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Sample records for compressive stress field

  1. Compressive light field displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzstein, Gordon; Lanman, Douglas; Hirsch, Matthew; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Raskar, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Light fields are the multiview extension of stereo image pairs: a collection of images showing a 3D scene from slightly different perspectives. Depicting high-resolution light fields usually requires an excessively large display bandwidth; compressive light field displays are enabled by the codesign of optical elements and computational-processing algorithms. Rather than pursuing a direct "optical" solution (for example, adding one more pixel to support the emission of one additional light ray), compressive displays aim to create flexible optical systems that can synthesize a compressed target light field. In effect, each pixel emits a superposition of light rays. Through compression and tailored optical designs, fewer display pixels are necessary to emit a given light field than a direct optical solution would require.

  2. Changes in ferroelectric properties of lead indium niobate-lead titanate ceramics under compressive stress applied perpendicular to an electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruan, Muangjai, E-mail: muangjaiunruan@yahoo.co [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, 239, T. Suthep A. Muang, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wongsaenmai, Supattra [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Ngamjarurojana, Athipong; Laosiritaworn, Yongyut; Ananta, Supon [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, 239, T. Suthep A. Muang, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Guo Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Yimnirun, Rattikorn [School of Physics, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand)

    2010-02-15

    The influences of perpendicular compressive stress on the ferroelectric properties of (1-x)Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3} (x=0.1-0.4) ceramics were investigated in this study. In general, with increasing compressive stress the coercive field and the dissipation energy of the ceramics were seen to increase. The stress-induced changes in the polarization, however, depended significantly on ceramic compositions. The observations were mainly interpreted in terms of competing influence of the domain switching through non-180 deg. domain walls, clamping of domain walls, and the stress-induced decrease in the switchable part of spontaneous polarization.

  3. Discrete fracture in quasi-brittle materials under compressive and tensile stress states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klerck, PA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for modelling discrete fracture in geomaterials under tensile and compressive stress fields has been developed based on a Mohr-Coulomb failure surface in compression and three independent anisotropic rotating crack models in tension...

  4. The Diagonal Compression Field Method using Circular Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    . Since the eighties the diagonal compression field method has been used to design transverse shear reinforcement in concrete beams. The method is based on the lower-bound theorem of the theory of plasticity, and it has been adopted in Eurocode 2. The paper presents a new design method, which...... with low shear stresses. The larger inclination (the smaller -value) of the uniaxial concrete stress the more transverse shear reinforcement is needed; hence it would be optimal if the -value for a given beam could be set to a low value in regions with high shear stresses and thereafter increased...... in regions with low shear stresses. Thus the shear reinforcement would be reduced and the concrete strength would be utilized in a better way. In the paper it is shown how circular fan stress fields may be used whenever changes in the concrete compression direction are desired. Between two homogeneous stress...

  5. The Diagonal Compression Field Method using Circular Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new design method, which is a modification of the diagonal compression field method, the modification consisting of the introduction of circular fan stress fields. The traditional method does not allow changes of the concrete compression direction throughout a given beam...... if equilibrium is strictly required. This is conservative, since it is not possible fully to utilize the concrete strength in regions with low shear stresses. The larger inclination (the smaller -value) of the uniaxial concrete stress the more transverse shear reinforcement is needed; hence it would be optimal...... if the -value for a given beam could be set to a low value in regions with high shear stresses and thereafter increased in regions with low shear stresses. Thus the shear reinforcement would be reduced and the concrete strength would be utilized in a better way. In the paper it is shown how circular fan stress...

  6. Compressive Surface Stress in Magnetic Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Kwon, S. K.; Kollár, J.; Johansson, B.; Vitos, L.

    2011-02-01

    Because of the increased electron density within the surface layer, metal surfaces are generally expected to have tensile surface stress. Here, using first-principles density functional calculations, we demonstrate that in magnetic 3d metals surface magnetism can alter this commonly accepted picture. We find that the thermodynamically stable surfaces of chromium and manganese possess compressive surface stress. The revealed negative surface stress is shown to be ascribed to the enhanced magnetic moments within the surface layer relative to the bulk values.

  7. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  8. Cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Hengdi; Zhao, Shichao; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Song, Zhenfei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    The cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field (MC-1) is a kind of unique high energy density technique. It has characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising, and would have widely used in areas like high pressure physics, new material synthesis and ultrahigh magnetic field physics. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) has begun the experiment since 2011 and a primary experimental device had been set-up. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5 Tesla were set-up first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive initiated synchronously. The internal diameter of the liner is 97 mm, and its thickness is 1.5 mm. The movement of liner was recorded optically and a typical turnaround phenomenon was observed. From the photography results the liner was compressed smoothly and evenly and its average velocity was about 5-6 km/s. In the experiment a axial magnetic field of over 1400 Tesla has been recorded. The MC-1 process was numerical simulated by 1D MHD code MC11D and the simulations are in accord with the experiments.

  9. Intrinsic Compressive Stress in Polycrystalline Films is Localized at Edges of the Grain Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasco, Enrique; Polop, Celia

    2017-12-01

    The intrinsic compression that arises in polycrystalline thin films under high atomic mobility conditions has been attributed to the insertion or trapping of adatoms inside grain boundaries. This compression is a consequence of the stress field resulting from imperfections in the solid and causes the thermomechanical fatigue that is estimated to be responsible for 90% of mechanical failures in current devices. We directly measure the local distribution of residual intrinsic stress in polycrystalline thin films on nanometer scales, using a pioneering method based on atomic force microscopy. Our results demonstrate that, at odds with expectations, compression is not generated inside grain boundaries but at the edges of gaps where the boundaries intercept the surface. We describe a model wherein this compressive stress is caused by Mullins-type surface diffusion towards the boundaries, generating a kinetic surface profile different from the mechanical equilibrium profile by the Laplace-Young equation. Where the curvatures of both profiles differ, an intrinsic stress is generated in the form of Laplace pressure. The Srolovitz-type surface diffusion that results from the stress counters the Mullins-type diffusion and stabilizes the kinetic surface profile, giving rise to a steady compression regime. The proposed mechanism of competition between surface diffusions would explain the flux and time dependency of compressive stress in polycrystalline thin films.

  10. Compression Fracture of CFRP Laminates Containing Stress Intensifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Christian; Schütt, Martin; Liebig, Wilfried V; Philipkowski, Timo; Kürten, Jonas; Schulte, Karl; Fiedler, Bodo

    2017-09-05

    For brittle fracture behaviour of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) under compression, several approaches exist, which describe different mechanisms during failure, especially at stress intensifications. The failure process is not only initiated by the buckling fibres, but a shear driven fibre compressive failure beneficiaries or initiates the formation of fibres into a kink-band. Starting from this kink-band further damage can be detected, which leads to the final failure. The subject of this work is an experimental investigation on the influence of ply thickness and stacking sequence in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates containing stress intensifications under compression loading. Different effects that influence the compression failure and the role the stacking sequence has on damage development and the resulting compressive strength are identified and discussed. The influence of stress intensifications is investigated in detail at a hole in open hole compression (OHC) tests. A proposed interrupted test approach allows identifying the mechanisms of damage initiation and propagation from the free edge of the hole by causing a distinct damage state and examine it at a precise instant of time during fracture process. Compression after impact (CAI) tests are executed in order to compare the OHC results to a different type of stress intensifications. Unnotched compression tests are carried out for comparison as a reference. With this approach, a more detailed description of the failure mechanisms during the sudden compression failure of CFRP is achieved. By microscopic examination of single plies from various specimens, the different effects that influence the compression failure are identified. First damage of fibres occurs always in 0°-ply. Fibre shear failure leads to local microbuckling and the formation and growth of a kink-band as final failure mechanisms. The formation of a kink-band and finally steady state kinking is shifted to higher compressive strains

  11. Cold compression residual stress reduction in aluminium alloy 7010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, D.A. [Limerick Univ. (Ireland). Materials Research Centre; Robinson, J.S. [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Univ. of Limerick (Ireland); Cudd, R.L. [HDA Forgings Ltd., Redditch, Worchestershire (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    7010 is one of the high strength aluminium alloys used mainly as plate and forgings in the aerospace industry. Its high strength is achieved through a quenching operation where the material is rapidly cooled from the solution heat treatment temperature (475 C) to room temperature. As with all rapid quenching operations, residual stresses develop, leaving the material unsuitable for further machining operations and for service. Regular shaped forgings are generally cold compressed after quenching to relieve residual stresses. The effect of friction, increasing/decreasing the amount of cold compression and applying cold compression in 'bites' on residual stress magnitudes is unknown. This paper aims to study the effect that these variables have on final residual stress patterns through use of a finite element model. (orig.)

  12. Bone Response to Static Compressive Stress at Bone-Implant Interface: A Pilot Study of Critical Static Compressive Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikumi, Noriharu; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical imbalance caused by mechanical overload or poor bone quality around a dental implant can result in osseointegration failure. To avoid that, it is important to identify an appropriate safety stress margin (critical stress level). For this study, a novel device was developed to generate a quantitative amount of static compressive stress under an aseptic closed condition. The aim was to clarify the amount of critical stress produced on the cortical bone when static compression is applied to the osseointegrated bone-implant interface. Small parts for bone sustaining, load generation, and load transmittance were developed to generate quantitative static compressive stress at the bone-implant interface and implanted inside the tibial cortical bone in adult beagle dogs. Each tibia in two dogs received bone-sustaining parts, then after 2 months, the load-transmitting parts were placed into the bone-sustaining parts. After another 2 months, various magnitudes of static compressive stress (0-180 MPa) were generated by tightening the load-generating part to the osseointegrated bone-implant interface. After 7 days, the animals were euthanized, and dissected blocks were prepared for histomorphometric analyses. There were no obvious signs of bone resorption or loss of osseointegration in any of the dogs. The change in shape of osteon was not influenced by the amount of static compressive stress. However, periosteal reactions were observed under the cortical bone on the opposite side. These results indicate that osseointegrated bone-implant interfaces show minimal response based on the magnitude of static compressive stress, even when such stress is greater than 120 MPa.

  13. Soil Compressibility Models for a Wide Stress Range

    KAUST Repository

    Chong, Song-Hun

    2016-03-03

    Soil compressibility models with physically correct asymptotic void ratios are required to analyze situations that involve a wide stress range. Previously suggested models and other functions are adapted to satisfy asymptotic void ratios at low and high stress levels; all updated models involve four parameters. Compiled consolidation data for remolded and natural clays are used to test the models and to develop correlations between model parameters and index properties. Models can adequately fit soil compression data for a wide range of stresses and soil types; in particular, models that involve the power of the stress σ\\'β display higher flexibility to capture the brittle response of some natural soils. The use of a single continuous function avoids numerical discontinuities or the need for ad hoc procedures to determine the yield stress. The tangent stiffness-readily computed for all models-should not be mistaken for the small-strain constant-fabric stiffness. © 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  14. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  15. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhuowei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5–6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Joule Heating Behavior and Residual Compressive Stress around Crack Tip under High Electric Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jin-Chee Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the Joule heating effect and residual compressive stress near the crack tip under the electro-thermo-structural coupling state. For the crack tip field, the compressive condition is important for retarding or stopping the crack growth.

  17. Modified mortar pad behavior in the transfer of compressive stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Ditz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This research aims to analyze the compressive stress transfer between precast concrete elements using cement mortar pads modified with polypropylene fibers, styrene-butadiene latex and heat-expanded vermiculite. The stress transfer analyses are performed interleaving a cementbearing pad between two concrete blocks, subjecting the entire specimen to different compressive load tests. The parameters analyzed in the tests are: surface roughness (using bosses on the bonded phase of different thicknesses, compressive strength with monotonic and cyclic loadings. The main results obtained in this study are: a the presence of pad increased the strength in 24% for thicknesses of imperfections of 0.5 mm and approximately 12% for smooth faces blocks; b gain of effectiveness of the bearing pad when the concrete strength was reduced; c for cyclic loading, the bearing pad increased in 48% the connections strength.

  18. Influence of Compression Stresses on Timber Potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of Compression Stresses on Timber Potentials of Plantation Grown. Eucalyptus camaldulensis Denhn in North-Western Nigeria. *1A.A. Malami and 2B. Olufemi. 1Department of Forestry and Fisheries, Faculty of Agriculture, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto. 2Department of Forestry and Wood Technology, ...

  19. Stress field models from Maxwell stress functions: southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Peter

    2017-08-01

    shallow stress maxima and discontinuous horizontal compression at the Moho, which the new model can only approximate. The new model also lacks the spatial resolution to portray the localized stress states that may occur near the central surfaces of weak faults; instead, the model portrays the regional or background stress field which provides boundary conditions for weak faults. Peak shear stresses in one registered model and one alternate model are 120 and 150 MPa, respectively, while peak vertically integrated shear stresses are 2.9 × 1012 and 4.1 × 1012 N m-1. Channeling of deviatoric stress along the strong Great Valley and the western slope of the Peninsular Ranges is evident. In the neotectonics of southern California, it appears that deviatoric stress and long-term strain rate have a negative correlation, because regions of low heat flow are strong and act as stress guides, while undergoing very little internal deformation. In contrast, active faults lie preferentially in areas with higher heat flow, and their low strength keeps deviatoric stresses locally modest.

  20. A novel full-field experimental method to measure the local compressibility of gas diffusion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Li, Yongqiang; Rock, Jeffrey A.

    The gas diffusion medium (GDM) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell needs to simultaneously satisfy the requirements of transporting reactant gases, removing product water, conducting electrons and heat, and providing mechanical support to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Concerning the localized over-compression which may force carbon fibers and other conductive debris into the membrane to cause fuel cell failure by electronically shorting through the membrane, we have developed a novel full-field experimental method to measure the local thickness and compressibility of GDM. Applying a uniform air pressure upon a thin polyimide film bonded on the top surface of the GDM with support from the bottom by a flat metal substrate and measuring the thickness change using the 3-D digital image correlation technique with an out-of-plane displacement resolution less than 0.5 μm, we have determined the local thickness and compressive stress/strain behavior in the GDM. Using the local thickness and compressibility data over an area of 11.2 mm × 11.2 mm, we numerically construct the nominal compressive response of a commercial Toray™ TGP-H-060 based GDM subjected to compression by flat platens. Good agreement in the nominal stress/strain curves from the numerical construction and direct experimental flat-platen measurement confirms the validity of the methodology proposed in this article. The result shows that a nominal pressure of 1.4 MPa compressed between two flat platens can introduce localized compressive stress concentration of more than 3 MPa in up to 1% of the total area at various locations from several hundred micrometers to 1 mm in diameter. We believe that this full-field experimental method can be useful in GDM material and process development to reduce the local hard spots and help to mitigate the membrane shorting failure in PEM fuel cells.

  1. Size scale dependence of compressive instabilities in layered composites in the presence of stress gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    compressive stress but also on spatial stress or strain gradients, rendering failure initiation size scale dependent. The present work demonstrates and investigates the aforementioned effect through numerical simulations of periodically layered structures withnotches and holes under bending and compressive...

  2. Conversion of engineering stresses to Cauchy stresses in tensile and compression tests of thermoplastic polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schümann Kerstin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic polymers exhibit non-isochoric behaviour during tensile and compression testing as well as particular deformations like local necking (tension or buckling (compression. A method for the determination of Cauchy stresses from tensile and compression tests is presented, that considers the actual deformations of the test specimens. The exact geometry of the specimens in the respective present configuration is determined in photographs, which are taken continuously throughout the test. The engineering stresses at several time points are converted into Cauchy stresses using newly developed formulas in consideration of the actual specimen geometry. For validation finite element analyses of the tensile and compression tests are performed using the identified stress-strain curves. The numerical results show good agreement with the experiments for the tested polymers. Thus a method for conversion of engineering to Cauchy stresses in tensile and compression tests could be established considering the non-isochoric deformation in plasticity. With this method “true” stress-strain curves as input for finite element material models can be identified for arbitrary materials.

  3. Suitability of pre-compression stress as the real critical stress of unsaturated agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosaddeghi, M.R.; Koolen, A.J.; Hajabbasi, M.A.; Hemmat, A.; Keller, T.

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine if the pre-compression stress sigma(pc) is the major critical stress influencing soil physical quality indices, i.e. air permeability K-g and air-filled porosity (AFP). Topoils of five soil series were collected from the Isfahan Province in central Iran.

  4. Progress in turbulence modeling for complex flow fields including effects of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two second-order-closure turbulence models were devised that are suitable for predicting properties of complex turbulent flow fields in both incompressible and compressible fluids. One model is of the "two-equation" variety in which closure is accomplished by introducing an eddy viscosity which depends on both a turbulent mixing energy and a dissipation rate per unit energy, that is, a specific dissipation rate. The other model is a "Reynolds stress equation" (RSE) formulation in which all components of the Reynolds stress tensor and turbulent heat-flux vector are computed directly and are scaled by the specific dissipation rate. Computations based on these models are compared with measurements for the following flow fields: (a) low speed, high Reynolds number channel flows with plane strain or uniform shear; (b) equilibrium turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients or effects of compressibility; and (c) flow over a convex surface with and without a pressure gradient.

  5. Depth assisted compression of full parallax light fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziosi, Danillo B.; Alpaslan, Zahir Y.; El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.

    2015-03-01

    Full parallax light field displays require high pixel density and huge amounts of data. Compression is a necessary tool used by 3D display systems to cope with the high bandwidth requirements. One of the formats adopted by MPEG for 3D video coding standards is the use of multiple views with associated depth maps. Depth maps enable the coding of a reduced number of views, and are used by compression and synthesis software to reconstruct the light field. However, most of the developed coding and synthesis tools target linearly arranged cameras with small baselines. Here we propose to use the 3D video coding format for full parallax light field coding. We introduce a view selection method inspired by plenoptic sampling followed by transform-based view coding and view synthesis prediction to code residual views. We determine the minimal requirements for view sub-sampling and present the rate-distortion performance of our proposal. We also compare our method with established video compression techniques, such as H.264/AVC, H.264/MVC, and the new 3D video coding algorithm, 3DV-ATM. Our results show that our method not only has an improved rate-distortion performance, it also preserves the structure of the perceived light fields better.

  6. Electromagnetic fields stress living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Martin; Goodman, Reba

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMF), in both ELF (extremely low frequency) and radio frequency (RF) ranges, activate the cellular stress response, a protective mechanism that induces the expression of stress response genes, e.g., HSP70, and increased levels of stress proteins, e.g., hsp70. The 20 different stress protein families are evolutionarily conserved and act as 'chaperones' in the cell when they 'help' repair and refold damaged proteins and transport them across cell membranes. Induction of the stress response involves activation of DNA, and despite the large difference in energy between ELF and RF, the same cellular pathways respond in both frequency ranges. Specific DNA sequences on the promoter of the HSP70 stress gene are responsive to EMF, and studies with model biochemical systems suggest that EMF could interact directly with electrons in DNA. While low energy EMF interacts with DNA to induce the stress response, increasing EMF energy in the RF range can lead to breaks in DNA strands. It is clear that in order to protect living cells, EMF safety limits must be changed from the current thermal standard, based on energy, to one based on biological responses that occur long before the threshold for thermal changes.

  7. Effects of shock topology on temperature field in compressible turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-01-01

    Effects of two types of shock topology, namely, small-scale shocklet and large-scale shock wave, on the statistics of temperature in compressible turbulence were investigated by simulations. The shocklet and shock wave are caused by the solenoidal and compressive modes of driven forces, respectively. Hereafter, the related two flows are called as SFT and CFT, respectively. It shows that in SFT the temperature spectrum follows the k^-5/3 power law, and the temperature field has "ramp-cliff" structures. By contrast, in CFT the temperature spectrum obeys the k^-2 power law, and the temperature field is dominated by large-scale rarefaction and compression. The power-law exponents for the p.d.f. of large negative dilatation are -2.5 in SFT and -3.5 in CFT, close to theoretical values. For the isentropic assumption of thermodynamic variables, the derivation in SFT grows with the turbulent Mach number (Mt), and for same Mt, the variables in CFT are more anisentropic. The angle statistics shows that the temperature g...

  8. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  9. Compressive yield stress of depletion gels from stationary centrifugation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuada, Enrico; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Piazza, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the stationary sedimentation profiles of colloidal gels obtained by an arrested phase-separation process driven by depletion forces, which have been compressed either by natural gravity or by a centrifugal acceleration ranging between 6g and 2300g. Our measurements show that the gel rheological properties display a drastic change when the gel particle volume fraction exceeds a value φc , which barely depends on the strength of the interparticle attractive forces that consolidate the network. In particular, the gel compressive yield stress \\Pi(φ) , which increases as \\Pi(φ) ∼ φ4.2 for φ ≲ φc , displays a diverging behaviour for φ>φc , with an asymptotic value that is close to the random close packing value for hard spheres. The evidence we obtained suggests that φc basically coincides with the liquid (colloid-rich) branch of the metastable coexistence curve, rather than with the lower (and ϕ-dependent) values expected for an attractive glass line penetrating inside the coexistence region.

  10. Neotectonic stresses in Fennoscandia: field observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The present-day stress state of Fennoscandia is traditionally viewed as the combination of far field sources and residual glacial loading stresses. Investigations were conducted in different regions of Norway with the purpose of detecting and measuring stress-relief features and to derive from them valuable information on the crustal stress state. Stress-relief features are induced by blasting and sudden rock unloading in road construction and quarrying operations and are common in Norway and very likely in other regions of Fennoscandia. Stress relief at the Earth's surface is diagnostic of anomalously high stress levels at shallow depths in the crust and appears to be a characteristic of the formerly glaciated Baltic and Canadian Precambrian shields. The studied stress-relief features are, in general, indicative of NW-SE compression, suggesting ridge-push as the main source of stress. Our derived stress directions are also in excellent agreement with the ones derived from other kinds of stress indicators, including focal mechanisms from deep earthquakes, demonstrating that stress-relief features are valuable for neotectonic research. As a second step we applied numerical modelling techniques to simulate the neotectonic stress field in Fennoscandia with particular emphasis to southern Norway. A numerical method was used to reconstruct the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere. The numerical method involves classical steady-state heat equations to derive lithosphere thickness, geotherm and density distribution and, in addition, requires the studied lithosphere to be isostatically compensated at its base. The a priori crustal structure was derived from previous geophysical studies. Undulations of the geoid were used to calibrate the models. Once the density structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere is reconstructed it is straightforward to quantify its stress state and compare modelling results with existing stress indicators. The modelling suggests that

  11. Estimation of the iron loss in deep-sea permanent magnet motors considering seawater compressive stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongxiang; Wei, Yanyu; Zou, Jibin; Li, Jianjun; Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM). The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress.

  12. The ambient stress field in the continental margin around the Korean Peninsula and Japanese islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Hong, T. K.; Chang, C.

    2016-12-01

    The ambient stress field is mainly influenced by regional tectonics. The stress field composition is crucial information for seismic hazard assessment. The Korean Peninsula, Japanese Islands and East Sea comprise the eastern margin of the Eurasian plate. The regions are surrounded by the Okhotsk, Pacific, and Philippine Sea plates. We investigate the regional stress field around the Korean Peninsula and Japanese islands using the focal mechanism solutions of regional earthquakes. Complex lateral and vertical variations of regional crustal stress fields are observed around a continental margin. The dominant compression directions are ENE-WSW around the Korean Peninsula and eastern China, E-W in the central East Sea and northern and southern Japan, NW-SE in the central Japan, and N-S around the northern Nankai trough. The horizontal compression directions are observed to be different by fault type, suggesting structure-dependent stress field distortion. The regional stress field change by depth and location, suggesting that the compression and tension stress may alternate in local region. The stress field and structures affect mutually, causing stress field distortion and reactivation of paleo-structures. These observation may be useful for understanding of local stress-field perturbation for seismic hazard mitigation of the region.

  13. Study of the stress-strain state of compressed concrete elements with composite reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko Yurii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency analysis of the application of glass composite reinforcement in compressed concrete elements as a load-carrying component has been performed. The results of experimental studies of the deformation-strength characteristics of this reinforcement on compression and compressed concrete cylinders reinforced by this reinforcement are presented. The results of tests and mechanisms of sample destruction have been analyzed. The numerical analysis of the stress-strain state has been performed for axial compression of concrete elements with glasscomposite reinforcement. The influence of the reinforcement percentage on the stressed state of a concrete compressed element with the noted reinforcement is estimated. On the basis of the obtained results, it is established that the glass-composite reinforcement has positive effect on the strength of the compressed concrete elements. That is, when calculating the load-bearing capacity of such structures, the function of composite reinforcement on compression should not be neglected.

  14. Contribution of Reynolds stress distribution to the skin friction in compressible turbulent channel flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, T; Flutet, V; Sagaut, P

    2009-03-01

    An exact relationship for the local skin friction is derived for the compressible turbulent wall-bounded flow (channel, pipe, flat plate). This expression is an extension of the compressible case of that derived by Fukagata [Phys. Fluids 14, L73 (2002)] in the case of incompressible wall-bounded flows. This decomposition shows that the skin friction can be interpreted as the contribution of four physical processes, i.e., laminar, turbulent, compressible, and a fourth coming from the interaction between turbulence and compressibility. Compressible numerical simulations show that, even at Mach number M=2 , the main contribution comes from the turbulence, i.e., the Reynolds stress term.

  15. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichen Yan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Matched field processing (MFP is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method.

  16. Fatigue Characteristics and Compressive Residual Stress of Shot Preened Alloy 600 Under High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Cheon; Cheong, Seong Kyun [Seoul Nat' l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hong Seok [KEPCO Plant Service and Engineering co., Ltd., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The compressive residual stress and fatigue behavior of shot preened alloy 600 under a high-temperature environment is investigated in this study. Alloy 600 is used in the main parts of nuclear power plants, and the compressive residual stress induced by the shot peening process is considered to prevent Succ (stress corrosion cracking). To obtain practical results, the fatigue characteristics and compressive residual stress are evaluated under the actual operating temperature of a domestic nuclear power plant, as well as a high-temperature environment. The experimental results show that the peening effects are valid at a high temperature lower than approximately 538 .deg. C,, which is the threshold temperature. The fatigue life was maintained at temperatures lower than 538 .deg. C, and the compressive residual stress at 538 .deg. C was 68.2% of that at room temperature. The present results are expected to be used to obtain basic safety and reliability data.

  17. Pressure-Induced Changes in Inter-Diffusivity and Compressive Stress in Chemically Strengthened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Thirion, Lynn M.; Youngman, Randall E.

    and more damage resistant glasses. However, the interplay among isostatic compression, pressure-induced changes in alkali diffusivity, compressive stress generated through ion exchange, and the resulting mechanical properties are poorly understood. In this work, we employ a specially designed gas pressure...... chamber to compress bulk glass samples isostatically up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature before or after the ion exchange treatment of an industrial sodium-magnesium aluminosilicate glass. Compression of the samples prior to ion exchange leads to a decreased Na+-K+ inter-diffusivity, increased compressive...... stress, and slightly increased hardness. Compression after the ion exchange treatment changes the shape of the potassium-sodium diffusion profiles and significantly increases glass hardness. We discuss these results in terms of the underlying structural changes in network-modifier environments...

  18. Thermal convection of magneto compressible couple-stress fluid saturated in a porous medium with Hall current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, C. B.; Singh, M.; Kumar, S.

    2016-02-01

    An investigation is made on the effect of Hall currents on thermal instability of a compressible couple-stress fluid in the presence of a horizontal magnetic field saturated in a porous medium. The analysis is carried out within the framework of the linear stability theory and normal mode technique. A dispersion relation governing the effects of viscoelasticity, Hall currents, compressibility, magnetic field and porous medium is derived. For the stationary convection a couple-stress fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid due to the vanishing of the viscoelastic parameter. Compressibility, the magnetic filed and couple-stress parameter have stabilizing effects on the system whereas Hall currents and medium permeability have a destabilizing effect on the system, but in the absence of Hall current couple-stress has a destabilizing effect on the system. It has been observed that oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of viscoelasticity, magnetic field porous medium and Hall currents which were non-existent in their absence.

  19. Mechanical Pre-Stressing a Transducer through a Negative DC Biasing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-21

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,224 21 April 2017 Mechanical Pre-Stressing a Transducer through a Negative DC Biasing Field Stephen C...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mechanical Pre-Stressing a Transducer through a Negative DC Biasing Field 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...with regards to the feasibility of using a negative DC biasing approach to apply a mechanical compressive stress to a transducer’s piezoelectric

  20. Statistics-Based Compression of Global Wind Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Jaehong

    2017-02-07

    Wind has the potential to make a significant contribution to future energy resources. Locating the sources of this renewable energy on a global scale is however extremely challenging, given the difficulty to store very large data sets generated by modern computer models. We propose a statistical model that aims at reproducing the data-generating mechanism of an ensemble of runs via a Stochastic Generator (SG) of global annual wind data. We introduce an evolutionary spectrum approach with spatially varying parameters based on large-scale geographical descriptors such as altitude to better account for different regimes across the Earth\\'s orography. We consider a multi-step conditional likelihood approach to estimate the parameters that explicitly accounts for nonstationary features while also balancing memory storage and distributed computation. We apply the proposed model to more than 18 million points of yearly global wind speed. The proposed SG requires orders of magnitude less storage for generating surrogate ensemble members from wind than does creating additional wind fields from the climate model, even if an effective lossy data compression algorithm is applied to the simulation output.

  1. Density and permeability of a loess soil: long-term organic matter effect and the response to compressive stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    Pa). Investigated indicators for compression resistance included compression index, precompression stress, and resistance and resilience indices based on measured soil physical properties (bulk density, air-filled porosity, air permeability, and void ratio). Soil resilience was assessed following exposure...

  2. Compression and self-entanglement of single DNA molecules under uniform electric field

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jing; Du, Ning; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally study the effects of a uniform electric field on the conformation of single DNA molecules. We demonstrate that a moderate electric field (∼200 V/cm) strongly compresses isolated DNA polymer coils into isotropic globules. Insight into the nature of these compressed states is gained by following the expansion of the molecules back to equilibrium after halting the electric field. We observe two distinct types of expansion modes: a continuous molecular expansion analogous to a c...

  3. Shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Nasiłowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539. The research shows strengthening of the top layer and the formation of compressive stresses in the subsurface layers of the shot-peening elements.[b]Keyword[/b]: austenitic steel 1.4539, residual stresses, Waisman-Phillips’a method

  4. Stress field modelling from digital geological map data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Gáspár; Barancsuk, Ádám; Szentpéteri, Krisztián

    2016-04-01

    calculated from the fracture criterion. The calculation includes the gravitational acceleration, the average density of rocks and the experimental 60 degree of the fracture angle from the normal of the fault plane. This way, the stress tensors are calculated as absolute pressure values per square meters on both sides of the faults. If the stress from the overburden is greater than 1 bar (i.e. the faults are buried), a confined compression would be present. Modelling this state of stress may result a confusing pattern of vectors, because in a confined position the horizontal stress vectors may point towards structures primarily associated with extension. To step over this, and to highlight the variability in the stress-field, the model calculates the vectors directly from the differential stress (practically subtracting the minimum principal stress from the critical stress). The result of the modelling is a vector map, which theoretically represents the minimum tectonic pressure in the moment, when the rock body breaks from an initial state. This map - together with the original fault-map - is suitable for determining those areas where unrevealed tectonic, sedimentary and lithological structures are possibly present (e.g. faults, sub-basins and intrusions). With modelling different deformational phases on the same area, change of the stress vectors can be detected which reveals not only the varying directions of the principal stresses, but the tectonic-driven sedimentation patterns too. The decrease of necessary critical stress in the case of a possible reactivation of a fault in subsequent deformation phase can be managed with the down-ranking of the concerning structural elements. Reference: Albert G., Ungvári ZS., Szentpéteri K. 2014: Modeling the present day stress field of the Pannonian Basin from neotectonic maps - In: Beqiraj A, Ionescu C, Christofides G, Uta A, Beqiraj Goga E, Marku S (eds.) Proceedings XX Congress of the Carpathian-Balkan Geological Association

  5. Effect of stress on field dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, V; Heineken, E; Peters, H

    1976-08-01

    60 subjects were tested in the rod-and-frame test under flicker conditions (stress). As compared to scores in a control situation (no flicker), the rod-and-frame scores were large under stress and increased monotonically during the session. Futhermore, both intra- and interindividual variability of rod-and-frame performance changed under stress conditions in a consistent manner. The general results, which clearly point to a reliable influence of stress on field dependency, are discussed within the methodological framework of Witkin's theory of perception and personality.

  6. A novel method for estimating soil precompression stress from uniaxial confined compression tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    obtained from the new method were linearly related to the maximum stress experienced by the soil samples prior to the uniaxial, confined compression test at each soil condition with a slope close to 1. Precompression stress determined with the new method was not related to soil type or dry bulk density......The concept of precompression stress is used for estimating soil strength of relevance to fieldtraffic. It represents the maximum stress experienced by the soil. The most recently developed fitting method to estimate precompression stress (Gompertz) is based on the assumption of an S-shape stress......-strain curve, which is not always fulfilled. A new simple numerical method was developed to estimate precompression stress from stress-strain curves, based solely on the sharp bend on the stress-strain curve partitioning the curve into an elastic and a plastic section. Our study had three objectives: (i...

  7. COMPRESSIBILITY OF NUCLEI IN RELATIVISTIC MEAN FIELD-THEORY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, HF; MALFLIET, R; SCHOLTEN, O

    1991-01-01

    Using the relativistic Hartree approximation in the sigma-omega model we study the isoscalar giant monopole resonance. It is shown that the ISGMR of lighter nuclei has non-negligible anharmonic terms. The compressibility of nuclear matter is determined using a leptodermous expansion.

  8. Hydromagnetic waves in a compressed-dipole field via field-aligned Klein–Gordon equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydromagnetic waves, especially those of frequencies in the range of a few millihertz to a few hertz observed in the Earth's magnetosphere, are categorized as ultra low-frequency (ULF waves or pulsations. They have been extensively studied due to their importance in the interaction with radiation belt particles and in probing the structures of the magnetosphere. We developed an approach to examining the toroidal standing Aflvén waves in a background magnetic field by recasting the wave equation into a Klein–Gordon (KG form along individual field lines. The eigenvalue solutions to the system are characteristic of a propagation type when the corresponding eigenfrequency is greater than a critical frequency and a decaying type otherwise. We apply the approach to a compressed-dipole magnetic field model of the inner magnetosphere and obtain the spatial profiles of relevant parameters and the spatial wave forms of harmonic oscillations. We further extend the approach to poloidal-mode standing Alfvén waves along field lines. In particular, we present a quantitative comparison with a recent spacecraft observation of a poloidal standing Alfvén wave in the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis based on the KG equation yields consistent results which agree with the spacecraft measurements of the wave period and the amplitude ratio between the magnetic field and electric field perturbations.

  9. Far-field implications of laser transmission through a compressible shear field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchiello, James M.; Fitzgerald, Edward J.; Jumper, Eric J.

    2001-06-01

    Progress has recently been made in both the collection and modeling of fluid-optic disturbances imparted by compressible, shear flows. This field of research, termed Aero-Optics, has been motivated primarily by the development of directed-energy weapons; however, it is equally applicable to a general class of applications involving laser transmission and reception from aircraft. Examples of these-type applications include free-space, laser transmission from ground to air, from air to air and from air to space. In the present paper, we examine the effect of laser transmission through high-Mach-number, subsonic, compressible free shear layers on the ability to focus the beam on distant targets. Time-resolved time series of distorted wavefronts due to propagation through a Mach-0.8 free shear layer collected at the Aero-Optics facility at Arnold Engineering and Development Center, are used as the input to a Fourier-Optics routine that computes time series of far-field irradiance patterns. These patterns are then used to compute the time-averaged Strehl ratio directly, and these are compared to time-averaged Strehl ratios computed using the wavefront's rms Optical Path Differences and the large-aperture approximation. Conclusions are drawn about the appropriateness of using the large-aperture approximation for Aero-Optic-type wavefront aberrations.

  10. A primary study on the performance of piezoceramic based smart aggregate under various compressive stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dujian; Liu, Tiejun; Yang, Antai; Zhao, Yanru; Du, Chengcheng

    2017-10-01

    The reliability of piezoceramic based smart aggregate (SA) used for damage detection of concrete structures has already been validated by laboratory tests. However, the in situ concrete members are generally under a big range of stress levels, and the performance of SA under various compressive stresses is still unclear. In this study, an electronic universal testing machine was employed to apply different stresses on the SAs. The received signals of SA sensor accompanying with different drive signals were recorded. The experimental results show that the amplitude of received signals increases firstly, and then tends to be stable with stress. This enhancement is mainly induced by the decrease in thickness of epoxy resin layer caused by compressive stress. It indicates that the change of load applied on monitored concrete members embedded with SAs may lead to a change in monitoring signal amplitude even in elastic range, but it does not stand for the change of health state of monitored concrete member.

  11. Foam behavior of solid glass spheres – Zn22Al2Cu composites under compression stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon-Lezama, J.A., E-mail: alja@correo.azc.uam.mx [Departamento de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-A, Avenida San Pablo 180, Colonia Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Garcia-Borquez, A., E-mail: a.garciaborquez@yahoo.com.mx [Ciencia de Materiales, ESFM – Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Edif. 9, Unid. Prof. A. Lopez Mateos, Colonia Lindavista, 07738 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Torres-Villaseñor, G., E-mail: gtorres@unam.mx [Departamento de Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo., P 70-360, México, D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-06-25

    Solid glass spheres – Zn22Al2Cu composites, having different densities and microstructures, were elaborated and studied under compression. Their elaboration process involves alloy melting, spheres submersion into the liquid alloy and finally air cooling. The achieved composites with densities 2.6884, 2.7936 and 3.1219 g/cm{sup 3} were studied in casting and thermally induced, fine-grain matrix microstructures. Test samples of the composites were compressed at a 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} strain rate, and their microstructure characterized before and after compression by using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Although they exhibit different compression behavior depending on their density and microstructure, all of them show an elastic region at low strains, reach their maximum stress (σ{sub max}) at hundreds of MPa before the stress fall or collapse up to a lowest yield point (LYP), followed by an important plastic deformation at nearly constant stress (σ{sub p}): beyond this plateau, an extra deformation can be limitedly reached only by a significant stress increase. This behavior under compression stresses is similar to that reported for metal foams, being the composites with fine microstructure which nearest behave to metal foams under this pattern. Nevertheless, the relative values of the elastic modulus, and maximum and plateau stresses do not follow the Ashby equations by changing the relative density. Generally, the studied composites behave as foams under compression, except for their peculiar parameters values (σ{sub max}, LYP, and σ{sub p})

  12. Mixed mode I/II fatigue crack growth under tensile or compressive far-field loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirani, Hasan; Farhangdoost, Khalil

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the rate and path of fatigue crack growth under mixed mode I/II loading in the presence of tensile and compressive stresses. Compact tension shear (CTS) specimens made of 42CrMo4 steel are subjected to pure mode I, pure mode II, and mixed mode I/II loadings. Fatigue crack growth rates are determined for a number of K I/K II ratios and compared with each other. Paris’ law constants are found out for different modes of loading on the material. Crack growth paths at various loading angles, in the presence of tensile and compressive stresses, are analyzed and the specimens fracture surfaces are examined. In order to determine the stress intensity factors (SIFs) at different modes, finite element simulation of the CTS specimen is adopted. Using the SIFs yielded by simulation, the crack growth angles are obtained by a number of criteria and compared with the experimental results. At mixed mode loading involving compressive stresses, Richard’s criterion for the determination of crack growth angles gets improved. As a result, by determining Paris’ law constants and the coefficients of modified Richard’s criterion, the material behavior in mixed mode I/II fatigue involving compressive stresses is known. The specimens fracture surfaces reveals the wear of the surfaces under compressive loads.

  13. Global Geopotential Energy & Stress Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, S.B.

    in the lithosphere, induced by lateral density variation. The leading quantity is the Geopotential Energy, the integrated lithostatic pressure in a rock column, which is related to horizontal stresses by the Equations of Equilibrium. The Geopotential Energy can be furthermore linearly related to the Geoid under...... assumption of local isostasy. Satellite Geoid measurements contain, however, deeper mantle responses of most likely longwavelength. Still after filtering, the Geoid can't be satisfyingly corrected. Existing shallow signals can be hereby extinguished as well, for instance the somewhat age dependent signal...... response to Geopotential Energy and the Geoid. A linearized inverse method fits a lithospheric reference model to reproduce measured data sets, such as topography and surface heat flow, while assuming isostasy and solving the steady state heat equation. A FEM code solves the equations of equilibrium...

  14. Viscoelastic properties of passive skeletal muscle in compression: stress-relaxation behaviour and constitutive modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loocke, M; Lyons, C G; Simms, C K

    2008-01-01

    The compressive properties of skeletal muscle are important in impact biomechanics, rehabilitation engineering and surgical simulation. However, the mechanical behaviour of muscle tissue in compression remains poorly characterised. In this paper, the time-dependent properties of passive skeletal muscle were investigated using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Uniaxial ramp and hold compression tests were performed in vitro on fresh porcine skeletal muscle at various rates and orientations of the tissue fibres. Results show that above a very small compression rate, the viscoelastic component plays a significant role in muscle mechanical properties; it represents approximately 50% of the total stress reached at a compression rate of 0.5% s(-1). A stiffening effect with compression rate is observed especially in directions closer to the muscle fibres. Skeletal muscle viscoelastic behaviour is thus dependent on compression rate and fibre orientation. A model is proposed to represent the observed experimental behaviour, which is based on the quasi-linear viscoelasticity framework. A previously developed strain-dependent Young's Moduli formulation was extended with Prony series to account for the tissue viscoelastic properties. Parameters of the model were obtained by fitting to stress-relaxation data obtained in the muscle fibre, cross-fibre and 45 degrees directions. The model then successfully predicted stress-relaxation behaviour at 60 degrees from the fibre direction (errors fitting to data obtained at compression rates of 0.5% s(-1), 1%s(-1) and 10% s(-1) was performed and the model provided a good fit to the data as well as good predictions of muscle behaviour at rates of 0.05% s(-1) and 5% s(-1) (errors <25%).

  15. Introduction of Enhanced Compressive Residual Stress Profiles in Aerospace Components Using Combined Mechanical Surface Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Abhay; Lim, Andre; Nagarajan, Balasubramanian; Cher Wong, Chow; Maiti, Rajarshi; Castagne, Sylvie

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical surface treatments such as Shot Peening (SP) and Deep Cold Rolling (DCR) are being used to introduce Compressive Residual Stress (CRS) at the surface and subsurface layers of aerospace components, respectively. This paper investigates the feasibility of a combined introduction of both the surface and sub-surface compressive residual stress on Ti6Al4V material through a successive application of the two aforementioned processes, one after the other. CRS profiles between individual processes were compared to that of combination of processes to validate the feasibility. It was found out that shot peening introduces surface compressive residual stress into the already deep cold rolled sample, resulting in both surface and sub-surface compressive residual stresses in the material. However the drawback of such a combination would be the increased surface roughness after shot peening a deep cold rolled sample which can be critical especially in compressor components. Hence, a new technology, Vibro-Peening (VP) may be used as an alternative to SP to introduce surface stress at reduced roughness.

  16. Stress field reconstruction in an active mudslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroň, Ivo; Kernstocková, Markéta; Melichar, Rostislav

    2017-07-01

    Meso-scale structures from gravitational slope deformation observed in landslides and deep-seated gravitational slope failures are very similar to those of endogenous ones. Therefore we applied palaeostress analysis of fault-slip data for reconstructing the stress field of an active mudslide in Pechgraben, Austria. This complex compound landslide has developed in clayey colluvium and shale and was activated after a certain period of dormancy in June 2013. During the active motion on June 12, 2013, 73 fault-slip traces at 9 locations were measured within the landslide body. The heterogeneous fault-slip data were processed in term of palaeostresses, the reconstructed palaeostress tensor being characterized by the orientations of the three principal stress axes and the stress ratio (which provides the shape of the stress ellipsoid). The results of the palaeostress analysis were compared to airborne laser scan digital terrain models that revealed dynamics and superficial displacements of the moving mass prior and after our survey. The results were generally in good agreement with the observed landslide displacement pattern and with the anticipated stress regime according to Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria and Anderson's theory. The compressional regime was mostly registered at the toe in areas, where a compressional stress field is expected during previous mass-movement stages, or at margins loaded by subsequent landslide bodies from above. On the other hand, extension regimes were identified at the head scarps of secondary slides, subsequently on bulged ridges at the toe and in the zone of horst-and-graben structures in the lower central part of the main landslide body, where the basal slip surface probably had locally convex character. Strike-slip regimes, as well as oblique normal or oblique reverse regimes were observed at the lateral margins of the landslide bodies. The directions of principal stresses could be used as markers of landslide movement directions

  17. Hydromagnetic Waves in a Compressed Dipole Field via Field-Aligned Klein-Gordon Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Jinlei; McKenzie, J F; Webb, G M

    2014-01-01

    Hydromagnetic waves, especially those of frequencies in the range of a few milli-Hz to a few Hz observed in the Earth's magnetosphere, are categorized as Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves or pulsations. They have been extensively studied due to their importance in the interaction with radiation belt particles and in probing the structures of the magnetosphere. We developed an approach in examining the toroidal standing Aflv\\'{e}n waves in a background magnetic field by recasting the wave equation into a Klein-Gordon (KG) form along individual field lines. The eigenvalue solutions to the system are characteristic of a propagation type when the corresponding eigen-frequency is greater than a cut-off frequency and an evanescent type otherwise. We apply the approach to a compressed dipole magnetic field model of the inner magnetosphere, and obtain the spatial profiles of relevant parameters and the spatial wave forms of harmonic oscillations. We further extend the approach to poloidal mode standing Alfv\\'{e}n waves...

  18. Compression and self-entanglement of single DNA molecules under uniform electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Du, Ning; Doyle, Patrick S

    2011-09-27

    We experimentally study the effects of a uniform electric field on the conformation of single DNA molecules. We demonstrate that a moderate electric field (~200 V/cm) strongly compresses isolated DNA polymer coils into isotropic globules. Insight into the nature of these compressed states is gained by following the expansion of the molecules back to equilibrium after halting the electric field. We observe two distinct types of expansion modes: a continuous molecular expansion analogous to a compressed spring expanding, and a much slower expansion characterized by two long-lived metastable states. Fluorescence microscopy and stretching experiments reveal that the metastable states are the result of intramolecular self-entanglements induced by the electric field. These results have broad importance in DNA separations and single molecule genomics, polymer rheology, and DNA-based nanofabrication.

  19. Performance improvement of compressive light field display with the viewing-position-dependent weight distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duo; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Zeng, Xia; Xie, Songlin; Guo, Nan

    2016-12-26

    Compressive light field display with multilayer and multiframe decompositions is able to provide three-dimensional (3D) scenes with high spatial-angular resolution and without periodically repeating view-zones. However, there are still some limitations on the display performance, such as poor image quality and limited field of view (FOV). Compressive light field display with the viewing-position-dependent weight distribution is presented. When relevant views are given high weights in the optimization, the displaying performance at the viewing-position can be noticeably improved. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Peak signal-noise-ration (PSNR) is improved by 7dB for the compressive light field display with narrow FOV. The angle for wide FOV can be expended to 70° × 60°, and multi-viewers are supported.

  20. Efficient Compression of Far Field Matrices in Multipole Algorithms based on Spherical Harmonics and Radiating Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schroeder

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a compression of far field matrices in the fast multipole method and its multilevel extension for electromagnetic problems. The compression is based on a spherical harmonic representation of radiation patterns in conjunction with a radiating mode expression of the surface current. The method is applied to study near field effects and the far field of an antenna placed on a ship surface. Furthermore, the electromagnetic scattering of an electrically large plate is investigated. It is demonstrated, that the proposed technique leads to a significant memory saving, making multipole algorithms even more efficient without compromising the accuracy.

  1. Stress-Strain Compression of AA6082-T6 Aluminum Alloy at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre da Silva Scari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Short cylindrical specimens made of AA6082-T6 aluminum alloy were studied experimentally (compression tests, analytically (normalized Cockcroft-Latham criteria—nCL, and numerically (finite element analysis—FEA. The mechanical properties were determined with the stress-strain curves by the Hollomon equation. The elastic modulus obtained experimentally differs from the real value, as expected, and it is also explained. Finite element (FE analysis was carried out with satisfactory correlation to the experimental results, as it differs about 1,5% from the damage analysis by the nCL concerning the experimental data obtained by compression tests.

  2. Beltrami stress fields in an elastic body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristov, S. N.; Keller, I. E.

    2016-07-01

    It is proposed to search for solutions to the equation of continuum equilibrium satisfying additionally the Beltrami tensor equation, which describes self-transformation of a solenoidal field and is well-known in hydrodynamics for the velocity vector field; however, it has apparently still not been considered for tensor fields. A series of localized stress distributions twisting the material continuum are obtained as well as the stress distribution in the form of periodic structures in the space caused by the regular distribution of incompatible plastic deformation in an elasto-plastic solid. The obtained solutions are not known in the theory of elasticity and represent a certain interest in connection with the description of defects in a solid.

  3. The Varying Effects of Uniaxial Compressive Stress on the Bainitic Transformation under Different Austenitization Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thermal simulation experiments under different austenitization temperatures and different stress states were conducted. High-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM, thermal dilatometry, and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used to quantitatively investigate the effects of the uniaxial compressive stress on bainitic transformation at 330 °C following different austenitization temperatures. The transformation plasticity was also analyzed. It was found that the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation increases with the austenitization temperature due to larger prior austenite grain size as well as stronger promoting effect of mechanical driving force on selected variant growth at higher austenitization temperatures. The grain size and the yield strength of prior austenite are other important factors which influence the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation, besides the mechanical driving force provided by the stress. Moreover, the transformation plasticity increases with the austenitization temperature.

  4. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  5. Compressive Stress Inhibits Proliferation in Tumor Spheroids through a Volume Limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Morgan; Montel, Fabien; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François; Cappello, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    In most instances, the growth of solid tumors occurs in constrained environments and requires a competition for space. A mechanical crosstalk can arise from this competition. In this article, we dissect the biomechanical sequence caused by a controlled compressive stress on multicellular spheroids (MCSs) used as a tumor model system. On timescales of minutes, we show that a compressive stress causes a reduction of the MCS volume, linked to a reduction of the cell volume in the core of the MCS. On timescales of hours, we observe a reversible induction of the proliferation inhibitor, p27Kip1, from the center to the periphery of the spheroid. On timescales of days, we observe that cells are blocked in the cell cycle at the late G1 checkpoint, the restriction point. We show that the effect of pressure on the proliferation can be antagonized by silencing p27Kip1. Finally, we quantify a clear correlation between the pressure-induced volume change and the growth rate of the spheroid. The compression-induced proliferation arrest that we studied is conserved for five cell lines, and is completely reversible. It demonstrates a generic crosstalk between mechanical stresses and the key players of cell cycle regulation. Our results suggest a role of volume change in the sensitivity to pressure, and that p27Kip1 is strongly influenced by this change. PMID:25418163

  6. Stress Intensity Factor calculation from displacement fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Beretta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, visual image techniques such as Digital Image Correlation (DIC enabled to experimentally determine the crack tip displacement and strain fields at small scales. The displacements are tracked during loading, and parameters as the Stress Intensity Factor (SIF, opening and closing loads, T-stress can be readily measured. In particular, the SIFs and the T-stress can be obtained by fitting the analytical equation of the Williamstype expansion with the experimentally-determined displacement fields. The results in terms of fracture mechanics parameters strictly depend on the dimension of the area considered around the crack tip in conjunction with the crack length, the maximum SIF (and thus the plastic tip radius, and the number of terms to be considered in the Williams-type expansion. This work focuses in understanding the accuracy of the SIF calculation based on these factors. The study is based on Finite Element Analysis simulations where purely elastic material behavior is considered. The accuracy of the estimation of the SIF is investigated and a guide-line is provided to properly set the DIC measurements. The analysis is then experimentally validated for crack closure measurements adopting the SENT specimen geometry.

  7. Pressure and compressibility of a quantum plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The equilibrium pressure tensor that occurs in the momentum balance equation for a quantum plasma in a magnetic field is shown to be anisotropic. Its relation to the pressure that follows from thermodynamics is elucidated. A general proof of the compressibility rule for a magnetized quantum plasma

  8. Effects of increasing the allowable compressive stress at release on the shear strength of prestressed concrete girders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, several research projects have been conducted to study the feasibility of increasing the allowable : compressive stress in concrete at prestress transfer, currently defined as 0.60f'ci in the AASHTO LRFD Bridge : Design Specification...

  9. Effect of Compressive Stresses on Leakage Currents in Microchip Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Microchip tantalum capacitors are manufactured using new technologies that allow for production of small size capacitors (down to EIA case size 0402) with volumetric efficiency much greater than for regular chip capacitors. Due to a small size of the parts and leadless design they might be more sensitive to mechanical stresses that develop after soldering onto printed wiring boards (PWB) compared to standard chip capacitors. In this work, the effect of compressive stresses on leakage currents in capacitors has been investigated in the range of stresses up to 200 MPa. Significant, up to three orders of magnitude, variations of currents were observed after the stress exceeds a certain critical level that varied from 10 MPa to 180 MPa for capacitors used in this study. A stress-induced generation of electron traps in tantalum pentoxide dielectric is suggested to explain reversible variations of leakage currents in tantalum capacitors. Thermo-mechanical characteristics of microchip capacitors have been studied to estimate the level of stresses caused by assembly onto PWB and assess the risk of stress-related degradation and failures. Keywords: tantalum capacitors, leakage current, soldering, reliability, mechanical stress.

  10. Specimen aspect ratio and progressive field strain development of sandstone under uniaxial compression by three-dimensional digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Munoz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The complete stress–strain characteristics of sandstone specimens were investigated in a series of quasi-static monotonic uniaxial compression tests. Strain patterns development during pre- and post-peak behaviours in specimens with different aspect ratios was also examined. Peak stress, post-peak portion of stress–strain, brittleness, characteristics of progressive localisation and field strain patterns development were affected at different extents by specimen aspect ratio. Strain patterns of the rocks were obtained by applying three-dimensional (3D digital image correlation (DIC technique. Unlike conventional strain measurement using strain gauges attached to specimen, 3D DIC allowed not only measuring large strains, but more importantly, mapping the development of field strain throughout the compression test, i.e. in pre- and post-peak regimes. Field strain development in the surface of rock specimen suggests that strain starts localising progressively and develops at a lower rate in pre-peak regime. However, in post-peak regime, strains increase at different rates as local deformations take place at different extents in the vicinity and outside the localised zone. The extent of localised strains together with the rate of strain localisation is associated with the increase in rate of strength degradation. Strain localisation and local inelastic unloading outside the localised zone both feature post-peak regime.

