) approximation of the x, y-geometry diffusion equation in this work. Performing the same combinatorial operations involved in composing the combinatorial cell on these discrete-variable equations yields equations that employ new discrete variables defined only on the combinatorial cell's volume and faces. The only approximation involved in this process, beyond the truncation error committed in discretizing the diffusion equation over each component cell, is a consistent-order Legendre series expansion. Preliminary results for simple configurations establish the accuracy of the solution to the combinatorial geometry solution compared to straight FD as the system dimensions decrease. Furthermore numerical results validate the consistent Legendre-series expansion order by illustrating the second order accuracy of the combinatorial geometry solution, the same as standard FD. Nevertheless the magnitude of the error for the new approach is larger than FD's since it incorporates the additional truncated series approximation. (authors)

  11. Computational methods of electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of computational methods simulating the non-plasma transport of electrons and their attendant cascades is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linearized formalisms at electron energies above 1 keV. The effectiveness of various metods is discussed including moments, point-kernel, invariant imbedding, discrete-ordinates, and Monte Carlo. Future research directions and the potential impact on various aspects of science and engineering are indicated

  12. Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry LDRD 13-0144 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebeida, Mohamed Salah [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Vicente J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rushdi, Ahmad A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Abdelkader, Ahmad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This SAND report summarizes our work on the Sandia National Laboratory LDRD project titled "Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry" which was project #165617 and proposal #13-0144. This report merely summarizes our work. Those interested in the technical details are encouraged to read the full published results, and contact the report authors for the status of the software and follow-on projects.

  13. New Computational Approach to Electron Transport in Irregular Graphene Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Douglas; Heller, Eric; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    For novel graphene devices of nanoscale-to-macroscopic scale, many aspects of their transport properties are not easily understood due to difficulties in fabricating devices with regular edges. Here we develop a framework to efficiently calculate and potentially screen electronic transport properties of arbitrary nanoscale graphene device structures. A generalization of the established recursive Green's function method is presented, providing access to arbitrary device and lead geometries with substantial computer-time savings. Using single-orbital nearest-neighbor tight-binding models and the Green's function-Landauer scattering formalism, we will explore the transmission function of irregular two-dimensional graphene-based nanostructures with arbitrary lead orientation. Prepared by LBNL under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 and supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Computer Science Graduate Fellowship under grant DE-FG02-97ER25308.

  14. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt-Riera, Re.; Betancourt-Riera, Ri.; Nieto Jalil, J. M.; Riera, R.

    2015-01-01

    We study the electron states and the differential cross section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry. The electron Raman scattering developed here can be used to provide direct information about the electron band structures of these confinement systems. We assume that the system grows in a GaAs/Al 0.35 Ga 0.65 As matrix. The system is modeled by considering T = 0 K and also a single parabolic conduction band, which is split into a sub-band system due to the confinement. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations, and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. Singularities in the spectra are found and interpreted. (paper)

  15. Characterization of feed channel spacer performance using geometries obtained by X-ray computed tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Haaksman, Viktor A.

    2016-09-09

    Spiral-wound membrane modules used in water treatment for water reuse and desalination make use of spacer meshes for keeping the membrane leaves apart and for enhancing the mass transfer. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has gained importance in the design of new spacers with optimized hydrodynamic characteristics, but this requires a precise description of the spacer geometry. This study developed a method to obtain accurate three-dimensional (3-D) geometry representations for any given spacer design from X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The method revealed that the filaments of industrial spacers have a highly variable cross-section size and shape, which impact the flow characteristics in the feed channel. The pressure drop and friction factors were calculated from numerical simulations on five commercially available feed spacers used in practice. Model solutions compared well to experimental data measured using a flow cell for average velocities up to 0.2 m/s, as used in industrial reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membrane operations. A newly-proposed spacer geometry with alternating strand thickness was tested, which was found to yield a lower pressure drop while being highly efficient in converting the pumping power into membrane shear. Numerical model solutions using CFD with geometries from CT scans were closer to measurements than those obtained using the traditional circular cross-section strand simplification, indicating that CT scans are very well suitable to approximate real feed spacer geometries. By providing detailed insight on the spacer filament shape, CT scans allow better quantification of local distribution of velocity and shear, possibly leading to more accurate estimations of fouling and concentration polarization. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  16. New method for computing ideal MHD normal modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysocki, F.; Grimm, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Analytic elimination of the two magnetic surface components of the displacement vector permits the normal mode ideal MHD equations to be reduced to a scalar form. A Galerkin procedure, similar to that used in the PEST codes, is implemented to determine the normal modes computationally. The method retains the efficient stability capabilities of the PEST 2 energy principle code, while allowing computation of the normal mode frequencies and eigenfunctions, if desired. The procedure is illustrated by comparison with earlier various of PEST and by application to tilting modes in spheromaks, and to stable discrete Alfven waves in tokamak geometry

  17. New results on classical problems in computational geometry in the plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Mikkel

    In this thesis, we revisit three classical problems in computational geometry in the plane. An obstacle that often occurs as a subproblem in more complicated problems is to compute the common tangents of two disjoint, simple polygons. For instance, the common tangents turn up in problems related...... to visibility, collision avoidance, shortest paths, etc. We provide a remarkably simple algorithm to compute all (at most four) common tangents of two disjoint simple polygons. Given each polygon as a read-only array of its corners in cyclic order, the algorithm runs in linear time and constant workspace...... and is the first to achieve the two complexity bounds simultaneously. The set of common tangents provides basic information about the convex hulls of the polygons—whether they are nested, overlapping, or disjoint—and our algorithm thus also decides this relationship. One of the best-known problems in computational...

  18. A Geometry Based Infra-Structure for Computational Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimes, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The computational steps traditionally taken for most engineering analysis suites (computational fluid dynamics (CFD), structural analysis, heat transfer and etc.) are: (1) Surface Generation -- usually by employing a Computer Assisted Design (CAD) system; (2) Grid Generation -- preparing the volume for the simulation; (3) Flow Solver -- producing the results at the specified operational point; (4) Post-processing Visualization -- interactively attempting to understand the results. For structural analysis, integrated systems can be obtained from a number of commercial vendors. These vendors couple directly to a number of CAD systems and are executed from within the CAD Graphical User Interface (GUI). It should be noted that the structural analysis problem is more tractable than CFD; there are fewer mesh topologies used and the grids are not as fine (this problem space does not have the length scaling issues of fluids). For CFD, these steps have worked well in the past for simple steady-state simulations at the expense of much user interaction. The data was transmitted between phases via files. In most cases, the output from a CAD system could go to Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) or Standard Exchange Program (STEP) files. The output from Grid Generators and Solvers do not really have standards though there are a couple of file formats that can be used for a subset of the gridding (i.e. PLOT3D data formats). The user would have to patch up the data or translate from one format to another to move to the next step. Sometimes this could take days. Specifically the problems with this procedure are:(1) File based -- Information flows from one step to the next via data files with formats specified for that procedure. File standards, when they exist, are wholly inadequate. For example, geometry from CAD systems (transmitted via IGES files) is defined as disjoint surfaces and curves (as well as masses of other information of no interest for the Grid Generator

  19. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dongsheng [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Rusz, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Cai, Jianwang [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Jing, E-mail: jzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-10-15

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique. - Highlights: • The zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry is presented for EMCD technique. • The detailed calculations for EMCD signals under ZA case are conducted. • The EMCD signals are obtained under the ZA case in the experiments. • The effect of dynamical effect on EMCD signals under ZA case is discussed. • Site-specific EMCD signals of Fe in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} are obtained by specific ZA conditions.

  20. Neuro-Inspired Computing with Stochastic Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Naous, Rawan

    2016-01-06

    The extensive scaling and integration within electronic systems have set the standards for what is addressed to as stochastic electronics. The individual components are increasingly diverting away from their reliable behavior and producing un-deterministic outputs. This stochastic operation highly mimics the biological medium within the brain. Hence, building on the inherent variability, particularly within novel non-volatile memory technologies, paves the way for unconventional neuromorphic designs. Neuro-inspired networks with brain-like structures of neurons and synapses allow for computations and levels of learning for diverse recognition tasks and applications.

  1. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  2. Ideals, varieties, and algorithms an introduction to computational algebraic geometry and commutative algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, David A; O'Shea, Donal

    2015-01-01

    This text covers topics in algebraic geometry and commutative algebra with a strong perspective toward practical and computational aspects. The first four chapters form the core of the book. A comprehensive chart in the preface illustrates a variety of ways to proceed with the material once these chapters are covered. In addition to the fundamentals of algebraic geometry—the elimination theorem, the extension theorem, the closure theorem, and the Nullstellensatz—this new edition incorporates several substantial changes, all of which are listed in the Preface. The largest revision incorporates a new chapter (ten), which presents some of the essentials of progress made over the last decades in computing Gröbner bases. The book also includes current computer algebra material in Appendix C and updated independent projects (Appendix D). The book may serve as a first or second course in undergraduate abstract algebra and, with some supplementation perhaps, for beginning graduate level courses in algebraic geom...

  3. Methods for computing SN eigenvalues and eigenvectors of slab geometry transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, Musa

    1998-01-01

    We discuss computational methods for computing the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of single energy-group neutral particle transport (S N ) problems in homogeneous slab geometry, with an arbitrary scattering anisotropy of order L. These eigensolutions are important when exact (or very accurate) solutions are desired for coarse spatial cell problems demanding rapid execution times. Three methods, one of which is 'new', are presented for determining the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of such S N problems. In the first method, separation of variables is directly applied to the S N equations. In the second method, common characteristics of the S N and P N-1 equations are used. In the new method, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors can be computed provided that the cell-interface Green's functions (transmission and reflection factors) are known. Numerical results for S 4 test problems are given to compare the new method with the existing methods

  4. Methods for computing SN eigenvalues and eigenvectors of slab geometry transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, M.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss computational methods for computing the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of single energy-group neutral particle transport (S N ) problems in homogeneous slab geometry, with an arbitrary scattering anisotropy of order L. These eigensolutions are important when exact (or very accurate) solutions are desired for coarse spatial cell problems demanding rapid execution times. Three methods, one of which is 'new', are presented for determining the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of such S N problems. In the first method, separation of variables is directly applied to the S N equations. In the second method, common characteristics of the S N and P N-1 equations are used. In the new method, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors can be computed provided that the cell-interface Green's functions (transmission and reflection factors) are known. Numerical results for S 4 test problems are given to compare the new method with the existing methods. (author)

  5. Discrete ordinates cross-section generation in parallel plane geometry -- 2: Computational results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, M.

    1998-01-01

    In Ref. 1, the author presented inverse discrete ordinates (S N ) methods for cross-section generation with an arbitrary scattering anisotropy of order L (L ≤ N - 1) in parallel plane geometry. The solution techniques depend on the S N eigensolutions. The eigensolutions are determined by the inverse simplified S N method (ISS N ), which uses the surface Green's function matrices (T and R). Inverse problems are generally designed so that experimentally measured physical quantities can be used in the formulations. In the formulations, although T and R (TR matrices) are measurable quantities, the author does not have such data to check the adequacy and accuracy of the methods. However, it is possible to compute TR matrices by S N methods. The author presents computational results and computationally observed properties

  6. Thermal Protection System Cavity Heating for Simplified and Actual Geometries Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations with Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) Cavity Heating is predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) on unstructured grids for both simplified cavities and actual cavity geometries. Validation was performed using comparisons to wind tunnel experimental results and CFD predictions using structured grids. Full-scale predictions were made for simplified and actual geometry configurations on the Space Shuttle Orbiter in a mission support timeframe.

  7. Highly Manufacturable Deep (Sub-Millimeter) Etching Enabled High Aspect Ratio Complex Geometry Lego-Like Silicon Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    A highly manufacturable deep reactive ion etching based process involving a hybrid soft/hard mask process technology shows high aspect ratio complex geometry Lego-like silicon electronics formation enabling free-form (physically flexible

  8. New edge magnetoplasmon for a two-dimensional electron gas in a ring geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proetto, C.R.

    1992-09-01

    The dynamical response of a classical two-dimensional electron gas confined in a ring geometry under a perpendicular magnetic field is analysed. Within the hydrodynamical approach and in the strong magnetic field limit, a new set of antidot edge magnetoplasmons is obtained, corresponding to density oscillations circulating along the inner boundary of the ring and whose frequency increases with magnetic field. The associated self-induced distribution of densities and currents are presented, together with an analysis of the size dependence of these perimeter waves. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs

  9. Analysis of electronic circuits using digital computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapu, C.

    1968-01-01

    Various programmes have been proposed for studying electronic circuits with the help of computers. It is shown here how it possible to use the programme ECAP, developed by I.B.M., for studying the behaviour of an operational amplifier from different point of view: direct current, alternating current and transient state analysis, optimisation of the gain in open loop, study of the reliability. (author) [fr

  10. Studies of urea geometry by means of ab initio methods and computer simulations of liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Cirino, José Jair Vianna; Bertran, Celso Aparecido

    2002-01-01

    A study was carried out on the urea geometries using ab initio calculation and Monte Carlo computational simulation of liquids. The ab initio calculated results showed that urea has a non-planar conformation in the gas phase in which the hydrogen atoms are out of the plane formed by the heavy atoms. Free energies associated to the rotation of the amino groups of urea in water were obtained using the Monte Carlo method in which the thermodynamic perturbation theory is implemented. The magnitud...

  11. CLASSIFICATION AND COMPUTER SIMULATION OF CONSTRUCTIVE PROBLEM IN THE PLANE GEOMETRY: METHOD OF CIRCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan H. Lenchuk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Presented article concerns construction problems in plane geometry. Solved the problem of the formation of students' stereotypes efficient, economical in time visual representation of algorithms for solving problems on the modern computer screens. Used universal author’s method of fragmented typing tasks on the method of circles. Allocated rod-type problem with its subsequent filling with ingredients. Previously developed educational software (partially, GeoGebra ensure optimal realization of the construction. Their dynamic characteristics and constructive capabilities - quality visual- shaped stages of "evidence" and "research".

  12. GPU-accelerated computation of electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Acocella, Angela; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Beu, Titus; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-11-05

    Electron transfer is a fundamental process that can be studied with the help of computer simulation. The underlying quantum mechanical description renders the problem a computationally intensive application. In this study, we probe the graphics processing unit (GPU) for suitability to this type of problem. Time-critical components are identified via profiling of an existing implementation and several different variants are tested involving the GPU at increasing levels of abstraction. A publicly available library supporting basic linear algebra operations on the GPU turns out to accelerate the computation approximately 50-fold with minor dependence on actual problem size. The performance gain does not compromise numerical accuracy and is of significant value for practical purposes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Variation in computer time with geometry prescription in monte carlo code KENO-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    In most studies, the Monte Carlo criticality code KENO-IV has been compared with other Monte Carlo codes, but evaluation of its performance with different box descriptions has not been done so far. In Monte Carlo computations, any fractional savings of computing time is highly desirable. Variation in computation time with box description in KENO for two different fast reactor fuel subassemblies of FBTR and PFBR is studied. The K eff of an infinite array of fuel subassemblies is calculated by modelling the subassemblies in two different ways (i) multi-region, (ii) multi-box. In addition to these two cases, excess reactivity calculations of FBTR are also performed in two ways to study this effect in a complex geometry. It is observed that the K eff values calculated by multi-region and multi-box models agree very well. However the increase in computation time from the multi-box to the multi-region is considerable, while the difference in computer storage requirements for the two models is negligible. This variation in computing time arises from the way the neutron is tracked in the two cases. (author)

  14. A computational approach to modeling cellular-scale blood flow in complex geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    We present a computational methodology for modeling cellular-scale blood flow in arbitrary and highly complex geometry. Our approach is based on immersed-boundary methods, which allow modeling flows in arbitrary geometry while resolving the large deformation and dynamics of every blood cell with high fidelity. The present methodology seamlessly integrates different modeling components dealing with stationary rigid boundaries of complex shape, moving rigid bodies, and highly deformable interfaces governed by nonlinear elasticity. Thus it enables us to simulate 'whole' blood suspensions flowing through physiologically realistic microvascular networks that are characterized by multiple bifurcating and merging vessels, as well as geometrically complex lab-on-chip devices. The focus of the present work is on the development of a versatile numerical technique that is able to consider deformable cells and rigid bodies flowing in three-dimensional arbitrarily complex geometries over a diverse range of scenarios. After describing the methodology, a series of validation studies are presented against analytical theory, experimental data, and previous numerical results. Then, the capability of the methodology is demonstrated by simulating flows of deformable blood cells and heterogeneous cell suspensions in both physiologically realistic microvascular networks and geometrically intricate microfluidic devices. It is shown that the methodology can predict several complex microhemodynamic phenomena observed in vascular networks and microfluidic devices. The present methodology is robust and versatile, and has the potential to scale up to very large microvascular networks at organ levels.

  15. Nonmonotonic magnetoresistance of a two-dimensional viscous electron-hole fluid in a confined geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, P. S.; Dmitriev, A. P.; Gornyi, I. V.; Kachorovskii, V. Yu.; Narozhny, B. N.; Titov, M.

    2018-02-01

    Ultrapure conductors may exhibit hydrodynamic transport where the collective motion of charge carriers resembles the flow of a viscous fluid. In a confined geometry (e.g., in ultra-high-quality nanostructures), the electronic fluid assumes a Poiseuille-type flow. Applying an external magnetic field tends to diminish viscous effects leading to large negative magnetoresistance. In two-component systems near charge neutrality, the hydrodynamic flow of charge carriers is strongly affected by the mutual friction between the two constituents. At low fields, the magnetoresistance is negative, however, at high fields the interplay between electron-hole scattering, recombination, and viscosity results in a dramatic change of the flow profile: the magnetoresistance changes its sign and eventually becomes linear in very high fields. This nonmonotonic magnetoresistance can be used as a fingerprint to detect viscous flow in two-component conducting systems.

  16. Optical determination of the electronic coupling and intercalation geometry of thiazole orange homodimer in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Paul D.; Bricker, William P.; Díaz, Sebastián A.; Medintz, Igor L.; Bathe, Mark; Melinger, Joseph S.

    2017-08-01

    Sequence-selective bis-intercalating dyes exhibit large increases in fluorescence in the presence of specific DNA sequences. This property makes this class of fluorophore of particular importance to biosensing and super-resolution imaging. Here we report ultrafast transient anisotropy measurements of resonance energy transfer (RET) between thiazole orange (TO) molecules in a complex formed between the homodimer TOTO and double-stranded (ds) DNA. Biexponential homo-RET dynamics suggest two subpopulations within the ensemble: 80% intercalated and 20% non-intercalated. Based on the application of the transition density cube method to describe the electronic coupling and Monte Carlo simulations of the TOTO/dsDNA geometry, the dihedral angle between intercalated TO molecules is estimated to be 81° ± 5°, corresponding to a coupling strength of 45 ± 22 cm-1. Dye intercalation with this geometry is found to occur independently of the underlying DNA sequence, despite the known preference of TOTO for the nucleobase sequence CTAG. The non-intercalated subpopulation is inferred to have a mean inter-dye separation distance of 19 Å, corresponding to coupling strengths between 0 and 25 cm-1. This information is important to enable the rational design of energy transfer systems that utilize TOTO as a relay dye. The approach used here is generally applicable to determining the electronic coupling strength and intercalation configuration of other dimeric bis-intercalators.

  17. Response matrix Monte Carlo based on a general geometry local calculation for electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, C.T.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Martin, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A Response Matrix Monte Carlo (RMMC) method has been developed for solving electron transport problems. This method was born of the need to have a reliable, computationally efficient transport method for low energy electrons (below a few hundred keV) in all materials. Today, condensed history methods are used which reduce the computation time by modeling the combined effect of many collisions but fail at low energy because of the assumptions required to characterize the electron scattering. Analog Monte Carlo simulations are prohibitively expensive since electrons undergo coulombic scattering with little state change after a collision. The RMMC method attempts to combine the accuracy of an analog Monte Carlo simulation with the speed of the condensed history methods. Like condensed history, the RMMC method uses probability distributions functions (PDFs) to describe the energy and direction of the electron after several collisions. However, unlike the condensed history method the PDFs are based on an analog Monte Carlo simulation over a small region. Condensed history theories require assumptions about the electron scattering to derive the PDFs for direction and energy. Thus the RMMC method samples from PDFs which more accurately represent the electron random walk. Results show good agreement between the RMMC method and analog Monte Carlo. 13 refs., 8 figs

  18. A computer program for fitting smooth surfaces to an aircraft configuration and other three dimensional geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craidon, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program that uses a three-dimensional geometric technique for fitting a smooth surface to the component parts of an aircraft configuration is presented. The resulting surface equations are useful in performing various kinds of calculations in which a three-dimensional mathematical description is necessary. Programs options may be used to compute information for three-view and orthographic projections of the configuration as well as cross-section plots at any orientation through the configuration. The aircraft geometry input section of the program may be easily replaced with a surface point description in a different form so that the program could be of use for any three-dimensional surface equations.

  19. Collective modes and dielectric and superconducting properties of electronic systems in confined geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    The dielectric response function of electronic systems in restricted geometries is studied as well as some of the consequences, using the self-consistent field method. These consequences include: 1) existence of multiple branches of longitudinal slender acoustic plasma oscillations (SAP) in thin wires; 2) a new superconductivity mechanism in thin wires via the exchange of SAPs by the electrons forming the Cooper pairs, and 3) reduction of the static screening offered by the valence electrons in a thin semiconductor film with respect to the bulk case. The SAP modes are collective modes shown to exist only in thin wires and neither in a bulk system nor in a thin film. They have linear dispersion relations with phase velocities smaller than the Fermi velocity of the system and are not Landau-damped. Numerical examples of these SAP modes in metallic and semiconductor wires are presented, showing that they sould be more easily observable in semiconductor structures. The SAP-induced mechanism of superconductivity is shown to possibly give higher critical temperature T/sub c/ than the phonon mechanism in thin wires. The author presents a semi-rigorous calculation of T/sub c/ and shows that by increasing the frequency of the SAP modes and having a small effective electron mass one would be able to increase T/sub c/. He also shows that the dielectric function of a thin semiconductor slab is wavenumber dependent even at long wavelengths and is not a constant as in the bulk case

  20. A computer simulation of auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragheb, M S; Bakr, M H.S. [Dept. Of Accellerators and Ion Sources, Division of Basic Nuclear Sciences, NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    A simulation study of Auger electron spectroscopy was performed to reveal how far the dependency between the different parameters governing the experimental behavior affects the peaks. The experimental procedure followed by the AC modulation technique were reproduced by means of a computer program. It generates the assumed output Auger electron peaks, exposes them to a retarding AC modulated field and collects the resulting modulated signals. The program produces the lock-in treatment in order to demodulate the signals revealing the Auger peaks. It analyzes the spectrum obtained giving the peak positions and energies. Comparison between results of simulation and the experimental data showed good agreement. The peaks of the spectrum obtained depend upon the amplitude, frequency and resolution of the applied modulated signal. The peak shape is effected by the rise time, the slope and the starting potential of the retarding field. 4 figs.

  1. Interacting electrons theory and computational approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Richard M; Ceperley, David M

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the theory and computation of electronic structure is bringing an unprecedented level of capability for research. Many-body methods are becoming essential tools vital for quantitative calculations and understanding materials phenomena in physics, chemistry, materials science and other fields. This book provides a unified exposition of the most-used tools: many-body perturbation theory, dynamical mean field theory and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Each topic is introduced with a less technical overview for a broad readership, followed by in-depth descriptions and mathematical formulation. Practical guidelines, illustrations and exercises are chosen to enable readers to appreciate the complementary approaches, their relationships, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method. This book is designed for graduate students and researchers who want to use and understand these advanced computational tools, get a broad overview, and acquire a basis for participating in new developments.

  2. Electronic circuit design with HEP computational tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Mario

    1996-01-01

    CPSPICE is an electronic circuit statistical simulation program developed to run in a parallel environment under UNIX operating system and TCP/IP communications protocol, using CPS - Cooperative Processes Software , SPICE program and CERNLIB software package. It is part of a set of tools being develop, intended to help electronic engineers to design, model and simulate complex systems and circuits for High Energy Physics detectors, based on statistical methods, using the same software and methodology used by HEP physicists for data analysis. CPSPICE simulates electronic circuits by Monte Carlo method, through several different processes running simultaneously SPICE in UNIX parallel computers or workstation farms. Data transfer between CPS processes for a modified version of SPICE2G6 is done by RAM memory, but can also be done through hard disk files if no source files are available for the simulator, and for bigger simulation outputs files. Simulation results are written in a HBOOK file as a NTUPLE, to be examined by HBOOK in batch model or graphics, and analyzed by statistical procedures available. The HBOOK file be stored on hard disk for small amount of data, or into Exabyte tape file for large amount of data. HEP tools also helps circuit or component modeling, like MINUT program from CERNLIB, that implements Nelder and Mead Simplex and Gradient with or without derivatives algorithms, and can be used for design optimization.This paper presents CPSPICE program implementation. The scheme adopted is suitable to make parallel other electronic circuit simulators. (author)

  3. Highly Manufacturable Deep (Sub-Millimeter) Etching Enabled High Aspect Ratio Complex Geometry Lego-Like Silicon Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, Mohamed Tarek; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    A highly manufacturable deep reactive ion etching based process involving a hybrid soft/hard mask process technology shows high aspect ratio complex geometry Lego-like silicon electronics formation enabling free-form (physically flexible, stretchable, and reconfigurable) electronic systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Highly Manufacturable Deep (Sub-Millimeter) Etching Enabled High Aspect Ratio Complex Geometry Lego-Like Silicon Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2017-02-01

    A highly manufacturable deep reactive ion etching based process involving a hybrid soft/hard mask process technology shows high aspect ratio complex geometry Lego-like silicon electronics formation enabling free-form (physically flexible, stretchable, and reconfigurable) electronic systems.

  5. Electronic Properties of Corrugated Graphene, the Heisenberg Principle and Wormhole Geometry in Solid State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanasov, Victor; Saxena, Avadh

    2010-12-01

    Adopting a purely two dimensional relativistic equation for graphene's carriers contradicts the Heisenberg uncertainty principle since it requires setting off-the-surface coordinate of a three-dimensional wavefunction to zero. Here we present a theoretical framework for describing graphene's massless relativistic carriers in accordance with this most fundamental of all quantum principles. A gradual confining procedure is used to restrict the dynamics onto a surface and in the process the embedding of this surface into the three dimensional world is accounted for. As a result an invariant geometric potential arises which scales linearly with the Mean curvature and shifts the Fermi energy of the material proportional to bending. Strain induced modification of the electronic properties or 'straintronics' is clearly an important field of study in graphene. This opens a venue to producing electronic devices, MEMS and NEMS where the electronic properties are controlled by geometric means and no additional alteration of graphene is necessary. The appearance of this geometric potential also provides us with clues as to how quantum dynamics looks like in the curved space-time of general relativity. In this context, we explore a two-dimensional cross-section of the wormhole geometry realized with graphene as a solid state thought experiment. (author)

  6. Spectral Transfer Learning using Information Geometry for a User-Independent Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Roy Waytowich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in signal processing and machine learning techniques have enabled the application of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technologies to fields such as medicine, industry and recreation. However, BCIs still suffer from the requirement of frequent calibration sessions due to the intra- and inter- individual variability of brain-signals, which makes calibration suppression through transfer learning an area of increasing interest for the development of practical BCI systems. In this paper, we present an unsupervised transfer method (spectral transfer using information geometry, STIG, which ranks and combines unlabeled predictions from an ensemble of information geometry classifiers built on data from individual training subjects. The STIG method is validated in both offline and real-time feedback analysis during a rapid serial visual presentation task (RSVP. For detection of single-trial, event-related potentials (ERPs, the proposed method can significantly outperform existing calibration-free techniques as well as outperform traditional within-subject calibration techniques when limited data is available. This method demonstrates that unsupervised transfer learning for single-trial detection in ERP-based BCIs can be achieved without the requirement of costly training data, representing a step-forward in the overall goal of achieving a practical user-independent BCI system.

  7. Spectral Transfer Learning Using Information Geometry for a User-Independent Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytowich, Nicholas R; Lawhern, Vernon J; Bohannon, Addison W; Ball, Kenneth R; Lance, Brent J

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in signal processing and machine learning techniques have enabled the application of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technologies to fields such as medicine, industry, and recreation; however, BCIs still suffer from the requirement of frequent calibration sessions due to the intra- and inter-individual variability of brain-signals, which makes calibration suppression through transfer learning an area of increasing interest for the development of practical BCI systems. In this paper, we present an unsupervised transfer method (spectral transfer using information geometry, STIG), which ranks and combines unlabeled predictions from an ensemble of information geometry classifiers built on data from individual training subjects. The STIG method is validated in both off-line and real-time feedback analysis during a rapid serial visual presentation task (RSVP). For detection of single-trial, event-related potentials (ERPs), the proposed method can significantly outperform existing calibration-free techniques as well as outperform traditional within-subject calibration techniques when limited data is available. This method demonstrates that unsupervised transfer learning for single-trial detection in ERP-based BCIs can be achieved without the requirement of costly training data, representing a step-forward in the overall goal of achieving a practical user-independent BCI system.

  8. Young children reorient by computing layout geometry, not by matching images of the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2011-02-01

    Disoriented animals from ants to humans reorient in accord with the shape of the surrounding surface layout: a behavioral pattern long taken as evidence for sensitivity to layout geometry. Recent computational models suggest, however, that the reorientation process may not depend on geometrical analyses but instead on the matching of brightness contours in 2D images of the environment. Here we test this suggestion by investigating young children's reorientation in enclosed environments. Children reoriented by extremely subtle geometric properties of the 3D layout: bumps and ridges that protruded only slightly off the floor, producing edges with low contrast. Moreover, children failed to reorient by prominent brightness contours in continuous layouts with no distinctive 3D structure. The findings provide evidence that geometric layout representations support children's reorientation.

  9. Cherenkov imaging method for rapid optimization of clinical treatment geometry in total skin electron beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M., E-mail: Jacqueline.M.Andreozzi.th@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Lesley.A.Jarvis@hitchcock.org; Glaser, Adam K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Gladstone, David J.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Jarvis, Lesley A., E-mail: Jacqueline.M.Andreozzi.th@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Lesley.A.Jarvis@hitchcock.org [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: A method was developed utilizing Cherenkov imaging for rapid and thorough determination of the two gantry angles that produce the most uniform treatment plane during dual-field total skin electron beam therapy (TSET). Methods: Cherenkov imaging was implemented to gather 2D measurements of relative surface dose from 6 MeV electron beams on a white polyethylene sheet. An intensified charge-coupled device camera time-gated to the Linac was used for Cherenkov emission imaging at sixty-two different gantry angles (1° increments, from 239.5° to 300.5°). Following a modified Stanford TSET technique, which uses two fields per patient position for full body coverage, composite images were created as the sum of two beam images on the sheet; each angle pair was evaluated for minimum variation across the patient region of interest. Cherenkov versus dose correlation was verified with ionization chamber measurements. The process was repeated at source to surface distance (SSD) = 441, 370.5, and 300 cm to determine optimal angle spread for varying room geometries. In addition, three patients receiving TSET using a modified Stanford six-dual field technique with 6 MeV electron beams at SSD = 441 cm were imaged during treatment. Results: As in previous studies, Cherenkov intensity was shown to directly correlate with dose for homogenous flat phantoms (R{sup 2} = 0.93), making Cherenkov imaging an appropriate candidate to assess and optimize TSET setup geometry. This method provided dense 2D images allowing 1891 possible treatment geometries to be comprehensively analyzed from one data set of 62 single images. Gantry angles historically used for TSET at their institution were 255.5° and 284.5° at SSD = 441 cm; however, the angles optimized for maximum homogeneity were found to be 252.5° and 287.5° (+6° increase in angle spread). Ionization chamber measurements confirmed improvement in dose homogeneity across the treatment field from a range of 24.4% at the initial

  10. Cognitive Load for Configuration Comprehension in Computer-Supported Geometry Problem Solving: An Eye Movement Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John Jr-Hung; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated (a) whether the perceived cognitive load was different when geometry problems with various levels of configuration comprehension were solved and (b) whether eye movements in comprehending geometry problems showed sources of cognitive loads. In the first investigation, three characteristics of geometry configurations…

  11. Reconstruction for interior region-of-interest inverse geometry computed tomography: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yu Yoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) composed of multiple source and small size detector has several merits such as reduction of scatter effect and large volumetric imaging within one rotation without cone-beam artifact, compared to conventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). By using this multi-source characteristics, we intend to present a selective and multiple interior region-of-interest (ROI) imaging method by using a designed source on-off sequence of IGCT. ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance for radiotherapy. ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. Projection of ROI-IGCT is performed by selective irradiation, hence unnecessary imaging dose to non-interest region can be reduced. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance for radiotherapy.

  12. Development of a computer program to determine the pulse-height distribution in a gamma-ray detector from an arbitrary geometry source -feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, G.D.; Marshall, M.

    1989-03-01

    The feasibility of developing a computer program suitable for evaluating the pulse-height spectrum in a gamma-ray detector from a complex geometry source has been examined. A selection of relevant programs, Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, have been identified and their applicability to this study discussed. It is proposed that the computation be performed in two parts: the evaluation of the photon fluence at the detector using a photon transport code, and calculation of the pulse-height distribution from this spectrum using response functions determined with an electron-photon transport code. The two transport codes selected to perform this procedure are MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon code), and EGS4 (Electron Gamma Shower code). (Author)

  13. Influence of a transition metal atom on the geometry and electronic structure of Mg and Mg-H clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siretskiy, M.Yu.; Shelyapina, M.G.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Skryabina, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the study of (MgH 2 ) n + M complexes (M = Ti or Ni) carried out within the framework of the cluster density functional theory (DFT) method. The influence of such transition metal atoms on the cluster geometry and electronic structure is discussed considering the stability of MgH 2 hydride.

  14. Impact of three-dimensional geometry on the performance of isolated electron-injection infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathipour, Vala; Jang, Sung Jun; Nia, Iman Hassani; Mohseni, Hooman, E-mail: hmohseni@northwestern.edu [Bio-Inspired Sensors and Optoelectronics Laboratory, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-01-12

    We present a quantitative study of the influence of three-dimensional geometry of the isolated electron–injection detectors on their characteristics. Significant improvements in the device performance are obtained as a result of scaling the injector diameter with respect to the trapping/absorbing layer diameters. Devices with about ten times smaller injector area with respect to the trapping/absorbing layer areas show more than an order of magnitude lower dark current, as well as an order of magnitude higher optical gain compared with devices of same size injector and trapping/absorbing layer areas. Devices with 10 μm injector diameter and 30 μm trapping/absorbing layer diameter show an optical gain of ∼2000 at bias voltage of −3 V with a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. Analytical expressions are derived for the electron-injection detector optical gain to qualitatively explain the significance of scaling the injector with respect to the absorber.

  15. Effect of inlet geometry on macrosegregation during the direct chill casting of 7050 alloy billets: experiments and computer modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L; Miroux, A; Subroto, T; Katgerman, L; Eskin, D G

    2012-01-01

    Controlling macrosegregation is one of the major challenges in direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys. In this paper, the effect of the inlet geometry (which influences the melt distribution) on macrosegregation during the DC casting of 7050 alloy billets was studied experimentally and by using 2D computer modelling. The ALSIM model was used to determine the temperature and flow patterns during DC casting. The results from the computer simulations show that the sump profiles and flow patterns in the billet are strongly influenced by the melt flow distribution determined by the inlet geometry. These observations were correlated to the actual macrosegregation patterns found in the as-cast billets produced by having two different inlet geometries. The macrosegregation analysis presented here may assist in determining the critical parameters to consider for improving the casting of 7XXX aluminium alloys.

  16. Effect of inlet geometry on macrosegregation during the direct chill casting of 7050 alloy billets: experiments and computer modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Eskin, D. G.; Miroux, A.; Subroto, T.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-07-01

    Controlling macrosegregation is one of the major challenges in direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys. In this paper, the effect of the inlet geometry (which influences the melt distribution) on macrosegregation during the DC casting of 7050 alloy billets was studied experimentally and by using 2D computer modelling. The ALSIM model was used to determine the temperature and flow patterns during DC casting. The results from the computer simulations show that the sump profiles and flow patterns in the billet are strongly influenced by the melt flow distribution determined by the inlet geometry. These observations were correlated to the actual macrosegregation patterns found in the as-cast billets produced by having two different inlet geometries. The macrosegregation analysis presented here may assist in determining the critical parameters to consider for improving the casting of 7XXX aluminium alloys.

  17. Computer-optimized γ-NDA geometries for uranium enrichment verification of gaseous UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichers, V.A.; Aaldijk, J.K.; Betue, P.A.C. de; Harry, R.J.S.

    1993-05-01

    An improved collimator pair of novel design tailored for deposit independent enrichment verification of gaseous UF 6 at low pressures in cascade-to-header pipes of small diameters in centrifuge enrichment plants is presented. The designs are adapted for use in a dual-geometry arrangement for simultaneous measurements with both detection geometries. The average measurement time with the dual-geometry arrangement is approximately half an hour for deposit-to-gas activity ratios as high as 20. (orig.)

  18. A computational geometry framework for the optimisation of atom probe reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfer, Peter [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Institute for General Materials Properties, Department of Materials Science, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Cairney, Julie [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we present pathways for improving the reconstruction of atom probe data on a coarse (>10 nm) scale, based on computational geometry. We introduce a way to iteratively improve an atom probe reconstruction by adjusting it, so that certain known shape criteria are fulfilled. This is achieved by creating an implicit approximation of the reconstruction through a barycentric coordinate transform. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the compensation of trajectory aberrations and the iterative improvement of the reconstruction of a dataset containing a grain boundary. We also present a method for obtaining a hull of the dataset in both detector and reconstruction space. This maximises data utilisation, and can be used to compensate for ion trajectory aberrations caused by residual fields in the ion flight path through a ‘master curve’ and correct for overall shape deviations in the data. - Highlights: • An atom probe reconstruction can be iteratively improved by using shape constraints. • An atom probe reconstruction can be inverted using barycentric coordinate transforms. • Hulls for atom probe datasets can be obtained from 2D detector outlines that are co-reconstructed with the data. • Ion trajectory compressions caused by instrument-specific residual fields in the drift tube can be corrected.

  19. Applying computational geometry techniques for advanced feature analysis in atom probe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felfer, Peter; Ceguerra, Anna; Ringer, Simon; Cairney, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present new methods for feature analysis in atom probe tomography data that have useful applications in materials characterisation. The analysis works on the principle of Voronoi subvolumes and piecewise linear approximations, and feature delineation based on the distance to the centre of mass of a subvolume (DCOM). Based on the coordinate systems defined by these approximations, two examples are shown of the new types of analyses that can be performed. The first is the analysis of line-like-objects (i.e. dislocations) using both proxigrams and line-excess plots. The second is interfacial excess mapping of an InGaAs quantum dot. - Highlights: • Computational geometry is used to detect and analyse features within atom probe data. • Limitations of conventional feature detection are overcome by using atomic density gradients. • 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D features can be analysed by using Voronoi tessellation for spatial binning. • New, robust analysis methods are demonstrated, including line and interfacial excess mapping

  20. An Automated Approach to Very High Order Aeroacoustic Computations in Complex Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustics requires efficient, high-resolution simulation tools. And for smooth problems, this is best accomplished with very high order in space and time methods on small stencils. But the complexity of highly accurate numerical methods can inhibit their practical application, especially in irregular geometries. This complexity is reduced by using a special form of Hermite divided-difference spatial interpolation on Cartesian grids, and a Cauchy-Kowalewslci recursion procedure for time advancement. In addition, a stencil constraint tree reduces the complexity of interpolating grid points that are located near wall boundaries. These procedures are used to automatically develop and implement very high order methods (>15) for solving the linearized Euler equations that can achieve less than one grid point per wavelength resolution away from boundaries by including spatial derivatives of the primitive variables at each grid point. The accuracy of stable surface treatments is currently limited to 11th order for grid aligned boundaries and to 2nd order for irregular boundaries.