  11. Elastic stresses and plastic deformations in 'Santa Clara' tomato fruits caused by package dependent compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA ADRIANA VARGAS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the fruit compression behavior aiming to develop new tomato packages. Deformations caused by compression forces were observed inside packages and in individual 'Santa Clara' tomato fruit. The forces applied by a transparent acrylic lever to the fruit surface caused pericarp deformation and the flattened area was proportional to the force magnitude. The deformation was associated to the reduction in the gas volume (Vg, caused by expulsion of the air from the loculus cavity and reduction in the intercellular air volume of the pericarp. As ripening advanced, smaller fractions of the Vg reduced by the compressive force were restored after the stress was relieved. The lack of complete Vg restoration was an indication of permanent plastic deformations of the stressed cells. Vg regeneration (elastic recovery was larger in green fruits than in the red ones. The ratio between the applied force and the flattened area (flattening pressure, which depends on cell turgidity, decreased during ripening. Fruit movements associated with its depth in the container were observed during storage in a transparent glass container (495 x 355 x 220 mm. The downward movement of the fruits was larger in the top layers because these movements seem to be driven by a summation of the deformation of many fruits in all layers.

  12. Dynamics and stress field of the Eurasian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warners-Ruckstuhl, Karin; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2013-04-01

    extent, to lithospheric density structure and normal pressure from mantle flow. Stress observations require collision forces on the India-Eurasia boundary of 7.2 - 10.5 T N/m and on the Arabia-Eurasia boundary of 1.3 - 2.3 T N/m. Implication of mechanical equilibrium of the plate is that forces on the contacts with the African and Australian plates amount to 1.0 - 2.1 and 0 - 0.8 T N/m, respectively. The inferred collision forces are part of the best-fitting overall set of forces acting on the Eurasian plate, satisfying constraints from basic mechanics, absolute plate motion and stress field. We use our results to assess the validity of the classical view that the mean elevation of an orogenic plateau can be taken as a measure of the magnitude of the compressive (in this case: collision-related) forces involved. We find that for both the Tibetan and the Iranian plateau, two plateaus with significantly different average elevations, the horizontal force derived from the excess gravitational potential energy (collapse force) is in balance with the collision force, thus confirming the hypothesis of balanced topography.

  13. Reconstruction of compressive multispectral sensing data using a multilayered conditional random field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Shafiee, Mohammad J.; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of compressive sensing is continually growing in all facets of imaging science. Com- pressive sensing allows for the capture and reconstruction of an entire signal from a sparse (under- sampled), yet sufficient, set of measurements that is representative of the target being observed. This compressive sensing strategy reduces the duration of the data capture, the size of the acquired data, and the cost of the imaging hardware as well as complexity while preserving the necessary underlying information. Compressive sensing systems require the accompaniment of advanced re- construction algorithms to reconstruct complete signals from the sparse measurements made. Here, a new reconstruction algorithm is introduced specifically for the reconstruction of compressive multispectral (MS) sensing data that allows for high-quality reconstruction from acquisitions at sub-Nyquist rates. We propose a multilayered conditional random field (MCRF) model, which extends upon the CRF model by incorporating two joint layers of certainty and estimated states. The proposed algorithm treats the reconstruction of each spectral channel as a MCRF given the sparse MS measurements. Since the observations are incomplete, the MCRF incorporates an extra layer determining the certainty of the measurements. The proposed MCRF approach was evaluated using simulated compressive MS data acquisitions, and is shown to enable fast acquisition of MS sensing data with reduced imaging hardware cost and complexity.

  14. Pressure and Compressibility of Conformal Field Theories from the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Dolan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The equation of state associated with N = 4 supersymmetric Yang–Mills in four dimensions, for S U ( N in the large N limit, is investigated using the AdS/CFT correspondence. An asymptotically AdS black-hole on the gravity side provides a thermal background for the Yang–Mills theory on the boundary in which the cosmological constant is equivalent to a volume. The thermodynamic variable conjugate to the cosmological constant is a pressure, and the P - V diagram of the quark-gluon plasma is studied. It is known that there is a critical point where the heat capacity diverges, and this is reflected in the isothermal compressibility. Critical exponents are derived and found to be mean field in the large N limit. The same analysis applied to three- and six-dimensional conformal field theories again yields mean field exponents associated with the compressibility at the critical point.

  15. Crustal stress field perturbations in the continental margin around the Korean Peninsula and Japanese islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junhyung; Hong, Tae-Kyung; Chang, Chandong

    2017-10-01

    Seismic activity and focal mechanisms are governed by the effective stress field that is a combined result of regional tectonic processes and local stress perturbation. This study investigates the regional variation in the stress field in the eastern continental margin of the Eurasian plate around the Korean Peninsula and Japanese islands using a damped stress inversion technique based on the focal mechanism solutions of regional earthquakes. The dominant compressional stress is directed ENE-WSW around the Korean Peninsula and eastern China, E-W at the central East Sea and northern and southern Japan, NW-SE at central Japan, and N-S around the northern Nankai trough. The dominant compression direction changes rapidly in the East Sea and Japanese islands, which may be due to the combined effects of tectonic loading in the subduction zones off the Japanese islands and the India-Eurasia plate boundary. The crustal stress fields around the subduction zones off the Japanese islands present characteristic depth-dependent orientations. The orientations of the largest horizontal stress components, σH, in the subduction zones are subparallel with the plate convergence directions at shallow depths. The σH orientations are observed to rotate clockwise with the depth owing to slab subduction and lithospheric deformation. The regional stress field around the Japanese islands was perturbed temporally by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki megathrust earthquake. The regional stress field was recovered in a couple of years. The stress field and tectonic structures are mutually affected, causing stress field distortion and a localized mixture of earthquakes in different faulting types.

  16. Influence of high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size on rat brain shear stress morphology and magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslach, Henry W; Gipple, Jenna M; Leahy, Lauren N

    2017-04-01

    An external mechanical insult to the brain, such as a blast, may create internal stress and deformation waves, which have shear and longitudinal components that can induce combined shear and compression of the brain tissue. To isolate the consequences of such interactions for the shear stress and to investigate the role of the extracellular fluid in the mechanical response, translational shear stretch at 10/s, 60/s, and 100/s translational shear rates under either 0% or 33% fixed transverse compression is applied without preconditioning to rat brain specimens. The specimens from the cerebrum, the cerebellum grey matter, and the brainstem white matter are nearly the full length of their respective regions. The translational shear stress response to translational shear deformation is characterized by the effect that each of four factors, high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size, have on the shear stress magnitude averaged over ten specimens for each combination of factors. Increasing the deformation rate increases the magnitude of the shear stress at a given translational shear stretch, and as tested by ANOVAs so does applying transverse fixed compression of 33% of the thickness. The stress magnitude differs by the region that is the specimen source: cerebrum, cerebellum or brainstem. The magnitude of the shear stress response at a given deformation rate and stretch depends on the specimen length, called a specimen size effect. Surprisingly, under no compression a shorter length specimen requires more shear stress, but under 33% compression a shorter length specimen requires less shear stress, to meet a required shear deformation rate. The shear specimen size effect calls into question the applicability of the classical shear stress definition to hydrated soft biological tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MODELING OF DIESEL- COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS BUBBLY FLOW UNDER INFLUENCING OF A MAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASANAIN A. ABDULWAHHAB

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of a single compressed natural gas bubble in diesel flow with effecting magnetic flux is presented in this paper. The three dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations have been used to solve the Diesel and compressed natural gas laminar two phase flow in horizontal pipe. The simulation was carried out using COMSOL Multiphysic software version 4.4, Level-Set method. The interface between the gaseous and liquid phases was described as the zero level set of a smooth function. The results showed that compressed natural gas bubble under magnetic field grow up vertically to have bigger elliptical shape in the Diesel phase, doubling in diameter before it breaks away in two parts of 0.2 and 0.8 tesla. Also, it has been noted that the compressed natural gas bubble velocity is decreasing as the magnetic field is strengthening. The numerical procedure has been validated by comparing the computational results with experimental results reported in the literature where a good agreement was achieved.

  18. Interferometry and computational studies of an oscillating airfoil compressible dynamic stall flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.; Ekaterinaris, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A unique comparison has been made between real time interferograms and full Navier-Stokes computations of the density field over an oscillating airfoil undergoing dynamic stall for compressible flow conditions. Good agreement was found until a dynamic stall vortex formed in the flow. Subsequent evolution of the flow field was found to be very different in the computations. The reasons for this difference have been explained in terms of the leading edge region flow physics and the refined flow modeling that needs to be used for the post-stall flow field.

  19. Pulverization Texturein Fault Damage Zones: A result of Implosion Damage or Dynamic Compressive Stresses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, T. K.; Girty, G.; Whearty, J.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Micro-brecciation, or pulverization, is recognized as a fundamental component of the architecture and damage products of many large faults, although the precise mechanisms to produce this damage are debated, with both compressive and tensile mechanisms proposed. We characterized several sites along the San Jacinto fault, southern California, where the total depth of exhumation for the life history of the fault can be determined, to study the confining stresses required for pulverization. In basement rock near Anza, where exhumation is less than 100 m, granitic dikes injected into schist of the Burnt Valley Complex are pulverized out to several meters from the fault core, whereas the schist is brecciated at the macro-scale and contains narrow centimeter-thick seams of black cataclasite. Similar relationships are observed in Horse Canyon, which is exhumed about 400 m below a regional Tertiary erosion surface, where granitic dikes emplaced into schist are pulverized out to distances of several tens of meters from the fault core. These observations imply that very low confining stress is required for micro-brecciation in granitic rock. Unconsolidated sandstones (alluvial fan deposits) along the SJF in Rock House Canyon are undeformed where the deposits are exhumed by about 70 m, but show incipient pulverization (high-density, sub-grain cracking) at 120 m depth of exhumation. Cracks oriented perpendicular to the fault formed in individual quartz and feldspar grains out to a few meters from the fault core. These observations suggest that the confining stress required for onset of pulverization in unconsolidated deposits is on the order of 2-2.5 MPa. As the tensile strength of quartz is an order of magnitude higher than these confining stresses, the most likely mechanism that is producing this damage is dynamic compressive stresses during passage of the rupture front.

  20. Residual Stress State in Single-Edge Notched Tension Specimen Caused by the Local Compression Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yifan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D finite element analyses (FEA are performed to simulate the local compression (LC technique on the clamped single-edge notched tension (SE(T specimens. The analysis includes three types of indenters, which are single pair of cylinder indenters (SPCI, double pairs of cylinder indenters (DPCI and single pair of ring indenters (SPRI. The distribution of the residual stress in the crack opening direction in the uncracked ligament of the specimen is evaluated. The outcome of this study can facilitate the use of LC technique on SE(T specimens.

  1. Measurement of the stress field of a tunnel through its rock EMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Wang, Enyuan; Song, Dazhao; Liu, Zhentang; Shen, Rongxi; Lv, Ganggang; Xu, Zhaoyong

    2017-08-01

    In order to quantitatively study the relationship between the disturbance stress of coal mine roadways and the electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of rocks, and further evaluate their internal stress distributions, we first examined the characteristics of EMR signals emitted from rock mass under uniaxial compression, analyzed the relationship between the stress inside the rock mass and its emitted EMR intensity, and put forward a new disturbance stress testing method by monitoring the EMR from the rock mass to retrieve its surrounding stress field. Then, we applied the method to monitor EMR intensity from the no.11803 rock roadway of the Nuodong coal mine, China, and inversely retrieved its stress field. Lastly, we analyzed the causes of local stress anomalies in the Nuodong area by testing the EMR intensity of its nearby areas, and we examined the geology of the whole region. The results showed that: (1) in the rock roadway and the surrounding area of the Nuodong coal mine, the disturbance stress was in the range of 4.8 ∼ 9.1 MPa, the angle between the direction of the stress field and the horizontal plane of the roadway was 35 ± 2.5°, the lateral pressure coefficient was 1.30 ∼ 1.57 (2) the Laoguishan and Yulong anticlines in the vicinity of the Nuodong coal mine caused great horizontal tectonic stress in the region, and the existence of the auxiliary roadway and F12 normal fault resulted in the formation of two high stress zones in the no.11803 rock roadway. Overall, monitoring the EMR from rock mass could ascertain the state, direction, size and distribution of disturbance stress in a roadway and further obtain the distribution of the stress field of an underground structure.

  2. FEM analysis of deformation localization mechanisms in a 3-D fractured medium under rotating compressive stress orientations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, G.; Beekman, F.; Bertotti, G.; Luthi, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress distributions and deformation patterns in a medium with a pre-existing fracture set are analyzed as a function of the remote compressive stress orientation (σH) using finite element models with increasingly complex fracture configurations. Slip along the fractures causes deformation

  3. Precise measurement of a magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic flux compression technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D.; Sawabe, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Takeyama, S.

    2013-04-01

    The precision of the values of a magnetic field generated by electromagnetic flux compression was investigated in ultra-high magnetic fields of up to 700 T. In an attempt to calibrate the magnetic field measured by pickup coils, precise Faraday rotation (FR) measurements were conducted on optical (quartz and crown) glasses. A discernible "turn-around" phenomenon was observed in the FR signal as well as the pickup coils before the end of a liner implosion. We found that the magnetic field measured by pickup coils should be corrected by taking into account the high-frequency response of the signal transmission line. Near the peak magnetic field, however, the pickup coils failed to provide reliable values, leaving the FR measurement as the only method to precisely measure extremely high magnetic fields.

  4. Compressive imaging for difference image formation and wide-field-of-view target tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhar

    2010-11-01

    Use of imaging systems for performing various situational awareness tasks in military and commercial settings has a long history. There is increasing recognition, however, that a much better job can be done by developing non-traditional optical systems that exploit the task-specific system aspects within the imager itself. In some cases, a direct consequence of this approach can be real-time data compression along with increased measurement fidelity of the task-specific features. In others, compression can potentially allow us to perform high-level tasks such as direct tracking using the compressed measurements without reconstructing the scene of interest. In this dissertation we present novel advancements in feature-specific (FS) imagers for large field-of-view surveillence, and estimation of temporal object-scene changes utilizing the compressive imaging paradigm. We develop these two ideas in parallel. In the first case we show a feature-specific (FS) imager that optically multiplexes multiple, encoded sub-fields of view onto a common focal plane. Sub-field encoding enables target tracking by creating a unique connection between target characteristics in superposition space and the target's true position in real space. This is accomplished without reconstructing a conventional image of the large field of view. System performance is evaluated in terms of two criteria: average decoding time and probability of decoding error. We study these performance criteria as a function of resolution in the encoding scheme and signal-to-noise ratio. We also include simulation and experimental results demonstrating our novel tracking method. In the second case we present a FS imager for estimating temporal changes in the object scene over time by quantifying these changes through a sequence of difference images. The difference images are estimated by taking compressive measurements of the scene. Our goals are twofold. First, to design the optimal sensing matrix for taking

  5. Fracture Toughness Prediction under Compressive Residual Stress by Using a Stress-Distribution T-Scaling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Meshii

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in the fracture toughness Jc of a material in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature region due to compressive residual stress (CRS was considered in this study. A straightforward fracture prediction was performed for a specimen with mechanical CRS by using the T-scaling method, which was originally proposed to scale the fracture stress distributions between different temperatures. The method was validated for a 780-MPa-class high-strength steel and 0.45% carbon steel. The results showed that the scaled stress distributions at fracture loads without and with CRS are the same, and that Jc improvement was caused by the loss in the one-to-one correspondence between J and the crack-tip stress distribution. The proposed method is advantageous in possibly predicting fracture loads for specimens with CRS by using only the stress–strain relationship, and by performing elastic-plastic finite element analysis, i.e., without performing fracture toughness testing on specimens without CRS.

  6. Accelerating decomposition of light field video for compressive multi-layer display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhaoxing

    2015-12-28

    Compressive light field display based on multi-layer LCDs is becoming a popular solution for 3D display. Decomposing light field into layer images is the most challenging task. Iterative algorithm is an effective solver for this high-dimensional decomposition problem. Existing algorithms, however, iterate from random initial values. As such, significant computation time is required due to the deviation between random initial estimate and target values. Real-time 3D display at video rate is difficult based on existing algorithms. In this paper, we present a new algorithm to provide better initial values and accelerate decomposition of light field video. We utilize internal coherence of single light field frame to transfer the ignorance-to-target to a much lower resolution level. In addition, we explored external coherence for further accelerating light field video and achieved 5.91 times speed improvement. We built a prototype and developed parallel algorithm based on CUDA.

  7. Residual compressive surface stress increases the bending strength of dental zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Zhang, Fei; Vanmeensel, Kim; De Munck, Jan; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Naert, Ignace; Vleugels, Jozef; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-04-01

    To assess the influence of surface treatment and thermal annealing on the four-point bending strength of two ground dental zirconia grades. Fully-sintered zirconia specimens (4.0×3.0×45.0mm3) of Y-TZP zirconia (LAVA Plus, 3M ESPE) and Y-TZP/Al2O3 zirconia (ZirTough, Kuraray Noritake) were subjected to four surface treatments: (1) 'GROUND': all surfaces were ground with a diamond-coated grinding wheel on a grinding machine; (2) 'GROUND+HEAT': (1) followed by annealing at 1100°C for 30min; (3) 'GROUND+Al2O3 SANDBLASTED': (1) followed by sandblasting using Al2O3; (4) 'GROUND+CoJet SANDBLASTED': (1) followed by tribochemical silica (CoJet) sandblasting. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the zirconia-phase composition and potentially induced residual stress. The four-point bending strength was measured using a universal material-testing machine. Weibull analysis revealed a substantially higher Weibull modulus and slightly higher characteristic strength for ZirTough (Kuraray Noritake) than for LAVA Plus (3M ESPE). For both zirconia grades, the 'GROUND' zirconia had the lowest Weibull modulus in combination with a high characteristic strength. Sandblasting hardly changed the bending strength but substantially increased the Weibull modulus of the ground zirconia, whereas a thermal treatment increased the Weibull modulus of both zirconia grades but resulted in a significantly lower bending strength. Micro-Raman analysis revealed a higher residual compressive surface stress that correlated with an increased bending strength. Residual compressive surface stress increased the bending strength of dental zirconia. Thermal annealing substantially reduced the bending strength but increased the consistency (reliability) of 'GROUND' zirconia. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical Simulation for Thermal Shock Resistance of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics Considering the Effects of Initial Stress Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking the hafnium diboride ceramic as an example, the effects of heating rate, cooling rate, thermal shock initial temperature, and external constraint on the thermal shock resistance (TSR of ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTCs were studied through numerical simulation in this paper. The results show that the external constraint has an approximately linear influence on the critical rupture temperature difference of UHTCs. The external constraint prepares a compressive stress field in the structure because of the predefined temperature field, and this compressive stress field relieves the tension stress in the structure when it is cooled down and then it improves the TSR of UHTCs. As the thermal shock initial temperature, a danger heating rate (or cooling rate exists where the critical temperature difference is the lowest.

  9. Numerical modeling of tectonic stress field and fault activity in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a 3-dimension visco-elastic finite element model of lithosphere in North China, we numerically simulate the recent mutative figures of tectonic stress field. Annual change characteristics of stress field are; 1 Maximum principal tensile stress is about 3–9 kPaa−1 and its azimuth lie in NNW-SSE. 2 Maximum principal compressive stress is about 1–6 kPaa−1 and its azimuth lie in NEE-SWW. 3 Maximum principal tensile stress is higher both in the west region and Liaoning Province. 4 Variation of tectonic stress field benefits fault movement in the west part and northeast part of North China. 5 Annual accumulative rates of Coulomb fracture stress in Tanlu fault belt have segmentation patterns: Jiashan-Guangji segment is the highest (6 kPaa−1, Anshan-Liaodongwan segment is the second (5 kPaa−1, and others are relatively lower (3–4 kPaa−1.

  10. Design and analysis of a toroidal tester for the measurement of core losses under axial compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatawneh, Natheer; Rahman, Tanvir; Lowther, David A.; Chromik, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Electric machine cores are subjected to mechanical stresses due to manufacturing processes. These stresses include radial, circumferential and axial components that may have significant influences on the magnetic properties of the electrical steel and hence, on the output and efficiencies of electrical machines. Previously, most studies of iron losses due to mechanical stress have considered only radial and circumferential components. In this work, an improved toroidal tester has been designed and developed to measure the core losses and the magnetic properties of electrical steel under a compressive axial stress. The shape of the toroidal ring has been verified using 3D stress analysis. Also, 3D electromagnetic simulations show a uniform flux density distribution in the specimen with a variation of 0.03 T and a maximum average induction level of 1.5 T. The developed design has been prototyped, and measurements were carried out using a steel sample of grade 35WW300. Measurements show that applying small mechanical stresses normal to the sample thickness rises the delivered core losses, then the losses decrease continuously as the stress increases. However, the drop in core losses at high stresses does not go lower than the free-stress condition. Physical explanations for the observed trend of core losses as a function of stress are provided based on core loss separation to the hysteresis and eddy current loss components. The experimental results show that the effect of axial compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel at high level of inductions becomes less pronounced.

  11. Stress State Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Masonry Columns Reinforced with FRP under Concentric Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Witzany

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The strengthening and stabilization of damaged compressed masonry columns with composites based on fabrics of high-strength fibers and epoxy resin, or polymer-modified cement mixtures, belongs to novel, partially non-invasive and reversible progressive methods. The stabilizing and reinforcing effect of these fabrics significantly applies to masonry structures under concentric compressive loading whose failure mechanism is characterized by the appearance and development of vertical tensile cracks accompanied by an increase in horizontal masonry strain. During the appearance of micro and hairline cracks (10−3 to 10−1 mm, the effect of non-pre-stressed wrapping composite is very small. The favorable effect of passive wrapping is only intensively manifested after the appearance of cracks (10−1 mm and bigger at higher loading levels. In the case of “optimum” reinforcement of a masonry column, the experimental research showed an increase in vertical displacements δy (up to 247%, horizontal displacements δx (up to 742% and ultimate load-bearing capacity (up to 136% compared to the values reached in unreinforced masonry columns. In the case of masonry structures in which no intensive “bed joint filler–masonry unit” interaction occurs, e.g., in regular coursed masonry with little differences in the mechanical characteristics of masonry units and the binder, the reinforcing effect of the fabric applies only partially.

  12. Compressive sensing of full wave field data for structural health monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Tommaso; De Marchi, Luca; Perelli, Alessandro; Marzani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Numerous nondestructive evaluations and structural health monitoring approaches based on guide waves rely on analysis of wave fields recorded through scanning laser Doppler vibrometers (SLDVs) or ultrasonic scanners. The informative content which can be extracted from these inspections is relevant; however, the acquisition process is generally time-consuming, posing a limit in the applicability of such approaches. To reduce the acquisition time, we use a random sampling scheme based on compressive sensing (CS) to minimize the number of points at which the field is measured. The CS reconstruction performance is mostly influenced by the choice of a proper decomposition basis to exploit the sparsity of the acquired signal. Here, different bases have been tested to recover the guided waves wave field acquired on both an aluminum and a composite plate. Experimental results show that the proposed approach allows a reduction of the measurement locations required for accurate signal recovery to less than 34% of the original sampling grid.

  13. Efficient compressive sampling of spatially sparse fields in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonnese, Stefania; Cusani, Roberto; Rinauro, Stefano; Ruggiero, Giorgia; Scarano, Gaetano

    2013-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs), i.e., networks of autonomous, wireless sensing nodes spatially deployed over a geographical area, are often faced with acquisition of spatially sparse fields. In this paper, we present a novel bandwidth/energy-efficient compressive sampling (CS) scheme for the acquisition of spatially sparse fields in a WSN. The paper contribution is twofold. Firstly, we introduce a sparse, structured CS matrix and analytically show that it allows accurate reconstruction of bidimensional spatially sparse signals, such as those occurring in several surveillance application. Secondly, we analytically evaluate the energy and bandwidth consumption of our CS scheme when it is applied to data acquisition in a WSN. Numerical results demonstrate that our CS scheme achieves significant energy and bandwidth savings with respect to state-of-the-art approaches when employed for sensing a spatially sparse field by means of a WSN.

  14. C-phycocyanin alleviates osteoarthritic injury in chondrocytes stimulated with H2O2 and compressive stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, In-Chi; Chuang, Sung-Ting; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Sun, Yu-Jun; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2016-12-01

    During the progression of osteoarthritis (OA), dysregulation of extracellular matrix anabolism, abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokines have been shown to accelerate the degradation process of cartilage. The potency of c-phycocyanin (C-PC) to protect cellular components against oxidative stress, along with its anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis effects, are well documented; however, effects of C-PC on OA are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of C-PC on OA using H2O2 or compression-stimulated OA-like porcine chondrocyte models. The results showed that C-PC had the ability to inhibit ROS production, reverse caspase-3 activity, and reduce apoptosis cell population. C-PC also reversed aggrecan and type II collagen gene expressions after stimulation with 1mM H2O2 or 60psi of compression. Inhibition of IL-6 and MMP-13 genes was observed in compression-stimulated chondrocytes but not in H2O2-treated cells. In dimethylmethylene blue assay and alcian blue staining, C-PC maintained the sulfated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content after stimulation with compression. We concluded that C-PC can prevent early signs of OA caused by compressive stress and attenuate H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Therefore, we suggest that C-PC can be used as a potential drug candidate for chronic OA treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A DEM study of oedometric compression of model granular materials Initial state influence, stress ratio, elasticity, irreversibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili Mohamed Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A DEM simulation study of spherical beads with elastic-frictional contacts in oedometric compression is carried out for a wide variety of initial states, differing in solid fraction Φ, coordination number z (independent of Φ in dense systems and inherent anisotropy. Stress ratio K0 = σ2/σ1, along with z, Φ and force and fabric anisotropies are monitored in compressions in which axial stress σ1 varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude. K0 tends to remain constant if the material was already one-dimensionally compressed in the assembling stage. Otherwise, it decreases steadily over the investigated stress range. K0 relates to force and fabric anisotropy parameters by a simple formula. Elastic moduli may express the response to very small stress increments about the transversely isotropic equilibrated states, although oedometric compression proves an essentially anelastic process, mainly due to friction mobilization. Despite apparent nearly reversible increases of axial strain ϵ1 (or density Φ, especially in dense samples, internal state evolutions are strongly irreversible, as evidenced by changes in z and K0. Fabric changes are reflected by anisotropic elastic moduli.

  16. Laser-driven shock experiments in pre-compressed water: Implications for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K; Benedetti, L R; Jeanloz, R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Moon, S J; Mackinnon, A; Henry, E; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Collins, G W

    2005-11-10

    Laser-driven shock compression of pre-compressed water (up to 1 GPa precompression) produces high-pressure, -temperature conditions in the water inducing two optical phenomena: opacity and reflectivity in the initially transparent water. The onset of reflectivity at infrared wavelengths can be interpreted as a semi-conductor to electronic conductor transition in water and is found at pressures above {approx}130 GPa for single-shocked samples pre-compressed to 1 GPa. This electronic conduction provides an additional contribution to the conductivity required for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune.

  17. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, R.; Pahlevani, F.; Quadir, M. Z.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2016-10-01

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels’ performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a combination of standard compression testing, X-ray diffraction, optical microstructure, electron backscattering diffraction imaging, electron probe micro-analysis, nano-indentation and micro-indentation measurements, we determined the mechanical stability of retained austenite and martensite in high carbon steel under compressive stress and identified the phase transformation mechanism, from the macro to the nano level. We found at the early stage of plastic deformation hexagonal close-packed (HCP) martensite formation dominates, while higher compression loads trigger body-centred tetragonal (BCT) martensite formation. The combination of this phase transformation and strain hardening led to an increase in the hardness of high carbon steel of around 30%. This comprehensive characterisation of stress induced phase transformation could enable the precise control of the microstructures of high carbon martensitic steels, and hence their properties.

  18. Extracting Constitutive Stress-Strain Behavior of Microscopic Phases by Micropillar Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. J.; Walters, J. L.; Wang, M. Y.; Chawla, N.; Rohatgi, A.

    2013-02-01

    The macroscopic behavior of metallic materials is a complex function of microstructure. The size, morphology, volume fraction, crystallography, and distribution of a 2nd phase within a surrounding matrix all control the mechanical properties. Understanding the contributions of the individual microconstituents to the mechanical behavior of multiphase materials has proven difficult due to the inability to obtain accurate constitutive relationships of each individual constituent. In dual-phase steels, for example, the properties of martensite or ferrite in bulk form are not representative of their behavior at the microscale. In this study, micropillar compression was employed to determine the mechanical properties of individual microconstituents in metallic materials with "composite" microstructures, consisting of two distinct microconstituents: (I) a Mg-Al alloy with pure Mg dendrites and eutectic regions and (II) a powder metallurgy steel with ferrite and martensite constituents. The approach is first demonstrated in a Mg-Al directionally solidified alloy where the representative stress-strain behavior of the matrix and eutectic phases was obtained. The work is then extended to a dual-phase steel where the constitutive behavior of the ferrite and martensite were obtained. Here, the results were also incorporated into a modified rule-of-mixtures approach to predict the composite behavior of the steel. The constitutive behavior of the ferrite and martensite phases developed from micropillar compression was coupled with existing strength-porosity models from the literature to predict the ultimate tensile strength of the steel. Direct comparisons of the predictions with tensile tests of the bulk dual-phase steel were conducted and the correlations were quite good.

  19. Cyclotron resonance on galliumnitride in fields up to 700 T generated by explosive driven flux compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhlmann, N.; Tatsenko, O. M.; Stolpe, I.; Markevtsev, I. M.; von Ortenberg, M.; Platonov, V. V.; Selemir, V. D.; Bykov, A. I.; Moiseenko, A. N.; Schikora, D.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the first successful cyclotron resonance experiment on a semiconductor in ultrahigh magnetic fields generated by explosive-driven flux compression. The sample under investigation was a p-type cubic GaN layer grown by plasma-assisted MBE on a (0 0 1)-GaAs substrate. We have used the magnetocumulative generator MC-1 for generating a magnetic field exceeding 700 T. A CO 2 laser with a fixed wavelength of λ=10.6 μm was used as radiation source. The transmitted radiation intensity was detected by use of a fast HgCdTe-detector. The experiment was performed at 270 K in Faraday geometry with the magnetic field oriented parallel to the [0 0 1]-direction of the epitaxial layer. Three distinct transmission minima at about 90 T, 270 T and 400-425 T with a resonance depth of a few percent only, are clearly resolved. The data in the lower field region correspond excellently to results derived previously from experiments in fields up to 275 T generated by use of the single-turn coil technique. The data are compared directly with the Landau level scheme of cubic GaN in the Luttinger model.

  20. Exploiting of the Compression Methods for Reconstruction of the Antenna Far-Field Using Only Amplitude Near-Field Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puskely

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The novel approach exploits the principle of the conventional two-plane amplitude measurements for the reconstruction of the unknown electric field distribution on the antenna aperture. The method combines a global optimization with a compression method. The global optimization method (GO is used to minimize the functional, and the compression method is used to reduce the number of unknown variables. The algorithm employs the Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA as the global optimization approach. The Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT are applied to reduce the number of unknown variables. Pros and cons of methods are investigated and reported for the solution of the problem. In order to make the algorithm faster, exploitation of amplitudes from a single scanning plane is also discussed. First, the algorithm is used to obtain an initial estimate. Subsequently, the common Fourier iterative algorithm is used to reach global minima with sufficient accuracy. The method is examined measuring the dish antenna.

  1. Engineering stress in thin films for the field of bistable MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Dilan; Martin, Michael D.; Gowrishetty, Usha R.; Porter, Daniel A.; Berfield, Thomas A.; McNamara, Shamus P.; Walsh, Kevin M.

    2015-12-01

    While stress-free and tensile films are well-suited for released in-plane MEMS designs, compressive films are needed for released out-of-plane MEMS structures such as buckled beams and diaphragms. This study presents a characterization of stress on a variety of sputtered and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD)-deposited films, including titanium tungsten, invar, silicon nitride and amorphous silicon, appropriate for the field of bistable MEMS. Techniques and strategies are presented (including varying substrate bias, pressure, temperature, and frequency multiplexing) for tuning internal stress across the spectrum from highly compressive (-2300 MPa) to highly tensile (1500 MPa). Conditions for obtaining stress-free films are also presented in this work. Under certain conditions during the PECVD deposition of amorphous silicon, interesting ‘micro-bubbles’ formed within the deposited films. Strategies to mitigate their formation are presented, resulting in a dramatic improvement in surface roughness quality from 667 nm root mean square (RMS) to 16 nm RMS. All final deposited films successfully passed the traditional ‘tape test’ for adhesion.

  2. Uncemented Total Hip Replacement Stem Loosening after Long Term Compressive Stress Application: A Simulated FEA Study of Cortical Bone Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Duk-Young; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Nakai, Ryusuke; Ikeuchi, Ken; Sekel, Ron

    The purpose of this study is to predict with the use of FEA, the differing predisposition to cortical bone resorption and subsequent distal migration of an un-cemented femoral hip replacement stem subjected to long term biomechanical high compressive stresses, while varying the load angles, the material properties of the stem, and the stem length. A two-dimensional hip model was constructed to estimate the minimum principle stresses (P3) and migration magnitudes. Bone remodeling at the interface between the bone and the prosthesis was performed by comparison of the local compressive stress to physiological stress values governing bone resorption. With respect to load angles, migrations of the hip prosthesis did not occur with load angles between 63° and 74° load angle in relation to the longitudinal axis of the bony femur, as the compressive stress generated on the cortical bone was under the criteria threshold for bone resorption (-50MPa). In addition, the magnitude of migration (17%decrease) was relatively more sensitive to changes in stem length than those (92%decrease) of changes of material properties. In conclusion, using an FEA model for bone remodeling, based on the high compressive stresses exerted on distal cortical bone, it is possible to estimate migration magnitudes of cementless hip prostheses in the long term. The load angles have been shown to be an important parameter affecting the migration magnitudes and furthermore, it can be demonstrated that the stiffer materials and reduction of stem length can decrease the migration of cementless hip prosthesis in the long term.

  3. Joint development in perturbed stress fields near faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawnsley, K. D.; Rives, T.; Petti, J.-P.; Hencher, S. R.; Lumsden, A. C.

    1992-09-01

    Field evidence is presented for complex spatial and temporal perturbations of an otherwise systematic joint pattern around faults from well exposed faulted rock platforms. Joints propagating in perturbed stress fields will curve to follow the directions of the stress field trajectories. A progressive change in joint direction is observed from unperturbed regions away from faults, to strongly perturbed zones adjacent to faults. This indicates that the joint pattern can reflect perturbations of the regional stress field around faults. In the examples, the stress field perturbations are probably due to points of high friction on the fault plane which concentrate stress and distort the stress field in the surrounding rock. The corresponding joints converge at these points and are sub-parallel to the fault along the remainder of the fault plane. The possibility that a fault plane acts as a free surface contained within an elastic body is considered. In this situation the fault plane induces a rotation of the principal stress axes to become either perpendicular or parallel to the fault. The free surface model seems to explain the metre-scale curvature of joints in the vicinity of existing joints, but at the kilometre scale of a large fault plane the model becomes unrealistic unless the fault is open at the Earth's surface. Two examples are investigated from the Lias of Great Britain; at Nash Point and Robin Hood's Bay. Both comprise sub-horizontal strata of relatively homogeneous lithology and bed thickness, which provide striking examples of joints developed near faults.

  4. Post-Cretaceous to recent stress fields in the SE Moesian Platform (Bulgaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanov, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    The reconstruction of the stress fields in the SE Moesian Platform in Bulgaria has been made by means of earthquake fault-plane solutions, tectonic fracture and fold patterns, and physical (electrical) anisotropy in rocks restricted stratigraphically from the Early Cretaceous up to the Late Pliocene. The philosophy of the study is that the recognition of the older stress fields for a given area can be successful if the characteristics of the youngest ones are known. The contemporary stress field is discussed using the fault plane solutions from earthquakes and the kinematics of the activated faults. The reconstruction of the Post-Pliocene paleo-stress field was made by studies of conjugate shear joints systems in Upper Pliocene limestones. Measurements of elements of tectonic fractures were also performed in situ on more than 60 outcrops of rocks aged from Aptian to Pliocene. A limited number of sites were studied for electrical anisotropy using the Azimuthal Vertical Electrical Sounding method. A more complete study of the tectonic meso- and micro-structures has been performed on the Sarmatian sediments in the SE Moesian Platform. This study includes a description of the discovered folds, brittle tectonic analysis and reconstruction of the Post-Sarmatian paleo-stress field. As a result, it was deduced that the compression after the Early Cretaceous period is NE-SW directed. The direction of compression since Sarmatian to Early Quaternary was NW-SE. A clockwise rotation of the main stress axes was established for a number of sites. The contemporary contraction is directed also NW-SE, according to the fault-plane solutions determined for crustal earthquakes in the region. This result is tested using the data from the GPS measurement recently performed in this part of the Balkan Peninsula. It could be suggested that there has been a clockwise rotation of the stress field due to the evolution of curved fold-thrust belt in the south-eastern Carpathians and the

  5. Compressive stress induces dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain via RhoA phosphorylation by the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Takemoto

    Full Text Available Mechanical stress that arises due to deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM either stretches or compresses cells. The cellular response to stretching has been actively studied. For example, stretching induces phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC via the RhoA/RhoA-associated protein kinase (ROCK pathway, resulting in increased cellular tension. In contrast, the effects of compressive stress on cellular functions are not fully resolved. The mechanisms for sensing and differentially responding to stretching and compressive stress are not known. To address these questions, we investigated whether phosphorylation levels of MRLC were affected by compressive stress. Contrary to the response in stretching cells, MRLC was dephosphorylated 5 min after cells were subjected to compressive stress. Compressive loading induced activation of myosin phosphatase mediated via the dephosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853. Because myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853 is phosphorylated only by ROCK, compressive loading may have induced inactivation of ROCK. However, GTP-bound RhoA (active form increased in response to compressive stress. The compression-induced activation of RhoA and inactivation of its effector ROCK are contradictory. This inconsistency was due to phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser188 that reduced affinity of RhoA to ROCK. Treatment with the inhibitor of protein kinase A that phosphorylates RhoA (Ser188 induced suppression of compression-stimulated MRLC dephosphorylation. Incidentally, stretching induced phosphorylation of MRLC, but did not affect phosphorylation levels of RhoA (Ser188. Together, our results suggest that RhoA phosphorylation is an important process for MRLC dephosphorylation by compressive loading, and for distinguishing between stretching and compressing cells.

  6. Igneous sills record far-field and near-field stress interactions during volcano construction: Isle of Mull, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, T. L.; Walker, R. J.; Healy, D.; Bubeck, A.; England, R. W.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.

    2017-11-01

    Sill emplacement is typically associated with horizontally mechanically layered host rocks in a near-hydrostatic far-field stress state, where contrasting mechanical properties across the layers promote transitions from dykes, or inclined sheets, to sills. We used detailed field observations from the Loch Scridain Sill Complex (Isle of Mull, UK), and mechanical models to show that layering is not always the dominant control on sill emplacement. The studied sills have consistently shallow dips (1°-25°) and cut vertically bedded and foliated metamorphic basement rocks, and horizontally bedded cover sedimentary rocks and lavas. Horizontal and shallowly-dipping fractures in the host rock were intruded with vertical opening in all cases, whilst steeply-dipping discontinuities within the sequence (i.e. vertical fractures and foliation in the basement, and vertical polygonal joints in the lavas) were not intruded during sill emplacement. Mechanical models of slip tendency, dilation tendency, and fracture susceptibility for local and overall sill geometry data, support a radial horizontal compression during sill emplacement. Our models show that dykes and sills across Mull were emplaced during NW-SE horizontal shortening, related to a far-field tectonic stress state. The dykes generally accommodated phases of NE-SW horizontal tectonic extension, whereas the sills record the superposition of the far-field stress with a near-field stress state, imposed by emplacement of the Mull Central Volcano. We show that through detailed geometric characterisation coupled with mechanical modelling, sills may be used as an indication of fluctuations in the paleostress state.

  7. Investigations of some rock stress measuring techniques and the stress field in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, Tor Harald

    1997-12-31

    Rock stresses are important to the safe construction and operation of all man-made structures in rock, whether In mining, civil or petroleum engineering. The crucial issue is their relative magnitude and orientation. This thesis develops equipment and methods for further rock stress assessment and reevaluates existing overcoring rock stress measurements, and relates this information to the present geological setting. Both laboratory work and field work are involved. In the field, rock stresses are measured by the overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing technique. An observation technique for assessing likely high stresses is developed. The field data refer to several hydropower projects and to some offshore hydrocarbon fields. The principal sections are: (1) Tectonic setting in the western Fennoscandia, (2) Triaxial rock stress measurements by overcoring using the NTH cell (a strain gauge cell developed at the Norwegian technical university in Trondheim and based on the CSIR cell of the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), (3) Laboratory testing of the NTH cell, (4) Quality ranking of stresses measured by the NTH cell, (4) Recalculated rock stresses and implications to the regional stress field, (5) Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements. 113 refs., 98 figs., 62 tabs.

  8. Collaborative effects of electric field and fluid shear stress on fibroblast migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sukhyun; Han, Hana; Ko, Ung Hyun; Kim, Jaemin; Shin, Jennifer H

    2013-04-21

    Cells are inherently exposed to a number of different biophysical stimuli such as electric fields, shear stress, and tensile or compressive stress from the extracellular environment in vivo. Each of these biophysical cues can work simultaneously or independently to regulate cellular functions and tissue integrity in both physiological and pathological conditions. Thus, it is vital to understand the interaction of multiple stimuli on cells by decoupling and coupling the stimuli in simple combinations and by investigating cellular behaviors in response to these cues. Here, we report a novel microfluidic platform to apply the combinatorial stimulation of an electric field and fluid shear stress by controlling two directional cues independently. An integrated microfluidic platform was developed using soft lithography to monitor the cellular migration in real-time in response to an electric field and fluid shear stress in single, simultaneous, and sequential modes. When each of these stimulations is applied separately, normal human dermal fibroblasts migrate toward the anode and in the direction of fluid flow in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous stimulation with an electric field and shear stress, which mimics a wound in vivo, enhances the directional migration of fibroblasts by increasing both directedness and trajectory speed, suggesting the plausible scenario of cooperation between two physical cues to promote wound healing. When an electric field and shear stress are applied sequentially, migration behavior is affected by the applied stimulation as well as pre-existing stimulating conditions. This microfluidic platform can be utilized to understand other microenvironments such as embryogenesis, angiogenesis and tumor metastasis.

  9. Magnetic field induced strain assisted by stress in Ni-Fe-GaCo single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumlyakov Y.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMA have the possibility to induced a strain by applying a magnetic field. The main advantage of the FSMA is that the strain cycling frequency is two orders of magnitude higher than coventional shape memory alloys. The best alloy showing this effect is the Ni-Mn-Ga system, with a high mobility of its martensite variants and high magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant. Nevertheless, due to the high brittleness of this alloy, other systems (Ni-Fe-Ga, Co-Ni-Al, Co-Ni-Ga, ... are being investigated as an alternative to Ni-Mn-Ga. In the current work, Ni-Fe-Ga-Co single crystals have been studied. In spite of the formation of L10 martensite (low mobility of the variants, the [001] crystals exhibited magnetic-field-induced strains (in tension larger than 2%, under an assisting tensile stress around 16 MPa and fields below 15 kOe. In martensitic samples previously compressed, application of a constant tensile stress along the same axis together with a perpendicular magnetic field produces the elongation of the sample by variant reorientation, as one of the variants rotates its c axis from the field direction to the stress-axis direction. An estimated magnetostress of ~0.8 MPa is in good agreement with the theoretical value given by the ratio of magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant and twinning shear.

  10. STUDY ON DE-NOISING METHODS FOR SOIL COMPRESSIVE STRESS SIGNAL DURING VIBRATION COMPACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhe Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The compressive stress signal of soil during vibration compaction is an unstable and transient saltation signal accompanied by broadband noise, and the spectra of the signal and noise always overlap. To extract the ideal original signal from noisy data, this paper studies several signal de-noising methods such as low-pass filtering, multi-resolution wavelet transform, spectrum subtraction and independent component analysis. Experiments show that the traditional low-pass filter is only applicable when the spectra of the signal and noise can be separated in the frequency domain. The multi-resolution wavelet transform can decompose the signal into different frequency bands and remove the noise efficiently by extracting useful the frequency band of the signal, but this method is not reliable when the signal to noise ratio (SNR is low. Spectrum subtraction can remove strong background noise with stationary statistical characteristics even if the noise level is high and the spectrum of the signal overlaps with that of the noise. Independent component analysis can extract weak signals which are combined with heavy noise and can separate the noise from signal effectively when the independent channel hypothesis holds. These de-noising methods are of great importance for further analysing vibration signals in engineering.

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF MgO IN COMPRESSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dokko, P.C; Pask, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Compressive stress-strain curves for several types of polycrystalline MgO specimens were correlated with those for single crystals and analyzed as a function of grain size and grain-boundary character at 1200 and 1400 C for several strain rates. The results for fully dense specimens were explained in terms of grain-boundary sliding and intergranular separation in addition to slip. The modification of grain-boundary nature concurrent with heat treatment for grain growth, caused by residual LUF, was associated with enhanced grain-boundary sliding and intergranular separation. For grain sizes <30 {micro}m, it was concluded that the von Miss criteria for ductility could be relaxed by the Occurrence of dislocation climb and, to a limited extent, by intergranular separation. Yield drop corresponding to dislocation multiplication occurred when grain-boundary sliding was initially promoted. Specimens with a liquid phase of adequate viscosity also indicated plasticity accompanied by high strength. Specimens with clean grain boundaries exhibited ductility and normal strain hardening with no intergranular separation.

  12. Dynamic response and residual stress fields of Ti6Al4V alloy under shock wave induced by laser shock peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rujian; Li, Liuhe; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Lixin; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng; Li, Bo; Guo, Chao; Liu, Lei; Che, Zhigang; Li, Weidong; Sun, Jianfei; Qiao, Hongchao

    2017-09-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP), an innovative surface treatment technique, generates compressive residual stress on the surface of metallic components to improve their fatigue performance, wear resistance and corrosion resistance. To illustrate the dynamic response during LSP and residual stress fields after LSP, this study conducted FEM simulations of LSP in a Ti6Al4V alloy. Results showed that when power density was 7 GW cm-2, a plastic deformation occurred at 10 ns during LSP and increased until the shock pressure decayed below the dynamic yield strength of Ti6Al4V after 60 ns. A maximum tensile region appeared beneath the surface at around 240 ns, forming a compressive-tensile-compressive stress sandwich structure with a thickness of 98, 1020 and 606 μm for each layer. After the model became stabilized, the value of the surface residual compressive stress was 564 MPa at the laser spot center. Higher value of residual stress across the surface and thicker compressive residual stress layers were achieved by increasing laser power density, impact times and spot sizes during LSP. A ‘Residual stress hole’ occurred with a high laser power density of 9 GW cm-2 when laser pulse duration was 10 ns, or with a long laser pulse duration of 20 ns when laser power density was 7 GW cm-2 for Ti6Al4V. This phenomenon occurred because of the permanent reverse plastic deformation generated at laser spot center.

  13. Impact of compressibility and a guide field on Fermi acceleration during magnetic island coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Peter; Egedal, Jan; Lichko, Emily; Wetherton, Blake

    2017-10-01

    Previous work has shown that Fermi acceleration can be an effective heating mechanism during magnetic island coalescence, where electrons may undergo repeated reflections as the magnetic field lines contract. This energization has the potential to account for the power-law distributions of particle energy inferred from observations of solar flares. Here, we develop a generalized framework for the analysis of Fermi acceleration that can incorporate the effects of compressibility and non-uniformity along field lines, which have commonly been neglected in previous treatments of the problem. Applying this framework to the simplified case of the uniform flux tube allows us to find both the power-law scaling of the distribution function and the rate at which the power-law behavior develops. We find that a guide magnetic field of order unity effectively suppresses the development of power-law distributions. The work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX14AC68G, NSF GEM Grant No. 1405166, NSF Award 1404166, and NASA Award NNX15AJ73G.

  14. In situ neutron diffraction studies of a commercial, soft lead zirconate titanate ceramic: Response to electric fields and mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanick, Abhijit [University of Florida; Prewitt, Anderson [University of Florida; Cottrell, Michelle [University of Florida; Lee, Wayne [ITT Corporation Acoustic Sensors; Studer, Andrew J. [Bragg Institute, ANSTO; An, Ke [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Jones, Jacob [University of Florida

    2010-01-01

    Structural changes in commercial lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics (EC-65) under the application of electric fields and mechanical stress were measured using neutron diffraction instruments at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The structural changes during electric-field application were measured on the WOMBAT beamline at ANSTO and include non-180{sup o} domain switching, lattice strains and field-induced phase transformations. Using time-resolved data acquisition capabilities, lattice strains were measured under cyclic electric fields at times as short as 30 {mu}s. Structural changes including the (002) and (200) lattice strains and non-180{sup o} domain switching were measured during uniaxial mechanical compression on the NRSF2 instrument at ORNL. Contraction of the crystallographic polarization axis, (002), and reorientation of non-180{sup o} domains occur at lowest stresses, followed by (200) elastic strains at higher stresses.

  15. The Sub-Crustal Stress Field in the Taiwan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Mehdi Eshagh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the sub-crustal stress in the Taiwan region. A tectonic configuration in this region is dominated by a collision between the Philippine oceanic plate and the Eurasian continental margin. The horizontal components of the sub-crustal stress are computed based on the modified _ formulae in terms of the stress function with a subsequent numerical differentiation. This modification increases the (degree-dependent convergence domain of the asymptotically-convergent series and consequently allows evaluating the stress components to a spectral resolution, which is compatible with currently available global crustal models. Moreover, the solution to the Vening _ (VMM inverse isostasy problem is explicitly incorporated in the stress function definition. The sub-crustal stress is then computed for a variable Moho geometry, instead of assuming only a constant Moho depth. The regional results reveal that the Philippine plate subduction underneath the Eurasian continental margin generates the shear sub-crustal stress along the Ryukyu Trench. Some stress anomalies associated with this subduction are also detected along both sides of the Okinawa Trough. A tensional stress along this divergent tectonic plate boundary is attributed to a back-arc rifting. The sub-crustal stress, which is generated by a (reverse subduction of the Eurasian plate under the Philippine plate, propagates along both sides of the Luzon (volcanic Arc. This stress field has a prevailing compressional pattern.

  16. Experimental Study on Wing Crack Behaviours in Dynamic-Static Superimposed Stress Field Using Caustics and High-Speed Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Y. Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the drill-and-blast progress in rock tunnel excavation of great deep mine, rock fracture is evaluated by both blasting load and pre-exiting earth stress (pre-compression. Many pre-existing flaws in the rock mass, like micro-crack, also seriously affect the rock fracture pattern. Under blasting load with pre-compression, micro-cracks initiate, propagate and grow to be wing cracks. With an autonomous design of static-dynamic loading system, dynamic and static loads were applied on some PMMA plate specimen with pre-existing crack, and the behaviour of the wing crack was tested by caustics corroding with a high-speed photography. Four programs with different static loading modes that generate different pre-compression fields were executed, and the length, velocity of the blasting wing crack and dynamic stress intensity factor (SIF at the wing crack tip were analyzed and discussed. It is found that the behaviour of blasting-induced wing crack is affected obviously by blasting and pre-compression. And pre-compression, which is vertical to the direction of the wing crack propagation, hinders the crack propagation. Furthermore, the boundary constraint condition plays an important role on the behaviour of blasting induced crack during the experiment.

  17. Relationship between parallel faults and stress field in rock mass based on numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Y.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    Parallel cracks and faults, caused by earthquakes and crustal deformations, are often observed in various scales from regional to laboratory scales. However, the mechanism of formation of these parallel faults has not been quantitatively clarified, yet. Since the stress field plays a key role to the nucleation of parallel faults, it is fundamentally to investigate the failure and the extension of cracks in a large-scale rock mass (not with a laboratory-scale specimen) due to mechanically loaded stress field. In this study, we developed a numerical simulations code for rock mass failures under different loading conditions, and conducted rock failure experiments using this code. We assumed a numerical rock mass consisting of basalt with a rectangular shape for the model. We also assumed the failure of rock mass in accordance with the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, and the distribution of the initial tensile and compressive strength of rock elements to be the Weibull model. In this study, we use the Hamiltonian Particle Method (HPM), one of the particle methods, to represent large deformation and the destruction of materials. Out simulation results suggest that the confining pressure would have dominant influence for the initiation of parallel faults and their conjugates in compressive conditions. We conclude that the shearing force would provoke the propagation of parallel fractures along the shearing direction, but prevent that of fractures to the conjugate direction.

  18. Determining the stress field in active volcanoes using focal mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Massa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress inversion of seismological datasets became an essential tool to retrieve the stress field of active tectonics and volcanic areas. In particular, in volcanic areas, it is able to put constrains on volcano-tectonics and in general in a better understanding of the volcano dynamics. During the last decades, a wide range of stress inversion techniques has been proposed, some of them specifically conceived to manage seismological datasets. A modern technique of stress inversion, the BRTM, has been applied to seismological datasets available at three different regions of active volcanism: Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (197 Fault Plane Solutions, FPSs, Campi Flegrei (217 FPSs and Long Valley Caldera (38,000 FPSs. The key role of stress inversion techniques in the analysis of the volcano dynamics has been critically discussed. A particular emphasis was devoted to performances of the BRTM applied to volcanic areas.