  1. A computer code package for electron transport Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code package was developed for solving various electron transport problems by Monte Carlo simulation. It is based on condensed history Monte Carlo algorithm. In order to get reliable results over wide ranges of electron energies and target atomic numbers, specific techniques of electron transport were implemented such as: Moliere multiscatter angular distributions, Blunck-Leisegang multiscatter energy distribution, sampling of electron-electron and Bremsstrahlung individual interactions. Path-length and lateral displacement corrections algorithms and the module for computing collision, radiative and total restricted stopping powers and ranges of electrons are also included. Comparisons of simulation results with experimental measurements are finally presented. (author)

  2. Electronic Mail for Personal Computers: Development Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Christinger

    1994-01-01

    Examines competing, commercially developed electronic mail programs and how these technologies will affect the functionality and quality of electronic mail. How new standards for client-server mail systems are likely to enhance messaging capabilities and the use of electronic mail for information retrieval are considered. (Contains eight…

  3. Computer conferencing: the "nurse" in the "Electronic School District".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, D M; Phillips, A

    1991-01-01

    As computer-based instructional technologies become increasingly available, they offer new mechanisms for health educators to provide health instruction. This article describes a pilot project in which nurses established a computer conference to provide health instruction to high school students participating in an electronic link of high schools. The article discusses computer conferencing, the "Electronic School District," the design of the nursing conference, and the role of the nurse in distributed health education.

  4. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and

  5. Numerical simulation of high-energy-electron gerated field in dielectrics of various geometries. Final report, June 1, 1979-May 15, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, K.S.

    1980-01-01

    It has been observed that the exposure of dielectrics to electron beams can produce an electric field of sufficient magnitude to cause dielectric breakdown. The present investigations will be directed to calculate the electric field intensity in dielectrics under spherical and cylindrical geometries. In the spherical geometry the method of multiple images renders the full numerical calculation unnecessary, whereas in a finite length cylindrical geometry the full numerical calculation seems to be inevitable. A description and results of the spherical geometry are presented and a more detailed presentation of the finite cylinder geometry is given

  6. Efficient and Flexible Computation of Many-Electron Wave Function Overlaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasser, Felix; Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Oppel, Markus; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-03-08

    A new algorithm for the computation of the overlap between many-electron wave functions is described. This algorithm allows for the extensive use of recurring intermediates and thus provides high computational efficiency. Because of the general formalism employed, overlaps can be computed for varying wave function types, molecular orbitals, basis sets, and molecular geometries. This paves the way for efficiently computing nonadiabatic interaction terms for dynamics simulations. In addition, other application areas can be envisaged, such as the comparison of wave functions constructed at different levels of theory. Aside from explaining the algorithm and evaluating the performance, a detailed analysis of the numerical stability of wave function overlaps is carried out, and strategies for overcoming potential severe pitfalls due to displaced atoms and truncated wave functions are presented.

  7. Electronic digital computers their use in science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, Franz L

    1958-01-01

    Electronic Digital Computers: Their Use in Science and Engineering describes the principles underlying computer design and operation. This book describes the various applications of computers, the stages involved in using them, and their limitations. The machine is composed of the hardware which is run by a program. This text describes the use of magnetic drum for storage of data and some computing. The functions and components of the computer include automatic control, memory, input of instructions by using punched cards, and output from resulting information. Computers operate by using numbe

  8. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  9. Automatic procedures for computing complete configuration geometry from individual component descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Raymond L.; Adams, Mary S.

    1994-01-01

    Procedures are derived for developing a complete airplane surface geometry starting from component descriptions. The procedures involve locating the intersection lines of adjacent components and omitting any regions for which part of one surface lies within the other. The geometry files utilize the wave-drag (Harris) format, and output files are written in Hess format. Two algorithms are used: one, if both intersecting surfaces have airfoil cross sections; the other, if one of the surfaces has circular cross sections. Some sample results in graphical form are included.

  10. Quantum Computing with an Electron Spin Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesenberg, Janus; Ardavan, A.; Briggs, G.A.D.

    2009-01-01

    We propose to encode a register of quantum bits in different collective electron spin wave excitations in a solid medium. Coupling to spins is enabled by locating them in the vicinity of a superconducting transmission line cavity, and making use of their strong collective coupling to the quantized...

  11. Resolution Versus Error for Computational Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzi, Lorenzo; Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Images that are collected via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) can be undersampled to avoid damage to the specimen while maintaining resolution [1, 2]. We have used BPFA to impute missing data and reduce noise [3]. The reconstruction is typically evaluated using the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). This measure is too conservative for STEM images and we propose that the Fourier ring correlation (FRC) is used instead to evaluate the reconstruction. We are not concerned with exact reconstruction of the truth image, and therefore PSNR is a conservative estimation of the quality of the reconstruction. Instead, we are concerned with the visual resolution of the image and whether atoms can be distinguished. We have evaluated the reconstruction of a simulated STEM image using the FRC and compared the results with the PSNR measurements. The FRC captures the resolution of the image and is not affected by a large MSE if the atom peaks are still distinguishable. The noisy and reconstructed images are shown in Figure 1. The simulated STEM image was sampled at 100%, 80%, 40%, and 20% of the original pixels to simulate an undersampled scan. The reconstruction was done using BPFA with a patch size of 10 x 10 and no overlapping patches. Not having overlapping patches produces inferior results but they are still acceptable. The dictionary size is 64 and 30 iterations were completed during each reconstruction. The 100% image was denoised instead of reconstructed. Poisson noise was applied to the simulated image with λ values of 500, 50, and 5 to simulate lower imaging dose. The original simulated STEM image was also included in our calculations and was generated using a dose of 1000. The simulated STEM image is 100 by 100 pixels and has essentially no high frequency components. The image reconstruction tends to smooth the data, also resulting in no high frequency components. This causes the FRC of the two images to be large at higher resolutions and may be

  12. Using Dynamic Geometry and Computer Algebra Systems in Problem Based Courses for Future Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiczková, Svetlana; Lávicka, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    It is a modern trend today when formulating the curriculum of a geometric course at the technical universities to start from a real-life problem originated in technical praxis and subsequently to define which geometric theories and which skills are necessary for its solving. Nowadays, interactive and dynamic geometry software plays a more and more…

  13. Computation of electron cloud diagnostics and mitigation in the main injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, S A; Cary, J R; Stoltz, P H; LeBrun, P; Spentzouris, P; Amundson, J F

    2009-01-01

    High-performance computations on Blue Gene/P at Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility have been used to determine phase shifts induced in injected RF diagnostics as a function of electron cloud density in the Main Injector. Inversion of the relationship between electron cloud parameters and induced phase shifts allows us to predict electron cloud density and evolution over many bunch periods. Long time-scale simulations using Blue Gene have allowed us to measure cloud evolution patterns under the influence of beam propagation with realistic physical parameterizations, such as elliptical beam pipe geometry, self-consistent electromagnetic fields, space charge, secondary electron emission, and the application of arbitrary external magnetic fields. Simultaneously, we are able to simulate the use of injected microwave diagnostic signals to measure electron cloud density, and the effectiveness of various mitigation techniques such as surface coating and the application of confining magnetic fields. These simulations provide a baseline for both RF electron cloud diagnostic design and accelerator fabrication in order to measure electron clouds and mitigate the adverse effects of such clouds on beam propagation.

  14. PENTrack—a simulation tool for ultracold neutrons, protons, and electrons in complex electromagnetic fields and geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, W., E-mail: w.schreyer@tum.de [Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kikawa, T. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver (Canada); Losekamm, M.J.; Paul, S. [Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Picker, R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver (Canada); Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby (Canada)

    2017-06-21

    Modern precision experiments trapping low-energy particles require detailed simulations of particle trajectories and spin precession to determine systematic measurement limitations and apparatus deficiencies. We developed PENTrack, a tool that allows to simulate trajectories of ultracold neutrons and their decay products—protons and electrons—and the precession of their spins in complex geometries and electromagnetic fields. The interaction of ultracold neutrons with matter is implemented with the Fermi-potential formalism and diffuse scattering using Lambert and microroughness models. The results of several benchmark simulations agree with STARucn v1.2, uncovered several flaws in Geant4 v10.2.2, and agree with experimental data. Experiment geometry and electromagnetic fields can be imported from commercial computer-aided-design and finite-element software. All simulation parameters are defined in simple text files allowing quick changes. The simulation code is written in C++ and is freely available at (github.com/wschreyer/PENTrack.git).

  15. Computation of Surface Laplacian for tri-polar ring electrodes on high-density realistic geometry head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junwei Ma; Han Yuan; Sunderam, Sridhar; Besio, Walter; Lei Ding

    2017-07-01

    Neural activity inside the human brain generate electrical signals that can be detected on the scalp. Electroencephalograph (EEG) is one of the most widely utilized techniques helping physicians and researchers to diagnose and understand various brain diseases. Due to its nature, EEG signals have very high temporal resolution but poor spatial resolution. To achieve higher spatial resolution, a novel tri-polar concentric ring electrode (TCRE) has been developed to directly measure Surface Laplacian (SL). The objective of the present study is to accurately calculate SL for TCRE based on a realistic geometry head model. A locally dense mesh was proposed to represent the head surface, where the local dense parts were to match the small structural components in TCRE. Other areas without dense mesh were used for the purpose of reducing computational load. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed mesh and evaluated possible numerical errors as compared with a low-density model. Finally, with achieved accuracy, we presented the computed forward lead field of SL for TCRE for the first time in a realistic geometry head model and demonstrated that it has better spatial resolution than computed SL from classic EEG recordings.

  16. Fault tolerant embedded computers and power electronics for nuclear robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, A.; Robiolle, M.

    1995-01-01

    For requirements of nuclear industries, it is necessary to use embedded rad-tolerant electronics and high-level safety. In this paper, we first describe a computer architecture called MICADO designed for French nuclear industry. We then present outgoing projects on our industry. A special point is made on power electronics for remote-operated and legged robots. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs

  17. Electron Gun for Computer-controlled Welding of Small Components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dupák, Jan; Vlček, Ivan; Zobač, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 62, 2-3 (2001), s. 159-164 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2065015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : Electron beam-welding machine * Electron gun * Computer- control led beam Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.541, year: 2001

  18. Computation of the average energy for LXY electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau, A.

    1996-01-01

    The application of an atomic rearrangement model in which we only consider the three shells K, L and M, to compute the counting efficiency for electron capture nuclides, requires a fine averaged energy value for LMN electrons. In this report, we illustrate the procedure with two example, ''125 I and ''109 Cd. (Author) 4 refs

  19. Fault tolerant embedded computers and power electronics for nuclear robotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, A.; Robiolle, M.

    1995-12-31

    For requirements of nuclear industries, it is necessary to use embedded rad-tolerant electronics and high-level safety. In this paper, we first describe a computer architecture called MICADO designed for French nuclear industry. We then present outgoing projects on our industry. A special point is made on power electronics for remote-operated and legged robots. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Rapid Geometry Creation for Computer-Aided Engineering Parametric Analyses: A Case Study Using ComGeom2 for Launch Abort System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Veronica; Gage, Peter; Manning, Ted

    2007-01-01

    ComGeom2, a tool developed to generate Common Geometry representation for multidisciplinary analysis, has been used to create a large set of geometries for use in a design study requiring analysis by two computational codes. This paper describes the process used to generate the large number of configurations and suggests ways to further automate the process and make it more efficient for future studies. The design geometry for this study is the launch abort system of the NASA Crew Launch Vehicle.

  1. Comparison of surface extraction techniques performance in computed tomography for 3D complex micro-geometry dimensional measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torralba, Marta; Jiménez, Roberto; Yagüe-Fabra, José A.

    2018-01-01

    micro-geometries as well (i.e., in the sub-mm dimensional range). However, there are different factors that may influence the CT process performance, being one of them the surface extraction technique used. In this paper, two different extraction techniques are applied to measure a complex miniaturized......The number of industrial applications of computed tomography (CT) for dimensional metrology in 100–103 mm range has been continuously increasing, especially in the last years. Due to its specific characteristics, CT has the potential to be employed as a viable solution for measuring 3D complex...... dental file by CT in order to analyze its contribution to the final measurement uncertainty in complex geometries at the mm to sub-mm scales. The first method is based on a similarity analysis: the threshold determination; while the second one is based on a gradient or discontinuity analysis: the 3D...

  2. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 μm where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force

  3. On the computation of steady Hopper flows. II: von Mises materials in various geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremaud, Pierre A.; Matthews, John V.; O'Malley, Meghan

    2004-11-01

    Similarity solutions are constructed for the flow of granular materials through hoppers. Unlike previous work, the present approach applies to nonaxisymmetric containers. The model involves ten unknowns (stresses, velocity, and plasticity function) determined by nine nonlinear first order partial differential equations together with a quadratic algebraic constraint (yield condition). A pseudospectral discretization is applied; the resulting problem is solved with a trust region method. The important role of the hopper geometry on the flow is illustrated by several numerical experiments of industrial relevance.

  4. On the computation of steady Hopper flows II: von Mises materials in various geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gremaud, Pierre A.; Matthews, John V.; O'Malley, Meghan

    2004-01-01

    Similarity solutions are constructed for the flow of granular materials through hoppers. Unlike previous work, the present approach applies to nonaxisymmetric containers. The model involves ten unknowns (stresses, velocity, and plasticity function) determined by nine nonlinear first order partial differential equations together with a quadratic algebraic constraint (yield condition). A pseudospectral discretization is applied; the resulting problem is solved with a trust region method. The important role of the hopper geometry on the flow is illustrated by several numerical experiments of industrial relevance

  5. Calculation and construction of electron-diffraction photographs using computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayurov, S.S.; Notkin, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A method of computer construction and indexing of theoretical electronograms for monophase structures with arbitrary type of crystal lattice and for polyphase ones with known orientational coorrelations between phases is presented. Electron-diffraction photograph is presented, obtained from the foil area of two-phase VT22 alloy at β phase orientation in comparison with theoretical electron-diffraction photographs, built ap by computer, with the [100] β phase zone axis and with three variants of α phase orientation relatively to β phase. It is shown that on the experimental electron-diffraction photograph simultaneously presents α-phase three orientations, which reflexes can be indexing correctly [ru

  6. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. IV: Electronic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Matrone, Gwynne M.; Weaver, Tamar A.; Lewis, James D.; Kessler, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a system for electronically tracking relevant plan, prescription, and treatment data for computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy is described. Methods and Materials: The electronic charting system is implemented on a computer cluster coupled by high-speed networks to computer-controlled therapy machines. A methodical approach to the specification and design of an integrated solution has been used in developing the system. The electronic chart system is designed to allow identification and access of patient-specific data including treatment-planning data, treatment prescription information, and charting of doses. An in-house developed database system is used to provide an integrated approach to the database requirements of the design. A hierarchy of databases is used for both centralization and distribution of the treatment data for specific treatment machines. Results: The basic electronic database system has been implemented and has been in use since July 1993. The system has been used to download and manage treatment data on all patients treated on our first fully computer-controlled treatment machine. To date, electronic dose charting functions have not been fully implemented clinically, requiring the continued use of paper charting for dose tracking. Conclusions: The routine clinical application of complex computer-controlled conformal treatment procedures requires the management of large quantities of information for describing and tracking treatments. An integrated and comprehensive approach to this problem has led to a full electronic chart for conformal radiation therapy treatments

  7. Finite geometry effects on the stability of a charged beam propagating through a relativistic annular electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    Finite geometry effects on the stability properties of a charged beam propagating through an intense relativistic annular electron beam have been studied. The stability of the system under transverse oscillation has been examined in detail in a parameter domain pertinent to the collective particle accelerator, currently under development at the Naval Research Laboratory. Both the normal mode and the convective aspects of this instability have been investigated. Despite a substantial temporal growth rate as predicted by the normal mode approach, this instability does not prevent successful acceleration of a portion of the axial beam. Thus the transverse oscillation is not fatal to the collective particle accelerator operation

  8. ELECTRONIC ANALOG COMPUTER FOR DETERMINING RADIOACTIVE DISINTEGRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, H.P.

    1959-07-14

    A computer is presented for determining growth and decay curves for elements in a radioactive disintegration series wherein one unstable element decays to form a second unstable element or isotope, which in turn forms a third element, etc. The growth and decay curves of radioactive elements are simulated by the charge and discharge curves of a resistance-capacitance network. Several such networks having readily adjustable values are connected in series with an amplifier between each successive pair. The time constant of each of the various networks is set proportional to the half-life of a corresponding element in the series represented and the charge and discharge curves of each of the networks simulates the element growth and decay curve.

  9. Spinning geometry = Twisted geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Ziprick, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the SU(2)-gauge invariant phase space of loop gravity can be represented in terms of twisted geometries. These are piecewise-linear-flat geometries obtained by gluing together polyhedra, but the resulting geometries are not continuous across the faces. Here we show that this phase space can also be represented by continuous, piecewise-flat three-geometries called spinning geometries. These are composed of metric-flat three-cells glued together consistently. The geometry of each cell and the manner in which they are glued is compatible with the choice of fluxes and holonomies. We first remark that the fluxes provide each edge with an angular momentum. By studying the piecewise-flat geometries which minimize edge lengths, we show that these angular momenta can be literally interpreted as the spin of the edges: the geometries of all edges are necessarily helices. We also show that the compatibility of the gluing maps with the holonomy data results in the same conclusion. This shows that a spinning geometry represents a way to glue together the three-cells of a twisted geometry to form a continuous geometry which represents a point in the loop gravity phase space. (paper)

  10. Computation of higher spherical harmonics moments of the angular flux for neutron transport problems in spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahni, D.C.; Sharma, A.

    2000-01-01

    The integral form of one-speed, spherically symmetric neutron transport equation with isotropic scattering is considered. Two standard problems are solved using normal mode expansion technique. The expansion coefficients are obtained by solving their singular integral equations. It is shown that these expansion coefficients provide a representation of all spherical harmonics moments of the angular flux as a superposition of Bessel functions. It is seen that large errors occur in the computation of higher moments unless we take certain precautions. The reasons for this phenomenon are explained. They throw some light on the failure of spherical harmonics method in treating spherical geometry problems as observed by Aronsson

  11. GENIE - Generation of computational geometry-grids for internal-external flow configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, B. K.

    1988-01-01

    Progress realized in the development of a master geometry-grid generation code GENIE is presented. The grid refinement process is enhanced by developing strategies to utilize bezier curves/surfaces and splines along with weighted transfinite interpolation technique and by formulating new forcing function for the elliptic solver based on the minimization of a non-orthogonality functional. A two step grid adaptation procedure is developed by optimally blending adaptive weightings with weighted transfinite interpolation technique. Examples of 2D-3D grids are provided to illustrate the success of these methods.

  12. Characterization of electronics devices for computed tomography dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoal, Cinthia Marques Magalhaes

    2012-01-01

    less expressive in tomography due to geometry of the X ray beams. Since the photodiode device was the most stable, the majority of the following tests, was made only with the BPW34FS. In the evaluation of the dose profile in CT, it was confirmed that the extension of 100 mm of the chamber pencil is not enough to collect alI of the scattered radiation of the dose profile. Furthermore, it was shown that the detectors are able to obtain details of the dose profile and, thereby, estimate quantities in CT dosimetry. The new MSAD detector, which consists of a row of 31 BPW34FS photodiodes, presents an advantage in comparison to other detectors used to obtain the MSAD, through multiple slices, and the CTDI, through a single slice: the possibility of obtaining isolated (one slice) or adjacent (various slices) dose profiles in detail and in real time, and the possibility of calculating dosimetric quantities using an electronic system and computer programs, simplifying the dosimetry in CT. (author)

  13. Tally and geometry definition influence on the computing time in radiotherapy treatment planning with MCNP Monte Carlo code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Gallardo, S; Santos, A; Verdu, G

    2006-01-01

    The present work has simulated the photon and electron transport in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) (60)Co radiotherapy unit, using the Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. In order to become computationally more efficient in view of taking part in the practical field of radiotherapy treatment planning, this work is focused mainly on the analysis of dose results and on the required computing time of different tallies applied in the model to speed up calculations.

  14. ELECTRONIC EVIDENCE IN THE JUDICIAL PROCEEDINGS AND COMPUTER FORENSIC ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Boban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s perspective of the information society is characterized by the terminology of modern dictionaries of globalization including the terms such as convergence, digitization (media, technology and/or telecommunications and mobility of people or technology. Each word with progress, development, a positive sign of the rise of the information society. On the other hand in a virtual environment traditional evidence in judicial proceedings with the document on paper substrate, are becoming electronic evidence, and their management processes and criteria for admissibility are changing over traditional evidence. The rapid growth of computer data created new opportunities and the growth of new forms of computing, and cyber crime, but also the new ways of proof in court cases, which were unavailable just a few decades. The authors of this paper describe new trends in the development of the information society and the emergence of electronic evidence, with emphasis on the impact of the development of computer crime on electronic evidence; the concept, legal regulation and probative value of electronic evidence, and in particular of electronic documents; and the issue of electronic evidence expertise and electronic documents in court proceedings.

  15. Computer Simulation of Electron Positron Annihilation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, y

    2003-10-02

    With the launching of the Next Linear Collider coming closer and closer, there is a pressing need for physicists to develop a fully-integrated computer simulation of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation process at center-of-mass energy of 1TeV. A simulation program acts as the template for future experiments. Either new physics will be discovered, or current theoretical uncertainties will shrink due to more accurate higher-order radiative correction calculations. The existence of an efficient and accurate simulation will help us understand the new data and validate (or veto) some of the theoretical models developed to explain new physics. It should handle well interfaces between different sectors of physics, e.g., interactions happening at parton levels well above the QCD scale which are described by perturbative QCD, and interactions happening at much lower energy scale, which combine partons into hadrons. Also it should achieve competitive speed in real time when the complexity of the simulation increases. This thesis contributes some tools that will be useful for the development of such simulation programs. We begin our study by the development of a new Monte Carlo algorithm intended to perform efficiently in selecting weight-1 events when multiple parameter dimensions are strongly correlated. The algorithm first seeks to model the peaks of the distribution by features, adapting these features to the function using the EM algorithm. The representation of the distribution provided by these features is then improved using the VEGAS algorithm for the Monte Carlo integration. The two strategies mesh neatly into an effective multi-channel adaptive representation. We then present a new algorithm for the simulation of parton shower processes in high energy QCD. We want to find an algorithm which is free of negative weights, produces its output as a set of exclusive events, and whose total rate exactly matches the full Feynman amplitude calculation. Our strategy is to create

  16. Effective leaf area index retrieving from terrestrial point cloud data: coupling computational geometry application and Gaussian mixture model clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Tamura, M.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the most important structural parameters of forestry studies which manifests the ability of the green vegetation interacted with the solar illumination. Classic understanding about LAI is to consider the green canopy as integration of horizontal leaf layers. Since multi-angle remote sensing technique developed, LAI obliged to be deliberated according to the observation geometry. Effective LAI could formulate the leaf-light interaction virtually and precisely. To retrieve the LAI/effective LAI from remotely sensed data therefore becomes a challenge during the past decades. Laser scanning technique can provide accurate surface echoed coordinates with densely scanned intervals. To utilize the density based statistical algorithm for analyzing the voluminous amount of the 3-D points data is one of the subjects of the laser scanning applications. Computational geometry also provides some mature applications for point cloud data (PCD) processing and analysing. In this paper, authors investigated the feasibility of a new application for retrieving the effective LAI of an isolated broad leaf tree. Simplified curvature was calculated for each point in order to remove those non-photosynthetic tissues. Then PCD were discretized into voxel, and clustered by using Gaussian mixture model. Subsequently the area of each cluster was calculated by employing the computational geometry applications. In order to validate our application, we chose an indoor plant to estimate the leaf area, the correlation coefficient between calculation and measurement was 98.28 %. We finally calculated the effective LAI of the tree with 6 × 6 assumed observation directions.

  17. The computation of multiple MHD equilibria in axisymmetric and straight geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.Ll.

    1979-01-01

    The details of the numerical methods used in codes for computing MHD equilibria in discrete conductor configurations are described with both code users and code writers in mind. Results produced by the codes have been successfully verified against analytic results and independent computations. The axisymmetric code has proved to be a valuable diagnostic aid for the TOSCA experiment. The user images of the codes are described in the appendices. (author)

  18. Computational Analysis of an effect of aerodynamic pressure on the side view mirror geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murukesavan, P.; Mu'tasim, M. A. N.; Sahat, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of aerodynamic flow effects on side mirror geometry for a passenger car using ANSYS Fluent CFD simulation software. Results from analysis of pressure coefficient on side view mirror designs is evaluated to analyse the unsteady forces that cause fluctuations to mirror surface and image blurring. The fluctuation also causes drag forces that increase the overall drag coefficient, with an assumption resulting in higher fuel consumption and emission. Three features of side view mirror design were investigated with two input velocity parameters of 17 m/s and 33 m/s. Results indicate that the half-sphere design shows the most effective design with less pressure coefficient fluctuation and drag coefficient.

  19. Evaluation of cyclone geometry and its influence on performance parameters by computational fluid dynamics (CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. P. Martignoni

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyclone models have been used without relevant modifications for more than a century. Most of the attention has been focused on finding new methods to improve performance parameters. Recently, some studies were conducted to improve equipment performance by evaluating geometric effects on projects. In this work, the effect of cyclone geometry was studied through the creation of a symmetrical inlet and a volute scroll outlet section in an experimental cyclone and comparison to an ordinary single tangential inlet. The study was performed for gas-solid flow, based on an experimental study available in the literature, where a conventional cyclone model was used. Numerical experiments were performed by using CFX 5.7.1. The axial and tangential velocity components were evaluated using RSM and LES turbulence models. Results showed that these new designs can improve the cyclone performance parameters significantly and very interesting details were found on cyclone fluid dynamics properties using RSM and LES.

  20. Electronic structure and geometries of small compound metal clusters: Progress report, August 1, 1987-July 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, P.; Rao, B.K.; Khanna, S.N.

    1988-04-01

    Our research during this reporting period has focused on studying electronic structure and properties of both gas-phase clusters and clusters as models of crystals and defects. We have also concentrated on developing new theoretical techniques that can allow us to study large clusters in a computationally effective manner. Following is a summary of results

  1. SPHERE: a spherical-geometry multimaterial electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1977-06-01

    SPHERE provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through multimaterial configurations possessing spherical symmetry. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. SPHERE combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies, with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. 8 figs., 3 tables

  2. The 3d International Workshop on Computational Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, Stephen M.

    1994-09-01

    The Third International Workshop on Computational Electronics (IWCE) was held at the Benson Hotel in downtown Portland, Oregon, on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994. The workshop was devoted to a broad range of topics in computational electronics related to the simulation of electronic transport in semiconductors and semiconductor devices, particularly those which use large computational resources. The workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Naval Research and the Army Research Office, as well as local support from the Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering and the Oregon Center for Advanced Technology Education. There were over 100 participants in the Portland workshop, of which more than one quarter represented research groups outside of the United States from Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. There were a total 81 papers presented at the workshop, 9 invited talks, 26 oral presentations and 46 poster presentations. The emphasis of the contributions reflected the interdisciplinary nature of computational electronics with researchers from the Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Physics communities participating in the workshop.

  3. Process parameters-weld bead geometry interactions and their influence on mechanical properties: A case of dissimilar aluminium alloy electron beam welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mastanaiah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of weld bead geometry is always an interesting and challenging research topic as it involves understanding of complex multi input and multi output system. The weld bead geometry has a profound impact on the load bearing capability of a weld joint, which in-turn decides the performance in real time service conditions. The present study introduces a novel approach of detecting a relationship between weld bead geometry and mechanical properties (e.g. tensile load for the purpose of catering the best the process could offer. The significance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a case of dissimilar aluminium alloy (AA2219 and AA5083 electron beam welds. A mathematical model of tensile braking load as a function of geometrical attributes of weld bead geometry is presented. The results of investigation suggests the effective thickness of weld – a geometric parameter of weld bead has the most significant influence on tensile breaking load of dissimilar weld joint. The observations on bead geometry and the mechanical properties (microhardness, ultimate tensile load and face bend angle are correlated with detailed metallurgical analysis. The fusion zone of dissimilar electron beam weld has finer grain size with a moderate evaporation and segregation of alloying elements magnesium and copper respectively. The mechanical properties of weld joint are controlled by optimum bead geometry and HAZ softening in weaker AA5083 Al alloy. Keywords: Electron beam welding, AA2219, AA5083, Bead geometry, Tensile breaking load

  4. An inverted-geometry, high voltage polarized electron gun with UHV load lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breidenbach, M.; Foss, M.; Hodgson, J.; Kulikov, A.; Odian, A.; Putallaz, G.; Rogers, H.; Schindler, R.; Skarpaas, K.; Zolotorev, M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a high voltage electron source with a GaAs photocathode and a load lock system is described. The inverted high voltage structure of the gun permits a compact and simple design. Test results demonstrate that the load lock system provides a reliable way to achieve high quantum efficiency of the photocathode in a high voltage device. ((orig.))

  5. Excitation of lower hybrid waves by electron beams in finite geometry plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.R.J.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    The dispersion relations for the quasi-static lower hybrid surface waves are derived. Conditions for their existence and their linear excitation by a small density electron beam are discussed. Instabilities appearing in low-frequency surface waves are also discussed. (author)

  6. High performance parallel computing of flows in complex geometries: II. Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourdain, N; Gicquel, L; Staffelbach, G; Vermorel, O; Duchaine, F; Boussuge, J-F; Poinsot, T

    2009-01-01

    Present regulations in terms of pollutant emissions, noise and economical constraints, require new approaches and designs in the fields of energy supply and transportation. It is now well established that the next breakthrough will come from a better understanding of unsteady flow effects and by considering the entire system and not only isolated components. However, these aspects are still not well taken into account by the numerical approaches or understood whatever the design stage considered. The main challenge is essentially due to the computational requirements inferred by such complex systems if it is to be simulated by use of supercomputers. This paper shows how new challenges can be addressed by using parallel computing platforms for distinct elements of a more complex systems as encountered in aeronautical applications. Based on numerical simulations performed with modern aerodynamic and reactive flow solvers, this work underlines the interest of high-performance computing for solving flow in complex industrial configurations such as aircrafts, combustion chambers and turbomachines. Performance indicators related to parallel computing efficiency are presented, showing that establishing fair criterions is a difficult task for complex industrial applications. Examples of numerical simulations performed in industrial systems are also described with a particular interest for the computational time and the potential design improvements obtained with high-fidelity and multi-physics computing methods. These simulations use either unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods or large eddy simulation and deal with turbulent unsteady flows, such as coupled flow phenomena (thermo-acoustic instabilities, buffet, etc). Some examples of the difficulties with grid generation and data analysis are also presented when dealing with these complex industrial applications.

  7. Long-term internal thoracic artery bypass graft patency and geometry assessed by multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Mette; Damgaard, Sune; Lilleoer, Nikolaj Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The left internal thoracic artery (LITA) undergoes vascular remodelling when used for coronary artery bypass grafting. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the extent of the LITA remodelling late after coronary artery bypass grafting assessed by multidetector computed tomography is related...

  8. Characterization of feed channel spacer performance using geometries obtained by X-ray computed tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Haaksman, Viktor A.; Siddiqui, Amber; Schellenberg, Carsten; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    design from X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The method revealed that the filaments of industrial spacers have a highly variable cross-section size and shape, which impact the flow characteristics in the feed channel. The pressure drop and friction

  9. Quantum Geometry: Relativistic energy approach to cooperative electron-nucleary-transition spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Юрьевна Хецелиус

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An advanced relativistic energy approach is presented and applied to calculating parameters of electron-nuclear 7-transition spectra of nucleus in the atom. The intensities of the spectral satellites are defined in the relativistic version of the energy approach (S-matrix formalism, and gauge-invariant quantum-electrodynamical perturbation theory with the Dirac-Kohn-Sham density-functional zeroth approximation.

  10. Floating-point geometry: toward guaranteed geometric computations with approximate arithmetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajard, Jean-Claude; Langlois, Philippe; Michelucci, Dominique; Morin, Géraldine; Revol, Nathalie

    2008-08-01

    Geometric computations can fail because of inconsistencies due to floating-point inaccuracy. For instance, the computed intersection point between two curves does not lie on the curves: it is unavoidable when the intersection point coordinates are non rational, and thus not representable using floating-point arithmetic. A popular heuristic approach tests equalities and nullities up to a tolerance ɛ. But transitivity of equality is lost: we can have A approx B and B approx C, but A not approx C (where A approx B means ||A - B|| < ɛ for A,B two floating-point values). Interval arithmetic is another, self-validated, alternative; the difficulty is to limit the swell of the width of intervals with computations. Unfortunately interval arithmetic cannot decide equality nor nullity, even in cases where it is decidable by other means. A new approach, developed in this paper, consists in modifying the geometric problems and algorithms, to account for the undecidability of the equality test and unavoidable inaccuracy. In particular, all curves come with a non-zero thickness, so two curves (generically) cut in a region with non-zero area, an inner and outer representation of which is computable. This last approach no more assumes that an equality or nullity test is available. The question which arises is: which geometric problems can still be solved with this last approach, and which cannot? This paper begins with the description of some cases where every known arithmetic fails in practice. Then, for each arithmetic, some properties of the problems they can solve are given. We end this work by proposing the bases of a new approach which aims to fulfill the geometric computations requirements.

  11. High performance parallel computing of flows in complex geometries: I. Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourdain, N; Gicquel, L; Montagnac, M; Vermorel, O; Staffelbach, G; Garcia, M; Boussuge, J-F; Gazaix, M; Poinsot, T

    2009-01-01

    Efficient numerical tools coupled with high-performance computers, have become a key element of the design process in the fields of energy supply and transportation. However flow phenomena that occur in complex systems such as gas turbines and aircrafts are still not understood mainly because of the models that are needed. In fact, most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions as found today in industry focus on a reduced or simplified version of the real system (such as a periodic sector) and are usually solved with a steady-state assumption. This paper shows how to overcome such barriers and how such a new challenge can be addressed by developing flow solvers running on high-end computing platforms, using thousands of computing cores. Parallel strategies used by modern flow solvers are discussed with particular emphases on mesh-partitioning, load balancing and communication. Two examples are used to illustrate these concepts: a multi-block structured code and an unstructured code. Parallel computing strategies used with both flow solvers are detailed and compared. This comparison indicates that mesh-partitioning and load balancing are more straightforward with unstructured grids than with multi-block structured meshes. However, the mesh-partitioning stage can be challenging for unstructured grids, mainly due to memory limitations of the newly developed massively parallel architectures. Finally, detailed investigations show that the impact of mesh-partitioning on the numerical CFD solutions, due to rounding errors and block splitting, may be of importance and should be accurately addressed before qualifying massively parallel CFD tools for a routine industrial use.

  12. A computational geometry approach to pore network construction for granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Joost H.; Sufian, Adnan; Narsilio, Guillermo A.; Russell, Adrian R.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2018-03-01

    Pore network construction provides the ability to characterize and study the pore space of inhomogeneous and geometrically complex granular media in a range of scientific and engineering applications. Various approaches to the construction have been proposed, however subtle implementational details are frequently omitted, open access to source code is limited, and few studies compare multiple algorithms in the context of a specific application. This study presents, in detail, a new pore network construction algorithm, and provides a comprehensive comparison with two other, well-established Delaunay triangulation-based pore network construction methods. Source code is provided to encourage further development. The proposed algorithm avoids the expensive non-linear optimization procedure in existing Delaunay approaches, and is robust in the presence of polydispersity. Algorithms are compared in terms of structural, geometrical and advanced connectivity parameters, focusing on the application of fluid flow characteristics. Sensitivity of the various networks to permeability is assessed through network (Stokes) simulations and finite-element (Navier-Stokes) simulations. Results highlight strong dependencies of pore volume, pore connectivity, throat geometry and fluid conductance on the degree of tetrahedra merging and the specific characteristics of the throats targeted by the merging algorithm. The paper concludes with practical recommendations on the applicability of the three investigated algorithms.

  13. Computational modelling for diffusion of neutrons problems inside nuclear multiplying medium on bidimensional cartesian rectangular geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Nozimar do

    2003-01-01

    Diffusion theory is traditionally applied to nuclear reactor global calculations. Based on the good results generated by the one-dimensional spectral nodal diffusion (SND) method for benchmark problems, we offer the SND method for nuclear reactor global calculations in X,Y geometry. In this method, the continuity equation and Flick law are transverse integrated in each spatial direction leading to a system of two 'one-dimensional' equations coupled by the transverse leakage terms. We then apply the SND method to numerically solve this system with constant approximations for the transverse leakage terms. We perform a spectral analysis to determine the local general solution of each 'one-dimensional' nodal equation with flat approximation for the transverse leakages. We used special auxiliary equations with parameters that are to be determined in order to preserve the analytical general solutions in the numerical algorithm. By considering continuity conditions at the node interfaces and appropriate boundary conditions, we obtain a solvable system of discretized equations involving the node-edge average scalar fluxes at each estimate of the dominant eigenvalue (k eff ) in the outer power iterations. As we considered approximations to the transverse leakages, the SND method is not free of spatial truncation errors. Nevertheless, it generated good results for the typical model problems that we considered. (author)

  14. Management and Valorization of Electronic and Computer Wastes in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    So far, little is known about the extent of the problem and there is little research available to serve as a basis for persuading decision-makers to address it. This project will examine the issue of electronic and computer waste and its management, and endeavor to identify feasible and sustainable strategies for valorizing such ...

  15. Regional Platform on Personal Computer Electronic Waste in Latin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Regional Platform on Personal Computer Electronic Waste in Latin America and the Caribbean. Donation of ... This project aims to identify environmentally responsible and sustainable solutions to the problem of e-waste. ... Policy in Focus publishes a special issue profiling evidence to empower women in the labour market.

  16. Management and Valorization of Electronic and Computer Wastes in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will examine the issue of electronic and computer waste and its management, and endeavor to identify feasible and sustainable strategies for ... IDRC congratulates first cohort of Women in Climate Change Science Fellows ... titled “Climate change and adaptive water management: Innovative solutions from the ...

  17. A miniaturised, nested-cylindrical electrostatic analyser geometry for dual electron and ion, multi-energy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedington, Robert, E-mail: r.bedington@nus.edu.sg; Kataria, Dhiren; Smith, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The CATS (Cylindrical And Tiny Spectrometer) electrostatic optics geometry features multiple nested cylindrical analysers to simultaneously measure multiple energies of electron and multiple energies of ion in a configuration that is targeted at miniaturisation and MEMS fabrication. In the prototyped model, two configurations of cylindrical analyser were used, featuring terminating side-plates that caused particle trajectories to either converge (C type) or diverge (D type) in the axial direction. Simulations show how these different electrode configurations affect the particle focussing and instrument parameters; C-type providing greater throughputs but D-type providing higher resolving powers. The simulations were additionally used to investigate unexpected plate spacing variations in the as-built model, revealing that the k-factors are most sensitive to the width of the inter-electrode spacing at its narrowest point. - Highlights: • A new nested cylindrical miniaturised electrostatic analyser geometry is described. • “Converging” (C) and “diverging” (D) type channel properties are investigated. • C channels are shown to have greater throughputs and D greater resolving powers. • Plate factors are shown to be sensitive to the minimum in inter-electrode spacing.

  18. GENGTC-JB: a computer program to calculate temperature distribution for cylindrical geometry capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Someya, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Niimi, Motoji; Hoshiya, Taiji; Harayama, Yasuo

    1987-09-01

    In design of JMTR irradiation capsules contained specimens, a program (named GENGTC) has been generally used to evaluate temperature distributions in the capsules. The program was originally compiled by ORNL(U.S.A.) and consisted of very simple calculation methods. From the incorporated calculation methods, the program is easy to use, and has many applications to the capsule design. However, it was considered to replace original computing methods with advanced ones, when the program was checked from a standpoint of the recent computer abilities, and also to be complicated in data input. Therefore, the program was versioned up as aim to make better calculations and improve input method. The present report describes revised calculation methods and input/output guide of the version-up program. (author)

  19. Computational Flow Modeling of a Simplified Integrated Tractor-Trailer Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salari, K.; McWherter-Payne, M.

    2003-01-01

    For several years, Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been part of a consortium funded by the Department of Energy to improve fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles such as Class 8 trucks through aerodynamic drag reduction. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach to predict the flow field around heavy vehicles, with special emphasis on the base region of the trailer, and to compute the aerodynamic forces. In particular, Sandia's computational fluid dynamics code, SACCARA, was used to simulate the flow on a simplified model of a tractor-trailer vehicle. The results are presented and compared with NASA Ames experimental data to assess the predictive capability of RANS to model the flow field and predict the aerodynamic forces

  20. Spectral Transfer Learning using Information Geometry for a User-Independent Brain-Computer Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Roy Waytowich; Nicholas Roy Waytowich; Vernon Lawhern; Vernon Lawhern; Addison Bohannon; Addison Bohannon; Kenneth Ball; Brent Lance

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in signal processing and machine learning techniques have enabled the application of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technologies to fields such as medicine, industry and recreation. However, BCIs still suffer from the requirement of frequent calibration sessions due to the intra- and inter- individual variability of brain-signals, which makes calibration suppression through transfer learning an area of increasing interest for the development of practical BCI systems. In this p...

  1. Spectral Transfer Learning Using Information Geometry for a User-Independent Brain-Computer Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Waytowich, Nicholas R.; Lawhern, Vernon J.; Bohannon, Addison W.; Ball, Kenneth R.; Lance, Brent J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in signal processing and machine learning techniques have enabled the application of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technologies to fields such as medicine, industry, and recreation; however, BCIs still suffer from the requirement of frequent calibration sessions due to the intra- and inter-individual variability of brain-signals, which makes calibration suppression through transfer learning an area of increasing interest for the development of practical BCI systems. In this p...

  2. Geometry of the diffusive propagation region in the August 14, 1982 solar electron event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    On August 14, 1982, relativistic electrons arrived promptly after an impulsive gamma ray flare, indicating that very little scattering was taking place in interplanetary space. By ignoring anisotropy data the time profile of the event is well described by interplanetary diffusion except for the derived particle injection time. This discrepancy provides independent evidence that the particles are diffusing in a volume close to the Sun rather than in interplanetary space. The flux at maximum method of determining the number of particles produced is still a good approximation when appropriately applied.

  3. IVA3: Computer code for modelling of transient three dimensional three phase flow in complicated geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the input and output ov IVA3 computer code and the procedure how to compile, link, and run the code. The common blocs recorded for restarts files and post processing are described in detail as well as the IVA3 interface for thermodynamic and thermo physical properties. Some recommendations for the input preparation together with some detailed comments on some architectural and functional features of the code are given in order to give some insight of the caused actions by changing some control parameters. (orig.) [de

  4. Bone geometry in young male and female football players: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Berges, Gabriel; Matute-Llorente, Ángel; Gómez-Bruton, Alejandro; González-Agüero, Alex; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán; Casajús, José A

    2018-05-08

    The present study shows that football practice during growth may improve bone geometry in male and female football players. However, only females had better bone strength in comparison with controls. The aim of this study was to compare bone geometry in adolescent football players and controls. A total of 107 football players (71 males/36 females; mean age 12.7 ± 0.6/12.7 ± 0.6 years) and 42 controls (20 males/22 females; mean age 13.1 ± 1.4/12.7 ± 1.3 years) participated in this study. Total and trabecular volumetric bone mineral content (Tt.BMC/Tb.BMC), cross-sectional area (Tt.Ar/Tb.Ar), and bone strength index (BSI) were measured at 4% site of the non-dominant tibia by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Moreover, Tt.BMC, cortical BMC (Ct.BMC), Tt.Ar, cortical Ar (Ct.Ar), cortical thickness (Ct.Th), periosteal circumference (PC), endosteal circumference (EC), fracture load in X-axis, and polar strength strain index (SSIp) were measured at 38% site of the tibia. Multivariate analyses of covariance were used to compare bone pQCT variables between football players and controls using the tibia length and maturity offset as covariates. Female football players demonstrated 13.8-16.4% higher BSI, Ct.Th, fracture load in X-axis, and SSIp than controls (p  .0036). In relation to bone mineral content and area, male football players showed 8.8% higher Tt.Ar and Tb.Ar at the 4% site of the tibia when compared to controls; whereas 13.8-15.8% higher Tt.BMC, Ct.BMC, and Ct.Ar at the 38% site of the tibia were found in female football players than controls (p female adolescent football players presented better bone geometry and strength values than controls. In contrast, only bone geometry was higher in male football players than controls.

  5. Scintillating fiber detector performance, detector geometries, trigger, and electronics issues for scintillating fiber tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbaugh, A.E.

    1994-06-01

    Scintillating Fiber tracking technology has made great advances and has demonstrated great potential for high speed charged particle tracking and triggering. The small detector sizes and fast scintillation fluors available make them very promising for use at high luminosity experiments at today's and tomorrow's colliding and fixed target experiments where high rate capability is essential. This talk will discuss the current state of Scintillating fiber performance and current Visual Light Photon Counter (VLPC) characteristics. The primary topic will be some of the system design and integration issues which should be considered by anyone attempting to design a scintillating fiber tracking system which includes a high speed tracking trigger. Design. constraints placed upon the detector system by the electronics and mechanical sub-systems will be discussed. Seemingly simple and unrelated decisions can have far reaching effects on overall system performance. SDC and DO example system designs will be discussed

  6. Assessment of three root canal preparation techniques on root canal geometry using micro-computed tomography: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikha M Al-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the effects of three root canal preparation techniques on canal volume and surface area using three-dimensionally reconstructed root canals in extracted human maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted Human Maxillary Molars having three separate roots and similar root shape were randomly selected from a pool of extracted teeth for this study and stored in normal saline solution until used. A computed tomography scanner (Philips Brilliance CT 64-slice was used to analyze root canals in extracted maxillary molars. Specimens were scanned before and after canals were prepared using stainless steel K-Files, Ni-Ti rotary ProTaper and rotary SafeSiders instruments. Differences in dentin volume removed, the surface area, the proportion of unchanged area and canal transportation were calculated using specially developed software. Results: Instrumentation of canals increased volume and surface area. Statistical analysis found a statistically significant difference among the 3 groups in total change in volume (P = 0.001 and total change in surface area (P = 0.13. Significant differences were found when testing both groups with group III (SafeSiders. Significant differences in change of volume were noted when grouping was made with respect to canal type (in MB and DB (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The current study used computed tomography, an innovative and non destructive technique, to illustrate changes in canal geometry. Overall, there were few statistically significant differences between the three instrumentation techniques used. SafeSiders stainless steel 40/0.02 instruments exhibit a greater cutting efficiency on dentin than K-Files and ProTaper. CT is a new and valuable tool to study root canal geometry and changes after preparation in great details. Further studies with 3D-techniques are required to fully understand the biomechanical aspects of root canal preparation.

  7. Contrast timing in computed tomography: Effect of different contrast media concentrations on bolus geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Jost, Gregor; Seidensticker, Peter; Kuhl, Christiane; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of low-osmolar, monomeric contrast media with different iodine concentrations on bolus shape in aortic CT angiography. Materials and methods: Repeated sequential computed tomography scanning of the descending aorta of eight beagle dogs (5 male, 12.7 ± 3.1 kg) was performed without table movement with a standardized CT scan protocol. Iopromide 300 (300 mg I/mL), iopromide 370 (370 mg I/mL) and iomeprol 400 (400 mg I/mL) were administered via a foreleg vein with an identical iodine delivery rate of 1.2 g I/s and a total iodine dose of 300 mg I/kg body weight. Time-enhancement curves were computed and analyzed. Results: Iopromide 300 showed the highest peak enhancement (445.2 ± 89.1 HU), steepest up-slope (104.2 ± 17.5 HU/s) and smallest full width at half maximum (FWHM; 5.8 ± 1.0 s). Peak enhancement, duration of FWHM, enhancement at FWHM and up-slope differed significantly between iopromide 300 and iomeprol 400 (p 0.05). Conclusions: Low viscous iopromide 300 results in a better defined bolus with a significantly higher peak enhancement, steeper up-slope and smaller FWHM when compared to iomeprol 400. These characteristics potentially affect contrast timing.

  8. Selection of stationary phase particle geometry using X-ray computed tomography and computational fluid dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Irma; Minceva, Mirjana; Arlt, Wolfgang

    2012-02-17

    The X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to determine local parameters related to the column packing homogeneity and hydrodynamics in columns packed with spherically and irregularly shaped particles of same size. The results showed that the variation of porosity and axial dispersion coefficient along the column axis is insignificant, compared to their radial distribution. The methodology of using the data attained by CT measurements to perform a CFD simulation of a batch separation of model binary mixtures, with different concentration and separation factors is demonstrated. The results of the CFD simulation study show that columns packed with spherically shaped particles provide higher yield in comparison to columns packed with irregularly shaped particles only below a certain value of the separation factor. The presented methodology can be used for selecting a suited packing material for a particular separation task. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discriminating between photorealistic computer graphics and natural images using fractal geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Feng; CHEN JiongBin; HUANG JiWu

    2009-01-01

    Rendering technology in computer graphics (CG) Is now capable of producing highly photorealistlc Images, giving rise to the problem of how to identify CG Images from natural images. Some methods were proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we give a novel method from a new point of view of Image perception. Although the photorealisUc CG images are very similar to natural images, they are surrealistic and smoother than natural images, thus leading to the difference in perception. A part of features are derived from fractal dimension to capture the difference In color perception between CG images and natural Images, and several generalized dimensions are used as the rest features to capture difference in coarseness. The effect of these features is verified by experiments. The average accuracy is over 91.2%.

  10. A Parametric Geometry Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Study Utilizing Design of Experiments (DOE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Design of Experiments (DOE) was applied to the LAS geometric parameter study to efficiently identify and rank primary contributors to integrated drag over the vehicles ascent trajectory in an order of magnitude fewer CFD configurations thereby reducing computational resources and solution time. SME s were able to gain a better understanding on the underlying flowphysics of different geometric parameter configurations through the identification of interaction effects. An interaction effect, which describes how the effect of one factor changes with respect to the levels of other factors, is often the key to product optimization. A DOE approach emphasizes a sequential approach to learning through successive experimentation to continuously build on previous knowledge. These studies represent a starting point for expanded experimental activities that will eventually cover the entire design space of the vehicle and flight trajectory.

  11. A computational study on the influence of insect wing geometry on bee flight mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Feaster

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD is applied to better understand the effects of wing cross-sectional morphology on flow field and force production. This study investigates the influence of wing cross-section on insect scale flapping flight performance, for the first time, using a morphologically representative model of a bee (Bombus pensylvanicus wing. The bee wing cross-section was determined using a micro-computed tomography scanner. The results of the bee wing are compared with flat and elliptical cross-sections, representative of those used in modern literature, to determine the impact of profile variation on aerodynamic performance. The flow field surrounding each cross-section and the resulting forces are resolved using CFD for a flight speed range of 1 to 5 m/s. A significant variation in vortex formation is found when comparing the ellipse and flat plate with the true bee wing. During the upstroke, the bee and approximate wing cross-sections have a much shorter wake structure than the flat plate or ellipse. During the downstroke, the flat plate and elliptical cross-sections generate a single leading edge vortex, while the approximate and bee wings generate numerous, smaller structures that are shed throughout the stroke. Comparing the instantaneous aerodynamic forces on the wing, the ellipse and flat plate sections deviate progressively with velocity from the true bee wing. Based on the present findings, a simplified cross-section of an insect wing can misrepresent the flow field and force production. We present the first aerodynamic study using a true insect wing cross-section and show that the wing corrugation increases the leading edge vortex formation frequency for a given set of kinematics.

  12. Theoretical galactic cosmic ray electron spectrum obtained for sources of varying geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.E.

    1969-01-01

    Jokipii and Meyer have recently obtained an electron density energy spectrum of the cosmic rays, originating in the Galaxy, using integral solutions of the steady state transfer equations, by considering a circular cylindric galactic disc as source and approximating the resulting fourth order integral. In this report, we present general results, obtained by using an arbitrary circular cylindric source, without restricting ourselves to the galactic disc. The integrals are treated exactly. The conclusions of Jokipii and Meyer form special cases of these results. We also obtain an exponential energy variation which, at the moment, is not observed experimentally. The second part of this work deals with more complicated, but perhaps more realistic models of elliptic cylindric and ellipsoidal galactic disc sources. One may also note that a very large source concentrated in a very small region gives a spectrum not unlike that for a small source distributed throughout a large volume. Finally, it may be remarked that the model adopted is much less restrictive than the artificial conception of 'leakage time' followed by other workers. (author) [fr

  13. Equilibrium geometries, electronic and magnetic properties of small AunNi- (n = 1-9) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cui-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Xu; Yang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Geometrical, electronic and magnetic properties of small AunNi- (n = 1-9) clusters have been investigated based on density functional theory (DFT) at PW91P86 level. An extensive structural search shows that the relative stable structures of AunNi- (n = 1-9) clusters adopt 2D structure for n = 1-5, 7 and 3D structure for n = 6, 8-9. And the substitution of a Ni atom for an Au atom in the Au-n+1 cluster obviously changes the structure of the host cluster. Moreover, an odd-even alternation phenomenon has been found for HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, indicating that the relative stable structures of the AunNi- clusters with odd-numbered gold atoms have a higher relative stability. Finally, the natural population analysis (NPA) and the vertical detachment energies (VDE) are studied, respectively. The theoretical values of VDE are reported for the first time to our best knowledge.

  14. Geometry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Walter J

    2006-01-01

    Meyer''s Geometry and Its Applications, Second Edition, combines traditional geometry with current ideas to present a modern approach that is grounded in real-world applications. It balances the deductive approach with discovery learning, and introduces axiomatic, Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, and transformational geometry. The text integrates applications and examples throughout and includes historical notes in many chapters. The Second Edition of Geometry and Its Applications is a significant text for any college or university that focuses on geometry''s usefulness in other disciplines. It is especially appropriate for engineering and science majors, as well as future mathematics teachers.* Realistic applications integrated throughout the text, including (but not limited to): - Symmetries of artistic patterns- Physics- Robotics- Computer vision- Computer graphics- Stability of architectural structures- Molecular biology- Medicine- Pattern recognition* Historical notes included in many chapters...

  15. Electron correlations and two-photon states in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: A peculiar role of geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryanpour, Karan [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Shukla, Alok [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Mazumdar, Sumit [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    We present numerical studies of one- and two-photon excited states ordering in a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: coronene, hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene, and circumcoronene, all possessing D{sub 6h} point group symmetry versus ovalene with D{sub 2h} symmetry, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople model of interacting π-electrons. The calculated energies of the two-photon states as well as their relative two-photon absorption cross-sections within the interacting model are qualitatively different from single-particle descriptions. More remarkably, a peculiar role of molecular geometry is found. The consequence of electron correlations is far stronger for ovalene, where the lowest spin-singlet two-photon state is a quantum superposition of pairs of lowest spin triplet states, as in the linear polyenes. The same is not true for D{sub 6h} group hydrocarbons. Our work indicates significant covalent character, in valence bond language, of the ground state, the lowest spin triplet state and a few of the lowest two-photon states in D{sub 2h} ovalene but not in those with D{sub 6h} symmetry.

  16. Electron correlations and two-photon states in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: A peculiar role of geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Shukla, Alok; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2014-01-01

    We present numerical studies of one- and two-photon excited states ordering in a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: coronene, hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene, and circumcoronene, all possessing D 6h point group symmetry versus ovalene with D 2h symmetry, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople model of interacting π-electrons. The calculated energies of the two-photon states as well as their relative two-photon absorption cross-sections within the interacting model are qualitatively different from single-particle descriptions. More remarkably, a peculiar role of molecular geometry is found. The consequence of electron correlations is far stronger for ovalene, where the lowest spin-singlet two-photon state is a quantum superposition of pairs of lowest spin triplet states, as in the linear polyenes. The same is not true for D 6h group hydrocarbons. Our work indicates significant covalent character, in valence bond language, of the ground state, the lowest spin triplet state and a few of the lowest two-photon states in D 2h ovalene but not in those with D 6h symmetry

  17. Electron correlations and two-photon states in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: a peculiar role of geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Shukla, Alok; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2014-03-14

    We present numerical studies of one- and two-photon excited states ordering in a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: coronene, hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene, and circumcoronene, all possessing D(6h) point group symmetry versus ovalene with D(2h) symmetry, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople model of interacting π-electrons. The calculated energies of the two-photon states as well as their relative two-photon absorption cross-sections within the interacting model are qualitatively different from single-particle descriptions. More remarkably, a peculiar role of molecular geometry is found. The consequence of electron correlations is far stronger for ovalene, where the lowest spin-singlet two-photon state is a quantum superposition of pairs of lowest spin triplet states, as in the linear polyenes. The same is not true for D(6h) group hydrocarbons. Our work indicates significant covalent character, in valence bond language, of the ground state, the lowest spin triplet state and a few of the lowest two-photon states in D(2h) ovalene but not in those with D(6h) symmetry.

  18. Effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions and nonspherical geometry on minor ions in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgi, A.

    1987-01-01

    A previous model has shown that in order to account for the charge state distribution in the low-speed solar wind, a high coronal temperature is necessary and that this temperature peak goes together with a peak of nx/np in the corona. In the present paper, one of the assumptions made previously, i.e., that coronal electrons are Maxwellian, is relaxed, and a much cooler model is presented, which could account for the same oxygen charge states in the solar wind due to the inclusion of non-Maxwellian electrons. Also, due to a different choice of the coronal magnetic field geometry, this model would show no enhancement of the coronal nx/np. Results of the two models are then compared, and observational tests to distinguish between the two scenarios are proposed: comparison of directly measured coronal Te to charge state measurements in the solar wind, determination of the coronal nx/np measurement of ion speeds in the acceleration region of the solar wind, and measurement of the frozen-in silicon charge state distribution.

  19. Final Report: Novel Nanowires as Probes of Electron Coherence and Correlations in Restricted Geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natelson, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    This is a final summary report of the research conducted under DE-FG03-01ER45946, which was a research program using metal nanostructures to examine quantum coherence of electrons in normal and ferromagnetic metals. This program was the PI's first federal research grant, and by augmenting with other funds (Packard Foundation), this grant supported two graduate students during its duration. In normal metal nanostructures, quantum coherence was assessed by two independent techniques: weak localization magnetoresistance, and time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations (TDUCF noise). This work found that, in AuPd nanowires, the coherence information inferred from these two techniques were quantitatively consistent, even in the presence of magnetic impurity and phonon scattering. This confirmed theoretical expectations. However, in Ag and Au wires, the two techniques disagree, with noise measurements indicating a lower coherence length at low temperatures than weak localization. We have a candidate explanation for this, and are finishing these experiments. This work shows that subtleties remain in our understanding of coherence processes even in normal metals, particularly those involving the tunneling two-level systems that produce low frequency noise; this has relevance for quantum information processing implementations using metal devices. We have also studied time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations in ferromagnetic metals for the first time. The TDUCF in ferromagnetic nanowires show that the Cooperon channel of coherent processes is suppressed in these correlated materials. Furthermore, the surprisingly steep temperature dependence of the noise suggests that decoherence in these systems is through a different process than in normal metals. We are finishing measurements of ''magnetofingerprint'' conductance fluctuations in ferromagnetic metals to examine this unusual temperature dependence with an independent technique. This program has produced three

  20. Development, construction and characterization of a variable repetitive spin-polarized electron gun with an inverted-geometry insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espig, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Within the scope of this thesis a pulsed source of spin polarized electrons Photo-CATCH was designed, constructed, characterized and has been put into operation. This source is based on the photoemission of spin-polarized electrons from GaAs-photocathodes. Both the design of the electron gun, consisting of an ultra-high vacuum chamber and an electrode with Pierce geometry, as well as the properties of the electron beam have been simulated with CST Studio. Results were a maximum electric field of (0.064±0.001) MV/m/kV on the electrode surface and a beam emittance as a function of the radius of the laser spot on the photocathode of element of _n_,_x=(1.7478(4).10"-"4.(r)/(μm)+2.8(18).10"-"5) mm mrad at a beam current of 100 μA. Currently Photo-CATCH provides electron beams with an energy of 60 keV, which can be expanded up to 100 keV by upgrading the high-voltage power supply. The electron gun has an inverted-geometry insulator to ensure a compact design of the ultra-high vacuum chamber and a maximum person- and machine-safety from sparkovers. Since the properties of the laser light directly affect the properties of the generated electron beam a pulsed semiconductor laser system has been specially developed and built for Photo-CATCH. This is characterized by a high variability of its operating parameters, in particular its wavelength and repetition rate, in order to fulfill the broad variety of requirements of various nuclear physics experiments. By selecting the wavelength of the used laser diode highly polarized or high-current electron beams can be generated from GaAs-photocathodes. The time profile of the laser has direct influence to the longitudinal profile of the electron bunch. Through the radiofrequency modulation of the pumping current of the impedance-matched semiconductor laser system, consisting of a DC power source and an electrical pulse generator with 881 ps broad pump pulses, Lorentz shaped laser pulses with a minimum FWHM of (43.8±1.2) ps at a

  1. Evaluation and optimization of the performance of frame geometries for lithium-ion battery application by computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, D. [Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Instituto Politécnico de Viana do Castelo, Viana do Castelo (Portugal); Miranda, F. [CIDMA, Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro (Portugal); Instituto Politécnico de Viana do Castelo, Viana do Castelo (Portugal); Costa, C. M.; Almeida, A. M.; Lanceros-Méndez, S. [Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2016-06-08

    Tailoring battery geometries is essential for many applications, as geometry influences the delivered capacity value. Two geometries, frame and conventional, have been studied and, for a given scan rate of 330C, the square frame shows a capacity value of 305,52 Ahm{sup −2}, which is 527 times higher than the one for the conventional geometry for a constant the area of all components.

  2. Silver atom solvation and desolvation in ice matrices: study of solvation shell geometry by electron spin resonance and electron spin echo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, L; Narayana, P A

    1978-01-01

    Results of studies of the solvation shell structure of silver atoms in ice matrix at 4/sup 0/K by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin echo spectrometry are reported. Drastic change in the hyperfine coupling constant of the silver atom was noted when the silver atom initially produced at 4/sup 0/K was warmed to 77/sup 0/K and reexamined by ESR at 4/sup 0/K. This suggested a very drastic rearrangement of the water molecules surrounding the silver atom. The geometric arrangement of water molecules around the silver atom produced at 4/sup 0/K was what would be expected for a solvated silver ion, indicating that no rearrangement had occurred after the silver atom formed. The addition of a little thermal excitation (heating to 77/sup 0/K) results in the geometry changes than can be explained by assuming either that a water molecule rotates around one of its OH bands or by the development of a hydrogen bond between the silver atom and one of the first solvation shell water molecules. Optical excitation in the absorption band of the silver atom in the ice matrix at 400nm resulted in desolvation of the silver ion or a reversion to the structure originally obtained by reaction of solver salts in ic matrix with radiation produced electrons. This was best explained by a charge transfer mechanism. (BLM)

  3. Computer simulations of supercooled polymer melts in the bulk and in confined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baschnagel, J; Varnik, F

    2005-01-01

    We survey results of computer simulations for the structure and dynamics of supercooled polymer melts and films. Our survey is mainly concerned with features of a coarse grained polymer model-a bead-spring model-in the temperature regime above the critical glass temperature T c of the ideal mode-coupling theory (MCT). We divide our discussion into two parts: a part devoted to bulk properties and a part dealing with thin films. The discussion of the bulk properties focuses on two aspects: a comparison of the simulation results with MCT and an analysis of dynamic heterogeneities. We explain in detail how the analyses are performed and what results may be obtained, and we critically assess their strengths and weaknesses. In discussing the application of MCT we also present first results of a quantitative comparison which does not rely on fits, but exploits static input from the simulation to predict the relaxation dynamics. The second part of this review is devoted to extensions of the simulations from the bulk to thin films. We explore in detail the influence of the boundary condition, imposed by smooth or rough walls, on the structure and dynamics of the polymer melt. Geometric confinement is found to shift the glass transition temperature T g (or T c in our case) relative to the bulk. We compare our and other simulation results for the T g shift with experimental data, briefly survey some theoretical ideas for explaining these shifts and discuss related simulation work on the glass transition of confined liquids. Finally, we also present some technical details of how to perform fits to MCT and give a brief introduction to another approach to the glass transition based on the potential energy landscape of a liquid. (topical review)

  4. Computed Microtomography Quantification of Internal Pore Geometry of Soil Aggregates from Contrasting Land Management Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyeva, K.; Wang, W.; Smucker, A. J.; Kravchenko, A. N.; Chun, H. C.; Rivers, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Structure of soil aggregate interiors controls intra-aggregate processes and provides important contributions to the biogeochemical processes of the soil profile. Applications of computed microtomography (CMT) to soil science have enabled the direct and nondestructive analyses of internal aggregate pore structures within soil volumes. The main objective of this study was to employ CMT to examine the internal pore structures of soil aggregates, 4 to 6.3 mm across, sampled at 0-20 cm depths from contrasting long-term land management types. Intra-aggregate pore-size distributions were compared among land management types. Porosity below CMT resolution (tillage, grass vegetation) than that of aggregates managed by conventional tillage (CT) used for agriculture. There was also greater percentage of intra-aggregate pores >400 µm in aggregates from NS than CT or NT management systems. In the range 15-100 µm, however, porosity of CT aggregates exceeded that of NS and NT aggregates. Total intra-aggregate porosities were similar and higher for both CT and NS (34.6 and 34.7%, correspondingly) than the 32.6% for NT aggregates. Although statistically significant, this difference (CT or NS vs. NT) was practically small, requiring at least 48 replications to be detected. These results indicate that long-term differences in management affected intra-aggregate pore size distributions. Increased 15-100 µm porosity in CT aggregates is probably related to their greater fragility. A combination of higher microporosity (400 µm in NS aggregates may generate more favorable conditions for microbial activity through a combination of larger intra-aggregate regions with high water-holding capacities and increased aeration and preferential flow pathways for intra-aggregate solute and gas transport. Our current focus is comparing and relating specifics of internal pore structures in the aggregates from contrasting land management types, to the measurements of solution and microbial flow

  5. Computational study to investigate effect of tonometer geometry and patient-specific variability on radial artery tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pranjal; Choudhury, Mohammed Ikbal; Roy, Sitikantha; Prasad, Anamika

    2017-06-14

    Tonometry-based devices are valuable method for vascular function assessment and for measurement of blood pressure. However current design and calibration methods rely on simple models, neglecting key geometrical features, and anthropometric and property variability among patients. Understanding impact of these influences on tonometer measurement is thus essential for improving outcomes of current devices, and for proposing improved design. Towards this goal, we present a realistic computational model for tissue-device interaction using complete wrist section with hyperelastic material and frictional contact. Three different tonometry geometries were considered including a new design, and patient-specific influences incorporated via anthropometric and age-dependent tissue stiffness variations. The results indicated that the new design showed stable surface contact stress with minimum influence of the parameters analyzed. The computational predictions were validated with experimental data from a prototype based on the new design. Finally, we showed that the underlying mechanics of vascular unloading in tonometry to be fundamentally different from that of oscillatory method. Due to directional loading in tonometry, pulse amplitude maxima was observed to occur at a significantly lower compression level (around 31%) than previously reported, which can impact blood pressure calibration approaches based on maximum pulse pressure recordings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Computational study of the Risoe-B1-18 airfoil with a hinged flap providing variable trailing edge geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troldborg, N.

    2005-03-01

    A comprehensive computational study, in both steady and unsteady flow conditions, has been carried out to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of the Risoe-B1-18 airfoil equipped with variable trailing edge geometry as produced by a hinged flap. The function of such flaps should be to decrease fatigue-inducing oscillations on the blades. The computations were conducted using a 2D incompressible RANS solver with a k-w turbulence model under the assumption of a fully developed turbulent flow. The investigations were conducted at a Reynolds number of Re = 1.6 - 10{sup 6}. Calculations conducted on the baseline airfoil showed excellent agreement with measurements on the same airfoil with the same specified conditions. Furthermore, a more widespread comparison with an advanced potential theory code is presented. The influence of various key parameters, such as flap shape, flap size and oscillating frequencies, was investigated so that an optimum design can be suggested for application with wind turbine blades. It is concluded that a moderately curved flap with flap chord to airfoil curve ratio between 0.05 and 0.10 would be an optimum choice. (author)

  7. Computational Benchmarking for Ultrafast Electron Dynamics: Wave Function Methods vs Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Micael J T; Mignolet, Benoit; Kus, Tomasz; Papadopoulos, Theodoros A; Remacle, F; Verstraete, Matthieu J

    2015-05-12

    Attosecond electron dynamics in small- and medium-sized molecules, induced by an ultrashort strong optical pulse, is studied computationally for a frozen nuclear geometry. The importance of exchange and correlation effects on the nonequilibrium electron dynamics induced by the interaction of the molecule with the strong optical pulse is analyzed by comparing the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation based on the correlated field-free stationary electronic states computed with the equationof-motion coupled cluster singles and doubles and the complete active space multi-configurational self-consistent field methodologies on one hand, and various functionals in real-time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) on the other. We aim to evaluate the performance of the latter approach, which is very widely used for nonlinear absorption processes and whose computational cost has a more favorable scaling with the system size. We focus on LiH as a toy model for a nontrivial molecule and show that our conclusions carry over to larger molecules, exemplified by ABCU (C10H19N). The molecules are probed with IR and UV pulses whose intensities are not strong enough to significantly ionize the system. By comparing the evolution of the time-dependent field-free electronic dipole moment, as well as its Fourier power spectrum, we show that TD-DFT performs qualitatively well in most cases. Contrary to previous studies, we find almost no changes in the TD-DFT excitation energies when excited states are populated. Transitions between states of different symmetries are induced using pulses polarized in different directions. We observe that the performance of TD-DFT does not depend on the symmetry of the states involved in the transition.

  8. Computer Series, 98. Electronics for Scientists: A Computer-Intensive Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeline, Alexander; Mork, Brian J.

    1988-01-01

    Reports the design for a principles-before-details presentation of electronics for an instrumental analysis class. Uses computers for data collection and simulations. Requires one semester with two 2.5-hour periods and two lectures per week. Includes lab and lecture syllabi. (MVL)

  9. Computational Approaches to the Determination of the Molecular Geometry of Acrolein in its T_1(n,π*) State

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnally, Michael O.; Hlavacek, Nikolaus C.; Drucker, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    The spectroscopically derived inertial constants for acrolein (propenal) in its T_1(n,π*) state were used to test predictions from a variety of computational methods. One focus was on multiconfigurational methods, such as CASSCF and CASPT2, that are applicable to excited states. We also examined excited-state methods that utilize single reference configurations, including EOM-EE-CCSD and TD-PBE0. Finally, we applied unrestricted ground-state techniques, such as UCCSD(T) and the more economical UPBE0 method, to the T_1(n,π*) excited state under the constraint of C_s symmetry. The unrestricted ground-state methods are applicable because at a planar geometry, the T_1(n,π*) state of acrolein is the lowest-energy state of its spin multiplicity. Each of the above methods was used with a triple zeta quality basis set to optimize the T_1(n,π*) geometry. This procedure resulted in the following sets of inertial constants: Inertial constants (cm-1) of acrolein in its T_1(n,π*) state Method A B C Method A B C CASPT2(6,5) 1.667 0.1491 0.1368 UCCSD(T)^b 1.668 0.1480 0.1360 CASSCF(6,5) 1.667 0.1491 0.1369 UPBE0 1.699 0.1487 0.1367 EOM-EE-CCSD 1.675 0.1507 0.1383 TD-PBE0 1.719 0.1493 0.1374 Experiment^a 1.662 0.1485 0.1363 The two multiconfigurational methods produce the same inertial constants, and those constants agree closely with experiment. However the sets of computed bond lengths differ significantly for the two methods. In the CASSCF calculation, the lengthening of the C=O and C=C bonds and the shortening of the C--C bond are more pronounced than in CASPT2. O. S. Bokareva et al., Int. J. Quant. Chem. {108}, 2719 (2008).

  10. Computer simulations of the influence of geometry in the performance of conventional and unconventional lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, D.; Costa, C.M.; Almeida, A.M.; Lanceros-Méndez, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The influence of geometries in lithium-ion battery performance is analyzed. • Conventional and unconventional battery geometries are investigated. • Unconventional geometries include horseshoe, spiral, ring, antenna and gear batteries. • The best capacity value at 330 C is obtained for the interdigitated geometry. • The capacity value is dependent on thickness and collectors position. - Abstract: In order to optimize battery performance, different geometries have been evaluated taking into account their suitability for different applications. These different geometries include conventional, interdigitated batteries and unconventional geometries such as horseshoe, spiral, ring, antenna and gear batteries. The geometry optimization was performed by the finite element method, applying the Doyle/Fuller/Newman model. At 330 C, the capacity values for conventional, ring, spiral, horseshoe, gear and interdigitated geometries are 0.58 A h m"−"2, 149 A h m"−"2, 182 A h m"−"2, 216 A h m"−"2, 289 A h m"−"2 and 318 A h m"−"2, respectively. The delivered capacity depends on geometrical parameters such as maximum distance for the ions to move to the current collector, d-max, distance between of current collectors, d-cc, as well as the thickness of separator and electrodes, allowing to tailor battery performance and geometry for specific applications.

  11. Drawing the geometry of 3d transition metal-boron pairs in silicon from electron emission channeling experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Augustyns, Valerie; De Lemos Lima, Tiago Abel; Granadeiro Costa, Angelo Rafael; David Bosne, Eric; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Although the formation of transition metal-boron pairs is currently well established in silicon processing, the geometry of these complexes is still not completely understood. We investigated the lattice location of the transition metals manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel in n- and p+-type silicon by means of electron emission channeling. For manganese, iron and cobalt, we observed an increase of sites near the ideal tetrahedral interstitial position by changing the doping from n- to p+-type Si. Such increase was not observed for Ni. We ascribe this increase to the formation of pairs with boron, driven by Coulomb interactions, since the majority of iron, manganese and cobalt is positively charged in p+-type silicon while Ni is neutral. We propose that breathing mode relaxation around the boron ion within the pair causes the observed displacement from the ideal tetrahedral interstitial site. We discuss the application of the emission channeling technique in this system and, in particular, how it provides insi...

  12. [Computer-aided Diagnosis and New Electronic Stethoscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Pi, Xitian; Ao, Yilu; Wang, Zi

    2017-05-30

    Auscultation is an important method in early-diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and respiratory system disease. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis of new electronic auscultation system. It has developed an electronic stethoscope based on condenser microphone and the relevant intelligent analysis software. It has implemented many functions that combined with Bluetooth, OLED, SD card storage technologies, such as real-time heart and lung sounds auscultation in three modes, recording and playback, auscultation volume control, wireless transmission. The intelligent analysis software based on PC computer utilizes C# programming language and adopts SQL Server as the background database. It has realized play and waveform display of the auscultation sound. By calculating the heart rate, extracting the characteristic parameters of T1, T2, T12, T11, it can analyze whether the heart sound is normal, and then generate diagnosis report. Finally the auscultation sound and diagnosis report can be sent to mailbox of other doctors, which can carry out remote diagnosis. The whole system has features of fully function, high portability, good user experience, and it is beneficial to promote the use of electronic stethoscope in the hospital, at the same time, the system can also be applied to auscultate teaching and other occasions.

  13. CTD: a computer program to solve the three dimensional multi-group diffusion equation in X, Y, Z, and triangular Z geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J K

    1973-05-01

    CTD is a computer program written in Fortran 4 to solve the multi-group diffusion theory equations in X, Y, Z and triangular Z geometries. A power print- out neutron balance and breeding gain are also produced. 4 references. (auth)

  14. Comparison of aortic root dimensions and geometries before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation by 2- and 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography and multislice computed tomography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, A.C.; Delgado, V.; Kley, F. van der; Shanks, M.; Veire, N.R. van de; Bertini, M.; Nucifora, G.; Bommel, R.J. van; Tops, L.F.; Weger, A. de; Tavilla, G.; Roos, A. de; Kroft, L.J.; Leung, D.Y.; Schuijf, J.; Schalij, M.J.; Bax, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) may provide more accurate aortic annular and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) dimensions and geometries compared with 2D TEE. We assessed agreements between 2D and 3D TEE measurements with multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and changes in

  15. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra and density functional computations of the vibrational spectra, molecular geometry and atomic charges of the biomolecule: 5-bromouracil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rastogi, V.K.; Palafox, M. A.; Mittal, L.; Peica, N.; Keifer, W.; Lang, Kamil; Ojha, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2007), s. 1227-1241 ISSN 0377-0486 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : FTIR and FT-Raman spectra * density functional computations * molecular geometry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.514, year: 2007

  16. Bending and Twisting the Embryonic Heart: A Computational Model for C-Looping Based on Realistic Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei eShi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenetic process of cardiac looping transforms the straight heart tube into a curved tube that resembles the shape of the future four-chambered heart. Although great progress has been made in identifying the molecular and genetic factors involved in looping, the physical mechanisms that drive this process have remained poorly understood. Recent work, however, has shed new light on this complicated problem. After briefly reviewing the current state of knowledge, we propose a relatively comprehensive hypothesis for the mechanics of the first phase of looping, termed c-looping, as the straight heart tube deforms into a c-shaped tube. According to this hypothesis, differential hypertrophic growth in the myocardium supplies the main forces that cause the heart tube to bend ventrally, while regional growth and contraction in the omphalomesenteric veins (primitive atria and compressive loads exerted by the splanchnopleuric membrane drive rightward torsion. A computational model based on realistic embryonic heart geometry is used to test this hypothesis. The behavior of the model is in reasonable agreement with available experimental data from control and perturbed embryos, offering support for our hypothesis. The results also suggest, however, that several other mechanisms contribute secondarily to normal looping, and we speculate that these mechanisms play backup roles when looping is perturbed. Finally, some outstanding questions are discussed for future study.

  17. Computational Study of Geometry, Solvation Free Energy, Dipole Moment, Polarizability, Hyperpolarizability and Molecular Properties of 2-Methylimidazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Firoz Khan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio calculations were carried out to study the geometry, solvation free energy, dipole moment, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP, Mulliken and Natural charge distribution, polarizability, hyperpolarizability, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO energetic and different molecular properties like global reactivity descriptors (chemical hardness, softness, chemical potential, electronegativity, electrophilicity index of 2-methylimidazole. B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory was used to optimize the structure both in the gas phase and in solution. The solvation free energy, dipole moment and molecular properties were calculated by applying the Solvation Model on Density (SMD in four solvent systems, namely water, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, n-octanol and chloroform. The computed bond distances, bond angles and dihedral angles of 2-methylimidazole agreed reasonably well with the experimental data except for C(2-N(1, C(4-C(5 and N(1-H(7 bond lengths and N(1-C(5-C(4 bond angle. The solvation free energy, dipole moment, polarizability, first order hyperpolarizability, chemical potential, electronegativity and electrophilicity index of 2-methylimidazole increased on going from non-polar to polar solvents. Chemical hardness also increased with increasing polarity of the solvent and the opposite relation was found in the case of softness. These results provide better understanding of the stability and reactivity of 2-methylimidazole in different solvent systems.