  19. Determining the stress field in active volcanoes using focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Bruno; D'Auria, Luca; Cristiano, Elena; De Matteo, Ada

    2016-11-01

    Stress inversion of seismological datasets became an essential tool to retrieve the stress field of active tectonics and volcanic areas. In particular, in volcanic areas, it is able to put constrains on volcano-tectonics and in general in a better understanding of the volcano dynamics. During the last decades, a wide range of stress inversion techniques has been proposed, some of them specifically conceived to manage seismological datasets. A modern technique of stress inversion, the BRTM, has been applied to seismological datasets available at three different regions of active volcanism: Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (197 Fault Plane Solutions, FPSs), Campi Flegrei (217 FPSs) and Long Valley Caldera (38,000 FPSs). The key role of stress inversion techniques in the analysis of the volcano dynamics has been critically discussed. A particular emphasis was devoted to performances of the BRTM applied to volcanic areas.

  20. Algebraic Reynolds stress modeling of turbulence subject to rapid homogeneous and non-homogeneous compression or expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, I. A.; Wallin, S.; Brethouwer, G.; Grundestam, O.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (EARSM) by Grigoriev et al. ["A realizable explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model for compressible turbulent flow with significant mean dilatation," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 105112 (2013)] and the related differential Reynolds stress model (DRSM) are used to investigate the influence of homogeneous shear and compression on the evolution of turbulence in the limit of rapid distortion theory (RDT). The DRSM predictions of the turbulence kinetic energy evolution are in reasonable agreement with RDT while the evolution of diagonal components of anisotropy correctly captures the essential features, which is not the case for standard compressible extensions of DRSMs. The EARSM is shown to give a realizable anisotropy tensor and a correct trend of the growth of turbulence kinetic energy K, which saturates at a power law growth versus compression ratio, as well as retaining a normalized strain in the RDT regime. In contrast, an eddy-viscosity model results in a rapid exponential growth of K and excludes both realizability and high magnitude of the strain rate. We illustrate the importance of using a proper algebraic treatment of EARSM in systems with high values of dilatation and vorticity but low shear. A homogeneously compressed and rotating gas cloud with cylindrical symmetry, related to astrophysical flows and swirling supercritical flows, was investigated too. We also outline the extension of DRSM and EARSM to include the effect of non-homogeneous density coupled with "local mean acceleration" which can be important for, e.g., stratified flows or flows with heat release. A fixed-point analysis of direct numerical simulation data of combustion in a wall-jet flow demonstrates that our model gives quantitatively correct predictions of both streamwise and cross-stream components of turbulent density flux as well as their influence on the anisotropies. In summary, we believe that our approach, based on a proper

  1. Modelling of the Global Geopotential Energy & Stress Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, S.B.

    the Equations of equilibrium of stresses. The Geopotential Energy furthermore can be linearly related to the Geoid under assumption of local isostasy. Satellite Geoid measurements contain, however, also non-isostatic deeper mantle responses of long wavelength. Unfortunately, high-pass filtering of the Geoid...... flow in the presence of local isostasy and a steady state geotherm. Subsequently we use a FEM code to solve the Equations of equilibrium of stresses for a three dimensional elastic shell. The modelled results are shown and compared with the global stress field and other publications....

  2. Bioinformatic analysis of responsive genes in two-dimension and three-dimension cultured human periodontal ligament cells subjected to compressive stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K-L; Lee, S-W; Ahn, Y-S; Kim, S-H; Kang, Y-G

    2013-02-01

    Analyzing responses of human periodontal ligament cells to mechanical stress and mechanotransduction is important for understanding periodontal tissue physiology and remodeling. It has been shown that the cellular response to mechanical stress can vary according to the type and duration of force and to extracellular attachment conditions. This study investigated the gene-expression profile of human periodontal ligament cells cultured in two-dimension (2D) and three-dimension (3D) conditions after application of compressive stress for 2 and 48 h. Human primary periodontal ligament cells were obtained from premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes. Cells were cultured in a conventional 2D culture dish or in 3D collagen gel and compressive stress was applied for 2 and 48 h. Control cells were cultured under identical conditions but without the application of compressive stress. After the application of compressive stress, total RNA was extracted and a cDNA microarray was performed. Microarray data were analyzed using statistical methods, including david and gene set enrichment analysis to identify significant signaling pathways. Real-time PCR was performed for five mRNAs in order to confirm the cDNA microarray results. The cDNA microarray analysis revealed that after application of compressive stress for 2 h, 191 and 553 genes showed changes in their expression levels in 2D and 3D cultured cells, respectively. After application of compressive stress for 48 h, 280 and 519 genes showed changes in their expression levels in 2D and 3D cultured cells, respectively. Euclidean clustering method was used to demonstrate the gene-expression kinetics. Analysis of the results showed that several signaling pathways, including the MAPK pathway and the focal adhesion kinase pathway are relevant to the compressive force-induced cellular response. 2D and 3D cultured cells showed significantly different gene-expression profiles, suggesting that cellular attachment to extracellular

  3. Intraplate stress field in South America from earthquake focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Marcelo; Dias, Fábio L.; Zevallos, Ivan; Naliboff, John B.

    2016-11-01

    We present an updated compilation of earthquake focal mechanisms in Brazil together with focal mechanisms from the sub-Andean region (mainly from global CMT catalogs). All earthquakes in the sub-Andean region show reverse (majority) or strike-slip faulting mechanisms. Focal mechanisms in Brazil show reverse, strike-slip and normal faulting. Focal mechanisms of nearby earthquakes in the same tectonic environment were grouped and inverted for the stress tensor. In the sub-Andean region, stresses are compressional, as expected, with the principal major compression (S1) roughly E-W, on average. A slight rotation of S1 can be observed and is controlled by the orientation of the Andean plateau. In the sub-Andean region, the intermediate principal stress (S2) is also compressional (i.e., larger than the lithostatic pressure, Sv), a feature that is not always reproduced in numerical models published in the literature. In mid-plate South America stresses seem to vary in nature and orientation. In SE Brazil and the Chaco-Pantanal basins, S1 tends to be oriented roughly E-W with S2 approximately equal to S3. This stress pattern changes to purely compressional (both SHmax and Shmin larger than Sv) in the São Francisco craton. A rotation of SHmax from E-W to SE-NW is suggested towards the Amazon region. Along the Atlantic margin, the regional stresses are very much affected by coastal effects (due to continent/ocean spreading stresses as well as flexural effects from sediment load at the continental margin). This coastal effect tends to make SHmax parallel to the coastline and Shmin (usually S3) perpendicular to the coastline. Few breakout data and in-situ measurements are available in Brazil and are generally consistent with the pattern derived from the earthquake focal mechanisms. Although numerical models of global lithospheric stresses tend to reproduce the main large-scale features in most mid-plate areas, the S1 rotation from ∼E-W in SE Brazil to SE-NW in the Amazon

  4. Methodology for Computer-aided, Interactive Rapid Assessment of Local or Regional Stress Fields on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, S. L.; Ferrill, D. A.; Sims, D. W.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Franklin, N. M.

    2003-03-01

    We present a method for rapid assessment of stress fields on Mars: (i) mapping geologic structures, (ii) calculating stress fields, and (iii) determining resolved stresses on faults. Preliminary results are presented for northern Utopia Planitia.

  5. Stress Energy Tensor in c=0 Logarithmic Conformal Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kogan, I. I.; Nichols, A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the partners of the stress energy tensor and their structure in Logarithmic conformal field theories. In particular we draw attention to the fundamental differences between theories with zero and non-zero central charge. We analyze the OPE for T, \\bar{T} and the logarithmic partners t and \\bar{t} for c=0 theories.

  6. Subsurface Stress Fields in FCC Single Crystal Anisotropic Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Knudsen, Erik; Swanson, Gregory R.; Duke, Gregory; Ham-Battista, Gilda

    2004-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy turbine blades used in high pressure turbomachinery are subject to conditions of high temperature, triaxial steady and alternating stresses, fretting stresses in the blade attachment and damper contact locations, and exposure to high-pressure hydrogen. The blades are also subjected to extreme variations in temperature during start-up and shutdown transients. The most prevalent high cycle fatigue (HCF) failure modes observed in these blades during operation include crystallographic crack initiation/propagation on octahedral planes, and non-crystallographic initiation with crystallographic growth. Numerous cases of crack initiation and crack propagation at the blade leading edge tip, blade attachment regions, and damper contact locations have been documented. Understanding crack initiation/propagation under mixed-mode loading conditions is critical for establishing a systematic procedure for evaluating HCF life of single crystal turbine blades. This paper presents analytical and numerical techniques for evaluating two and three dimensional subsurface stress fields in anisotropic contacts. The subsurface stress results are required for evaluating contact fatigue life at damper contacts and dovetail attachment regions in single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades. An analytical procedure is presented for evaluating the subsurface stresses in the elastic half-space, based on the adaptation of a stress function method outlined by Lekhnitskii. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical and spherical anisotropic contacts, using finite element analysis (FEA). Effects of crystal orientation on stress response and fatigue life are examined. Obtaining accurate subsurface stress results for anisotropic single crystal contact problems require extremely refined three-dimensional (3-D) finite element grids, especially in the edge of contact region. Obtaining resolved shear stresses (RSS) on the principal slip planes also involves

  7. A Parameter Sensitivity Analysis of the Effect of Rebar Corrosion on the Stress Field in the Surrounding Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyuan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebar corrosion results in a change in the stress field in the surrounding concrete, which in turn accelerates the deterioration of the concrete structure. In addition to the protective layer, the compressive stress under which concrete is prestressed also affects the effect of corrosion-induced rebar expansion on the stress field in the concrete. The present study simulates the effect of corrosion-induced rebar expansion on the stress field in the concrete using the finite element method (FEM by applying a virtual radial displacement to the product of corrosion-induced rebar expansion. Based on an analysis of the effect of multiple rebars on the stress field in ordinary concrete, stress distribution in the protective layer of the concrete is determined. Afterward, the locations where there is damage to the surface concrete caused by rebar corrosion are determined. After verifying the feasibility of the FEM analysis, the effect of corrosion-induced ordinary rebar expansion in a typical prestressed concrete segment is determined by analyzing the characteristics of corrosion-induced rebar expansion occurring in various prestressed concrete specimens.

  8. β-distribution for Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux in relaxation turbulent boundary layer of compression ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YanChao; Bi, WeiTao; Li, ShiYao; She, ZhenSu

    2017-12-01

    A challenge in the study of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) is to understand the non-equilibrium relaxation process after sep-aration and reattachment due to shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. The classical boundary layer theory cannot deal with the strong adverse pressure gradient, and hence, the computational modeling of this process remains inaccurate. Here, we report the direct numerical simulation results of the relaxation TBL behind a compression ramp, which reveal the presence of intense large-scale eddies, with significantly enhanced Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux. A crucial finding is that the wall-normal profiles of the excess Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux obey a β-distribution, which is a product of two power laws with respect to the wall-normal distances from the wall and from the boundary layer edge. In addition, the streamwise decays of the excess Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux also exhibit power laws with respect to the streamwise distance from the corner of the compression ramp. These results suggest that the relaxation TBL obeys the dilation symmetry, which is a specific form of self-organization in this complex non-equilibrium flow. The β-distribution yields important hints for the development of a turbulence model.

  9. 3D Residual Stress Field in Arteries: Novel Inverse Method Based on Optical Full-field Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Badel, Pierre; Avril, Stéphane; 10.1111/str.12008

    2013-01-01

    Arterial tissue consists of multiple structurally important constituents that have individual material properties and associated stress-free configurations that evolve over time. This gives rise to residual stresses contributing to the homoeostatic state of stress in vivo as well as adaptations to perturbed loads, disease or injury. The existence of residual stresses in an intact but load-free excised arterial segment suggests compressive and tensile stresses, respectively, in the inner and outer walls. Accordingly, an artery ring springs open into a sector after a radial cut. The measurement of the opening angle is commonly used to deduce the residual stresses, which are the stresses required to close back the ring. The opening angle method provides an average estimate of circumferential residual stresses but it gives no information on local distributions through the thickness and along the axial direction. To address this lack, a new method is proposed in this article to derive maps of residual stresses usi...

  10. Visualization and Transparentization of the Structure and Stress Field of Aggregated Geomaterials Through 3D Printing and Photoelastic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yang; Wang, Li; Xie, Heping; Ma, Guowei; Zheng, Zemin; Mao, Lingtao

    2017-06-01

    Natural resource reservoirs usually consist of heterogeneous aggregated geomaterials containing a large number of randomly distributed particles with irregular geometry. As a result, the accurate characterization of the stress field, which essentially governs the mechanical behaviour of such geomaterials, through analytical and experimental methods, is considerably difficult. Physical visualization of the stress field is a promising method to quantitatively characterize and reveal the evolution and distribution of stress in aggregated geomaterials subjected to excavation loads. This paper presents a novel integration of X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging, three-dimensional (3D) printing, and photoelastic testing for the transparentization and visualization of the aggregated structure and stress field of heterogeneous geomaterials. In this study, a glutenite rock sample was analysed by CT to acquire the 3D aggregate structure, following which 3D printing was adopted to produce transparent models with the same aggregate structure as that of the glutenite sample. Uniaxial compression tests incorporated with photoelastic techniques were performed on the transparent models to acquire and visualize the stress distribution of the aggregated models at various loading stages. The effect of randomly distributed aggregates on the stress field characteristics of the models, occurrence of plastic zones, and fracture initiation was analysed. The stress field characteristics of the aggregated models were analysed using the finite element method (FEM). The failure process was simulated using the distinct element method (DEM). Both FEM and DEM results were compared with the experimental observations. The results showed that the proposed method can very well visualize the stress field of aggregated solids during uniaxial loading. The results of the visualization tests were in good agreement with those of the numerical simulations.

  11. The stress field beneath Mt. Vesuvius (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Luca; Massa, Bruno; De Matteo, Ada

    2014-05-01

    The Somma-Vesuvius is the smallest and one of the youngest volcanoes of the Neapolitan district. Its origin is linked to a Late Pleistocene-Holocene extension occurred along the entire Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain. Nowadays, Mt. Vesuvius is a quiescent strato-volcano. Using different approaches and a comparison between observations and numerical models we have determined the spatial variations in the stress field beneath the volcano edifice. In order to achieve this target we have analyzed a focal mechanism dataset derived from 197 events recorded from Jan. 1999 to Jan. 2012. The main results highlight the presence of two seismogenic volumes characterized by markedly different stress patterns. The two volumes are separated by a layer where the seismic strain release shows a significant decrease. Previous studies postulated the existence, at about the same depth, of a ductile layer allowing the spreading of the Mt. Vesuvius edifice. We interpreted the difference in the stress pattern within the two volumes as the effect of a mechanical decoupling caused by the aforementioned ductile layer. The stress pattern in the top volume is dominated by a reverse faulting style, which agrees with the hypothesis of a seismicity driven by the spreading process. On the other hand, the stress field determined for the deep volume is consistent with a background regional field locally perturbed by the effects of the topography and of heterogeneities in the volcanic structure. Since the seismicity of the deep volume shows an intermittent behaviour and has shown to be linked to geochemical variations in the fumaroles of the volcano, we hypothesize that it results from the effect of fluid injection episodes, possibly of magmatic origin, perturbing the pore pressure within the hydrothermal system. The retrieved changes in the stress pattern could indicate variations in volcano dynamics potentially linked to the intrusion of magma at shallow depth.

  12. Volume digital image correlation to assess displacement field in compression loaded bread crumb under X-ray microtomography

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present an original approach to assess structural changes during bread crumb compression using a mechanical testing bench coupled to 3D X-ray microtomography. X-ray images taken at different levels of compression of the bread crumb are processed using image analysis. A subset-based digital volume correlation method is used to achieve the 3D displacement field. Within the limit of the approach, deterministic search strategy is implemented for solving subset displacement in each deformed image with regards to the undeformed one. The predicted displacement field in the transverse directions shows differences that depend on local cell arrangement as confirmed by finite element analysis. The displacement component in the loading direction is affected by the magnitude of imposed displacement and shows more regular change. Large displacement levels in the compression direction are in good agreement with the imposed experimental displacement. The results presented here are promising in a sense of possible identification of local foam properties. New insights are expected to achieve better understanding of structural heterogeneities in the overall perception of the product. Industrial relevance: Texture evaluation of cereal product is an important aspect for testing consumer acceptability of new designed products. Mechanical evaluation of backed products is a systemic route for determining texture of cereal based product. From the industrial viewpoint, mechanical evaluation allows saving both time and cost compared to panel evaluation. We demonstrate that better understanding of structural changes during texture evaluation can be achieved in addition to texture evaluation. Sensing structural changes during bread crumb compression is achievable by combining novel imaging technique and processing based on image analysis. We present thus an efficient way to predict displacements during compression of freshly baked product. This method can be used in different

  13. Characteristics of Xanthosoma sagittifolium roots during cooking, using physicochemical analysis, uniaxial compression, multispectral imaging and low field NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boakye, Abena Achiaa; Gudjónsdóttir, María; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    To effectively promote the industrial utilization of cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) roots for enhanced food sustainability and security, there is a need to study their molecular, mechanical and physicochemical properties in detail. The physicochemical and textural characteristics of the red...... and white varieties of cocoyam roots were thus analysed by low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry, multispectral imaging, uniaxial compression testing, and relevant physicochemical analysis in the current study. Both varieties had similar dry matter content, as well as physical and mechanical...

  14. A new barometer from stress fields around inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avadanii, Diana; Hansen, Lars; Wallis, David; Waters, David

    2017-04-01

    A key step in understanding geological and geodynamic processes is modelling the pressure-temperature paths of metamorphic rocks. Traditional thermobarometry relies on mineral assemblage equilibria and thermodynamic modelling to infer the pressures and temperatures of chemical equilibration. This approach requires the presence of specific mineral assemblages and compositions, which narrows its applicability. In this study we aim to develop a geobarometer based on mechanical interactions between inclusions and their host grains. Exhumation of minerals with inclusions causes heterogeneous residual stress fields due to the different, and often anisotropic, elastic properties of the inclusion and host. Recent studies measure residual mean stresses within inclusions using Raman spectroscopy and use those stresses as a barometer. In contrast, we map each component of the stress tensor around inclusions using high angular-resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD). This technique provides both higher spatial resolution and increased sensitivity to elastic strains relative to Raman spectroscopy. We focus on quartz inclusions in garnet, a common feature in metamorphic rocks. This assemblage also provides an opportunity to test our results with compositional thermobarometry. We analyse samples metamorphosed at pressures ranging from ˜ 300 MPa to ˜ 1600 MPa, as recorded by independent geobarometers. HR-EBSD reveals symmetric and lobate signals around inclusions, with elastic strains and residual stresses of the order 10-3 and ±102 -103 MPa, respectively. We solve Eshelby's problem for the 'inhomogeneous inclusion' case to simulate the elastic strain/stress field around an anisotropic ellipsoidal inclusion surrounded by an isotropic, homogeneous, infinite matrix. This model calculates the stress disturbances caused by differential expansion of an inclusion and host subjected to decompression. We additionally account for differential expansion related to cooling

  15. Subsurface Stress Fields In Single Crystal (Anisotropic) Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Knudsen, Erik C.; Duke, Greg; Battista, Gilda; Swanson, Greg

    2004-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy turbine blades used in high pressure turbomachinery are subject to conditions of high temperature, triaxial steady and alternating stresses, fretting stresses in the blade attachment and damper contact locations, and exposure to high-pressure hydrogen. The blades are also subjected to extreme variations in temperature during start-up and shutdown transients. The most prevalent HCF failure modes observed in these blades during operation include crystallographic crack initiation/propagation on octahedral planes, and noncrystallographic initiation with crystallographic growth. Numerous cases of crack initiation and crack propagation at the blade leading edge tip, blade attachment regions, and damper contact locations have been documented. Understanding crack initiation/propagation under mixed-mode loading conditions is critical for establishing a systematic procedure for evaluating HCF life of single crystal turbine blades. This paper presents analytical and numerical techniques for evaluating two and three dimensional subsurface stress fields in anisotropic contacts. The subsurface stress results are required for evaluating contact fatigue life at damper contacts and dovetail attachment regions in single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades. An analytical procedure is , presented, for evaluating the subsurface stresses in the elastic half-space, using a complex potential method outlined by Lekhnitskii. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical and spherical anisotropic contacts, using finite element analysis. Effects of crystal orientation on stress response and fatigue life are examined.

  16. THE FIELD OF RECENT TECTONIC STRESSES IN CENTRAL AND SOUTH-EASTERN ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Rebetsky

    2014-01-01

    Global CMT Database, reconstructions based on the first catalog are mapped. In the maps showing consolidated patterns of the state of stresses, spacious areas of horizontal extension of the crust in Tibet are clearly identified. In the south, such areas are bordered by regions of horizontal compression of the crust in Himalaya; in the north and north-east, they are bordered by regions of horizontal shear of the crust in East Kunlun. According to results of calculations at stage 2 of the method of cataclastic analyses, the crust in the central part of Tibet is subject to intensive confining pressure and lateral compression that is reduced in the neighboring regions. The crust in the southern and northern parts of Pamir is also subject to horizontal extension and shear. Regions of horizontal compression are located to the north, west and south of Pamir. Regulations of the field of recent tectonic stresses of Tibet and Pamir, which are revealed in this study, can be explained by the concept of ‘tectonic spreading’ of these regions due to gravity, which causes intensive horizontal spreading of the crust in Himalaya when the southern boundary of Tibet bends outwards and spreads over the Indian ‘indenter’ moving in the north–north-eastern direction. It is suggested by the data on horizontal extension of the crust in Tibet and underthrusting shear stresses over the horizontal zones that the impact Indian ‘indenter’ does not go beyond the crust of Pamir and the crust of the central parts of Tibet which is located above the long-term active mantle plume.  

  17. Steady fall of isothermal, resistive-viscous, compressible fluid across magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, B. C., E-mail: low@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Egan, A. K., E-mail: andrea.egan@colorado.edu [Barnard College, New York, New York 10027, USA and Department of Physics, Colorado University, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    This is a basic MHD study of the steady fall of an infinite, vertical slab of isothermal, resistive-viscous, compressible fluid across a dipped magnetic field in uniform gravity. This double-diffusion steady flow in unbounded space poses a nonlinear but numerically tractable, one-dimensional (1D) free-boundary problem, assuming constant coefficients of resistivity and viscosity. The steady flow is determined by a dimensionless number μ{sub 1} proportional to the triple product of the two diffusion coefficients and the square of the linear total mass. For a sufficiently large μ{sub 1}, the Lorentz, viscous, fluid-pressure, and gravitational forces pack and collimate the fluid into a steady flow of a finite width defined by the two zero-pressure free-boundaries of the slab with vacuum. The viscous force is essential in this collimation effect. The study conjectures that in the regime μ{sub 1}→0, the 1D steady state exists only for μ{sub 1}∈Ω, a spectrum of an infinite number of discrete values, including μ{sub 1} = 0 that corresponds to two steady states, the classical zero-resistivity static slab of Kippenhahn and Schlüter [R. Kippenhahn and A. Schlüter, Z. Astrophys. 43, 36 (1957)] and its recent generalization [B. C. Low et al., Astrophys. J. 755, 34 (2012)] to admit an inviscid resistive flow. The pair of zero-pressure boundaries of each of the μ{sub 1}→0 steady-state slabs are located at infinity. Computational evidence suggests that the Ω steady-states are densely distributed around μ{sub 1} = 0, as an accumulation point, but are sparsely separated by open intervals of μ{sub 1}-values for which the slab must be either time-dependent or spatially multi-dimensional. The widths of these intervals are vanishingly small as μ{sub 1}→0. This topological structure of physical states is similar to that described by Landau and Liftshitz [L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics (Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1959)] to explain the onset

  18. FEM Simulation of the Effect of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion and Heat Capacity on Prediction of Residual Stresses of Compression Molded Glass Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bo; Yuan, Ye

    2017-11-01

    In this research, the effects of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and heat capacity on the prediction of residual stresses in BK7 compression molded glass lenses were studied. Three different groups of CTE and two different kinds of heat capacity, which are constant and proportional to temperature, were chosen to investigate the impacts of residual stresses. The simulation results show a big difference and suggest that the properties of glass materials determine the residual stresses and should be measured carefully.

  19. Stress field control during large caldera-forming eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Costa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Crustal stress field can have a significant influence on the way magma is channelled through the crust and erupted explosively at the surface. Large Caldera Forming Eruptions (LCFEs can erupt hundreds to thousands of cubic kilometres of magma in a relatively short time along fissures under the control of a far-field extensional stress. The associated eruption intensities are estimated in the range 109 - 1011 kg/s. We analyse syn-eruptive dynamics of LCFEs, by simulating numerically explosive flow of magma through a shallow dyke conduit connected to a magma chamber that in turn is fed by a deeper magma reservoir, both under the action of an extensional far-field stress. Results indicate that huge amounts of high viscosity silicic magma can be erupted over timescales of a few to several hours. Our study provides answers to outstanding questions relating to the intensity and duration of catastrophic volcanic eruptions in the past. In addition, it presents far-reaching implications for the understanding of dynamics and intensity of large-magnitude volcanic eruptions on Earth and to highlight the necessity of a future research to advance our knowledge of these rare catastrophic events.

  20. Preliminary Investigation of Workplace-Provided Compressed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction with Pediatric Medical Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Kelly; Mische Lawson, Lisa; Andrews, Stephanie; Pecora, Jodi; Boyd, Sabra

    2017-11-01

    Mindfulness practices, including mindfulness meditation, show promise for decreasing stress among health care providers. This exploratory study investigates the feasibility of a two-day compressed mindfulness-based stress reduction (cMBSR) course provided in the hospital workplace with pediatric health care social workers. The standard course of Jon Kabat-Zinn's MBSR requires a participant commitment to eight weeks of instruction consisting of one 2.5-hour-per-week class, a single day retreat, and 45 minutes of practice for six of seven days each week. Commitments to family, work, caregiving, education, and so on, as well as limitations such as distance, may prevent health care providers from participating in a standard MBSR course. Using t tests, researchers measured the effect of cMBSR on (a) positive and negative experiences in pediatric social work, (b) perceived stress, (c) mindfulness, and (d) caring self-efficacy (as a component of patient- and family-centered care). Results included significant differences between the pre- and post-intervention outcome variables on the Professional Quality of Life Secondary Traumatic Stress subscale, the Mindful Attention and Awareness Scale, and the Caring Efficacy Scale. Findings found adequate evidence for the feasibility of cMBSR design and for a need of a more rigorous study of the effects of the cMBSR intervention. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  1. Ferroelectric behavior of a lead titanate nanosphere due to depolarization fields and mechanical stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade Landeta, J.; Lascano, I.

    2017-07-01

    A theorical model has been developed based on the theory of Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire to study and predict the effects the decreasing of size particle in a nanosphere of PbTiO3 subjected to the action of depolarization fields and mechanical stress. It was considered that the nanosphere is surrounded by a layer of space charges on its surface, and containing 180° domains generated by minimizing free energy of depolarization. Energy density of depolarization, wall domain and electro-elastic energy have been incorporated into the free energy of the theory Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire. Free energy minimization was performed to determine the spontaneous polarization and transition temperature system. These results show that the transition temperature for nanosphere is substantially smaller than the corresponding bulk material. Also, it has been obtained that the stability of the ferroelectric phase of nanosphere is favored for configurations with a large number of 180° domains, with the decreasing of thickness space charge layer, and the application of tensile stress and decreases with compressive stress. (Author)

  2. Thermodynamics of Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites Revisited: Compressible Self-Consistent Field Theory Modeling of Melt-Intercalated Organoclays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Valeriy; Jog, Prasanna; Weinhold, Jeffrey; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2010-03-01

    We formulate a ``compressible'' version of lattice self-consistent field theory (SCFT) to describe thermodynamic behavior of organically modified clays in polymer melt. The melt consists of the homopolymer matrix and a fraction of end-functionalized ``active'' chains, each chain having a single ``sticker'' end-group with strong affinity to the clay surface. We calculate the phase map for this system as function of the melt composition and the strength of the ``sticker'' adhesion to the clay. It is shown that within the compressible SCFT model, intercalated morphologies are favored in a significantly broader parameter range than was expected based on the incompressible SCFT analysis. We provide a qualitative analysis of this result and discuss implications for the physics of nanocomposites in general.

  3. Investigation on stresses of superconductors under pulsed magnetic fields based on multiphysics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaobin, E-mail: yangxb@lzu.edu.cn; Li, Xiuhong; He, Yafeng; Wang, Xiaojun; Xu, Bo

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The differential equation including temperature and magnetic field was derived for a long cylindrical superconductor. • Thermal stress and electromagnetic stress were studied at the same time under pulse field magnetizing. • The distributions of the magnetic field, the temperature and stresses are studied and compared for two pulse fields of the different duration. • The Role thermal stress and electromagnetic stress play in the process of pulse field magnetizing is discussed. - Abstract: A multiphysics model for the numerical computation of stresses, trapped field and temperature distribution of a infinite long superconducting cylinder is proposed, based on which the stresses, including the thermal stresses and mechanical stresses due to Lorentz force, and trapped fields in the superconductor subjected to pulsed magnetic fields are analyzed. By comparing the results under pulsed magnetic fields with different pulse durations, it is found that the both the mechanical stress due to the electromagnetic force and the thermal stress due to temperature gradient contribute to the total stress level in the superconductor. For pulsed magnetic field with short durations, the thermal stress is the dominant contribution to the total stress, because the heat generated by AC-loss builds up significant temperature gradient in such short durations. However, for a pulsed field with a long duration the gradient of temperature and flux, as well as the maximal tensile stress, are much smaller. And the results of this paper is meaningful for the design and manufacture of superconducting permanent magnets.

  4. Influence of Residual Stress Field on the Fatigue Crack Propagation in Prestressing Steel Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effect of several residual stress profiles on the fatigue crack propagation in prestressing steel wires subjected to tension loading or bending moment. To this end, a computer program was developed to evaluate the crack front evolution on the basis of the Walker law. Results demonstrate that the absence of residual stresses makes the crack propagate towards a preferential crack path. When surface residual stresses are tensile and, correspondingly, core residual stresses are compressive, the fatigue crack fronts rapidly converge towards a quasi-straight shape. When surface residual stresses are compressive, with their corresponding tensile stresses in the core area, a preferential crack path also appears.

  5. Active stress field and seismotectonic features in Intra-Carpathian region of Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oros, Eugen; Popa, Mihaela; Diaconescu, Mihai; Radulian, Mircea

    2017-04-01

    The Romanian Intra-Carpathian Region is located on the eastern half of Tisa-Dacia geodynamic block from the Neogene Carpathian-Pannonian Basin. The distribution of seismicity displays clear clusters and narrower zones with seismogenic potential confirmed by the damaging earthquakes recoded in the region, e.g. July 01, 1829 (Mw=6.2), October 10, 1834 (Mw=5.6), January 26, 1916 (Mw=6.4), July 12, 1991 (Mw=5.7), December 2, 1991 (Mw=5.5). The state of recent stress and deformation appears to be controlled by the interaction of plate-boundary and intraplate forces, which include the counterclockwise rotation and N-NE-directed indentation of the Adria microplate and buoyancy forces associated with differential topography and lithospheric heterogeneities. The stress field and tectonic regime are investigated at regional and local scales by the formal inversion of focal mechamisms. There can be observed short-scale lateral changes of i) tectonic regimes from compressive (reverse and strike-slip faultings) to pure extensive (normal faultings) and ii) variation of stress directions (SHmax) from NE-SW to EW and WNW-ESE towards Southern Carpathians and NS within Easter Carpathians. The changes in stress directions occur over a distance that is comparable to or smaller than the thickness of the lithosphere. A comparative analysis of stress tensor with GPS velocity/displacememt vectors shows variations from paralellism to orthogonality, suggesting different mechanisms of crustal deformations.The major seismic activity (Mw≥5.0) appears to be generally concentrated along the faults systems bordering de Tisa-Dacia Block, intersections of faults of different ages, internal shear zones and with the border of the former structural terrains, old rifts and neostructures.

  6. Self-generated electric field suppressing the ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transition in ferroelectric ceramics under shock wave compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongdong; Du, Jinmei; Gu, Yan; Feng, Yujun

    2012-01-01

    Kinetics of the ferroelectric (FE) to antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transformation under shock wave compression is critical to design the shock-activated power supply and can be characterized in terms of both a transition rate and a limiting degree of transition. By measuring the depoling currents under the short-circuit and high-impedance conditions, we investigated the influence of self-generated electric field on the phase transition kinetics of tin-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramics (Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.90Sn0.10)0.96Ti0.04]0.98O3) in the pressure range from 0.61 to 4.50 GPa. Experimental results indicate that the self-generated electric field does not appear to have a significant effect on the depoling currents at high shock pressures, but has a strong effect at low pressures. At 0.61 and 1.03 GPa, transition rate and degree diminish with increasing the electric field, illustrating that the self-generated electric field suppresses the FE-to-AFE phase transition. These observations are found to be generally consistent with many ferroelectric materials and results under hydrostatic compression. Fundamental issues are discussed from the perspective of the soft mode theory.

  7. Stress distribution during cold compression of a quartz aggregate using synchrotron X-ray diffraction: Observed yielding, damage, and grain crushing: STRESS DISTRIBUTION OF QUARTZ AGGREGATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C. S. N. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Geological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison Wisconsin USA; Weidner, D. J. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Li, L. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Meredith, P. G. [Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, London UK; Chen, H. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Whitaker, M. L. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Chen, X. [Chemistry Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA

    2017-04-01

    We report new experimental results that quantify the stress distribution within a quartz aggregate during pore collapse and grain crushing. The samples were probed with synchrotron X-ray diffraction as they were compressed in a multianvil deformation apparatus at room temperature from low pressure (tens of megapascal) to pressures of a few gigapascal. In such a material, stress is likely to concentrate at grain-to-grain contacts and vanish where grains are bounded by open porosity. Therefore, internal stress is likely to vary significantly from point to point in such an aggregate, and hence, it is important to understand both the heterogeneity and anisotropy of such variation with respect to the externally applied stress. In our quartz aggregate (grain size of ~4 μm), the measured diffraction peaks broaden asymmetrically at low pressure (tens of megapascal), suggesting that open pores are still a dominant characteristic of grain boundaries. In contrast, a reference sample of novaculite (a highly dense quartz polycrystal, grain size of ~6–9 μm) showed virtually no peak broadening with increasing pressure. In the quartz aggregate, we observed significant deviation in the pressure-volume curves in the range of P = 400–600 MPa. We suggest that this marks the onset of grain crushing (generally denoted as P* in the rock mechanic literature), which is commonly reported to occur in sandstones at pressures of this order, in general agreement with a Hertzian analysis of fracturing at grain contacts.

  8. Tertiary stress field evolution in Sistan (Eastern Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Jentzer; Marc, Fournier; Philippe, Agard; Jafar, Omrani

    2016-04-01

    The Sistan orogenic belt in eastern Iran, near the boundary with Afghanistan, results from the closure of a branch of the Neo-Thethys: the Sistan Ocean. It was divided by Tirrul et al. (1983) in five main units: the Lut (1) and Afghan (2) continental blocks where basement is exposed; the Neh (3) and Ratuk (4) complexes which display ophiolitic rocks weakly and highly (HP-BT) metamorphosed, respectively, and the Sefidabeh basin lying over these complexes and interpreted as a fore-arc basin. Sistan is bordered by the Makran and Zagros (formed by the closure of the Neo-Tethys) to the south and by the Kopet Dagh (formed by the closure of Paleo-Tethys) to the North. The aim of this study is to fill the gap between preliminary studies about the overall structure of the Sistan Suture Zone and recent investigations of active tectonics in the region (e.g., Walker et al., 2004 and 2006 a and b). Questions herein addressed are: (1) how are stresses transfered throughout Iran from the Zagros to the Sistan belts? (2) Did the Zagros, Makran and Sistan belts evolve independently through time, or were they mechanically coupled? In order to answer these questions, we have determined paleostress evolution in the Sistan, using a direct inversion method for 42 microtectonic sites in almost all lithologies of the Neh complex and the Sefidabeh basin. We find three successive directions of compression: (1) 87°N for the oldest deformation stage dated of the Late Miocene, (2) 59°N for the intermediate stage probably dated of the Early Pliocene, and (3) 26°N for the youngest stage dated of the Plio-Quaternary. A counterclockwise rotation of about 60° of the main stress (σ1) in less than 10 Ma is therefore documented in Sistan. These same three stages of deformation were also documented by several microtectonic studies in Iran, especially in Makran and Zagros. The direction of the youngest compression is very homogeneous indicating that the mountain belts and continental blocks of Iran

  9. Stress- and Magnetic Field-Induced Martensitic Transformation at Cryogenic Temperatures in Fe-Mn-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji; Xu, Xiao; Miyake, Atsushi; Kimura, Yuta; Omori, Toshihiro; Tokunaga, Masashi; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-11-01

    Stress-induced and magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation behaviors at low temperatures were investigated for Fe-Mn-Al-Ni alloys. The magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was directly observed by in situ optical microscopy. Magnetization measurements under pulsed magnetic fields up to 50 T were carried out at temperatures between 4.2 and 125 K on a single-crystal sample; full magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was confirmed at all tested temperatures. Compression tests from 10 to 100 K were conducted on a single-crystal sample; full shape recovery was obtained at all tested temperatures. It was found that the temperature dependence of both the critical stress and critical magnetic field is small and that the transformation hysteresis is less sensitive to temperature even at cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of entropy change during martensitic transformation up to 100 K was then derived using the Clausius-Clapeyron relation with critical stresses and magnetic fields.

  10. Stress- and Magnetic Field-Induced Martensitic Transformation at Cryogenic Temperatures in Fe-Mn-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji; Xu, Xiao; Miyake, Atsushi; Kimura, Yuta; Omori, Toshihiro; Tokunaga, Masashi; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-12-01

    Stress-induced and magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation behaviors at low temperatures were investigated for Fe-Mn-Al-Ni alloys. The magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was directly observed by in situ optical microscopy. Magnetization measurements under pulsed magnetic fields up to 50 T were carried out at temperatures between 4.2 and 125 K on a single-crystal sample; full magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was confirmed at all tested temperatures. Compression tests from 10 to 100 K were conducted on a single-crystal sample; full shape recovery was obtained at all tested temperatures. It was found that the temperature dependence of both the critical stress and critical magnetic field is small and that the transformation hysteresis is less sensitive to temperature even at cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of entropy change during martensitic transformation up to 100 K was then derived using the Clausius-Clapeyron relation with critical stresses and magnetic fields.

  11. Compressions of electrorheological fluids under different initial gap distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Wen, Shizhu; Meng, Yonggang

    2003-05-01

    Compressions of electrorheological (ER) fluids have been carried out under different initial gap distances and different applied voltages. The nominal yield stresses of the compressed ER fluid under different conditions, according to the mechanics of compressing continuous fluids considering the yield stress of the plastic fluid, have been calculated. Curves of nominal yield stress under different applied voltages at an initial gap distance of 4 mm overlapped well and were shown to be proportional to the square of the external electric field and agree well with the traditional description. With the decrease of the initial gap distance, the difference between the nominal yield stress curves increased. The gap distance effect on the compression of ER fluids could not be explained by the traditional description based on the Bingham model and the continuous media theory. An explanation based on the mechanics of particle chain is proposed to describe the gap distance effect on the compression of ER fluids.

  12. Differences in Visual-Spatial Input May Underlie Different Compression Properties of Firing Fields for Grid Cell Modules in Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-19

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Differences in Visual -Spatial Input May Underlie Different Compression Properties of Firing Fields for Grid Cell Modules in Medial...gmail.com Abstract Firing fields of grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex show compression or expansion after manipulations of the location of...present a model for differences in the response of modules to barrier location that arise from different mechanisms for the influence of visual

  13. Stress Characterization of 4H-SiC Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MOSFET) using Raman Spectroscopy and the Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Kosaka, Kenichi; Seki, Hirohumi; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2016-07-01

    We measured the depolarized and polarized Raman spectra of a 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) and found that compressive stress of approximately 20 MPa occurs under the source and gate electrodes and tensile stress of approximately 10 MPa occurs between the source and gate electrodes. The experimental result was in close agreement with the result obtained by calculation using the finite element method (FEM). A combination of Raman spectroscopy and FEM provides much data on the stresses in 4H-SiC MOSFET. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Numerical modeling of present-day stress field and deformation pattern in Anatolia

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, Sunil Kumar; Hayashi, Daigoro; 林, 大五郎

    2010-01-01

    The present-day stress field in the Earth's crust is important and provides insights into mechanisms that drive plate motions. In this study, an elastic plane stress finite element modeling incorporating realistic rock parameters have been used to calculate the stress field, displacement field and deformation of the plate interactions in Anatolia. Modeled stress data for the African-Arabian-Anatolian plate interactions with fixed Eurasian platform correlate well with observed stress indicator...

  15. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  16. Flow Stress and Processing Map of a PM 8009Al/SiC Particle Reinforced Composite During Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haibo; Teng, Jie; Chen, Shuang; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Hot compression tests of 8009Al alloy reinforced with 15% SiC particles (8009Al/15%SiCp composites) prepared by powder metallurgy (direct hot extrusion methods) were performed on Gleeble-3500 system in the temperature range of 400-550 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. The processing map based on the dynamic material model was established to evaluate the flow instability regime and optimize processing parameters; the associated microstructural changes were studied by the observations of optical metallographic and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the flow stress increased initially and reached a plateau after peak stress value with increasing strain. The peak stress increased as the strain rate increased and deformation temperature decreased. The optimum parameters were identified to be deformation temperature range of 500-550 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-0.02 s-1 by combining the processing map with microstructural observation.

  17. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  18. Numerical analysis of stress fields generated by quenching process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bokota

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In work the presented numerical models of tool steel hardening processes take into account mechanical phenomena generated by thermalphenomena and phase transformations. In the model of mechanical phenomena, apart from thermal, plastic and structural strain, alsotransformations plasticity was taken into account. The stress and strain fields are obtained using the solution of the Finite Elements Method of the equilibrium equation in rate form. The thermophysical constants occurring in constitutive relation depend on temperature and phase composite. For determination of plastic strain the Huber-Misses condition with isotropic strengthening was applied whereas fordetermination of transformation plasticity a modified Leblond model was used. In order to evaluate the quality and usefulness of thepresented models a numerical analysis of stresses and strains associated hardening process of a fang lathe of cone shaped made of tool steel was carried out.

  19. Thermodynamics of a Compressible Maier-Saupe Model Based on the Self-Consistent Field Theory of Wormlike Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical formalism for describing systems of semiflexible polymers, which can have density variations due to finite compressibility and exhibit an isotropic-nematic transition. The molecular architecture of the semiflexible polymers is described by a continuum wormlike-chain model. The non-bonded interactions are described through a functional of two collective variables, the local density and local segmental orientation tensor. In particular, the functional depends quadratically on local density-variations and includes a Maier–Saupe-type term to deal with the orientational ordering. The specified density-dependence stems from a free energy expansion, where the free energy of an isotropic and homogeneous homopolymer melt at some fixed density serves as a reference state. Using this framework, a self-consistent field theory is developed, which produces a Helmholtz free energy that can be used for the calculation of the thermodynamics of the system. The thermodynamic properties are analysed as functions of the compressibility of the model, for values of the compressibility realizable in mesoscopic simulations with soft interactions and in actual polymeric materials.

  20. Breakdown and critical field evaluation for porous PZT 95/5 ferroelectric ceramics under shock wave compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yixuan; Wang, Xingzhe; Zhang, Fuping; He, Hongliang

    2014-08-01

    Bounded charges of PZT 95/5 ferroelectric ceramics with polarization can be rapidly released by shock wave loadings to form a high-power electrical energy output, which motivates pulsed power applications of ferroelectric materials. In the present paper, we first investigated experimentally the depoling current and output electric field, as well as the critical electric fields of breakdown for porous PZT 95/5 ceramics in the normal shock-wave-loaded mode by means of a gas-gun facility. By combining the output electric-field profile by shock loading with the breakdown of the quasi-static electric field, we were able to theoretically evaluate the range of the breakdown field for porous ferroelectric ceramics with different porosities under shock wave compression. Although it is a rough bound-field evaluation on breakdown of shocked porous PZT 95/5 ferroelectric ceramics suggested in the present work, it sounds reasonable and the predictions of critical field-bounds on the breakdown show good agreement with the magnitude of the experimental results. The influences of load resistance, porosity and velocity of shock wave on the lower and upper bounds of critical electric field for poled porous PZT 95/5 ceramics during the discharge process were also discussed.

  1. FE Simulation of the Stress-Strain State during Shear-Compression Testing and Asymmetric Three-Roll Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesin Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-roll rolling process is a significant technique in the production of wire rod, round bars and hexagonal profiles for structural applications. Better mechanical properties of wire rod, round bars and hexagonal profiles can be achieved due to large plastic deformation by the three-roll rolling process. Asymmetric rolling is a novel technique characterized by a kinematic asymmetry linked to the difference in peripheral speed of the rolls, able to introduce additional shear strains through the bar thickness. Physical simulation of shear strain, which is similar to that occurring in asymmetric three-roll rolling process, is very important for design of technology of producing ultrafine grain materials. Shear testing is complicated by the fact that a state of large shear is not easily achievable in most specimen geometries. Application of the shear-compression testing and specimen geometry to physical simulation of asymmetric three-roll rolling process is discussed in the paper. FEM simulation and comparison of the stress-strain state during shear-compression testing and asymmetric three-roll rolling process is presented. The results of investigation can be used to optimize the physical simulation of asymmetric three-roll rolling processes and for design of technology of producing ultrafine grain materials by severe plastic deformation.

  2. Intermittent compressive stress regulates Notch target gene expression via transforming growth factor-β signaling in murine pre-osteoblast cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manokawinchoke, Jeeranan; Pavasant, Prasit; Osathanon, Thanaphum

    2017-10-01

    Different mechanical stimuli regulate behaviors of various cell types, including osteoblasts, osteocytes, and periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Notch signaling participates in the mechanical stress-regulated cell responses. The present study investigated the regulation of Notch target gene and sclerostin (Sost) expression in murine pre-osteoblast cell line (MC3T3-E1) under intermittent compressive stress. MC3T3-E1 were subjected to the intermittent compressive force under the computerized controlled machine. In some experiments, cells were pretreated with chemical inhibitors for Notch and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling prior to mechanical stimuli. To evaluate role of Notch signaling in MC3T3-E1 cells under unloaded condition, cells were seeded on indirect immobilized Notch ligand (Jagged1). Gene expression was determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The intermittent compressive stress significantly upregulated Notch target gene expression (Hes Family BHLH transcription factor 1; Hes1 and Hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif protein1; Hey1). The intermittent stress-induced Hes1 and Hey1 mRNA expression could be inhibited by a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) or a TGF-β superfamily type I activing receptor-like kinase receptors inhibitor (SB431542). The results imply that intermittent compressive stress regulates Notch signaling via TGF-β pathway. Further, the intermittent compressive stress reduced Sost mRNA expression and this phenomenon could be rescued by a DAPT pretreatment, implying the involvement of Notch signaling. However, activation of Notch signaling under the unloaded condition resulted in the increase of Sost expression and the reduction of osteogenic marker genes. These results imply the involvement of Notch signaling in the homeostasis maintaining of osteogenic cells under mechanical stress stimuli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using baseline-dependent window functions for data compression and field-of-interest shaping in radio interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atemkeng, M. T.; Smirnov, O. M.; Tasse, C.; Foster, G.; Jonas, J.

    2016-11-01

    In radio interferometry, observed visibilities are intrinsically sampled at some interval in time and frequency. Modern interferometers are capable of producing data at very high time and frequency resolution; practical limits on storage and computation costs require that some form of data compression be imposed. The traditional form of compression is a simple averaging of the visibilities over coarser time and frequency bins. This has an undesired side effect: the resulting averaged visibilities `decorrelate', and do so differently depending on the baseline length and averaging interval. This translates into a non-trivial signature in the image domain known as `smearing', which manifests itself as an attenuation in amplitude towards off-centre sources. With the increasing fields of view and/or longer baselines employed in modern and future instruments, the trade-off between data rate and smearing becomes increasingly unfavourable. In this work, we investigate alternative approaches to low-loss data compression. We show that averaging of the visibility data can be treated as a form of convolution by a boxcar-like window function, and that by employing alternative baseline-dependent window functions a more optimal interferometer smearing response may be induced. In particular, we show improved amplitude response over a chosen field of interest, and better attenuation of sources outside the field of interest. The main cost of this technique is a reduction in nominal sensitivity; we investigate the smearing versus sensitivity trade-off, and show that in certain regimes a favourable compromise can be achieved. We show the application of this technique to simulated data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the European Very-long-baseline interferometry Network (EVN).

  4. Systematic Review of Uit Parameters on Residual Stresses of Sensitized AA5456 and Field Based Residual Stress Measurements for Predicting and Mitigating Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    sensitization EBSD electron backscatter diffraction ECAE equal channel angular extrusion FIB-SEM focused ion beam, scanning electron microscope GMAW gas...induce compressive stresses [40, 43]. Other SPD methods include equal channel angular extrusion ( ECAE ), accumulative roll bonding (ARB), and...pp. 414–419, 2003. [50] Lambda Technologies Group . (2012). Low plasticity burnishing. [Online]. Available: http://www.lambdatechs.com/low

  5. Investigation on thermal oxidative aging of nitrile rubber (NBR) O-rings under compression stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. R.; Zhang, W. F.; Lou, W. T.; Huang, Y. X.; Dai, W.

    2017-11-01

    The degradation behaviors of nitrile rubber O-rings exposure to air under compression were investigated at three elevated temperatures. The physical and mechanical properties of the aging samples before and after exposure at selected time were studied by measuring weight loss, tensile strength and elongation at break. The Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and fracture morphology were used to reveal the microstructural changes of the aging samples. The results indicate that the weight decreased with exposure time and temperature. Based on the results of the crosslinking density, the crosslinking predominates during the most of aging process. The significant changes in tensile strength and elongation at break also indicate the severe degradation in air. The fracture morphology results show that the fracture surface after 64 days of exposure to air turns rough and present defects. The ATR-FTIR results demonstrate that the hydroxyl groups were formed for the samples aged in air.

  6. Permeability of concrete under thermal and compressive stress influence; an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the permeability was found as one of the main parameters affecting the durability of concrete. Especially in concrete at high temperatures in case of fire loading, the interaction of thermal/mechanical loading and fluid transfer strongly influences degradation of mechanical properties within concrete and spalling of near-surface concrete layers. To understand the change in transport properties of concrete, a new experimental setup was developed, allowing us to conduct permeability tests under uniaxial compressive loading up to 20 MPa and thermal condition up to 350 °C. Based on the obtained results, the effect of both mechanical and thermal loading on the effective transport properties is highlighted and relations to more simplified test setups, disregarding mechanical loading and/or conducting the permeability test at room temperature giving the residual permeability, are established.

  7. Design, fabrication and test of lightweight shell structure. [axial compression loads and torsion stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A cylindrical shell structure 3.66 m (144 in.) high by 4.57 m (180 in.) diameter was designed using a wide variety of materials and structural concepts to withstand design ultimate combined loading 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion. The overall cylinder geometry and design loading are representative of that expected on a high performance space tug vehicle. The relatively low design load level results in designs that use thin gage metals and fibrous-composite laminates. Fabrication and structural tests of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods. Three of the designs evaluated, honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiber-glass meteoroid protection layers, were selected for further evaluation.

  8. Failure of Ceramic Composites in Non-Uniform Stress Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Varun P.

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are of interest as hot-section components in gas turbine engines due to their refractoriness and low density relative to metallic alloys. In service, CMCs will be subjected to spatially inhomogeneous temperature and stress fields. Robust tools that enable prediction of deformation and fracture under these conditions are therefore required for component design and analysis. Such tools are presently lacking. The present work helps to address this deficiency by developing models for CMC mechanical behavior at two length scales: that of the constituents and that of the components. Problems of interest are further divided into two categories: '1-D loadings,' in which the stresses are aligned with the fiber axes, and '2-D loadings,' in which the stress state is more general. For the former class of problems, the major outstanding issue is material fracture, not deformation. A fracture criterion based on the attainment of a global load maximum is developed, which yields results for pure bending of CMCs in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. For the latter class of problems, the understanding of both the micro-scale and macro-scale behavior is relatively immature. An approach based upon analysis of a unit cell (a single fiber surrounded by a matrix jacket) is pursued. Stress fields in the constituents of the composite are estimated using analytical models, the accuracy of which is confirmed using finite element analysis. As part of a fracture mechanics analysis, these fields enable estimation of the steady-state matrix cracking stress for arbitrary in-plane loading of a unidirectional ply. While insightful at the micro-scale, unit cell models are difficult to extend to coarser scales. Instead, material deformation is typically predicted using phenomenological constitutive models. One such model for CMC laminates is investigated and found to predict material instability where none should exist. Remedies to

  9. Comparison of magnetic field observations of an average magnetic cloud with a simple force free model: the importance of field compression and expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lepping

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ability of the cylindrically symmetric force-free magnetic cloud (MC fitting model of Lepping et al. (1990 to faithfully reproduce actual magnetic field observations by examining two quantities: (1 a difference angle, called β, i.e., the angle between the direction of the observed magnetic field (Bobs and the derived force free model field (Bmod and (2 the difference in magnitudes between the observed and modeled fields, i.e., ΔB(=|Bobs|−|Bmod|, and a normalized ΔB (i.e., ΔB/ is also examined, all for a judiciously chosen set of 50 WIND interplanetary MCs, based on quality considerations. These three quantities are developed as a percent of MC duration and averaged over this set of MCs to obtain average profiles. It is found that, although B> and its normalize version are significantly enhanced (from a broad central average value early in an average MC (and to a lesser extent also late in the MC, the angle is small (less than 8° and approximately constant all throughout the MC. The field intensity enhancements are due mainly to interaction of the MC with the surrounding solar wind plasma causing field compression at front and rear. For example, for a typical MC, ΔB/B> is: 0.21±0.27 very early in the MC, −0.11±0.10 at the center (and −0.085±0.12 averaged over the full "central region," i.e., for 30% to 80% of duration, and 0.05±0.29 very late in the MC, showing a double sign change as we travel from front to center to back, in the MC. When individual MCs are examined we find that over 80% of them possess field enhancements within several to many hours of the front boundary, but only about 30% show such enhancements at their rear portions. The enhancement of the MC's front field is also due to MC expansion, but this is usually a lesser effect compared to compression. It is expected that this compression is manifested as significant distortion to the MC's cross-section from the ideal circle, first suggested by

  10. Incremental stress and microstructural response of granular soils under undrained axisymmetric compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Nishant; Luding, Stefan; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Soga, K.; Kumar, K; Biscontin, G.; Kuo, M.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the micromechanics on the response of stress and fabric on strain is an essential part of a constitutive model for granular matter, because it contains the information of how different deformation paths (history) affect the actual mechanical state of the system. Here, we study a

  11. Some characteristics of the seismicity and the stress field in the Panxi rift zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian-Zhong; Xu, Wen-Yue; Liu, Jin; Zou, Ying

    1987-02-01

    Some characteristics of the horizontal distribution of the earthquakes, the focus depth distribution, distribution of the earthquakes with time, b-values, fault slip rates and stress field in the Panxi rift zone have been investigated. The results are as follows: (1) Earthquakes with M ⩾ 4.7 occurred mainly along the major faults in the Panxi rift zone. Earthquake activity is greater along the sides of the Panxi rift zone than along its axis. Earthquakes with M ⩾ 6 occurred along the bounding faults of the Panxi rift zone. The small earthquakes exhibit a random distribution. (2) The focal depths along the axis of the Panxi rift zone are shallow (5-20 km), but the focal depths outside the rift zone are deeper (6-40 km). (3) The b-values in the Panxi rift zone are 0.58-0.75. (4) The correlation of the seismicity between the Panxi rift zone and the eastern India-Eurasian collision zone is high. (5) The fault planes in the Panxi rift zone are nearly vertical and strike-slip. The fault slip rates in the Panxi rift zone are 0.13-0.19 cm/yr. (6) The maximum principal compressive stress axis in the Panxi rift zone is nearly horizontal, NNW-SSE in direction. According to the above results, a dynamic model for the aborting process of the Panxi rift zone is suggested.