  18. Electron beam treatment planning: A review of dose computation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.; Riley, R.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of dose computations are reviewed. The equivalent path length methods used to account for body curvature and internal structure are not adequate because they ignore the lateral diffusion of electrons. The Monte Carlo method for the broad field three-dimensional situation in treatment planning is impractical because of the enormous computer time required. The pencil beam technique may represent a suitable compromise. The behavior of a pencil beam may be described by the multiple scattering theory or, alternatively, generated using the Monte Carlo method. Although nearly two orders of magnitude slower than the equivalent path length technique, the pencil beam method improves accuracy sufficiently to justify its use. It applies very well when accounting for the effect of surface irregularities; the formulation for handling inhomogeneous internal structure is yet to be developed

  19. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.M.; Serrano-Andres, L.; Klein, D.J.; Schleyer, P.V.R.; Mich, J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of poly carborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i) the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii) endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii) the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv) higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photo energy processes.

  20. Search of computers for discovery of electronic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisarić Milana M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address the specific nature of criminal activities committed using computer networks and systems, the efforts of states to adapt or complement the existing criminal law with purposeful provisions is understandable. To create an appropriate legal framework for supressing cybercrime, except the rules of substantive criminal law predict certain behavior as criminal offenses against the confidentiality, integrity and availability of computer data, computer systems and networks, it is essential that the provisions of the criminal procedure law contain adequate powers of competent authorities for detecting sources of illegal activities, or the collection of data on the committed criminal offense and offender, which can be used as evidence in criminal proceedings, taking into account the specificities of cyber crime and the environment within which the illegal activity is undertaken. Accordingly, the provisions of the criminal procedural law should be designed to be able to overcome certain challenges in discovering and proving high technology crime, and the provisions governing search of computer for discovery of electronic evidence is of special importance.

  1. Comparing two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing through an atomic electronic structure computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Man-Hong

    2016-01-01

    By performing the electronic structure computation of a Si atom, we compare two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing in the literature. One was proposed by Johnson and implemented in the well-known VASP code. The other was given by Eyert. We solve the Kohn-Sham equation by using a conventional outward/inward integration of the differential equation and then connect two parts of solutions at the classical turning points, which is different from the method of the matrix eigenvalue solution as used in the VASP code. Compared to Johnson’s algorithm, the one proposed by Eyert needs fewer total iteration numbers. (paper)

  2. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed

  3. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  4. Computer Conferencing and Electronic Messaging. Conference Proceedings (Guelph, Ontario, Canada, January 22-23, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelph Univ. (Ontario).

    This 21-paper collection examines various issues in electronic networking and conferencing with computers, including design issues, conferencing in education, electronic messaging, computer conferencing applications, social issues of computer conferencing, and distributed computer conferencing. In addition to a keynote address, "Computer…

  5. Simulation of the behaviour of electron-optical systems using a parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balladore, J.L.; Hawkes, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The advantage of using a multiprocessor computer for the calculation of electron-optical properties is investigated. A considerable reduction of computing time is obtained by reorganising the finite-element field computation. (orig.)

  6. Current algorithms for computed electron beam dose planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two- and sometimes three-dimensional computer algorithms for electron beam irradiation are capable of taking all irregularities of the body cross-section and the properties of the various tissues into account. This is achieved by dividing the incoming broad beams into a number of narrow pencil beams, the penetration of which can be described by essentially one-dimensional formalisms. The constituent pencil beams are most often described by Gaussian, experimentally or theoretically derived distributions. The accuracy of different dose planning algorithms is discussed in some detail based on their ability to take the different physical interaction processes of high energy electrons into account. It is shown that those programs that take the deviations from the simple Gaussian model into account give the best agreement with experimental results. With such programs a dosimetric relative accuracy of about 5% is generally achieved except in the most complex inhomogeneity configurations. Finally, the present limitations and possible future developments of electron dose planning are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Experimental approach for the uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometry dimensional measurements using computed tomography at the mm and sub-mm scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Roberto; Torralba, Marta; Yagüe-Fabra, José A.

    2017-01-01

    The dimensional verification of miniaturized components with 3D complex geometries is particularly challenging. Computed Tomography (CT) can represent a suitable alternative solution to micro metrology tools based on optical and tactile techniques. However, the establishment of CT systems......’ traceability when measuring 3D complex geometries is still an open issue. In this work, an alternative method for the measurement uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometries by using CT is presented. The method is based on the micro-CT system Maximum Permissible Error (MPE) estimation, determined...... experimentally by using several calibrated reference artefacts. The main advantage of the presented method is that a previous calibration of the component by a more accurate Coordinate Measuring System (CMS) is not needed. In fact, such CMS would still hold all the typical limitations of optical and tactile...

  8. Electro-optic sampling at 90 degree interaction geometry for time-of-arrival stamping of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    C. M. Scoby; P. Musumeci; J. T. Moody; M. S. Gutierrez

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a new geometry setup for electro-optic sampling (EOS) where the electron beam runs parallel to the ⟨110⟩ face of a ZnTe crystal and the probe laser is perpendicular to it and to the beam path. The simple setup is used to encode the time-of-arrival information of a 3.5  MeV

  9. Design and implementation of an optimal laser pulse front tilting scheme for ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry with high temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pennacchio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful technique to investigate out-of-equilibrium atomic dynamics in solids with high temporal resolution. When diffraction is performed in reflection geometry, the main limitation is the mismatch in group velocity between the overlapping pump light and the electron probe pulses, which affects the overall temporal resolution of the experiment. A solution already available in the literature involved pulse front tilt of the pump beam at the sample, providing a sub-picosecond time resolution. However, in the reported optical scheme, the tilted pulse is characterized by a temporal chirp of about 1 ps at 1 mm away from the centre of the beam, which limits the investigation of surface dynamics in large crystals. In this paper, we propose an optimal tilting scheme designed for a radio-frequency-compressed ultrafast electron diffraction setup working in reflection geometry with 30 keV electron pulses containing up to 105 electrons/pulse. To characterize our scheme, we performed optical cross-correlation measurements, obtaining an average temporal width of the tilted pulse lower than 250 fs. The calibration of the electron-laser temporal overlap was obtained by monitoring the spatial profile of the electron beam when interacting with the plasma optically induced at the apex of a copper needle (plasma lensing effect. Finally, we report the first time-resolved results obtained on graphite, where the electron-phonon coupling dynamics is observed, showing an overall temporal resolution in the sub-500 fs regime. The successful implementation of this configuration opens the way to directly probe structural dynamics of low-dimensional systems in the sub-picosecond regime, with pulsed electrons.

  10. Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dickenstein, Alicia; Sommese, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been a burgeoning of activity in the design and implementation of algorithms for algebraic geometric computation. Some of these algorithms were originally designed for abstract algebraic geometry, but now are of interest for use in applications and some of these algorithms were originally designed for applications, but now are of interest for use in abstract algebraic geometry. The workshop on Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry that was held in the framework of the IMA Annual Program Year in Applications of Algebraic Geometry by the Institute for Mathematics and Its

  11. A Crafts-Oriented Approach to Computing in High School: Introducing Computational Concepts, Practices, and Perspectives with Electronic Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Lee, Eunkyoung; Searle, Kristin; Fields, Deborah; Kaplan, Eliot; Lui, Debora

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the use of electronic textiles (e-textiles) for introducing key computational concepts and practices while broadening perceptions about computing. The starting point of our work was the design and implementation of a curriculum module using the LilyPad Arduino in a pre-AP high school computer science class. To…

  12. 77 FR 50726 - Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear...-1209, ``Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics used... Electronics Engineers (ANSI/IEEE) Standard 830-1998, ``IEEE Recommended Practice for Software Requirements...

  13. Towards the Rational Design of MRI Contrast Agents: Electron Spin Relaxation Is Largely Unaffected by the Coordination Geometry of Gadolinium(III)–DOTA-Type Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Jonathan F.; Clarkson, Robert B.; Helm, Lothar; Moriggi, Loïck; Sherry, A. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Electron-spin relaxation is one of the determining factors in the efficacy of MRI contrast agents. Of all the parameters involved in determining relaxivity it remains the least well understood, particularly as it relates to the structure of the complex. One of the reasons for the poor understanding of electron-spin relaxation is that it is closely related to the ligand-field parameters of the Gd3+ ion that forms the basis of MRI contrast agents and these complexes generally exhibit a structural isomerism that inherently complicates the study of electron spin relaxation. We have recently shown that two DOTA-type ligands could be synthesised that, when coordinated to Gd3+, would adopt well defined coordination geometries and are not subject to the problems of intramolecular motion of other complexes. The EPR properties of these two chelates were studied and the results examined with theory to probe their electron-spin relaxation properties. PMID:18283704

  14. Hyperbolic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Iversen, Birger

    1992-01-01

    Although it arose from purely theoretical considerations of the underlying axioms of geometry, the work of Einstein and Dirac has demonstrated that hyperbolic geometry is a fundamental aspect of modern physics

  15. Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory and its analytic gradients: Accurate equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur; Sherrill, C. David

    2013-08-01

    Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory [or simply "optimized CEPA(0)," OCEPA(0), for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. For variational optimization of the molecular orbitals for the OCEPA(0) method, a Lagrangian-based approach is used along with an orbital direct inversion of the iterative subspace algorithm. The cost of the method is comparable to that of CCSD [O(N6) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OCEPA(0) method is only half as expensive as CCSD since there is no need to solve the λ2-amplitude equation for OCEPA(0). The performance of the OCEPA(0) method is compared with that of the canonical MP2, CEPA(0), CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods, for equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method improves upon CEPA(0) and CCSD by 25%-43% and 38%-53%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. Especially for the open-shell test set, the performance of OCEPA(0) is comparable with that of CCSD(T) (ΔR is 0.0003 Å on average). For harmonic vibrational frequencies of closed-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method again outperforms CEPA(0) and CCSD by 33%-79% and 53%-79%, respectively. For harmonic vibrational frequencies of open-shell molecules, the mean absolute error (MAE) of the OCEPA(0) method (39 cm-1) is fortuitously even better than that of CCSD(T) (50 cm-1), while the MAEs of CEPA(0) (184 cm-1) and CCSD (84 cm-1) are considerably higher. For complete basis set estimates of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OCEPA(0) method again exhibits a substantially better performance than CEPA(0), providing a mean absolute error of 0.7 kcal mol-1, which is more than 6 times lower than that of CEPA(0) (4.6 kcal mol-1), and comparing to MP2 (7.7 kcal mol-1) there is a more than 10-fold reduction in errors. Whereas the MAE for the CCSD method is only 0.1 kcal

  16. Twistor geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed exposition of the relation between the geometry of twistor space and the geometry of Minkowski space. The paper has a didactical purpose; no use has been made of differential geometry and cohomology.

  17. Computational thermal-fluid dynamics analysis of the laminar flow regime in the meander flow geometry characterizing the heat exchanger used in high temperature superconducting current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, Enrico; Heller, Reinhard; Richard, Laura Savoldi; Zanino, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The laminar regime in the meander flow geometry has been analysed with a previously validated computational strategy. • Several meander flow geometries as well as flow conditions have been analysed. • A range for the Reynolds number has been defined in which the flow can be considered laminar. • Correlations for the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficients in the laminar regime have been derived. • A comparison between the computed the experimental pressure drop of the W7-X HTS current lead prototype is presented. -- Abstract: The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Politecnico di Torino have developed and validated a computational thermal-fluid dynamics (CtFD) strategy for the systematic analysis of the thermal-hydraulics inside the meander flow heat exchanger used in high-temperature superconducting current leads for fusion applications. In the recent past, the application of this CtFD technique has shown that some operating conditions occurring in these devices may not reach the turbulent regime region. With that motivation, the CtFD analysis of the helium thermal-fluid dynamics inside different meander flow geometries is extended here to the laminar flow regime. Our first aim is to clarify under which operative conditions the flow regime can be considered laminar and how the pressure drop as well as the heat transfer are related to the geometrical parameters and to the flow conditions. From the results of this analysis, correlations for the pressure drop and for the heat transfer coefficient in the meander flow geometry have been derived, which are applicable with good accuracy to the design of meander flow heat exchangers over a broad range of geometrical parameters

  18. Computational thermal-fluid dynamics analysis of the laminar flow regime in the meander flow geometry characterizing the heat exchanger used in high temperature superconducting current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.rizzo@kit.edu [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Heller, Reinhard [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Richard, Laura Savoldi; Zanino, Roberto [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The laminar regime in the meander flow geometry has been analysed with a previously validated computational strategy. • Several meander flow geometries as well as flow conditions have been analysed. • A range for the Reynolds number has been defined in which the flow can be considered laminar. • Correlations for the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficients in the laminar regime have been derived. • A comparison between the computed the experimental pressure drop of the W7-X HTS current lead prototype is presented. -- Abstract: The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Politecnico di Torino have developed and validated a computational thermal-fluid dynamics (CtFD) strategy for the systematic analysis of the thermal-hydraulics inside the meander flow heat exchanger used in high-temperature superconducting current leads for fusion applications. In the recent past, the application of this CtFD technique has shown that some operating conditions occurring in these devices may not reach the turbulent regime region. With that motivation, the CtFD analysis of the helium thermal-fluid dynamics inside different meander flow geometries is extended here to the laminar flow regime. Our first aim is to clarify under which operative conditions the flow regime can be considered laminar and how the pressure drop as well as the heat transfer are related to the geometrical parameters and to the flow conditions. From the results of this analysis, correlations for the pressure drop and for the heat transfer coefficient in the meander flow geometry have been derived, which are applicable with good accuracy to the design of meander flow heat exchangers over a broad range of geometrical parameters.

  19. Trapped electron decay by the thermally-assisted tunnelling to electron acceptors in glassy matrices. A computer simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feret, B.; Bartczak, W.M.; Kroh, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Redi-Hopefield quantum mechanical model of the thermally-assisted electron transfer has been applied to simulate the decay of trapped electrons by tunnelling to electron acceptor molecules added to the glassy matrix. It was assumed that the electron energy levels in donors and acceptors are statistically distributed and the electron excess energy after transfer is dissipated in the medium by the electron-phonon coupling. The electron decay curves were obtained by the method of computer simulation. It was found that for a given medium there exists a certain preferred value of the electronic excess energy which can be effectively converted into the matrix vibrations. If the mismatch of the electron states on the donor and acceptor coincides with the ''resonance'' energy the overall kinetics of electron transfer is accelerated. (author)

  20. CALIPSO - a computer code for the calculation of fluiddynamics, thermohydraulics and changes of geometry in failing fuel elements of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedziur, F.

    1982-07-01

    The computer code CALIPSO was developed for the calculation of a hypothetical accident in an LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor), where the failure of fuel pins is assumed. It calculates two-dimensionally the thermodynamics, fluiddynamics and changes in geometry of a single fuel pin and its coolant channel in a time period between failure of the pin and a state, at which the geometry is nearly destroyed. The determination of temperature profiles in the fuel pin cladding and the channel wall make it possible to take melting and freezing processes into account. Further features of CALIPSO are the variable channel cross section in order to model disturbances of the channel geometry as well as the calculation of two velocity fields including the consideration of virtual mass effects. The documented version of CALIPSO is especially suited for the calculation of the SIMBATH experiments carried out at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, which simulate the above-mentioned accident. The report contains the complete documentation of the CALIPSO code: the modeling of the geometry, the equations used, the structure of the code and the solution procedure as well as the instructions for use with an application example. (orig.) [de

  1. Geometry Effect Investigation on a Conical Chamber with Porous Media Boundary Condition Using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Bindar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to introduce the method for optimizing the geometry of the unit process. The comprehensive unit process performances are generated by a CFD engine. The CFD engine can simulate the unit process performances at what ever conditions. Both design geometry and operating variables weree used on the CFD simulation. The burden on a simplified process was taken out from CFD simulation. A complex geometry of a unit process is represented by a secondary reformer. A secondary reformer has a conical volume as a space to undergo the combustion reaction before entering the catalyst bed. This complexity is added by the boundary of the porous solid surface as the top surface of catalyst bed. The spread angle affect the flow pattern in side the conical volume having a porous solid surface as a base. The spread angle above 65o results the disappearing of the recirculation flow. The inlet distance from the porous solid surface also can exhibit different characteristics of recirculation flow. The closer the distance to the porous solid surface, the stronger the recirculation is. The inlet velocity values have no significant effect on the flow pattern. The introduction of a solid volume inside the geometry creates the distortion of the flow pattern. In the application, the inserted solid volume is equivalent to a burner. It means that the use of the burner inherently produces some problems of the flow distribution

  2. FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR spectra, density functional computations of the vibrational assignments (for monomer and dimer) and molecular geometry of anticancer drug 7-amino-2-methylchromone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-04-01

    Vibrational assignments for the 7-amino-2-methylchromone (abbreviated as 7A2MC) molecule using a combination of experimental vibrational spectroscopic measurements and ab initio computational methods are reported. The optimized geometry, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, first order hyperpolarizability and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of 7A2MC have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. The calculated molecular geometry parameters, the theoretically computed vibrational frequencies for monomer and dimer and relative peak intensities were compared with experimental data. DFT calculations using the B3LYP method and 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set were found to yield results that are very comparable to experimental IR and Raman spectra. Detailed vibrational assignments were performed with DFT calculations and the potential energy distribution (PED) obtained from the Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) study revealed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization of the molecular structure. 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, All the possible calculated values are analyzed using correlation coefficients linear fitting equation and are shown strong correlation with the experimental data.

  3. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  4. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-04-05

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  5. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics, and Actuators with Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The role of computational nanotechnology in developing next generation of multifunctional materials, molecular scale electronic and computing devices, sensors, actuators, and machines is described through a brief review of enabling computational techniques and few recent examples derived from computer simulations of carbon nanotube based molecular nanotechnology.

  6. Influence of cross-sectional geometry on the sensitivity and hysteresis of liquid-phase electronic pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Lae; Tepayotl-Ramirez, Daniel; Wood, Robert J.; Majidi, Carmel

    2012-11-01

    Cross-sectional geometry influences the pressure-controlled conductivity of liquid-phase metal channels embedded in an elastomer film. These soft microfluidic films may function as hyperelastic electric wiring or sensors that register the intensity of surface pressure. As pressure is applied to the elastomer, the cross-section of the embedded channel deforms, and the electrical resistance of the channel increases. In an effort to improve sensitivity and reduce sensor nonlinearity and hysteresis, we compare the electrical response of 0.25 mm2 channels with different cross-sectional geometries. We demonstrate that channels with a triangular or concave cross-section exhibit the least nonlinearity and hysteresis over pressures ranging from 0 to 70 kPa. These experimental results are in reasonable agreement with predictions made by theoretical calculations that we derive from elasticity and Ohm's Law.

  7. Two dimensional electron systems for solid state quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sumit

    Two dimensional electron systems based on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are extremely useful in various scientific investigations of recent times including the search for quantum computational schemes. Although significant strides have been made over the past few years to realize solid state qubits on GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs, there are numerous factors limiting the progress. We attempt to identify factors that have material and design-specific origin and develop ways to overcome them. The thesis is divided in two broad segments. In the first segment we describe the realization of a new field-effect induced two dimensional electron system on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the novel device-design is expected to suppress the level of charge noise present in the device. Modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are utilized extensively in the study of quantum transport in nanostructures, but charge fluctuations associated with remote ionized dopants often produce deleterious effects. Electric field-induced carrier systems offer an attractive alternative if certain challenges can be overcome. We demonstrate a field-effect transistor in which the active channel is locally devoid of modulation-doping, but silicon dopant atoms are retained in the ohmic contact region to facilitate low-resistance contacts. A high quality two-dimensional electron gas is induced by a field-effect that is tunable over a density range of 6.5x10 10cm-2 to 2.6x1011cm-2 . Device design, fabrication, and low temperature (T=0.3K) characterization results are discussed. The demonstrated device-design overcomes several existing limitations in the fabrication of field-induced 2DEGs and might find utility in hosting nanostructures required for making spin qubits. The second broad segment describes our effort to correlate transport parameters measured at T=0.3K to the strength of the fractional quantum Hall state observed at nu=5/2 in the second Landau level of high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional

  8. Preconditioner and convergence study for the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) nonlinear poisson problem posed on the Ottawa Flat 270 design geometry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalashnikova, Irina

    2012-05-01

    A numerical study aimed to evaluate different preconditioners within the Trilinos Ifpack and ML packages for the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) non-linear Poisson problem implemented within the Albany code base and posed on the Ottawa Flat 270 design geometry is performed. This study led to some new development of Albany that allows the user to select an ML preconditioner with Zoltan repartitioning based on nodal coordinates, which is summarized. Convergence of the numerical solutions computed within the QCAD computational suite with successive mesh refinement is examined in two metrics, the mean value of the solution (an L{sup 1} norm) and the field integral of the solution (L{sup 2} norm).

  9. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  10. Computer-assisted expert case definition in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander M; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Weiss, Lisa S; Shen, Rongjun; Sobel, Rachel E; Bate, Andrew; Reynolds, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    To describe how computer-assisted presentation of case data can lead experts to infer machine-implementable rules for case definition in electronic health records. As an illustration the technique has been applied to obtain a definition of acute liver dysfunction (ALD) in persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The technique consists of repeatedly sampling new batches of case candidates from an enriched pool of persons meeting presumed minimal inclusion criteria, classifying the candidates by a machine-implementable candidate rule and by a human expert, and then updating the rule so that it captures new distinctions introduced by the expert. Iteration continues until an update results in an acceptably small number of changes to form a final case definition. The technique was applied to structured data and terms derived by natural language processing from text records in 29,336 adults with IBD. Over three rounds the technique led to rules with increasing predictive value, as the experts identified exceptions, and increasing sensitivity, as the experts identified missing inclusion criteria. In the final rule inclusion and exclusion terms were often keyed to an ALD onset date. When compared against clinical review in an independent test round, the derived final case definition had a sensitivity of 92% and a positive predictive value of 79%. An iterative technique of machine-supported expert review can yield a case definition that accommodates available data, incorporates pre-existing medical knowledge, is transparent and is open to continuous improvement. The expert updates to rules may be informative in themselves. In this limited setting, the final case definition for ALD performed better than previous, published attempts using expert definitions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pictorial review: Electron beam computed tomography and multislice spiral computed tomography for cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, Alexander; Hein, Patrick A.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Klessen, Christian; Wiese, Till H.; Hoffmann, Udo; Hamm, Bernd; Enzweiler, Christian N.H.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) revolutionized cardiac imaging by combining a constant high temporal resolution with prospective ECG triggering. For years, EBCT was the primary technique for some non-invasive diagnostic cardiac procedures such as calcium scoring and non-invasive angiography of the coronary arteries. Multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on the other hand significantly advanced cardiac imaging through high volume coverage, improved spatial resolution and retrospective ECG gating. This pictorial review will illustrate the basic differences between both modalities with special emphasis to their image quality. Several experimental and clinical examples demonstrate the strengths and limitations of both imaging modalities in an intraindividual comparison for a broad range of diagnostic applications such as coronary artery calcium scoring, coronary angiography including stent visualization as well as functional assessment of the cardiac ventricles and valves. In general, our examples indicate that EBCT suffers from a number of shortcomings such as limited spatial resolution and a low contrast-to-noise ratio. Thus, EBCT should now only be used in selected cases where a constant high temporal resolution is a crucial issue, such as dynamic (cine) imaging. Due to isotropic submillimeter spatial resolution and retrospective data selection MSCT seems to be the non-invasive method of choice for cardiac imaging in general, and for assessment of the coronary arteries in particular. However, technical developments are still needed to further improve the temporal resolution in MSCT and to reduce the substantial radiation exposure

  12. On the value of geometry-based models for left ventricular volumetry in magnetic resonance imaging and electron beam tomography: a Bland-Altman analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Gert; Reiter, Ursula; Rienmueller, Rainer; Gagarina, Nina; Ryabikin, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Methodological comparison of ellipsoid model-based approaches and Simpson method to evaluate left ventricular volumetric parameters by magnetic resonance (MR) and electron beam tomography (EBT) and analysis of the origin of possible discrepancies. Methods and material: 100 subjects (87 patients, 13 healthy volunteers) were studied in MR in various cardiac views and EBT long axis view to determine left ventricular volumes and masses by applying (rotational) ellipsoid and Simpson model. Observer variation and method agreement was quantified by means of variance component and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Simpson approach showed smaller observer variability than all ellipsoid approaches. All geometry-based models gave smaller left ventricular volumes than Simpson approach, the bias in mass determination was minimal. Whereas high correlation coefficients (typically 0.85-0.95) for left ventricular volume and mass measurements indicated satisfying correspondence between methods, large 95% limits of agreement made a transfer of results for single subjects between Simpson and ellipsoid approaches difficult and between different geometry-based models almost impossible. Because 95% limits of agreement and observer variability of geometry-based approaches were of equal order, the latter could be identified as main limiting factor of methodological agreement. Conclusion: MR Simpson approach is superior to all ellipsoid model-based approaches, because observer variability is smaller

  13. 77 FR 27078 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of... entitled Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... the United States after importation of certain electronic devices, including mobile phones and tablet...

  14. Introduction to tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maclagan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Tropical geometry is a combinatorial shadow of algebraic geometry, offering new polyhedral tools to compute invariants of algebraic varieties. It is based on tropical algebra, where the sum of two numbers is their minimum and the product is their sum. This turns polynomials into piecewise-linear functions, and their zero sets into polyhedral complexes. These tropical varieties retain a surprising amount of information about their classical counterparts. Tropical geometry is a young subject that has undergone a rapid development since the beginning of the 21st century. While establishing itself as an area in its own right, deep connections have been made to many branches of pure and applied mathematics. This book offers a self-contained introduction to tropical geometry, suitable as a course text for beginning graduate students. Proofs are provided for the main results, such as the Fundamental Theorem and the Structure Theorem. Numerous examples and explicit computations illustrate the main concepts. Each of t...

  15. MORET: a Monte Carlo program for fast computation of the effective multiplying factors of fissile media within complex geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caizergues, Robert; Poullot, Gilles; Teillet, J.-R.

    1976-06-01

    The MORET code determines effective multiplying factors. It uses the Monte Carlo technique and the multigroup theory; a collision is taken as isotropic, but anisotropy is taken into account by means of the transport correction. Complex geometries can be rapidly treated: the array to be studied is divided in simple elementary volumes (spheres, cylinders, boxes, cones, half space planes...) to which are applied operators of the theory of sets. Some constant or differential (albedos) reflection coefficients simulate neighboring reflections on the outer volume [fr

  16. Analysis of the effect of cone-beam geometry and test object configuration on the measurement accuracy of a computed tomography scanner used for dimensional measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Jagadeesha; Attridge, Alex; Williams, Mark A; Wood, P K C

    2011-01-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are used for non-contact dimensional measurement of small, fragile components and difficult-to-access internal features of castings and mouldings. However, the accuracy and repeatability of measurements are influenced by factors such as cone-beam system geometry, test object configuration, x-ray power, material and size of test object, detector characteristics and data analysis methods. An attempt is made in this work to understand the measurement errors of a CT scanner over the complete scan volume, taking into account only the errors in system geometry and the object configuration within the scanner. A cone-beam simulation model is developed with the radiographic image projection and reconstruction steps. A known amount of errors in geometrical parameters were introduced in the model to understand the effect of geometry of the cone-beam CT system on measurement accuracy for different positions, orientations and sizes of the test object. Simulation analysis shows that the geometrical parameters have a significant influence on the dimensional measurement at specific configurations of the test object. Finally, the importance of system alignment and estimation of correct parameters for accurate CT measurements is outlined based on the analysis

  17. An experimental determination of the hot electron ring geometry in a Bumpy Torus and its implications for Bumpy Torus stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillis, D.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Bigelow, T.S.; Jaeger, E.F.; Swain, D.W.; Hankins, O.E.; Juhala, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The hot electron rings of the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion (IAEA, Vienna, 1975), Vol. II, p. 141] are formed by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and have an electron temperature of 350 to 500 keV. The original intention of these hot electron rings was to provide a local minimum in the magnetic field and, thereby, stabilize the simple interchange and flute modes, which are inherent in a closed field line bumpy torus. To evaluate the electron energy density of the EBT rings and determine if enough stored energy is present to provide a local minimum in the magnetic field, a detailed understanding of the spatial distribution of the rings is imperative. The purpose of this report is to measure the ring thickness and investigate its implications for bumpy torus stability. The spatial location and radial profile of the hot electron ring are measured with a unique metal ball pellet injector, which injects small metallic balls into the EBT ring plasma. From these measurements the radial extent (or ring thickness) is about 5 to 7 cm full width at half maximum for typical EBT operation, which is much larger than previously expected. These measurements and recent modeling of the EBT plasma indicate that the hot electron ring's stored energy may not be sufficient to produce a local minimum in the magnetic field

  18. Optical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.; Trautman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of classical physics is Lorentzian; but weaker geometries are often more appropriate: null geodesics and electromagnetic fields, for example, are well known to be objects of conformal geometry. To deal with a single null congruence, or with the radiative electromagnetic fields associated with it, even less is needed: flag geometry for the first, optical geometry, with which this paper is chiefly concerned, for the second. The authors establish a natural one-to-one correspondence between optical geometries, considered locally, and three-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann structures. A number of Lorentzian geometries are shown to be equivalent from the optical point of view. For example the Goedel universe, the Taub-NUT metric and Hauser's twisting null solution have an optical geometry isomorphic to the one underlying the Robinson congruence in Minkowski space. The authors present general results on the problem of lifting a CR structure to a Lorentz manifold and, in particular, to Minkowski space; and exhibit the relevance of the deviation form to this problem

  19. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.b, E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo, E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DMPA/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Matematica Aplicada

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS{sub N} method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS{sub N} nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  20. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS N method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS N nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  1. ITS version 5.0 :the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/Photon monte carlo transport codes with CAD geometry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2005-09-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  2. Application of advanced electronics to a future spacecraft computer design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Advancements in hardware and software technology are summarized with specific emphasis on spacecraft computer capabilities. Available state of the art technology is reviewed and candidate architectures are defined.

  3. Using Computer Conferencing and Electronic Mail to Facilitate Group Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Margaret D.

    1996-01-01

    Reports on the use of electronic mail and an electronic conferencing system to conduct group projects in three educational psychology courses at the State University of New York College at Cortland. Course design is explained and group project design is described, including assignments and oral presentations during regular class sessions.…

  4. Computational characterization of HPGe detectors usable for a wide variety of source geometries by using Monte Carlo simulation and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, J.G., E-mail: jglezg2002@gmail.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Rubiano, J.G. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Estudios Ambientales y Recursos Naturales, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Winter, G. [Instituto Universitario de Sistemas Inteligentes y Aplicaciones Numéricas en la Ingeniería, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Guerra, A.G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M.A.; Tejera, A.; Martel, P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Estudios Ambientales y Recursos Naturales, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Bolivar, J.P. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2017-06-21

    In this work, we have developed a computational methodology for characterizing HPGe detectors by implementing in parallel a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, together with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The evolutionary algorithm is used for searching the geometrical parameters of a model of detector by minimizing the differences between the efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and two reference sets of Full Energy Peak Efficiencies (FEPEs) corresponding to two given sample geometries, a beaker of small diameter laid over the detector window and a beaker of large capacity which wrap the detector. This methodology is a generalization of a previously published work, which was limited to beakers placed over the window of the detector with a diameter equal or smaller than the crystal diameter, so that the crystal mount cap (which surround the lateral surface of the crystal), was not considered in the detector model. The generalization has been accomplished not only by including such a mount cap in the model, but also using multi-objective optimization instead of mono-objective, with the aim of building a model sufficiently accurate for a wider variety of beakers commonly used for the measurement of environmental samples by gamma spectrometry, like for instance, Marinellis, Petris, or any other beaker with a diameter larger than the crystal diameter, for which part of the detected radiation have to pass through the mount cap. The proposed methodology has been applied to an HPGe XtRa detector, providing a model of detector which has been successfully verificated for different source-detector geometries and materials and experimentally validated using CRMs. - Highlights: • A computational method for characterizing HPGe detectors has been generalized. • The new version is usable for a wider range of sample geometries. • It starts from reference FEPEs obtained through a standard calibration procedure. • A model of an HPGe XtRa detector has been

  5. Computational characterization of HPGe detectors usable for a wide variety of source geometries by using Monte Carlo simulation and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, J.G.; Rubiano, J.G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A.G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M.A.; Tejera, A.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we have developed a computational methodology for characterizing HPGe detectors by implementing in parallel a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, together with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The evolutionary algorithm is used for searching the geometrical parameters of a model of detector by minimizing the differences between the efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and two reference sets of Full Energy Peak Efficiencies (FEPEs) corresponding to two given sample geometries, a beaker of small diameter laid over the detector window and a beaker of large capacity which wrap the detector. This methodology is a generalization of a previously published work, which was limited to beakers placed over the window of the detector with a diameter equal or smaller than the crystal diameter, so that the crystal mount cap (which surround the lateral surface of the crystal), was not considered in the detector model. The generalization has been accomplished not only by including such a mount cap in the model, but also using multi-objective optimization instead of mono-objective, with the aim of building a model sufficiently accurate for a wider variety of beakers commonly used for the measurement of environmental samples by gamma spectrometry, like for instance, Marinellis, Petris, or any other beaker with a diameter larger than the crystal diameter, for which part of the detected radiation have to pass through the mount cap. The proposed methodology has been applied to an HPGe XtRa detector, providing a model of detector which has been successfully verificated for different source-detector geometries and materials and experimentally validated using CRMs. - Highlights: • A computational method for characterizing HPGe detectors has been generalized. • The new version is usable for a wider range of sample geometries. • It starts from reference FEPEs obtained through a standard calibration procedure. • A model of an HPGe XtRa detector has been

  6. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, Amir; Wallner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  7. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  8. Computational design of molecules for dye sensitized solar cells and nano electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnsø, Kristian Baruël

    sensitized solar cell (DSSC) in terms of a loss-less level alignment quality. This scoring only takes into account a simplified absorption spectrum of the dye in combination with the alignment between the molecular levels, the semi-conductor conduction band edge and the redox mediator. To improve on this...... a molecular junction, is by controlling the junction geometry. This is achieved by designing a molecule with two sets of anchor groups, which bind to gold with significantly different strengths. Hence, it is proposed that the geometry can be controlled by chemical passivisation of one type of anchor group....... Using a simple computational model, this experimental hypothesis is verified and the change in conductance upon changing junction geometry is reproduced....

  9. Beautiful geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, Eli

    2014-01-01

    If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configur

  10. Blue copper model complexes with distorted tetragonal geometry acting as effective electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shigeki; Wada, Yuji; Yanagida, Shozo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2005-07-06

    The electron self-exchange rate constants of blue copper model complexes, [(-)-sparteine-N,N'](maleonitriledithiolato-S,S')copper ([Cu(SP)(mmt)])(0/)(-), bis(2,9-dimethy-1,10-phenanthroline)copper ([Cu(dmp)(2)](2+/+)), and bis(1,10-phenanthroline)copper ([Cu(phen)(2)](2+/+)) have been determined from the rate constants of electron transfer from a homologous series of ferrocene derivatives to the copper(II) complexes in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer. The resulting electron self-exchange rate constant increases in the order: [Cu(phen)(2)](2+/+) geometry. The dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) were constructed using the copper complexes as redox couples to compare the photoelectrochemical responses with those using the conventional I(3)(-)/I(-) couple. The light energy conversion efficiency (eta) values under illumination of simulated solar light irradiation (100 mW/cm(2)) of DSSCs using [Cu(phen)(2)](2+/+), [Cu(dmp)(2)](2+/+), and [Cu(SP)(mmt)](0/)(-) were recorded as 0.1%, 1.4%, and 1.3%, respectively. The maximum eta value (2.2%) was obtained for a DSSC using the [Cu(dmp)(2)](2+/+) redox couple under the light irradiation of 20 mW/cm(2) intensity, where a higher open-circuit voltage of the cell was attained as compared to that of the conventional I(3)(-)/I(-) couple.

  11. Analytische Geometrie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnitz, Arnfried

    Der Grundgedanke der Analytischen Geometrie besteht darin, dass geometrische Untersuchungen mit rechnerischen Mitteln geführt werden. Geometrische Objekte werden dabei durch Gleichungen beschrieben und mit algebraischen Methoden untersucht.

  12. Algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to algebraic geometry and a bridge between its analytical-topological and algebraical aspects, this text for advanced undergraduate students is particularly relevant to those more familiar with analysis than algebra. 1953 edition.

  13. Information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ay, Nihat; Lê, Hông Vân; Schwachhöfer, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive introduction and a novel mathematical foundation of the field of information geometry with complete proofs and detailed background material on measure theory, Riemannian geometry and Banach space theory. Parametrised measure models are defined as fundamental geometric objects, which can be both finite or infinite dimensional. Based on these models, canonical tensor fields are introduced and further studied, including the Fisher metric and the Amari-Chentsov tensor, and embeddings of statistical manifolds are investigated. This novel foundation then leads to application highlights, such as generalizations and extensions of the classical uniqueness result of Chentsov or the Cramér-Rao inequality. Additionally, several new application fields of information geometry are highlighted, for instance hierarchical and graphical models, complexity theory, population genetics, or Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The book will be of interest to mathematicians who are interested in geometry, inf...

  14. Electronic structure and geometries of small compound metal clusters: Progress report, August 1, 1988--July 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, P.; Rao, B.K.; Khanna, S.N.

    1989-04-01

    Our research during this reporting period has focused on the following two aspects of cluster research. Electronic structure and stability of charged clusters and studies of evolution of magnetic properties with increasing cluster size. Following is a summary of our results

  15. Experimental Approach for the Uncertainty Assessment of 3D Complex Geometry Dimensional Measurements Using Computed Tomography at the mm and Sub-mm Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Roberto; Torralba, Marta; Yagüe-Fabra, José A; Ontiveros, Sinué; Tosello, Guido

    2017-05-16

    The dimensional verification of miniaturized components with 3D complex geometries is particularly challenging. Computed Tomography (CT) can represent a suitable alternative solution to micro metrology tools based on optical and tactile techniques. However, the establishment of CT systems' traceability when measuring 3D complex geometries is still an open issue. In this work, an alternative method for the measurement uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometries by using CT is presented. The method is based on the micro-CT system Maximum Permissible Error (MPE) estimation, determined experimentally by using several calibrated reference artefacts. The main advantage of the presented method is that a previous calibration of the component by a more accurate Coordinate Measuring System (CMS) is not needed. In fact, such CMS would still hold all the typical limitations of optical and tactile techniques, particularly when measuring miniaturized components with complex 3D geometries and their inability to measure inner parts. To validate the presented method, the most accepted standard currently available for CT sensors, the Verein Deutscher Ingenieure/Verband Deutscher Elektrotechniker (VDI/VDE) guideline 2630-2.1 is applied. Considering the high number of influence factors in CT and their impact on the measuring result, two different techniques for surface extraction are also considered to obtain a realistic determination of the influence of data processing on uncertainty. The uncertainty assessment of a workpiece used for micro mechanical material testing is firstly used to confirm the method, due to its feasible calibration by an optical CMS. Secondly, the measurement of a miniaturized dental file with 3D complex geometry is carried out. The estimated uncertainties are eventually compared with the component's calibration and the micro manufacturing tolerances to demonstrate the suitability of the presented CT calibration procedure. The 2U/T ratios resulting from the

  16. Computer Aided Design Tools for Extreme Environment Electronics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to provide Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools for radiation-tolerant, wide-temperature-range digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio-frequency...

  17. Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delferriere, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Nyckees, S.; Sauce, Y.; Tuske, O. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

    2012-02-15

    One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

  18. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometry for controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans, Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma based accelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beam to push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase via ponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulse is discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beam of a 0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a 1 = 0.8 both focused on the middle of a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ∼ 260 mu m long gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the colliding pulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of the colliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, which suggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV

  19. Electron Correlations and Two-Photon States in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Molecules: A Peculiar Role of Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Aryanpour, K.; Shukla, A.; Mazumdar, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present numerical studies of one- and two-photon excited states ordering in a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: coronene, hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene and circumcoronene, all possessing $D_{6h}$ point group symmetry versus ovalene with $D_{2h}$ symmetry, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople model of interacting $\\pi$-electrons. The calculated energies of the two-photon states as well as their relative two-photon absorption cross-sections within the interacting model are qualitat...

  20. Effect of ligand nature and geometry of its surrounding on electron absorption spectra of NpO22+ and PuO22+ compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, E.I.; Tebelev, L.G.; Melkaya, R.F.; Rykov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Electron absorption spectra of actinide compounds with the symmetry of the nearest surrounding of actinyl-ions as follows: Dsub(2h)-AnO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 xnH 2 O, AnO 2 (CH 3 COO) 2 x2H 2 O; Dsub(3h)-MAnO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 (M-K, Rb, Cs), NaAnO 2 (CH 3 COO) 3 , (NH 4 ) 4 AnO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ; Dsub(4h)-Cs 2 AnO 2 Cl 4 , where An-U, Np, Pb, are measured at room temperature. It is established that position, intensity and form of absorption bands in neptunyl compound spectra are sensible equally to geometry of coordination sphere and to ligand nature. The character of the change of plutonyl compound spectra is the same as of neptunyl ones: it is determined both by surrounding geometry and chemical nature of ligands. It is shown that in the near infrared region ligand effect on plutonyl compound spectra with the symmetry of anion complex Dsub(3h) is weaker than in the visible region

  1. CASKETSS-DYNA2D: a nonlinear impact analysis computer program for nuclear fuel transport casks in two dimensional geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi

    1988-10-01

    A nonlinear impact analysis computer program DYNA2D, which was developed by Hallquist, has been introduced from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the purpose of using impact analysis of nuclear fuel transport casks. DYNA2D has been built in CASKETSS code system (CASKETSS means a modular code system for CASK Evaluation code system for Thermal and Structural Safety). Main features of DYNA2D are as follows; (1) This program has been programmed to provide near optimal speed on vector processing computers. (2) An explicit time integration method is used for fast calculation. (3) Many material models are available in the program. (4) A contact-impact algorithm permits gap and sliding along structural interfaces. (5) A rezoner has been embedded in the program. (6) The graphic program for representations of calculation is provided. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method, input data and sample calculations are presented. (author)

  2. Electro-optic sampling at 90 degree interaction geometry for time-of-arrival stamping of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Scoby

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study a new geometry setup for electro-optic sampling (EOS where the electron beam runs parallel to the ⟨110⟩ face of a ZnTe crystal and the probe laser is perpendicular to it and to the beam path. The simple setup is used to encode the time-of-arrival information of a 3.5  MeV<10  pC electron bunch on the spatial profile of the laser pulse. The electric field lines inside the dielectric bend at an angle due to a relatively large (n∼3 index of refraction of the ZnTe crystal. We found theoretically and experimentally that the EOS signal can be maximized with a proper choice of incoming laser polarization angle. We achieved single-shot nondestructive measurement of the relative time of arrival between the pump and the probe beams thus improving the temporal resolution of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction experiments.

  3. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers carbon nanotubes, their characteristics, and their potential future applications. The presentation include predictions on the development of nanostructures and their applications, the thermal characteristics of carbon nanotubes, mechano-chemical effects upon carbon nanotubes, molecular electronics, and models for possible future nanostructure devices. The presentation also proposes a neural model for signal processing.

  4. Theoretical galactic cosmic ray electron spectrum obtained for sources of varying geometry; Spectre theorique des electrons du rayonnement cosmique dans la galaxie obtenu pour des sources a geometrie variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Jokipii and Meyer have recently obtained an electron density energy spectrum of the cosmic rays, originating in the Galaxy, using integral solutions of the steady state transfer equations, by considering a circular cylindric galactic disc as source and approximating the resulting fourth order integral. In this report, we present general results, obtained by using an arbitrary circular cylindric source, without restricting ourselves to the galactic disc. The integrals are treated exactly. The conclusions of Jokipii and Meyer form special cases of these results. We also obtain an exponential energy variation which, at the moment, is not observed experimentally. The second part of this work deals with more complicated, but perhaps more realistic models of elliptic cylindric and ellipsoidal galactic disc sources. One may also note that a very large source concentrated in a very small region gives a spectrum not unlike that for a small source distributed throughout a large volume. Finally, it may be remarked that the model adopted is much less restrictive than the artificial conception of 'leakage time' followed by other workers. (author) [French] Jokipii et Meyer ont dernierement obtenu un spectre d'energie pour les electrons galactiques dans le rayonnement cosmique, en utilisant les solutions des equations de transfert, a l'etat stationnaire, ces dernieres etant sous forme d'integrales, en prenant une source completement diffusee dans le disque galactique, celui-ci etant hypothetiquement choisi comme circulaire et cylindrique et en faisant une approximation sur l'integrale du quatrieme degre. Dans ce rapport, nous presentons des resultats generaux obtenus en faisant appel a une source, diffusee dans un cylindre circulaire, arbitrairement choisi, c'est-a-dire sans nous restreindre au disque galactique comme source. Les integrales sont traitees d'une maniere exacte. Les conclusions de Jokipii et Meyer constituent des cas speciaux des resultats precedents. Nous obtenons

  5. Lectures on discrete geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Discrete geometry investigates combinatorial properties of configurations of geometric objects. To a working mathematician or computer scientist, it offers sophisticated results and techniques of great diversity and it is a foundation for fields such as computational geometry or combinatorial optimization. This book is primarily a textbook introduction to various areas of discrete geometry. In each area, it explains several key results and methods, in an accessible and concrete manner. It also contains more advanced material in separate sections and thus it can serve as a collection of surveys in several narrower subfields. The main topics include: basics on convex sets, convex polytopes, and hyperplane arrangements; combinatorial complexity of geometric configurations; intersection patterns and transversals of convex sets; geometric Ramsey-type results; polyhedral combinatorics and high-dimensional convexity; and lastly, embeddings of finite metric spaces into normed spaces. Jiri Matousek is Professor of Com...

  6. Experimental and Computational Study of the Flow past a Simplified Geometry of an Engine/Pylon/Wing Installation at low velocity/moderate incidence flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Yannick; Lucas, Matthieu; Bonnaud, Cyril; Joly, Laurent; ISAE Team; Airbus Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically and experimentally the vortices that develop past a model geometry of a wing equipped with pylon-mounted engine at low speed/moderate incidence flight conditions. For such configuration, the presence of the powerplant installation under the wing initiates a complex, unsteady vortical flow field at the nacelle/pylon/wing junctions. Its interaction with the upper wing boundary layer causes a drop of aircraft performances. In order to decipher the underlying physics, this study is initially conducted on a simplified geometry at a Reynolds number of 200000, based on the chord wing and on the freestream velocity. Two configurations of angle of attack and side-slip angle are investigated. This work relies on unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes computations, oil flow visualizations and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. The vortex dynamics thus produced is described in terms of vortex core position, intensity, size and turbulent intensity thanks to a vortex tracking approach. In addition, the analysis of the velocity flow fields obtained from PIV highlights the influence of the longitudinal vortex initiated at the pylon/wing junction on the separation process of the boundary layer near the upper wing leading-edge.

  7. THEAP-I: A computer program for thermal hydraulic analysis of a thermally interacting channel bundle of complex geometry. The micro computer version user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megaritou, A; Bartzis, J G

    1987-09-01

    In the present report the micro computer version of the code is described. More emphasis is given in the new features of the code (i.e. input data structure). A set of instructions for running in an IBM-AT2 computer with the Microsoft FORTRAN V.4.0 is also included together with a sample problem refering to the Greek Research Reactor.

  8. Apocrustacyanin C(1) crystals grown in space and on earth using vapour-diffusion geometry: protein structure refinements and electron-density map comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash, Jarjis; Boggon, Titus J; Raftery, James; Chayen, Naomi E; Zagalsky, Peter F; Helliwell, John R

    2003-07-01

    Models of apocrustacyanin C(1) were refined against X-ray data recorded on Bending Magnet 14 at the ESRF to resolutions of 1.85 and 2 A from a space-grown and an earth-grown crystal, respectively, both using vapour-diffusion crystal-growth geometry. The space crystals were grown in the APCF on the NASA Space Shuttle. The microgravity crystal growth showed a cyclic nature attributed to Marangoni convection, thus reducing the benefits of the microgravity environment, as reported previously [Chayen et al. (1996), Q. Rev. Biophys. 29, 227-278]. A subsequent mosaicity evaluation, also reported previously, showed only a partial improvement in the space-grown crystals over the earth-grown crystals [Snell et al. (1997), Acta Cryst. D53, 231-239], contrary to the case for lysozyme crystals grown in space with liquid-liquid diffusion, i.e. without any major motion during growth [Snell et al. (1995), Acta Cryst. D52, 1099-1102]. In this paper, apocrustacyanin C(1) electron-density maps from the two refined models are now compared. It is concluded that the electron-density maps of the protein and the bound waters are found to be better overall for the structures of apocrustacyanin C(1) studied from the space-grown crystal compared with those from the earth-grown crystal, even though both crystals were grown using vapour-diffusion crystal-growth geometry. The improved residues are on the surface of the protein, with two involved in or nearby crystal lattice-forming interactions, thus linking an improved crystal-growth mechanism to the molecular level. The structural comparison procedures developed should themselves be valuable for evaluating crystal-growth procedures in the future.

  9. International Conference on Emerging Research in Electronics, Computer Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sheshadri, Holalu; Padma, M

    2014-01-01

    PES College of Engineering is organizing an International Conference on Emerging Research in Electronics, Computer Science and Technology (ICERECT-12) in Mandya and merging the event with Golden Jubilee of the Institute. The Proceedings of the Conference presents high quality, peer reviewed articles from the field of Electronics, Computer Science and Technology. The book is a compilation of research papers from the cutting-edge technologies and it is targeted towards the scientific community actively involved in research activities.

  10. Frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between photonic crystal slabs: a computational approach for arbitrary geometries and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Ilic, Ognjen; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Johnson, Steven G

    2011-09-09

    We demonstrate the possibility of achieving enhanced frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between patterned (photonic-crystal) slabs at designable frequencies and separations, exploiting a general numerical approach for computing heat transfer in arbitrary geometries and materials based on the finite-difference time-domain method. Our simulations reveal a tradeoff between selectivity and near-field enhancement as the slab-slab separation decreases, with the patterned heat transfer eventually reducing to the unpatterned result multiplied by a fill factor (described by a standard proximity approximation). We also find that heat transfer can be further enhanced at selective frequencies when the slabs are brought into a glide-symmetric configuration, a consequence of the degeneracies associated with the nonsymmorphic symmetry group.

  11. Linking computer-aided design (CAD) to Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations for precise implementation of complex treatment head geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Magdalena; Constantin, Dragos E; Keall, Paul J; Narula, Anisha; Svatos, Michelle; Perl, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Most of the treatment head components of medical linear accelerators used in radiation therapy have complex geometrical shapes. They are typically designed using computer-aided design (CAD) applications. In Monte Carlo simulations of radiotherapy beam transport through the treatment head components, the relevant beam-generating and beam-modifying devices are inserted in the simulation toolkit using geometrical approximations of these components. Depending on their complexity, such approximations may introduce errors that can be propagated throughout the simulation. This drawback can be minimized by exporting a more precise geometry of the linac components from CAD and importing it into the Monte Carlo simulation environment. We present a technique that links three-dimensional CAD drawings of the treatment head components to Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of dose deposition. (note)

  12. BACCHUS-3D/SP. A computer programme for the three-dimensional description of sodium single-phase flow in bundle geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni, M.; Dorr, B.; Homann, C.; Struwe, D.

    1983-07-01

    The computer programme BACCHUS implemented at KfK includes a steady-state version, a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional transient single-phase flow version describing the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the coolant (sodium or water) in bundle geometry under nominal or accident conditions. All versions are coupled with a pin model describing the temperature distribution in fuel (or electrical heaters) and cladding. The report describes the programme from the viewpoints of the geometrical model, the mathematical foundations and the numerical treatment of the basic equations. Although emphasis is put on the three-dimensional version, the two-dimensional and the steady state versions are also documented in self-consistent sections. (orig.) [de

  13. Computational study of the Risø-B1-18 airfoil with a hinged flap providing variable trailing edge geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive computational study, in both steady and unsteady flow conditions, has been carried out to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of the Risø-B1.18 airfoil equipped with variable trailing edge geometry as produced by a hinged flap. The function of such flaps should...... on the baseline airfoil showed excellent agreement with measurements on the same airfoil with the same specified conditions. Furthermore, a more widespread comparison with an advanced potential theory code is presented. The influence of various key parameters, such as flap shape, flap size and oscillating...... frequencies, was investigated so that an optimum design can be suggested for application with wind turbine blades. It is concluded that a moderately curved flap with flap chord to airfoil curve ratio between 0.05 and 0.10 would be an optimum choice....

  14. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  15. Geometry Revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Both classical geometry and modern differential geometry have been active subjects of research throughout the 20th century and lie at the heart of many recent advances in mathematics and physics. The underlying motivating concept for the present book is that it offers readers the elements of a modern geometric culture by means of a whole series of visually appealing unsolved (or recently solved) problems that require the creation of concepts and tools of varying abstraction. Starting with such natural, classical objects as lines, planes, circles, spheres, polygons, polyhedra, curves, surfaces,

  16. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  17. Noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Connes, Alain

    1994-01-01

    This English version of the path-breaking French book on this subject gives the definitive treatment of the revolutionary approach to measure theory, geometry, and mathematical physics developed by Alain Connes. Profusely illustrated and invitingly written, this book is ideal for anyone who wants to know what noncommutative geometry is, what it can do, or how it can be used in various areas of mathematics, quantization, and elementary particles and fields.Key Features* First full treatment of the subject and its applications* Written by the pioneer of this field* Broad applications in mathemat

  18. Consistent Atomic Geometries and Electronic Structure of Five Phases of Potassium Niobate from Density-Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform a comprehensive theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of potassium niobate (KNbO3 in the cubic, tetragonal, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral phase, based on density-functional theory. The influence of different parametrizations of the exchange-correlation functional on the investigated properties is analyzed in detail, and the results are compared to available experimental data. We argue that the PBEsol and AM05 generalized gradient approximations as well as the RTPSS meta-generalized gradient approximation yield consistently accurate structural data for both the external and internal degrees of freedom and are overall superior to the local-density approximation or other conventional generalized gradient approximations for the structural characterization of KNbO3. Band-structure calculations using a HSE-type hybrid functional further indicate significant near degeneracies of band-edge states in all phases which are expected to be relevant for the optical response of the material.

  19. Geometry of behavioral spaces: A computational approach to analysis and understanding of agent based models and agent behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenek, Martin; Dahl, Spencer K.

    2016-11-01

    Systems with non-linear dynamics frequently exhibit emergent system behavior, which is important to find and specify rigorously to understand the nature of the modeled phenomena. Through this analysis, it is possible to characterize phenomena such as how systems assemble or dissipate and what behaviors lead to specific final system configurations. Agent Based Modeling (ABM) is one of the modeling techniques used to study the interaction dynamics between a system's agents and its environment. Although the methodology of ABM construction is well understood and practiced, there are no computational, statistically rigorous, comprehensive tools to evaluate an ABM's execution. Often, a human has to observe an ABM's execution in order to analyze how the ABM functions, identify the emergent processes in the agent's behavior, or study a parameter's effect on the system-wide behavior. This paper introduces a new statistically based framework to automatically analyze agents' behavior, identify common system-wide patterns, and record the probability of agents changing their behavior from one pattern of behavior to another. We use network based techniques to analyze the landscape of common behaviors in an ABM's execution. Finally, we test the proposed framework with a series of experiments featuring increasingly emergent behavior. The proposed framework will allow computational comparison of ABM executions, exploration of a model's parameter configuration space, and identification of the behavioral building blocks in a model's dynamics.

  20. Computer Mediated Communication and the Emergence of "Electronic Opportunism"

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco, Elena; Warglien, Massimo

    1996-01-01

    An experiment on how communication affects cooperation in a social dilemma shows that computer mediated communication (CMC) and face to face communication have markedly different effects on patterns of collective behavior. While face to face communication sustains stable cooperation, CMC makes cooperative agreements in groups extremely fragile, giving rise to waves of opportunistic behavior. Further analysis of communication protocols highlights that the breakdown of ordinary communication ru...

  1. A FORTRAN program for an IBM PC compatible computer for calculating kinematical electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjerpe, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a computer program which is useful in transmission electron microscopy. The program is written in FORTRAN and calculates kinematical electron diffraction patterns in any zone axis from a given crystal structure. Quite large unit cells, containing up to 2250 atoms, can be handled by the program. The program runs on both the Helcules graphic card and the standard IBM CGA card

  2. Computer Cataloging of Electronic Journals in Unstable Aggregator Databases: The Hong Kong Baptist University Library Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiu-On; Leung, Shirley W.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of aggregator databases focuses on a project at the Hong Kong Baptist University library to integrate full-text electronic journal titles from three unstable aggregator databases into its online public access catalog (OPAC). Explains the development of the electronic journal computer program (EJCOP) to generate MARC records for…

  3. Information Technology in project-organized electronic and computer technology engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the integration of IT in the education of electronic and computer technology engineers at Institute of Electronic Systems, Aalborg Uni-versity, Denmark. At the Institute Information Technology is an important tool in the aspects of the education as well as for communication...

  4. 77 FR 34063 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... the United States after importation of certain electronic devices, including mobile phones and tablet... mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof that infringe one or more of claims 1-3 and 5...

  5. Effectiveness of an Electronic Performance Support System on Computer Ethics and Ethical Decision-Making Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kert, Serhat Bahadir; Uz, Cigdem; Gecu, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an electronic performance support system (EPSS) on computer ethics education and the ethical decision-making processes. There were five different phases to this ten month study: (1) Writing computer ethics scenarios, (2) Designing a decision-making framework (3) Developing EPSS software (4) Using EPSS in a…

  6. Projective Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mathematicians are trained to use very precise language, and so find it hard to simplify and state .... thing. If you take a plane on which there are two such triangles which enjoy the above ... within this geometry to simplify things if needed.

  7. Geometry -----------~--------------RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parallel: A pair of lines in a plane is said to be parallel if they do not meet. Mathematicians were at war ... Subsequently, Poincare, Klein, Beltrami and others refined non-. Euclidean geometry. ... plane divides the plane into two half planes and.

  8. Computer experiments on the imaging of point defects with the conventional transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakow, W [Xerox Corp., Rochester, N.Y. (USA)

    1978-02-01

    To aid in the interpretation of high resolution electron micrographs of defect structures in crystals, computer-simulated dark-field electron micrographs have been obtained for a variety of point defects in metals. Interpretation of these images in terms of atomic positions and atom correlations becomes straightforward, and it is a simple matter to distinguish between real structural information and image artifacts produced by the phase contrast mechanism in the electron optical imaging process.

  9. Computer-based Role Playing Game Environment for Analogue Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan M MacKinnon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available An implementation of a design for a game based virtual learning environment is described. The game is developed for a course in analogue electronics, and the topic is the design of a power supply. This task can be solved in a number of different ways, with certain constraints, giving the students a certain amount of freedom, although the game is designed not to facilitate trial-and-error approach. The use of storytelling and a virtual gaming environment provides the student with the learning material in a MMORPG environment.

  10. Multicomponent Density Functional Theory: Impact of Nuclear Quantum Effects on Proton Affinities and Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-08-03

    Nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy play a critical role in computational chemistry and often are included as energetic corrections following geometry optimizations. The nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) method treats select nuclei, typically protons, quantum mechanically on the same level as the electrons. Electron-proton correlation is highly significant, and inadequate treatments lead to highly overlocalized nuclear densities. A recently developed electron-proton correlation functional, epc17, has been shown to provide accurate nuclear densities for molecular systems. Herein, the NEO-DFT/epc17 method is used to compute the proton affinities for a set of molecules and to examine the role of nuclear quantum effects on the equilibrium geometry of FHF - . The agreement of the computed results with experimental and benchmark values demonstrates the promise of this approach for including nuclear quantum effects in calculations of proton affinities, pK a 's, optimized geometries, and reaction paths.

  11. Two-parametric model of electron beam in computational dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazurik, V.M.; Lazurik, V.T.; Popov, G.; Zimek, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulation of irradiation process of various materials with electron beam (EB) can be applied to correct and control the performances of radiation processing installations. Electron beam energy measurements methods are described in the international standards. The obtained results of measurements can be extended by implementation computational dosimetry. Authors have developed the computational method for determination of EB energy on the base of two-parametric fitting of semi-empirical model for the depth dose distribution initiated by mono-energetic electron beam. The analysis of number experiments show that described method can effectively consider random displacements arising from the use of aluminum wedge with a continuous strip of dosimetric film and minimize the magnitude uncertainty value of the electron energy evaluation, calculated from the experimental data. Two-parametric fitting method is proposed for determination of the electron beam model parameters. These model parameters are as follow: E 0 – energy mono-energetic and mono-directional electron source, X 0 – the thickness of the aluminum layer, located in front of irradiated object. That allows obtain baseline data related to the characteristic of the electron beam, which can be later on applied for computer modeling of the irradiation process. Model parameters which are defined in the international standards (like E p – the most probably energy and R p – practical range) can be linked with characteristics of two-parametric model (E 0 , X 0 ), which allows to simulate the electron irradiation process. The obtained data from semi-empirical model were checked together with the set of experimental results. The proposed two-parametric model for electron beam energy evaluation and estimation of accuracy for computational dosimetry methods on the base of developed model are discussed. - Highlights: • Experimental and computational methods of electron energy evaluation. • Development

  12. Incorporating electronic-based and computer-based strategies: graduate nursing courses in administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graveley, E; Fullerton, J T

    1998-04-01

    The use of electronic technology allows faculty to improve their course offerings. Four graduate courses in nursing administration were contemporized to incorporate fundamental computer-based skills that would be expected of graduates in the work setting. Principles of adult learning offered a philosophical foundation that guided course development and revision. Course delivery strategies included computer-assisted instructional modules, e-mail interactive discussion groups, and use of the electronic classroom. Classroom seminar discussions and two-way interactive video conferencing focused on group resolution of problems derived from employment settings and assigned readings. Using these electronic technologies, a variety of courses can be revised to accommodate the learners' needs.

  13. Computer simulation of high resolution transmission electron micrographs: theory and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilaas, R.

    1985-03-01

    Computer simulation of electron micrographs is an invaluable aid in their proper interpretation and in defining optimum conditions for obtaining images experimentally. Since modern instruments are capable of atomic resolution, simulation techniques employing high precision are required. This thesis makes contributions to four specific areas of this field. First, the validity of a new method for simulating high resolution electron microscope images has been critically examined. Second, three different methods for computing scattering amplitudes in High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) have been investigated as to their ability to include upper Laue layer (ULL) interaction. Third, a new method for computing scattering amplitudes in high resolution transmission electron microscopy has been examined. Fourth, the effect of a surface layer of amorphous silicon dioxide on images of crystalline silicon has been investigated for a range of crystal thicknesses varying from zero to 2 1/2 times that of the surface layer

  14. Electron Scattering in Solid Matter A Theoretical and Computational Treatise

    CERN Document Server

    Zabloudil, Jan; Szunyogh, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    Addressing graduate students and researchers, this book gives a very detailed theoretical and computational description of multiple scattering in solid matter. Particular emphasis is placed on solids with reduced dimensions, on full potential approaches and on relativistic treatments. For the first time approaches such as the Screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method that have emerged during the last 5 – 10 years are reviewed, considering all formal steps such as single-site scattering, structure constants and screening transformations, and also the numerical point of view. Furthermore, a very general approach is presented for solving the Poisson equation, needed within density functional theory in order to achieve self-consistency. Going beyond ordered matter and translationally invariant systems, special chapters are devoted to the Coherent Potential Approximation and to the Embedded Cluster Method, used, for example, for describing nanostructured matter in real space. In a final chapter, physical properties...

  15. Development of superconductor electronics technology for high-end computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, A [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Kleinsasser, A [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Kerber, G [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Herr, Q [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Dorojevets, M [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, SUNY-Stony Brook, NY 11794-2350 (United States); Bunyk, P [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Abelson, L [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States)

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes our programme to develop and demonstrate ultra-high performance single flux quantum (SFQ) VLSI technology that will enable superconducting digital processors for petaFLOPS-scale computing. In the hybrid technology, multi-threaded architecture, the computational engine to power a petaFLOPS machine at affordable power will consist of 4096 SFQ multi-chip processors, with 50 to 100 GHz clock frequency and associated cryogenic RAM. We present the superconducting technology requirements, progress to date and our plan to meet these requirements. We improved SFQ Nb VLSI by two generations, to a 8 kA cm{sup -2}, 1.25 {mu}m junction process, incorporated new CAD tools into our methodology, demonstrated methods for recycling the bias current and data communication at speeds up to 60 Gb s{sup -1}, both on and between chips through passive transmission lines. FLUX-1 is the most ambitious project implemented in SFQ technology to date, a prototype general-purpose 8 bit microprocessor chip. We are testing the FLUX-1 chip (5K gates, 20 GHz clock) and designing a 32 bit floating-point SFQ multiplier with vector-register memory. We report correct operation of the complete stripline-connected gate library with large bias margins, as well as several larger functional units used in FLUX-1. The next stage will be an SFQ multi-processor machine. Important challenges include further reducing chip supply current and on-chip power dissipation, developing at least 64 kbit, sub-nanosecond cryogenic RAM chips, developing thermally and electrically efficient high data rate cryogenic-to-ambient input/output technology and improving Nb VLSI to increase gate density.

  16. Development of superconductor electronics technology for high-end computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, A; Kleinsasser, A; Kerber, G; Herr, Q; Dorojevets, M; Bunyk, P; Abelson, L

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes our programme to develop and demonstrate ultra-high performance single flux quantum (SFQ) VLSI technology that will enable superconducting digital processors for petaFLOPS-scale computing. In the hybrid technology, multi-threaded architecture, the computational engine to power a petaFLOPS machine at affordable power will consist of 4096 SFQ multi-chip processors, with 50 to 100 GHz clock frequency and associated cryogenic RAM. We present the superconducting technology requirements, progress to date and our plan to meet these requirements. We improved SFQ Nb VLSI by two generations, to a 8 kA cm -2 , 1.25 μm junction process, incorporated new CAD tools into our methodology, demonstrated methods for recycling the bias current and data communication at speeds up to 60 Gb s -1 , both on and between chips through passive transmission lines. FLUX-1 is the most ambitious project implemented in SFQ technology to date, a prototype general-purpose 8 bit microprocessor chip. We are testing the FLUX-1 chip (5K gates, 20 GHz clock) and designing a 32 bit floating-point SFQ multiplier with vector-register memory. We report correct operation of the complete stripline-connected gate library with large bias margins, as well as several larger functional units used in FLUX-1. The next stage will be an SFQ multi-processor machine. Important challenges include further reducing chip supply current and on-chip power dissipation, developing at least 64 kbit, sub-nanosecond cryogenic RAM chips, developing thermally and electrically efficient high data rate cryogenic-to-ambient input/output technology and improving Nb VLSI to increase gate density

  17. A prediction for bubbling geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Takuya

    2007-01-01

    We study the supersymmetric circular Wilson loops in N=4 Yang-Mills theory. Their vacuum expectation values are computed in the parameter region that admits smooth bubbling geometry duals. The results are a prediction for the supergravity action evaluated on the bubbling geometries for Wilson loops.

  18. PENELOPE, and algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, F.; Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Baro, J.; Sempau, J.

    1996-10-01

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from similar{sub t}o 1 KeV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm.

  19. PENELOPE, an algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, F; Fernandez-Varea, J M; Baro, J; Sempau, J

    1996-07-01

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from 1 keV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres, cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm. (Author) 108 refs.

  20. Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with posit...

  1. Special geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1990-01-01

    A special manifold is an allowed target manifold for the vector multiplets of D=4, N=2 supergravity. These manifolds are of interest for string theory because the moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau threefolds and c=9, (2,2) conformal field theories are special. Previous work has given a local, coordinate-dependent characterization of special geometry. A global description of special geometries is given herein, and their properties are studied. A special manifold M of complex dimension n is characterized by the existence of a holomorphic Sp(2n+2,R)xGL(1,C) vector bundle over M with a nowhere-vanishing holomorphic section Ω. The Kaehler potential on M is the logarithm of the Sp(2n+2,R) invariant norm of Ω. (orig.)

  2. A computer code package for Monte Carlo photon-electron transport simulation Comparisons with experimental benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2000-01-01

    A computer code package (PTSIM) for particle transport Monte Carlo simulation was developed using object oriented techniques of design and programming. A flexible system for simulation of coupled photon, electron transport, facilitating development of efficient simulation applications, was obtained. For photons: Compton and photo-electric effects, pair production and Rayleigh interactions are simulated, while for electrons, a class II condensed history scheme was considered, in which catastrophic interactions (Moeller electron-electron interaction, bremsstrahlung, etc.) are treated in detail and all other interactions with reduced individual effect on electron history are grouped together using continuous slowing down approximation and energy straggling theories. Electron angular straggling is simulated using Moliere theory or a mixed model in which scatters at large angles are treated as distinct events. Comparisons with experimentally benchmarks for electron transmission and bremsstrahlung emissions energy and angular spectra, and for dose calculations are presented

  3. Computational characterization of HPGe detectors usable for a wide variety of source geometries by using Monte Carlo simulation and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, J. G.; Rubiano, J. G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A. G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M. A.; Tejera, A.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we have developed a computational methodology for characterizing HPGe detectors by implementing in parallel a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, together with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The evolutionary algorithm is used for searching the geometrical parameters of a model of detector by minimizing the differences between the efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and two reference sets of Full Energy Peak Efficiencies (FEPEs) corresponding to two given sample geometries, a beaker of small diameter laid over the detector window and a beaker of large capacity which wrap the detector. This methodology is a generalization of a previously published work, which was limited to beakers placed over the window of the detector with a diameter equal or smaller than the crystal diameter, so that the crystal mount cap (which surround the lateral surface of the crystal), was not considered in the detector model. The generalization has been accomplished not only by including such a mount cap in the model, but also using multi-objective optimization instead of mono-objective, with the aim of building a model sufficiently accurate for a wider variety of beakers commonly used for the measurement of environmental samples by gamma spectrometry, like for instance, Marinellis, Petris, or any other beaker with a diameter larger than the crystal diameter, for which part of the detected radiation have to pass through the mount cap. The proposed methodology has been applied to an HPGe XtRa detector, providing a model of detector which has been successfully verificated for different source-detector geometries and materials and experimentally validated using CRMs.

  4. Computer Tomography from Micro-Electronics to Assembled Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Bryant

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional CT in our industry has been limited to Business card sized samples, due to the Cone Beam x-ray systems used by Electronics manufacturing companies. Inclined or Partial CT provides a slightly different solution showing layers or slices in 2D very well, but due to the partial nature of the scans does not produce very accurate 3D reconstructions. This seminar will look at more sophisticated x-ray systems, including dual tube units, which can image at sub-micron level and have the ability to build an accurate and detailed 3D image of a tablet or smart phone without any stitching or joining of images. With high quality reconstruction software, these images can easily be manipulated to allow key features or failure sites to be easily seen. These systems are being used in Failure Analysis but also in NPI and in the design and development process as CAD data can be overlaid and metrology is also possible with some systems.

  5. General Geometry and Geometry of Electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdiyev, Shervgi S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that Electromagnetism creates geometry different from Riemannian geometry. General geometry including Riemannian geometry as a special case is constructed. It is proven that the most simplest special case of General Geometry is geometry underlying Electromagnetism. Action for electromagnetic field and Maxwell equations are derived from curvature function of geometry underlying Electromagnetism. And it is shown that equation of motion for a particle interacting with electromagnetic...

  6. Studies of electron collisions with polyatomic molecules using distributed-memory parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstead, C.; Hipes, P.G.; Lima, M.A.P.; McKoy, V.

    1991-01-01

    Elastic electron scattering cross sections from 5--30 eV are reported for the molecules C 2 H 4 , C 2 H 6 , C 3 H 8 , Si 2 H 6 , and GeH 4 , obtained using an implementation of the Schwinger multichannel method for distributed-memory parallel computer architectures. These results, obtained within the static-exchange approximation, are in generally good agreement with the available experimental data. These calculations demonstrate the potential of highly parallel computation in the study of collisions between low-energy electrons and polyatomic gases. The computational methodology discussed is also directly applicable to the calculation of elastic cross sections at higher levels of approximation (target polarization) and of electronic excitation cross sections

  7. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  8. THE TEACHING OF GEOMETRY SUPPORTED BY COMPUTERS: A NEW REALITY IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL / LA ENSEÑANZA DE LA GEOMETRÍA ASISTIDA POR COMPUTADORAS: UNA NUEVA REALIDAD EN LA SECUNDARIA BÁSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Fonseca Pérez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With the third revolution in the educational system in Cuba, schools are provided with new technologies, among them: computers, constituting a challenge for its usage in the teaching-learning process. Being aware that the learning of Geometry presents difficulties proved in different moments and by different people, this work offers methodological words of advice for teachers and it shows some activities designed where it is used a computer´ program of application as it is Geometry, which eases to reveal its potentialities and transform the teaching-learning process of Geometry and takes into account the levels of development of the geometric thought, the formation of stages in the mental actions and the didactic for a developing process. In its implementation, in the referential provincial center, are shown significant changes in the learners.

  9. Quantum computation in semiconductor quantum dots of electron-spin asymmetric anisotropic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiang; Zhu Shiqun

    2007-01-01

    The universal quantum computation is obtained when there exists asymmetric anisotropic exchange between electron spins in coupled semiconductor quantum dots. The asymmetric Heisenberg model can be transformed into the isotropic model through the control of two local unitary rotations for the realization of essential quantum gates. The rotations on each qubit are symmetrical and depend on the strength and orientation of asymmetric exchange. The implementation of the axially symmetric local magnetic fields can assist the construction of quantum logic gates in anisotropic coupled quantum dots. This proposal can efficiently use each physical electron spin as a logical qubit in the universal quantum computation

  10. Gersch-Rodriguez-Smith computation of deep inelastic electron scattering on 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viviani, M.; Kievsky, A.; Rinat, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We compute cross sections for inclusive scattering of high-energy electrons on 4 He, based on the two lowest orders of the Gersch-Rodriguez-Smith series. The required one- and two-particle density matrices are obtained from nonrelativistic 4 He wave functions using realistic models for the nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interaction. The computed results for E=3.6 GeV agree well with the NE3 SLAC-Virginia data

  11. The utilization of electronic computers for bone density measurements with iodine 125 profile scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.

    1974-01-01

    The utilization of electronic computers in the determination of the mineral content in bone with the 125 I profile scanner offers many advantages. The computer considerably lessens intensive work of routine evaluation. It enables the direct calculation of the attenuation coefficients. This means a greater accuracy and correctness of the results compared to the former 'graphical' method, as the approximations are eliminated and reference errors are avoided. (orig./LH) [de

  12. Evaluating Electronic Customer Relationship Management Performance: Case Studies from Persian Automotive and Computer Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Safari, Narges; Safari, Fariba; Olesen, Karin; Shahmehr, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    This research paper investigates the influence of industry on electronic customer relationship management (e-CRM) performance. A case study approach with two cases was applied to evaluate the influence of e-CRM on customer behavioral and attitudinal loyalty along with customer pyramid. The cases covered two industries consisting of computer and automotive industries. For investigating customer behavioral loyalty and customer pyramid companies database were computed while for examining custome...

  13. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  14. Simulation of electronic structure Hamiltonians in a superconducting quantum computer architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaicher, Michael; Wilhelm, Frank K. [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Love, Peter J. [Department of Physics, Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania 19041 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Quantum chemistry has become one of the most promising applications within the field of quantum computation. Simulating the electronic structure Hamiltonian (ESH) in the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK)-Basis to compute the ground state energies of atoms/molecules reduces the number of qubit operations needed to simulate a single fermionic operation to O(log(n)) as compared to O(n) in the Jordan-Wigner-Transformation. In this work we will present the details of the BK-Transformation, show an example of implementation in a superconducting quantum computer architecture and compare it to the most recent quantum chemistry algorithms suggesting a constant overhead.

  15. The Need for Optical Means as an Alternative for Electronic Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adbeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald; Witherow, William; Paley, Steve; Penn, Benjamin; Bank, Curtis; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An increasing demand for faster computers is rapidly growing to encounter the fast growing rate of Internet, space communication, and robotic industry. Unfortunately, the Very Large Scale Integration technology is approaching its fundamental limits beyond which the device will be unreliable. Optical interconnections and optical integrated circuits are strongly believed to provide the way out of the extreme limitations imposed on the growth of speed and complexity of nowadays computations by conventional electronics. This paper demonstrates two ultra-fast, all-optical logic gates and a high-density storage medium, which are essential components in building the future optical computer.

  16. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuromorphic computing enabled by physics of electron spins: Prospects and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Roy, Kaushik

    2018-03-01

    “Spintronics” refers to the understanding of the physics of electron spin-related phenomena. While most of the significant advancements in this field has been driven primarily by memory, recent research has demonstrated that various facets of the underlying physics of spin transport and manipulation can directly mimic the functionalities of the computational primitives in neuromorphic computation, i.e., the neurons and synapses. Given the potential of these spintronic devices to implement bio-mimetic computations at very low terminal voltages, several spin-device structures have been proposed as the core building blocks of neuromorphic circuits and systems to implement brain-inspired computing. Such an approach is expected to play a key role in circumventing the problems of ever-increasing power dissipation and hardware requirements for implementing neuro-inspired algorithms in conventional digital CMOS technology. Perspectives on spin-enabled neuromorphic computing, its status, and challenges and future prospects are outlined in this review article.

  18. 78 FR 63492 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-847] Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is...

  19. Assessment of coronary artery bypass graft patency by multidetector computed tomography and electron-beam tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, LH; Dorgelo, J; Tio, RA; Jessurun, GAJ; Oudkerk, M; Zijlstra, F

    This case report describes the use of retrospectively ECG-gated 16-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and electron-beam tomography (EBT) for assessing bypass graft patency in two patients with recurrent angina after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The results of each tomographic

  20. Separation of electron ion ring components (computational simulation and experimental results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, V.S.; Dolbilov, G.V.; Kazarinov, N.Yu.; Mironov, V.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Perel'shtejn, Eh.A.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Shevtsov, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of the available polarization value of electron-ion rings in the regime of acceleration and separation of its components at the final stage of acceleration are studied. The results of computational simulation by use of the macroparticle method and experiments on the ring acceleration and separation are given. The comparison of calculation results with experiment is presented

  1. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROCHEMISTRY: AQUEOUS ONE-ELECTRON OXIDATION POTENTIALS FOR SUBSTITUTED ANILINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiempirical molecular orbital theory and density functional theory are used to compute one-electron oxidation potentials for aniline and a set of 21 mono- and di-substituted anilines in aqueous solution. Linear relationships between theoretical predictions and experiment are co...

  2. An approach to first principles electronic structure calculation by symbolic-numeric computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Kikuchi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide variety of electronic structure calculation cooperating with symbolic computation. The main purpose of the latter is to play an auxiliary role (but not without importance to the former. In the field of quantum physics [1-9], researchers sometimes have to handle complicated mathematical expressions, whose derivation seems almost beyond human power. Thus one resorts to the intensive use of computers, namely, symbolic computation [10-16]. Examples of this can be seen in various topics: atomic energy levels, molecular dynamics, molecular energy and spectra, collision and scattering, lattice spin models and so on [16]. How to obtain molecular integrals analytically or how to manipulate complex formulas in many body interactions, is one such problem. In the former, when one uses special atomic basis for a specific purpose, to express the integrals by the combination of already known analytic functions, may sometimes be very difficult. In the latter, one must rearrange a number of creation and annihilation operators in a suitable order and calculate the analytical expectation value. It is usual that a quantitative and massive computation follows a symbolic one; for the convenience of the numerical computation, it is necessary to reduce a complicated analytic expression into a tractable and computable form. This is the main motive for the introduction of the symbolic computation as a forerunner of the numerical one and their collaboration has won considerable successes. The present work should be classified as one such trial. Meanwhile, the use of symbolic computation in the present work is not limited to indirect and auxiliary part to the numerical computation. The present work can be applicable to a direct and quantitative estimation of the electronic structure, skipping conventional computational methods.