  12. Effective Compressibility of A Bubbly Slurry: II. Fitting Numerical Results to Field Data and Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kam, Seung I.(PEMEX REFINACION); Gauglitz, Phillip A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rossen, William R.(UNKNOWN)

    2000-12-01

    The goal of this study is to fit model parameters to changes in waste level in response to barometric pressure changes in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This waste compressibility is a measure of the quantity of gas, typically hydrogen and other flammable gases that can pose a safety hazard, retained in the waste. A one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model for compressibility of a bubbly slurry is presented in a companion paper. Fitting these results to actual waste level changes in the tanks implies that bubbles are long in the slurry layer and the ratio of pore-body radius to pore-throat radius is close to one; unfortunately, capillary effects can not be quantified unambiguously from the data without additional information on pore geometry. Therefore determining the quantity of gas in the tanks requires more than just slurry volume data. Similar ambiguity also exists with two other simple models: a capillary-tube model with contact angle hysteresis and spherical-p ore model.

  13. Near tip stress and strain fields for short elastic cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soediono, A. H.; Kardomateas, G. A.; Carlson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental fatigue crack growth studies have concluded an apparent anomalous behavior of short cracks. To investigate the reasons for this unexpected behavior, the present paper focuses on identifying the crack length circumstances under which the requirements for a single parameter (K(sub I) or delta K(sub I) if cyclic loading is considered) characterization are violated. Furthermore, an additional quantity, the T stress, as introduced by Rice, and the related biaxiality ratio, B, are calculated for several crack lengths and two configurations, the single-edge-cracked and the centrally-cracked specimen. It is postulated that a two-parameter characterization by K and T (or B) is needed for the adequate description of the stress and strain field around a short crack. To further verify the validity of this postulate, the influence of the third term of the Williams series on the stress, strain and displacement fields around the crack tip and in particular on the B parameter is also examined. It is found that the biaxiality ratio would be more negative if the third term effects are included in both geometries. The study is conducted using the finite element method with linearly elastic material and isoparametric elements and axial (mode I) loading. Moreover, it is clearly shown that it is not proper to postulate the crack size limits for 'short crack' behavior as a normalized ratio with the specimen width, a/w; it should instead be stated as an absolute, or normalized with respect to a small characteristic dimension such as the grain size. Finally, implications regarding the prediction of cyclic (fatigue) growth of short cracks are discussed.

  14. Stress field and kinematics for diffuse microseismicity in a zone of continental transpression, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Smith, Emily; Lamb, Simon; Stern, Tim A.

    2017-04-01

    We analyze shallow (0-20 km) microseismicity adjacent to the Alpine Fault in New Zealand, where there is oblique convergence of the Australian and Pacific plates. Focal mechanisms for 155 earthquakes (June 2012 to October 2013) are inverted to determine the orientation of the stress field. This yields a principal horizontal axis of compression, SHmax = 114° ± 10°, which cannot be explained in terms of the sum of stress from tectonic loading due to plate convergence, indicated by GPS observations, and gravitational stresses. The azimuth of slip vectors for individual focal mechanisms cluster perpendicular and parallel to the plate convergence vector. These faults, however, strike at 45° to SHmax from the stress inversion, suggesting a very low coefficient of friction. The earthquake slip directions may be kinematically controlled, accommodating the plate convergence on a limited set of fractures, similar to the segmentation for neotectonic faulting along the Alpine Fault, which is partitioned into strike-slip and thrust segments at a 1-10 km scale. We suggest two possible controls on our calculated SHmax azimuths. First, there may be a slight clockwise bias in the estimates of SHmax from earthquakes; slip may be occurring on a more limited range of fractures than assumed by the stress inversion method, although this effect is likely to be relatively small (±5°). More importantly, the components of the stress field may be relieved at different timescales during big earthquakes, resulting in a residual stress field that varies significantly (±15°) on timescales of several large earthquakes.

  15. Strength criterion for rocks under compressive-tensile stresses and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqing You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating in-situ stress with hydraulic borehole fracturing involves tensile strength of rock. Several strength criteria with three parameters result in tensile strengths with great differences, although they may describe the relation between strength of rock and confining pressure with low misfits. The exponential criterion provides acceptable magnitudes of tensile strengths for granites and over-estimates that for other rocks, but the criterion with tension cut-off is applicable to all rocks. The breakdown pressure will be lower than the shut-in pressure during hydraulic borehole fracturing, when the maximum horizontal principal stress is 2 times larger than the minor one; and it is not the peak value in the first cycle, but the point where the slope of pressure-time curve begins to decline.

  16. Magnetostriction of a sphere: stress development during magnetization and residual stresses due to the remanent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Felix A.; Rickert, Wilhelm; Stahn, Oliver; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2017-03-01

    Based on the principles of rational continuum mechanics and electrodynamics (see Truesdell and Toupin in Handbuch der Physik, Springer, Berlin, 1960 or Kovetz in Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000), we present closed-form solutions for the mechanical displacements and stresses of two different magnets. Both magnets are initially of spherical shape. The first (hard) magnet is uniformly magnetized and deforms due to the field induced by the magnetization. In the second problem of a (soft) linear-magnetic sphere, the deformation is caused by an applied external field, giving rise to magnetization. Both problems can be used for modeling parts of general magnetization processes. We will address the similarities between both settings in context with the solutions for the stresses and displacements. In both problems, the volumetric Lorentz force density vanishes. However, a Lorentz surface traction is present. This traction is determined from the magnetic flux density. Since the obtained displacements and stresses are small in magnitude, we may use Hooke's law with a small-strain approximation, resulting in the Lamé- Navier equations of linear elasticity theory. If gravity is neglected and azimuthal symmetry is assumed, these equations can be solved in terms of a series. This has been done by Hiramatsu and Oka (Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 3(2):89-90, 1966) before. We make use of their series solution for the displacements and the stresses and expand the Lorentz tractions of the analyzed problems suitably in order to find the expansion coefficients. The resulting algebraic system yields finite numbers of nonvanishing coefficients. Finally, the resulting stresses, displacements, principal strains and the Lorentz tractions are illustrated and discussed.

  17. Flavour fields in steady state: stress tensor and free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics,1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata- 700064 (India); Kundu, Sandipan [Department of Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, New York, 14853 (United States)

    2016-02-16

    The dynamics of a probe brane in a given gravitational background is governed by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The corresponding open string metric arises naturally in studying the fluctuations on the probe. In Gauge-String duality, it is known that in the presence of a constant electric field on the worldvolume of the probe, the open string metric acquires an event horizon and therefore the fluctuation modes on the probe experience an effective temperature. In this article, we bring together various properties of such a system to a formal definition and a subsequent narration of the effective thermodynamics and the stress tensor of the corresponding flavour fields, also including a non-vanishing chemical potential. In doing so, we point out a potentially infinitely-degenerate scheme-dependence of regularizing the free energy, which nevertheless yields a universal contribution in certain cases. This universal piece appears as the coefficient of a log-divergence in free energy when a space-filling probe brane is embedded in AdS{sub d+1}-background, for d=2,4, and is related to conformal anomaly. For the special case of d=2, the universal factor has a striking resemblance to the well-known heat current formula in (1+1)-dimensional conformal field theory in steady-state, which endows a plausible physical interpretation to it. Interestingly, we observe a vanishing conformal anomaly in d=6.

  18. Stress Field and Seismicity in the Basin of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesca-Perez, E.; Quintanar, L.; Garcia-Palomo, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mexico City is located in the basin of Mexico, inside the so called Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The region in general and the basin in particular, is characterized by local low magnitude seismicity (Mc Milpa Alta outside Mexico City; the rest of the basin presents lower seismic activity. We recorded and located 336 earthquakes with digital seismograms between 1996 and 2007. From them, just 23 focal mechanisms could be evaluated because of low magnitude that creates recording problems in the seismological networks and high frequency background noise. The focal mechanisms are mainly strike-slip and dip-slip (normal) faulting. We used three different techniques (when possible) to calculate the focal mechanisms: simple and composite first motion focal mechanism, Hash's S/P amplitude rate focal mechanism and time domain moment tensor inversion using broadband three components seismograms. The final goal is to find the local and regional stress field for the whole basin.

  19. Mixed mode stress field effect in adhesive fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical or analytical analyses were performed on seven different test specimens including blister test, 90-degree peel test, torsion test, and various cone tests. These specimens are in general subjected to complex stress fields having various amounts of Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III loads. The specimens were then constructed using polymethyl methacrylate for the adherends and a transparent polyurethane elastomer (Solithane 113) for the adhesive. This combination permitted direct observation of the bondline as load was applied. Although initial debonds as well as bond end termination singularities were present in all specimens, in some cases the debond did not initiate at the singularity points as would normally have been expected. An explanation for this behavior is presented, as well as a comparison of loading mode effect on those specimens for which the debond did propagate from a bond terminus singular point.

  20. Residual stress reduction by combined treatment of pulsed magnetic field and pulsed current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Zhipeng, E-mail: czpdme@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang Xinquan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-07-25

    Highlights: {yields} The combination of magnetic field and current releases stress significantly. {yields} Both magneto and electro-plasticity may exit in the combined treatment. {yields} Stress increase caused by current should be studied later. - Abstract: This paper reports a significant decrease on residual stress by combined treatment of a pulsed magnetic field and a pulse current on steel samples with pre-induced residual stress conditions, compared to a separately single treatment by either the pulsed magnetic field or the pulsed current. Briefly, 10% stress decrease by pulsed magnetic field treatment and 20% increase by pulsed current treatment were observed respectively. While 60% stress release is achieved by the combined treatments, in which the same magnetic field and current parameters were applied. It is supposed that the magnetic field facilitates dislocations depinning and pulsed current provides conduction electrons to drive dislocations to move further and faster. The combined effects lead to electro-magneto-plasticity and further residual stress release.

  1. Compressive sensing of full wave field data for structural health monitoring applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso; De Marchi, Luca; Perelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Numerous nondestructive evaluations and structural health monitoring approaches based on guide waves rely on analysis of wave fields recorded through scanning laser Doppler vibrometers (SLDVs) or ultrasonic scanners. The informative content which can be extracted from these inspections is relevan...

  2. Leading edge velocity field of an oscillating airfoil in compressible dynamic stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandyken, R. D.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Phase-averaged mean-velocity and turbulence data are obtained and analyzed for the leading-edge region of an oscillating airfoil under compressibility conditions. A two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry system was used to make the measurements. Results are compared for the two Mach numbers 0.3 and 0.4 at a reduced frequency of 0.05 with varying airfoil angles of attack. For a Mach number of 0.3, a separation bubble is present on the airfoil throughout the oscillation cycle and no dynamic stall occurs as the peak angle of attack is below the static stall angle. However, a slight imprint of vortical structures is seen in the shear layer enveloping the bubble at the top of the cycle, a result confirmed also by the vorticity contours and in agreement with the earlier stroboscopic schlieren studies. When the Mach number is 0.4, dynamic stall occurs with its origin in the break-up of the separation bubble. Turbulence intensities in the bubble were found to be very large.

  3. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  4. Field Phenotyping of Soybean Roots for Drought Stress Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhanu A. Fenta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Root architecture was determined together with shoot parameters under well watered and drought conditions in the field in three soybean cultivars (A5409RG, Jackson and Prima 2000. Morphology parameters were used to classify the cultivars into different root phenotypes that could be important in conferring drought tolerance traits. A5409RG is a drought-sensitive cultivar with a shallow root phenotype and a root angle of <40°. In contrast, Jackson is a drought-escaping cultivar. It has a deep rooting phenotype with a root angle of >60°. Prima 2000 is an intermediate drought-tolerant cultivar with a root angle of 40°–60°. It has an intermediate root phenotype. Prima 2000 was the best performing cultivar under drought stress, having the greatest shoot biomass and grain yield under limited water availability. It had abundant root nodules even under drought conditions. A positive correlation was observed between nodule size, above-ground biomass and seed yield under well-watered and drought conditions. These findings demonstrate that root system phenotyping using markers that are easy-to-apply under field conditions can be used to determine genotypic differences in drought tolerance in soybean. The strong association between root and nodule parameters and whole plant productivity demonstrates the potential application of simple root phenotypic markers in screening for drought tolerance in soybean.

  5. Split field coding: low complexity error-resilient entropy coding for image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, James J.; Martens, Christopher J.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we describe split field coding, an approach for low complexity, error-resilient entropy coding which splits code words into two fields: a variable length prefix and a fixed length suffix. Once a prefix has been decoded correctly, then the associated fixed length suffix is error-resilient, with bit errors causing no loss of code word synchronization and only a limited amount of distortion on the decoded value. When the fixed length suffixes are segregated to a separate block, this approach becomes suitable for use with a variety of methods which provide varying protection to different portions of the bitstream, such as unequal error protection or progressive ordering schemes. Split field coding is demonstrated in the context of a wavelet-based image codec, with examples of various error resilience properties, and comparisons to the rate-distortion and computational performance of JPEG 2000.

  6. Effects of strain rate and elevated temperature on compressive flow stress and absorbed energy of polyimide foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horikawa K.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, at first, the effect of strain rate on the strength and the absorbed energy of polyimide foam was experimentally examined by carrying out a series of compression tests at various strain rates, from 10−3 to 103 s−1. This polyimide foam has open cell structure with small cell size of 0.3 ∼ 0.6 mm. In the measurement of impact load, a special load cell with a small part for sensing load was adopted. For the measurement of the displacement, a high-speed camera was used. It was found that the flow stress of polyimide foam and the absorbed energy up to a strain of 0.4 increased with the increase of the strain rates. Secondly, the effect of ambient temperature on the strength and absorbed energy of polyimide foam was also investigated by using a sprit Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus and testing at elevated temperatures of 100 and 200 ∘C. With the increase of temperature, the strength and absorbed energy decreased and the effect is smaller in dynamic tests than static tests.

  7. Stress Field in Brazil with Focal Mechanism: Regional and Local Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, F.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-05-01

    The knowledge of stress field is fundamental not only to understand driving forces and plate deformation but also in the study of intraplate seismicity. The stress field in Brazil has been determined mainly using focal mechanisms and a few breakout data and in-situ measurements. However the stress field still is poorly known in Brazil. The focal mechanisms of recent earthquakes (magnitude lower than 5 mb) were studied using waveform modeling. We stacked the record of several teleseismic stations ( delta > 30°) stacked groups of stations separated according to distance and azimuth. Every record was visually inspected and those with a good signal/noise ratio (SNR) were grouped in windows of ten degrees distance and stacked. The teleseismic P-wave of the stacked signals was modeled using the hudson96 program of Herrmann seismology package (Herrmann, 2002) and the consistency of focal mechanism with the first-motion was checked. Some events in central Brazil were recorded by closer stations (~ 1000 km) and the moment tensor was determined with the ISOLA code (Sokos & Zahradnik, 2008). With the focal mechanisms available in literature and those obtained in this work, we were able to identify some patterns: the central region shows a purely compressional pattern (E-W SHmax), which is predicted by regional theoretical models (Richardson & Coblentz, 1996 and the TD0 model of Lithgow & Bertelloni, 2004). Meanwhile in the Amazon we find an indication of SHmax oriented in the SE-NW direction, probably caused by the Caribbean plate interaction (Meijer, 1995). In northern coastal region, the compression rotates following the coastline, which indicates an important local component related to spreading effects at the continental/oceanic transition (Assumpção, 1998) and flexural stresses caused by sedimentary load in Amazon Fan. We determine the focal mechanism of several events in Brazil using different techniques according to the available data. The major difficulty is to

  8. Comparison of magnetic field observations of an average magnetic cloud with a simple force free model: the importance of field compression and expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lepping

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ability of the cylindrically symmetric force-free magnetic cloud (MC fitting model of Lepping et al. (1990 to faithfully reproduce actual magnetic field observations by examining two quantities: (1 a difference angle, called β, i.e., the angle between the direction of the observed magnetic field (Bobs and the derived force free model field (Bmod and (2 the difference in magnitudes between the observed and modeled fields, i.e., ΔB(=|Bobs|−|Bmod|, and a normalized ΔB (i.e., ΔB/<B> is also examined, all for a judiciously chosen set of 50 WIND interplanetary MCs, based on quality considerations. These three quantities are developed as a percent of MC duration and averaged over this set of MCs to obtain average profiles. It is found that, although <ΔB> and its normalize version are significantly enhanced (from a broad central average value early in an average MC (and to a lesser extent also late in the MC, the angle <β> is small (less than 8° and approximately constant all throughout the MC. The field intensity enhancements are due mainly to interaction of the MC with the surrounding solar wind plasma causing field compression at front and rear. For example, for a typical MC, ΔB/<B> is: 0.21±0.27 very early in the MC, −0.11±0.10 at the center (and −0.085±0.12 averaged over the full "central region," i.e., for 30% to 80% of duration, and 0.05±0.29 very late in the MC, showing a double sign change as we travel from front to center to back, in the MC. When individual MCs are examined we find that over 80% of them possess field enhancements within several to many hours of the front boundary, but only about 30% show such enhancements at their rear portions. The enhancement of the MC's front field is also due to MC expansion, but this is usually a lesser effect

  9. Assessing Maize Foliar Water Stress Levels Under Field Conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Initially, plant water stress has been measured through destructive approaches that are limited in spatial extent as a result of being labour intensive (Graeff & Claupein,. 2007). The basis of detecting water stress with remote sensing relates to the difference in reflectance properties of plants under different water stress levels ...

  10. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage, polymerization shrinkage stress, wear resistance, and compressive strength of a silorane-based composite: A finite element analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Mitthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the mechanical properties is important in predicting the clinical behavior of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA evaluates properties of materials replicating clinical scenario. Aim: This study evaluated polymerization shrinkage and stress, wear resistance (WR, and compressive strength (CS of silorane in comparison with two methacrylate resins. Settings and Design: This study design was a numerical study using FEA. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional (3D models of maxillary premolar with Class I cavities (2 mm depth, 4 mm length, and 2.5 mm width created and restored with silorane, nanohybrid, and microhybrid; Groups I, II, and III, respectively. Loads of 200–600 N were applied. Polymerization shrinkage was first determined by displacement produced in the X, Y, and Z planes. Maximum stress distribution due to shrinkage was calculated using AN SYS software. 3D cube models of composite resins were simulated with varying filler particle size. Similar loads were applied. WR and compressive stress were calculated: K W L/H and load/cross-sectional area, respectively. Statistical analysis done using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey's honestly significant difference test (P < 0.05. Results: Polymerization shrinkage (0.99% and shrinkage stress (233.21 Mpa of silorane were less compared to microhybrid (2.14% and 472.43 Mpa and nanohybrid (2.32% and 464.88 Mpa. Silorane (7.92×/1011 μm/mm3 and nanohybrid (7.79×/1011 showed superior WR than microhybrid (1.113×/1017. There was no significant difference in compressive stress among the groups. Conclusion: Silorane exhibited less polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress compared to methacrylates. Silorane and nanohybrid showed greater WR compared to microhybrid. CS of all groups was similar.

  11. Quantifying the heterogeneity of the tectonic stress field using borehole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenball, Martin; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2017-01-01

    The heterogeneity of the tectonic stress field is a fundamental property which influences earthquake dynamics and subsurface engineering. Self-similar scaling of stress heterogeneities is frequently assumed to explain characteristics of earthquakes such as the magnitude-frequency relation. However, observational evidence for such scaling of the stress field heterogeneity is scarce.We analyze the local stress orientations using image logs of two closely spaced boreholes in the Coso Geothermal Field with sub-vertical and deviated trajectories, respectively, each spanning about 2 km in depth. Both the mean and the standard deviation of stress orientation indicators (borehole breakouts, drilling-induced fractures and petal-centerline fractures) determined from each borehole agree to the limit of the resolution of our method although measurements at specific depths may not. We find that the standard deviation in these boreholes strongly depends on the interval length analyzed, generally increasing up to a wellbore log length of about 600 m and constant for longer intervals. We find the same behavior in global data from the World Stress Map. This suggests that the standard deviation of stress indicators characterizes the heterogeneity of the tectonic stress field rather than the quality of the stress measurement. A large standard deviation of a stress measurement might be an expression of strong crustal heterogeneity rather than of an unreliable stress determination. Robust characterization of stress heterogeneity requires logs that sample stress indicators along a representative sample volume of at least 1 km.

  12. Data Compression Algorithm Architecture for Large Depth-of-Field Particle Image Velocimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Brent; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Kizhner, Semion; Antonille, Scott

    2013-01-01

    A large depth-of-field particle image velocimeter (PIV) is designed to characterize dynamic dust environments on planetary surfaces. This instrument detects lofted dust particles, and senses the number of particles per unit volume, measuring their sizes, velocities (both speed and direction), and shape factors when the particles are large. To measure these particle characteristics in-flight, the instrument gathers two-dimensional image data at a high frame rate, typically >4,000 Hz, generating large amounts of data for every second of operation, approximately 6 GB/s. To characterize a planetary dust environment that is dynamic, the instrument would have to operate for at least several minutes during an observation period, easily producing more than a terabyte of data per observation. Given current technology, this amount of data would be very difficult to store onboard a spacecraft, and downlink to Earth. Since 2007, innovators have been developing an autonomous image analysis algorithm architecture for the PIV instrument to greatly reduce the amount of data that it has to store and downlink. The algorithm analyzes PIV images and automatically reduces the image information down to only the particle measurement data that is of interest, reducing the amount of data that is handled by more than 10(exp 3). The state of development for this innovation is now fairly mature, with a functional algorithm architecture, along with several key pieces of algorithm logic, that has been proven through field test data acquired with a proof-of-concept PIV instrument.

  13. Radial focusing and energy compression of a laser-produced proton beam by a synchronous rf field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a MeV laser-produced proton beam affected by a radio frequency (rf electric field has been studied. The proton beam was emitted normal to the rear surface of a thin polyimide target irradiated with an ultrashort pulsed laser with a power density of 4×10^{18}  W/cm^{2}. The energy spread was compressed to less than 11% at the full width at half maximum (FWHM by an rf field. Focusing and defocusing effects of the transverse direction were also observed. These effects were analyzed and reproduced by Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results show that the transversely focused protons had a broad continuous spectrum, while the peaks in the proton spectrum were defocused. Based on this new information, we propose that elimination of the continuous energy component of laser-produced protons is possible by utilizing a focal length difference between the continuous spectral protons and the protons included in the spectral peak.

  14. Experimental approach to shape field relevant blast wave profiles in compressed gas-driven shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind eSundaramurthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Detonation of a high explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects even at farther distances, which is termed as primary blast injury, which is the theme of this work. The shock-blast profile is characterized with blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs. These parameters in turn are a function of field factors, such as the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (Chandra et al., 2011;Sundaramurthy et al., 2012;Skotak et al., 2013, the profile not only determines the survival of the animal but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, exact replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. 40 experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68 to 1209.68 mm, measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium. The relationships between SAPs and the resulting shock-blast profiles are characterized. Finally, shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared with the profiles obtained

  15. Effect of internal heating during hot compression testing on the stress-strain behavior and hot working characteristics of Alloy 304L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mataya, M.C.; Sackschewsky, V.E.

    1993-05-01

    Temperature change from conversion of deformation to internal heat, and its effect on stress-strain behavior of alloy 304L was investigated by initially isothermal (temperature of specimen, compression dies, environment equilibrated at initiation of test) uniaxial compression. Strain rate was varied 0.01 s{sup {minus}1} to 1 s{sup {minus}1} (thermal state of specimen varied from nearly isothermal to nearly adiabatic). Specimens were deformed at 750 to 1150 to a strain of 1. Change in temperature with strain was calculated via finite element analysis from measured stress-strain data and predictions were confirmed with thermocouples to verify the model. Temperature increased nearly linearly at the highest strain rate, consistent with temperature rise being a linear function of strain (adiabatic). As strain rate was lowered, heat transfer from superheated specimen to cooler dies caused sample temperature to increase and then decrease with strain as the sample thinned and specimen-die contact area increased. As-measured stress was corrected. Resulting isothermal flow curves were compared to predictions of a simplified method suggested by Thomas and Shrinivasan and differences are discussed. Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy for deformation, and flow curve peak associated with onset of dynamic recrystallization were determined from both as-measured and isothermal stress-strain data and found to vary widely. The impact of utilizing as-measured stress-strain data, not corrected for internal heating, on results of a number of published investigations is discussed.

  16. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  17. In situ rock strength and far field stress in the Nankai accretionary complex: Integration of downhole data from multiple wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Knowing the magnitude of tectonic stress and rock strength at seismically active margins is important towards understanding fault strength and failure mechanics, yet both are difficult to measure in situ. Recent work at subduction margins, including Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Subduction Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) drillsites, uses the width of compressional wellbore breakouts (BO), which depends on far field stress conditions, rock strength, and borehole annular pressure (APRS), to estimate the magnitude of horizontal principal stresses (SHmax and Shmin); estimates are problematic due to uncertainty in rock strength (unconfined compressive strength/UCS- for which direct measurements are scarce) and rheology that govern stress distribution at the wellbore. We conduct a novel case study at IODP Site C0002, where a hole was drilled twice with different boundary conditions, providing an opportunity to define in situ stress and strength from field data. Site C0002 is the main deep riser borehole for NanTroSEIZE, located near the seaward edge of the Kumano Basin above the seismogenic plate boundary, ~30 km from the trench. Several boreholes were drilled at the site. During IODP Expedition 314 in 2007, Hole C0002A was drilled with a suite of logging while drilling (LWD) tools to 1401 mbsf in a riserless mode. Hole C0002F, ~70 m away, was drilled to 862 mbsf in riserless mode during Exp. 326 in 2010 and deepened to 2005 mbsf in a riser mode during Expedition 338 in 2012-2013. Increased APRS achieved by riser drilling stabilizes the borehole and suppresses BO, consistent with resistivity imaging data from Exp. 314 that document well-developed, continuous BO throughout the borehole, and data from Expedition 338 indicating few BO. We use a semi-Newtonian approach to solve for stress and UCS consistent with the observed BO width and measured APRS in the two holes over the interval from 862-2005 mbsf. Effective SHmax ranges from ~10-30 MPa and

  18. Wavy Lineaments on Europa: Fracture Propagation into Combined Nonsynchronous and Diurnal Stress Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Zane; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Barr, Amy C.; Gleeson, Damhnait; Mullen, McCall; Nimmo, Francis; Stempel, Michelle M.; Wahr, John

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the processes that have operated on Europa and the manner in which they may have changed through time is fundamental to understanding the satellite's geology and present-day habitability. Previous studies have shown that lineament patterns on Europa can be explained by accumulation of tensile stress from slow nonsynchronous rotation (NSR), while the cycloidal planforms of other Europan lineaments can be explained if fractures propagate through a diurnally changing tensile stress field. We find that fractures propagated into combined diurnal and NSR stress fields can be "wavy" in planform for NSR stress accumulated over 2 to 8 of ice shell rotation and average propagation speeds of approx. 1 to 3 m/s. The variety of Europa's observed lineament planforms from cycloidal, to wavy, to arcuate can be produced by accumulation of NSR stress relative to the diurnal stress field. Varying proportions of these stress mechanisms plausibly may be related to a time-variable (slowing) NSR rate.

  19. The present-day stress field orientation in Italy: new release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montone, P.; Mariucci, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    When contemporary stress field in a region is well-known and faults are identified, it is possible to determine which faults are favorably oriented and are more likely to slip in the future. Stress data are also an important input in integrated crustal modeling to get more reliable evaluations in many applicative researches. Then, the knowledge of the active stress field contributes to the seismotectonic zoning of a region. In Italy, although at large scale a first order stress field due to plate boundary forces controls the contemporary tectonics, some areas show changes in stress regime over small distances and/or with depth clearly linked to localized stress perturbations. Where information is lacking each prediction of stress patterns could significantly differ from the reality and any further evaluation would be weakly supported by data. Therefore we continuously collect the available stress indicators and here present an update of present-day stress orientations in Italy with the last 5 years data, relative to crustal earthquake focal mechanisms (0-40 km depth), borehole breakouts from deep wells and fault data. About 100 new quality-ranked entries complete the definition of the horizontal stress orientation and tectonic regime in some areas, and bring new information mainly in Po Plain and Calabria area, recently affected by important earthquake sequences. Now the global Italian dataset consists of ~800 data points, including ~580 of A-C quality, with an increase of 17% compared to the previous compilation (Montone et al., 2012). We use A-, B- and C-quality stress indicators for analyzing first-order stress patterns while we also consider D-quality data to define second-or third-order stress field, as observed in other studies in the world. In particular we discuss the simultaneous occurrence of different stress regimes and the complex interaction between first order stress field and local effects, and the influence of the inherited tectonic structures.

  20. Earthquakes focal mechanism and stress field pattern in the northeastern part of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad K. Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    The inversion technique scheme is used also in the present study for determining the regional stress field parameters for earthquake focal mechanism solutions based on the grid search method of Gephart and Forsyth (1984. The Results of the stress tensor using focal mechanisms of recent earthquakes show a prevailed tension stress field in N52°E, N41°E and N52°E for the northern Red Sea, Gulf of Suez and Gulf of Aqaba zone respectively.

  1. Focal mechanisms in the southern Aegean from temporary seismic networks – implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Friederich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral variation of the stress field in the southern Aegean plate and the subducting Hellenic slab is determined from recordings of seismicity obtained with the CYCNET and EGELADOS networks in the years from 2002 to 2007. First motions from 7000 well-located microearthquakes were analysed to produce 540 well-constrained focal mechanisms. They were complemented by another 140 derived by waveform matching of records from larger events. Most of these earthquakes fall into 16 distinct spatial clusters distributed over the southern Aegean region. For each cluster, a stress inversion could be carried out yielding consistent estimates of the stress field and its spatial variation. At crustal levels, the stress field is generally dominated by a steeply dipping compressional principal stress direction except in places where coupling of the subducting slab and overlying plate come into play. Tensional principal stresses are generally subhorizontal. Just behind the forearc, the crust is under arc-parallel tension whereas in the volcanic areas around Kos, Columbo and Astypalea tensional and intermediate stresses are nearly degenerate. Further west and north, in the Santorini–Amorgos graben and in the area of the islands of Mykonos, Andros and Tinos, tensional stresses are significant and point around the NW–SE direction. Very similar stress fields are observed in western Turkey with the tensional axis rotated to NNE–SSW. Intermediate-depth earthquakes below 100 km in the Nisyros region indicate that the Hellenic slab experiences slab-parallel tension at these depths. The direction of tension is close to east–west and thus deviates from the local NW-oriented slab dip presumably owing to the segmentation of the slab. Beneath the Cretan sea, at shallower levels, the slab is under NW–SE compression. Tensional principal stresses in the crust exhibit very good alignment with extensional strain rate principal axes derived from GPS velocities except

  2. Stress and the Workplace: A Comparison of Occupational Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Doris B.; Casteel, Jim Frank

    Stress in various occupations is of interest to managers, counselors, and personnel workers. A study was undertaken to examine, through the use of self-report scales, stress-related characteristics of workers in occupations which require many and varied human interactions. Subjects were 244 full-time employees in six professions: health services,…

  3. Ultrastructure of the innermost surface of differentiating normal and compression wood tracheids as revealed by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Sik; Awano, Tatsuya; Yoshinaga, Arata; Takabe, Keiji

    2012-06-01

    The ultrastructure of the innermost surface of Cryptomeria japonica differentiating normal wood (NW) and compression wood (CW) was comparatively investigated by field emission electron microscopy (FE-SEM) combined with enzymatic degradation of hemicelluloses. Cellulose microfibril (CMF) bundles were readily observed in NW tracheids in the early stage of secondary cell wall formation, but not in CW tracheids because of the heavy accumulation of amorphous materials composed mainly of galactans and lignin. This result suggests that the ultrastructural deposition of cell wall components in the tracheid cell wall differ between NW and CW from the early stage of secondary cell wall formation. Delignified NW and CW tracheids showed similar structural changes during differentiating stages after xylanase or β-mannanase treatment, whereas they exhibited clear differences in ultrastructure in mature stages. Although thin CMF bundles were exposed in both delignified mature NW and CW tracheids by xylanase treatment, ultrastructural changes following β-mannanase treatment were only observed in CW tracheids. CW tracheids also showed different degradation patterns between xylanase and β-mannanase. CMF bundles showed a smooth surface in delignified mature CW tracheids treated with xylanase, whereas they had an uneven surface in delignified mature CW tracheids treated with β-mannanase, indicating that the uneven surface of CMF bundles was related to xylans. The present results suggest that ultrastructural deposition and organization of lignin and hemicelluloses in CW tracheids may differ from those of NW tracheids.

  4. INTERRUPTED IN-SITU COMPRESSIVE DEFORMATION EXPERIMENTS ON MMC FOAMS IN AN XCT: EXPERIMENTS AND ESTIMATION OF DISPLACEMENT FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Losch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of a metal-matrix composite foam are investigated by interrupted in-situ compressive deformation experiments within an X-ray computed tomography device (XCT. Each in-situ experiment generates a sequence of reconstructed 3D images of the foam microstructure. From these data, the deformation field is estimated by registring the images corresponding to three consecutive steps. To this end, the generic registration framework of the itk software suite is exploited and combined with several image preprocessing steps. Both segmented (binary images having just two grey values for foreground (strut structure and background (pore space and the result of the Euclidean distance transform (EDT on pore space and solid phase are used. The estimation quality is evaluated based on a sequence of synthetic data sets, where the foam’s microstructure is modelled by a random Laguerre tessellation. For large deformations, a combination of non-rigid registration for the EDT images and partwise-rigid registration on strongly deformed regions of the binary images, yields surprisingly small estimation errors.

  5. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nayyer

    One of the original ocean-bottom time-lapse seismic studies was performed at the Teal South oil field in the Gulf of Mexico during the late 1990's. This work reexamines some aspects of previous work using modern analysis techniques to provide improved quantitative interpretations. Using three-dimensional volume visualization of legacy data and the two phases of post-production time-lapse data, I provide additional insight into the fluid migration pathways and the pressure communication between different reservoirs, separated by faults. This work supports a conclusion from previous studies that production from one reservoir caused regional pressure decline that in turn resulted in liberation of gas from multiple surrounding unproduced reservoirs. I also provide an explanation for unusual time-lapse changes in amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) data related to the compaction of the producing reservoir which, in turn, changed an isotropic medium to an anisotropic medium. In the first part of this work, I examine regional changes in seismic response due to the production of oil and gas from one reservoir. The previous studies primarily used two post-production ocean-bottom surveys (Phase I and Phase II), and not the legacy streamer data, due to the unavailability of legacy prestack data and very different acquisition parameters. In order to incorporate the legacy data in the present study, all three post-stack data sets were cross-equalized and examined using instantaneous amplitude and energy volumes. This approach appears quite effective and helps to suppress changes unrelated to production while emphasizing those large-amplitude changes that are related to production in this noisy (by current standards) suite of data. I examine the multiple data sets first by using the instantaneous amplitude and energy attributes, and then also examine specific apparent time-lapse changes through direct comparisons of seismic traces. In so doing, I identify time-delays that, when

  6. Analysis and interpretation of stress indicators in deviated wells of the Coso Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenball, Martin; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing the tectonic stress field is an integral part for the development of hydrothermal systems, especially enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). With a known stress field, critically stressed faults can be identified. Faults that are critically oriented with respect to the in-situ stress field exhibit a high tendency for slip, and thus are likely candidates for reactivation during the creation of an EGS. Reactivated faults are known to serve as dominant fluid pathways during hydrothermal circulation and the characteristics of this process determine the potential for damaging earthquakes; should extensive portions of well-oriented, large features be reactivated. As part of the FORGE initiative at the West Flank of the Coso Geothermal Field, we analyze a large set of image logs obtained from wells distributed across the geothermal field for details about the stress state revealed by indicators such as borehole breakouts and drilling-induced tensile fractures. Previous stress analyses at Coso have ignored deviated well sections, since their interpretation for the orientation of the stress tensor is non-unique with respect to varying stress magnitudes. Using interpreted borehole-induced structures, we perform a grid search over all possible Andersonian stress states and find a best fitting vertical stress tensor for each stress state characterized by principal stress magnitudes. By including deviated well sections and recently drilled wells, we considerably expand the suite of stress measurements in the Coso Geothermal Field. Along individual wells, this analysis also reveals local meter length-scale deviations from the best-fitting mean stress orientation. While most wells show consistent horizontal principal stress orientations with standard deviations of about 10°, other wells show large standard deviations on the order of 25°. Several regions have logged well trajectories with lateral spacing below 1 km. This enables us to trace changes of the stress

  7. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, R.; Pahlevani, F.; Quadir, M. Z.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2016-01-01

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels? performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a com...

  8. Tectonic stress in the plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Sleep, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, the basic set of global intraplate stress orientation data is plotted and tabulated. Although the global intraplate stress field is complicated, several large-scale patterns can be seen. Much of stable North America is characterized by an E-W to NE-SW trend for the maximum compressive stress. South American lithosphere beneath the Andes, and perhaps farther east in the stable interior, has horizontal compressive stresses trending E-W to NW-SE. Western Europe north of the Alps is characterized by a NW-SE trending maximum horizontal compression, while Asia has the maximum horizontal compressive stress trending more nearly N-S, especially near the Himalayan front.

  9. Prevention of brittle fracture of steel structures by controlling the local stress and strain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyseychik Evgeniy Alekseevich

    Full Text Available In the article the author offers a classification of the methods to increase the cold resistance of steel structural shapes with a focus on the regulation of local fields of internal stresses and strains to prevent brittle fracture of steel structures. The need of a computer thermography is highlighted not only for visualization of temperature fields on the surface, but also to control the fields of residual stresses and strains in a controlled element.

  10. Electromechanical behaviour of REBCO tape lap splices under transverse compressive loading

    CERN Document Server

    Grether, A; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of transverse compressive stress on the resistance and critical current (Ic) of soldered REBCO tape lap splices. Internal contact resistances dominate the overall REBCO lap splice resistances. Application of transverse compressive stress up to 250 MPa during the resistance measurements does not alter the resistance and Ic of the soldered REBCO splices that were studied. The resistance of unsoldered REBCO tape lap splices depends strongly on the contact pressure. At a transverse compressive stress of 100 MPa to which Roebel cables are typically exposed in high field magnets, the crossover splice contact resistance is comparable to the internal tape resistances.

  11. A Parametric Approach to Shape Field-Relevant Blast Wave Profiles in Compressed-Gas-Driven Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    compared with the profiles obtained from the shock tube. To conclude, our experimental results demonstrate that a compressed-gas shock tube when designed and operated carefully can replicate the blast time profiles of field explosions accurately. Such a faithful replication is an essential first step when studying the effects of blast induced neurotrauma using animal models. PMID:25520701

  12. A parametric approach to shape field-relevant blast wave profiles in compressed-gas-driven shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    with the profiles obtained from the shock tube. To conclude, our experimental results demonstrate that a compressed-gas shock tube when designed and operated carefully can replicate the blast time profiles of field explosions accurately. Such a faithful replication is an essential first step when studying the effects of blast induced neurotrauma using animal models.

  13. 3D stress field simulation for Greater Munich, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Moritz; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna Maria; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Geotechnical applications such as tunneling, storage of waste, wellbore planning, or reservoir engineering requires detailed 3D information on the rock properties and behavior of the continuum. One of the key parameters is the contemporary crustal in-situ stress state. However, generally the availability of stress data on reservoir scale is scarce or no data exists at all. Furthermore, stress data is often limited to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress. Hence, geomechanical-numerical modelling provides an approximation of a continuous description of the 3D in-situ stress state. We present a model workflow that shows (1) how to calibrate a regional scale model of Greater Munich with stress orientations and magnitudes mainly from borehole data and (2) how to derive from the regional model boundary conditions for a local high-resolution model of a geothermal reservoir site. This approach using two models is an alternative to the required trade-off between resolution, computational cost and a sufficient number of calibration data which is otherwise inevitable for a single model. The incorporated 3D geological models contain the topography from a digital elevation model and 6 stratigraphic units with different elasto-plastic rock properties. The local model mimics the area of a planned reservoir and its resolution is significantly higher than in the regional model and down to 10 m near the planned borehole trajectories using 21×106 tetrahedron finite elements with linear approximation functions. The uncertainties of the calibrated regional model are large since no information on the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress is available. Even in the entire Greater Munich area only two reliable leak-off tests that deliver the magnitude of the minimum horizontal stress could be used. These uncertainties are transferred also to the local model. Hence we also show how to quantify for the workflow in general the systematic uncertainties and discuss

  14. Characteristics of Xanthosoma sagittifolium roots during cooking, using physicochemical analysis, uniaxial compression, multispectral imaging and low field NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye, Abena Achiaa; Gudjónsdóttir, María; Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Wireko-Manu, Faustina Dufie; Oduro, Ibok

    2017-08-01

    To effectively promote the industrial utilization of cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) roots for enhanced food sustainability and security, there is a need to study their molecular, mechanical and physicochemical properties in detail. The physicochemical and textural characteristics of the red and white varieties of cocoyam roots were thus analysed by low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry, multispectral imaging, uniaxial compression testing, and relevant physicochemical analysis in the current study. Both varieties had similar dry matter content, as well as physical and mechanical properties. However, up to four fast-interacting water populations were observed in the roots, dependent on the root variety and their degree of gelatinization during cooking. Changes in the relaxation parameters indicated weak gelatinization of starch at approximately 80 °C in both varieties. However, shorter relaxation times and a higher proportion of restricted water in the white variety indicated that this variety was slightly more sensitive towards gelatinization. A strong negative correlation existed between dry matter and all multispectral wavelengths >800 nm, suggesting the potential use of that spectral region for rapid analysis of dry matter and water content of the roots. The small, but significant differences in the structural and gelatinization characteristics of the two varieties indicated that they may not be equally suited for further processing, e.g. to flours or starches. Processors thus need to choose their raw materials wisely dependent on the aimed product characteristics. However, the spectroscopic methods applied in the study were shown to be effective in assessing important quality attributes during cooking of the roots.

  15. ANALYSIS ON THE GROUND DESTROYED FEATURES AND TECTONIC STRESS FIELD OF THE 2008 WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE AND OUR TREATING TACTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Wang, H.; Deng, Z.; You, H.

    2009-12-01

    To research the ground destroyed features and tectonic stress field of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, we went the earthquake-hazard area, Hongkou Town in Dujiangyan City, Yingxiu Town in Wenchuan County, Bailu Town in Pengzhou City, Yinghua Town in Shifang City, Hanwang Town in Mianzhu City and Beichuan Cit early and late twice in 2008. The geological survey was made. Firstly, the ground destroyed features of the Wenchuan Earthquake around both Yingxiu - Beichuan Fracture and Guanxian - Jiangyou Fracture were analyzed. They mainly display as the ground crack ground, road steep slope, ground deformation, road rise high and deformation, road staggering and rupture, etc. Besides, the Wenchuan Earthquake resulted in the great deal of building collapse and lots of bridges damage even break down; It can be seen that the first floor of the building disappeared or damaged seriously; Some building still stood there although damaged by the earthquake; A few of building was damaged slightly and kept intact structure. Furthermore, the earthquake caused earth slide, mudflow and rolling stone, which lead to the building destroyed seriously, river blocked up, the life line engineering destroyed. Secondly, the phenomena of the ground destroy were analyzed preliminarily. The seismic intensity was determined based on the field investigation. The damaged situation of the construction was concluded. Based on the principle of structure geology and making use of the Stereographic projection, the stress field was analyzed according to the attitude, structural nature and relations among the fracture, fault scratch and joint fissure as well as the characteristics of ground deformation thirdly. The geodynamics of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake are probed into preliminarily. The main compressive stress (the maximum main stress) σ1 took Northeast by east direction, and the main tensile stress (the minimum main stress)σ3 took Northwest by north direction. The main fracture shows as the right

  16. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields: Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    OpenAIRE

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    2006-01-01

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose stress fields vanish. We explain that a grain boundary (a dislocation wall satisfying Frank's formula) has vanishing stress in the continuum limit. We show that the general stress-free state can be wri...

  17. Experimental investigation of the acoustic anisotropy field in the sample with a stress concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey I. Grishchenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of acoustic anisotropy and the longitudinal wave velocity in the case of multiaxial stress-strain state of the plate under inelastic deformation has been studied experimentally. The plate had a stress concentrator in the form of the central hole. The results for several deformation levels, and the results of finite element analysis of active stresses were presented. The qualitative agreement between the calculated stress fields and the distribution fields of acoustic anisotropy was revealed. It was found that the absolute magnitude maximum of acoustic anisotropy fell on the areas with the biggest stresses near the concentrator. It was supposed that the non-uniform distribution of acoustic anisotropy in the material testified to a possible stress concentration at the corresponding points.

  18. Integration method to calculate the stress field in the optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Minning; Chen, Dandan; Huang, Liujun

    2017-11-01

    An integration method based on superposition theorem to calculate the stress field in the optical fiber with arbitrary shape stress elements is derived. The identity between the theoretical analysis result and the integration method in the optical fiber with sector shape bow-tie stress elements is proved. The integration method calculation is compared with the Comsol Multiphysics software simulation and they are agreed well with each other.

  19. The effect of compressibility, rotation and magnetic field on thermal instability of Walters’ fluid permeated with suspended particles in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Kumar Amrish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of compressibility, rotation, magnetic field and suspended particles on thermal stability of a layer of visco-elastic Walters’ (model fluid in porous medium. Using linearized theory and normal mode analysis, dispersion relation has been obtained. In case of stationary convection, it is found that the rotation has stabilizing effect on the system. The magnetic field may have destabilizing effect on the system in the presence of rotation while in the absence of rotation it always has stabilizing effect. The medium permeability has destabilizing effect on the system in the absence of rotation while in the presence of rotation it may have stabilizing effect. The suspended particles and compressibility always have destabilizing effect. Due to vanishing of visco-elastic parameter, the compressible visco-elastic fluid behaves like Newtonian fluid. Graphs have also been plotted to depict the stability characteristics. The viscoelasticity, magnetic field and rotation are found to introduce oscillatory modes into the system which were non-existent in their absence.

  20. Evaluation of debonding strength of single lap joint by the intensity of singular stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsujiro; Noda, Nao-Aki

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the similarity of the singular stress field of the single lap joint (SLJ) is discussed to evaluate the debonding fracture by the intensity of the singular stress field (ISSF). The practical method is proposed for analyzing the ISSF for the SLJ. The analysis method focuses on the FEM stress at the interface end by applying the same mesh pattern to the unknown and reference models. It is found that the independent technique useful for the bonded plate and butt joint cannot be applied to the SLJ because the singular stress field of the SLJ consists of two singular stress terms. The FEM stress is divided to two FEM stresses by applying the unknown and reference models to different minimum element sizes. Then, the practicality of the present method is examined by applying to the previous tensile test results of the SLJ composed of the aluminum alloy and the epoxy resin. The ISSFs for the SLJ were calculated by changing the adhesive thickness t 2 and the overlap length l 2. In the case of the SLJ with 225 mm in total length and 7 mm in adherend thickness, it was found that the similar singular stress fields are formed in the range of 0.15 mm ≤ t 2 ≤ 0.9mm and 15 mm ≤ l 2 ≤ 50 mm. It is shown that the critical ISSFs at the fracture are constant in the range.

  1. Biofeedback systems for stress reduction : Towards a bright future for a revitalized field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, E.L. van den; Westerink, J.H.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. This article proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. A concise state-of-the-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental

  2. Biofeedback for stress reduction: towards a brigth future for a revitalized field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Broek, E.L.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. Thisarticle proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. Aconcise state-ofthe-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental health

  3. Biofeedback systems for stress reduction: Towards a Bright Future for a Revitalized Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Conchon, E.; Correia, C.; Fred, A.; Gamboa, H.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. This article proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. A concise state-ofthe-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental

  4. A satellite based crop water stress index for irrigation scheduling in sugarcane fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veysi, Shadman; Naseri, Abd Ali; Hamzeh, Saeid; Bartholomeus, Harm

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the capability of crop water stress index (CWSI) based on satellite thermal infrared data for estimating water stress and irrigation scheduling in sugarcane fields was evaluated. For this purpose, eight Landsat 8 satellite images were acquired during the sugarcane growing season

  5. Seed ageing and field performance of maize under water stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... vigor seeds and proper storage are necessary to ensure optimum stand establishment and ... deleterious effects of seed ageing on field performance of .... Effects of seed vigour and the duration of cold acclimation on freezing ...

  6. Influence of Residual Stress on Fatigue Design of AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steel cannot be hardened by any form of heat treatment, in fact, quenching from 10000C merely softens them. They are usually cold worked to increase the hardness. Shot peening is a cold working process that changes micro-structure as well as residual stress in the surface layer. In the present work, the compressive residual stress and fatigue strength of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel have been evaluated at various shot peening conditions. The improvement in various mechanical properties such as hardness, damping factors and fatigue strength was noticed. Compressive residual stress induced by shot peening varies with cyclic loading due to relaxation of compressive residual stress field. The consideration of relaxed compressive residual stress field instead of original compressive residual stress field provides reliable fatigue design of components. In this paper, the exact reductions in weight and control of mechanical properties due to shot peening process are discussed.

  7. Stress field rotation or block rotation: An example from the Lake Mead fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1990-02-01

    The Coulomb criterion, as applied by Anderson (1951), has been widely used as the basis for inferring paleostresses from in situ fault slip data, assuming that faults are optimally oriented relative to the tectonic stress direction. Consequently if stress direction is fixed during deformation so must be the faults. Freund (1974) has shown that faults, when arranged in sets, must generally rotate as they slip. Nur et al., (1986) showed how sufficiently large rotations require the development of new sets of faults which are more favorably oriented to the principal direction of stress. This leads to the appearance of multiple fault sets in which older faults are offset by younger ones, both having the same sense of slip. Consequently correct paleostress analysis must include the possible effect of fault and material rotation, in addition to stress field rotation. The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were investigated in the Lake Meade Fault System (LMFS) especially in the Hoover Dam area. Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 degrees clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast structural data from the rest of the Great Basin suggest only a 30 degrees CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic and seismic evidence, the 30 degrees discrepancy can be neatly resolved. Based on paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on NW trending right lateral faults caused a local 30 degrees counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area. Consequently the inferred 60 degrees CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS consists of an actual 30 degrees CW rotation of the stress field (as for the entire Great Basin) plus a local 30 degrees CCW material rotation of the LMFS fault blocks.

  8. Analysis and interpretation of stress indicators in deviated wells of the Coso Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenball, Martin; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the tectonic stress field is an integral part of the development of hydrothermal systems and especially for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). With a well characterized stress field the propensity of fault slip on faults with known location and orientation can be identified. Faults that are critically oriented for faulting with respect to the stress field are known to provide natural fluid pathways. A high slip tendency makes a fault a likely candidate for reactivation during the creation of an EGS. Similarly, the stress state provides insight for the potential of larger, damaging earthquakes should extensive portions of well-oriented, larger faults be reactivated.The analysis of stress indicators such as drilling-induced fractures and borehole breakouts is the main tool to infer information on the stress state of a geothermal reservoir. The standard procedure is applicable to sub-vertical wellbore sections and highly deviated sections have to be discarded. However, in order to save costs and reduce the environmental impact most recent wells are directionally drilled with deviations that require appropriate consideration of the deviated trajectory. Here we present an analysis scheme applicable to arbitrary well trajectories or a combination of wells to infer the stress state. Through the sampling of the stress tensor along several directions additional information on the stress regime and even relative stress magnitudes can be obtained. We apply this method on image logs from the pair of wells 58-10 and 58A-10 that were drilled from the same well pad. Both wells have image logs of about 2km of their trajectories that are separated by less than 300m. For both wells we obtain a mean orientation of SHmax of N23° with large standard deviations of locations of stress indicators of 24° and 26°, respectively. While the local stress direction is highly variable along both wells with dominant wavelengths from around 50 to 500m, the mean directions are very

  9. Mean-Field Scenario for the Athermal Creep Dynamics of Yield-Stress Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Martens, Kirsten; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2018-01-01

    We develop a theoretical description based on an existent mean-field model for the transient dynamics prior to the steady flow of yielding materials. The mean-field model not only reproduces the experimentally observed nonlinear time dependence of the shear-rate response to an external stress, but also allows for the determination of the different physical processes involved in the onset of the reacceleration phase after the initial slowing down and a distinct fluidization phase. The fluidization time displays a power-law dependence on the distance of the applied stress to an age-dependent yield stress, which is not universal but strongly dependent on initial conditions.