  3. Psychiatrists' Comfort Using Computers and Other Electronic Devices in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Farifteh F; Fochtmann, Laura J; Clarke, Diana E; Barber, Keila; Hong, Seung-Hee; Yager, Joel; Mościcki, Eve K; Plovnick, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    This report highlights findings from the Study of Psychiatrists' Use of Informational Resources in Clinical Practice, a cross-sectional Web- and paper-based survey that examined psychiatrists' comfort using computers and other electronic devices in clinical practice. One-thousand psychiatrists were randomly selected from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile and asked to complete the survey between May and August, 2012. A total of 152 eligible psychiatrists completed the questionnaire (response rate 22.2 %). The majority of psychiatrists reported comfort using computers for educational and personal purposes. However, 26 % of psychiatrists reported not using or not being comfortable using computers for clinical functions. Psychiatrists under age 50 were more likely to report comfort using computers for all purposes than their older counterparts. Clinical tasks for which computers were reportedly used comfortably, specifically by psychiatrists younger than 50, included documenting clinical encounters, prescribing, ordering laboratory tests, accessing read-only patient information (e.g., test results), conducting internet searches for general clinical information, accessing online patient educational materials, and communicating with patients or other clinicians. Psychiatrists generally reported comfort using computers for personal and educational purposes. However, use of computers in clinical care was less common, particularly among psychiatrists 50 and older. Information and educational resources need to be available in a variety of accessible, user-friendly, computer and non-computer-based formats, to support use across all ages. Moreover, ongoing training and technical assistance with use of electronic and mobile device technologies in clinical practice is needed. Research on barriers to clinical use of computers is warranted.

  4. Psychiatrists’ Comfort Using Computers and Other Electronic Devices in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochtmann, Laura J.; Clarke, Diana E.; Barber, Keila; Hong, Seung-Hee; Yager, Joel; Mościcki, Eve K.; Plovnick, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    This report highlights findings from the Study of Psychiatrists’ Use of Informational Resources in Clinical Practice, a cross-sectional Web- and paper-based survey that examined psychiatrists’ comfort using computers and other electronic devices in clinical practice. One-thousand psychiatrists were randomly selected from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile and asked to complete the survey between May and August, 2012. A total of 152 eligible psychiatrists completed the questionnaire (response rate 22.2 %). The majority of psychiatrists reported comfort using computers for educational and personal purposes. However, 26 % of psychiatrists reported not using or not being comfortable using computers for clinical functions. Psychiatrists under age 50 were more likely to report comfort using computers for all purposes than their older counterparts. Clinical tasks for which computers were reportedly used comfortably, specifically by psychiatrists younger than 50, included documenting clinical encounters, prescribing, ordering laboratory tests, accessing read-only patient information (e.g., test results), conducting internet searches for general clinical information, accessing online patient educational materials, and communicating with patients or other clinicians. Psychiatrists generally reported comfort using computers for personal and educational purposes. However, use of computers in clinical care was less common, particularly among psychiatrists 50 and older. Information and educational resources need to be available in a variety of accessible, user-friendly, computer and non-computer-based formats, to support use across all ages. Moreover, ongoing training and technical assistance with use of electronic and mobile device technologies in clinical practice is needed. Research on barriers to clinical use of computers is warranted. PMID:26667248

  5. Electron correlation in molecules: concurrent computation Many-Body Perturbation Theory (ccMBPT) calculations using macrotasking on the NEC SX-3/44 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncrieff, D.; Wilson, S.

    1992-06-01

    The ab initio determination of the electronic structure of molecules is a many-fermion problem involving the approximate description of the motion of the electrons in the field of fixed nuclei. It is an area of research which demands considerable computational resources but having enormous potential in fields as diverse as interstellar chemistry and drug design, catalysis and solid state chemistry, molecular biology and environmental chemistry. Electronic structure calculations almost invariably divide into two main stages: the approximate solution of an independent electron model, in which each electron moves in the average field created by the other electrons in the system, and then, the more computationally demanding determination of a series of corrections to this model, the electron correlation effects. The many-body perturbation theory expansion affords a systematic description of correlation effects, which leads directly to algorithms which are suitable for concurrent computation. We term this concurrent computation Many-Body Perturbation Theory (ccMBPT). The use of a dynamic load balancing technique on the NEC SX-3/44 computer in electron correlation calculations is investigated for the calculation of the most demanding energy component in the most accurate of contemporary ab initio studies. An application to the ground state of the nitrogen molecule is described. We also briefly discuss the extent to which the calculation of the dominant corrections to such studies can be rendered computationally tractable by exploiting both the vector processing and parallel processor capabilities of the NEC SX-3/44 computer. (author)

  6. Capabilities and Advantages of Cloud Computing in the Implementation of Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Aslani, Nasim

    2018-01-01

    With regard to the high cost of the Electronic Health Record (EHR), in recent years the use of new technologies, in particular cloud computing, has increased. The purpose of this study was to review systematically the studies conducted in the field of cloud computing. The present study was a systematic review conducted in 2017. Search was performed in the Scopus, Web of Sciences, IEEE, Pub Med and Google Scholar databases by combination keywords. From the 431 article that selected at the first, after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 27 articles were selected for surveyed. Data gathering was done by a self-made check list and was analyzed by content analysis method. The finding of this study showed that cloud computing is a very widespread technology. It includes domains such as cost, security and privacy, scalability, mutual performance and interoperability, implementation platform and independence of Cloud Computing, ability to search and exploration, reducing errors and improving the quality, structure, flexibility and sharing ability. It will be effective for electronic health record. According to the findings of the present study, higher capabilities of cloud computing are useful in implementing EHR in a variety of contexts. It also provides wide opportunities for managers, analysts and providers of health information systems. Considering the advantages and domains of cloud computing in the establishment of HER, it is recommended to use this technology.

  7. Inconsistency in 9 mm bullets: correlation of jacket thickness to post-impact geometry measured with non-destructive X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornby, John; Landheer, Dirk; Williams, Tim; Barnes-Warden, Jane; Fenne, Paul; Norman, Danielle G; Attridge, Alex; Williams, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental to any ballistic armour standard is the reference projectile to be defeated. Typically, for certification purposes, a consistent and symmetrical bullet geometry is assumed, however variations in bullet jacket dimensions can have far reaching consequences. Traditionally, characteristics and internal dimensions have been analysed by physically sectioning bullets--an approach which is of restricted scope and which precludes subsequent ballistic assessment. The use of a non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) method has been demonstrated and validated (Kumar et al., 2011 [15]); the authors now apply this technique to correlate bullet impact response with jacket thickness variations. A set of 20 bullets (9 mm DM11) were selected for comparison and an image-based analysis method was employed to map jacket thickness and determine the centre of gravity of each specimen. Both intra- and inter-bullet variations were investigated, with thickness variations of the order of 200 μm commonly found along the length of all bullets and angular variations of up to 50 μm in some. The bullets were subsequently impacted against a rigid flat plate under controlled conditions (observed on a high-speed video camera) and the resulting deformed projectiles were re-analysed. The results of the experiments demonstrate a marked difference in ballistic performance between bullets from different manufacturers and an asymmetric thinning of the jacket is observed in regions of pre-impact weakness. The conclusions are relevant for future soft armour standards and provide important quantitative data for numerical model correlation and development. The implications of the findings of the work on the reliability and repeatability of the industry standard V50 ballistic test are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Matter in toy dynamical geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konopka, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of theories describing quantum dynamical geometry is to compute expectation values of geometrical observables. The results of such computations can be affected by whether or not matter is taken into account. It is thus important to understand to what extent and to what effect

  9. Molecular Computational Investigation of Electron Transfer Kinetics across Cytochrome-Iron Oxide Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Valiev, Marat

    2007-01-01

    The interface between electron transfer proteins such as cytochromes and solid phase mineral oxides is central to the activity of dissimilatory-metal reducing bacteria. A combination of potential-based molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic structure calculations are used in the framework of Marcus' electron transfer theory to compute elementary electron transfer rates from a well-defined cytochrome model, namely the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) from Shewanella oneidensis, to surfaces of the iron oxide mineral hematite (a-Fe2O3). Room temperature molecular dynamics simulations show that an isolated STC molecule favors surface attachment via direct contact of hemes I and IV at the poles of the elongated axis, with electron transfer distances as small as 9 Angstroms. The cytochrome remains attached to the mineral surface in the presence of water and shows limited surface diffusion at the interface. Ab initio electronic coupling matrix element (VAB) calculations of configurations excised from the molecular dynamics simulations reveal VAB values ranging from 1 to 20 cm-1, consistent with nonadiabaticity. Using these results, together with experimental data on the redox potential of hematite and hemes in relevant cytochromes and calculations of the reorganization energy from cluster models, we estimate the rate of electron transfer across this model interface to range from 1 to 1000 s-1 for the most exothermic driving force considered in this work, and from 0.01 to 20 s-1 for the most endothermic. This fairly large range of electron transfer rates highlights the sensitivity of the rate upon the electronic coupling matrix element, which is in turn dependent on the fluctuations of the heme configuration at the interface. We characterize this dependence using an idealized bis-imidazole heme to compute from first principles the VAB variation due to porphyrin ring orientation, electron transfer distance, and mineral surface termination. The electronic

  10. Multilevel geometry optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jocelyn M.; Fast, Patton L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2000-02-01

    Geometry optimization has been carried out for three test molecules using six multilevel electronic structure methods, in particular Gaussian-2, Gaussian-3, multicoefficient G2, multicoefficient G3, and two multicoefficient correlation methods based on correlation-consistent basis sets. In the Gaussian-2 and Gaussian-3 methods, various levels are added and subtracted with unit coefficients, whereas the multicoefficient Gaussian-x methods involve noninteger parameters as coefficients. The multilevel optimizations drop the average error in the geometry (averaged over the 18 cases) by a factor of about two when compared to the single most expensive component of a given multilevel calculation, and in all 18 cases the accuracy of the atomization energy for the three test molecules improves; with an average improvement of 16.7 kcal/mol.

  11. Multilevel geometry optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Jocelyn M. [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputer Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); Fast, Patton L. [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputer Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); Truhlar, Donald G. [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputer Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States)

    2000-02-15

    Geometry optimization has been carried out for three test molecules using six multilevel electronic structure methods, in particular Gaussian-2, Gaussian-3, multicoefficient G2, multicoefficient G3, and two multicoefficient correlation methods based on correlation-consistent basis sets. In the Gaussian-2 and Gaussian-3 methods, various levels are added and subtracted with unit coefficients, whereas the multicoefficient Gaussian-x methods involve noninteger parameters as coefficients. The multilevel optimizations drop the average error in the geometry (averaged over the 18 cases) by a factor of about two when compared to the single most expensive component of a given multilevel calculation, and in all 18 cases the accuracy of the atomization energy for the three test molecules improves; with an average improvement of 16.7 kcal/mol. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Advances in discrete differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This is one of the first books on a newly emerging field of discrete differential geometry and an excellent way to access this exciting area. It surveys the fascinating connections between discrete models in differential geometry and complex analysis, integrable systems and applications in computer graphics. The authors take a closer look at discrete models in differential geometry and dynamical systems. Their curves are polygonal, surfaces are made from triangles and quadrilaterals, and time is discrete. Nevertheless, the difference between the corresponding smooth curves, surfaces and classical dynamical systems with continuous time can hardly be seen. This is the paradigm of structure-preserving discretizations. Current advances in this field are stimulated to a large extent by its relevance for computer graphics and mathematical physics. This book is written by specialists working together on a common research project. It is about differential geometry and dynamical systems, smooth and discrete theories, ...

  13. Reconciliation of the cloud computing model with US federal electronic health record regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Eugene J

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing refers to subscription-based, fee-for-service utilization of computer hardware and software over the Internet. The model is gaining acceptance for business information technology (IT) applications because it allows capacity and functionality to increase on the fly without major investment in infrastructure, personnel or licensing fees. Large IT investments can be converted to a series of smaller operating expenses. Cloud architectures could potentially be superior to traditional electronic health record (EHR) designs in terms of economy, efficiency and utility. A central issue for EHR developers in the US is that these systems are constrained by federal regulatory legislation and oversight. These laws focus on security and privacy, which are well-recognized challenges for cloud computing systems in general. EHRs built with the cloud computing model can achieve acceptable privacy and security through business associate contracts with cloud providers that specify compliance requirements, performance metrics and liability sharing.

  14. Reconciliation of the cloud computing model with US federal electronic health record regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing refers to subscription-based, fee-for-service utilization of computer hardware and software over the Internet. The model is gaining acceptance for business information technology (IT) applications because it allows capacity and functionality to increase on the fly without major investment in infrastructure, personnel or licensing fees. Large IT investments can be converted to a series of smaller operating expenses. Cloud architectures could potentially be superior to traditional electronic health record (EHR) designs in terms of economy, efficiency and utility. A central issue for EHR developers in the US is that these systems are constrained by federal regulatory legislation and oversight. These laws focus on security and privacy, which are well-recognized challenges for cloud computing systems in general. EHRs built with the cloud computing model can achieve acceptable privacy and security through business associate contracts with cloud providers that specify compliance requirements, performance metrics and liability sharing. PMID:21727204

  15. Current-voltage curves for molecular junctions computed using all-electron basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Lawson, John W.

    2006-01-01

    We present current-voltage (I-V) curves computed using all-electron basis sets on the conducting molecule. The all-electron results are very similar to previous results obtained using effective core potentials (ECP). A hybrid integration scheme is used that keeps the all-electron calculations cost competitive with respect to the ECP calculations. By neglecting the coupling of states to the contacts below a fixed energy cutoff, the density matrix for the core electrons can be evaluated analytically. The full density matrix is formed by adding this core contribution to the valence part that is evaluated numerically. Expanding the definition of the core in the all-electron calculations significantly reduces the computational effort and, up to biases of about 2 V, the results are very similar to those obtained using more rigorous approaches. The convergence of the I-V curves and transmission coefficients with respect to basis set is discussed. The addition of diffuse functions is critical in approaching basis set completeness

  16. Effect of build geometry on the β-grain structure and texture in additive manufacture of Ti-6Al-4V by selective electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonysamy, A.A.; Meyer, J.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    With titanium alloys, the solidification conditions in Additive Manufacturing (AM) frequently lead to coarse columnar β-grain structures. The effect of geometry on the variability in the grain structure and texture, seen in Ti-6Al-4V alloy components produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM), has been investigated. Reconstruction of the primary β-phase, from α-phase EBSD data, has confirmed that in bulk sections where in-fill “hatching” is employed growth selection favours columnar grains aligned with an β direction normal to the deposited powder layers; this results in a coarse β-grain structure with a strong β fibre texture (up 8 x random) that can oscillate between a near random distribution around the fibre axis and cube reinforcement with build height. It is proposed that this behaviour is related to the highly elongated melt pool and the raster directions alternating between two orthogonal directions every layer, which on average favours grains with cube alignment. In contrast, the outline, or “contour”, pass produces a distinctly different grain structure and texture resulting in a skin layer on wall surfaces, where nucleation occurs off the surrounding powder and growth follows the curved surface of the melt pool. This structure becomes increasingly important in thin sections. Local heterogeneities have also been found within different section transitions, resulting from the growth of skin grain structures into thicker sections. Texture simulations have shown that the far weaker α-texture (∼ 3 x random), seen in the final product, arises from transformation on cooling occurring with a near random distribution of α-plates across the 12 variants possible from the Burgers relationship. - Highlights: • Distinctly different skin and bulk structures are produced by the contour and hatching passes. • Bulk sections contain coarse β-grains with a fibre texture in the build direction. • This oscillates between a random distribution

  17. Effect of build geometry on the β-grain structure and texture in additive manufacture of Ti-6Al-4V by selective electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonysamy, A.A., E-mail: alphons.antonysamy@GKNAerospace.com [Additive Manufacturing Centre, GKN Aerospace, P.O. Box 500, Golf Course Lane, Filton, BS34 9 AU (United Kingdom); Meyer, J., E-mail: jonathan.meyer@eads.com [EADS Innovation Works, 20A1 Building, Golf Course Lane, Filton, Bristol, BS997AR (United Kingdom); Prangnell, P.B., E-mail: philip.prangnell@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    With titanium alloys, the solidification conditions in Additive Manufacturing (AM) frequently lead to coarse columnar β-grain structures. The effect of geometry on the variability in the grain structure and texture, seen in Ti-6Al-4V alloy components produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM), has been investigated. Reconstruction of the primary β-phase, from α-phase EBSD data, has confirmed that in bulk sections where in-fill “hatching” is employed growth selection favours columnar grains aligned with an <001> {sub β} direction normal to the deposited powder layers; this results in a coarse β-grain structure with a strong < 001 > {sub β} fibre texture (up 8 x random) that can oscillate between a near random distribution around the fibre axis and cube reinforcement with build height. It is proposed that this behaviour is related to the highly elongated melt pool and the raster directions alternating between two orthogonal directions every layer, which on average favours grains with cube alignment. In contrast, the outline, or “contour”, pass produces a distinctly different grain structure and texture resulting in a skin layer on wall surfaces, where nucleation occurs off the surrounding powder and growth follows the curved surface of the melt pool. This structure becomes increasingly important in thin sections. Local heterogeneities have also been found within different section transitions, resulting from the growth of skin grain structures into thicker sections. Texture simulations have shown that the far weaker α-texture (∼ 3 x random), seen in the final product, arises from transformation on cooling occurring with a near random distribution of α-plates across the 12 variants possible from the Burgers relationship. - Highlights: • Distinctly different skin and bulk structures are produced by the contour and hatching passes. • Bulk sections contain coarse β-grains with a < 001 > fibre texture in the build direction. • This

  18. Radiation defects in Te-implanted germanium. Electron microscopy and computer simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalitzova, M.G.; Karpuzov, D.S.; Pashov, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    Direct observation of radiation damage induced by heavy ion implantation in crystalline germanium by means of high-resolution electron microscopy is reported. The dark-field lattice imaging mode is used, under conditions suitable for object-like imaging. Conventional TEM is used for estimating the efficiency of creating visibly damaged regions. Heavy ion damage clusters with three types of inner structure are observed: with near-perfect crystalline cores, and with metastable and stable amorphous cores. The MARLOWE computer code is used to simulate the atomic collision cascades and to obtain the lateral spread distributions of point defects created. A comparison of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) with computer simulation results shows encouraging agreement for the average cluster dimensions and for the lateral spread of vacancies and interstitials. (author)

  19. Plant Layout Analysis by Computer Simulation for Electronic Manufacturing Service Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Visuwan D.; Phruksaphanrat B

    2014-01-01

    In this research, computer simulation is used for Electronic Manufacturing Service (EMS) plant layout analysis. The current layout of this manufacturing plant is a process layout, which is not suitable due to the nature of an EMS that has high-volume and high-variety environment. Moreover, quick response and high flexibility are also needed. Then, cellular manufacturing layout design was determined for the selected group of products. Systematic layout planning (SLP) was used to analyze and de...

  20. Full surface examination of small spheres with a computer controlled scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, C.M.; Willenborg, D.L.; Montgomery, K.L.

    1979-01-01

    This report discusses a computer automated stage and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) system for detecting defects in glass spheres for inertial confinement laser fusion experiments. This system detects submicron defects and permits inclusion of acceptable spheres in targets after examination. The stage used to examine and manipulate the spheres through 4π steradians is described. Primary image recording is made on a roster scanning video disc. The need for SEM stability and methods of achieving it are discussed

  1. A computer-controlled electronic system for the ultrasonic NDT of components for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehrmann, M.; Harbecke, D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes an automatic ultrasonic testing system combined with a computer-controlled electronics system, called IMPULS I, for the non-destructive testing of components of nuclear reactors. The system can be used for both in-service inspection and for inspection during the manufacturing process. IMPUL I has more functions and less components than conventional ultrasonic systems, and the system gives good reproducible test results and is easy to operate. (U.K.)

  2. Maximal thickness of the normal human pericardium assessed by electron-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delille, J.P.; Hernigou, A.; Sene, V.; Chatellier, G.; Boudeville, J.C.; Challande, P.; Plainfosse, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal value of normal pericardial thickness with an electron-beam computed tomography unit allowing fast scan times of 100 ms to reduce cardiac motion artifacts. Electron-beam computed tomography was performed in 260 patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension, as these pathologies have no effect on pericardial thickness. The pixel size was 0.5 mm. Measurements could be performed in front of the right ventricle, the right atrioventricular groove, the right atrium, the left ventricle, and the interventricular groove. Maximal thickness of normal pericardium was defined at the 95th percentile. Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility studies were assessed from additional CT scans by the Bland and Altman method [24]. The maximal thickness of the normal pericardium was 2 mm for 95 % of cases. For the reproducibility studies, there was no significant relationship between the inter-observer and intra-observer measurements, but all pericardial thickness measurements were ≤ 1.6 mm. Using electron-beam computed tomography, which assists in decreasing substantially cardiac motion artifacts, the threshold of detection of thickened pericardium is statistically established as being 2 mm for 95 % of the patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension. However, the spatial resolution available prevents a reproducible measure of the real thickness of thin pericardium. (orig.)

  3. Maximal thickness of the normal human pericardium assessed by electron-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delille, J.P.; Hernigou, A.; Sene, V.; Chatellier, G.; Boudeville, J.C.; Challande, P.; Plainfosse, M.C. [Service de Radiologie Centrale, Hopital Broussais, Paris (France)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal value of normal pericardial thickness with an electron-beam computed tomography unit allowing fast scan times of 100 ms to reduce cardiac motion artifacts. Electron-beam computed tomography was performed in 260 patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension, as these pathologies have no effect on pericardial thickness. The pixel size was 0.5 mm. Measurements could be performed in front of the right ventricle, the right atrioventricular groove, the right atrium, the left ventricle, and the interventricular groove. Maximal thickness of normal pericardium was defined at the 95th percentile. Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility studies were assessed from additional CT scans by the Bland and Altman method [24]. The maximal thickness of the normal pericardium was 2 mm for 95 % of cases. For the reproducibility studies, there was no significant relationship between the inter-observer and intra-observer measurements, but all pericardial thickness measurements were {<=} 1.6 mm. Using electron-beam computed tomography, which assists in decreasing substantially cardiac motion artifacts, the threshold of detection of thickened pericardium is statistically established as being 2 mm for 95 % of the patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension. However, the spatial resolution available prevents a reproducible measure of the real thickness of thin pericardium. (orig.) With 6 figs., 1 tab., 31 refs.

  4. Rational design of metal-organic electronic devices: A computational perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilukuri, Bhaskar

    Organic and organometallic electronic materials continue to attract considerable attention among researchers due to their cost effectiveness, high flexibility, low temperature processing conditions and the continuous emergence of new semiconducting materials with tailored electronic properties. In addition, organic semiconductors can be used in a variety of important technological devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors (FETs), flash memory, radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, light emitting diodes (LEDs), etc. However, organic materials have thus far not achieved the reliability and carrier mobility obtainable with inorganic silicon-based devices. Hence, there is a need for finding alternative electronic materials other than organic semiconductors to overcome the problems of inferior stability and performance. In this dissertation, I research the development of new transition metal based electronic materials which due to the presence of metal-metal, metal-pi, and pi-pi interactions may give rise to superior electronic and chemical properties versus their organic counterparts. Specifically, I performed computational modeling studies on platinum based charge transfer complexes and d 10 cyclo-[M(mu-L)]3 trimers (M = Ag, Au and L = monoanionic bidentate bridging (C/N~C/N) ligand). The research done is aimed to guide experimental chemists to make rational choices of metals, ligands, substituents in synthesizing novel organometallic electronic materials. Furthermore, the calculations presented here propose novel ways to tune the geometric, electronic, spectroscopic, and conduction properties in semiconducting materials. In addition to novel material development, electronic device performance can be improved by making a judicious choice of device components. I have studied the interfaces of a p-type metal-organic semiconductor viz cyclo-[Au(mu-Pz)] 3 trimer with metal electrodes at atomic and surface levels. This work was aimed to guide the device

  5. CBM RICH geometry optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Tariq; Hoehne, Claudia [II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 2-11 AGeV (SIS100) beam energy. The main electron identification detector in the CBM experiment will be a RICH detector with a CO{sub 2} gaseous-radiator, focusing spherical glass mirrors, and MAPMT photo-detectors being placed on a PMT-plane. The RICH detector is located directly behind the CBM dipole magnet. As the final magnet geometry is now available, some changes in the RICH geometry become necessary. In order to guarantee a magnetic field of 1 mT at maximum in the PMT plane for effective operation of the MAPMTs, two measures have to be taken: The PMT plane is moved outwards of the stray field by tilting the mirrors by 10 degrees and shielding boxes have been designed. In this contribution the results of the geometry optimization procedure are presented.

  6. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant (“skin-like”) electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  7. Design Principles for the Atomic and Electronic Structure of Halide Perovskite Photovoltaic Materials: Insights from Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Robert F

    2018-02-09

    In the current decade, perovskite solar cell research has emerged as a remarkably active, promising, and rapidly developing field. Alongside breakthroughs in synthesis and device engineering, halide perovskite photovoltaic materials have been the subject of predictive and explanatory computational work. In this Minireview, we focus on a subset of this computation: density functional theory (DFT)-based work highlighting the ways in which the electronic structure and band gap of this class of materials can be tuned via changes in atomic structure. We distill this body of computational literature into a set of underlying design principles for the band gap engineering of these materials, and rationalize these principles from the viewpoint of band-edge orbital character. We hope that this perspective provides guidance and insight toward the rational design and continued improvement of perovskite photovoltaics. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Some algorithms for the solution of the symmetric eigenvalue problem on a multiprocessor electronic computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molchanov, I.N.; Khimich, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    This article shows how a reflection method can be used to find the eigenvalues of a matrix by transforming the matrix to tridiagonal form. The method of conjugate gradients is used to find the smallest eigenvalue and the corresponding eigenvector of symmetric positive-definite band matrices. Topics considered include the computational scheme of the reflection method, the organization of parallel calculations by the reflection method, the computational scheme of the conjugate gradient method, the organization of parallel calculations by the conjugate gradient method, and the effectiveness of parallel algorithms. It is concluded that it is possible to increase the overall effectiveness of the multiprocessor electronic computers by either letting the newly available processors of a new problem operate in the multiprocessor mode, or by improving the coefficient of uniform partition of the original information

  9. P ≠NP Millenium-Problem(MP) TRIVIAL Physics Proof Via NATURAL TRUMPS Artificial-``Intelligence'' Via: Euclid Geometry, Plato Forms, Aristotle Square-of-Opposition, Menger Dimension-Theory Connections!!! NO Computational-Complexity(CC)/ANYthing!!!: Geometry!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, London; Menger, Karl; Rota, Gian-Carlo; Euclid, Alexandria; Siegel, Edward

    P ≠NP MP proof is by computer-''science''/SEANCE(!!!)(CS) computational-''intelligence'' lingo jargonial-obfuscation(JO) NATURAL-Intelligence(NI) DISambiguation! CS P =(?) =NP MEANS (Deterministic)(PC) = (?) =(Non-D)(PC) i.e. D(P) =(?) = N(P). For inclusion(equality) vs. exclusion (inequality) irrelevant (P) simply cancels!!! (Equally any/all other CCs IF both sides identical). Crucial question left: (D) =(?) =(ND), i.e. D =(?) = N. Algorithmics[Sipser[Intro. Thy.Comp.(`97)-p.49Fig.1.15!!!

  10. Complex analysis and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this wide-ranging collection report on the results of investigations from a number of linked disciplines, including complex algebraic geometry, complex analytic geometry of manifolds and spaces, and complex differential geometry.

  11. Non-Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhart, Luther Pfahler

    2005-01-01

    This concise text by a prominent mathematician deals chiefly with manifolds dominated by the geometry of paths. Topics include asymmetric and symmetric connections, the projective geometry of paths, and the geometry of sub-spaces. 1927 edition.

  12. Computation of quantum electron transport with local current conservation using quantum trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarcón, A; Oriols, X

    2009-01-01

    A recent proposal for modeling time-dependent quantum electron transport with Coulomb and exchange correlations using quantum (Bohm) trajectories (Oriols 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 066803) is extended towards the computation of the total (particle plus displacement) current in mesoscopic devices. In particular, two different methods for the practical computation of the total current are compared. The first method computes the particle and the displacement currents from the rate of Bohm particles crossing a particular surface and the time-dependent variations of the electric field there. The second method uses the Ramo–Shockley theorem to compute the total current on that surface from the knowledge of the Bohm particle dynamics in a 3D volume and the time-dependent variations of the electric field on the boundaries of that volume. From a computational point of view, it is shown that both methods achieve local current conservation, but the second is preferred because it is free from 'spurious' peaks. A numerical example, a Bohm trajectory crossing a double-barrier tunneling structure, is presented, supporting the conclusions

  13. Geometry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  14. Variable geometry Darrieus wind machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytlinski, J. T.; Serrano, D.

    1983-08-01

    A variable geometry Darrieus wind machine is proposed. The lower attachment of the blades to the rotor can move freely up and down the axle allowing the blades of change shape during rotation. Experimental data for a 17 m. diameter Darrieus rotor and a theoretical model for multiple streamtube performance prediction were used to develop a computer simulation program for studying parameters that affect the machine's performance. This new variable geometry concept is described and interrelated with multiple streamtube theory through aerodynamic parameters. The computer simulation study shows that governor behavior of a Darrieus turbine can not be attained by a standard turbine operating within normally occurring rotational velocity limits. A second generation variable geometry Darrieus wind turbine which uses a telescopic blade is proposed as a potential improvement on the studied concept.

  15. Automated processing of dynamic properties of intraventricular pressure by computer program and electronic circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, D; Mahler, Y

    1980-04-01

    A procedure for automatic detection and digital processing of the maximum first derivative of the intraventricular pressure (dp/dtmax), time to dp/dtmax(t - dp/dt) and beat-to-beat intervals have been developed. The procedure integrates simple electronic circuits with a short program using a simple algorithm for the detection of the points of interest. The tasks of differentiating the pressure signal and detecting the onset of contraction were done by electronics, while the tasks of finding the values of dp/dtmax, t - dp/dt, beat-to-beat intervals and all computations needed were done by software. Software/hardware 'trade off' considerations and the accuracy and reliability of the system are discussed.

  16. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10 -6 that is below the error threshold of 10 -4 required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  17. A computational study of the electronic properties of one-dimensional armchair phosphorene nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sheng; Zhu, Hao; Eshun, Kwesi; Arab, Abbas; Badwan, Ahmad; Li, Qiliang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22033 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We have performed a comprehensive first-principle computational study of the electronic properties of one-dimensional phosphorene nanotubes (PNTs), and the strain effect on the mechanical and electrical properties of PNTs, including the elastic modulus, energy bandstructure, and carrier effective mass. The study has demonstrated that the armchair PNTs have semiconducting properties along the axial direction and the carrier mobility can be significantly improved by compressive strain. The hole mobility increases from 40.7 cm{sup 2}/V s to 197.0 cm{sup 2}/V s as the compressive strain increases to −5% at room temperature. The investigations of size effect on armchair PNTs indicated that the conductance increases significantly as the increasing diameter. Overall, this study indicated that the PNTs have very attractive electronic properties for future application in nanomaterials and devices.

  18. Stochastic Modelling of River Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Schaarup-Jensen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic river models are used in a large number of applications to estimate critical events for rivers. These estimates are subject to a number of uncertainties. In this paper, the problem to evaluate these estimates using probabilistic methods is considered. Stochastic models for ...... for river geometries are formulated and a coupling between hydraulic computational methods and numerical reliability methods is presented....

  19. Reproducibility of coronary calcification detection with electron-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernigou, A.; Challande, P.; Boudeville, J.C.; Sene, V.; Grataloup, C.; Plainfosse, M.

    1996-01-01

    If coronary calcification scores obtained with electron-beam computed tomography (EBT) were proved to be correlated to coronary atherosclerosis, the reproducibility of the technique had to be assessed before being useed for patient follow-up. A total of 150 patients, selected as a result of a cholesterol screening programme, were studied by EBT. Twelve contiguous 3-mm-thick transverse slices beginning on the proximal coronary arteries were obtained through the base of the heart. The amount of calcium was evaluated as the calcified area weighted by a coefficient depending on the density peak level. The value was expressed as a logarithmic scale. Intra-observer, inter-observer and inter-examination reproducibilities were calculated. They were 1.9, 1.3 and 7.2%, respectively. These results were good enough to allow the use of EBT for longitudinal studies. The influence of acquisition and calculation conditions on score computation were also analysed. (orig.)

  20. Identify and rank key factors influencing the adoption of cloud computing for a healthy Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Shukuhy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing as a new technology with Internet infrastructure and new approaches can be significant benefits in providing medical services electronically. Aplying this technology in E-Health requires consideration of various factors. The main objective of this study is to identify and rank the factors influencing the adoption of e-health cloud. Based on the Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE framework and Human-Organization-Technology fit (HOT-fit model, 16 sub-factors were identified in four major factors. With survey of 60 experts, academics and experts in health information technology and with the help of fuzzy analytic hierarchy process had ranked these sub-factors and factors. In the literature, considering newness this study, no internal or external study, have not alluded these number of criteria. The results show that when deciding to adopt cloud computing in E-Health, respectively, must be considered technological, human, organizational and environmental factors.

  1. An electron beam linear scanning mode for industrial limited-angle nano-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxiang; Zeng, Li; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Lingli; Guo, Yumeng; Gong, Changcheng

    2018-01-01

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT), which utilizes X-rays to research the inner structure of some small objects and has been widely utilized in biomedical research, electronic technology, geology, material sciences, etc., is a high spatial resolution and non-destructive research technique. A traditional nano-CT scanning model with a very high mechanical precision and stability of object manipulator, which is difficult to reach when the scanned object is continuously rotated, is required for high resolution imaging. To reduce the scanning time and attain a stable and high resolution imaging in industrial non-destructive testing, we study an electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system that can avoid mechanical vibration and object movement caused by the continuously rotated object. Furthermore, to further save the scanning time and study how small the scanning range could be considered with acceptable spatial resolution, an alternating iterative algorithm based on ℓ0 minimization is utilized to limited-angle nano-CT reconstruction problem with the electron beam linear scanning mode. The experimental results confirm the feasibility of the electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system.

  2. Computer-automated tuning of semiconductor double quantum dots into the single-electron regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Eendebak, P. T. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-05-23

    We report the computer-automated tuning of gate-defined semiconductor double quantum dots in GaAs heterostructures. We benchmark the algorithm by creating three double quantum dots inside a linear array of four quantum dots. The algorithm sets the correct gate voltages for all the gates to tune the double quantum dots into the single-electron regime. The algorithm only requires (1) prior knowledge of the gate design and (2) the pinch-off value of the single gate T that is shared by all the quantum dots. This work significantly alleviates the user effort required to tune multiple quantum dot devices.

  3. The ELPA library: scalable parallel eigenvalue solutions for electronic structure theory and computational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, A; Blum, V; Johanni, R; Havu, V; Lang, B; Auckenthaler, T; Heinecke, A; Bungartz, H-J; Lederer, H

    2014-05-28

    Obtaining the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large matrices is a key problem in electronic structure theory and many other areas of computational science. The computational effort formally scales as O(N(3)) with the size of the investigated problem, N (e.g. the electron count in electronic structure theory), and thus often defines the system size limit that practical calculations cannot overcome. In many cases, more than just a small fraction of the possible eigenvalue/eigenvector pairs is needed, so that iterative solution strategies that focus only on a few eigenvalues become ineffective. Likewise, it is not always desirable or practical to circumvent the eigenvalue solution entirely. We here review some current developments regarding dense eigenvalue solvers and then focus on the Eigenvalue soLvers for Petascale Applications (ELPA) library, which facilitates the efficient algebraic solution of symmetric and Hermitian eigenvalue problems for dense matrices that have real-valued and complex-valued matrix entries, respectively, on parallel computer platforms. ELPA addresses standard as well as generalized eigenvalue problems, relying on the well documented matrix layout of the Scalable Linear Algebra PACKage (ScaLAPACK) library but replacing all actual parallel solution steps with subroutines of its own. For these steps, ELPA significantly outperforms the corresponding ScaLAPACK routines and proprietary libraries that implement the ScaLAPACK interface (e.g. Intel's MKL). The most time-critical step is the reduction of the matrix to tridiagonal form and the corresponding backtransformation of the eigenvectors. ELPA offers both a one-step tridiagonalization (successive Householder transformations) and a two-step transformation that is more efficient especially towards larger matrices and larger numbers of CPU cores. ELPA is based on the MPI standard, with an early hybrid MPI-OpenMPI implementation available as well. Scalability beyond 10,000 CPU cores for problem

  4. Teaching strategies applied to teaching computer networks in Engineering in Telecommunications and Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Manuel Castañeda-González

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the large impact that today computer networks, their study in related fields such as Telecommunications Engineering and Electronics is presented to the student with great appeal. However, by digging in content, lacking a strong practical component, you can make this interest decreases considerably. This paper proposes the use of teaching strategies and analogies, media and interactive applications that enhance the teaching of discipline networks and encourage their study. It is part of an analysis of how the teaching of the discipline process is performed and then a description of each of these strategies is done with their respective contribution to student learning.

  5. Development of Computer-Based Training to Supplement Lessons in Fundamentals of Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian P. Benitez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Fundamentals of Electronics allow students to familiarize with basic electronics concepts, acquire skills in the use of multi-meter test instrument, and develop mastery in testing basic electronic components. Actual teaching and doing observations during practical activities on components pin identification and testing showed that the lack of skills of new students in testing components can lead to incorrect fault diagnosis and wrong pin connection during in-circuit replacement of the defective parts. With the aim of reinforcing students with concrete understanding of the concepts of components applied in the actual test and measurement, a Computer-Based Training was developed. The proponent developed the learning modules (courseware utilizing concept mapping and storyboarding instructional design. Developing a courseware as simulated, activity-based and interactive as possible was the primary goal to resemble the real-world process. A Local area network (LAN-based learning management system was also developed to use in administering the learning modules. The Paired Sample T-Test based on the pretest and post-test result was used to determine whether the students achieved learning after taking the courseware. The result revealed that there is a significant achievement of the students after studying the learning module. The E-learning content was validated by the instructors in terms of contents, activities, assessment and format with a grand weighted mean of 4.35 interpreted as Sufficient. Based from the evaluation result, supplementing with the proposed computer-based training can enhance the teachinglearning process in electronic fundamentals.

  6. Investigating the need for clinicians to use tablet computers with a newly envisioned electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Jason J; Savoy, April; Etherton, Gale; Herout, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has deployed a large number of tablet computers in the last several years. However, little is known about how clinicians may use these devices with a newly planned Web-based electronic health record (EHR), as well as other clinical tools. The objective of this study was to understand the types of use that can be expected of tablet computers versus desktops. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 clinicians at a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Medical Center. An inductive qualitative analysis resulted in findings organized around recurrent themes of: (1) Barriers, (2) Facilitators, (3) Current Use, (4) Anticipated Use, (5) Patient Interaction, and (6) Connection. Our study generated several recommendations for the use of tablet computers with new health information technology tools being developed. Continuous connectivity for the mobile device is essential to avoid interruptions and clinician frustration. Also, making a physical keyboard available as an option for the tablet was a clear desire from the clinicians. Larger tablets (e.g., regular size iPad as compared to an iPad mini) were preferred. Being able to use secure messaging tools with the tablet computer was another consistent finding. Finally, more simplicity is needed for accessing patient data on mobile devices, while balancing the important need for adequate security. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  8. Device controllers using an industrial personal computer of the PF 2.5-GeV Electron Linac at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Yuji; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Kakihara, Kazuhisa; Ogawa, Yujiro; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Shidara, Tetsuo; Nakahara, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    Device controllers for electron guns and slits using an industrial personal computer have been designed and installed in the Photon Factory 2.5-GeV Electron Linac at KEK. The design concept of the controllers is to realize a reliable system and good productivity of hardware and software by using an industrial personal computer and a programmable sequence controller. The device controllers have been working reliably for several years. (author)

  9. XVI International symposium on nuclear electronics and VI International school on automation and computing in nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churin, I.N.