  10. Flow and Stress Field Analysis of Different Fluids and Blades for Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation techniques are applied for the biotechnology and are widely used for food manufacturing, materials processing, chemical reaction, and so forth. Different fluids and types of blades in the tank for fermentation cause distinct flow and stress field distributions on the surface between fluid and blade and various flow reactions in the tank appear. This paper is mainly focused on the analysis of flow field with different fluid viscosities and also studied the stress field acting on the blades with different scales and shapes of them under specific rotational speed. The results show that the viscosity of fluid influences the flow field and stress distributions on the blades. The maximum stress that acts on the blade is increased with the increasing of viscosity. On the other hand, the ratio of blade length to width influences stress distributions on the blade. At the same time, the inclined angle of blade is also the key parameter for the consideration of design and appropriate inclined angle of blade will decrease the maximum stress. The results provide effective means of gaining insights into the flow and stress distribution of fermentation process.

  11. Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Chayut

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants’ developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2–4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution.

  12. Shielding Flowers Developing under Stress: Translating Theory to Field Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayut, Noam; Sobol, Shiri; Nave, Nahum; Samach, Alon

    2014-07-11

    Developing reproductive organs within a flower are sensitive to environmental stress. A higher incidence of environmental stress during this stage of a crop plants' developmental cycle will lead to major breaches in food security. Clearly, we need to understand this sensitivity and try and overcome it, by agricultural practices and/or the breeding of more tolerant cultivars. Although passion fruit vines initiate flowers all year round, flower primordia abort during warm summers. This restricts the season of fruit production in regions with warm summers. Previously, using controlled chambers, stages in flower development that are sensitive to heat were identified. Based on genetic analysis and physiological experiments in controlled environments, gibberellin activity appeared to be a possible point of horticultural intervention. Here, we aimed to shield flowers of a commercial cultivar from end of summer conditions, thus allowing fruit production in new seasons. We conducted experiments over three years in different settings, and our findings consistently show that a single application of an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis to vines in mid-August can cause precocious flowering of ~2-4 weeks, leading to earlier fruit production of ~1 month. In this case, knowledge obtained on phenology, environmental constraints and genetic variation, allowed us to reach a practical solution.

  13. Vector Magnetic Fields, Sub surface Stresses and Evolution of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Arendt 1996). Bogdan (1984) found that flux tubes of the same sense of twist will merge if their relative velocities are slow enough to allow their magnetic fields to reconnect. Zweibel & Rhoads (1995) estimated an upper limit to the critical velocity and concluded that colliding twisted flux tubes may coalesce at the base of the ...

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  15. Fracture strength and principal stress fields during crush testing of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Brian C., E-mail: brian.campbell.davis@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Ward, Logan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Fillery, Brent [Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow (Germany); Reimanis, Ivar [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diametrical compression testing is an important technique to evaluate fracture properties of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated nuclear fuel particles. This study was conducted to expand the understanding and improve the methodology of the test. An analytic solution and multiple FEA models are used to determine the development of the principal stress fields in the SiC shell during a crush test. An ideal fracture condition where the diametrical compression test best mimics in-service internal pressurization conditions was discovered. For a small set of empirical data points, results from different analysis methodologies were input to an iterative Weibull equation set to determine characteristic strength (332.9 MPa) and Weibull modulus (3.80). These results correlate well with published research. It is shown that SiC shell asphericity is currently the limiting factor of greatest concern to obtaining repeatable results. Improvements to the FEA are the only apparent method for incorporating asphericity and improving accuracy. - Highlights: • A continuous stress vs. force function is defined by modifying the analytic solution. • FEA simulations with nonlinear geometry show improvements over analytic solutions. • During the test there are three different stress regimes defined by divot size. • SiC asphericity is a likely cause of numerical results deviating from empirical data. • Modeling true shell geometry is the factor of greatest concern in improving accuracy.

  16. Stress distribution during cold compression of a quartz aggregate using synchrotron X-ray diffraction: Observed yielding, damage, and grain crushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C. S. N.; Weidner, D. J.; Li, L.; Meredith, P. G.; Chen, H.; Whitaker, M. L.; Chen, X.

    2017-04-01

    We report new experimental results that quantify the stress distribution within a quartz aggregate during pore collapse and grain crushing. The samples were probed with synchrotron X-ray diffraction as they were compressed in a multianvil deformation apparatus at room temperature from low pressure (tens of megapascal) to pressures of a few gigapascal. In such a material, stress is likely to concentrate at grain-to-grain contacts and vanish where grains are bounded by open porosity. Therefore, internal stress is likely to vary significantly from point to point in such an aggregate, and hence, it is important to understand both the heterogeneity and anisotropy of such variation with respect to the externally applied stress. In our quartz aggregate (grain size of 4 μm), the measured diffraction peaks broaden asymmetrically at low pressure (tens of megapascal), suggesting that open pores are still a dominant characteristic of grain boundaries. In contrast, a reference sample of novaculite (a highly dense quartz polycrystal, grain size of 6-9 μm) showed virtually no peak broadening with increasing pressure. In the quartz aggregate, we observed significant deviation in the pressure-volume curves in the range of P = 400-600 MPa. We suggest that this marks the onset of grain crushing (generally denoted as P* in the rock mechanic literature), which is commonly reported to occur in sandstones at pressures of this order, in general agreement with a Hertzian analysis of fracturing at grain contacts.

  17. Interlaminar shear stresses and laminae separation in a disc. Finite element analysis of the L3-L4 motion segment subjected to axial compressive loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, V K; Monroe, B T; Gilbertson, L G; Brinckmann, P

    1995-03-15

    This study analyzed interlaminar shear stresses across the laminae of a ligamentous L3-L4 motion segment. A three-dimensional finite element model of the motion segment was developed and its response in axial compression mode was predicted. The contributions of "mechanical" factors in producing laminae separation in a disc are not well understood, especially when the nucleus is still gel-like in appearance (stage 1 of disc degeneration). All types of stresses are likely to contribute to laminae separation. The authors believe it is partially due to the interlaminar shear stresses at the laminae interfaces in specific regions of an intact disc because the disc is a composite structure. The effects of anular tears on the interlaminar shear stresses were also investigated. These tears can be circumferential or radial in nature, and commonly occur in the aged, degenerated disc. A large number of biomechanical studies dealing with the role of the disc vis-a-vis other spinal components have been reported in the literature. The role of mechanical factors, however, in producing laminae separation, especially when the nucleus is still gel-like in appearance (stage 1 of disc degeneration), is not entirely clear. A three-dimensional nonlinear finite element model of an intact L3-L4 lumbar motion segment, based on the use of a special type of element for the disc anulus, was created to investigate the interlaminar shear stresses in the anulus. The effects of radial "out-in," radial "in-out," and "circumferential" injuries were analyzed. Injury was modeled as element removal in the posterolateral portion of the disc. Models subjected to axial compressive loads, ranging from 200 N to 2000 N, were analyzed. In addition to the interlaminar shear stresses, disc bulge, and displacements including coupled motions were predicted. The theoretical disc bulge predictions for the radial in-out injury case were in agreement with the disc bulge data obtained experimentally. Displacements

  18. Displacement and stress fields around rock fractures opened by irregular overpressure variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigekazu eKusumoto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many rock fractures are entirely driven open by fluids such as ground water, geothermal water, gas, oil, and magma. These are a subset of extension fractures (mode I cracks; e.g., dikes, mineral veins and joints referred to as hydrofractures. Field measurements show that many hydrofractures have great variations in aperture. However, most analytical solutions for fracture displacement and stress fields assume the loading to be either constant or with a linear variation. While these solutions have been widely used, it is clear that a fracture hosted by heterogeneous and anisotropic rock is normally subject to loading that is neither constant nor with a linear variation. Here we present new general solutions for the displacement and stress fields around hydrofractures, modelled as two-dimensional elastic cracks, opened by irregular overpressure variations given by the Fourier cosine series. Each solution has two terms. The first term gives the displacement and stress fields due to the average overpressure acting inside the crack; it is given by the initial term of the Fourier coefficients expressing the overpressure variation. The second term gives the displacement and stress fields caused by the overpressure variation; it is given by general terms of the Fourier coefficients and solved through numerical integration. Our numerical examples show that the crack aperture variation closely reflects the overpressure variation. Also, that the general displacement and stress fields close to the crack follow the overpressure variation but tend to be more uniform far from the crack. The present solutions can be used to estimate the displacement and stress fields around any fluid-driven crack, that is, any hydrofracture, as well as its aperture, provided the variation in overpressure can be described by Fourier series. The solutions add to our understanding of local stresses, displacements, and fluid transport associated with hydrofractures in the crust.

  19. Coherent gradient sensing method for measuring thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coherent gradient sensing (CGS method can be used to measure the slope of a reflective surface, and has the merits of full-field, non-contact, and real-time measurement. In this study, the thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating (TBC structures is measured by CGS method. Two kinds of powders were sprayed onto Ni-based alloy using a plasma spraying method to obtain two groups of film–substrate specimens. The specimens were then heated with an oxy-acetylene flame. The resulting thermal mismatch between the film and substrate led to out-of-plane deformation of the specimen. The deformation was measured by the reflective CGS method and the thermal stress field of the structure was obtained through calibration with the help of finite element analysis. Both the experiment and numerical results showed that the thermal stress field of TBC structures can be successfully measured by CGS method.

  20. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2018-01-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  1. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2017-11-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  2. Relationship Between Far Field Stresses, Fluid Flow and High-Pressure Deserpentinization in Subducting Slabs: a Case Study From the Almirez Ultramafic Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilissen, Nicole; Hidas, Károly; Garrido, Carlos J.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Jesús Román-Alpiste, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Serpentinite dehydration during prograde metamorphism plays a crucial role in subduction dynamics. Observations from exhumed paleo-subduction metamorphic terranes suggest that the discharge of deserpentinization fluids from the subducting slab takes place along different pathways and mechanisms [e.g. 1-3]. Analysis of intermediate-depth focal solutions in active subduction zones indicates that slabs are subjected to different principal stress fields characterized primarily by downdip compression and downdip tension [4]. Although it is well known that far field stresses play a crucial role on fluid flow channeling, their potential impact on the kinetics of serpentinite dehydration and subsequent fluid escape in subducting slabs is still poorly understood. Here, we present a detailed structural and microstructural study to investigate the relationships between far field stresses, fluid flow and high-pressure deserpentinization in the Almirez ultramafic massif (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain) [1, 2]. This massif preserves the high-pressure breakdown of antigorite (Atg-) serpentinite to prograde chlorite (Chl-) harzburgite, which are separated by a sharp isograd [2, 5]. The Chl-harzburgite reaction products show either a granofels or spinifex-like texture indicating crystallization under different overstepping of the Atg-out reaction. The two different textural types of Chl-harzburgite occur below the Atg-out isograd as alternating, meter-wide lenses with either a granofels or spinifex texture. From field measurements, we infer that during antigorite dehydration the minimum compressive stress was subnormal to the dehydration front and the paleo-slab surface. This stress field is consistent with subduction zones with slabs under downdip compression at intermediate depths [4]. The detailed microstructural study —combining µ-CT and EBSD-SEM [6]— of Chl-harzburgite across a c. 15 m wide lens reveals that the SPO and CPO of olivines with contrasting textures are strongly

  3. Long-lasting transcurrent tectonics in SW Alps evidenced by Neogene to present-day stress fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauve, Victorien; Plateaux, Romain; Rolland, Yann; Sanchez, Guillaume; Bethoux, Nicole; Delouis, Bertrand; Darnault, Romain

    2014-05-01

    The SW Alps are an active orogen undergoing intra-mountainous extension and peripheral compression. We discuss the significance of syn-orogenic extension based on a comparison of paleo-stress derived from fault-slip data inversion reflecting the long-term (San Remo.

  4. Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

  5. Developing an in-Field Yield Monitoring System and Predicting Some Nutritional Quality Properties of Alfalfa Using Shear and Compressive Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M Maharlooei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precision Agriculture is continuously trying to address the sources and factors affecting the in-field variability and taking appropriate managerial decisions. One of the popular research focuses in the recent three decades has been on the development of new approaches to making yield variability maps. Advancement in development of sensors and the importance of quality factor in high value crops has motivated scientists to investigate real-time and nondestructive testing methods. This study tried to introduce and evaluate a new approach to concurrent yield mapping and to estimate some nutritional qualitative factors of alfalfa production. In this study, yield quantity was determined by measurement of added hay slice in every hay compression cycle by employing a new star wheel and integrating its output with positioning data from Global Positioning System. To predict some nutritional quality properties, measurement of specific shear energy applied on the cutting blade and compressive energy on plunger head of a hay baler in field conditions were also evaluated. The results of statistical analysis of yield quantity measurement data showed a very good correlation between the suggested approach and yield mass (r=0.96 and R2=0.92. The results of using specific shear energy for estimation of crude fiber and cumulative index RFV with regard to field conditions were rated as acceptable. Using specific compression energy was suitable only for estimating the dry matter. None of the suggested methods was able to estimate the hay crude protein. Further investigations at more extensive variations of quality indices and alfalfa varieties are suggested.

  6. Dynamics of Mount Somma-Vesuvius edifice: from stress field inversion to analogue and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteo, Ada; Massa, Bruno; D'Auria, Luca; Castaldo, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    Geological processes are generally very complex and too slow to be directly observed in their completeness; modelling procedures overcome this limit. The state of stress in the upper lithosphere is the main responsible for driving geodynamical processes; in order to retrieve the active stress field in a rock volume, stress inversion techniques can be applied on both seismological and structural datasets. This approach has been successfully applied to active tectonics as well as volcanic areas. In this context the best approach in managing heterogeneous datasets in volcanic environments consists in the analysis of spatial variations of the stress field by applying robust techniques of inversion. The study of volcanic seismicity is an efficient tool to retrieve spatial and temporal pattern of the pre-, syn- and inter-eruptive stress field: magma migration as well as dynamics of magma chamber and hydrothermal system are directly connected to the volcanic seismicity. Additionally, analysis of the temporal variations of stress field pattern in volcanoes could be a useful monitoring tool. Recently the stress field acting on several active volcanoes has been investigated by using stress inversion techniques on seismological datasets (Massa et al., 2016). The Bayesian Right Trihedra Method (BRTM; D'Auria and Massa, 2015) is able to successfully manage heterogeneous datasets allowing the identification of regional fields locally overcame by the stress field due to volcano specific dynamics. In particular, the analysis of seismicity and stress field inversion at the Somma-Vesuvius highlighted the presence of two superposed volumes characterized by different behaviour and stress field pattern: a top volume dominated by an extensional stress field, in accordance with a gravitational spreading-style of deformation, and a bottom volume related to a regional extensional stress field. In addition, in order to evaluate the dynamics of deformation, both analogue and numerical

  7. THEORETICAL COMPUTATION OF A STRESS FIELD IN A CYLINDRICAL GLASS SPECIMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORBERT KREČMER

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the computation of the stress field generated in an infinitely high glass cylinder while cooling. The theory of structural relaxation is used in order to compute the heat capacity, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the viscosity. The relaxation of the stress components is solved in the frame of the Maxwell viscoelasticity model. The obtained results were verified by the sensitivity analysis and compared with some experimental data.

  8. Myelographic and low-field magnetic resonance imaging findings in dogs with presumptive acute hydrated non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Carlos; de la Fuente, Cristian; Rodenas, Sergio; Novellas, Rosa; Viu, Judit; Aã Or, Sonia

    2017-12-01

    MRI is considered gold standard for the diagnosis of presumptive acute hydrated non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusions (AHNCNPE). This retrospective study describes the myelographic findings in dogs with AHNCNPE diagnosed by low-field MRI and their association with neurological grade, need of surgical decompression and outcome. Forty-two myelographies (21 dogs with presumptive AHNCNPE, 21 dogs with Hansen type I disc disease herniation) were blindly evaluated. Site of herniation, compression pattern, ratio of length of the lesion to length of the second lumbar vertebra (LL:L2) and degree of spinal cord compression (SCC) were measured on the myelographies of dogs with presumptive AHNCNPE and were compared with the corresponding MRI features. Percentage of extruded volume of nucleus pulposus (VNP) was calculated on MR images. Myelographic interobserver agreement for presumptive diagnosis of AHNCNPE was almost perfect (κ=0.8). Accuracy of myelography to detect site of herniation was 80.9 per cent and to identify extradural compression was 57.1 per cent. Mean SCC was 5.8±2.6 per cent for myelography and 6.6±3 per cent for MRI. Mean LL:L2 ratio was 1.7±0.9 for myelography and 1.2±0.8 for MRI. Mean percentage of extruded VNP was 40±14 per cent, and it was positively associated with neurological grade. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Numerical and experimental study of moisture-induced stress and strain field developments in timber logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2013-01-01

    When solid wood dries from a green condition to a moisture content used for further processing, moisture-induced fracture and stresses can occur. The drying stresses arise because of internal deformation constraints that are strongly affected by the cross-sectional moisture gradient differential...... shrinkage and the inhomogeneity of the material. To obtain a better understanding of how stresses develop during climatic variations, the field histories of stresses (and strains) in cross sections in their entirety need to be studied. The present paper reports on experiments and numerical simulations...... concerned with analysing the development of strains and stresses during the drying of 15-mm-thick discs of Norway spruce timber log. The samples were dried at 23 °C and relative humidity of 64 % from a green condition to equilibrium moisture content. The moisture gradient in the longitudinal direction...

  10. Development of the Stress of Immigration Survey (SOIS): a Field Test among Mexican Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Rosa Maria; Nápoles, Anna Maria; Gregorich, Steven; Paul, Steven; Lee, Kathryn A.; Stewart, Anita L.

    2016-01-01

    The Stress of Immigration Survey (SOIS) is a screening tool used to assess immigration-related stress. The mixed methods approach included concept development, pretesting, field-testing, and psychometric evaluation in a sample of 131 low-income women of Mexican descent. The 21-item SOIS screens for stress related to language; immigrant status; work issues; yearning for family and home country; and cultural dissonance. Mean scores ranged from 3.6 to 4.4 (1-5 scale, higher is more stress). Cronbach's alphas >.80 for all sub-scales. The SOIS may be a useful screening tool for detecting high levels of immigration-related stress in low-income Mexican immigrant women. PMID:26605954

  11. Development of the Stress of Immigration Survey: A Field Test Among Mexican Immigrant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Rosa Maria; Nápoles, Anna Maria; Gregorich, Steven; Paul, Steven; Lee, Kathryn A; Stewart, Anita L

    2016-01-01

    The Stress of Immigration Survey (SOIS) is a screening tool used to assess immigration-related stress. The mixed methods approach included concept development, pretesting, field testing, and psychometric evaluation in a sample of 131 low-income women of Mexican descent. The 21-item SOIS screens for stress related to language, immigrant status, work issues, yearning for family and home country, and cultural dissonance. Mean scores ranged from 3.6 to 4.4 (a scale of 1-5, higher is more stress). Cronbach α values were more than 0.80 for all subscales. The SOIS may be a useful screening tool for detecting high levels of immigration-related stress in low-income Mexican immigrant women.

  12. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Zi-yan; Zhang,Jing; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Yu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT) on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR), and oxidative stress (OS) of Canton-Special (CS) and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25?C and 35?C (thermal stress). Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 fl...

  13. Stress fields in soft material induced by injection of highly-focused microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuta; Endo, Nanami; Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Kiyama, Akihito; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2017-11-01

    Needle-free drug injection systems using high-speed microjets are of great importance for medical innovations since they can solve problems of the conventional needle injection systems. However, the mechanical stress acting on the skin/muscle of patients during the penetration of liquid-drug microjets had not been clarified. In this study we investigate the stress caused by the penetration of microjets into soft materials, which is compared with the stress induced by the penetration of needles. In order to capture high-speed temporal evolution of the stress field inside the material, we utilized a high-speed polarized camera and gelatin that resembles human skin. Remarkably we find clear differences in the stress fields induced by microjets and needles. On one hand, high shear stress induced by the microjets is attenuated immediately after the injection, even though the liquid stays inside the soft material. On the other hand, high-shear stress induced by the needles stays and never decays unless the needles are entirely removed from the material. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26709007 and 17H01246.

  14. Estimating bed shear stress from remotely measured surface turbulent dissipation fields in open channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. D.; Cowen, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    Synoptic information on bed shear stress is necessary in predicting the transport of sediments and environmental contaminants in rivers and open channels. Existing methods of estimating bed shear stress typically involve measuring vertical profiles of streamwise velocity or Reynolds stress and taking advantage of the logarithmic or the constant stress region, respectively, to determine friction velocity and subsequently, bed shear stress. While effective, these methods yield local measurements of bed shear stress only. Direct measurements of bed shear stress can also be obtained through measurements with a drag plate. However, this method yields average shear stress information over the area of the plate and is impractical for large-scale implementation in the field. Here we present a method capable of providing continuous synoptic measurements of bed shear stress over a large field-of-view. A series of Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) and Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements were made in a variety of flows generated in a wide-open channel facility. Turbulent dissipation is calculated on the free surface from the 2-D LSPIV results and is correlated with near-surface ADV measurements of turbulent dissipation in the water column. The ADV results are consistent with the Nezu (1977) established relationship for the vertical variation of turbulent dissipation in the water column. Knowledge of the correlation between free-surface and near-surface dissipation values coupled with Nezu's (1977) relationship allow a robust and accurate estimate of friction velocity to be made and subsequently, shear stress at the bed can be estimated.

  15. The stress field of Vrancea region from fault plane solution (FPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Telesca

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The fault plane solutions (FPS of 247 seismic events were used for stress field investigation of the region. The eigenvectors t, p, b, and moment tensor M components for each FPS were defined and computed numerically. The obtained results confirm the hypothesis of subduction-type intermediate depth earthquakes for the Vrancea seismic region and this may be considered the first approximation of the stress field for the whole of the Vrancea (intermediate depth region.

  16. Phase-Field Relaxation of Topology Optimization with Local Stress Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stainko, Roman; Burger, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a new relaxation scheme for structural topology optimization problems with local stress constraints based on a phase-field method. In the basic formulation we have a PDE-constrained optimization problem, where the finite element and design analysis are solved simultaneously. The star......We introduce a new relaxation scheme for structural topology optimization problems with local stress constraints based on a phase-field method. In the basic formulation we have a PDE-constrained optimization problem, where the finite element and design analysis are solved simultaneously...

  17. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of stress response in a spinal cord clip compression injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aneurysm clip impact-compression model of spinal cord injury (SCI) is a standard injury model in animals that closely mimics the primary mechanism of most human injuries: acute impact and persisting compression. Its histo-pathological and behavioural outcomes are extensively similar to human SCI. To understand the distinct molecular events underlying this injury model we analyzed global mRNA abundance changes during the acute, subacute and chronic stages of a moderate to severe injury to the rat spinal cord. Results Time-series expression analyses resulted in clustering of the majority of deregulated transcripts into eight statistically significant expression profiles. Systematic application of Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment pathway analysis allowed inference of biological processes participating in SCI pathology. Temporal analysis identified events specific to and common between acute, subacute and chronic time-points. Processes common to all phases of injury include blood coagulation, cellular extravasation, leukocyte cell-cell adhesion, the integrin-mediated signaling pathway, cytokine production and secretion, neutrophil chemotaxis, phagocytosis, response to hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, angiogenesis, apoptosis, inflammatory processes and ossification. Importantly, various elements of adaptive and induced innate immune responses span, not only the acute and subacute phases, but also persist throughout the chronic phase of SCI. Induced innate responses, such as Toll-like receptor signaling, are more active during the acute phase but persist throughout the chronic phase. However, adaptive immune response processes such as B and T cell activation, proliferation, and migration, T cell differentiation, B and T cell receptor-mediated signaling, and B cell- and immunoglobulin-mediated immune response become more significant during the chronic phase. Conclusions This analysis showed that, surprisingly, the diverse series of molecular events that

  18. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  19. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF, but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR, and oxidative stress (OS of Canton-Special (CS and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25°C and 35°C (thermal stress. Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 flies, shortened their lifespan, and influenced their locomotion rhythm and activity. The upregulated expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP 22, HSP26, and HSP70 indicated that HSR was enhanced. Thermal stress-induced OS response increased malondialdehyde content, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased reactive oxygen species level. The effects of thermal stress on the death rates, lifespan, locomotion, and HSP gene expression of flies, especially w1118 line, were also enhanced by ELF-EMF. In conclusion, thermal stress weakened the physiological function and promoted the HSR and OS of flies. ELF-EMF aggravated damages and enhanced thermal stress-induced HSP and OS response. Therefore, thermal stress and ELF-EMF elicited a synergistic effect.

  20. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Yu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT) on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR), and oxidative stress (OS) of Canton-Special (CS) and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25°C and 35°C (thermal stress). Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 flies, shortened their lifespan, and influenced their locomotion rhythm and activity. The upregulated expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 22, HSP26, and HSP70 indicated that HSR was enhanced. Thermal stress-induced OS response increased malondialdehyde content, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased reactive oxygen species level. The effects of thermal stress on the death rates, lifespan, locomotion, and HSP gene expression of flies, especially w1118 line, were also enhanced by ELF-EMF. In conclusion, thermal stress weakened the physiological function and promoted the HSR and OS of flies. ELF-EMF aggravated damages and enhanced thermal stress-induced HSP and OS response. Therefore, thermal stress and ELF-EMF elicited a synergistic effect.

  1. Force Field Benchmark of Organic Liquids: Density, Enthalpy of Vaporization, Heat Capacities, Surface Tension, Isothermal Compressibility, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Dielectric Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The chemical composition of small organic molecules is often very similar to amino acid side chains or the bases in nucleic acids, and hence there is no a priori reason why a molecular mechanics force field could not describe both organic liquids and biomolecules with a single parameter set. Here, we devise a benchmark for force fields in order to test the ability of existing force fields to reproduce some key properties of organic liquids, namely, the density, enthalpy of vaporization, the surface tension, the heat capacity at constant volume and pressure, the isothermal compressibility, the volumetric expansion coefficient, and the static dielectric constant. Well over 1200 experimental measurements were used for comparison to the simulations of 146 organic liquids. Novel polynomial interpolations of the dielectric constant (32 molecules), heat capacity at constant pressure (three molecules), and the isothermal compressibility (53 molecules) as a function of the temperature have been made, based on experimental data, in order to be able to compare simulation results to them. To compute the heat capacities, we applied the two phase thermodynamics method (Lin et al. J. Chem. Phys.2003, 119, 11792), which allows one to compute thermodynamic properties on the basis of the density of states as derived from the velocity autocorrelation function. The method is implemented in a new utility within the GROMACS molecular simulation package, named g_dos, and a detailed exposé of the underlying equations is presented. The purpose of this work is to establish the state of the art of two popular force fields, OPLS/AA (all-atom optimized potential for liquid simulation) and GAFF (generalized Amber force field), to find common bottlenecks, i.e., particularly difficult molecules, and to serve as a reference point for future force field development. To make for a fair playing field, all molecules were evaluated with the same parameter settings, such as thermostats and barostats

  2. Stress-energy tensor of quantized massive fields in static wormhole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocuper, Ewa; Matyjasek, Jerzy; Zwierzchowska, Kasia

    2017-11-01

    In order to be traversable, the static Lorentzian wormhole must be made out of some exotic matter that violates the weak energy condition. The quantized fields are the natural candidates as their stress-energy tensor, in many cases, possesses desired properties. In this paper we construct and examine the stress-energy tensor of the quantized massive scalar, spinor and vector fields in six static wormhole spacetimes. We find that in all considered cases the quantum fields violate the Morris-Thorne conditions and do not have the form necessary to support the wormhole throat. This is in concord with the previous results and indicates that the massive quantum fields make the wormholes less operable.

  3. Photoelastic method to quantitatively visualise the evolution of whole-field stress in 3D printed models subject to continuous loading processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yang; Ren, Zhangyu; Wang, Li; Mao, Lingtao; Chiang, Fu-Pen

    2018-01-01

    The combination of three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques and photoelastic testing is a promising way to quantitatively determine the continuous whole-field stress distributions in solids that are characterized by complex structures. However, photoelastic testing produces wrapped isoclinic and isochromatic phase maps, and unwrapping these maps has always been a significant challenge. To realize the visualization and transparentization of the stress fields in complex structures, we report a new approach to quantify the continuous evolution of the whole-field stress in photosensitive material that is applicable to the fabrication of complex structures using 3D printing technology. The stress fringe orders are determined by analyzing a series of continuous frames extracted from a video recording of the fringe changes over the entire loading process. The integer portion of the fringe orders at a specific point on the model can be determined by counting the valleys of the light intensity change curve over the whole loading process, and the fractional portion can be calculated based on the cosine function between the light intensity and retardation. This method allows the fringe orders to be determined from the video itself, which significantly improves characterization accuracy and simplifies the experimental operation over the entire processes. To validate the proposed method, we compare the results of the theoretical calculations to those of experiments based on the diametric compression of a circular disc prepared by a 3D printer with photosensitive resin. The results indicate that the method can accurately determine the stress fringe order, except for points where the deformation is too large to differentiate the fringes pertaining to photoplasticity.

  4. Active phase locking of a tiled two-grating assembly for high-energy laser pulse compression using simultaneous controls from far-field profiles and interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. K.; Joshi, A. S.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-04-01

    A prototype study on active phase locking of a tiled two-grating assembly (TTGA) using four electronic nanometric actuators has been reported, for its use in high-energy laser pulse compression. Measurement and correction of various phase errors of a TTGA have been demonstrated with a precision of sub-50 nm in differential longitudinal translational and sub-10 µrad in differential angular errors using controls derived from simultaneous recording of laser interferogram and far-field profiles of reflected and diffracted beams from TTGA differentiating in-plane rotation with respect to tip error, which is otherwise difficult in the case of using interferometry alone. Multiple-level intensities in the thresholds of the power spectra of apodized interferogram and far-field profiles have been adapted to estimate spatial frequencies and beam peak positions with sub-pixel accuracies.

  5. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegemann, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Stegemann@bam.de [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko [HZB Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Kreutzbruck, Marc [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); IKT, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic microstructure with neutron diffraction stress analysis. • High spatial resolution magnetic stray field images of hypereutectoid TIG welds. • Spatial variations of the stray fields are below the magnetic field of the earth. • GMR spin valve gradiometer arrays adapted for the evaluation of magnetic microstructures. • Magnetic stray fields are closely linked to microstructure of the material.

  6. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    Hydraulic fracturing is a technique which is used to exploit geologic features and subsurface properties in an effort to increase production in low-permeability formations. The process of hydraulic fracturing provides a greater surface contact area between the producing formation and the wellbore and thus increases the amount of recoverable hydrocarbons from within the reservoir. The use of this stimulation technique has brought on massive applause from the industry due to its widespread success and effectiveness, however the dynamic processes that take part in the development of hydraulic fractures is a relatively new area of research with respect to the massive scale operations that are seen today. The process of hydraulic fracturing relies upon understanding and exploiting the in-situ stress distribution throughout the area of study. These in-situ stress conditions are responsible for directing fracture orientation and propagation paths throughout the period of injection. The relative magnitude of these principle stresses is key in developing a successful stimulation plan. In horizontal well plan development the interpretation of stress within the reservoir is required for determining the azimuth of the horizontal well path. These horizontal laterals are typically oriented in a manner such that the well path lies parallel to the minimum horizontal stress. This allows for vertical fractures to develop transversely to the wellbore, or normal to the least principle stress without the theoretical possibility of fractures overlapping, creating the most efficient use of the fluid energy during injection. The orientation and magnitude of these in-situ stress fields however can be dynamic, controlled by the subsequent fracture propagation and redistribution of the surrounding stresses. That is, that as the fracture propagates throughout the reservoir, the relative stress fields surrounding the fractures may see a shift and deviate from their original direction or

  7. Quantifying the stress fields due to a delta-hydride precipitate in alpha-Zr matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tummala, Hareesh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This report is a preliminary study on δ-hydride precipitate in zirconium alloy performed using 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulations. The ability of dislocations in modifying the largely anisotropic stress fields developed by the hydride particle in a matrix phase is addressed for a specific dimension of the hydride. The influential role of probable dislocation nucleation at the hydride-matrix interface is reported. Dislocation nucleation around a hydride was found to decrease the shear stress (S13) and also increase the normal stresses inside the hydride. We derive conclusions on the formation of stacks of hydrides in zirconium alloys. The contribution of mechanical fields due to dislocations was found to have a non-negligible effect on such process.

  8. [Investigation research of occupational stress and job burnout for oil field workers in Xinjiang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Li; Li, Fuye; Yang, Xiaoyan; Ge, Hua; Liu, Jiwen

    2014-03-01

    To provide scientific basis for further intervention, the association between occupational stress and job burnout among oil field workers of Xinjiang was discussed. A random sample and research on Xinjiang oil-field outdoor workers who will finish occupation Stress Inventory-Revised questionnaire and Maslash Burnout Survey. The scoring of each OSI-R dimension and each MBI dimension varied significantly between different individual characterizations (age, gender and education). Multiple linear regression analysis showed: occupation task, physical strain, work environment, subjective support, self health care are the main factors influencing occupation burnout. Different individual characteristics effect the occurrence of occupation stresses and job burnout, reduce the occupation task, strengthen social support and self health care consciousness, strive to build and improve the enterprise culture atmosphere can prevent occupation burnout.

  9. Field performance of timber bridges. 11, Spearfish Creek stress-laminated box-beam bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter; K. Stanfill-McMillan

    The Spearfish Creek bridge was constructed in 1992 in Spearfish, South Dakota. It is a single-span, stress-laminated, box-beam superstructure. Performance of the bridge is being monitored for 5 years, beginning at installation. This report summarizes results for the first 3-1/2 years of monitoring and includes information on the design, construction, and field...

  10. Field performance of stress-laminated highway bridges constructed with glued laminated timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.P. Wacker

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the field performance of three stress-laminated deck timber bridges located in Wisconsin, New York, and Arizona. The deck superstructures of these single-span highway bridges is comprised of full-span glued laminated timber (glulam) beam laminations manufactured with southern pine, hem fir/red maple combination, and/or Douglas fir lumber species....

  11. The University of California Institute of Environmental Stress Marathon Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    In 1973, the Institute of Environmental Stress of the University of California-Santa Barbara, under the direction of Steven M. Horvath, began a series of field and laboratory studies of marathon runners during competition. As one of Horvath's graduate students, many of these studies became part of my doctoral dissertation. The rationale for…

  12. Atomistically enabled nonsingular anisotropic elastic representation of near-core dislocation stress fields in α -iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Dariush; Po, Giacomo; Mrovec, Matous; Lazar, Markus; Elsässer, Christian; Gumbsch, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The stress fields of dislocations predicted by classical elasticity are known to be unrealistically large approaching the dislocation core, due to the singular nature of the theory. While in many cases this is remedied with the approximation of an effective core radius, inside which ad hoc regularizations are implemented, such approximations lead to a compromise in the accuracy of the calculations. In this work an anisotropic nonsingular elastic representation of dislocation fields is developed to accurately represent the near-core stresses of dislocations in α -iron. The regularized stress field is enabled through the use of a nonsingular Green's tensor function of Helmholtz-type gradient anisotropic elasticity, which requires only a single characteristic length parameter in addition to the material's elastic constants. Using a magnetic bond-order potential to model atomic interactions in iron, molecular statics calculations are performed, and an optimization procedure is developed to extract the required length parameter. Results show the method can accurately replicate the magnitude and decay of the near-core dislocation stresses even for atoms belonging to the core itself. Comparisons with the singular isotropic and anisotropic theories show the nonsingular anisotropic theory leads to a substantially more accurate representation of the stresses of both screw and edge dislocations near the core, in some cases showing improvements in accuracy of up to an order of magnitude. The spatial extent of the region in which the singular and nonsingular stress differ substantially is also discussed. The general procedure we describe may in principle be applied to accurately model the near-core dislocation stresses of any arbitrarily shaped dislocation in anisotropic cubic media.

  13. Soil precompression stress: II a comparison of different compaction tests and stress-displacement behaviour of the soil during wheeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, T.; Arvidsson, J.; Dawidowski, J.B.; Koolen, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Precompression stress is often used as a criterion for soil susceptibility to compaction. The objective of this study was to compare precompression stresses derived from different compression test methods and relate these values to measured stress and displacement during wheeling in the field.

  14. Identification of natural fractures and in situ stress at Rantau Dedap geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyanto, Andika; Sapiie, Benyamin; Idham Abdullah, Chalid; Permana Sidik, Ridwan

    2017-12-01

    Rantau Dedap Area is a geothermal field which is located in Great Sumatra Fault (GSF). The fault and fracture are main factor in the permeability of the geothermal system. However, not all faults and fractures have capability of to flow the fluids. Borehole image log is depiction of the borehole conditions, it is used to identify the natural fractures and drilling induced fracture. Both of them are used to identify the direction of the fracture, direction of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax), and geomechanics parameters. The natural fractures are the results of responses to stress on a rock and permeability which controlling factor in research area. Breakouts is found in this field as a trace of drilling induced fracture due to in situ stress work. Natural fractures are strongly clustered with true strike trending which first, second, and third major direction are N170°E – N180°E (N-S), N60°E – N70°E (NE-SW), and N310°E – N320°E (NW-SE), while the dominant dip is 80° –90°. Based on borehole breakout analysis, maximum horizontal stress orientation is identified in N162°E – N204°E (N-S) and N242°E (NE-SW) direction. It’s constantly similar with regional stress which is affected by GSF. Several parameters have been identified and analyzed are SHmax, SHmin, and Sy. It can be concluded that Rantau Dedap Geothermal Field is affected by strike-slip regime. The determination of in situ stress and natural fractures are important to study the pattern of permeability which is related to the fault in reservoir of this field.

  15. The effect of a tectonic stress field on coal and gas outbursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fenghua; Cheng, Yuanping

    2014-01-01

    Coal and gas outbursts have always been a serious threat to the safe and efficient mining of coal resources. Ground stress (especially the tectonic stress) has a notable effect on the occurrence and distribution of outbursts in the field practice. A numerical model considering the effect of coal gas was established to analyze the outburst danger from the perspective of stress conditions. To evaluate the outburst tendency, the potential energy of yielded coal mass accumulated during an outburst initiation was studied. The results showed that the gas pressure and the strength reduction from the adsorbed gas aggravated the coal mass failure and the ground stress altered by tectonics would affect the plastic zone distribution. To demonstrate the outburst tendency, the ratio of potential energy for the outburst initiation and the energy consumption was used. Increase of coal gas and tectonic stress could enhance the potential energy accumulation ratio, meaning larger outburst tendency. The component of potential energy for outburst initiation indicated that the proportion of elastic energy was increased due to tectonic stress. The elastic energy increase is deduced as the cause for a greater outburst danger in a tectonic area from the perspective of stress conditions.

  16. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  17. Corrosion of metals exposed to 25% magnesium chloride solution and tensile stress: Field and laboratory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemicals for snow and ice control operations is a common practice for improving the safety and mobility of roadways in cold climate, but brings significant concerns over their risks including the corrosive effects on transportation infrastructure and motor vehicles. The vast majority of existing studies and methods to test the deicer corrosivity have been restricted to laboratory environments and unstressed metals, which may not reliably simulate actual service conditions. As such, we report a case study in which stainless steel SS 304 (unstressed and externally tensile stressed, aluminum (Al 1100 and low carbon steel (C1010 coupons were exposed to 25% MgCl2 under field conditions for six weeks. A new corrosion test-bed was developed in Montana to accelerate the field exposure to this deicer. To further investigate the observed effect of tensile stress on the corrosion of stainless steel, SS 304 (unstressed and externally stressed coupons were exposed to 25% MgCl2 solution under the laboratory conditions. The C 1010 exhibited the highest percentage of rust area and suffered the most weight loss as a result of field exposure and MgCl2 sprays. In terms of ultimate tensile strength, the Al 1100 coupons saw the greatest reduction and the unstressed and externally stressed SS 304 coupons saw the least. The ability of MgCl2 to penetrate deep into the matrix of aluminum alloy poses great risk to such structural material. Tensile stressed SS 304 suffered more corrosion than unstressed SS 304 in both the field and laboratory conditions. Results from this case study may shed new light on the deicer corrosion issue and help develop improved field testing methods to evaluate the deicer corrosivity to metals in service.

  18. Surface profile and stress field evaluation using digital gradient sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; Tippur, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output such a data accurately. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squares integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.

  19. An Algorithm for the Numerical Solution of the Pseudo Compressible Navier-stokes Equations Based on the Experimenting Fields Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the experimenting fields approach is applied to the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible viscous flow. In this work, the solution is sought for both the pressure and velocity fields in the same time. Apparently, the correct velocity and pressure fields satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. In this technique a set of predefined fields are introduced to the governing equations and the residues are calculated. The flow according to these fields will not satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. However, the residues are used to construct the matrix of coefficients. Although, in this setup it seems trivial constructing the global matrix of coefficients, in other setups it can be quite involved. This technique separates the solver routine from the physics routines and therefore makes easy the coding and debugging procedures. We compare with few examples that demonstrate the capability of this technique.

  20. Modelling of stress fields during LFEM DC casting of aluminium billets by a meshless method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrič, B.; Šarler, B.

    2015-06-01

    Direct Chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys is a widely established technology for efficient production of aluminium billets and slabs. The procedure is being further improved by the application of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field (LFEM) in the area of the mold. Novel LFEM DC processing technique affects many different phenomena which occur during solidification, one of them being the stresses and deformations present in the billet. These quantities can have a significant effect on the quality of the cast piece, since they impact porosity, hot-tearing and cold cracking. In this contribution a novel local radial basis function collocation method (LRBFCM) is successfully applied to the problem of stress field calculation during the stationary state of DC casting of aluminium alloys. The formulation of the method is presented in detail, followed by the presentation of the tackled physical problem. The model describes the deformations of linearly elastic, inhomogeneous isotropic solid with a given temperature field. The temperature profile is calculated using the in-house developed heat and mass transfer model. The effects of low frequency EM casting process parameters on the vertical, circumferential and radial stress and on the deformation of billet surface are presented. The application of the LFEM appears to decrease the amplitudes of the tensile stress occurring in the billet.

  1. The Effect of Magnetic Field and Initial Stress on Fractional Order Generalized Thermoelastic Half-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Deswal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study magneto-thermoelastic interactions in an initially stressed isotropic homogeneous half-space in the context of fractional order theory of generalized thermoelasticity. State space formulation with the Laplace transform technique is used to obtain the general solution, and the resulting formulation is applied to the ramp type increase in thermal load and zero stress. Solutions of the problem in the physical domain are obtained by using a numerical method of the Laplace inverse transform based on the Fourier expansion technique, and the expressions for the displacement, temperature, and stress inside the half-space are obtained. Numerical computations are carried out for a particular material for illustrating the results. Results obtained for the field variables are displayed graphically. Some comparisons have been shown in figures to present the effect of fractional parameter, ramp parameter, magnetic field, and initial stress on the field variables. Some particular cases of special interest have been deduced from the present investigation.

  2. Compressed Sensing in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Jérôme; Starck, Jean-Luc; Ottensamer, Roland

    2008-11-01

    Recent advances in signal processing have focused on the use of sparse representations in various applications. A new field of interest based on sparsity has recently emerged: compressed sensing. This theory is a new sampling framework that provides an alternative to the well-known Shannon sampling theory. In this paper, we investigate how compressed sensing (CS) can provide new insights into astronomical data compression. We first give a brief overview of the compressed sensing theory which provides very simple coding process with low computational cost, thus favoring its use for real-time applications often found onboard space mission. In practical situations, owing to particular observation strategies (for instance, raster scans) astronomical data are often redundant; in that context, we point out that a CS-based compression scheme is flexible enough to account for particular observational strategies. Indeed, we show also that CS provides a new fantastic way to handle multiple observations of the same field view, allowing us to recover low level details, which is impossible with standard compression methods. This kind of CS data fusion concept could lead to an elegant and effective way to solve the problem ESA is faced with, for the transmission to the earth of the data collected by PACS, one of the instruments onboard the Herschel spacecraft which will launched in late 2008/early 2009. We show that CS enables to recover data with a spatial resolution enhanced up to 30% with similar sensitivity compared to the averaging technique proposed by ESA.

  3. Full-field mapping of internal strain distribution in red sandstone specimen under compression using digital volumetric speckle photography and X-ray computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingtao Mao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is always desirable to know the interior deformation pattern when a rock is subjected to mechanical load. Few experimental techniques exist that can represent full-field three-dimensional (3D strain distribution inside a rock specimen. And yet it is crucial that this information is available for fully understanding the failure mechanism of rocks or other geomaterials. In this study, by using the newly developed digital volumetric speckle photography (DVSP technique in conjunction with X-ray computed tomography (CT and taking advantage of natural 3D speckles formed inside the rock due to material impurities and voids, we can probe the interior of a rock to map its deformation pattern under load and shed light on its failure mechanism. We apply this technique to the analysis of a red sandstone specimen under increasing uniaxial compressive load applied incrementally. The full-field 3D displacement fields are obtained in the specimen as a function of the load, from which both the volumetric and the deviatoric strain fields are calculated. Strain localization zones which lead to the eventual failure of the rock are identified. The results indicate that both shear and tension are contributing factors to the failure mechanism.

  4. Field investigations of high stress soft surrounding rocks and deformation control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Field investigations of high stress soft rock deformations show that the high stress soft rock roadway can slide with large deformation. Severe extrusion and floor heave can also be subsequently observed. The supported roadway can be locally damaged or completely fail, where the floor has a large deformation and/or is seriously damaged. The factors inducing large deformation of surrounding rocks in deep roadway are rock strengths, structure face cutting types, stress states, stress release, support patterns, and construction methods. Based on the deformation characteristics of high stress soft rock roadway, a comprehensive support scheme is proposed. The overall support technology of “step-by-step and joint, hierarchical reinforcement” for roadway is presented, and the anchor cable and bolt parameters to check the design methods are also given. Finally, the proposed comprehensive support method “bolt + metal mesh + U-steel arch + shortcrete + grouting and cable” is used in the extension section of east main haulage roadway at −850 m level of Qujiang coal mine. The 173-day monitoring results show that the average convergence of sidewalls reaches 208 mm, and the average relative convergence of roof and floor reaches 448 mm, suggesting that this kind of support technology for controlling large deformation of high stress soft surrounding rock roadway is effective.

  5. Quercitol and osmotic adaptation of field-grown Eucalyptus under seasonal drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stefan K; Livesley, Stephen J; Merchant, Andrew; Bleby, Timothy M; Grierson, Pauline F

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the role of quercitol in osmotic adjustment in field-grown Eucalyptus astringens Maiden subject to seasonal drought stress over the course of 1 year. The trees grew in a native woodland and a farm plantation in the semi-arid wheatbelt region of south Western Australia. Plantation trees allocated relatively more biomass to leaves than woodland trees, but they suffered greater drought stress over summer, as indicated by lower water potentials, CO(2)assimilation rates and stomatal conductances. In contrast, woodland trees had relatively fewer leaves and suffered less drought stress. Plantation trees under drought stress engaged in osmotic adjustment, but woodland trees did not. Quercitol made a significant contribution to osmotic adjustment in drought-stressed trees (25% of total solutes), and substantially more quercitol was measured in the leaves of plantation trees (5% dry matter) than in the leaves of woodland trees (2% dry matter). We found no evidence that quercitol was used as a carbon storage compound while starch reserves were depleted under drought stress. Differences in stomatal conductance, biomass allocation and quercitol production clearly indicate that E. astringens is both morphologically and physiologically 'plastic' in response to growth environment, and that osmotic adjustment is only one part of a complex strategy employed by this species to tolerate drought.

  6. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth.

  7. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields : Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose

  8. Integrative field scale phenotyping for investigating metabolic components of water stress within a vineyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gago

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a high requirement for field phenotyping methodologies/technologies to determine quantitative traits related to crop yield and plant stress responses under field conditions. Methods We employed an unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with a thermal camera as a high-throughput phenotyping platform to obtain canopy level data of the vines under three irrigation treatments. High-resolution imagery (< 2.5 cm/pixel was employed to estimate the canopy conductance (g c via the leaf energy balance model. In parallel, physiological stress measurements at leaf and stem level as well as leaf sampling for primary and secondary metabolome analysis were performed. Results Aerial g c correlated significantly with leaf stomatal conductance (g s and stem sap flow, benchmarking the quality of our remote sensing technique. Metabolome profiles were subsequently linked with g c and g s via partial least square modelling. By this approach malate and flavonols, which have previously been implicated to play a role in stomatal function under controlled greenhouse conditions within model species, were demonstrated to also be relevant in field conditions. Conclusions We propose an integrative methodology combining metabolomics, organ-level physiology and UAV-based remote sensing of the whole canopy responses to water stress within a vineyard. Finally, we discuss the general utility of this integrative methodology for broad field phenotyping.

  9. Geophysical Properties of Hard Rock for Investigation of Stress Fields in Deep Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbo, M.; Young, R. P.; Schmitt, D. R.; Milkereit, B.

    2014-12-01

    A complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines is the high-stress dependency of the physical properties of hard rocks. In-mine observations show anisotropic variability of the in situ P- and S-wave velocities and resistivity of the hard rocks that are likely related to stress field changes. As part of a comprehensive study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, data from in situ monitoring of the seismicity, conductivity, stress, and stress dependent physical properties has been obtain. In-laboratory experiments are also being performed on borehole cores from the Sudbury mines. These experiments will measure the Norite borehole core's properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. Hydraulic fracturing has been successfully implemented in industries such as oil and gas and enhanced geothermal systems, and is currently being investigated as a potential method for preconditioning in mining. However, further research is required to quantify how hydraulic fractures propagate through hard, unfractured rock as well as naturally fractured rock typically found in mines. These in laboratory experiments will contribute to a hydraulic fracturing project evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing as a method of de-stressing hard rock mines. A tri-axial deformation cell equipped with 18 Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors will be used to bring the borehole cores to a tri-axial state of stress. The cores will then be injected with fluid until the the hydraulic fracture has propagated to the edge of the core, while AE waveforms will be digitized continuously at 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution for the duration of each experiment. These laboratory hydraulic fracture experiments will contribute to understanding how parameters including stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and viscosity, affect the fracturing process.

  10. Stress analysis of three-dimensional roadway layout of stagger arrangement with field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zimo; Chanda, Emmanuel; Zhao, Jingli; Wang, Zhihe

    2018-01-01

    Longwall top-coal caving (LTCC) has been a popular, more productive and cost-effective method for extracting thick (> 5 m) to ultra-thick coal seams in recent years. However, low-level recovery ratio of coal resources and top-coal loss above the supports at both ends of working face are long-term problems. Geological factors, such as large dip angle, soft rock, mining depth further complicate the problems. This paper proposes addressing this issue by adopting three-dimensional roadway layout of stagger arrangement (3-D RLSA). In this study, the first step was to analyse the stress environment surrounding head entry in the replacing working face based on the stress distribution characteristics at the triangular coal-pillar side in gob and the stress slip line field theory. In the second step, filed observation was conducted. Finally, an economic evaluation of the 3-D RLSA for extracting thick to ultra-thick seams was conducted.

  11. Formulation of Deformation Stress Fields and Constitutive Equations in Rational Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jianhua, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    In continuum mechanics, stress concept plays an essential role. For complicated materials, different stress concepts are used with ambiguity or different understanding. Geometrically, a material element is expressed by a closed region with arbitral shape. The internal region is acted by distance dependent force (internal body force), while the surface is acted by surface force. Further more, the element as a whole is in a physical background (exterior region) which is determined by the continuum where the element is embedded (external body force). Physically, the total energy can be additively decomposed as three parts: internal region energy, surface energy, and the background energy. However, as forces, they cannot be added directly. After formulating the general forms of physical fields, the deformation tensor is introduced to formulate the force variations caused by deformation. As the force variation is expressed by the deformation tensor, the deformation stress concept is well formulated. Furthermore, a...

  12. Field-based observations confirm linear scaling of sand flux with wind stress

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L

    2016-01-01

    Wind-driven sand transport generates atmospheric dust, forms dunes, and sculpts landscapes. However, it remains unclear how the sand flux scales with wind speed, largely because models do not agree on how particle speed changes with wind shear velocity. Here, we present comprehensive measurements from three new field sites and three published studies, showing that characteristic saltation layer heights, and thus particle speeds, remain approximately constant with shear velocity. This result implies a linear dependence of saltation flux on wind shear stress, which contrasts with the nonlinear 3/2 scaling used in most aeolian process predictions. We confirm the linear flux law with direct measurements of the stress-flux relationship occurring at each site. Models for dust generation, dune migration, and other processes driven by wind-blown sand on Earth, Mars, and several other planetary surfaces should be modified to account for linear stress-flux scaling.

  13. Crustal stress field in the Greek region inferred from inversion of moment tensor solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Heidbach, Oliver; Oncken, Onno; Suppe, John

    2016-04-01

    The Hellenic region is the seismically most active area in Europe, having experienced numerous large magnitude catastrophic earthquakes and associated devastating tsunamis. A means of mitigating these potential hazards is by better understanding the patterns of spatial and temporal deformation of the crust across the Hellenic orogenic system, over timescales that range from individual earthquakes to several tens of years. In this study for the first time we make collective use of the Global CMT (GCMT), Regional CMT (RCMT) and National Observatory of Athens (NOA) moment tensor databases in order to extract focal mechanism solutions that will be used to infer crustal stresses in the Greek region at an unprecedented resolution. We focus on the shallow seismicity within the upper plate (down to 42 km) and select solutions with good waveform fits and well-resolved hypocentral depths. In this way we obtained 1,614 focal mechanism solutions covering western Greece up to southern Albania, central and southern Greece, northern Aegean as well as the subduction trench west and east of Crete. These solutions are used as input to a regional-scale damped stress inversion over a grid whose node spacing is 0.35 degrees for the purpose of recovering the three principal stress axes and the stress ratio R for each node. Several sensitivity tests are performed where parameters such as damping, hypocentral depth, magnitude range are varied, in order to ascertain the robustness of our results. The final stress field model is then compared to the GPS-derived strain field revealing an excellent agreement between the two datasets. Additionally, maximum and minimum stress axes orientations are correlated with the strike and dip of known faults in order to improve our understanding of future fault rupture and corresponding seismic hazard.

  14. Analytical Solution for Stress Field and Intensity Factor in CSTBD under Mixed Mode Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najaf Ali Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that rocks fail faster under tensile stress, rock tensile strength is of greatimportance in applications such as blasting, rock fragmentation, slope stability, hydraulic fracturing,caprock integrity, and geothermal energy extraction. There are two direct and indirect methods tomeasure tensile strength. Since direct methods always encompass difficulties in test setup, indirectmethods, specifically the Brazilian test, have often been employed for tensile strength measurement.Tensile failure is technically attributed to crack propagation in rock. Fracture mechanics hassignificant potential for the determination of crack behaviour as well as propagation pattern. To applyBrazilian tests, cracked disc geometry has been suggested by the International Society for RockMechanics ISRM. Accordingly, a comprehensive study is necessary to evaluate stress field and stressintensity factor (SIF around the crack in the centre of the specimen. In this paper, superpositionprinciple is employed to solve the problem of cracked straight-through Brazilian disc (CSTBD, usingtwo methods of dislocation and complex stress function. Stress field and SIF in the vicinity of thecrack tip are then calculated. With the proposed method, the magnitude of critical load for crackinitiation in structures can be predicted. This method is valid for any crack of any arbitrary length andangle. In addition, numerical modelling has been carried out for the Brazilian disc. Finally, theanalytical solution has been compared with numerical modelling results showing the same outcomefor both methods.

  15. Influence of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary on the stress field northwest of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, J.; Cornet, F. H.; Cara, M.

    2014-11-01

    In 1356, a magnitude 6-7 earthquake occurred near Basel, in Switzerland. But recent compilations of GPS measurements reveal that measured horizontal deformation rates in northwestern continental Europe are smaller than error bars on the measurements, proving present tectonic activity, if any, is very small in this area. We propose to reconcile these apparently antinomic observations with a mechanical model of the lithosphere that takes into account the geometry of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, assuming that the only loading mechanism is gravity. The lithosphere is considered to be an elastoplastic material satisfying a Von Mises plasticity criterion. The model, which is 400 km long, 360 km wide and 230 km thick, is centred near Belfort in eastern France, with its width oriented parallel to the N145°E direction. It also takes into account the real topography of both the ground surface and that of the Moho discontinuity. Not only does the model reproduce observed principal stress directions orientations, it also identifies a plastic zone that fits roughly the most seismically active domain of the region. Interestingly, a somewhat similar stress map may be produced by considering an elastic lithosphere and an ad-hoc horizontal `tectonic' stress field. However, for the latter model, examination of the plasticity criterion suggests that plastic deformation should have taken place. It is concluded that the present-day stress field in this region is likely controlled by gravity and rheology, rather than by active Alpine tectonics.

  16. Transgenic alteration of ethylene biosynthesis increases grain yield in maize under field drought-stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habben, Jeffrey E; Bao, Xiaoming; Bate, Nicholas J; DeBruin, Jason L; Dolan, Dennis; Hasegawa, Darren; Helentjaris, Timothy G; Lafitte, Renee H; Lovan, Nina; Mo, Hua; Reimann, Kellie; Schussler, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    A transgenic gene-silencing approach was used to modulate the levels of ethylene biosynthesis in maize (Zea mays L.) and determine its effect on grain yield under drought stress in a comprehensive set of field trials. Commercially relevant transgenic events were created with down-regulated ACC synthases (ACSs), enzymes that catalyse the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis. These events had ethylene emission levels reduced approximately 50% compared with nontransgenic nulls. Multiple, independent transgenic hybrids and controls were tested in field trials at managed drought-stress and rain-fed locations throughout the US. Analysis of yield data indicated that transgenic events had significantly increased grain yield over the null comparators, with the best event having a 0.58 Mg/ha (9.3 bushel/acre) increase after a flowering period drought stress. A (genotype × transgene) × environment interaction existed among the events, highlighting the need to better understand the context in which the down-regulation of ACSs functions in maize. Analysis of secondary traits showed that there was a consistent decrease in the anthesis-silking interval and a concomitant increase in kernel number/ear in transgene-positive events versus nulls. Selected events were also field tested under a low-nitrogen treatment, and the best event was found to have a significant 0.44 Mg/ha (7.1 bushel/acre) yield increase. This set of extensive field evaluations demonstrated that down-regulating the ethylene biosynthetic pathway can improve the grain yield of maize under abiotic stress conditions. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Impact of Brake Pad Structure on Temperature and Stress Fields of Brake Disc

    OpenAIRE

    Guoshun Wang; Rong Fu

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing ABAQUS finite element software, the study established the relationship between a brake pad structure and distributions of temperature and thermal stress on brake disc. By introducing radial structure factor and circular structure factor concepts, the research characterized the effect of friction block radial and circumferential arrangement on temperature field of the brake disc. A method was proposed for improving heat flow distribution of the brake disc through optimizing the posit...

  18. Deleterious localized stress fields: the effects of boundaries and stiffness tailoring in anisotropic laminated plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, R M J; Weaver, P M

    2016-10-01

    The safe design of primary load-bearing structures requires accurate prediction of stresses, especially in the vicinity of geometric discontinuities where deleterious three-dimensional stress fields can be induced. Even for thin-walled structures significant through-thickness stresses arise at edges and boundaries, and this is especially precarious for laminates of advanced fibre-reinforced composites because through-thickness stresses are the predominant drivers in delamination failure. Here, we use a higher-order equivalent single-layer model derived from the Hellinger-Reissner mixed variational principle to examine boundary layer effects in laminated plates comprising constant-stiffness and variable-stiffness laminae and deforming statically in cylindrical bending. The results show that zigzag deformations, which arise due to layerwise differences in the transverse shear moduli, drive boundary layers towards clamped edges and are therefore critically important in quantifying localized stress gradients. The relative significance of the boundary layer scales with the degree of layerwise anisotropy and the thickness to characteristic length ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that the phenomenon of alternating positive and negative transverse shearing deformation through the thickness of composite laminates, previously only observed at clamped boundaries, can also occur at other locations as a result of smoothly varying the material properties over the in-plane dimensions of the laminate.

  19. The distribution of stresses in rigid fractal-like aggregates in a uniform flow field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldi, Andrea; Vanni, Marco

    2011-05-01

    The distribution of stresses in rigid fractal-like aggregates moving in a uniform flow field was investigated for particle-cluster and cluster-cluster aggregates with fractal dimensions ranging from 1.7 to 2.3. The method of reflections was used to calculate the drag force on each monomer, while the internal inter-monomer interactions were calculated by applying force and torque balances on each primary particle. The stress distribution was found to be very dissimilar from that of the applied external forces. Although the highest external forces act on the monomers located at the periphery of the aggregate where the drag is more intense, the most stressed inter-monomer bonds are always located in the internal part of the aggregate. This phenomenon is a consequence of the structure of the studied fractal aggregates, which are made mainly of filaments of monomers: the stress generated by the external forces is propagated and progressively accumulated by such filaments up to their roots, which are situated in the inner part of the cluster. Such a behaviour is different from that exhibited by highly connected structures, in which the loads are absorbed locally by the structure and the largest stresses are normally found in the proximity of the highest applied external forces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of stress fields on magma chamber stability and the formation of collapse calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, William; Burke, Kevin; Strecker, Manfred

    2003-08-01

    The summits of many of the Earth's and other planets' larger volcanoes are occupied by calderas that formed by collapse into an evacuating, underlying magma chamber. These collapse calderas are typically several tens of square kilometers in area and are commonly elliptical in shape. We show that the long axes of late Quaternary collapse calderas in the Kenya rift valley, the western Basin and Range province, the Snake River-Yellowstone Plateau, and the Iceland rift zone are parallel to the upper crustal minimum horizontal stress direction (Sh) as determined by independent criteria. We suggest that circular magma chambers beneath these volcanoes became elliptical by stress-induced spalling of their chamber walls, by a mechanism that is analogous to the formation of breakouts in boreholes and tunnels. In breakouts, the hole becomes elongate parallel to the far-field minimum stress. In the Kenya rift, Late Pleistocene caldera collapse was accompanied by a 45° rotation of Sh and an increase in the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress (SH). The breakout model predicts increasingly unstable caldera walls under these conditions, a possible explanation for the sudden appearance of so many collapse events in a volcanic setting that had never experienced them before. This mechanism of stress change-induced collapse may have played a role in other caldera settings.

  1. Generalized stress field in granular soils heap with Rayleigh–Ritz method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Bi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The stress field in granular soils heap (including piled coal will have a non-negligible impact on the settlement of the underlying soils. It is usually obtained by measurements and numerical simulations. Because the former method is not reliable as pressure cells instrumented on the interface between piled coal and the underlying soft soil do not work well, results from numerical methods alone are necessary to be doubly checked with one more method before they are extended to more complex cases. The generalized stress field in granular soils heap is analyzed with Rayleigh–Ritz method. The problem is divided into two cases: case A without horizontal constraint on the base and case B with horizontal constraint on the base. In both cases, the displacement functions u(x, y and v(x, y are assumed to be cubic polynomials with 12 undetermined parameters, which will satisfy the Cauchy's partial differential equations, generalized Hooke's law and boundary equations. A function is built with the Rayleigh–Ritz method according to the principle of minimum potential energy, and the problem is converted into solving two undetermined parameters through the variation of the function, while the other parameters are expressed in terms of these two parameters. By comparison of results from the Rayleigh–Ritz method and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that the Rayleigh–Ritz method is feasible to study the generalized stress field in granular soils heap. Solutions from numerical methods are verified before being extended to more complicated cases.

  2. Mapping three-dimensional stress and strain fields within a soft hydrogel using a fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew S; Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2012-05-16

    Three-dimensional cell culture is becoming mainstream as it is recognized that many animal cell types require the biophysical and biochemical cues within the extracellular matrices to perform truly physiologically realistic functions. However, tools for characterizing cellular mechanical environment are largely limited to cell culture plated on a two-dimensional substrate. We present a three-dimensional traction microscopy that is capable of mapping three-dimensional stress and strain within a soft and transparent extracellular matrix using a fluorescence microscope and a simple forward data analysis algorithm. We validated this technique by mapping the strain and stress field within the bulk of a thin polyacrylamide gel layer indented by a millimeter-size glass ball, together with a finite-element analysis. The experimentally measured stress and strain fields are in excellent agreements with results of the finite-element simulation. The unique contributions of the presented three-dimensional traction microscopy technique are: 1), the use of a fluorescence microscope in contrast with the confocal microscope that is required for the current three-dimensional traction microscopes in the literature; 2), the determination of the pressure field of an incompressible gel from strains; and 3), the simple forward-data-analysis algorithm. Future application of this technique for mapping animal cell traction in three-dimensional nonlinear biological gels is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Isentropic compression studies using the NHMFL single turn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rickel, Dwight [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-19

    Magnetic isentropic compression experiments (ICE) provide the most accurate shock free compression data for materials at megabar stresses. Recent ICE experiments performed on the Sandia Z-machine (Asay, 1999) and at the Los Alamos High Explosive Pulsed Power facility (Tasker, 2006) are providing our nation with data on material properties in extreme dynamic high stress environments. The LANL National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) can offer a less complex ICE experiment at high stresses (up to {approx}1Mbar) with a high sample throughput and relatively low cost. This is not to say that the NHMFL technique will replace the other methods but rather complement them. For example, NHMFL-ICE is ideal for the development of advanced diagnostics, e.g., to detect phase changes. We will discuss the physics of the NHMFL-ICE experiments and present data from the first proof-of-principle experiments that were performed in September 2010.

  4. Characterization of Compressive Properties of Polymer Foam Materials Using DIC and a Modified Arcan Fixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taher, Siavash Talebi; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    A modified Arcan fixture (MAF) has been developed to characterize polymer foam materials with respect to their tensile, compressive, shear and bidirectional mechanical properties at room and at elevated temperatures. The MAF enables the realization of pure compression or high compression to shear...... to misalignment. The objective is to use digital image correlation (DIC) to obtain the unidirectional and bidirectional elastic coefficients and the stress-strain response to failure of polymer foam materials at elevated tempreature. To account for nonhomogeneity of the strain field in the specimen cross sections...

  5. Effects of tensile and compressive in-plane stress fields on adhesion in laser induced delamination experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, A.; Vellinga, W. P.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the adhesion of a polymer coating on steel substrate subjected to uniaxial tensile plastic deformations was studied with the laser induced delamination technique. A decrease in the practical work of adhesion has been measured as the deformation of the substrate progressed. Moreover, it

  6. Effects of a magnetic field on pelvic floor muscle function in women with stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Jonathan; Robertson, Jack R; Elia, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been found to affect neuromuscular function. To study the effect of a magnetic field on measurements of urethral function in women with stress urinary incontinence. Observational comparative study. Consecutive patients in a continence center. Twenty-six consecutive women with diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). History and physical examination, neurologic exam, urethrocystoscopy, urodynamic testing with water-filling cystometry, urethral profilometry at rest, during coughing, and during coughing while performing a levator ani contraction (knack maneuver). The same urodynamic procedures were performed again after the subjects were asked to step on specifically designed magnets (magnetic cushion device). Two-tailed student t test. Urethral pressure at rest, during coughing, and during coughing while performing a levator ani contraction. Mean age was 58.3 years (range: 36-81), mean parity 2.8 (range: 0-8). The urodynamic parameters measured without and with the use of the magnetic cushion device were not found to be different except for the knack maneuver. The pressure in the urethra during the knack maneuver while the subjects were stepping on the magnetic device was significantly higher than the 1 obtained without the magnetic field. In our patient population, a magnetic field increases the efficacy of voluntary levator ani contractions.

  7. A multi-stage 3-D stress field modelling approach exemplified in the Bavarian Molasse Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Moritz O.; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the contemporary in situ stress state is a key issue for safe and sustainable subsurface engineering. However, information on the orientation and magnitudes of the stress state is limited and often not available for the areas of interest. Therefore 3-D geomechanical-numerical modelling is used to estimate the in situ stress state and the distance of faults from failure for application in subsurface engineering. The main challenge in this approach is to bridge the gap in scale between the widely scattered data used for calibration of the model and the high resolution in the target area required for the application. We present a multi-stage 3-D geomechanical-numerical approach which provides a state-of-the-art model of the stress field for a reservoir-scale area from widely scattered data records. Therefore, we first use a large-scale regional model which is calibrated by available stress data and provides the full 3-D stress tensor at discrete points in the entire model volume. The modelled stress state is used subsequently for the calibration of a smaller-scale model located within the large-scale model in an area without any observed stress data records. We exemplify this approach with two-stages for the area around Munich in the German Molasse Basin. As an example of application, we estimate the scalar values for slip tendency and fracture potential from the model results as measures for the criticality of fault reactivation in the reservoir-scale model. The modelling results show that variations due to uncertainties in the input data are mainly introduced by the uncertain material properties and missing SHmax magnitude estimates needed for a more reliable model calibration. This leads to the conclusion that at this stage the model's reliability depends only on the amount and quality of available stress information rather than on the modelling technique itself or on local details of the model geometry. Any improvements in modelling and increases

  8. Contemporary stress field in the area of the 2016 Amatrice seismic sequence (central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Mariucci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We update the last present-day stress map for Italy relatively to the area of 2016 Amatrice seismic sequence (central Italy taking into account a large number of earthquakes occurred from August 24 to October 3, 2016. In particular in this paper, we discuss the new stress data from crustal earthquake focal mechanisms selecting those with Magnitude ≥ 4.0; at the same time, we revise the borehole data, analyze the stratigraphic profiles and the relative sonic logs in 4 deep wells located close to the Amatrice sequence along the Apennine belt and toward east along the Adriatic foredeep. From these data we consider the P-wave velocity trend with depth and estimate rock density following an empirical relationship. Then we calculate the overburden stress magnitude for each well. The new present-day stress indicators confirm the presence of prevalent normal faulting regime and better define the local stress field in the area, highlighting a slight rotation from NE-SW to ENE-WSW of extension. The analysis evidences that the lithostatic gradient gradually changes from ~26 MPa/km in the belt to less than 23 MPa/km along the Adriatic foredeep. Finally, at a depth of 5 km we estimate the vertical stress magnitude varying from 130 MPa to 114 moving from the Apennine belt to the Adriatic foredeep. Although the wells are very close each other they show different P wave velocities from the belt to the foredeep with values ~7km/s and ~4 km/s at 5 km depth, respectively.

  9. The generalized fracture criteria based on the multi-parameter representation of the crack tip stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, L. V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper is devoted to the multi-parameter asymptotic description of the stress field near the crack tip of a finite crack in an infinite isotropic elastic plane medium subject to 1) tensile stress; 2) in-plane shear; 3) mixed mode loading for a wide range of mode-mixity situations (Mode I and Mode II). The multi-parameter series expansion of stress tensor components containing higher-order terms is obtained. All the coefficients of the multiparameter series expansion of the stress field are given. The main focus is on the discussion of the influence of considering the higher-order terms of the Williams expansion. The analysis of the higher-order terms in the stress field is performed. It is shown that the larger the distance from the crack tip, the more terms it is necessary to keep in the asymptotic series expansion. Therefore, it can be concluded that several more higher-order terms of the Williams expansion should be used for the stress field description when the distance from the crack tip is not small enough. The crack propagation direction angle is calculated. Two fracture criteria, the maximum tangential stress criterion and the strain energy density criterion, are used. The multi-parameter form of the two commonly used fracture criteria is introduced and tested. Thirty and more terms of the Williams series expansion for the near-crack-tip stress field enable the angle to be calculated more precisely.

  10. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A; Leiva, Luisa F; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G; Worthington, Margaret L; Miles, John W; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress.

  11. Field Investigations On the Lateral Vibration Features Of Prestressed Concrete Stress Ribbon Footbridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukada Saiji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prestressed concrete (PC stress ribbon footbridge is a type of suspension bridge without towers, which has been applied in Japan and all over the world for years in light of its low construction cost and aesthetic merit. It generally consists of the precast concrete slabs with embedded cables. However, the walking-induced lateral vibration trouble of the Millennium Bridge in London in 2000 gave a lesson to the engineers that the lateral vibration feature must be taken into consideration for the footbridge vibration evaluation. In this sense, the field investigations on the lateral vibration features of 14 pre-stressed concrete stress ribbon footbridge in Japan was carried out by artificial impact and damping free vibration tests. According to the investigations, the larger the bridge span, the lower the frequencies of lateral-related vibration modes. In addition, based on the damping-free vibration field tests, there was a tendency toward the damping constant degradation when bridge span became larger.

  12. Attachment styles of helping volunteers and their coping with stress in the field of psychosocial help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonida Kobal Možina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years I have been observing young adults who worked as volunteers in the field of psychosocial help. I have studied their functioning during summer psychotherapeutic camps, where they spent about 20 days with children and adolescents with heavier emotional and behaviour problems. Therapeutic camps based on the concept of milieu therapy often presented a stress factor for the volunteers, consisting mostly of students with no therapeutic education. I presumed they would differ in prevailing attachment styles, in their ways of coping with stress, and in constructive shifts when coping with stress. The sample consisted of 21 volunteers. Data were collected with The Attachment Style Questionnaire and with two semi-structured interviews and interpreted with the qualitative analysis. Volunteers with a preoccupied attachment style, for example, had difficulties with distancing themselves from inner experiencing in stressful situations and often went through intense emotional crises, helplessness, suffering; they were looking for constant support and held on to idealized individuals; they needed frequent feedback information about themselves and their work; self-image and self-evaluation depended on external factors. Volunteers with an avoidant attachment style, for example, avoided conflicts and emotional engagements by occupying themselves with work, activity; holding back emotions was often followed by intense anger outbursts; their reactions were inflexible and connected with their expectations and goals, thus exercising constant control in the relationship with their self-sufficient attitude.

  13. Numerical and experimental analysis of the residual stress field in cladded components; Numerische und experimentelle Bestimmung des Eigenspannungszustands in plattierten Komponenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, Dieter; Brand, Marcus; Hohe, Joerg [Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The inner surface of a ferritic reactor pressure vessel is protected against corrosion by an austenitic cladding that is usually performed by a double-pass welding in order to avoid under-clad defects und to improve the microstructural properties of the cladding material. On the other hand the different thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and the base metal induce a complex residual stress field. This has a non-negligible influence on the fracture mechanical assessment of postulated flaws within or under the cladding. The determination of the residual stress field was achieved by numerical simulation of the cladding process. The calibration of the used equivalent heat sources for the modelling of the heat input within the simulation was performed using measured data of the temperature field in a KTA compliant cladding process of test plates made of plant-representative materials. The simulation of the welding process used the temperature dependent material characteristics taking into account the transformation behaviour of the ferritic base metal. The resulting residual stress field shows significant tensile stresses within the cladding with a subsequent compressive stress field under the cladding. The calculated residual stress field is in good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison of the calculated residual stress field using the process simulation with the results of a simplified modelling assuming an increased stress-free temperature in the range of the operation temperature shows also a good agreement, esp. using the materials characteristics of KTA. [German] Die Innenoberflaeche von Reaktordruckbehaeltern aus ferritischen Werkstoffen wird zum Schutz gegen Korrosion mit einer austenitischen Plattierung versehen. Diese wird ueblicherweise als zweilagige Schweissplattierung ausgefuehrt, um die Bildung von Unterplattierungsfehlern zu vermeiden und die mikrostrukturellen Eigenschaften des Plattierungswerkstoffs zu verbessern. Auf der

  14. Estimation of transient creep crack-tip stress fields for SE(B) specimen under elastic-plastic-creep conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Sang; Je, Jin Ho; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Yun Jae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper estimates the time-dependent crack-tip stress fields under elastic-plastic-creep conditions. We perform Finite-Element (FE) transient creep analyses for a Single-Edge-notched-Bend (SEB) specimen. We investigate the effect of the initial plasticity on the transient creep by systematically varying the magnitude of the initial step-load. We consider both the same stress exponent and different stress exponent in the power-law creep and plasticity to determine the elastic-plastic-creep behaviour. To estimation of the crack-tip stress fields, we compare FE analysis results with those obtained numerically formulas. In addition, we propose a new equation to predict the crack-tip stress fields when the creep exponent is different from the plastic exponent.

  15. Vacuum stress tensor of a scalar field in a rectangular waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.B.; Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: robson@cbpf.br; svaiter@lns.mit.edu; Paola, R.D.M. de [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias]. E-mail: rpaola@efei.br

    2001-11-01

    Using the heat Kernel method and the analytical continuation of the zeta function, we calculate the canonical and improved vacuum stress tensors, {l_brace}T{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(vector x){r_brace} and {l_brace}{theta}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} (vector x){r_brace}, associated with a massless scalar field confined in the interior of an infinity long rectangular waveguide. The local depence of the renormalized energy for two special configurations when the total energy is positive and negative are presented using {l_brace}T{sub 00}(vector x){r_brace} and {l_brace}{theta}{sub 00}(vector x){r_brace}. From the stress tensors we obtain the local casimir forces in all walls by introducing a particular external configuration. It is hown that this external configuration cannot give account of the edge divergences of the local forces. The local form of the forces is obtained for three special configurations. (author)

  16. Bioeffects of Static Magnetic Fields: Oxidative Stress, Genotoxic Effects, and Cancer Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Ghodbane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of static magnetic fields (SMFs with living organisms is a rapidly growing field of investigation. The magnetic fields (MFs effect observed with radical pair recombination is one of the well-known mechanisms by which MFs interact with biological systems. Exposure to SMF can increase the activity, concentration, and life time of paramagnetic free radicals, which might cause oxidative stress, genetic mutation, and/or apoptosis. Current evidence suggests that cell proliferation can be influenced by a treatment with both SMFs and anticancer drugs. It has been recently found that SMFs can enhance the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic drugs; this may provide a new strategy for cancer therapy. This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of SMFs bioeffects. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: free radical generation and oxidative stress, apoptosis and genotoxicity, and cancer. After an introduction on SMF classification and medical applications, the basic phenomena to understand the bioeffects are described. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts; international safety guidelines are also cited.

  17. Osteoblastic differentiation and stress response of human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to alternating current electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electric fields are integral to many biological events, from maintaining cellular homeostasis to embryonic development to healing. The application of electric fields offers substantial therapeutic potential, while optimal dosing regimens and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the positive clinical impact are poorly understood. Methods The purpose of this study was to track the differentiation profile and stress response of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation during exposure to a 20 mV/cm, 60 kHz electric field. Morphological and biochemical changes were imaged using endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and quantitatively assessed through eccentricity calculations and extraction of the redox ratio from NADH, FAD and lipofuscin contributions. Real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR were used to track osteogenic differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase (ALP and collagen type 1 (col1, and stress response markers, such as heat shock protein 27 (hsp27 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. Comparisons of collagen deposition between the stimulated hMSCs and controls were examined through second harmonic generation (SHG imaging. Results Quantitative differences in cell morphology, as described through an eccentricity ratio, were found on days 2 and days 5 (p Conclusions Electrical stimulation is a useful tool to improve hMSC osteogenic differentiation, while heat shock proteins may reveal underlying mechanisms, and optical non-invasive imaging may be used to monitor the induced morphological and biochemical changes.

  18. Phase field approach with anisotropic interface energy and interface stresses: Large strain formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Warren, James A.

    2016-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent, large-strain, multi-phase field approach (with consequent interface stresses) is generalized for the case with anisotropic interface (gradient) energy (e.g. an energy density that depends both on the magnitude and direction of the gradients in the phase fields). Such a generalization, if done in the "usual" manner, yields a theory that can be shown to be manifestly unphysical. These theories consider the gradient energy as anisotropic in the deformed configuration, and, due to this supposition, several fundamental contradictions arise. First, the Cauchy stress tensor is non-symmetric and, consequently, violates the moment of momentum principle, in essence the Herring (thermodynamic) torque is imparting an unphysical angular momentum to the system. In addition, this non-symmetric stress implies a violation of the principle of material objectivity. These problems in the formulation can be resolved by insisting that the gradient energy is an isotropic function of the gradient of the order parameters in the deformed configuration, but depends on the direction of the gradient of the order parameters (is anisotropic) in the undeformed configuration. We find that for a propagating nonequilibrium interface, the structural part of the interfacial Cauchy stress is symmetric and reduces to a biaxial tension with the magnitude equal to the temperature- and orientation-dependent interface energy. Ginzburg-Landau equations for the evolution of the order parameters and temperature evolution equation, as well as the boundary conditions for the order parameters are derived. Small strain simplifications are presented. Remarkably, this anisotropy yields a first order correction in the Ginzburg-Landau equation for small strains, which has been neglected in prior works. The next strain-related term is third order. For concreteness, specific orientation dependencies of the gradient energy coefficients are examined, using published molecular dynamics

  19. Regional Stress Field in the Maghreb Region From an Updated Focal Mechanism Catalog (1954-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamara, Samir; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the regional stress field in the Maghreb region we construct a focal mechanism catalog for earthquakes that occurred from 1954 to 2014. To this intent, all available moment tensor solutions of past earthquakes obtained from different sources were checked, compared and corrected. Furthermore, the focal solutions of all recent earthquakes with magnitude down to 4 and for which data is available were calculated using a new method based on waveform fitting of observed seismograms and synthetics calculated for a range of fault angles and hypocenter depths. Observed seismograms of all stations for a given earthquake were thus collected, processed and subject to a rigorous quality control according to the corresponding signal-to-noise ratio. An average 1-D earth model for the Maghreb-western Mediterranean region was also constructed to calculate synthetics. The misfits between these observed seismograms and a set of synthetics calculated for every value of fault angles (strike, dip and rake) and hypocenter depths were calculated after respectively, a phase fitting obtained by shifting the seismograms to the best cross-correlation between data and synthetics, and amplitudes scaling. The best configuration of fault angles and hypocenter depths was then selected according to the smallest average misfit over all stations. If a systematic time shift was noticeable for all stations or most of them, an additional relocation step was done to obtain the most accurate earthquake's epicenter. Most of the earthquakes included in the catalog define several spatial clusters for which the assumption of homogeneous stress can be fulfilled. Hence, a stress inversion for each cluster was performed and a stress ratio indicating the dominance of compressional or tensional stresses as well as the directions and dips of the tensional, intermediate and compressional axis were obtained.

  20. Caffeine and sleep-deprivation mediated changes in open-field behaviours, stress response and antioxidant status in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olakunle Onaolapo

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Repeated caffeine consumption and/or acute sleep-deprivation led to significant changes in pattern of open-field behaviour and stress/antioxidant response in mice. Responses seen in the study are probably due to modulatory effects of caffeine on the total body response to stressful stimuli.

  1. Stress propagation in a concentrated colloidal suspension under shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martys, N S; Khalil, M; George, W L; Lootens, D; Hébraud, P

    2012-03-01

    The stress propagation in a concentrated attractive colloidal suspension under shear is studied using numerical simulations. The spatial correlations of the intercolloidal stress field are studied and an inertia-like tensor is defined in order to characterize the anisotropic nature of the stress field. It is shown that the colloids remain in a liquid order, the intercolloidal stress is strongly anisotropic. A transition under flow is observed: during a transient regime at low deformation, the stress propagates along the compression direction of the shear, whereas at larger deformations, the stress is organized into layers parallel to the (flow, vorticity) plane.

  2. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Lucas, J.H.; Moore, G.T.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-10-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible behavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The first project evaluated the potentially aversive character of exposure to 60 Hz electric fields by determining the threshold intensity that produces escape or avoidance responses. The second project estimated the threshold intensity for detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means was 6 to 16 kV/m. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. 131 refs., 87 figs., 123 tabs.

  3. Reynolds and Maxwell stress measurements in the reversed field pinch experiment Extrap-T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    The complete Reynolds stress (RS) has been measured in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. The RS exhibits a strong gradient in the region where a high E × B shear takes place. Experimental results show this gradient to be almost entirely due to the electrostatic contribution. This has been interpreted as experimental evidence of flow generation via turbulence mechanism. The scales involved in flow generation are deduced from the frequency decomposition of RS tensor. They are found related to magnetohydrodynamic activity but are different with respect to the scales responsible for turbulent transport.

  4. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  5. Anisotropic sensitivity of RDX and HMX from compressive shear reactive dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; An, Qi; Liu, Yi; Zybin, Sergey V.; Goddard, William A., III; Materials Process Simulation Center, Caltech Team

    2011-06-01

    The ReaxFF reactive force field was applied to study the mechanical and chemical behavior of RDX and HMX under combined compression and shear load. We use it to predict the anisotropic shock sensitivity of RDX and HMX single crystals. After compressed uniaxially along different shock directions, several preferable slip systems are chosen based on the maximum resolved shear stress. The pure shear deformation is applied at constant rate on these slip systems to relax the mechanical stresses until the crystal becomes amorphous. We find that the shear on a slip system with larger steric hindrance between molecules leads to larger shear stress overshoot and faster temperature increase resulting in early bond-breaking processes and initiation of chemical reactions. Our simulations confirm the effect of steric hindrance to shear on shock anisotropy of sensitivity and capture the thermochemical processes dominating the phenomena of shear-induced chemical initiation of shock- compressed explosives.

  6. Modeling of stresses and electric fields in piezoelectric multilayer: Application to multi quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaneshwar Mishra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Exact closed-form expressions have been derived for the stresses and the electric fields induced in piezoelectric multilayers deposited on a substrate with lattice misfit and thermal expansion coefficient mismatch. The derived formulations can model any number of layers using recursive relations that minimize the computation time. A proper rotation matrix has been utilized to generalize the expressions so that they can be used for various growth orientations with each layer having hexagonal crystal symmetry. As an example, the influence of lattice misfit and thermal expansion coefficient mismatch on the state of electroelastic fields in different layers of GaN multi quantum wells has been examined. A comparison with the finite element analysis results showed very close agreement. The analytical expressions developed herein will be useful in designing optoelectronic devices as well as in predicting defect density in multi quantum wells.

  7. Non-Destructive Detection of Wire Rope Discontinuities from Residual Magnetic Field Images Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform and Compressed Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juwei; Tan, Xiaojiang; Zheng, Pengbo

    2017-03-16

    Electromagnetic methods are commonly employed to detect wire rope discontinuities. However, determining the residual strength of wire rope based on the quantitative recognition of discontinuities remains problematic. We have designed a prototype device based on the residual magnetic field (RMF) of ferromagnetic materials, which overcomes the disadvantages associated with in-service inspections, such as large volume, inconvenient operation, low precision, and poor portability by providing a relatively small and lightweight device with improved detection precision. A novel filtering system consisting of the Hilbert-Huang transform and compressed sensing wavelet filtering is presented. Digital image processing was applied to achieve the localization and segmentation of defect RMF images. The statistical texture and invariant moment characteristics of the defect images were extracted as the input of a radial basis function neural network. Experimental results show that the RMF device can detect defects in various types of wire rope and prolong the service life of test equipment by reducing the friction between the detection device and the wire rope by accommodating a high lift-off distance.

  8. Non-Destructive Detection of Wire Rope Discontinuities from Residual Magnetic Field Images Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform and Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic methods are commonly employed to detect wire rope discontinuities. However, determining the residual strength of wire rope based on the quantitative recognition of discontinuities remains problematic. We have designed a prototype device based on the residual magnetic field (RMF of ferromagnetic materials, which overcomes the disadvantages associated with in-service inspections, such as large volume, inconvenient operation, low precision, and poor portability by providing a relatively small and lightweight device with improved detection precision. A novel filtering system consisting of the Hilbert-Huang transform and compressed sensing wavelet filtering is presented. Digital image processing was applied to achieve the localization and segmentation of defect RMF images. The statistical texture and invariant moment characteristics of the defect images were extracted as the input of a radial basis function neural network. Experimental results show that the RMF device can detect defects in various types of wire rope and prolong the service life of test equipment by reducing the friction between the detection device and the wire rope by accommodating a high lift-off distance.

  9. Determination of Hot-Carrier Distribution Functions in Uniaxially Stressed p-Type Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    1973-01-01

    This paper gives a description of an experimental determination of distribution functions in k→ space of hot holes in uniaxially compressed germanium. The hot-carrier studies were made at 85°K at fields up to 1000 V/cm and uniaxial stresses up to 11 800 kg/cm2. The field and stress were always...

  10. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... natural disaster. This type of stress can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different people may feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, ...

  11. High-Throughput Phenotyping in Plant Stress Response: Methods and Potential Applications to Polyamine Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, D; Briglia, N; Summerer, S; Petrozza, A; Cellini, F; Iannacone, R

    2018-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping has opened whole new perspectives for crop improvement and better understanding of quantitative traits in plants. Generation of loss-of-function and gain-of-function plant mutants requires processing and imaging a large number of plants in order to determine unknown gene functions and phenotypic changes generated by genetic modifications or selection of new traits. The use of phenomics for the evaluation of transgenic lines contributed significantly to the identification of plants more tolerant to biotic/abiotic stresses and furthermore, helped in the identification of unknown gene functions. In this chapter we describe the High-throughput phenotyping (HTP) platform working in our facility, drawing the general protocol and showing some examples of data obtainable from the platform. Tomato transgenic plants over-expressing the arginine decarboxylase 2 gene, which is involved in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, were analyzed through our HTP facility for their tolerance to abiotic stress and significant differences in water content and ability to recover after drought stress where highlighted. This demonstrates the applicability of this methodology to the plant polyamine field.

  12. Impact of Brake Pad Structure on Temperature and Stress Fields of Brake Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoshun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing ABAQUS finite element software, the study established the relationship between a brake pad structure and distributions of temperature and thermal stress on brake disc. By introducing radial structure factor and circular structure factor concepts, the research characterized the effect of friction block radial and circumferential arrangement on temperature field of the brake disc. A method was proposed for improving heat flow distribution of the brake disc through optimizing the position of the friction block of the brake pad. Structure optimization was conducted on brake pads composed of 5 or 7 circular friction blocks. The result shows that, with the same overall contact area of friction pair, an appropriate brake pad structure can make the friction energy distribute evenly and therefore lowers peak temperature and stress of the brake disc. Compared with a brake pad of 7 friction blocks, an optimized brake pad of 5 friction blocks lowered the peak temperature of the corresponding brake disc by 4.9% and reduced the highest stress by 10.7%.

  13. Stress field evolution above the Peruvian flat-slab (Cordillera Blanca, northern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, A.; Audin, L.; Robert, X.; Pêcher, A.; Schwartz, S.

    2017-08-01

    In subduction settings, the tectonic regime of the overriding plate is closely related to the geometry of the subducting plate. Flat-slab segments are supposed to increase coupling at the plate interface in the Andes, resulting in an increase and eastward migration of the shortening in the overriding plate. Above the Peruvian flat-slab, a 200 km-long normal fault trend parallel to the range and delimits the western flank of the Cordillera Blanca. In a context of flat subduction, expected to produce shortening, the presence of the Cordillera Blanca normal fault (CBNF) is surprising. We performed a systematic inversion of striated fault planes in the Cordillera Blanca region to better characterize the stress field above the Peruvian flat-slab. It evidences the succession of different tectonic regimes. NE-SW extension is predominant in most of the sites indicating a regional extension. We suggest that the Peruvian flat-slab trigger extension in the Western Cordillera while the shortening migrated eastward. Finally, we propose that flat-slab segments do not increase the coupling at the trench neither the shortening in the overriding plate but only favor shortening migration backward. However, the stress field of the overriding plate arises from the evolution of plate interface properties through time due to bathymetric anomaly migration.

  14. Stress Fields Along Okinawa Trough and Ryukyu Arc Inferred From Regional Broadband Moment Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, A.; Fukuyama, E.

    2001-12-01

    Most shallow earthquakes along Okinawa trough and Ryukyu arc are relatively small (MFREESIA). Lower limit of magnitude of the earthquakes determined becomes 1.5 smaller in M{}w than that of Harvard moment tensors. As a result, we could examine the stress field in more detail than Fournier et al.(2001, JGR, 106, 13751-) did based on surface geology and teleseismic moment tensors. In the NE Okinawa trough, extension axes are oblique to the trough strike, while in SW Okinawa trough, they are perpendicular to the trough. Fault type in SW is normal fault and gradually changes to mixture of normal and strike slip toward NE. In the Ryukyu arc, extension axes are parallel to the arc. Although this feature is not clear in the NW Ryukyu arc, arc parallel extension may be a major property of entire arc. Dominant fault type is normal fault and several strike slips with the same extensional component are included. The volcanic train is located at the edge of arc parallel extension field faced A simple explanation of the arc parallel extension is the response to the opening motion of the Okinawa trough. Another possible mechanism is forearc movement due to oblique subduction which is enhanced in SW. We consider that the Okinawa trough and the Ryukyu arc are independent stress provinces.

  15. Extreme of random field over rectangle with application to concrete rupture stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2000-01-01

    Probabilities of excursions of random processes and fields into critical domains are of fundamental interestin many civil engineering decision problems. Examples are reliability evaluations of structures subject torandom load processes, the influence of the size of a structural element on the car......Probabilities of excursions of random processes and fields into critical domains are of fundamental interestin many civil engineering decision problems. Examples are reliability evaluations of structures subject torandom load processes, the influence of the size of a structural element...... results for such probabilities. However, dueto the engineering importance of the problem, several approximate assessment methods have been suggestedin the past. The suitability and accuracy of each of these methods depends on the type of process or fieldunder consideration. Often recourse must be taken...... to the area of the rectangle and the side lengths of therectangle. Published rupture stress data for plain concrete beams illustrate the applicability of the derivedclosed form extreme value distributions as models for distributions of rupture stresses related to weakest linkmechanisms....

  16. Whole-field measurement of three-dimensional stress by scattered-light photoelasticity with unpolarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihara T.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In digital scattered-light photoelasticity with unpolarized light (DSLPUL, secondary principal stress direction ψj and total relative phase retardation ρjtot in a three-dimensional stressed model with rotation of the principal stress axes are obtained by measuring Stokes parameters of scattered light from optical slices. The present paper describes intelligibly the principle of DSLPUL, and then demonstrates that the ψj and ρjtot in a frozen stress sphere model are nondestructively measured over the entire field.

  17. Williams expansion-based approximation of the stress field in an Al 2024 body with a crack from optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Seitl

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the approximation of the stress field in the vicinity of crack tip in a compact tension specimen made from Al 2024-T351 is presented. Crack tip stress tensor components are expressed using the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM theory in this work, more precisely via its multi-parameter formulation, i.e. by Williams power series (WPS. Determination of coefficients of terms of this series is performed using a least squares-based regression technique known as over deterministic method (ODM for which displacements data obtained experimentally via optical measurements are taken as inputs. The stress fields reconstructed based on the displacement data obtained experimentally by means of optical measurements are verified by means of the stress field approximations derived for the normalized CT specimen via hybrid elements.

  18. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  19. Reconstruction of orientation of stresses acting in infinity within the Kovdor ore body based on field determinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybin V. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mining Institute KSC RAS has conducted research which aim is to study the possibilities of increasing the tilt angles of pit walls in massifs of solid rock. One of the problems the solution of which will contribute to achieving this goal is to determine the direction of the maximum component of principal stresses in intact massif on the "infinity" necessary to work out mathematical models of rock massif including quarry recess. To solve this problem it has been proposed to use the results of parameters' measurement of stress state by the unloading method in near-wall rock massif. The basic research of near-wall rock massif has been conducted on mine quarry "Zhelezny" (JSC "Kovdor ore processing plant". The measurements have been performed by the discharge method in option of end measurements directly from the quarry ledges on special observation stations using horizontal wells. The direction of maximum compression acting in sub-meridional course in the Kovdor apatiteshtafelyte-baddeleite deposit (the Kovdor ore cluster has been determined by the conformal mapping method on the basis of experimental estimations of stress parameters in the rock massif. The results obtained are of great importance for assessing a level of stresses acting directly in a near open-pit zone. They are applied to set boundary conditions when modeling stress-strain state of near-wall rock massif and assess slope stability.

  20. The lithospheric stress field from joint modeling of lithosphere and mantle circulation using constraints from the latest global tomography models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Holt, W. E.; Ghosh, A.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the lithospheric stress field is important because these stresses are one indication of processes within the Earth's interior. In order to calculate the lithosphere stress field it is necessary to take into account the effects of lithosphere structure and topography along with coupling with 3-D mantle flow. We separate these effects into two parts: (1) contributions from topography and lithosphere structure are calculated by computing the stresses associated with gravitational potential energy (GPE) differences, and (2) stresses associated with mantle tractions are computed using the latest tomography models. The contributions from GPE and tractions are then combined to obtain model estimates of the lithospheric stress field, strain rate field, and surface velocity field. We simultaneously use the World Stress Map, the Global Strain Rate Model, and the No-Net-Rotation (NNR) surface velocity vectors to constrain models. We systematically test the latest global tomography models (SEMum [Lekic and Romanowicz, 2011], S40RTS [Ritsema et al., 2011], and S362ANI_PREM [Kustowski et al., 2008]) and the composite tomography model (SMEAN [Becker and Boschi, 2002]), along with the influence of different mantle radial viscosity models. We find that a coupled model with a weak viscosity channel, sandwiched between a strong lithosphere and strong lower mantle is best able to match the observational constraints, although there is a slight difference in stress field among the different tomography models. There is considerable evidence that the contributions from shallow versus deeper sources vary dramatically over the surface of the globe. We quantify these relative contributions as a function of position on the globe and systematically compare the results of different tomography models. Subduction zones are dominated by the effects of GPE differences, whereas within many of the plate interiors the contributions from mantle flow dominate.

  1. Multi-parameter approximation of stress field in a cracked specimen using purpose-built Java applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, V.; Sopek, J.; Tesař, D.; Frantík, P.; Pail, T.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 33 (2015), s. 120-133 ISSN 1971-8993 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Cracked specimen * Near-crack-tip fields * Williams expansion * Higher order terms * Stress field reconstruction * Finite element analysis * Java application Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  2. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Hino, Yuki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  3. Analysis of the Thermal Stress for Combined Electrode of Soldered Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells under Temperature Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of material mechanics and thermal stress analysis, the stress distribution of combined electrode for crystalline silicon solar module was studied for the first time. The shear stress and normal stress distribution of soldered structure for crystalline silicon solar cells under the thermal field were discussed. And the results show that the stress distribution is not simply linear relationship as some results found. But there is a stress concentration at the edge, which was considered as the true reason that caused microcracks at the edge of soldered solar cells. The conclusions we got in this paper provide a theoretical basis for deceasing the breakage rates of soldered crystalline silicon solar cells and improving the reliability of crystalline silicon solar modules.

  4. Gradual Recovery from Nonambulatory Quadriparesis Caused by Metastatic Epidural Cervical Cord Compression in an Octogenarian Gallbladder Carcinoma Patient Treated with Image-Guided Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Alone Using a Field-in-Field Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ohtakara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy for acute metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC involves conventional techniques and dose fractionation schemes, as it needs to be initiated quickly. However, even with rapid intervention, few paraplegic patients regain ambulation. Here, we describe the case of a mid-octogenarian who presented with severe pain and nonambulatory quadriparesis attributable to MESCC at the fifth cervical vertebra, which developed 10 months after the diagnosis of undifferentiated carcinoma of the gallbladder. Image-guided three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (IG-3DCRT was started with 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by a boost of 12 Gy in 3 fractions, for which a field-in-field (FIF technique was used to optimize the dose distribution. Despite the fact that steroids were not administered, the patient reported significant pain reduction and showed improved motor function 3 and 4 weeks after the IG-3DCRT, respectively. Over the following 4 months, her neurological function gradually improved, and she was consequently able to eat and change clothes without assistance and to walk slowly for 10–20 m using a walker. She succumbed to progression of abdominal disease 8.5 months after the IG-3DCRT. This case demonstrates that image-guided FIF radiotherapy with a dose-escalated hypofractionated regimen can potentially improve functional outcome and local control.

  5. Gravitational potential stresses and stress field of passive continental margins: Insights from the south-Norway shelf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascal, C.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the stress state at passive margins is mainly dominated by ridge push and that other stress sources have only a limited temporal and/or spatial influence. We show, by means of numerical modelling, that observed variations in lithosphere structure and elevation from a

  6. A stress field in the vortex lattice in the type-II superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruszewski, Bogdan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux can penetrate a type-II superconductor in the form of Abrikosov vortices (also called flux lines, flux tubes, or fluxons, each carrying a quantum of magnetic flux. These tiny vortices of supercurrent tend to arrange themselves in a triangular and/or quadratic flux-line lattice, which is more or less perturbed by material inhomogeneities that pin the flux lines. Pinning is caused by imperfections of the crystal lattice, such as dislocations, point defects, grain boundaries, etc. Hence, a honeycomb-like pattern of the vortex array presents some mechanical properties. If the Lorentz force of interactions between the vortices is much bigger than the pinning force, the vortex lattice behaves elastically. So we assume that the pinning force is negligible in the sequel and we deal with soft vortices. The vortex motion in the vortex lattice and/or creep of the vortices in the vortex fluid is accompanied by energy dissipation. Hence, except for the elastic properties, the vortex field is also of a viscous character. The main aim of the paper is a formulation of a thermoviscoelastic stress - strain constitutive law consisted of coexistence of the ordered and disordered states of the vortex field. Its form describes an auxetic-like thermomechanical (anomalous property of the vortex field.

  7. Stress distribution calculations through a snow slab of varying elastic modulus; comparison with stability evaluation in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Laura; Borstad, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Field observations are the main tools for assessing the snow stability concerning dry snow slab avalanche release. Often, theoretical studies cannot directly be translated into useful information for avalanche recreationists and forecasters in the field, and vice versa; field observations are not always objective and quantifiable for theoretical studies. Moreover, numerical models often simplify the snowpack and generally use an isotropic single layer slab which is not representative of the real-life situation. The aim of this study is to investigate the stress distribution in a snowpack with an elastic modulus that continuously varies with depth. The focus lies on the difference between a slab with a gradient in hardness and a slab with isotropic hardness and the effect on the calculated maximum stress and the stability evaluation in the field. Approximately 20 different snow pits were evaluated in the mountains around Tromsø, Norway and Longyearbyen, Svalbard. In addition to the standard snowpack observations, the hardness was measured using a thin-blade gauge. Extended column tests were executed for stability evaluation. Measurements from the field were used as input for stress calculations for each snow pit using a line load solution for a sloping half space with a non-homogeneous elastic modulus. The hardness measurements were used to calculate the elastic modulus and a power law relation was fit through the modulus in the slab. The calculated shear stress was compared to the estimated stability and character of the specific snowpack The results show that the approach used for this study improves the calculation of stress at a given depth, although many assumptions and simplifications were still needed. Comparison with the snow profiles indicate that calculated stresses correlate well with the observed snowpack properties and stability. The calculated shear stresses can be introduced in the standard stability index and give a better indication for the

  8. Compressibility effects in turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubesin, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical turbulence modeling is discussed with attention given to fluid property variations caused by compressibility in an adiabatic flow. The models are considered in terms of integral quantities expressed by ordinary differential equations and by those formulated as partial differential equations. Compressibility corrections for both integral and partial differential methods are reviewed. Eddy-viscosity models are explored for their capability to characterize the mass-weighted Reynolds stress, which can be accounted for with primitive and/or mass-weighted variables. Compressible flow simulations are currently constrained to low Re and zero mean dilation. The effects of compressibility are defined in wave number space by resolving the Fourier transforms of the velocity vectors into components which are perpendicular and parallel to the wave number vector. Statistical correlations then permit obtaining a value for each contribution.

  9. Vortex configuration in the presence of local magnetic field and locally applied stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kremen, Anna; Shperber, Yishai; Kalisky, Beena, E-mail: beena@biu.ac.il

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We discuss different ways to determine vortex configuration using a scanning SQUID. • We determined the vortex configuration by approaching the sample during cooling. • We observed an accumulation of vortices when contact was made with the sample. • We show how we can manipulate local vortex configuration using contact. - Abstract: Vortex configuration is determined by the repulsive interaction, which becomes dominant with increasing vortex density, by the pinning potential, and by other considerations such as the local magnetic fields, currents flowing in the sample, or as we showed recently, by local stress applied on the sample. In this work we describe different ways to control vortex configuration using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  10. Influence of selenium in drought-stressed wheat plants under greenhouse and field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghieh HAJIBOLAND

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of selenium (Na2SeO4 was studied in two wheat genotypes under well-watered and drought conditions in greenhouse (15 µg Se L-1 and field (20-60 60 g ha-1 experiments. Application of Se improved dry matter and grain yield under both well-watered and drought conditions. Se increased leaf concentration of pigments and photosynthesis rate under both well-watered and drought conditions. Our results indicated that Se alleviates drought stress via increased photosynthesis rate, protection of leaf photochemical events, accumulation of organic osmolytes and improvement of water use efficiency. Under well-watered condition, Se-mediated growth improvement was associated with higher photosynthesis rate and water use efficiency, greater root length and diameter, and higher leaf water content.

  11. A method of fundamental solutions in poroelasticity to model the stress field in geothermal reservoirs

    CERN Document Server

    Augustin, Matthias Albert

    2015-01-01

    This monograph focuses on the numerical methods needed in the context of developing a reliable simulation tool to promote the use of renewable energy. One very promising source of energy is the heat stored in the Earth’s crust, which is harnessed by so-called geothermal facilities. Scientists from fields like geology, geo-engineering, geophysics and especially geomathematics are called upon to help make geothermics a reliable and safe energy production method. One of the challenges they face involves modeling the mechanical stresses at work in a reservoir. The aim of this thesis is to develop a numerical solution scheme by means of which the fluid pressure and rock stresses in a geothermal reservoir can be determined prior to well drilling and during production. For this purpose, the method should (i) include poroelastic effects, (ii) provide a means of including thermoelastic effects, (iii) be inexpensive in terms of memory and computational power, and (iv) be flexible with regard to the locations of data ...

  12. Irregular focal mechanisms observed at Salton Sea Geothermal Field: Possible influences of anthropogenic stress perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall-Bear, Aren; Barbour, Andrew J.; Schoenball, Martin; Schoenball, Martin

    2018-01-01

    At the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), strain accumulation is released through seismic slip and aseismic deformation. Earthquake activity at the SSGF often occurs in swarm-like clusters, some with clear migration patterns. We have identified an earthquake sequence composed entirely of focal mechanisms representing an ambiguous style of faulting, where strikes are similar but deformation occurs due to steeply-dipping normal faults with varied stress states. In order to more accurately determine the style of faulting for these events, we revisit the original waveforms and refine estimates of P and S wave arrival times and displacement amplitudes. We calculate the acceptable focal plane solutions using P-wave polarities and S/P amplitude ratios, and determine the preferred fault plane. Without constraints on local variations in stress, found by inverting the full earthquake catalog, it is difficult to explain the occurrence of such events using standard fault-mechanics and friction. Comparing these variations with the expected poroelastic effects from local production and injection of geothermal fluids suggests that anthropogenic activity could affect the style of faulting.

  13. Numerical simulation of stress field for laser thermal loading on piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-Bo; Pang, Ming; Zhang, Zhen-Guo; Tan, Jian-Song; Zhu, Gang-Xian; Wang, Ming-Di

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the laser thermal loading on diesel engine piston, the employed Gaussian laser beam was transformed into concentric multi-circular patterns of specific intensity distributions with the aid of diffractive optical elements (DOEs), the time duration of laser thermal loading was controlled by computer with air cooling on the top surface of piston, and water cooling of oil tunnel and bottom surface of piston. Numerical simulation model of stress field of laser thermal action was established with the consideration of experimental conditions and the temperature dependent of thermal physical properties of the piston materials. Results show that the stress fluctuation rate at the concave pit site of top surface of piston is larger than that of laser irradiated region due to concave pit region near oil tunnel. Meanwhile, the regions of concave pit, oil tunnel and inner chamber near the top surface of piston are most vulnerable sites to form thermal cracks due to their direct contact with the cooling medium. Results of experimental and numerical simulation have good agreement, which validates the numerical simulation mode.