    1995-01-01

    Reports and papers of the 16- International Symposium on nuclear electronics and the 6- International school on automation and computing in nuclear physics and astrophysics are presented. The latest achievements in the field of development of fact - response electronic circuits designed for detecting and spectrometric facilities are studied. The peculiar attention is paid to the systems for acquisition, processing and storage of experimental data. The modern equipment designed for data communication in the computer networks is studied

  10. Computer predictions on Rh-based double perovskites with unusual electronic and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Anita; Nafday, Dhani; Sanyal, Prabuddha; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2018-03-01

    In search for new magnetic materials, we make computer prediction of structural, electronic and magnetic properties of yet-to-be synthesized Rh-based double perovskite compounds, Sr(Ca)2BRhO6 (B=Cr, Mn, Fe). We use combination of evolutionary algorithm, density functional theory, and statistical-mechanical tool for this purpose. We find that the unusual valence of Rh5+ may be stabilized in these compounds through formation of oxygen ligand hole. Interestingly, while the Cr-Rh and Mn-Rh compounds are predicted to be ferromagnetic half-metals, the Fe-Rh compounds are found to be rare examples of antiferromagnetic and metallic transition-metal oxide with three-dimensional electronic structure. The computed magnetic transition temperatures of the predicted compounds, obtained from finite temperature Monte Carlo study of the first principles-derived model Hamiltonian, are found to be reasonably high. The prediction of favorable growth condition of the compounds, reported in our study, obtained through extensive thermodynamic analysis should be useful for future synthesize of this interesting class of materials with intriguing properties.

  11. Data mining technique for a secure electronic payment transaction using MJk-RSA in mobile computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. V., Ramesh Babu; Narayana, G.; Sulaiman, A.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the evolution of the Electronic Learning (E-Learning), one can easily get desired information on computer or mobile system connected through Internet. Currently E-Learning materials are easily accessible on the desktop computer system, but in future, most of the information shall also be available on small digital devices like Mobile, PDA, etc. Most of the E-Learning materials are paid and customer has to pay entire amount through credit/debit card system. Therefore, it is very important to study about the security of the credit/debit card numbers. The present paper is an attempt in this direction and a security technique is presented to secure the credit/debit card numbers supplied over the Internet to access the E-Learning materials or any kind of purchase through Internet. A well known method i.e. Data Cube Technique is used to design the security model of the credit/debit card system. The major objective of this paper is to design a practical electronic payment protocol which is the safest and most secured mode of transaction. This technique may reduce fake transactions which are above 20% at the global level.

  12. Clinical application of electron beam computed tomography in intravenous three-dimensional coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Chufan; Du Zhimin; Hu Chengheng; Li Yi; Zeng Wutao; Ma Hong; Li Xiangmin; Zhou Xuhui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of intravenous three-dimensional coronary angiography using electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) as compared with selective coronary angiography. Methods: Intravenous EBCT and selective coronary angiography were performed during the same period in 38 patients. The value of EBCT angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease was evaluated. Results: The number of coronary arteries adequately evaluated by EBCT angiography was 134 out of 152 vessels (88.2%), including 100% of the left main coronary arteries, 94.7% of the left anterior descending arteries, 81.6% of the left circumflex arteries and 76.3 % of the right coronary arteries. Significantly more left main and heft anterior descending coronary arteries were adequately visualized than the left circumflex and right coronary arteries (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive value of EBCT angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease were 88.0%, 84.6%, 86.8%, 91.7% and 78.6%, respectively. Of the 38 arteries with ≥ 50% stenosis, EBCT underestimated 8, for a sensitivity of 78.9%. Of the 96 arteries without significant stenosis, EBCT overestimated 7 stenosis, for a specificity of 92.7%. Conclusion: Intravenous electron beam computed tomographic coronary angiography is a promising noninvasive method for diagnosing coronary artery disease

  13. A computational perspective of vibrational and electronic analysis of potential photosensitizer 2-chlorothioxanthone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Narmeen; Mansha, Asim; Asim, Sadia; Zahoor, Ameer Fawad; Ghafoor, Sidra; Akbar, Muhammad Usman

    2018-03-01

    This paper deals with combined theoretical and experimental study of geometric, electronic and vibrational properties of 2-chlorothioxanthone (CTX) molecule which is potential photosensitizer. The FT-IR spectrum of CTX in solid phase was recorded in 4000-400 cm-1 region. The UV-Vis. absorption spectrum was also recorded in the laboratory as well as computed at DFT/B3LYP level in five different phases viz. gas, water, DMSO, acetone and ethanol. The quantum mechanics based theoretical IR and Raman spectra were also calculated for the title compound employing HF and DFT functional with 3-21G+, 6-31G+ and 6-311G+, 6-311G++ basis sets, respectively, and assignment of each vibrational frequency has been done on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). A comparison has been made between theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra as well as for the UV-Vis. absorption spectra. The computed infra red & Raman spectra by DFT compared with experimental spectra along with reliable vibrational assignment based on PED. The calculated electronic properties, results of natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, charge distribution, dipole moment and energies have been reported in the paper. Bimolecular quenching of triplet state of CTX in the presence of triethylamine, 2-propanol triethylamine and diazobicyclooctane (DABCO) reflect the interactions between them. The bimolecular quenching rate constant is fastest for interaction of 3CTX in the presence of DABCO reflecting their stronger interactions.

  14. E-commerce, paper and energy use: a case study concerning a Dutch electronic computer retailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogeveen, M.J.; Reijnders, L. [Open University Netherlands, Heerlen (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Impacts of the application of c-commerce on paper and energy use are analysed in a case study concerning a Dutch electronic retailer (e-tailer) of computers. The estimated use of paper associated with the e-tailer concerned was substantially reduced if compared with physical retailing or traditional mail-order retailing. However, the overall effect of e-tailing on paper use strongly depends on customer behaviour. Some characteristics of c-commerce, as practised by the e-tailer concerned, such as diminished floor space requirements, reduced need for personal transport and simplified logistics, improve energy efficiency compared with physical retailing. Substitution of paper information by online information has an energetic effect that is dependent on the time of online information perusal and the extent to which downloaded information is printed. Increasing distances from producers to consumers, outsourcing, and increased use of computers, associated equipment and electronic networks are characteristics of e-commerce that may have an upward effect on energy use. In this case study, the upward effects thereof on energy use were less than the direct energy efficiency gains. However, the indirect effects associated with increased buying power and the rebound effect on transport following from freefalling travel time, greatly exceeded direct energy efficiency gains. (author)

  15. Studies Of Urea Geometry By Means Of Ab Initio Methods And Computer Simulations Of Liquids [estudo Da Geometria Da Uréia Por Métodos Ab Initio E Simulaição Computacional De Líquidos

    OpenAIRE

    Cirino J.J.V.; Bertran C.A.

    2002-01-01

    A study was carried out on the urea geometries using ab initio calculation and Monte Carlo computational simulation of liquids. The ab initio calculated results showed that urea has a non-planar conformation in the gas phase in which the hydrogen atoms are out of the plane formed by the heavy atoms. Free energies associated to the rotation of the amino groups of urea in water were obtained using the Monte Carlo method in which the thermodynamic perturbation theory is implemented. The magnitud...

  16. Fractal geometry of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosolov, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    Microstructural geometry of superconducting structural composites of Ag-Yba 2 Cu 3 O x system with a volumetric shave of silver from 0 to 60% is investigated by light and electron microscopy methods. It is ascertained that the structure of cermets investigated is characterized by fractal geometry which is sufficient for describing the electrical and mechanical properties of these materials

  17. EDF: Computing electron number probability distribution functions in real space from molecular wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, E.; Pendás, A. Martín; Blanco, M. A.

    2008-04-01

    Given an N-electron molecule and an exhaustive partition of the real space ( R) into m arbitrary regions Ω,Ω,…,Ω ( ⋃i=1mΩ=R), the edf program computes all the probabilities P(n,n,…,n) of having exactly n electrons in Ω, n electrons in Ω,…, and n electrons ( n+n+⋯+n=N) in Ω. Each Ω may correspond to a single basin (atomic domain) or several such basins (functional group). In the later case, each atomic domain must belong to a single Ω. The program can manage both single- and multi-determinant wave functions which are read in from an aimpac-like wave function description ( .wfn) file (T.A. Keith et al., The AIMPAC95 programs, http://www.chemistry.mcmaster.ca/aimpac, 1995). For multi-determinantal wave functions a generalization of the original .wfn file has been introduced. The new format is completely backwards compatible, adding to the previous structure a description of the configuration interaction (CI) coefficients and the determinants of correlated wave functions. Besides the .wfn file, edf only needs the overlap integrals over all the atomic domains between the molecular orbitals (MO). After the P(n,n,…,n) probabilities are computed, edf obtains from them several magnitudes relevant to chemical bonding theory, such as average electronic populations and localization/delocalization indices. Regarding spin, edf may be used in two ways: with or without a splitting of the P(n,n,…,n) probabilities into α and β spin components. Program summaryProgram title: edf Catalogue identifier: AEAJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5387 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 52 381 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer

  18. Geometry and electronic structure of an impurity-trapped exciton in the Cs2GeF6 crystal doped with U4+. The 5f17s1 manifold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordejon, B.; Seijo, L.; Barandiaran, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Excitons trapped at impurity centres in highly ionic crystals were first described by McClure and Pedrini [Phys. Rev. B 32, 8465 (1985)] as excited states consisting of a bound electron-hole pair with the hole localized on the impurity and the electron on nearby lattice sites, and a very short impurity-ligand bond length. In this work we present a detailed microscopic characterization of an impurity - trapped exciton in Cs 2 GeF 6 doped with U 4+ . Its electronic structure has been studied by means of CASSCF/CASPT2/SOCI relativistic ab initio model potential (AIMP) embedded-cluster calculations on (UF 6 ) 2- and (UF 6 Cs 8 ) 6+ clusters embedded in Cs 2 GeF 6 . The local geometry of the impurity-trapped exciton, the potential energy curves, and the multi electronic wavefunctions, have been obtained as direct, non-empirical results of the methods. The calculated excited states appear to be significantly delocalized outside the UF 6 volume and their U-F bond length turns out to be very short, closer to that of a pentavalent uranium defect than to that of a tetravalent uranium defect. The wavefunctions of these excited states show a dominant U 5f 1 7s 1 configuration character. This result has never been anticipated by simpler models and reveals the unprecedented ability of diffuse orbitals of f-element impurities to act as electron traps in ionic crystals

  19. Desiderata for computable representations of electronic health records-driven phenotype algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Huan; Thompson, William K; Rasmussen, Luke V; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Jiang, Guoqian; Kiefer, Richard; Zhu, Qian; Xu, Jie; Montague, Enid; Carrell, David S; Lingren, Todd; Mentch, Frank D; Ni, Yizhao; Wehbe, Firas H; Peissig, Peggy L; Tromp, Gerard; Larson, Eric B; Chute, Christopher G; Pathak, Jyotishman; Denny, Joshua C; Speltz, Peter; Kho, Abel N; Jarvik, Gail P; Bejan, Cosmin A; Williams, Marc S; Borthwick, Kenneth; Kitchner, Terrie E; Roden, Dan M; Harris, Paul A

    2015-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly used for clinical and translational research through the creation of phenotype algorithms. Currently, phenotype algorithms are most commonly represented as noncomputable descriptive documents and knowledge artifacts that detail the protocols for querying diagnoses, symptoms, procedures, medications, and/or text-driven medical concepts, and are primarily meant for human comprehension. We present desiderata for developing a computable phenotype representation model (PheRM). A team of clinicians and informaticians reviewed common features for multisite phenotype algorithms published in PheKB.org and existing phenotype representation platforms. We also evaluated well-known diagnostic criteria and clinical decision-making guidelines to encompass a broader category of algorithms. We propose 10 desired characteristics for a flexible, computable PheRM: (1) structure clinical data into queryable forms; (2) recommend use of a common data model, but also support customization for the variability and availability of EHR data among sites; (3) support both human-readable and computable representations of phenotype algorithms; (4) implement set operations and relational algebra for modeling phenotype algorithms; (5) represent phenotype criteria with structured rules; (6) support defining temporal relations between events; (7) use standardized terminologies and ontologies, and facilitate reuse of value sets; (8) define representations for text searching and natural language processing; (9) provide interfaces for external software algorithms; and (10) maintain backward compatibility. A computable PheRM is needed for true phenotype portability and reliability across different EHR products and healthcare systems. These desiderata are a guide to inform the establishment and evolution of EHR phenotype algorithm authoring platforms and languages. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical

  20. Use of information technologies in teaching course "Analytical geometry" in higher schools on example of software "ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY"

    OpenAIRE

    V. B. Grigorieva

    2009-01-01

    In article are considered the methodical questions of using of computer technologies, for example, the software "Analytical geometry", in process of teaching course of analytical geometry in the higher school.

  1. Electron optical characteristics of a concave electrostatic electron mirror for a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamarat, R.T.; Witzani, J.; Hoerl, E.M.

    1984-08-01

    Numerical computer calculations are used to explore the design characteristics of a concave electrostatic electron mirror for a mirror attachment for a conventional scanning electron microscope or an instrument designed totally as a scanning electron mirror microscope. The electron paths of a number of set-ups are calculated and drawn graphically in order to find the optimum shape and dimensions of the mirror geometry. This optimum configuration turns out to be the transition configuration between two cases of electron path deflection, towards the optical axis of the system and away from it. (Author)

  2. Computer programs for unit-cell determination in electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.Z.

    2005-01-01

    A set of computer programs for unit-cell determination from an electron diffraction tilt series and pattern indexing has been developed on the basis of several well-established algorithms. In this approach, a reduced direct primitive cell is first determined from experimental data, in the means time, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. The derived primitive cell is then checked for possible higher lattice symmetry and transformed into a proper conventional cell. Finally a least-squares refinement procedure is adopted to generate optimum lattice parameters on the basis of the lengths of basic reflections in each diffraction pattern and the indices of these reflections. Examples are given to show the usage of the programs

  3. Recent Progress in First-Principles Methods for Computing the Electronic Structure of Correlated Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Nilsson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Substantial progress has been achieved in the last couple of decades in computing the electronic structure of correlated materials from first principles. This progress has been driven by parallel development in theory and numerical algorithms. Theoretical development in combining ab initio approaches and many-body methods is particularly promising. A crucial role is also played by a systematic method for deriving a low-energy model, which bridges the gap between real and model systems. In this article, an overview is given tracing the development from the LDA+U to the latest progress in combining the G W method and (extended dynamical mean-field theory ( G W +EDMFT. The emphasis is on conceptual and theoretical aspects rather than technical ones.

  4. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder...... gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature...... was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature...

  5. Real-time data acquisition and computation for the SSC using optical and electronic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Fenyves, E.J.; Wallace, B.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss combinations of optical and electronic technologies that may be able to address major data-filtering and data-analysis problems at the SSC. Novel scintillation detectors and optical readout may permit the use of optical processing techniques for trigger decisions and particle tracking. Very-high-speed fiberoptic local-area networks will be necessary to pipeline data from the detectors to the triggers and from the triggers to computers. High-speed, few-processor MIMD superconductors with advanced fiberoptic I/O technology offer a usable, cost-effective alternative to the microprocessor farms currently proposed for event selection and analysis for the SSC. The use of a real-time operating system that provides standard programming tools will facilitate all tasks, from reprogramming the detectors' event-selection criteria to detector simulation and event analysis. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Part 2 of the summary for the electronics, DAQ, and computing working group: Technological developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The attraction of hadron machines as B factories is the copious production of B particles. However, the interesting physics lies in specific rare final states. The challenge is selecting and recording the interesting ones. Part 1 of the summary for this working group, open-quote Comparison of Trigger and Data Acquisition Parameters for Future B Physics Experiments close-quote summarizes and compares the different proposals. In parallel with this activity, the working group also looked at a number of the technological developments being proposed to meet the trigger and DAQ requirements. The presentations covered a wide variety of topics, which are grouped into three categories: (1) front-end electronics, (2) level 0 fast triggers, and (3) trigger and vertex processors. The group did not discuss on-line farms or offine data storage and computing due to lack of time

  7. Concepts and techniques: Active electronics and computers in safety-critical accelerator operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires an extensive Access Control System to protect personnel from Radiation, Oxygen Deficiency and Electrical hazards. In addition, the complicated nature of operation of the Collider as part of a complex of other Accelerators necessitates the use of active electronic measurement circuitry to ensure compliance with established Operational Safety Limits. Solutions were devised which permit the use of modern computer and interconnections technology for Safety-Critical applications, while preserving and enhancing, tried and proven protection methods. In addition a set of Guidelines, regarding required performance for Accelerator Safety Systems and a Handbook of design criteria and rules were developed to assist future system designers and to provide a framework for internal review and regulation

  8. Concepts and techniques: Active electronics and computers in safety-critical accelerator operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires an extensive Access Control System to protect personnel from Radiation, Oxygen Deficiency and Electrical hazards. In addition, the complicated nature of operation of the Collider as part of a complex of other Accelerators necessitates the use of active electronic measurement circuitry to ensure compliance with established Operational Safety Limits. Solutions were devised which permit the use of modern computer and interconnections technology for Safety-Critical applications, while preserving and enhancing, tried and proven protection methods. In addition a set of Guidelines, regarding required performance for Accelerator Safety Systems and a Handbook of design criteria and rules were developed to assist future system designers and to provide a framework for internal review and regulation.

  9. COMPUTATIONAL EFFICIENCY OF A MODIFIED SCATTERING KERNEL FOR FULL-COUPLED PHOTON-ELECTRON TRANSPORT PARALLEL COMPUTING WITH UNSTRUCTURED TETRAHEDRAL MESHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONG WOON KIM

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified scattering kernel approach to avoid the unnecessarily repeated calculations involved with the scattering source calculation, and used it with parallel computing to effectively reduce the computation time. Its computational efficiency was tested for three-dimensional full-coupled photon-electron transport problems using our computer program which solves the multi-group discrete ordinates transport equation by using the discontinuous finite element method with unstructured tetrahedral meshes for complicated geometrical problems. The numerical tests show that we can improve speed up to 17∼42 times for the elapsed time per iteration using the modified scattering kernel, not only in the single CPU calculation but also in the parallel computing with several CPUs.

  10. Influence of geometry of the discharge interval on distribution of ion and electron streams at surface of the Penning source cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egiazaryan, G.A.; Khachatrian, Zh.B.; Badalyan, E.S.; Ter-Gevorgyan, E.I.; Hovhannisyan, V.N.

    2006-01-01

    In the discharge of oscillating electrons, the mechanism of the processes, which controls the distribution of the ion and electron streams over the cathode surface, is investigated experimentally. The influence of the length of the discharge interval on value and distribution of the ion and electron streams is analyzed. The distribution both of ion and electron streams at the cathode surface is determined at different conditions of the discharge. It is shown that for given values of the anode diameter d a =31 mm and the gas pressure P=5x10 -5 Torr, the intensive stream of positive ions falls entirely on the cathode central area in the whole interval of the anode length variation (l a =1-11 cm). At the cathode, the ion current reaches the maximal value at a certain (optimal) value of the anode length that, in turn, depends on the anode voltage U a . The intensive stream of longitudinal electrons forms in the short anodes only (l a =2.5-3.5 cm) and depending on the choice of the discharge regime, may fall both on central and middle parts of the cathode

  11. Algebraic geometry in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    algebraic geometry but also in related fields like number theory. ... every vector bundle on the affine space is trivial. (equivalently ... les on a compact Riemann surface to unitary rep- ... tial geometry and topology and was generalised in.

  12. Spinorial Geometry and Branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloane, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We adapt the spinorial geometry method introduced in [J. Gillard, U. Gran and G. Papadopoulos, 'The spinorial geometry of supersymmetric backgrounds,' Class. Quant. Grav. 22 (2005) 1033 [ (arXiv:hep-th/0410155)

  13. Spinorial Geometry and Branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloane, Peter [Department of Mathematics, King' s College, University of London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    We adapt the spinorial geometry method introduced in [J. Gillard, U. Gran and G. Papadopoulos, 'The spinorial geometry of supersymmetric backgrounds,' Class. Quant. Grav. 22 (2005) 1033 [ (arXiv:hep-th/0410155)

  14. Hepatic blood flow distribution and performance in conventional and novel Y-graft Fontan geometries: a case series computational fluid dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiguang; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E; Troianowski, Guillaume; Reddy, V Mohan; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Marsden, Alison L

    2012-05-01

    A novel Y-shaped baffle has been proposed for the Fontan operation with promising initial results. However, previous studies have relied either on idealized models or a single patient-specific model. The objective of this study is to comprehensively compare the hemodynamic performance and hepatic blood flow distribution of the Y-graft Fontan baffle with 2 current designs using multiple patient-specific models. Y-shaped and tube-shaped grafts were virtually implanted into 5 patient-specific Glenn models forming 3 types of Fontan geometries: Y-graft, T-junction, and offset. Unsteady flow simulations were performed at rest and at varying exercise conditions. The hepatic flow distribution between the right and left lungs was carefully quantified using a particle tracking method. Other physiologically relevant parameters such as energy dissipation, superior vena cava pressure, and wall shear stress were evaluated. The Fontan geometry significantly influences the hepatic flow distribution. The Y-graft design improves the hepatic flow distribution effectively in 4 of 5 patients, whereas the T-junction and offset designs may skew as much as 97% of hepatic flow to 1 lung in 2 cases. Sensitivity studies show that changes in pulmonary flow split can affect the hepatic flow distribution dramatically but that some Y-graft and T-junction designs are relatively less sensitive than offset designs. The Y-graft design offers moderate improvements over the traditional designs in power loss and superior vena cava pressure in all patients. The Y-graft Fontan design achieves overall superior hemodynamic performance compared with traditional designs. However, the results emphasize that no one-size-fits-all solution is available that will universally benefit all patients and that designs should be customized for individual patients before clinical application. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electronics, trigger, data acquisition, and computing working group on future B physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1993-01-01

    Electronics, trigger, data acquisition, and computing: this is a very broad list of topics. Nevertheless in a modern particle physics experiment one thinks in terms of a data pipeline in which the front end electronics, the trigger and data acquisition, and the offline reconstruction are linked together. In designing any piece of this pipeline it is necessary to understand the bigger picture of the data flow, data rates and volume, and the input rate, output rate, and latencies for each part of the pipeline. All of this needs to be developed with a clear understanding of the requirements imposed by the physics goals of the experiment; the signal efficiencies, background rates, and the amount of recorded information that needs to be propagated through the pipeline to select and analyse the events of interest. The technology needed to meet the demanding high data volume needs of the next round of B physics experiments appears to be available, now or within a couple of years. This seems to be the case for both fixed target and collider B physics experiments. Although there are many differences between the various data pipelines that are being proposed, there are also striking similarities. All experiments have a multi-level trigger scheme (most have levels 1, 2, and 3) where the final level consists of a computing farm that can run offline-type code and reduce the data volume by a factor of a few. Finally, the ability to reconstruct large data volumes offline in a reasonably short time, and making large data volumes available to many physicists for analysis, imposes severe constraints on the foreseen data pipelines, and a significant uncertainty in evaluating the various approaches proposed

  16. A computationally efficient moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method with implementation in Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A., E-mail: ddixon@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS P365, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Prinja, A.K., E-mail: prinja@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, MSC01 1120, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Franke, B.C., E-mail: bcfrank@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87123 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical demonstration of a moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method. Foremost, a full implementation of the moment-preserving (MP) method within the Geant4 particle simulation toolkit is demonstrated. Beyond implementation details, it is shown that the MP method is a viable alternative to the condensed history (CH) method for inclusion in current and future generation transport codes through demonstration of the key features of the method including: systematically controllable accuracy, computational efficiency, mathematical robustness, and versatility. A wide variety of results common to electron transport are presented illustrating the key features of the MP method. In particular, it is possible to achieve accuracy that is statistically indistinguishable from analog Monte Carlo, while remaining up to three orders of magnitude more efficient than analog Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, it is shown that the MP method can be generalized to any applicable analog scattering DCS model by extending previous work on the MP method beyond analytical DCSs to the partial-wave (PW) elastic tabulated DCS data.

  17. Electromagnetic computer simulations of collective ion acceleration by a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, M.; Gisler, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    A 2.5 electromagnetic particle-in-cell computer code is used to study the collective ion acceleration when a relativistic electron beam is injected into a drift tube partially filled with cold neutral plasma. The simulations of this system reveals that the ions are subject to electrostatic acceleration by an electrostatic potential that forms behind the head of the beam. This electrostatic potential develops soon after the beam is injected into the drift tube, drifts with the beam, and eventually settles to a fixed position. At later times, this electrostatic potential becomes a virtual cathode. When the permanent position of the electrostatic potential is at the edge of the plasma or further up, then ions are accelerated forward and a unidirectional ion flow is obtained otherwise a bidirectional ion flow occurs. The ions that achieve higher energy are those which drift with the negative potential. When the plasma density is varied, the simulations show that optimum acceleration occurs when the density ratio between the beam (n b ) and the plasma (n o ) is unity. Simulations were carried out by changing the ion mass. The results of these simulations corroborate the hypothesis that the ion acceleration mechanism is purely electrostatic, so that the ion acceleration depends inversely on the charge particle mass. The simulations also show that the ion maximum energy increased logarithmically with the electron beam energy and proportional with the beam current

  18. Meeting the security requirements of electronic medical records in the ERA of high-speed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, H O; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kiah, M L Mat; Al-Bakri, S H

    2015-01-01

    This study has two objectives. First, it aims to develop a system with a highly secured approach to transmitting electronic medical records (EMRs), and second, it aims to identify entities that transmit private patient information without permission. The NTRU and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cryptosystems are secured encryption methods. The AES is a tested technology that has already been utilized in several systems to secure sensitive data. The United States government has been using AES since June 2003 to protect sensitive and essential information. Meanwhile, NTRU protects sensitive data against attacks through the use of quantum computers, which can break the RSA cryptosystem and elliptic curve cryptography algorithms. A hybrid of AES and NTRU is developed in this work to improve EMR security. The proposed hybrid cryptography technique is implemented to secure the data transmission process of EMRs. The proposed security solution can provide protection for over 40 years and is resistant to quantum computers. Moreover, the technique provides the necessary evidence required by law to identify disclosure or misuse of patient records. The proposed solution can effectively secure EMR transmission and protect patient rights. It also identifies the source responsible for disclosing confidential patient records. The proposed hybrid technique for securing data managed by institutional websites must be improved in the future.

  19. The Bravyi-Kitaev transformation for quantum computation of electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Jacob T.; Richard, Martin J.; Love, Peter J.

    2012-12-01

    Quantum simulation is an important application of future quantum computers with applications in quantum chemistry, condensed matter, and beyond. Quantum simulation of fermionic systems presents a specific challenge. The Jordan-Wigner transformation allows for representation of a fermionic operator by O(n) qubit operations. Here, we develop an alternative method of simulating fermions with qubits, first proposed by Bravyi and Kitaev [Ann. Phys. 298, 210 (2002), 10.1006/aphy.2002.6254; e-print arXiv:quant-ph/0003137v2], that reduces the simulation cost to O(log n) qubit operations for one fermionic operation. We apply this new Bravyi-Kitaev transformation to the task of simulating quantum chemical Hamiltonians, and give a detailed example for the simplest possible case of molecular hydrogen in a minimal basis. We show that the quantum circuit for simulating a single Trotter time step of the Bravyi-Kitaev derived Hamiltonian for H2 requires fewer gate applications than the equivalent circuit derived from the Jordan-Wigner transformation. Since the scaling of the Bravyi-Kitaev method is asymptotically better than the Jordan-Wigner method, this result for molecular hydrogen in a minimal basis demonstrates the superior efficiency of the Bravyi-Kitaev method for all quantum computations of electronic structure.

  20. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mølgaard Mortensen, Peter; Willum Hansen, Thomas; Birkedal Wagner, Jakob; Degn Jensen, Anker

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature difference over the TEM grid is less than 5 °C, at what must be considered typical conditions, and it is concluded that the conditions on the sample grid in the ETEM can be considered as isothermal during general use. - Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics used for mapping flow and temperature in ETEM setup. • Temperature gradient across TEM grid in furnace based heating holder very small in ETEM. • Conduction from TEM grid and gas in addition to radiation from TEM grid most important. • Pressure drop in ETEM limited to the pressure limiting apertures

  1. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  2. Computed tomography as a source of electron density information for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrzynski, Witold; Slusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Bulski, Wojciech; Zielinska-Dabrowska, Sylwia; Wachowicz, Marta; Kukolowicz, Pawel F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) systems of various designs as a source of electron density (ρ el ) data for treatment planning of radiation therapy. Material and methods: dependence of CT numbers on relative electron density of tissue-equivalent materials (HU-ρ el relationship) was measured for several general-purpose CT systems (single-slice, multislice, wide-bore multislice), for radiotherapy simulators with a single-slice CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) options, as well as for linear accelerators with kV and MV CBCT systems. Electron density phantoms of four sizes were used. Measurement data were compared with the standard HU-ρ el relationships predefined in two commercial treatment-planning systems (TPS). Results: the HU-ρ el relationships obtained with all of the general-purpose CT scanners operating at voltages close to 120 kV were very similar to each other and close to those predefined in TPS. Some dependency of HU values on tube voltage was observed for bone-equivalent materials. For a given tube voltage, differences in results obtained for different phantoms were larger than those obtained for different CT scanners. For radiotherapy simulators and for kV CBCT systems, the information on ρ el was much less precise because of poor uniformity of images. For MV CBCT, the results were significantly different than for kV systems due to the differing energy spectrum of the beam. Conclusion: the HU-ρ el relationships predefined in TPS can be used for general-purpose CT systems operating at voltages close to 120 kV. For nontypical imaging systems (e.g., CBCT), the relationship can be significantly different and, therefore, it should always be measured and carefully analyzed before using CT data for treatment planning. (orig.)

  3. Digital and discrete geometry theory and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Li

    2014-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the modern methods for geometric problems in the computing sciences. It also covers concurrent topics in data sciences including geometric processing, manifold learning, Google search, cloud data, and R-tree for wireless networks and BigData.The author investigates digital geometry and its related constructive methods in discrete geometry, offering detailed methods and algorithms. The book is divided into five sections: basic geometry; digital curves, surfaces and manifolds; discretely represented objects; geometric computation and processing; and a

  4. Combined dose and geometry correction (DMG) for low energy multi electron beam lithography (5kV): application to the 16nm node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Luc; Manakli, Serdar; Bayle, Sebastien; Belledent, Jérôme; Soulan, Sebastien; Wiedemann, Pablo; Farah, Abdi; Schiavone, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Lithography faces today many challenges to meet the ITRS road-map. 193nm is still today the only existing industrial option to address high volume production for the 22nm node. Nevertheless to achieve such a resolution, double exposure is mandatory for critical level patterning. EUV lithography is still challenged by the availability of high power source and mask defectivity and suffers from a high cost of ownership perspective. Its introduction is now not foreseen before 2015. Parallel to these mask-based technologies, maskless lithography regularly makes significant progress in terms of potential and maturity. The massively parallel e-beam solution appears as a real candidate for high volume manufacturing. Several industrial projects are under development, one in the US, with the KLA REBL project and two in Europe driven by IMS Nanofabrication (Austria; MAPPER (The Netherlands). Among the developments to be performed to secure the takeoff of the multi-beam technology, the availability of a rapid and robust data treatment solution will be one of the major challenges. Within this data preparation flow, advanced proximity effect corrections must be implemented to address the 16nm node and below. This paper will detail this process and compare correction strategies in terms of robustness and accuracy. It will be based on results obtained using a MAPPER tool within the IMAGINE program driven by CEA-LETI, in Grenoble, France. All proximity effects corrections and the dithering step were performed using the software platform Inscale® from Aselta Nanographics. One important advantage of Inscale® is the ability to combine both model based dose and geometry adjustment to accurately pattern critical features. The paper will focus on the advantage of combining those two corrections at the 16nm node instead of using only geometry corrections. Thanks to the simulation capability of Inscale®, pattern fidelity and correction robustness will be evaluated and compared between

  5. Simulating TGF and gamma ray emission above and within stormclouds due to the interaction of TeV cosmic ray shower electrons/positrons/photons with plausible electric field geometries generated in stormclouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Valencia has developed a software simulator LEPTRACK to simulate lepton and photon scattering in any kind of media with a variable density, and permeated by electric/magnetic fields of any geometry, and which can handle an exponential runaway avalanche. Here we show results of simulating the interaction of electrons/positrons/photons in an incoming TeV cosmic ray shower with the kind of electric fields expected in a stormcloud after a CG discharge which removes much of the positive charge build up at the centre of the cloud. The point is to show not just a Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) above the upper negative shielding layer at 12 km but other gamma ray emission due to electron/positron interaction in the remaining positive charge around 9km and the lower negative charge at 6km altitude. We present here images, lightcurves, altitude profiles, spectra and videos showing the different ionization, excitation and photon density fields produced, their time evolution, and how they depend critically on where the cosmic ray shower beam intercepts the electric field geometry. We also show a new effect of incoming positrons, which make up a significant fraction of the shower, where they appear to "orbit" within the high altitude negative shielding layer, and which has been conjectured to produce significant microwave emission, as well as a short range 511 keV annihilation line. The interesting question is if this conjectured emission can be observed and correlated with TGF orbital observations to prove that a TGF originates in the macro-fields of stormclouds or the micro-fields of light leaders and streamers where this "positron orbiting" is not likely to occur.

  6. S/sub N/ computational benchmark solutions for slab geometry models of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) lattice cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    S/sub N/ computational benchmark solutions are generated for a onegroup and multigroup fuel-void slab lattice cell which is a rough model of a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) lattice cell. The reactivity induced by the extrusion of the fuel material into the voided region is determined for a series of partially extruded lattice cell configurations. A special modified Gauss S/sub N/ ordinate array design is developed in order to obtain eigenvalues with errors less than 0.03% in all of the configurations that are considered. The modified Gauss S/sub N/ ordinate array design has a substantially improved eigenvalue angular convergence behavior when compared to existing S/sub N/ ordinate array designs used in neutron streaming applications. The angular refinement computations are performed in some cases by using a perturbation theory method which enables one to obtain high order S/sub N/ eigenvalue estimates for greatly reduced computational costs

  7. The accuracy of molecular bond lengths computed by multireference electronic structure methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, Ron; Kedziora, Gary S.; Lischka, Hans; Shavitt, Isaiah; Mueller, Thomas; Szalay, Peter G.; Kallay, Mihaly; Seth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We compare experimental R e values with computed R e values for 20 molecules using three multireference electronic structure methods, MCSCF, MR-SDCI, and MR-AQCC. Three correlation-consistent orbital basis sets are used, along with complete basis set extrapolations, for all of the molecules. These data complement those computed previously with single-reference methods. Several trends are observed. The SCF R e values tend to be shorter than the experimental values, and the MCSCF values tend to be longer than the experimental values. We attribute these trends to the ionic contamination of the SCF wave function and to the corresponding systematic distortion of the potential energy curve. For the individual bonds, the MR-SDCI R e values tend to be shorter than the MR-AQCC values, which in turn tend to be shorter than the MCSCF values. Compared to the previous single-reference results, the MCSCF values are roughly comparable to the MP4 and CCSD methods, which are more accurate than might be expected due to the fact that these MCSCF wave functions include no extra-valence electron correlation effects. This suggests that static valence correlation effects, such as near-degeneracies and the ability to dissociate correctly to neutral fragments, play an important role in determining the shape of the potential energy surface, even near equilibrium structures. The MR-SDCI and MR-AQCC methods predict R e values with an accuracy comparable to, or better than, the best single-reference methods (MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)), despite the fact that triple and higher excitations into the extra-valence orbital space are included in the single-reference methods but are absent in the multireference wave functions. The computed R e values using the multireference methods tend to be smooth and monotonic with basis set improvement. The molecular structures are optimized using analytic energy gradients, and the timings for these calculations show the practical advantage of using variational wave

  8. The accuracy of molecular bond lengths computed by multireference electronic structure methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, Ron [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: shepard@tcg.anl.gov; Kedziora, Gary S. [High Performance Technologies Inc., 2435 5th Street, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States); Lischka, Hans [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Shavitt, Isaiah [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mueller, Thomas [Juelich Supercomputer Centre, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Szalay, Peter G. [Laboratory for Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Kallay, Mihaly [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, P.O. Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Seth, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive, N.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2008-06-16

    We compare experimental R{sub e} values with computed R{sub e} values for 20 molecules using three multireference electronic structure methods, MCSCF, MR-SDCI, and MR-AQCC. Three correlation-consistent orbital basis sets are used, along with complete basis set extrapolations, for all of the molecules. These data complement those computed previously with single-reference methods. Several trends are observed. The SCF R{sub e} values tend to be shorter than the experimental values, and the MCSCF values tend to be longer than the experimental values. We attribute these trends to the ionic contamination of the SCF wave function and to the corresponding systematic distortion of the potential energy curve. For the individual bonds, the MR-SDCI R{sub e} values tend to be shorter than the MR-AQCC values, which in turn tend to be shorter than the MCSCF values. Compared to the previous single-reference results, the MCSCF values are roughly comparable to the MP4 and CCSD methods, which are more accurate than might be expected due to the fact that these MCSCF wave functions include no extra-valence electron correlation effects. This suggests that static valence correlation effects, such as near-degeneracies and the ability to dissociate correctly to neutral fragments, play an important role in determining the shape of the potential energy surface, even near equilibrium structures. The MR-SDCI and MR-AQCC methods predict R{sub e} values with an accuracy comparable to, or better than, the best single-reference methods (MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)), despite the fact that triple and higher excitations into the extra-valence orbital space are included in the single-reference methods but are absent in the multireference wave functions. The computed R{sub e} values using the multireference methods tend to be smooth and monotonic with basis set improvement. The molecular structures are optimized using analytic energy gradients, and the timings for these calculations show the practical

  9. Geometry essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Just the critical concepts you need to score high in geometry This practical, friendly guide focuses on critical concepts taught in a typical geometry course, from the properties of triangles, parallelograms, circles, and cylinders, to the skills and strategies you need to write geometry proofs. Geometry Essentials For Dummies is perfect for cramming or doing homework, or as a reference for parents helping kids study for exams. Get down to the basics - get a handle on the basics of geometry, from lines, segments, and angles, to vertices, altitudes, and diagonals Conque

  10. Computer-assisted anatomical placement of a double-bundle ACL through 3D-fitting of a statistically generated femoral template into individual knee geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luites, J. W. H.; Wymenga, A. B.; Sati, M.; Bourquin, Y.; Blankevoort, L.; van der Venne, R.; Kooloos, J. G. M.; Staubli, H. U.

    2000-01-01

    Femoral graft placement is an important factor in the success of ACL-reconstruction. Besides improving the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement, Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS) can be used to determine the anatomical Location. This requires a 3D femoral template with the position of the anatomical

  11. Arithmetic noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Marcolli, Matilde

    2005-01-01

    Arithmetic noncommutative geometry denotes the use of ideas and tools from the field of noncommutative geometry, to address questions and reinterpret in a new perspective results and constructions from number theory and arithmetic algebraic geometry. This general philosophy is applied to the geometry and arithmetic of modular curves and to the fibers at archimedean places of arithmetic surfaces and varieties. The main reason why noncommutative geometry can be expected to say something about topics of arithmetic interest lies in the fact that it provides the right framework in which the tools of geometry continue to make sense on spaces that are very singular and apparently very far from the world of algebraic varieties. This provides a way of refining the boundary structure of certain classes of spaces that arise in the context of arithmetic geometry, such as moduli spaces (of which modular curves are the simplest case) or arithmetic varieties (completed by suitable "fibers at infinity"), by adding boundaries...