  14. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  15. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  16. Analysis of Stress and Strain Fields in and around Inclusions of Various Shapes in a Cylindrical Specimen Loaded in Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neimitz A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis is performed of the stress field in and around inclusions of various shapes. Inclusions both stiffer and more compliant than the metal matrix are analysed. The critical stresses required for inclusion fracture are estimated after observation of cavities and inclusions by scanning electron microscopy. Real inclusions were observed after performing uniaxial loading to different amounts of overall strain. The material tested was Hardox-400 steel.

  17. Effect of parameters on local stress field in single-lap bolted joints with the interference fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiefeng Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available From the interference fit bolt installation to tensile loading stage in single-lap joint with a hi-lock bolt, the stress and strain fields were studied experimentally and numerically. A three-dimensional finite element model was generated to simulate the experimental setup, which was validated using the experimental data. The fatigue behavior of the bolted joint is influenced by the local stress fields on the faying surface near the holes in single-lap joints. Therefore, with the aim to improve design awareness, the effects of the parameters on the local stress fields were investigated by means of finite element simulation. With an increase in the interference fit size, the occurred position of the maximum stress values on the upper plate faying surface moves away from the hole edge gradually. As the clamping force or friction coefficient increases, the position of larger stress area is changed to the side of bearing load from the transverse direction. The lap geometry of the bolted joint as well as the amplitude of tensile load has apparent impact on the maximum stress value.

  18. A linear least squares approach for evaluation of crack tip stress field parameters using DIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, R.; Vyasarayani, C. P.; Ramji, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, an experimental study is carried out to estimate the mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIF) for different cracked specimen configurations using digital image correlation (DIC) technique. For the estimation of mixed-mode SIF's using DIC, a new algorithm is proposed for the extraction of crack tip location and coefficients in the multi-parameter displacement field equations. From those estimated coefficients, SIF could be extracted. The required displacement data surrounding the crack tip has been obtained using 2D-DIC technique. An open source 2D DIC software Ncorr is used for the displacement field extraction. The presented methodology has been used to extract mixed-mode SIF's for specimen configurations like single edge notch (SEN) specimen and centre slant crack (CSC) specimens made out of Al 2014-T6 alloy. The experimental results have been compared with the analytical values and they are found to be in good agreement, thereby confirming the accuracy of the algorithm being proposed.

  19. The extended algebra of observables for Dirac fields and the trace anomaly of their stress-energy tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiagi, Claudio; Hack, Thomas-Paul; Pinamonti, Nicola [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2009-03-15

    We discuss from scratch the classical structure of Dirac spinors on an arbitrary globally hyperbolic, Lorentzian spacetime, their formulation as a locally covariant quantum field theory, and the associated notion of a Hadamard state. Eventually, we develop the notion of Wick polynomials for spinor fields, and we employ the latter to construct a covariantly conserved stress-energy tensor suited for back-reaction computations. We explicitly calculate its trace anomaly in particular. (orig.)

  20. The Emotional Stress Reaction Questionnaire (ESRQ): Measurement of Stress Reaction Level in Field Conditions in 60 Seconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    multinational military missions characterized by irregular warfare (see e.g. Bartone, Pastel , & Vaitkus, 2010), there is an accompanying need for easy-to-use...Antonovsky, A. (1987). Unraveling the mystery of health: How people manage stress and stay well. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Bartone, P. T., Pastel , R

  1. A new theoretical model of the quasistatic single-fiber pullout problem: Analysis of stress field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    A new theoretical model is developed in order to predict the stress transfer during the quasistatic single-fibre pullout process. The theoretical approach retains all relevant stress and strain components, and satisfies exactly the interfacial continuity conditions and all the stress boundary con...

  2. In-situ evaluation of compressed brick veneer using the flatjack technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.R.; Gabby, B.A.

    1999-07-01

    The flatjack is a relatively nondestructive tool that allows engineers engaged in the repair and retrofit of masonry buildings (both historic and non-historic) to directly determine the in-situ state of compressive stress in masonry walls. The flatjack technique recently was used on a large modern apartment complex to quantify the compression in a brick veneer that was distressed and had questionable wind-load resistance. The compression in the veneer was due to a combination of concrete frame shrinkage and brick growth in a wall system that lacked horizontal control joints under the steel shelf angles. Although the compression caused spalling in the veneer, it also contributed beneficially to the walls' wind resistance. The amount of compression in the veneer was determined in several location throughout the height of one elevation of the building using flatjacks. The authors found that the compression in the veneer was greater than the flexural tension produced by design wind loads (including a reasonable factor of safety), but below the compressive strength of the brick masonry. This finding allowed a repair solution that was modest relative to strengthening the wall for inadequate wind resistance. Prior to employing the flatjack in the field, the authors conducted in-house research to check the accuracy and reliability of method, and develop their technique. The authors found that by altering gauge points from those locations prescribed by current ASTM standards to those recommended in recent research, greater accuracy could be obtained.

  3. Laser cutting of triangular geometry into 2024 aluminum alloy: Influence of triangle size on thermal stress field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Akhtar, Syed Sohail [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Keles, Omer; Boran, Kurtulus [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2015-08-15

    Laser cutting of a triangular geometry into aluminum 2024 alloy is carried out. Thermal stress field in the cutting section is predicted using the finite element code ABAQUS. Surface temperature predictions are validated through the thermocouple data. Morphological changes in the cut section are examined incorporating optical and electron scanning microscopes. The effects of the size of the triangular geometry on thermal stress field are also examined. It is found that surface temperature predictions agree well with thermocouple data. von Mises stress remains high in the region close to the corners of the triangular geometry, which is more pronounced for the small size triangle. This behavior is associated with the occurrence of the high cooling rates in this region. Laser cut edges are free from large scale sideways burning and large size burr attachments. However, some locally scattered dross attachments are observed at the kerf exit.

  4. Assessing the accuracy of hyperspectral and multispectral satellite imagery for categorical and quantitative mapping of salinity stress in sugarcane fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamzeh, Saied; Naseri, Abd Ali; Alavipanah, Seyed Kazem; Bartholomeus, Harm; Herold, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of hyperspectral and multispectral satellite imagery for categorical and quantitative mapping of salinity stress in sugarcane fields located in the southwest of Iran. For this purpose a Hyperion image acquired on September 2, 2010 and a Landsat7 ETM+ image

  5. On the plane strain in a theory for self-gravitating elastic configuration with initial static stress field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. BOSCHI

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the plane strain in a theory for an arbitrary, uniformly rotating, self-gravitating, perfectly elastic Earth model with a hydrostatic initial stress field. Using the associated matrices method, a representation of Galerkin type is given. This representation enables us to derive the solution of the vibration problem corresponding to concentrated body forces.

  6. Mindfulness Training and Reductions in Teacher Stress and Burnout: Results from Two Randomized, Waitlist-Control Field Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, Robert W.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Jha, Amishi; Cullen, Margaret; Wallace, Linda; Wilensky, Rona; Oberle, Eva; Thomson, Kimberly; Taylor, Cynthia; Harrison, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The effects of randomization to mindfulness training (MT) or to a waitlist-control condition on psychological and physiological indicators of teachers' occupational stress and burnout were examined in 2 field trials. The sample included 113 elementary and secondary school teachers (89% female) from Canada and the United States. Measures were…

  7. Finite Element Verification of Non-Homogeneous Strain and Stress Fields during Composite Material Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2015-01-01

    Uni-directional glass fiber reinforced polymers play a central role in the task increasing the length of wind turbines blades and thereby lowering the cost of energy from wind turbine installations. During this, optimizing the mechanical performance regarding material stiffness, compression...

  8. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  9. Calculation of the residual stress field created by quenching and grinding in a cast duplex stainless steel pipe; Calcul des contraintes residuelles crees par la trempe et l`usinage d`un tuyau austenoferritique moule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupas, P.; Le Delliou, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    We calculate with a finite element program the residual stresses generated by quenching and grinding a cast duplex stainless steel pipe. These calculations are performed with Code Aster (developed by EDF/R and D D). They are preliminary to a 3D study concerning an elbow made of the same material. Quenching is simulated by an axisymmetric thermomechanical calculation. Grinding are simulated either by lowering mechanical properties in ground parts of the pipe, either by the releasing the nodes. Stresses due to quenching are in high compression in the skin and tensile in the middle. After grinding (the first concerning both internal and external skins, the second concerning only the internal skin), stresses become tensile on the skin. These results are compared to those obtained in a similar study by CEA and also to the measurement. Some important differences appear in the thermal results between the two FE programs, due to a too coarse time step in the CASTEM 2000 calculation. However, the effect on the residual stress field is not very important. Two complementary studies have shown a negligible influence of mesh size, as well as an equivalence of the two numerical methods used for simulating grinding (lowering the Young modulus and releasing the nodes), according the values given at the notes of the skin by the first method are corrected. (authors). 5 refs.

  10. Stresses of PTT, Giesekus, and Oldroyd-B fluids in a Newtonian velocity field near the stick-slip singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. D.; Palhares Junior, I. L.; Oishi, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    We characterise the stress singularity of the Oldroyd-B, Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT), and Giesekus viscoelastic models in steady planar stick-slip flows. For both PTT and Giesekus models in the presence of a solvent viscosity, the asymptotics show that the velocity field is Newtonian dominated near to the singularity at the join of the stick and slip surfaces. Polymer stress boundary layers are present at both the stick and slip surfaces. By integrating along streamlines, we verify the polymer stress behavior of r-4/11 for PTT and r-5/16 for Giesekus, where r is the radial distance from the singularity. These asymptotic results for PTT and Giesekus do not hold in the limit of vanishing quadratic stress terms for Oldroyd-B. However, we can consider the Oldroyd-B model in the fixed kinematics of a prescribed Newtonian velocity field. In contrast to PTT and Giesekus, this is not the correct balance for the momentum equation but does allow insight into the behavior of the Oldroyd-B equations near the singularity. A three-region asymptotic structure is again apparent with now a polymer stress singularity of r-4/5. The high Weissenberg boundary layer equations are found to manifest themselves at the stick surface and are of thickness r3/2. At the slip surface, dominant balance between the upper convected stress and rate-of-strain terms gives a slip boundary layer of thickness r2. The solution of the slip boundary layer shows that the polymer stress is now singular along the slip surface. These results are supported through numerical integration along streamlines of the Oldroyd-B equations in a Newtonian velocity field. The Oldroyd-B model thus extends the point singularity at the join of the stick and slip surfaces to the whole of slip surface. As such, it does not have a physically meaningful solution in a Newtonian velocity field. We would expect a similar stress behavior for this model in the true viscoelastic velocity field.

  11. The Compression of The Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, G. J.; Russell, C. T.

    When the pressure in the solar wind suddenly increases, the Earth's magnetosphere is compressed. Examination of the rise time for this compression in Polar magnetic field data shows that it is controlled by the time for passage of the pressure front past the magnetosphere. Unlike measurements on the surface of the Earth, there are signif- icantly large regions of the magnetosphere where the magnetic field decreases when the magnetosphere is compressed. This occurs in the regions in which the increased field associated with the enhanced magnetopause currents opposes the local internal magnetic field. While the rise in field strength is generally smooth, sometimes the compression begins with a sharp jump indicating that in some regions of the magne- tosphere the velocity of the compressional front exceeds that of the local fast mode wave. Lastly, we note that the solar wind monitors used in this study do not always agree when solar wind measurements are simultaneously available. We have devel- oped an intercalibration procedure to alleviate this disagreement.

  12. Field performance of timber bridges. 9, Big Erick`s stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. A. Kainz; J. P. Wacker; M. Nelson

    The Big Erickas bridge was constructed during September 1992 in Baraga County, Michigan. The bridge is 72 ft long, 16 ft wide, and consists of three simple spans: two stress-laminated deck approach spans and a stress-laminated box center span. The bridge is unique in that it is one of the first known stress-laminated timber bridge applications to use Eastern Hemlock...

  13. Residual stress fields in sol-gel-derived thin TiO2 layers

    OpenAIRE

    Teeuw, D.H.J.; Haas, M.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the induction of residual stresses during the curing process of thin titania layers, which are derived using a sol-gel process. During this process, stresses may build up in the spinning stage, the drying stage, and the consolidation stage. The magnitude and character of these stresses depend heavily on the morphology of the layers in the various stages and the processing conditions. Dried layers are densified using two different processes, conventional furnace heating an...

  14. The interaction of plant biotic and abiotic stresses: from genes to the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nicky J; Urwin, Peter E

    2012-06-01

    Plant responses to different stresses are highly complex and involve changes at the transcriptome, cellular, and physiological levels. Recent evidence shows that plants respond to multiple stresses differently from how they do to individual stresses, activating a specific programme of gene expression relating to the exact environmental conditions encountered. Rather than being additive, the presence of an abiotic stress can have the effect of reducing or enhancing susceptibility to a biotic pest or pathogen, and vice versa. This interaction between biotic and abiotic stresses is orchestrated by hormone signalling pathways that may induce or antagonize one another, in particular that of abscisic acid. Specificity in multiple stress responses is further controlled by a range of molecular mechanisms that act together in a complex regulatory network. Transcription factors, kinase cascades, and reactive oxygen species are key components of this cross-talk, as are heat shock factors and small RNAs. This review aims to characterize the interaction between biotic and abiotic stress responses at a molecular level, focusing on regulatory mechanisms important to both pathways. Identifying master regulators that connect both biotic and abiotic stress response pathways is fundamental in providing opportunities for developing broad-spectrum stress-tolerant crop plants.

  15. Temporal changes of static stress drop as a proxy for poroelastic effects at The Geysers geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszek, Monika; Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Leptokaropoulos, Konstantinos; Martinez-Garzon, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    One of the major environmental impacts of shale gas exploitation is triggered and induced seismicity. Due to the similarity of fluid injection process data from geothermal fields can be used as a proxy for shale gas exploitation associated seismicity. Therefore, in this paper we utilize 'The Geysers' dataset compiled within SHale gas Exploration and Exploitation induced Risks (SHEER) project. The dependence of earthquake static stress drops on pore pressure in the medium was previously suggested by Goertz-Allmann et al. (2011), who observed an increase of the static stress drop with the distance from injection well during reservoir stimulation at Deep Heat Mining project in Basel, Switzerland. Similar observation has been done by Kwiatek et al. (2014) in Berlín geothermal field, El Salvador. In this study, we use a high-quality data from The Geysers geothermal field to determine whether the static stress drops and the stress drop distributions change statistically significantly in time or not, and how such changes are correlated with the values of hypocenter depth, water injection rate, and distance from injection well. For the analyses we use a group of 354 earthquakes, which occurred in the proximity of Prati-9 and Prati-29 injection wells. Spectral parameters of these earthquakes were determined using mesh spectral ratio technique. Our results indicate that: (1) the static stress drop variation in time is statistically significant, (2) median static stress drop is inversely related to median injection rate. Therefore, it is highly expected that static stress drop is influenced by pore pressure in underground fluid injection conditions. References: Goertz-Allmann B., Goertz A., Wiemer S. (2011), Stress drop variations of induced earthquakes at the Basel geothermal site. Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L09308, doi:10.1029/2011GL047498. Kwiatek G., Bulut F., Bohnhoff M., Dresen G. (2014), High-resolution analysis of seismicity induced at Berlin geothermal field

  16. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  17. Assessment of occupational health problems and physiological stress among the brick field workers of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banibrata Das

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The brick field industry is one of the oldest industries in India, which employs a large number of workers of poor socioeconomic status. The main aim of the present investigation is i to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among brick field workers, ii to determine the prevalence of respiratory disorders and physiological stress among brick field workers compared to control workers. Material and Methods: For this study, a total of 220 brick field workers and 130 control subjects were selected randomly. The control subjects were mainly involved in hand-intensive jobs. The Modified Nordic Questionnaire was applied to assess the discomfort felt among both groups of workers. Thermal stress was also assessed by measuring the WBGT index. The pulmonary functions were checked using the spirometry. Physiological assessment of the workload was carried out by recording the heart rate and blood pressure of the workers prior to work and just after work in the field. Results: Brick field workers suffered from pain especially in the lower back (98%, hands (93%, knees (86%, wrists (85%, shoulders (76% and neck (65%. Among the brick-making activities, brick field workers felt discomfort during spading for mud collection (98%, carrying bricks (95% and molding (87%. The results showed a significantly lower p value < 0.001 in FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio and PEFR in brick field workers compared to the control group. The post-activity heart rate of the brick field workers was 148.6 beats/min, whereas the systolic and diastolic blood pressure results were 152.8 and 78.5 mm/Hg, respectively. Conclusions: This study concludes that health of the brick field workers was highly affected due to working in unhealthy working conditions for a long period of time.

  18. Cancer-associated fibroblasts enact field cancerization by promoting extratumoral oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeremy Soon Kiat; Tan, Ming Jie; Sng, Ming Keat; Teo, Ziqiang; Phua, Terri; Choo, Chee Chong; Li, Liang; Zhu, Pengcheng; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2017-01-19

    Histological inspection of visually normal tissue adjacent to neoplastic lesions often reveals multiple foci of cellular abnormalities. This suggests the presence of a regional carcinogenic signal that spreads oncogenic transformation and field cancerization. We observed an abundance of mutagenic reactive oxygen species in the stroma of cryosectioned patient tumor biopsies, indicative of extratumoral oxidative stress. Diffusible hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was elevated in the conditioned medium of cultured skin epithelia at various stages of oncogenic transformation, and H2O2 production increased with greater tumor-forming and metastatic capacity of the studied cell lines. Explanted cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) also had higher levels of H2O2 secretion compared with normal fibroblasts (FIBs). These results suggest that extracellular H2O2 acts as a field effect carcinogen. Indeed, H2O2-treated keratinocytes displayed decreased phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and increased Src activities because of oxidative modification. Furthermore, treating FIBs with CAF-conditioned medium or exogenous H2O2 resulted in the acquisition of an oxidative, CAF-like state. In vivo, the proliferative potential and invasiveness of composite tumor xenografts comprising cancerous or non-tumor-forming epithelia with CAFs and FIBs could be attenuated by the presence of catalase. Importantly, we showed that oxidatively transformed FIBs isolated from composite tumor xenografts retained their ability to promote tumor growth and aggressiveness when adoptively transferred into new xenografts. Higher H2O2 production by CAFs was contingent on impaired TGFβ signaling leading to the suppression of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1). Finally, we detected a reduction in Smad3, TAK1 and TGFβRII expression in a cohort of 197 clinical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) CAFs, suggesting that impaired stromal TGFβ signaling may be a clinical feature of SCC. Our study indicated

  19. Expanded Polystyrene Re-Expansion Analysis Following Impact Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    USAARL Report No. 2015-08 Expanded Polystyrene Re-Expansion Analysis Following Impact Compression By Mark S. Adams Frederick Brozoski Katie...13 iv This page is intentionally left blank. 1 Introduction Expanded bead polystyrene (EPS) is widely...steep rise in the stress-strain curve and little or no energy attenuation. When compressive stresses are removed, EPS foam will partially re- expand

  20. Compressive Failure of Fibre Reinforced Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2003-01-01

    Compressive failure of uni-directional fibre composites by the kink band mechanism is analysed taking into account effects of residual stresses. Two criteria for determining the strength of the composite material have been investigated: Kink band formation at a bifurcation stress in a composite w...

  1. Physiological and transcriptomic responses in the seed coat of field-grown soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, Courtney P; Yendrek, Craig R; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2017-12-12

    Understanding how intensification of abiotic stress due to global climate change affects crop yields is important for continued agricultural productivity. Coupling genomic technologies with physiological crop responses in a dynamic field environment is an effective approach to dissect the mechanisms underpinning crop responses to abiotic stress. Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv. Pioneer 93B15) was grown in natural production environments with projected changes to environmental conditions predicted for the end of the century, including decreased precipitation, increased tropospheric ozone concentrations ([O3]), or increased temperature. All three environmental stresses significantly decreased leaf-level photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, leading to significant losses in seed yield. This was driven by a significant decrease in the number of pods per node for all abiotic stress treatments. To understand the underlying transcriptomic response involved in the yield response to environmental stress, RNA-Sequencing analysis was performed on the soybean seed coat, a tissue that plays an essential role in regulating carbon and nitrogen transport to developing seeds. Gene expression analysis revealed 49, 148 and 1,576 differentially expressed genes in the soybean seed coat in response to drought, elevated [O3] and elevated temperature, respectively. Elevated [O3] and drought did not elicit substantive transcriptional changes in the soybean seed coat. However, this may be due to the timing of sampling and does not preclude impacts of those stresses on different tissues or different stages in seed coat development. Expression of genes involved in DNA replication and metabolic processes were enriched in the seed coat under high temperate stress, suggesting that the timing of events that are important for cell division and proper seed development were altered in a stressful growth environment.

  2. Trait associations in common bean genotypes grown under drought stress and field infestation by BSM bean fly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ambachew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding functional relations among plant traits and their modulation by growing conditions is imperative in designing selection strategies for breeding programs. This study assessed trait relationships among 196 common bean genotypes exposed to stresses for drought and field infestation of bean fly or bean stem maggot (BSM. The study was carried out at two locations and data was analyzed with linear correlation, path coefficient and genotype × trait biplot analyses. Multiple trait data related to mechanisms of drought and bean fly tolerance were collected on 196 genotypes grown under i water deficit at mid-pod fill, or ii unprotected against bean fly; iii irrigated, well watered conditions, or iv bean fly protection with chemicals. Seed yield exhibited positive and significant correlations with leaf chlorophyll content, vertical root pulling resistance, pod harvest index, pods per plant and seeds per pod at both phenotypic and genotypic levels under stress and non-stress conditions. Genotypic correlations of traits with seed yield were greater than their respective phenotypic correlations across environments indicating the greater contribution of genotypic factors to the trait correlation. Pods per plant and seeds per pod had high positive direct effects on seed yield both under stress and non-stress whereas pods per plant had the highest indirect effect on seed yield through pod harvest index under stress. In general, our results suggest that vertical root pulling resistance and pod harvest index are important selection objectives for improving seed yield in common beans under non-stress and stress conditions, and particularly useful for drought and BSM tolerance evaluation.

  3. Field performance of timber bridges. 5, Little Salmon Creek stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. Ritter; J. A. Kainz; G. J. Porter

    The Little Salmon Creek bridge was constructed in November 1988 on the Allegheny National Forest in Pennsylvania. The bridge is a simple span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that is approximately 26-ft long and 16-ft wide. The bridge is unique in that it is the first known stress-laminated timber bridge to be constructed of hardwood lumber. The...

  4. Field performance of timber bridges. 6, Hoffman Run stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. Ritter; P. D. Hilbrich Lee; G. J. Porter

    The Hoffman Run bridge, located just outside Dahoga, Pennsylvania, was constructed in October 1990. The bridge is a simple-span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that is approximately 26 ft long and 16 ft wide. It is the second stress-laminated timber bridge to be constructed of hardwood lumber in Pennsylvania. The performance of the bridge was...

  5. Residual stress fields in sol-gel-derived thin TiO2 layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, D.H.J.; Haas, M. de; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the induction of residual stresses during the curing process of thin titania layers, which are derived using a sol-gel process. During this process, stresses may build up in the spinning stage, the drying stage, and the consolidation stage. The magnitude and character of these

  6. Field performance of timber bridges. 7, Connell Lake stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. E. Hislop; M. A. Ritter

    The Connell Lake bridge was constructed in early 1991 on the Tongass National Forest, Alaska, as a demonstration bridge under the Timber Bridge Initiative. The bridge is a stress-laminated deck structure with an approximate 36-ft length and 18-ft width and is the first known stress-laminated timber bridge constructed in Alaska. Performance of the bridge was monitored...

  7. The Effect of Stress and Recovery on Field-test Performance in Floorball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Does, H. T. D.; Brink, M. S.; Visscher, C.; Huijgen, B. C. H.; Frencken, W. G. P.; Lemmink, K. A. P. M.

    Physical and psychosocial stress and recovery are important performance determinants. A holistic approach that monitors these performance determinants over a longer period of time is lacking. Therefore this study aims to investigate the effect of a player's physical and psychosocial stress and

  8. A phase field model coupling lithium diffusion and stress evolution with crack propagation and application in lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Peng; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2015-01-07

    Cracking and fracture of electrodes under diffusion during lithiation and delithiation is one of the main factors responsible for short life span of lithium based batteries employing high capacity electrodes. Coupling effects among lithium diffusion, stress evolution and crack propagation have a significant effect on dynamic processes of electrodes during cycling. In this paper, a phase field model coupling lithium diffusion and stress evolution with crack propagation is established. Then the model is applied to a silicon thin film electrode to explore the coupling effects on diffusion and crack propagation paths. During lithiation, simulation results show that lithium accumulates at crack tips and the lithium accumulation further reduces the local hydrostatic stress. Single and multiple crack geometries are considered to elucidate some of the crack patterns in thin film electrodes as a consequence of coupling effects and crack interactions.

  9. Client preferences for compression threshold in single-channel wide dynamic range compression hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, C; Dillon, H

    1999-04-01

    Compression in hearing aids can be applied with low compression ratios over a wide range of input levels, but reverts to linear amplification below the compression threshold (CT). In this study, we aimed to determine which of two CTs was preferred by subjects as they used their hearing aids in their own environments, and whether they would prefer to have no low ratio compression at all. Subjects were fitted with a multimemory hearing aid incorporating input controlled compression with a 2:1 compression ratio and output controlled compression limiting. The two memories contained identical programs except that they differed in CT. Sixteen mild to moderately sensorineurally hearing-impaired subjects compared low (approximately 40 dB SPL) and moderate (approximately 65 dB SPL) CTs over 2 mo of field trials using hand held remote controls to switch between the alternatives. In a third month's trial, the preferred option (which also included output controlled compression limiting) was compared with compression limiting alone. The higher CT was preferred by 14 of the subjects. The combination of input compression and output compression limiting was preferred to compression limiting alone by 14 of the subjects. Several real world advantages of frequency independent 2:1 compression with a CT of about 65 dB SPL were demonstrated over linear amplification. Extending the compression to much lower input levels appears to carry more disadvantages than advantages, at least for clients with mild and moderate hearing losses, when fitted with single-channel compression aids with a 2:1 compression ratio.

  10. Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Line Skov; Lova, Lotte; Hansen, Zandra Kulikovsky; Schønemann, Emilie; Larsen, Line Lyngby; Colberg Olsen, Maria Sophia; Juhl, Nadja; Magnussen, Bogi Roin

    2012-01-01

    Stress er en tilstand som er meget omdiskuteret i samfundet, og dette besværliggør i en vis grad konkretiseringen af mulige løsningsforslag i bestræbelsen på at forebygge den såkaldte folkesygdom. Hovedkonklusionen er, at selv om der bliver gjort meget for at forebygge, er der ikke meget der aktivt kan sættes i værk for at reducere antallet af stressramte, før en fælles forståelse af stressårsager og effektiv stresshåndtering er fremlagt. Problemformuleringen er besvaret gennem en undersø...

  11. On the low temperature dependence of the threshold field of CDW in NbSe3 : effect of uniaxial stress

    OpenAIRE

    Tessema, G.; Skove, M.; Tseng, Y.

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the effect of uniaxial stress on the threshold field in NbSe3. For the upper CDW, we show a clear separation of the threshold field into two additive components, E'T(t) and E"T(t,ε) where t = T /Tp. The impurity dependence of E"T(t,ε) indicates that this term is the impurity or bulk pinning term. E"T(t,ε) shows strong temperature dependence near Tp but saturates to a t independent minimum below t ≈ 0.85. On the other hand, the term E'T(t) takes nearly all the temperature depen...

  12. Scalar field with the source in the form of the stress-energy tensor trace as a dark energy model

    CERN Document Server

    Dudko, I G

    2016-01-01

    We consider a scalar-tensor theory of gravitation with the scalar source being the trace of the stress-energy tensor of the scalar field itself and matter. We obtain an example of a numerical solution of the cosmological equations which shows that under some special choice of the scalar parameters, there exists a slow-roll regime in which the modern values of the Hubble and deceleration parameters may be obtained.

  13. Three-term Asymptotic Stress Field Expansion for Analysis of Surface Cracked Elbows in Nuclear Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, Fernando

    2007-04-01

    Elbows with a shallow surface cracks in nuclear pressure pipes have been recognized as a major origin of potential catastrophic failures. Crack assessment is normally performed by using the J-integral approach. Although this one-parameter-based approach is useful to predict the ductile crack onset, it depends strongly on specimen geometry or constraint level. When a shallow crack exists (depth crack-to-thickness wall ratio less than 0.2) and/or a fully plastic condition develops around the crack, the J-integral alone does not describe completely the crack-tip stress field. In this paper, we report on the use of a three-term asymptotic expansion, referred to as the J- A 2 methodology, for modeling the elastic-plastic stress field around a three-dimensional shallow surface crack in an elbow subjected to internal pressure and out-of-plane bending. The material, an A 516 Gr. 70 steel, used in the nuclear industry, was modeled with a Ramberg-Osgood power law and flow theory of plasticity. A finite deformation theory was included to account for the highly nonlinear behavior around the crack tip. Numerical finite element results were used to calculate a second fracture parameter A 2 for the J- A 2 methodology. We found that the used three-term asymptotic expansion accurately describes the stress field around the considered three-dimensional shallow surface crack.

  14. Exposure to 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields elicits an HSP-related stress response in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Sen; He, Gen-Lin; Hao, Yu-Tong; Xiao, Yang; Chen, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Guang-Bin; Yu, Zheng-Ping

    2012-07-01

    The issue of possible neurobiological effects of the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure is highly controversial. To determine whether electromagnetic field exposure could act as an environmental stimulus capable of producing stress responses, we employed the hippocampus, a sensitive target of electromagnetic radiation, to assess the changes in its stress-related gene and protein expression after EMF exposure. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with body restrained were exposed to a 2.45 GHz EMF at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 6 W/kg or sham conditions. cDNA microarray was performed to examine the changes of gene expression involved in the biological effects of electromagnetic radiation. Of 2048 candidate genes, 23 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes were identified. Of these differential expression genes, two heat shock proteins (HSP), HSP27 and HSP70, are notable because expression levels of both proteins are increased in the rat hippocampus. Result from immunocytochemistry revealed that EMF caused intensive staining for HSP27 and HSP70 in the hippocampus, especially in the pyramidal neurons of cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) and granular cells of dentate gyrus (DG). The gene and protein expression profiles of HSP27 and HSP70 were further confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Our data provide direct evidence that exposure to electromagnetic fields elicits a stress response in the rat hippocampus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extremes of random fields over arbitrary domains with application to concrete rupture stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    To find the exact probability distribution of the global maximum or minimum of a random field within a bounded domain is a pending problem even for Gaussian fields. Except for very special examples of fields, recourse must be taken to approximate reasoning or asymptotic considerations to be judged...... functions of a smooth approximately Gaussian field, herein called a broken line Hino field. For completeness this particular field type is defined in Appendices A and B. The paper concludes with a statistical application on data for plain concrete tensile strength. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. The stress field and its sources in the North Atlantic Realm and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.B.; Schiffer, Christian; Stephenson, Randell Alexander

    in the convecting mantle cause mantle tractions at the base of the lithosphere. The radial component can cause dynamic topography and an anomalous state of lithospheric pressure, whereas the horizontal component might influence the plate movements directly. Relative plate movements and stress transmission through...... the rigid plates result in forces along plate boundaries. The relative importance and absolute magnitudes of the single stress sources is still matter of considerable discussion. Whereas the crustal structure is relatively well constrained for the estimation of the geopotential stress component...... and temperature variations at the base of the lithosphere that result in dynamic topography, and an anomalous geopotential energy. We do not include horizontal basal tractions or plate boundary forces. Nevertheless we can indirectly discuss the importance of additional stress sources for the lithospheric state...

  17. On the strength of oceanic fracture zones and their influence on the intraplate stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    We use the locations and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes to test the hypothesis that the strength of oceanic fracture zones is less than that of normal oceanic lithosphere. The 77 earthquakes selected for the study have well-determined focal mechanisms and epicenters in regions where fracture zones are well mapped. We have search for dependence of faulting style, fault orientation, or principal stress direction on the distance from the nearest fracture zone. If fracture zones were generally weaker than the surrounding lithosphere, one of the principal horizontal stresses would be oriented nearly perpendicular to the fracture zone; we find no evidence that principal stresses near fracture zones are oriented preferentially in this manner. There is a slight tendency for earthquakes to occur near fracture zones, and patterns of fault orientation and sense of slip support the view that differential cooling and horizontal contraction on fracture zones may contribute seismogenic stress.

  18. Field performance of timber bridges. 8, Lynches Woods Park stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter; D. Conger

    The Lynches Woods Park bridge was constructed during the summer of 1990 in Newberry, South Carolina. It is a single-span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that measures approximately 30 ft long, 16 ft wide, and 14 in. deep. The bridge is unique in that is one of the first known stress-laminated deck bridges to be constructed of Southern Pine lumber...

  19. Field performance of timber bridges. 4, Graves Crossing stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter

    The Graves Crossing bridge was constructed October 1991 in Antrim County, Michigan, as part of the demonstration timber bridge program sponsored by the USDA Forest Service. The bridge is a two-span continuous, stress-laminated deck superstructure and it is 36-ft long and 26-ft wide. The bridge is one of the first stress-laminated deck bridges to be built of sawn lumber...

  20. Analysis of Mode I Periodic Parallel Cracks-Tip Stress Field in an Infinite Orthotropic Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior near crack tip for periodic parallel cracks in an orthotropic composite plate subjected to the uniformly distributed load within the cracks surface is studied. The mechanical problem is turned into the boundary value problem of partial differential equation. By using the periodicity of the hyperbolic function in the complex domain and constructing proper Westergaard stress function, the periodicity of parallel cracks can be removed. Using the complex variable function method and the undetermined coefficients method, the boundary value problem of partial differential equation can be solved with the help of boundary conditions. The analytic expressions for stress intensity factor, stress, and displacement near the crack tip of periodical parallel cracks are obtained. When the vertical distance of cracks tends to infinity, the stress intensity factor degenerates into a single central crack situation. The stress intensity factor around the crack tip of periodic parallel cracks in an orthotropic composite plate depends on the shape factor. The interaction happens between the cracks. Finally, a numerical analysis of the stress and displacement changed with the polar angle is done.

  1. Local versus regional active stress field in 5900m San Gregorio Magno 1 well (southern Apennines, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdominici, S.; Montone, P.; Mariucci, M. T.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the local stress field in a peculiar sector of the southern Apennines by analyzing borehole breakouts, fractures and logging data along the San Gregorio Magno 1 deep well, and to compare the achieved stress field with the regional one. The study area is characterized by diffuse low-Magnitude seismicity, although in historical times it has been repeatedly struck by moderate to large earthquakes. We have analyzed in detail the 5900m San Gregorio Magno 1 well drilled in 1996-97 by ENI S.p.A. and located very close (1.3 km away) to the Irpinia Fault. This fault was responsible of the strongest earthquake happened in this area, the 23rd November 1980 M6.9 earthquake that produced the first unequivocal historical surface faulting ever documented in Italy. The mainshock enucleated on a fault 38 km-long with a strike of 308° and 60-70° northeast-dipping, consistent with a NE-SW T-axis and a normal faulting tectonic regime. Borehole breakouts, active faults and focal mechanism solutions have allowed to define the present-day stress along and around the San Gregorio Magno 1 well and other analysis (logging data) to discriminate the presence of fracture zones and/or faults at depth. We have considered data from 1200m to the bottom of San Gregorio Magno 1 well. Our analysis of stress-induced wellbore breakouts shows an inhomogeneous direction of minimum horizontal stress (N359+-31°) orientation along the well. This direction is moderately consistent with the Shmin-trend determined from breakouts in other wells in this region and also with the regional active stress field inferred from active faults and earthquake focal plane solutions (N44 Shmin oriented). For this reason we have computed for each breakout zone the difference between the local trend and the regional one; comparing these breakout rotations with the spikes or changing trend of logs we have identified possible fractures or faults at different depths. We have correlated

  2. Principal stress analysis in LDA measurement of the flow field downstream of 19-mm Sorin Bicarbon heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, V; Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; D'Avenio, G

    1998-11-01

    Heart valve replacement has become, since many years, a common surgical practice. Along with the improvement that the patients' health has derived from it, however, a certain amount of risk could not be avoided, bound to the inevitable hemodynamic disturbances that an artificial device generates. A major shortcoming, often reported, is the formation of thrombus on the edge of the prosthetic valve, with a possible obstruction of the orifices through which blood should normally flow undisturbed. Hemolysis is another possible consequence of the implantation of a mechanical heart valve, generally correlated to turbulence downstream of prosthetic heart valves (PHV). As it is agreed upon by many researchers, the risk of thrombogenicity or hemolysis is higher in those valves that are more subject to promote turbulence and flow separation in the flow through them. In the following paper, we present a study of the turbulence-related shear stress downstream of a bileaflet valve of minimum size (19 mm external diameter) Sorin Bicarbon. This size was chosen, accordingly to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance suggestion to investigate the worst case in turbulence promoted by PHVs, in order to have the highest velocity gradients and shear stresses for the FDA-stated cardiac output (6 1/min), related to maximum Reynolds number conditions. Velocity data were collected with the two-dimensional laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) technique; whereas this approach does not investigate directly all three components of the flow field, in the present case (bileaflet valves) it is not a limitation to the assessment of the maximum turbulence shear stress (TSS), thanks to the two-dimensional flow nature downstream of bileaflet models. Data taken in coincident mode were elaborated in order to determine the maximum shear stress in the measured points in the flow field, using the 2D Principal Stress Analysis (PSA). The consequences of a variable principal normal stress direction all

  3. Shock wave compression and self-generated electric field repolarization in ferroelectric ceramics Pb0.99[(Zr0.90Sn0.10)0.96Ti0.04]0.98Nb0.02O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongdong; Du, Jinmei; Gu, Yan; Feng, Yujun

    2012-03-01

    The shock wave induced depoling current of Pb0.99[(Zr0.90Sn0.10)0.96Ti0.04]0.98Nb0.02O3 ceramics was investigated with a system composed of a resistive load and an unpoled ceramic. Disparity in the depoling current was explained by considering the drawing charge effect of unpoled ceramic. The drawing effect for poled ceramics was analysed by developing a model incorporating a time- and electric-field-dependent repolarization. This model predicts that the high-impedance current eventually becomes higher than the short-circuit current, which is consistent with the experimental results in the literature. This work indicates that both the repolarization of uncompressed ceramics caused by the self-generated electric field and depolarization of compressed ceramics caused by the shock wave govern the output current.

  4. Comparison of Open-Hole Compression Strength and Compression After Impact Strength on Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates for the Ares I Composite Interstage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Nettles, Alan T.; Jackson, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    Notched (open hole) composite laminates were tested in compression. The effect on strength of various sizes of through holes was examined. Results were compared to the average stress criterion model. Additionally, laminated sandwich structures were damaged from low-velocity impact with various impact energy levels and different impactor geometries. The compression strength relative to damage size was compared to the notched compression result strength. Open-hole compression strength was found to provide a reasonable bound on compression after impact.

  5. Thermo-mechanical modeling of continental rift evolution over mantle upwelling in presence of far-field stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptev, Alexander; Burov, Evgueni; Calais, Eric; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    We conducted fully-coupled high resolution rheologically consistent 3D thermo-mechanical numerical models to investigate the processes of mantle-lithosphere interaction (MLI) in presence of preexisting far-field tectonic stresses. MLI-induced topography exhibits strongly asymmetric small-scale 3D features, such as rifts, flexural flank uplifts and complex faults structures. This suggests a dominant role of continental rheological structure and intra-plate stresses in controlling continental rifting and break-up processes above mantle upwelling while reconciling the passive (far-field tectonic stresses) versus active (plume-activated) rift concepts as our experiments show both processes in action. We tested different experiments by varying two principal controlling parameters: 1) horizontal extension velocity and 2) Moho temperature used as simplified indicator of the thermal and rheological lithosphere layering. An increase in the applied extension expectedly gives less localized deformation at lithospheric scale: the growth of external velocity from 1.5 mm/years to 6 mm/years leads to enlargement of the rift zones from 75-175 km to 150-425 km width. On the contrary, increasing of the lithospheric geotherm has an opposite effect leading to narrowing of the rift zone: the change of the Moho isotherm from 600°C to 800°C causes diminution of the rift width from 175-425 km to 75-150 km. Some of these finding are contra-intuitive in terms of usual assumptions. The models refer to strongly non-linear impact of far-field extension rates on timing of break-up processes. Experiments with relatively fast far-field extension (6 mm/years) show intensive normal fault localization in crust and uppermost mantle above the plume head at 15-20 Myrs after the onset of the experiment. When plume head material reaches the bottom of the continental crust (at 25 Myrs), the latter is rapidly ruptured (break-up time (from 60 to 70 Myrs depending on initial isotherm at the crust bottom

  6. Effect of far-field stresses and residual stresses incorporation in predicting fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced yttria stabilized zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Neelima; Nisar, Ambreen; Mohapatra, Pratyasha; Rawat, Siddharth; Ariharan, S.; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-10-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a potential thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications (>1000 °C). YSZ reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was processed via spark plasma sintering to produce dense, crack-free homogeneous sample and avoid any degradation of MWNTs when sintered using conventional routes. Despite porosity, the addition of MWNT has a profound effect in improving the damage tolerance of YSZ by allowing the retention of tetragonal phase. However, at some instances, the crack lengths in the MWNT reinforced YSZ matrices have been found to be longer than the standalone counterparts. Therefore, it becomes inappropriate to apply Anstis equation to calculate fracture toughness values. In this regard, a combined analytical cum numerical method is used to estimate the theoretical fracture toughness and quantitatively analyze the mechanics of matrix cracking in the reinforced composite matrices incorporating the effects of various factors (such as far-field stresses, volume fraction of MWNTs, change in the modulus and Poisson's ratio values along with the increase in porosity, and bridging and phase transformation mechanism) affecting the fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites. The results suggest that the incorporation of far-field stresses cannot be ignored in estimating the theoretical fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites.

  7. Fatigue Properties of Plain Concrete under Triaxial Tension-Compression-Compression Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfu Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue tests were performed on plain concrete under triaxial tension-compression-compression (T-C-C cyclic loading with constant and variable amplitude using a large multiaxial machine. Experimental results show that, under constant amplitude fatigue loads, the development of residual strain in the fatigue loading direction depends mostly on the lateral compressive stress ratio and is nearly independent of stress level. Under variable amplitude fatigue loads, the fatigue residual strain is related to the relative fatigue cycle and lateral compressive stress ratio but has little relationship with the loading process. To model this system, the relative residual strain was defined as the damage variant. Damage evolutions for plain concrete were established. In addition, fatigue damage analysis and predictions of fatigue remaining life were conducted. This work provides a reference for multistage fatigue testing and fatigue damage evaluation of plain concrete under multiaxial loads.

  8. Residual Stress Analysis Based on Acoustic and Optical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanichiro Yoshida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-application of acoustoelasticity and optical interferometry to residual stress analysis is discussed. The underlying idea is to combine the advantages of both methods. Acoustoelasticity is capable of evaluating a residual stress absolutely but it is a single point measurement. Optical interferometry is able to measure deformation yielding two-dimensional, full-field data, but it is not suitable for absolute evaluation of residual stresses. By theoretically relating the deformation data to residual stresses, and calibrating it with absolute residual stress evaluated at a reference point, it is possible to measure residual stresses quantitatively, nondestructively and two-dimensionally. The feasibility of the idea has been tested with a butt-jointed dissimilar plate specimen. A steel plate 18.5 mm wide, 50 mm long and 3.37 mm thick is braze-jointed to a cemented carbide plate of the same dimension along the 18.5 mm-side. Acoustoelasticity evaluates the elastic modulus at reference points via acoustic velocity measurement. A tensile load is applied to the specimen at a constant pulling rate in a stress range substantially lower than the yield stress. Optical interferometry measures the resulting acceleration field. Based on the theory of harmonic oscillation, the acceleration field is correlated to compressive and tensile residual stresses qualitatively. The acoustic and optical results show reasonable agreement in the compressive and tensile residual stresses, indicating the feasibility of the idea.

  9. Culture, Stress and Recovery from Schizophrenia: Lessons from the Field for Global Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This cultural case study investigates one U.S. psychosocial rehabilitation organization’s (Horizons) attempt to implement the recovery philosophy of the U.S. Recovery Movement and offers lessons from this local attempt that may inform global mental health care reform. Horizons’ “recovery-oriented” initiatives unwittingly mobilized stressful North American discourses of valued citizenship. At times, efforts to “empower” people diagnosed with schizophrenia to become esteemed self-made citizens generated more stressful sociocultural conditions for people whose daily lives were typically remarkably stressful. A recovery-oriented mental health system must account for people diagnosed with schizophrenia’s sensitivity to stress and offer consumers contextually relevant coping mechanisms. Any attempt to export U.S. mental health care practices to the rest of the world must acknowledge that (1) sociocultural conditions affect schizophrenia outcomes; (2) schizophrenia outcomes are already better in the developing world than in the United States; and (3) much of what leads to “better” outcomes in the developing world may rely on the availability of locally relevant techniques to address stress. PMID:20571905

  10. Disease stress detection on citrus using a leaf optical model and field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badnakhe, Mrunalini R.; Durbha, Surya; Adinarayana, J.

    2015-10-01

    As citrus is progressively contributing to horticultural production, wealth and economy of a country, it is necessary to understand the factors impacting citrus production. Gummosis is one of the most serious diseases causing considerable loss of overall citrus production and yield quality. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of citrus leaf biochemical properties are necessary to monitor the crop health, disease /pest stress and production. Total leaf chlorophyll content (Cab) represents one of the key biochemical factors which contributes in water, carbon, and energy exchange processes. Photosynthesis process in citrus will be disturbed as gummosis disease life cycle progresses. It is important to study Cab to evaluate the photosynthesis rate and disease stress. In this study the potential of Radiative Transfer (RT) PROSPECT model to retrieve Cab in citrus orchards was undertaken at different sites. The main goal is to evaluate the relationship between Cab and gummosis disease stress for citrus at various phenological stages. Inversion of PROSPECT model on measured hyperspectral data is carried out to extract the leaf level parameters influencing the disease. This model was inverted with the ground truth hyperspectral reading. The testing was separately initiated for healthy and infected plant leaves. This can lead to understand the disease stress on citrus leaves. For accuracy, raw spectra are filtered and processed which is an input parameter for Inversion PROSPECT model. Here, retrieved Cab content was correlated with gummosis disease stress in terms of oozing with R2 = 0.6021 and RMSE= 0.481272.

  11. An equivalent-time-lines model for municipal solid waste based on its compression characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wu; Bian, Xuecheng; Xu, Wenjie; Chen, Yunmin

    2017-10-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) demonstrates a noticeable time-dependent stress-strain behavior, which contributes greatly to the settlement of landfills and therefore influences both the storage capacity of landfills and the integrity of internal structures. The long-term compression tests for MSW under different biodegradation conditions were analyzed. It showed that the primary compression can affect the secondary compression due to the biodegradation and mechanical creep. Based on the time-lines model for clays and the compression characteristics of MSW, relationships between MSW's viscous strain rate and equivalent time were established, and then the viscous strain functions of MSW under different biodegradation conditions were deduced, and an equivalent-time-lines model for MSW settlement for two biodegradation conditions was developed, including the Type I model for the enhanced biodegradation condition and the Type II model for the normal biodegradation condition. The simulated compression results of laboratory and field compression tests under different biodegradation conditions were consistent with the measured data, which showed the reliability of both types of the equivalent-time-lines model for MSW. In addition, investigations of the long-term settlement of landfills from the literature indicated that the Type I model is suitable for predicting settlement in MSW landfills with a distinct biodegradation progress of MSW, a high content of organics in MSW, a short fill age or under an enhanced biodegradation environment; while the Type II model is good at predicting settlement in MSW landfills with a distinct progress of mechanical creep compression, a low content of organics in MSW, a long fill age or under a normal biodegradation condition. Furthermore, relationships between model parameters and the fill age of landfills were summarized. Finally, the similarities and differences between the equivalent-time-lines model for MSW and the stress

  12. Timing effects of heat-stress on plant physiological characteristics and growth: a field study with prairie vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available More intense, more frequent, and longer heat-waves are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic agricultural, economic and ecological impacts. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS treatment at different timing in naturally-occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5 ºC were applied to 12 1m2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by Andropogon gerardii (warm-season C4 grass and Solidago canadensis (warm-season C3 forb at different growing stages. During and after HS, air, canopy, and soil temperature were monitored; net CO2 assimilation (Pn, quantum yield of photosystem II (ФPSII, stomatal conductance (gs, and internal CO2 level (Ci of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species was determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii, indicated by negative heat stress effect on both physiological and growth responses. There were significant timing effect of heat stress on the two species, with greater reductions in the photosynthesis and productivity occurred when heat stress was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that heat stress, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe heat stress occur in the future.

  13. The Stress Field at an Axial Eccentrical Fatigue Loading - Influenced by the Test Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roşca, Vâlcu; Miriţoiu, Cosmin Mihai

    2017-12-01

    By applying a cyclic eccentrically tensile loading, oscillatory positive, determines at the crack peak that exist in a plate specimen CT type a compound loading of bending with tensile. The aim of the study is to analyze the equivalent stress variation σ, when the working temperature varies, namely: T= 293K (+20°C), T= 253K (-20C) and T= 213K (-60°C). The specimens are made from a stainless steel 10TiNiCr175 type, and were loaded with the asymmetry coefficient R= 0.1. There are drawn the variation curves of stress versus the crack length variation, σ(a), versus the material durability, σ(N), and respectively versus the stress intensity factor, σ(ΔK), for the three loading temperatures.

  14. Spatial variations of current tectonic stress field and its relationship to the structure and rheology of lithosphere around the Bohai Sea, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianrui; Wang, Jie; Zeng, Zuoxun; Dai, Qingqin

    2017-05-01

    The tectonic stress field in the middle-upper crust is closely related to the structure and rheology of the lithosphere. To determine the stress field in the deep crust, we inversed the focal mechanism solutions (FMSs) of 62 earthquakes that occurred between 2009 and 2015 in the Bohai Sea and its surrounding areas using broadband seismic waveforms collected from 140 stations. We then derived the tectonic stress field using the software SATSI (Spatial And Temporal Stress Inversion) based on the damped linear inversion method. The inversion results show that both the maximum (σ1) and minimum (σ3) principle stress axes throughout the entire region are nearly horizontal except in the Tangshan and Haicheng areas, suggesting that the study area is predominantly under a strike-slip faulting stress regime. The σ1 and σ3 axes are found to be oriented in the NEE-SWW or nearly E-W and NNW-SSE or nearly S-N directions, respectively. These results indicate that the stress field in the North China Craton is controlled by the combined effects of the Pacific Plate westward subduction and the India-Eurasia Plate collision. However, localized normal faulting stress regimes (where the vertical stress σv ≈ σ1) are observed in the Tangshan and Haicheng areas, where low viscosity bodies (LVBs) were identified using geophysical data. Based on the analysis of focal mechanism solutions, active faults and lithosphere rheology characteristics in the Tangshan and Haicheng areas, we speculate that the anomalous stress regime is caused by the local extension resulting from the movement of strike-slip faults under the action of the regional stress field. The existence of LVB may indicate weakness in the crust that favors the accumulation of tectonic stress and triggers large earthquakes.

  15. The Effect of the Free Surface on the Singular Stress Field at the Fatigue Crack Front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oplt Tomáš

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Description of stress singularity in the vicinity of a free surface is presented. Its presence causes the retardation of the fatigue crack growth in that region and fatigue crack is being curved. Numerical model is used to study dependence of the stress singularity exponent on Poisson’s ratio. Estimated values are compared to those already published. Experimentally measured angles of fatigue crack on SENB specimens confirm the relation between Poisson’s ratio and the angle between crack front and free surface.

  16. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  17. Central cooling: compressive chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1978-03-01

    Representative cost and performance data are provided in a concise, useable form for three types of compressive liquid packaged chillers: reciprocating, centrifugal, and screw. The data are represented in graphical form as well as in empirical equations. Reciprocating chillers are available from 2.5 to 240 tons with full-load COPs ranging from 2.85 to 3.87. Centrifugal chillers are available from 80 to 2,000 tons with full load COPs ranging from 4.1 to 4.9. Field-assemblied centrifugal chillers have been installed with capacities up to 10,000 tons. Screw-type chillers are available from 100 to 750 tons with full load COPs ranging from 3.3 to 4.5.

  18. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances....

  19. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances...

  20. Seed set, pollen morphology and pollen surface composition response to heat stress in field pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunfei; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Kumar, Saroj; Davis, Arthur R; Bueckert, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a major legume crop grown in a semi-arid climate in Western Canada, where heat stress affects pollination, seed set and yield. Seed set and pod growth characteristics, along with in vitro percentage pollen germination, pollen tube growth and pollen surface composition, were measured in two pea cultivars (CDC Golden and CDC Sage) subjected to five maximum temperature regimes ranging from 24 to 36 °C. Heat stress reduced percentage pollen germination, pollen tube length, pod length, seed number per pod, and the seed-ovule ratio. Percentage pollen germination of CDC Sage was greater than CDC Golden at 36 °C. No visible morphological differences in pollen grains or the pollen surface were observed between the heat and control-treated pea. However, pollen wall (intine) thickness increased due to heat stress. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectra revealed that the chemical composition (lipid, proteins and carbohydrates) of each cultivar's pollen grains responded differently to heat stress. The lipid region of the pollen coat and exine of CDC Sage was more stable compared with CDC Golden at 36 °C. Secondary derivatives of ATR spectra indicated the presence of two lipid types, with different amounts present in pollen grains from each cultivar. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Laue-DIC: a new method for improved stress field measurements at the micrometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, J; Castelnau, O; Bornert, M; Zhang, F G; Hofmann, F; Korsunsky, A M; Faurie, D; Le Bourlot, C; Micha, J S; Robach, O; Ulrich, O

    2015-07-01

    A better understanding of the effective mechanical behavior of polycrystalline materials requires an accurate knowledge of the behavior at a scale smaller than the grain size. The X-ray Laue microdiffraction technique available at beamline BM32 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is ideally suited for probing elastic strains (and associated stresses) in deformed polycrystalline materials with a spatial resolution smaller than a micrometer. However, the standard technique used to evaluate local stresses from the distortion of Laue patterns lacks accuracy for many micromechanical applications, mostly due to (i) the fitting of Laue spots by analytical functions, and (ii) the necessary comparison of the measured pattern with the theoretical one from an unstrained reference specimen. In the present paper, a new method for the analysis of Laue images is presented. A Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique, which is essentially insensitive to the shape of Laue spots, is applied to measure the relative distortion of Laue patterns acquired at two different positions on the specimen. The new method is tested on an in situ deformed Si single-crystal, for which the prescribed stress distribution has been calculated by finite-element analysis. It is shown that the new Laue-DIC method allows determination of local stresses with a strain resolution of the order of 10(-5).