  12. Validation of an Improved Computer-Assisted Technique for Mining Free-Text Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Marco; Marshall, John F; Parkin, Tim

    2017-06-29

    The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) offers opportunity for clinical epidemiological research. With large EMR databases, automated analysis processes are necessary but require thorough validation before they can be routinely used. The aim of this study was to validate a computer-assisted technique using commercially available content analysis software (SimStat-WordStat v.6 (SS/WS), Provalis Research) for mining free-text EMRs. The dataset used for the validation process included life-long EMRs from 335 patients (17,563 rows of data), selected at random from a larger dataset (141,543 patients, ~2.6 million rows of data) and obtained from 10 equine veterinary practices in the United Kingdom. The ability of the computer-assisted technique to detect rows of data (cases) of colic, renal failure, right dorsal colitis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in the population was compared with manual classification. The first step of the computer-assisted analysis process was the definition of inclusion dictionaries to identify cases, including terms identifying a condition of interest. Words in inclusion dictionaries were selected from the list of all words in the dataset obtained in SS/WS. The second step consisted of defining an exclusion dictionary, including combinations of words to remove cases erroneously classified by the inclusion dictionary alone. The third step was the definition of a reinclusion dictionary to reinclude cases that had been erroneously classified by the exclusion dictionary. Finally, cases obtained by the exclusion dictionary were removed from cases obtained by the inclusion dictionary, and cases from the reinclusion dictionary were subsequently reincluded using Rv3.0.2 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria). Manual analysis was performed as a separate process by a single experienced clinician reading through the dataset once and classifying each row of data based on the interpretation of the free

  13. Electronic structure of BN-aromatics: Choice of reliable computational tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazière, Audrey; Chrostowska, Anna; Darrigan, Clovis; Dargelos, Alain; Graciaa, Alain; Chermette, Henry

    2017-10-01

    The importance of having reliable calculation tools to interpret and predict the electronic properties of BN-aromatics is directly linked to the growing interest for these very promising new systems in the field of materials science, biomedical research, or energy sustainability. Ionization energy (IE) is one of the most important parameters to approach the electronic structure of molecules. It can be theoretically estimated, but in order to evaluate their persistence and propose the most reliable tools for the evaluation of different electronic properties of existent or only imagined BN-containing compounds, we took as reference experimental values of ionization energies provided by ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UV-PES) in gas phase—the only technique giving access to the energy levels of filled molecular orbitals. Thus, a set of 21 aromatic molecules containing B-N bonds and B-N-B patterns has been merged for a comparison between experimental IEs obtained by UV-PES and various theoretical approaches for their estimation. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) methods using B3LYP and long-range corrected CAM-B3LYP functionals are used, combined with the Δ SCF approach, and compared with electron propagator theory such as outer valence Green's function (OVGF, P3) and symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction ab initio methods. Direct Kohn-Sham estimation and "corrected" Kohn-Sham estimation are also given. The deviation between experimental and theoretical values is computed for each molecule, and a statistical study is performed over the average and the root mean square for the whole set and sub-sets of molecules. It is shown that (i) Δ SCF+TDDFT(CAM-B3LYP), OVGF, and P3 are the most efficient way for a good agreement with UV-PES values, (ii) a CAM-B3LYP range-separated hybrid functional is significantly better than B3LYP for the purpose, especially for extended conjugated systems, and (iii) the "corrected" Kohn-Sham result is a

  14. The Adsorption Geometry and Electronic Structure of Organic Dye Molecule on TiO2(101 Surface from First Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Mang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using density functional theory (DFT, we have investigated the structural and electronic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs comprised of I-doped anatase TiO2(101 surface sensitized with NKX-2554 dye. The calculation results indicate that the cyanoacrylic acid anchoring group in NKX-2554 has a strong binding to the TiO2(101 surface. The dissociative and bidentate bridging type was found to be the most favorable adsorption configuration. On the other hand, the incorporations of I dopant can reduce the band gap of TiO2 photoanode and improve the of NKX-2554 dye, which can improve the visible-light absorption of anatase TiO2 and can also facilitate the electron injection from the dye molecule to the TiO2 substrate. As a result, the I doping can significantly enhance the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE of DSSCs.

  15. Donaldson invariants in algebraic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goettsche, L.

    2000-01-01

    In these lectures I want to give an introduction to the relation of Donaldson invariants with algebraic geometry: Donaldson invariants are differentiable invariants of smooth compact 4-manifolds X, defined via moduli spaces of anti-self-dual connections. If X is an algebraic surface, then these moduli spaces can for a suitable choice of the metric be identified with moduli spaces of stable vector bundles on X. This can be used to compute Donaldson invariants via methods of algebraic geometry and has led to a lot of activity on moduli spaces of vector bundles and coherent sheaves on algebraic surfaces. We will first recall the definition of the Donaldson invariants via gauge theory. Then we will show the relation between moduli spaces of anti-self-dual connections and moduli spaces of vector bundles on algebraic surfaces, and how this makes it possible to compute Donaldson invariants via algebraic geometry methods. Finally we concentrate on the case that the number b + of positive eigenvalues of the intersection form on the second homology of the 4-manifold is 1. In this case the Donaldson invariants depend on the metric (or in the algebraic geometric case on the polarization) via a system of walls and chambers. We will study the change of the invariants under wall-crossing, and use this in particular to compute the Donaldson invariants of rational algebraic surfaces. (author)

  16. Comparison between experiment and MCNP simulation for retrospective dosimetry according to the geometry of exposure using electronic components in a mobile phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Chae; Kim, Hyoungtaek; Lee, Seung Kyu; Chang, Insu; Lee, Jungil; Kim, Jang-Lyul; Kim, Bong-Hwan; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2017-01-01

    Many efforts are carrying out for the use of thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of personal electronic devices (such as mobile phone, USB memory chip etc.) as fortuitous dosimeters in the case of radiation emergency. A correction is required when evaluating the exposure dose to the body using the measured dose to the devices. As a starting point of this purpose, we have studied to evaluate the effects of the position of the electronic device on human body to measure the dose to the electronic device (mobile phone). We evaluated the doses to the mobile phone by using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulations and TL method with resistors and inductors in the mobile phone, and the results were then compared. We have studied to evaluate the effects of the position of mobile phone on human body to measure the dose to the phone with TL method and MCNP simulation method, and then compared. The results obtained by the TL experiments showed excellent agreement with the simulation results. With these results, it is expected that the retrospective estimation of the exposure dose to human body is possible by using the dose to mobile phone measured by TL analysis of resistors and inductors in phone.

  17. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  18. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui; Li, Hong; Winget, Paul; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  19. Density functional theory study of adsorption geometries and electronic structures of azo-dye-based molecules on anatase TiO2 surface for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajongtat, Pongthep; Suramitr, Songwut; Nokbin, Somkiat; Nakajima, Koichi; Mitsuke, Koichiro; Hannongbua, Supa

    2017-09-01

    Structural and electronic properties of eight isolated azo dyes (ArNNAr', where Ar and Ar' denote the aryl groups containing benzene and naphthalene skeletons, respectively) were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) based on the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and TD-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) methods The effect of methanol solvent on the structural and electronic properties of the azo dyes was elucidated by employing a polarizable continuum model (PCM). Then, the azo dyes adsorbed onto the anatase TiO 2 (101) slab surface through a carboxyl group. The geometries and electronic structures of the adsorption complexes were determined using periodic DFT based on the PWC/DNP method. The calculated adsorption energies indicate that the adsorbed dyes preferentially take configuration of the bidentate bridging rather than chelating or monodentate ester-type geometries. Furthermore, the azo compounds having two carboxyl groups are coordinated to the TiO 2 surface more preferentially through the carboxyl group connecting to the benzene skeleton than through that connecting to the naphthalene skeleton. The dihedral angles (Φ B-N ) between the benzene- and naphthalene-skeleton moieties are smaller than 10° for the adsorbed azo compounds containing one carboxyl group. In contrast, Φ B-N > 30° are obtained for the adsorbed azo compounds containing two carboxyl groups. The almost planar conformations of the former appear to strengthen both π-electrons conjugation and electronic coupling between low-lying unoccupied molecular orbitals of the azo dyes and the conduction band of TiO 2 . On the other hand, such coupling is very weak for the latter, leading to a shift of the Fermi level of TiO 2 in the lower-energy direction. The obtained results are useful to the design and synthesize novel azo-dye-based molecules that give rise to higher photovoltaic performances of the dye-sensitized solar cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of differential quadrature based computational scheme in cylindrical geometry and its application to simulate radionuclide leaching from radioactive waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, T.K.; Bajpai, R.K.; Datta, D.

    2016-01-01

    Differential Quadrature Method (DQM) based computational scheme is developed to solve diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinate. In this scheme, time derivative is approximated using forward difference and the spatial derivatives using polynomial based DQM. This developed scheme is applied to simulate test problem on radionuclide leaching from radioactive waste form. Leach rate is calculated after simulating the leaching process. DQM based results are compared with the analytical solutions and good agreements between the two results are established. The developed tool is used as a numerical tool for computationally intensive calculations, such as regression analysis and correlation analysis etc. Multivariate regression analysis is carried out to establish a linear relationship between leach rate and model parameters e.g., diffusion coefficient, porosity and linear sorption coefficient. Study of correlation analysis carried out in this study shows that diffusion coefficient is positively more correlated with leach rate compared to porosity whereas, K_d is negatively correlated with leach rate. (author)

  1. Analysis of Void Fraction Distribution and Departure from Nucleate Boiling in Single Subchannel and Bundle Geometries Using Subchannel, System, and Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taewan Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the accuracy and validity of subchannel, system, and computational fluid dynamics codes, the Paul Scherrer Institut has participated in the OECD/NRC PSBT benchmark with the thermal-hydraulic system code TRACE5.0 developed by US NRC, the subchannel code FLICA4 developed by CEA, and the computational fluid dynamic code STAR-CD developed by CD-adapco. The PSBT benchmark consists of a series of void distribution exercises and departure from nucleate boiling exercises. The results reveal that the prediction by the subchannel code FLICA4 agrees with the experimental data reasonably well in both steady-state and transient conditions. The analyses of single-subchannel experiments by means of the computational fluid dynamic code STAR-CD with the CD-adapco boiling model indicate that the prediction of the void fraction has no significant discrepancy from the experiments. The analyses with TRACE point out the necessity to perform additional assessment of the subcooled boiling model and bulk condensation model of TRACE.

  2. 78 FR 1247 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media Players, and Televisions, and Components Thereof... devices, including wireless communication devices, tablet computers, media players, and televisions, and... wireless communication devices, tablet computers, media players, and televisions, and components thereof...

  3. An approach for management of geometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, R. P.; Herron, G. J.; Schweitzer, J. E.; Warkentine, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The strategies for managing Integrated Programs for Aerospace Design (IPAD) computer-based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. IPAD's data base system makes this information available to all authorized departments in a company. A discussion of the data structures and algorithms required to support geometry in IPIP (IPAD's data base management system) is presented. Through the use of IPIP's data definition language, the structure of the geometry components is defined. The data manipulation language is the vehicle by which a user defines an instance of the geometry. The manipulation language also allows a user to edit, query, and manage the geometry. The selection of canonical forms is a very important part of the IPAD geometry. IPAD has a canonical form for each entity and provides transformations to alternate forms; in particular, IPAD will provide a transformation to the ANSI standard. The DBMS schemas required to support IPAD geometry are explained.

  4. Electronic conductivity of solid and liquid (Mg, Fe)O computed from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmström, E.; Stixrude, L.; Scipioni, R.; Foster, A. S.

    2018-05-01

    Ferropericlase (Mg, Fe)O is an abundant mineral of Earth's lower mantle and the liquid phase of the material was an important component of the early magma ocean. Using quantum-mechanical, finite-temperature density-functional theory calculations, we compute the electronic component of the electrical and thermal conductivity of (Mg0.75, Fe0.25)O crystal and liquid over a wide range of planetary conditions: 0-200 GPa, 2000-4000 K for the crystal, and 0-300 GPa, 4000-10,000 K for the liquid. We find that the crystal and liquid are semi-metallic over the entire range studied: the crystal has an electrical conductivity exceeding 103 S/m, whereas that of the liquid exceeds 104 S/m. Our results on the crystal are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements of the electrical conductivity of ferropericlase once we account for the dependence of conductivity on iron content. We find that a harzburgite-dominated mantle with ferropericlase in combination with Al-free bridgmanite agrees well with electromagnetic sounding observations, while a pyrolitic mantle with a ferric-iron rich bridgmanite composition yields a lower mantle that is too conductive. The electronic component of thermal conductivity of ferropericlase with XFe = 0.19 is negligible (accounts for the high conductance that has been proposed to explain anomalies in Earth's nutation. The electrical conductivity of liquid ferropericlase exceeds that of liquid silica by more than an order of magnitude at conditions of a putative basal magma ocean, thus strengthening arguments that the basal magma ocean could have produced an ancient dynamo.

  5. Development of utility generic functional requirements for electronic work packages and computer-based procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Nuclear Electronic Work Packages - Enterprise Requirements (NEWPER) initiative is a step toward a vision of implementing an eWP framework that includes many types of eWPs. This will enable immediate paper-related cost savings in work management and provide a path to future labor efficiency gains through enhanced integration and process improvement in support of the Nuclear Promise (Nuclear Energy Institute 2016). The NEWPER initiative was organized by the Nuclear Information Technology Strategic Leadership (NITSL) group, which is an organization that brings together leaders from the nuclear utility industry and regulatory agencies to address issues involved with information technology used in nuclear-power utilities. NITSL strives to maintain awareness of industry information technology-related initiatives and events and communicates those events to its membership. NITSL and LWRS Program researchers have been coordinating activities, including joint organization of NEWPER-related meetings and report development. The main goal of the NEWPER initiative was to develop a set of utility generic functional requirements for eWP systems. This set of requirements will support each utility in their process of identifying plant-specific functional and non-functional requirements. The NEWPER initiative has 140 members where the largest group of members consists of 19 commercial U.S. nuclear utilities and eleven of the most prominent vendors of eWP solutions. Through the NEWPER initiative two sets of functional requirements were developed; functional requirements for electronic work packages and functional requirements for computer-based procedures. This paper will describe the development process as well as a summary of the requirements.

  6. Diagnostic value of electron-beam computed tomography (EBT). I. cardiac applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Lembcke, A.; Rogalla, P.; Taupitz, M.; Wiese, T.H.; Hammm, B.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Felix, R.; Knollmann, F.D.; Georgi, M.; Weisser, G.; Lehmann, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam tomography (EBT) directly competes with other non-invasive imaging modalities, such as multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and echocardiography, in the diagnostic assessment of cardiac diseases. EBT is the gold standard for the detection and quantification of coronary calcium as a preclinical sign of coronary artery disease (CAD). Its standardized examination protocols and the broad experience with this method favor EBT. First results with multislice CT indicate that this new technology may be equivalent to EBT for coronary calcium studies. The principal value of CT-based coronary calcium measurements continues to be an issue of controversy amongst radiologists and cardiologists due to lack of prospective randomized trials. Coronary angiography with EBT is characterized by a high negative predictive value and, in addition, may be indicated in some patients with manifest CAD. It remains to be shown whether coronary angiography with multislice CT is reliable and accurate enough to be introduced into the routine work-up, to replace some of the many strictly diagnostic coronary catheterizations in Germany and elsewhere. Assessment of coronary stent patency with EBT is associated with several problems and in our opinion cannot be advocated as a routine procedure. EBT may be recommended for the evaluation of coronary bypasses to look for bypass occlusions and significant stenoses, which, however, can be equally well achieved with multislice CT. Quantification of myocardial perfusion with EBT could not replace MRI or other modalities in this field. EBT has proven to be accurate, reliable and in some instances equivalent to MRI, which is the gold standard for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of cardiac function. Some disadvantages not the least of which is the limited distribution of electron beam scanners, favor MRI for functional assessment of the heart. (orig.) [de

  7. THEAP-I: A computer program for thermal hydraulic analysis of a thermally interacting channel bundle of complex geometry. Code description and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzis, J G; Megaritou, A; Belessiotis, V

    1987-09-01

    THEAP-I is a computer code developed in NRCPS `DEMOCRITUS` with the aim to contribute to the safety analysis of the open pool research reactors. THEAP-I is designed for three dimensional, transient thermal/hydraulic analysis of a thermally interacting channel bundle totally immersed into water or air, such as the reactor core. In the present report the mathematical and physical models and methods of the solution are given as well as the code description and the input data. A sample problem is also included, refering to the Greek Research Reactor analysis, under an hypothetical severe loss of coolant accident.

  8. The Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bárány, Imre; Vilcu, Costin

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents easy-to-understand yet surprising properties obtained using topological, geometric and graph theoretic tools in the areas covered by the Geometry Conference that took place in Mulhouse, France from September 7–11, 2014 in honour of Tudor Zamfirescu on the occasion of his 70th anniversary. The contributions address subjects in convexity and discrete geometry, in distance geometry or with geometrical flavor in combinatorics, graph theory or non-linear analysis. Written by top experts, these papers highlight the close connections between these fields, as well as ties to other domains of geometry and their reciprocal influence. They offer an overview on recent developments in geometry and its border with discrete mathematics, and provide answers to several open questions. The volume addresses a large audience in mathematics, including researchers and graduate students interested in geometry and geometrical problems.

  9. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin Lihui; Li Jinsheng; Ma, C-M Charlie

    2013-01-01

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose–volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  10. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C.-M. Charlie

    2013-08-01

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose-volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  11. Stretchable, Twisted Conductive Microtubules for Wearable Computing, Robotics, Electronics, and Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Thanh Nho Do; Yon Visell

    2017-01-01

    Stretchable and flexible multifunctional electronic components, including sensors and actuators, have received increasing attention in robotics, electronics, wearable, and healthcare applications. Despite advances, it has remained challenging to design analogs of many electronic components to be highly stretchable, to be efficient to fabricate, and to provide control over electronic performance. Here, we describe highly elastic sensors and interconnects formed from thin, twisted conductive mi...

  12. Electronic computer prediction of properties of binary refractory transition metal compounds on the base of their simplificated electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutolin, S.A.; Kotyukov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to obtain calculation equations of macroscopic physico-chemical properties of transition metal refractory compounds (density, melting temperature, Debye characteristic temperature, microhardness, standard formation enthalpy, thermo-emf) using the method of the regression analysis. Apart from the compound composition the argument of the regression equation is the distribution of electron bands of d-transition metals, created by the energy electron distribution in the simplified zone structure of transition metals and approximated by Chebishev polynoms, by the position of Fermi energy on the map of distribution of electron band energy depending upon the value of quasi-impulse, multiple to the first, second and third Brillouin zone for transition metals. The maximum relative error of the regressions obtained as compared with the literary data is 15-20 rel.%

  13. Fabrication of a novel silicon single electron transistor for Si:P quantum computer devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, S.J.; Smith, C.E.A.; Gauja, E.; Dzurak, A.S.; Clark, R.G.; Snider, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Quantum computation relies on the successful measurement of quantum states. Single electron transistors (SETs) are known to be able to perform fast and sensitive charge measurements of solid state qubits. However, due to their sensitivity, SETs are also very susceptible to random charge fluctuations in a solid-state materials environment. In previous dc transport measurements, silicon-based SETs have demonstrated greater charge stability than A1/A1 2 O 3 SETs. We have designed and fabricated a novel silicon SET architecture for a comparison of the noise characteristics of silicon and aluminium based devices. The silicon SET described here is designed for controllable and reproducible low temperature operation. It is fabricated using a novel dual gate structure on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A silicon quantum wire is formed in a 100nm thick high-resistivity superficial silicon layer using reactive ion etching. Carriers are induced in the silicon wire by a back gate in the silicon substrate. The tunnel barriers are created electrostatically, using lithographically defined metallic electrodes (∼40nm width). These tunnel barriers surround the surface of the quantum wire, thus producing excellent electrostatic confinement. This architecture provides independent control of tunnel barrier height and island occupancy, thus promising better control of Coulomb blockade oscillations than in previously investigated silicon SETs. The use of a near intrinsic silicon substrate offers compatibility with Si:P qubits in the longer term

  14. Electron-beam computed tomography findings of left atrial appendage in patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Makiko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-04-01

    We studied electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) findings in the left atrial appendage of 72 patients with cerebral embolism [27 in the acute phase (<48 hours) and 45 in the chronic phase], 9 cases with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) but without stroke, and 13 controls. EBCT was performed in the early (during injection of contrast medium), late-1 (5 min after injection), and-2 (10 min after injection) phases. In the acute phase patients, 41% showed filling defect (FD) in the early phase alone (FDE), 15% showed FD until late phase-1 (FDL-1), and 15% showed FD until late phase-2 (FDL-2). The chronic phase patients showed FDE in 33% of cases, FDL-1 in 8% and FDL-2 11%. Only FDE was observed in 44% in NVAF cases without stroke. No FDs were observed in controls. Flow velocity in the appendage measured by transesophageal echocardiography was 23{+-}10 cm/sec in 21 FDE cases, 14{+-}3 cm/sec in 3 FDL-1 cases, 29{+-}23 cm/sec in 4 FDL-2 cases, significantly lower in comparison with 58{+-}25 cm/s in the 23 cases with no FD. FDL-1 and -2 suggested severe stasis or presence of thrombus in the appendage, which indicated high risk of embolism slower the movement of MES through the sample volume. (author)

  15. Noninvasive detection of coronary artery bypass graft patency by intravenous electron beam computed tomographic angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakami, Shoji; Toyama, Junji; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsushita, Toyoaki; Murakami, Yoshimasa; Ogata, Masaki; Ito, Shigenori; Fukutomi, Tatsuya; Okayama, Naotsuka; Itoh, Makoto

    2003-11-01

    This study evaluates the usefullness of intravenous electron beam computed tomographic angiography (EBA) for the detection of coronary artery bypass graft patency in 43 patients (33 men and 10 women, mean age, 65 years) who had coronary artery bypass graft surgery. EBA was performed a few days before selective bypass graft angiography (SGA). Forty axial cross-sections of angiographic images of the heart were acquired consecutively by an electrocardiographic trigger signal at 40% of the RR interval, which corresponds to the end-systolic phase. EBA data were reconstructed as a three-dimensional shaded surface display of the heart and bypass grafts. Detectability of the patency of bypass gratis was evaluated, taking selective angiographic images of the bypass grafts as a gold standard. One hundred and nine grafts (96%) out of 114 grafts were subjected to evaluation: 37 grafts were left internal mammary artery grafts (LIMA), 7 were right internal mammary artery grafts (RIMA), 6 were gastroepiploic artery grafts (GEA), 7 were free gastroepiploic artery grafts with venous drainage (free-GEA), 7 were radial artery grafts (RAG), and 45 were saphenous vein gratis (SVG). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of EBA were 98%, 100%, 100%, 91%, and 98%, respectively. EBA sampled at the end-systolic period was determined to be useful for the detection of coronary artery bypass graft patency and occlusion.

  16. CT angiography using electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT). A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Kato, Akira; Kudo, Sho

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of CT angiography in small vessels using electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT). Vessel phantoms with inner diameters of 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm were prepared with segments of 75%, 50%, and 25% stenosis in each vessel. The vessels were filled with contrast medium (Iopamidol 300 at 1/24 dilution, approximately 380 HU). The EBCT apparatus used was an Imatron C-150. The step volume scan mode was used with slice thicknesses of 1.5 mm and 3.0 mm, scan time of 0.3 sec, and 210 mm field of view. Images with a slice thickness of 1.5 mm were definitely better than those with a slice thickness of 3.0 mm. The quality of maximum intensity projection (MIP) images was quite similar to that of three-dimensional (3D) images. Using the 8 mm vessel phantom, all stenotic segments were accurately visualized on CT angiography. The 50% stenotic segments were accurately estimated in all vessels. However, the 75% stenotic segments were slightly overestimated in smaller vessels, and the 25% stenotic segments were slightly underestimated in smaller vessels. We consider CT angiography using EBCT to be a useful, less invasive diagnostic modality for stenoocclusive lesions. (author)

  17. Clinical application of electron beam computed tomography in diagnosis of truncus arteriosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Gejun; Dai Ruping; Cao Cheng; Qi Xiaoou; Bai Hua; Ma Zhanhong; Chen Yao; Mu Feng; Ren Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate value of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in diagnosis of truncus arteriosus (TA). Methods: Ten cases of TA with age ranging from 2-month to 24 years were studied. All cases were examined and diagnosed with Imatron C-150 scanner using contrastmedia. The results of EBCT were analyzed and compared with the results of echocardiography (in 10 cases), cardiovascular angiography (in 3 cases) and surgery findings (in 1 case ). Results: EBCT yielded qualitative diagnosis and classification in all 10 cases. Echocardiography revealed qualitative diagnosis in 9 cases, however its classification was accordant to EBCT just in 5 cases. The concomitant abnormalities of TA were found more with EBCT than that with echocardiography. Cardiovascular angiography was performed in 3 cases, yielding inaccurate classification 2 cases. One case of TA was operated just based on the results of echocardiography, EBCT and catheterization. Conclusion: As a noninvasive method, EBCT could yield qualitative diagnosis of TA as well as classification. The results of EBCT examination combining echocardiography and catheterization could guide the operations. (authors)

  18. Electron-beam computed tomography findings of left atrial appendage in patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Makiko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi

    2002-01-01

    We studied electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) findings in the left atrial appendage of 72 patients with cerebral embolism [27 in the acute phase (<48 hours) and 45 in the chronic phase], 9 cases with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) but without stroke, and 13 controls. EBCT was performed in the early (during injection of contrast medium), late-1 (5 min after injection), and-2 (10 min after injection) phases. In the acute phase patients, 41% showed filling defect (FD) in the early phase alone (FDE), 15% showed FD until late phase-1 (FDL-1), and 15% showed FD until late phase-2 (FDL-2). The chronic phase patients showed FDE in 33% of cases, FDL-1 in 8% and FDL-2 11%. Only FDE was observed in 44% in NVAF cases without stroke. No FDs were observed in controls. Flow velocity in the appendage measured by transesophageal echocardiography was 23±10 cm/sec in 21 FDE cases, 14±3 cm/sec in 3 FDL-1 cases, 29±23 cm/sec in 4 FDL-2 cases, significantly lower in comparison with 58±25 cm/s in the 23 cases with no FD. FDL-1 and -2 suggested severe stasis or presence of thrombus in the appendage, which indicated high risk of embolism slower the movement of MES through the sample volume. (author)

  19. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  20. Nanoscale RRAM-based synaptic electronics: toward a neuromorphic computing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangsu; Noh, Jinwoo; Choo, Myung-Lae; Sheri, Ahmad Muqeem; Chang, Man; Kim, Young-Bae; Kim, Chang Jung; Jeon, Moongu; Lee, Byung-Geun; Lee, Byoung Hun; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2013-09-27

    Efforts to develop scalable learning algorithms for implementation of networks of spiking neurons in silicon have been hindered by the considerable footprints of learning circuits, which grow as the number of synapses increases. Recent developments in nanotechnologies provide an extremely compact device with low-power consumption.In particular, nanoscale resistive switching devices (resistive random-access memory (RRAM)) are regarded as a promising solution for implementation of biological synapses due to their nanoscale dimensions, capacity to store multiple bits and the low energy required to operate distinct states. In this paper, we report the fabrication, modeling and implementation of nanoscale RRAM with multi-level storage capability for an electronic synapse device. In addition, we first experimentally demonstrate the learning capabilities and predictable performance by a neuromorphic circuit composed of a nanoscale 1 kbit RRAM cross-point array of synapses and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor neuron circuits. These developments open up possibilities for the development of ubiquitous ultra-dense, ultra-low-power cognitive computers.

  1. Nanoscale RRAM-based synaptic electronics: toward a neuromorphic computing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sangsu; Noh, Jinwoo; Choo, Myung-lae; Sheri, Ahmad Muqeem; Jeon, Moongu; Lee, Byung-Geun; Lee, Byoung Hun; Chang, Man; Kim, Young-Bae; Kim, Chang Jung; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to develop scalable learning algorithms for implementation of networks of spiking neurons in silicon have been hindered by the considerable footprints of learning circuits, which grow as the number of synapses increases. Recent developments in nanotechnologies provide an extremely compact device with low-power consumption. In particular, nanoscale resistive switching devices (resistive random-access memory (RRAM)) are regarded as a promising solution for implementation of biological synapses due to their nanoscale dimensions, capacity to store multiple bits and the low energy required to operate distinct states. In this paper, we report the fabrication, modeling and implementation of nanoscale RRAM with multi-level storage capability for an electronic synapse device. In addition, we first experimentally demonstrate the learning capabilities and predictable performance by a neuromorphic circuit composed of a nanoscale 1 kbit RRAM cross-point array of synapses and complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor neuron circuits. These developments open up possibilities for the development of ubiquitous ultra-dense, ultra-low-power cognitive computers. (paper)

  2. External cervical resorption: an analysis using cone beam and microfocus computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, V; Mavridou, A; Huybrechts, B; Van Gorp, G; Bergmans, L; Lambrechts, P

    2013-09-01

    To provide a three-dimensional representation of external cervical resorption (ECR) with microscopy, stereo microscopy, cone beam computed tomography (CT), microfocus CT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). External cervical resorption is an aggressive form of root resorption, leading to a loss of dental hard tissues. This is due to clastic action, activated by a damage of the covering cementum and stimulated probably by infection. Clinically, it is a challenging situation as it is characterized by a late symptomatology. This is due to the pericanalar protection from a resorption-resistant sheet, composed of pre-dentine and surrounding dentine. The clastic activity is often associated with an attempt to repair, seen by the formation of osteoid tissue. Cone beam CT is extremely useful in the diagnoses and treatment planning of ECR. SEM analyses provide a better insight into the activity of osteoclasts. The root canal is surrounded by a layer of dentine that is resistant to resorption. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comprehensive evaluation of anomalous pulmonary venous connection by electron beam computed tomography as compared with ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shaoxiong; Dai Ruping; Bai Hua; He Sha; Jing Baolian

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Methods: Retrospective analysis on 14 cases with anomalous pulmonary venous connection was performed using EBCT volume scan. The slice thickness and scan time were 3 mm and 100 ms respectively. Non-ionic contrast medium was applied. Three dimensional reconstruction of EBCT images were carried out on all cases. Meanwhile, ultrasound echocardiography was performed on all patients. Conventional cardiovascular angiography was performed on 8 patients and 2 cases received operation. Results: Ten patients with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, including 6 cases of supra-cardiac type and 4 cases of cardiac type, were proved by EBCT examination. Among them, 3 cases of abnormal pulmonary venous drainage were not revealed by conventional cardiovascular angiography. Among four patients with partial pulmonary venous connection, including cardiac type in 2 cases, supra-cardiac type and infra-cardiac type in 1 case respectively, only one of them was demonstrated by echocardiography. Conclusion: EBCT has significant value in diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connection which may not be detectable with echocardiography or even cardiovascular angiography

  4. A computer control system for the PNC high power cw electron linac. Concept and hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, T.; Hirano, K.; Takei, Hayanori; Nomura, Masahiro; Tani, S. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Kato, Y.; Ishikawa, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Design and construction of a high power cw (Continuous Wave) electron linac for studying feasibility of nuclear waste transmutation was started in 1989 at PNC. The PNC accelerator (10 MeV, 20 mA average current, 4 ms pulse width, 50 Hz repetition) is dedicated machine for development of the high current acceleration technology in future need. The computer control system is responsible for accelerator control and supporting the experiment for high power operation. The feature of the system is the measurements of accelerator status simultaneously and modularity of software and hardware for easily implemented for modification or expansion. The high speed network (SCRAM Net {approx} 15 MB/s), Ethernet, and front end processors (Digital Signal Processor) were employed for the high speed data taking and control. The system was designed to be standard modules and software implemented man machine interface. Due to graphical-user-interface and object-oriented-programming, the software development environment is effortless programming and maintenance. (author)

  5. Theoretical investigation of geometries, stabilities, electronic and optical properties for advanced Ag{sub n}@(ZnO){sub 42} (n=6-18) hetero-nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hai-Xia [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); Wang, Xiao-Xu [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Cloud Platform, Beijing Computing Center, Beijing 100094 (China); Hu, Yao-Wen [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huo, Jin-Rong; Li, Lu; Qian, Ping, E-mail: ustbqianp@163.com; Wang, Rong-Ming [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-07-15

    The structural properties of Ag{sub n}@(ZnO){sub 42} (n=6-18) core-shell nanoparticles have been investigated by the first principles calculations, and the core-shell nanostructure with n=13 is proved to be the most stable one for the first time. Ag{sub 13}@(ZnO){sub 42} core-shell nanostructure possesses higher chemistry activity and shows a red shift phenomenon in the light of the absorption spectrum compare to the (ZnO){sub 48}, this can be confirmed by the calculated electron structure. The visible-light could be absorbed by Ag{sub 13}@(ZnO){sub 42} to improve the photo-catalysis of (ZnO){sub 48} nanostructure. Our results show good agreement with experiments.

  6. A Computer-Based, Interactive Videodisc Job Aid and Expert System for Electron Beam Lithography Integration and Diagnostic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kimberly

    This master's thesis describes the development of an expert system and interactive videodisc computer-based instructional job aid used for assisting in the integration of electron beam lithography devices. Comparable to all comprehensive training, expert system and job aid development require a criterion-referenced systems approach treatment to…

  7. Formulation of a Mesoscopic Electron Beam Splitter with Application in Semiconductor Based Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Shanker, A.; Bhowmik, D.; Bhattacharya, T. K.

    2010-01-01

    We aim to analytically arrive at a beam splitter formulation for electron waves. The electron beam splitter is an essential component of quantum logical devices. To arrive at the beam splitter structure, the electrons are treated as waves, i.e. we assume the transport to be ballistic. Ballistic electrons are electrons that travel over such short distances that their phase coherence is maintained. For mesoscopic devices with size smaller than the mean free path, the phase relaxation length and...

  8. Revolutions of Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Guides readers through the development of geometry and basic proof writing using a historical approach to the topic. In an effort to fully appreciate the logic and structure of geometric proofs, Revolutions of Geometry places proofs into the context of geometry's history, helping readers to understand that proof writing is crucial to the job of a mathematician. Written for students and educators of mathematics alike, the book guides readers through the rich history and influential works, from ancient times to the present, behind the development of geometry. As a result, readers are successfull

  9. Fundamental concepts of geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Meserve, Bruce E

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates relationships between different types of geometry. Provides excellent overview of the foundations and historical evolution of geometrical concepts. Exercises (no solutions). Includes 98 illustrations.

  10. Developments in special geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohaupt, Thomas; Vaughan, Owen

    2012-01-01

    We review the special geometry of N = 2 supersymmetric vector and hypermultiplets with emphasis on recent developments and applications. A new formulation of the local c-map based on the Hesse potential and special real coordinates is presented. Other recent developments include the Euclidean version of special geometry, and generalizations of special geometry to non-supersymmetric theories. As applications we discuss the proof that the local r-map and c-map preserve geodesic completeness, and the construction of four- and five-dimensional static solutions through dimensional reduction over time. The shared features of the real, complex and quaternionic version of special geometry are stressed throughout.

  11. Computational Study on Atomic Structures, Electronic Properties, and Chemical Reactions at Surfaces and Interfaces and in Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yu; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2018-06-01

    Through computer simulations using atomistic models, it is becoming possible to calculate the atomic structures of localized defects or dopants in semiconductors, chemically active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, nanoscale structures, and active sites in biological systems precisely. Furthermore, it is also possible to clarify physical and chemical properties possessed by these nanoscale structures such as electronic states, electronic and atomic transport properties, optical properties, and chemical reactivity. It is sometimes quite difficult to clarify these nanoscale structure-function relations experimentally and, therefore, accurate computational studies are indispensable in materials science. In this paper, we review recent studies on the relation between local structures and functions for inorganic, organic, and biological systems by using atomistic computer simulations.

  12. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code

  13. Casimir forces and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, R.

    2005-01-01

    Casimir interactions are interactions induced by quantum vacuum fluctuations and thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Using a path integral quantization for the gauge field, an effective Gaussian action will be derived which is the starting point to compute Casimir forces between macroscopic objects analytically and numerically. No assumptions about the independence of the material and shape dependent contributions to the interaction are made. We study the limit of flat surfaces in further detail and obtain a concise derivation of Lifshitz' theory of molecular forces. For the case of ideally conducting boundaries, the Gaussian action will be calculated explicitly. Both limiting cases are also discussed within the framework of a scalar field quantization approach, which is applicable for translationally invariant geometries. We develop a non-perturbative approach to calculate the Casimir interaction from the Gaussian action for periodically deformed and ideally conducting objects numerically. The obtained results reveal two different scaling regimes for the Casimir force as a function of the distance between the objects, their deformation wavelength and -amplitude. The results confirm that the interaction is non-additive, especially in the presence of strong geometric deformations. Furthermore, the numerical approach is extended to calculate lateral Casimir forces. The results are consistent with the results of the proximity-force approximation for large deformation wavelengths. A qualitatively different behaviour between the normal and lateral force is revealed. We also establish a relation between the boundary induced change of the of the density of states for the scalar Helmholtz equation and the Casimir interaction using the path integral method. For statically deformed boundaries, this relation can be expressed as a novel trace formula, which is formally similar to the so-called Krein-Friedel-Lloyd formula. While the latter formula describes the

  14. Geometry of multihadron production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  15. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  16. Geometry of multihadron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions

  17. The Beauty of Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a geometry project that used the beauty of stained-glass-window designs to teach middle school students about geometric figures and concepts. Three honors prealgebra teachers and a middle school mathematics gifted intervention specialist created a geometry project that covered the curriculum and also assessed students'…

  18. A Lorentzian quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotz, Andreas

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, a formulation of a Lorentzian quantum geometry based on the framework of causal fermion systems is proposed. After giving the general definition of causal fermion systems, we deduce space-time as a topological space with an underlying causal structure. Restricting attention to systems of spin dimension two, we derive the objects of our quantum geometry: the spin space, the tangent space endowed with a Lorentzian metric, connection and curvature. In order to get the correspondence to classical differential geometry, we construct examples of causal fermion systems by regularizing Dirac sea configurations in Minkowski space and on a globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifold. When removing the regularization, the objects of our quantum geometry reduce to the common objects of spin geometry on Lorentzian manifolds, up to higher order curvature corrections.

  19. Methods of information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Amari, Shun-Ichi

    2000-01-01

    Information geometry provides the mathematical sciences with a new framework of analysis. It has emerged from the investigation of the natural differential geometric structure on manifolds of probability distributions, which consists of a Riemannian metric defined by the Fisher information and a one-parameter family of affine connections called the \\alpha-connections. The duality between the \\alpha-connection and the (-\\alpha)-connection together with the metric play an essential role in this geometry. This kind of duality, having emerged from manifolds of probability distributions, is ubiquitous, appearing in a variety of problems which might have no explicit relation to probability theory. Through the duality, it is possible to analyze various fundamental problems in a unified perspective. The first half of this book is devoted to a comprehensive introduction to the mathematical foundation of information geometry, including preliminaries from differential geometry, the geometry of manifolds or probability d...

  20. A Lorentzian quantum geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a formulation of a Lorentzian quantum geometry based on the framework of causal fermion systems is proposed. After giving the general definition of causal fermion systems, we deduce space-time as a topological space with an underlying causal structure. Restricting attention to systems of spin dimension two, we derive the objects of our quantum geometry: the spin space, the tangent space endowed with a Lorentzian metric, connection and curvature. In order to get the correspondence to classical differential geometry, we construct examples of causal fermion systems by regularizing Dirac sea configurations in Minkowski space and on a globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifold. When removing the regularization, the objects of our quantum geometry reduce to the common objects of spin geometry on Lorentzian manifolds, up to higher order curvature corrections.