  2. Field performance of timber bridges. 15, Pueblo County, Colorado, stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. E. Hislop

    The Pueblo County 204B bridge was constructed in March 1990 in Pueblo, Colorado, as a demonstration bridge under the USDA Forest Service Timber Bridge Initiative. The stress-laminated deck superstructure is approximately 10 m long, 9 m wide, and 406 mm deep, with a skew of 10 degrees. Performance monitoring was conducted for 3 years, beginning at...

  3. Multigrid Solution of the 3D stress field in strongly heterogeneous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffy, Hugo; Venner, Cornelis H.

    2014-01-01

    Technology allows the production of advanced (heterogeneous) materials controlling properties on an increasingly local scale, e.g. layered, graded, granular and fiber-reinforced. In this paper the efficiency of the Multigrid method for 3D stress calculation involving such materials is investigated.

  4. Constructing 3D isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic crustal models across USArray using Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity: inferring continental stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F. C.; Schmandt, B.; Tsai, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    compressive stress directions. This suggests that the observed H/V ratio anisotropy can potentially be used to infer static stress field across the US.

  5. Finite Element Residual Stress Analysis of Planetary Gear Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to simulate residual stress field of planetary gear is proposed. In this method, the finite element model of planetary gear is established and divided to tooth zone and profile zone, whose different temperature field is set. The gear's residual stress simulation is realized by the thermal compression stress generated by the temperature difference. Based on the simulation, the finite element model of planetary gear train is established, the dynamic meshing process is simulated, and influence of residual stress on equivalent stress of addendum, pitch circle, and dedendum of internal and external meshing planetary gear tooth profile is analyzed, according to non-linear contact theory, thermodynamic theory, and finite element theory. The results show that the equivalent stresses of planetary gear at both meshing and nonmeshing surface are significantly and differently reduced by residual stress. The study benefits fatigue cracking analysis and dynamic optimization design of planetary gear train.

  6. Development of the numerical model for evaluating the temperature field and thermal stresses in structural elements of aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumaev, V. V.; Kuzenov, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    An approximate method for estimating the thermal stresses of the aircraft key components of the simple geometric shape (the edges of the hull and wings, the nose fairing) has been developed. The mathematical model of such estimates is based on the solution of the quasi-static thermoelasticity problem. The solution is evaluated in the area with curvilinear boundaries, and the shape of these boundaries changes under the influence of thermal and mechanical loads. Thus the computational domain is transformed to an area where the regular Cartesian (structured) grid can be introduced. The initial validation and verification of the developed numerical methodology was carried out. Numerical modeling of temperature fields and thermal stresses in the simplest components of aircraft structures (cylinder blunted over the sphere and the shell) is performed.

  7. Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself.

  8. The influence of axial compressive stresses on the formability and scattering of process parameters in micro-hydroforming processes of tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartl Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasible product geometries manufactured with micro-hydroforming, as well as process stability are crucially influenced by the microstructure of the used tube material. The higher ratio of grain size to tube wall thickness dk/t0 in micro-hydroforming, compared to conventional tube hydroforming, leads to an increase of scattering of process parameters and instabilities. This paper presents experimental and theoretical results for the micro-hydroforming of tubes made from stainless steel and from platinum with a focus on the correlations between the microstructure of the workpiece material, the stress state during forming and the resulting stability of the forming process. Investigated tube dimensions were 800 µm outer diameter and 40 µm wall thickness of the steel tubes, respectively 1650 µm and 76 µm of the platinum tubes. The average ratio dk/t0 was about 0.3 for the steel material and about 0.9 for the platinum alloy. It has been shown that superimposed axial stresses are suitable to reduce the restricting influence of an increased ratio dk/t0 and to improve the forming result as well as the process stability.

  9. Effect of magnetic field and silver nanoparticles on yield and water use efficiency of Carum copticum under water stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seghatoleslami Mohammadjavad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Normally the productivity of cropping systems in arid and semi- arid regions is very low. The sustainable agricultural systems try to find out environmental friendly technologies based on physical and biological treatments to increase crop production. In this study two irrigation treatments (control and water stress and six methods of fertilizer treatment (control, NPK-F, using magnetic band- M, using silver nano particles- N, M+N and M+N+50% F on performance of ajowan were compared. Results showed that treatments with magnetic field or base fertilizer had more yield compared to the control and silver nanoparticles (N treatments. Application of silver nanoparticles had no positive effect on yield. The highest seed and biomass WUE achieved in base fertilizer or magnetic field treatments. Under water stress treatment, seed WUE significantly increased. In conclusion magnetic field exposure, probably by encourage nutrient uptake efficiency could be applied to reduce fertilizer requirement. On the other hand the cultivation of plants under low MF could be an alternative way of WUE improving.

  10. Distributed deformation structures in shallow water carbonates subsiding through a simple stress field (Jandaira Formation, NE Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, Giovanni; Bisdom, Kevin; Bezerra, Hilario; Reijmer, John; Cazarin, Carol

    2016-04-01

    Despite the scarcity of major deformation structures such as folds and faults, the flat-lying, post-rift shallow water carbonates of the Jandaira Formation (Potiguar Basin, NE Brazil) display well-organized fracture systems distributed of tens of km2. Structures observed in the outcropping carbonates are sub-vertical, generally N-S trending mode I and hybrid veins and barren fractures, sub-vertical roughly E-W trending stylolites and sub-horizontal stylolites. These features developed during subsidence in a simple and constant stress field characterized by, beside gravity, a significant horizontal stress probably of tectonic origin. The corresponding depth curves have different origin and slopes and, therefore, cross each other resulting in position of the principal stresses which change with depth. As a result, the type and amount of fractures affecting subsiding rocks change despite the fact that the far-field stresses remain constant. Following early diagenesis and porosity elimination in the first 100-200m depth, Jandaira carbonates experienced wholesale fracturing at depths of 400-800m resulting in a network of NNW-NE trending fractures partly organized in conjugate sets with a low interfault angle and a sub-vertical intersection, and sub-vertical stylolites roughly perpendicular to the fractures. Intense fluid circulation was activated as a consequence through the carbonates. With increasing subsidence, sub-horizontal stylolites formed providing calcite which precipitated in the open fractures transforming them in veins. The Jandaira formation lost thereby the permeability it had reached during the previous stage. Because of the lack of major deformation, the outcrops of the Jandaira Formation is an excellent analog for carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East, South Atlantic and elsewhere.

  11. A reassessment of in situ stress determination by hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakirouhani, A.; Detournay, E.; Bunger, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    Estimating in situ stress based on hydraulic fracturing data typically depends on interpretation of the breakdown, secondary breakdown (`reopening') and shut-in pressure. While it has been recognized that the near-wellbore stress field should be taken into account and that the compressibility of the injection system and the viscous flow of the fluid can diminish the accuracy of stress estimates, these issues have not been well quantified. A coupled numerical model that includes the compressibility of the injection system and the flow of a viscous fluid in a plane-strain hydraulic fracture extending from a wellbore, in an impermeable rock, and in the presence of a non-isotropic in situ stress field provides a basic tool for estimating the order of the error associated with hydraulic fracturing stress measurements under non-ideal conditions. The main findings of this work are model-based guidelines on the values of relevant dimensionless parameter groups to ensure sufficient accuracy of stress estimates that use idealized models. When these guidelines cannot be met under field conditions, the model can be further applied to obtain first-order corrections that account for compressibility, viscosity and near-wellbore effects.

  12. Evaluation of crack-tip stress fields on microstructural-scale fracture in Al-Al2O3 interpenetrating network composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Moon; Mark Hoffman; Jurgen Rödel; Shigemi Tochino; Giuseppe Pezzotti

    2009-01-01

    The influence of local microstructure on the fracture process at the crack tip in a ceramic–metal composite was assessed by comparing the measured stress at a microstructural level and analogous finite element modelling (FEM). Fluorescence microprobe spectroscopy was used to investigate the influence of near-crack-tip stress fields on the resulting crack propagation at...

  13. Changes in permeability caused by transient stresses: field observations, experiments, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Michael; Beresnev, Igor; Brodsky, Emily E.; Elkhoury, Jean E.; Elsworth, Derek; Ingebritsen, Steve E.; Mays, David C.; Wang, Chi-Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Oscillations in stress, such as those created by earthquakes, can increase permeability and fluid mobility in geologic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes as small as 10–6 can increase discharge in streams and springs, change the water level in wells, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated values over a period of months to years. Mechanisms that can change permeability at such small stresses include unblocking pores, either by breaking up permeability-limiting colloidal deposits or by mobilizing droplets and bubbles trapped in pores by capillary forces. The recovery time over which permeability returns to the prestimulated value is governed by the time to reblock pores, or for geochemical processes to seal pores. Monitoring permeability in geothermal systems where there is abundant seismicity, and the response of flow to local and regional earthquakes, would help test some of the proposed mechanisms and identify controls on permeability and its evolution.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field and Residual Stress Distribution for Laser Cladding Remanufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hua

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional finite element model was employed to simulate the cladding process of Ni-Cr-B-Si coatings on 16MnR steel under different parameters of laser power, scanning speed, and spot diameter. The temperature and residual stress distribution, the depth of the heat affected zone (HAZ, and the optimized parameters for laser cladding remanufacturing technology were obtained. The orthogonal experiment and intuitive analysis on the depth of the HAZ were performed to study the influence of different cladding parameters. A new criterion based on the ratio of the maximum tensile residual stress and fracture strength of the substrate was proposed for optimization of the remanufacturing parameters. The result showed well agreement with that of the HAZ analysis.

  15. Influence of internal stresses on field-dependent elastic modulus and damping in pure nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, A.L., E-mail: AngelLuis.Morales@uclm.e [Area de Ingenieria Mecanica, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales (Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha), Edificio Politecnico, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Nieto, A.J.; Chicharro, J.M.; Pintado, P. [Area de Ingenieria Mecanica, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales (Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha), Edificio Politecnico, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Rodriguez, G.P.; Herranz, G. [Area de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales (Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha), Edificio Politecnico, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Measurements of the {Delta}E-effect and magnetomechanical damping are reported for crystalline pure nickel under several states of internal stresses. The different internal stresses are obtained by means of a wide variety of heat treatments and studied via microscopic examination and measurement. The influence of the heating temperature, the heating time and the cooling method on the magnetoelastic properties is studied. Our results make it possible to select the most suitable heat treatment for each application and to optimize the magnetoelastic response of nickel. Relative variations from 2% to 13% can be obtained in the {Delta}E-effect, whereas relative variations from 40.0% to 99.9% are possible in magnetomechanical damping, in terms of specific damping capacity.

  16. USE OF AUTODESK SIMULATION MULTIPHYSICS FOR RESEARCH OF TEMPERATURE FIELDS, STRESS AND DEFOMATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF GEAR PUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Puzanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gear pumps are the most common type of hydraulic machines. They are used in various industries: oil and gas processing industry, in machine tools, mobile military, road-building and agricultural machinery. The need to ensure efficiency of hydraulic mobile applications in a wide climatic range requires increasing the accuracy of the calculation methods for the design of their elements. The results of temperature field modeling and caused them stress and strain. The results obtained allowed to justify the design and technological solutions, providing an increase of hydraulic performance at critical ambient temperatures.

  17. Method to compute the stress-energy tensor for a quantum field outside a black hole that forms from collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul; Evans, Charles

    2017-01-01

    A method to compute the stress-energy tensor for a quantized massless minimally coupled scalar field outside the event horizon of a 4-D black hole that forms from the collapse of a spherically symmetric null shell is given. The method is illustrated in the corresponding 2-D case which is mathematically similar but is simple enough that the calculations can be done analytically. The approach to the Unruh state at late times is discussed. National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1505875 to Wake Forest University and National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1506182 to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  18. Investigation on Void Effect on Shear Stress Field in Bonded Stepped-Lap Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoddous,Behnam; Shishehsaz,Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, an adhesively-bonded stepped-lap joint suffering from a void within its adhesive layer is investigated. The void separates the layer into two sections. The joint is under tensile load and materials are isotropic and assumed to behave as linear elastic. Classical elasticity theory is used to determine shear stress distribution in the separated sections of adhesive layer along the overlap length. A set of differential equations was derived and solved by using appropriate...

  19. Field performance of timber bridges. 17, Ciphers stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Wacker; James A. Kainz; Michael A. Ritter

    In September 1989, the Ciphers bridge was constructed within the Beltrami Island State Forest in Roseau County, Minnesota. The bridge superstructure is a two-span continuous stress-laminated deck that is approximately 12.19 m long, 5.49 m wide, and 305 mm deep (40 ft long, 18 ft wide, and 12 in. deep). The bridge is one of the first to utilize red pine sawn lumber for...

  20. Field performance of timber bridges. 13, Mohawk Canal stress-laminated bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. D. Hilbrich Lee; X. Lauderdale

    The Mohawk Canal bridge was constructed in August 1994, just outside Roll, Arizona. It is a simple-span, double-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure, approximately 6.4 m (21 ft) long and 10.4 m (34 ft) wide and constructed with Combination 16F-V3 Douglas Fir glued-laminated timber beam laminations. The performance of the bridge was monitored continuously for 2...

  1. Field performance of timber bridges. 10, Sanborn Brook stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. D. Hilbrich Lee; J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter

    The Sanborn Brook bridge was constructed in August 1991, 10 miles northeast of Concord, New Hampshire, as part of the demonstration timber bridge program of the USDA Forest Service. The bridge is a simple-span, double-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure constructed from Southern Pine lumber and is approximately 25 ft long and 28 ft wide with a skew of 14 degrees...

  2. Field performance of timber bridges. 12, Christian Hollow stress-laminated box-beam bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Wacker; S. C. Catherman; R. G. Winnett

    In January 1992, the Christian Hollow bridge was constructed in Steuben County, New York. The bridge is a single-span, stress-laminated box-beam superstructure that is 9.1 m long, 9.8 m wide, and 502 mm deep (30 ft long, 32 ft wide, and 19-3/4 in. deep). The performance of the bridge was continuously monitored for 28 months, beginning shortly after installation....

  3. Laue-DIC: a new method for improved stress field measurements at the micrometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J., E-mail: johannpetit@u-paris10.fr [LEME, Université Paris Ouest, 50 rue de Sèvres, F-92410 Ville d’Avray (France); Castelnau, O. [PIMM, CNRS, Arts and Métiers ParisTech, 151 Bd de l’Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Bornert, M. [Laboratoire Navier, Université Paris-Est, École des Ponts ParisTech, F-77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Zhang, F. G. [PIMM, CNRS, Arts and Métiers ParisTech, 151 Bd de l’Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Hofmann, F.; Korsunsky, A. M. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Faurie, D. [LSPM, CNRS, Université Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Le Bourlot, C. [INSA-Lyon, MATEIS CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Micha, J. S. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPrAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SPrAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CRG-IF BM32 at ESRF, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Robach, O.; Ulrich, O. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPrAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CRG-IF BM32 at ESRF, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-05-09

    The increment of elastic strain distribution, with a micrometer spatial resolution, is obtained by the correlation of successive Laue images. Application to a bent Si crystal allows evaluation of the accuracy of this new Laue-DIC method, which is about 10{sup −5}. A better understanding of the effective mechanical behavior of polycrystalline materials requires an accurate knowledge of the behavior at a scale smaller than the grain size. The X-ray Laue microdiffraction technique available at beamline BM32 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility is ideally suited for probing elastic strains (and associated stresses) in deformed polycrystalline materials with a spatial resolution smaller than a micrometer. However, the standard technique used to evaluate local stresses from the distortion of Laue patterns lacks accuracy for many micromechanical applications, mostly due to (i) the fitting of Laue spots by analytical functions, and (ii) the necessary comparison of the measured pattern with the theoretical one from an unstrained reference specimen. In the present paper, a new method for the analysis of Laue images is presented. A Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique, which is essentially insensitive to the shape of Laue spots, is applied to measure the relative distortion of Laue patterns acquired at two different positions on the specimen. The new method is tested on an in situ deformed Si single-crystal, for which the prescribed stress distribution has been calculated by finite-element analysis. It is shown that the new Laue-DIC method allows determination of local stresses with a strain resolution of the order of 10{sup −5}.

  4. Field performance of timber bridges. 16, North Siwell Road stress-laminated bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. A. Kainz

    The North Siwell Road bridge was constructed during December 1994 in Hinds County, Mississippi. The bridge is a single-span, stress-laminated T-beam structure that measures 9.1 m (30 ft) long and 8.7 m (28.5 ft) wide. Performance of the bridge was monitored for 24 months, beginning at the time of installation. Monitoring involved gathering and evaluating data relative...

  5. Lithosphere strain rate and stress field orientations across the Alpine front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlie, Nicolas; Cardello, Luca

    2017-04-01

    In this study we test whether principal components of the strain rate and stress tensors align within Switzerland. We find that 1) the Alpine front is the most relevant tectonic boundary separating different domains of crustal stress / surface strain rates orientations and 2) orientations of T- axes (of moment tensor solutions) and long-term asthenosphere cumulative finite strain (from SKS shear wave splitting) are consistent. Additionally, we show that directions of principal components of both strain rate and stress tensors agree with orientations of shear wave splitting, implying that the Alpine arc is sheared by large-scale processe(s) taking place in the asthenosphere. At a more local scale, we find that seismic current activity and surface deformation are not in agreement in three regions (Basel, Swiss Jura and Ticino), possibly because of the low levels of deformation and seismicity. In the Basel area, deep seismicity exists while surface deformation is absent. In the Ticino and the Swiss Jura, where seismic activity is close to absent, surface deformation is detected at a level of 2x10-8/yr.

  6. Analytical Methods for Temperature Field and Temperature Stress of Column Pier under Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previous research work, a new idea is proposed for analyzing the impact of solar radiation on the substructure of bridges. Investigation is conducted in the thermodynamic phenomena and temperature stress of a dual-column pier. Research is led to the thermal conductivity of concrete structure and the values of the environmental parameters under solar radiation. An analytical code is written for the thermal analysis of the dual-column pier using the parametric modeling function of FE software, by means of which the temperature distribution of the bridge structure is computed under solar radiation. Using the thermal analytical results, the temperature stress of the dual-column pier is further calculated. The results tell that the temperature gradient distribution curve inside the concrete of the pier fits favorably the curve defined in the design specification and coincides quite well with real situation, which verifies the new idea proposed in this paper. Under the solar radiation which is a time-variable nonlinear temperature load to the bridge, the maximum principal stress is found at the corner of the pier with the sign of negative, which is believed to threaten the safety of the substructure of bridge and is necessary to arouse emphasis.

  7. A field study of management stress in reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rehbinder

    1982-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of stress was studied in semidomesticated reindeer subjected to various herding and handling methods. In herded and handled animals, stress lesions were found, such as abomasal haemorrhage, muscular and myocardial degeneration and marked changes in blood constituents. The degree of change was dependent of the magnitude of stress the animal had been exposed to. Manual handling and restraint was found to be one of the major stress factors. There were evident indications of a cumulative effect of repeated stress events. The use of motor vehicles (helicopter and snow-scooter, for herding and transporting the animals, was found to be an important stress factor. It is concluded that various herding and handling methods studied in the present investigation led to varying degrees of deleterious effects on the health of the animals and a poorer meatquality from slaughtered animals. Hence herding should be undertaken as carefully as possible, the time taken for manual handling should be minimized, and the corrals be so constructed as to cause a minimum of disturbance, capture and restraint. Transportation should be undertaken very cautiously with as little manual handling as possible during loading and unloading. To obtain a good meat quality, animals to be slaughtered should be subjected to a minimum of handling, i.e. slaughter should take place as quickly as possible. Transportation of live animals to slaughterhouses and the keeping of animals in corrals, pens or crates whilst awaiting slaughter will result in a lowered meat quality and should therefore be avoided.En fåltstudie av stress hos ren i samband med olika hanteringsformer.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfatning: Betydelsen av stress hos ren studerades i hjordar i vilka olika typer av samlings- och hanteringsmetoder anvandes. I samtliga hjordar som utsatts for olika former av drivning forelag hos slaktdjur skador betingade av stress i form av magblodningar, muskelsonderfall och

  8. Analysis of Channel Stress Induced by NiPt-Silicide in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor and Its Generation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuo, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Kudo, Shuichi; Hirose, Yukinori; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsuchimoto, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Nobuyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Channel stress induced by NiPt-silicide films in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) was demonstrated using UV-Raman spectroscopy, and its generation mechanism was revealed. It was possible to accurately measure the channel stress with the Raman test structure. The channel stress depends on the source/drain doping type and the second silicide annealing method. In order to discuss the channel stress generation mechanism, NiPt-silicide microstructure analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The channel stress generation mechanism can be elucidated by the following two factors: the change in the NiSi lattice spacing, which depends on the annealing temperature, and the NiSi crystal orientation. The analyses of these factors are important for controlling channel stress in stress engineering for high-performance transistors.

  9. ELF electro-magnetic fields as stress factors in some yeasts and molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galonja-Coghill Tamara A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of species targeted growth inhibition of three yeast (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one mold species (Aspergillus fumigatus by electromagnetic fields of certain characteristics was investigated. Cultures were exposed to sinusoidal 50 Hz fields, and 10, 40 and 70 mT magnetic components and 20 V/m electric component, for 30 minutes. Cell density in yeast cultures and germination time and rate in mold cultures were investigated.

  10. MRI Images Compression Using Curvelets Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beladgham, M.; Hacene, I. Boucli; Taleb-Ahmed, A.; Khélif, M.

    2008-06-01

    In the field of medical diagnostics, interested parties have resorted increasingly to medical imaging, it is well established that the accuracy and completeness of diagnosis are initially connected with the image quality, but the quality of the image is itself dependent on a number of factors including primarily the processing that an image must undergo to enhance its quality. We are interested in MRI medical image compression by Curvelets, of which we have proposed in this paper the compression algorithm FDCT using the wrapping method. In order to enhance the compression algorithm by FDCT, we have compared the results obtained with wavelet and Ridgelet transforms. The results are very satisfactory regarding compression ratio, and the computation time and quality of the compressed image compared to those of traditional methods.

  11. Snail phenotypic variation and stress proteins: do different heat response strategies contribute to Waddington's widget in field populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Heinz-R; Lazzara, Raimondo; Dittbrenner, Nils; Capowiez, Yvan; Mazzia, Christophe; Triebskorn, Rita

    2009-03-15

    On the basis of studies with laboratory strains of Drosophila and Arabidopsis, it has been hypothesized that potential buffers to the expression of phenotypic morphological variation, such as Hsp90 and possibly Hsp70, represent important components of Waddington's widget, which may confer capacitive evolution. As studies on field populations of living organisms to test this hypothesis are lacking, we tested whether a heat response strategy involving high stress protein levels is associated with low morphological variation and vice versa, using four natural populations of Mediterranean pulmonate snails. In response to 8 hr of elevated temperatures, a population of Xeropicta derbentina with uniform shell pigmentation pattern showed remarkably high Hsp70 but low Hsp90 levels. In contrast, a highly variable population of Cernuella virgata kept both Hsp90 and Hsp70 levels low when held at diverse though environmentally relevant temperatures. Two other populations (Theba pisana and another X. derbentina population) with intermediate variation in shell pigmentation pattern were also intermediate in inducing Hsp70, though Hsp90 was maintained at a low level. The observed correlation of stress protein levels and coloration pattern variation provide the first indirect evidence for an association of stress proteins with Waddington's widget under natural conditions.

  12. Deep-sequencing transcriptome analysis of field-grown Medicago sativa L. crown buds acclimated to freezing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lili; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Yue; Shu, Yongjun; Bai, Yan; Guo, Changhong

    2016-09-01

    Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) 'Zhaodong' is an important forage legume that can safely survive in northern China where winter temperatures reach as low as -30 °C. Survival of alfalfa following freezing stress depends on the amount and revival ability of crown buds. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms of frost tolerance in alfalfa, we used transcriptome sequencing technology and bioinformatics strategies to analyze crown buds of field-grown alfalfa during winter. We statistically identified a total of 5605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in freezing stress including 1900 upregulated and 3705 downregulated DEGs. We validated 36 candidate DEGs using qPCR to confirm the accuracy of the RNA-seq data. Unlike other recent studies, this study employed alfalfa plants grown in the natural environment. Our results indicate that not only the CBF orthologs but also membrane proteins, hormone signal transduction pathways, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathways indicate the presence of a special freezing adaptation mechanism in alfalfa. The antioxidant defense system may rapidly confer freezing tolerance to alfalfa. Importantly, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and phenylalanine metabolism, which is of potential importance in coordinating freezing tolerance with growth and development, were downregulated in subzero temperatures. The adaptive mechanism for frost tolerance is a complex multigenic process that is not well understood. This systematic analysis provided an in-depth view of stress tolerance mechanisms in alfalfa.

  13. Stress changes ahead of an advancing tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, J.F.; Lee, F.T.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumentation placed ahead of three model tunnels in the laboratory and ahead of a crosscut driven in a metamorphic rock mass detected stress changes several tunnel diameters ahead of the tunnel face. Stress changes were detected 4 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into nearly elastic acrylic, 2??50 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into concrete, and 2 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into Silver Plume Granite. Stress changes were detected 7??50 diameters ahead of a crosscut driven in jointed, closely foliated gneisses and gneissic granites in an experimental mine at Idaho Springs, Colorado. These results contrast markedly with a theoretical elastic estimate of the onset of detectable stress changes at 1 tunnel diameter ahead of the tunnel face. A small compressive stress concentration was detected 2 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in acrylic, 1.25 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in concrete, and 1 diameter ahead of the model tunnel in granite. A similar stress peak was detected about 6 diameters ahead of the crosscut. No such stress peak is predicted from elastic theory. The 3-dimensional in situ stress determined in the field demonstrate that geologic structure controls stress orientations in the metamorphic rock mass. Two of the computed principal stresses are parallel to the foliation and the other principal stress is normal to it. The principal stress orientations vary approximately as the foliation attitude varies. The average horizontal stress components and the average vertical stress component are three times and twice as large, respectively, as those predicted from the overburden load. An understanding of the measured stress field appears to require the application of either tectonic or residual stress components, or both. Laboratory studies indicate the presence of proportionately large residual stresses. Mining may have triggered the release of strain energy, which is controlled by geologic structure. ?? 1973.

  14. Effects of lead exposure on oxidative stress biomarkers and plasma biochemistry in waterbirds in the field

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Haro, Mónica; Green, Andy J.; Mateo, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Medina lagoon in Andalusia has one of the highest densities of spent lead (Pb) shot in Europe. Blood samples from waterbirds were collected in 2006-2008 to measure Pb concentration (PbB), δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), oxidative stress biomarkers and plasma biochemistry. PbB above background levels (>20 γg/dl) was observed in 19% (n=59) of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and in all common pochards (Aythya ferina) (n=4), but common coots (Fulica atra) (n=37) and moorhens (Gallinula ch...

  15. Effects of imposing higher-order far-field boundary conditions on the numerical solution of the two-dimensional compressible Euler equations. Nijigen asshukusei Euler hoteishiki no suchi keisan ni okeru koji enpo kyokai joken tekiyo koka no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitani, T. (Toray Industries, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)); Satofuka, N.; Tokunaga, H. (Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Design)

    1994-03-25

    Solving numerically a flow field around an object assumed of an infinite far field often becomes necessary for analyzing such an object important in terms of engineerings as represented by an airframe. This paper describes an application of high-order boundary conditions to analyzing an external flow field by using a positive line method for solving a two-dimensional compressible Euler equation to compare the result with the conventional low-order boundary conditions and discuss the convergence and the calculation efficiency. A discussion has also been given on such a case that an angle of attack is given to a wing under a condition of generating shock waves, and the position of a shock wave is varied above and below the wing. The calculation lattice is constructed by a C-shape around an NACA0012 wing shape with a chord length of one. Parameters varying distances to the forward boundary and the rearward boundary simultaneously were established. When a high-order boundary condition is used, lift coefficient is hardly subjected to the influence even if the forward and rearward boundary distances are varied simultaneously. Use of the high-order boundary condition tends to reduce the convergence. The fewer the number of lattice, the smaller the degree of the decrease. 5 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Source mechanisms and faulting analysis of the aftershocks in the Lake Erçek area (Eastern Anatolia, Turkey) during the 2011 Van event (Mw 7.1): Implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, M.; Pınar, A.; Tur, H.

    2017-12-01

    mechanisms with some strike-slip component are mostly confined in the upper crust (0-15 km), compatible with NS-striking normal and WE-striking reverse faults in the marginal sections of the lake; (e) the WE-striking reverse faulting in the N- and S-margins seems to have the seismic potential to generate destructive earthquakes in the lake area; (f) the tectonic implications of the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes in the lake are defined and supported by field observations and seismic reflection data. The result of these analyses reveals N-S compression/W-E extension in the lake and also the collisional/compressional regime taking place in a region of Lakes Van and Erçek.

  17. On the compressibility effects in mixing layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khlifi Hechmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of compressible flows carried out in the past few years have shown that the pressure-strain is the main indicator of the structural compressibility effects. Undoubtedly, this terms plays a key role toward strongly changing magnitude of the turbulent Reynolds stress anisotropy. On the other hand, the incompressible models of the pressure-strain correlation have not correctly predicted compressible turbulence at high speed shear flow. Consequently, a correction of these models is needed for precise prediction of compressibility effects. In the present work, a compressibility correction of the widely used incompressible Launder Reece and Rodi model making their standard coefficients dependent on the turbulent and convective Mach numbers is proposed. The ability of the model to predict the developed mixing layers in different cases from experiments of Goebel and Dutton is examined. The predicted results with the proposed model are compared with DNS and experimental data and those obtained by the compressible model of Adumitroiae et al. and the original LRR model. The results show that the essential compressibility effects on mixing layers are well captured by the proposed model.

  18. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and water stress on field-grown maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R. [eds.

    1993-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations are continuing to increase and will probably double during the next century. The effects of such an increase are of global concern. Carbon dioxide-induced climate changes may result in reduced precipitation in major agricultural areas. The potential therefore exists for severe CO{sub 2}-induced water-stress effects on agriculture. This set of studies determined the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and severe water stress on biomass production, evapotranspiration, water-use efficiency (WUE), water potential, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, morphology and phenology of maize grown under field conditions. Plants were grown at one of four daytime mean CO{sub 2} concentrations (348, 431, 506 or 656 {mu}LL{sup {minus}1}) in open-top field exposure chambers and at one of two levels of available water (well-watered or 50% of well-watered). This report is organized into 4 chapters followed by appendices. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the four chapters: (1) biomass production and water-use efficiency, (2) gas exchange and water potential, (3) morphology and phenology, and (4) and elemental analyses. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. A multiscale coupled finite-element and phase-field framework to modeling stressed grain growth in polycrystalline thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamshidian, M., E-mail: jamshidian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Thamburaja, P., E-mail: prakash.thamburaja@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi 43600 (Malaysia); Rabczuk, T., E-mail: timon.rabczuk@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Computational Mechanics, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Civil Engineering, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2016-12-15

    A previously-developed finite-deformation- and crystal-elasticity-based constitutive theory for stressed grain growth in cubic polycrystalline bodies has been augmented to include a description of excess surface energy and grain-growth stagnation mechanisms through the use of surface effect state variables in a thermodynamically-consistent manner. The constitutive theory was also implemented into a multiscale coupled finite-element and phase-field computational framework. With the material parameters in the constitutive theory suitably calibrated, our three-dimensional numerical simulations show that the constitutive model is able to accurately predict the experimentally-determined evolution of crystallographic texture and grain size statistics in polycrystalline copper thin films deposited on polyimide substrate and annealed at high-homologous temperatures. In particular, our numerical analyses show that the broad texture transition observed in the annealing experiments of polycrystalline thin films is caused by grain growth stagnation mechanisms. - Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Developing a theory for stressed grain growth in polycrystalline thin films. • Implementation into a multiscale coupled finite-element and phase-field framework. • Quantitative reproduction of the experimental grain growth data by simulations. • Revealing the cause of texture transition to be due to the stagnation mechanisms.

  20. Measuring the stress field around an evolving crack in tensile deformed Mg AZ31 using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Camin, Bettina; Schmidt, Søren

    2012-01-01

    the position, orientation and full stress tensor of each illuminated grain to be determined and, hence, enables the study of evolving stress fields in coarse grained materials with a spatial resolution equal to the grain size. Grain resolved information like this is vital for understanding what happens when...... element simulation. It was found that a full three-dimensional simulation was required to account for the measured transition from the overall plane stress case away from the notch to the essentially plane strain case observed near the notch tip. The measured and simulated stress contours were shown...

  1. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the behaviour, physiology and stress protein levels of desert locusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Shepherd, Sebastian; Sharkh, Suleiman; Jackson, Christopher W.; Newland, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are present throughout the modern world and are derived from many man-made sources including overhead transmission lines. The risks of extremely-low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are particularly poorly understood especially at high field strengths as they are rarely encountered at ground level. Flying insects, however, can approach close to high field strength transmission lines prompting the question as to how these high levels of exposure affect behaviour and physiology. Here we utilise the accessible nervous system of the locust to ask how exposure to high levels of ELF EMF impact at multiple levels. We show that exposure to ELF EMFs above 4 mT leads to reduced walking. Moreover, intracellular recordings from an identified motor neuron, the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron, show increased spike latency and a broadening of its spike in exposed animals. In addition, hind leg kick force, produced by stimulating the extensor tibiae muscle, was reduced following exposure, while stress-protein levels (Hsp70) increased. Together these results suggest that ELF EMF exposure has the capacity to cause dramatic effects from behaviour to physiology and protein expression, and this study lays the foundation to explore the ecological significance of these effects in other flying insects. PMID:27808167

  2. Effects of 60 Hz electric fields on operant and social stress behaviors of nonhuman primates: Projects 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, W.R.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.; Taylor, L.L.; Tuttle, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate, using the baboon as a nonhuman primate surrogate for the human, possible hehavioral effects associated with exposure to high intensity 60 Hz electric fields. Results from this program, along with information from experiments conducted elsewhere, will be used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate and evaluate the likelihood of deleterious consequences resulting from exposure of humans to the electric fields associated with power transmission over high voltage lines. This research program consists of four major research projects, all of which have been successfully completed. The third project assessed, in separate experiments conducted at 30 and 60 kV/m, effects of chronic exposure to electric fields on the performance of two operant conditioning tasks, fixed ratio (FR), and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL). In the same two experiments, the fourth project investigated, using the systematic quantitative observational sampling methods of primatology, the possible stress-inducing effects of chronic exposure to 60 Hz electric fields on the behavior of baboons living in small social groups. This volume contains only appendices for projects 3 and 4. 81 figs., 67 tabs.

  3. High strain-rate compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of selected polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10−3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five parameters for the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are determined by fitting to the experimental compressive stress-strain data using a least-squares fit. The compressive stress-strain curves at three different strain rates derived from the modified Ramberg-Osgood models are compared with the experimental results. It is shown that the compressive stress-strain behavior during loading process can be successfully predicted by the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation.

  4. High strain-rate compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of selected polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, K.; Yokoyama, T.

    2012-08-01

    The present paper deals with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10-3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five parameters for the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are determined by fitting to the experimental compressive stress-strain data using a least-squares fit. The compressive stress-strain curves at three different strain rates derived from the modified Ramberg-Osgood models are compared with the experimental results. It is shown that the compressive stress-strain behavior during loading process can be successfully predicted by the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation.

  5. Full field stress/strain analysis : use of Moire and TSA for wood structural assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. W. Wolfe; R. E. Rowlands; C. H. Lin

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory and field experiments in wood engineering often rely on different types of devices to measure strain. Each type has certain limitations and characteristics that generally dictate its applicability to wood. Some of the issues related to using traditional strain measurement devices on wood and wood-based materials are discussed in this paper.

  6. Bending stress- and magnetic field-dependence of Ic in JFCA-RRT samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, K.; Fujine, Y.; Sato, T.; Shirato, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Kikegawa, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kimura, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Kimura, A.

    2002-10-01

    Japan Fine Ceramics Association has carried out a round robin test (RRT) on the bending strain ( εb) dependence of the critical current Ic at 77 K in three kinds of Bi(2223)/Ag tape samples (VAM-1, JFC-1, JFC-2; three samples each) for future standardization. We measured Ic( εb) ( εb: 0-1.0%) as one of RRT participants and also measured the magnetic field dependence of Ic under several bending strains mentioned above as optional measurements. As results, we found a very fast decrease of Ic in low fields up to 0.5 T and then a gradual decrease up to 1.5-2.0 T. Ic maintains 0.9-0.95 of its initial value up to εb=0.4% strain and then decreases a little faster down to 0.60-0.65 at εb=1.0% for almost all samples and magnetic fields. The normalized pinning force F p/F p max shows scaling according to the expression F p/F p max∝(B/B irr)(1-(B/B irr)) 3 for all samples and bending strains, where Birr is the irreversibility field.

  7. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of temperature, stress, and electric field in GaN HEMTs with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnall, Kevin R.; Moore, Elizabeth A.; Badescu, Stefan C.; Zhang, Lenan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-11-01

    As semiconductor devices based on silicon reach their intrinsic material limits, compound semiconductors, such as gallium nitride (GaN), are gaining increasing interest for high performance, solid-state transistor applications. Unfortunately, higher voltage, current, and/or power levels in GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) often result in elevated device temperatures, degraded performance, and shorter lifetimes. Although micro-Raman spectroscopy has become one of the most popular techniques for measuring localized temperature rise in GaN HEMTs for reliability assessment, decoupling the effects of temperature, mechanical stress, and electric field on the optical phonon frequencies measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy is challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of temperature rise, inverse piezoelectric stress, thermoelastic stress, and vertical electric field via micro-Raman spectroscopy from the shifts of the E2 (high), A1 longitudinal optical (LO), and E2 (low) optical phonon frequencies in wurtzite GaN. We also validate experimentally that the pinched OFF state as the unpowered reference accurately measures the temperature rise by removing the effect of the vertical electric field on the Raman spectrum and that the vertical electric field is approximately the same whether the channel is open or closed. Our experimental results are in good quantitative agreement with a 3D electro-thermo-mechanical model of the HEMT we tested and indicate that the GaN buffer acts as a semi-insulating, p-type material due to the presence of deep acceptors in the lower half of the bandgap. This implementation of micro-Raman spectroscopy offers an exciting opportunity to simultaneously probe thermal, mechanical, and electrical phenomena in semiconductor devices under bias, providing unique insight into the complex physics that describes device behavior and reliability. Although GaN HEMTs have been specifically used in this study to

  9. Deformation failure characteristics of coal body and mining induced stress evolution law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhijie; Qu, Guanglong; Wen, Jinhao; Shi, Yongkui; Jia, Chuanyang

    2014-01-01

    The results of the interaction between coal failure and mining pressure field evolution during mining are presented. Not only the mechanical model of stope and its relative structure division, but also the failure and behavior characteristic of coal body under different mining stages are built and demonstrated. Namely, the breaking arch and stress arch which influence the mining area are quantified calculated. A systematic method of stress field distribution is worked out. All this indicates that the pore distribution of coal body with different compressed volume has fractal character; it appears to be the linear relationship between propagation range of internal stress field and compressed volume of coal body and nonlinear relationship between the range of outburst coal mass and the number of pores which is influenced by mining pressure. The results provide theory reference for the research on the range of mining-induced stress and broken coal wall.

  10. influence of relative humidity on tensile and compressive creep of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    While creep is as a result of sustained stress, shrinkage is due to hygrometric conditions [1]. According to Neville et al [2], a typical concrete element creeps up to twice its initial strain after a year of loading. Concrete creep can occur in tension and also in compression. The properties of tensile and compressive creep are ...

  11. Influence of Temperature on Compression, Impact Strength and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Izod-type impact and compression tests were carried out on virgin and recycled unplasticized polyvinylchloride (uPVC) for different temperatures, T; from 25oC to 130oC at intervals of 15oC, to determine and compare their impact strength and axial compressive stress (σz)a, respectively. Appropriate formulae available in ...

  12. Indentation of elastically soft and plastically compressible solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Needleman, A.; Tvergaard, Viggo; Van der Giessen, E.

    2015-01-01

    rigid sharp indenter into a cylinder modeling indentation of a half space. The material is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that allows for plastic as well as elastic compressibility. Both soft elasticity and plastic compressibility significantly reduce...... in the hydrostatic stress level in the material below the indenter....

  13. Effective stresses and shear failure pressure from in situ Biot's coefficient, Hejre Field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regel, Jeppe Bendix; Orozova-Bekkevold, Ivanka; Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2017-01-01

    , is significantly different from 1. The log-derived Biot's coefficient is above 0.8 in the Shetland Chalk Group and in the Tyne Group, and 0.6-0.8 in the Heno Sandstone Formation. We show that the effective vertical and horizontal stresses obtained using the log-derived Biot's coefficient result in a drilling...... window for a vertical well larger than if approximating Biot's coefficient by 1. The estimation of the Biot's coefficient is straightforward in formations with a stiff frame, whereas in formations such as shales, caution has to be taken. We discuss the consequence of assumptions made on the mineral...... composition of shales as unphysical results could be obtained when choosing inappropriate mineral moduli....

  14. Field measurements, simulation modeling and development of analysis for moisture stressed corn and soybeans, 1982 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blad, B. L.; Norman, J. M.; Gardner, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental design, data acquisition and analysis procedures for agronomic and reflectance data acquired over corn and soybeans at the Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory of the University of Nebraska are described. The following conclusions were reached: (1) predictive leaf area estimation models can be defined which appear valid over a wide range of soils; (2) relative grain yield estimates over moisture stressed corn were improved by combining reflectance and thermal data; (3) corn phenology estimates using the model of Badhwar and Henderson (1981) exhibited systematic bias but were reasonably accurate; (4) canopy reflectance can be modelled to within approximately 10% of measured values; and (5) soybean pubescence significantly affects canopy reflectance, energy balance and water use relationships.

  15. Evaluation of the evolving stress field of the Yellowstone volcanic plateau, 1988 to 2010, from earthquake first-motion inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, E.; Waite, G. P.; Tibaldi, A.

    2017-03-01

    Although the last rhyolite eruption occurred around 70 ka ago, the silicic Yellowstone volcanic field is still considered active due to high hydrothermal and seismic activity and possible recent magma intrusions. Geodetic measurements document complex deformation patterns in crustal strain and seismic activity likewise reveal spatial and temporal variations in the stress field. We use earthquake data recorded between 1988 and 2010 to investigate these variations and their possible causes in more detail. Earthquake relocations and a set of 369 well-constrained, double-couple, focal mechanism solutions were computed. Events were grouped according to location and time to investigate trends in faulting. The majority of the events have normal-faulting solutions, subordinate strike-slip kinematics, and very rarely, reverse motions. The dominant direction of extension throughout the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera is nearly ENE, consistent with the perpendicular direction of alignments of volcanic vents within the caldera, but our study also reveals spatial and temporal variations. Stress-field solutions for different areas and time periods were calculated from earthquake focal mechanism inversion. A well-resolved rotation of σ3 was found, from NNE-SSW near the Hebgen Lake fault zone, to ENE-WSW near Norris Junction. In particular, the σ3 direction changed throughout the years around Norris Geyser Basin, from being ENE-WSW, as calculated in the study by Waite and Smith (2004), to NNE-SSW, while the other σ3 directions are mostly unchanged over time. The presence of ;chocolate tablet; structures, with two sets of nearly perpendicular normal faults, was identified in many stages of the deformation history both in the Norris Geyser Basin area and inside the caldera.

  16. Influence of the tilt angle of Percutaneous Aortic Prosthesis on Velocity and Shear Stress Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alvares de Azevedo Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Due to the nature of the percutaneous prosthesis deployment process, a variation in its final position is expected. Prosthetic valve placement will define the spatial location of its effective orifice in relation to the aortic annulus. The blood flow pattern in the ascending aorta is related to the aortic remodeling process, and depends on the spatial location of the effective orifice. The hemodynamic effect of small variations in the angle of inclination of the effective orifice has not been studied in detail. Objective: To implement an in vitro simulation to characterize the hydrodynamic blood flow pattern associated with small variations in the effective orifice inclination. Methods: A three-dimensional aortic phantom was constructed, reproducing the anatomy of one patient submitted to percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Flow analysis was performed by use of the Particle Image Velocimetry technique. The flow pattern in the ascending aorta was characterized for six flow rate levels. In addition, six angles of inclination of the effective orifice were assessed. Results: The effective orifice at the -4° and -2° angles directed the main flow towards the anterior wall of the aortic model, inducing asymmetric and high shear stress in that region. However, the effective orifice at the +3° and +5° angles mimics the physiological pattern, centralizing the main flow and promoting a symmetric distribution of shear stress. Conclusion: The measurements performed suggest that small changes in the angle of inclination of the percutaneous prosthesis aid in the generation of a physiological hemodynamic pattern, and can contribute to reduce aortic remodeling.

  17. High strain-rate compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of selected polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama T; Nakai K

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10−3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five paramete...

  18. High-Field Nb3Sn Cos-theta Dipole with Stress Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitski, Igor [Fermilab; Carmichael, Justin [Fermilab; Kashikhin, Vadim V. [Fermilab; Zlobin, Alexander V. [Fermilab

    2017-01-01

    Cost-effective superconducting dipole magnets with operating fields up to 16 T are being considered for the LHC en-ergy upgrade (HE-LHC) and a Future Circular Collider (FCC). To demonstrate feasibility of 15 T accelerator quality dipole mag-nets, FNAL as a part of the US-MDP is developing a single-aper-ture Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator based on a 4-layer graded cos-theta coil with 60 mm aperture and cold iron yoke. In parallel, to explore the limit of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet technology, op-timize magnet design and performance parameters, and reduce magnet cost, magnet design studies are also being performed to push the nominal bore field to 16 T in a 60-mm aperture cos-theta dipole. Results of these studies are reported and discussed in this paper.

  19. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  20. Efficient predictive algorithms for image compression

    CERN Document Server

    Rosário Lucas, Luís Filipe; Maciel de Faria, Sérgio Manuel; Morais Rodrigues, Nuno Miguel; Liberal Pagliari, Carla

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses efficient prediction techniques for the current state-of-the-art High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, focusing on the compression of a wide range of video signals, such as 3D video, Light Fields and natural images. The authors begin with a review of the state-of-the-art predictive coding methods and compression technologies for both 2D and 3D multimedia contents, which provides a good starting point for new researchers in the field of image and video compression. New prediction techniques that go beyond the standardized compression technologies are then presented and discussed. In the context of 3D video, the authors describe a new predictive algorithm for the compression of depth maps, which combines intra-directional prediction, with flexible block partitioning and linear residue fitting. New approaches are described for the compression of Light Field and still images, which enforce sparsity constraints on linear models. The Locally Linear Embedding-based prediction method is in...

  1. Wavelet image compression

    CERN Document Server

    Pearlman, William A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the stages necessary to create a wavelet compression system for images and describes state-of-the-art systems used in image compression standards and current research. It starts with a high level discussion of the properties of the wavelet transform, especially the decomposition into multi-resolution subbands. It continues with an exposition of the null-zone, uniform quantization used in most subband coding systems and the optimal allocation of bitrate to the different subbands. Then the image compression systems of the FBI Fingerprint Compression Standard and the JPEG2000 S

  2. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  3. Volume Fraction Optimization of Functionally Graded Composite Plates for Stress Reduction and Thermo-Mechanical Buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Kyung-Su; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2008-02-01

    The volume fraction optimization of Functionally Graded Material (FGM) composite plate is investigated for stress reduction and thermo-mechanical buckling. Material properties are assumed to be temperature dependent and varied continuously in the thickness direction. The 3-D finite element is adopted using an 18-node solid element to analyze the plate model more accurately for the variation of material properties and temperature field in the thickness direction. Tensile and compressive stress ratios of the structure under mechanical load are evaluated for stress analysis. Temperature at each node is obtained by solving the steady-state heat transfer problem in the thermo-mechanical buckling analysis, and Newton-Raphson method is used for nonlinear analysis. Tensile stress ratios, compressive stress ratios and critical temperatures are analyzed for various thickness ratios and volume fraction distributions in the numerical study. Finally, the optimal design of FGM composite plate is investigated by considering the stress and the critical temperature.

  4. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tötzke, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Universität Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Manke, I.; Banhart, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Gaiselmann, G.; Schmidt, V. [Universität Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Bohner, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Müller, B. R.; Kupsch, A.; Hentschel, M. P. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -Prüfung, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Lehnert, W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RTWH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  5. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tötzke, C; Manke, I; Gaiselmann, G; Bohner, J; Müller, B R; Kupsch, A; Hentschel, M P; Schmidt, V; Banhart, J; Lehnert, W

    2015-04-01

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  6. Stress perturbation associated with the Amazonas and other ancient continental rifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M.L.; Richardson, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    The state of stress in the vicinity of old continental rifts is examined to investigate the possibility that crustal structure associated with ancient rifts (specifically a dense rift pillow in the lower crust) may modify substantially the regional stress field. Both shallow (2.0-2.6 km depth) breakout data and deep (20-45 km depth) crustal earthquake focal mechanisms indicate a N to NNE maximum horizontal compression in the vicinity of the Paleozoic Amazonas rift in central Brazil. This compressive stress direction is nearly perpendicular to the rift structure and represents a ???75?? rotation relative to a regional E-W compressive stress direction in the South American plate. Elastic two-dimensional finite element models of the density structure associated with the Amazonas rift (as inferred from independent gravity modeling) indicate that elastic support of this dense feature would generate horizontal rift-normal compressional stresses between 60 and 120 MPa, with values of 80-100 MPa probably most representative of the overall structure. The observed ???75?? stress rotation constrains the ratio of the regional horizontal stress difference to the rift-normal compressive stress to be between 0.25 and 1.0, suggesting that this rift-normal stress may be from 1 to 4 times larger than the regional horizontal stress difference. A general expression for the modification of the normalized local horizontal shear stress (relative to the regional horizontal shear stress) shows that the same ratio of the rift-normal compression relative to the regional horizontal stress difference, which controls the amount of stress rotation, also determines whether the superposed stress increases or decreases the local maximum horizontal shear stress. The potential for fault reactivation of ancient continental rifts in general is analyzed considering both the local stress rotation and modification of horizontal shear stress for both thrust and strike-slip stress regimes. In the Amazonas

  7. Multi-parameter approximation of the stress field in a cracked body in the more distant surroundings of the crack tip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, V.; Sobek, J.; Frantík, P.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 89, AUG (2016), s. 20-35 ISSN 0142-1123. [International Conference on Characterisation of Crack Tip Fields /3./. Urbino, 20.04.2015-22.04.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Crack-tip fields * Williams power series * Higher order terms * Stress field reconstruction * Multi-parameter approximation accuracy Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  8. A parametric study of laser spot size and coverage on the laser shock peening induced residual stress in thin aluminium samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sticchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Laser Shock Peening is a fatigue enhancement treatment using laser energy to induce compressive Residual Stresses (RS in the outer layers of metallic components. This work describes the variations of introduced RS-field with peen size and coverage for thin metal samples treated with under-water-LSP. The specimens under investigation were of aluminium alloy AA2024-T351, AA2139-T3, AA7050-T76 and AA7075-T6, with thickness 1.9 mm. The RS were measured by using Hole Drilling with Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry and X-ray Diffraction. Of particular interest are the effects of the above mentioned parameters on the zero-depth value, which gives indication of the amount of RS through the thickness, and on the value of the surface compressive stresses, which indicates the magnitude of induced stresses. A 2D-axisymmetrical Finite Element model was created for a preliminary estimation of the stress field trend. From experimental results, correlated with numerical and analytical analysis, the following conclusions can be drawn: increasing the spot size the zero-depth value increases with no significant change of the maximum compressive stress; the increase of coverage leads to significant increase of the compressive stress; thin samples of Al-alloy with low Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL reveal deeper compression field than alloy with higher HEL value.

  9. Effects of lead exposure on oxidative stress biomarkers and plasma biochemistry in waterbirds in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Haro, Monica; Green, Andy J; Mateo, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    Medina lagoon in Andalusia has one of the highest densities of spent lead (Pb) shot in Europe. Blood samples from waterbirds were collected in 2006-2008 to measure Pb concentration (PbB), δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), oxidative stress biomarkers and plasma biochemistry. PbB above background levels (>20 μg/dl) was observed in 19% (n=59) of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and in all common pochards (Aythya ferina) (n=4), but common coots (Fulica atra) (n=37) and moorhens (Gallinula chloropus) (n=12) were all ALAD ratio in mallards and coots decreased with PbB levels >6 μg/dl. In mallards, an inhibition of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and an increased level of oxidized glutathione (oxGSH) in red blood cells (RBC) were associated with PbB levels >20 μg/dl. In coots, PbB levels were negatively related to vitamin A and carotenoid levels in plasma, and total glutathione in RBCs; and positively related with higher superoxide dismutase and GPx activities and % oxGSH in RBCs. Overall, the results indicate that previously assumed background levels of PbB for birds need to be revised. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of Three-Dimensional Stress Fields and Slip Systems for FCC Single Crystal Superalloy Notched Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Magnan, Shannon; Ebrahimi, Fereshteh; Ferroro, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Metals and their alloys, except for a few intermetallics, are inherently ductile, i.e. plastic deformation precedes fracture in these materials. Therefore, resistance to fracture is directly related to the development of the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent studies indicate that the fracture toughness of single crystals depends on the crystallographic orientation of the notch as well as the loading direction. In general, the dependence of crack propagation resistance on crystallographic orientation arises from the anisotropy of (i) elastic constants, (ii) plastic deformation (or slip), and (iii) the weakest fracture planes (e.g. cleavage planes). Because of the triaxial stress state at the notch tips, many slip systems that otherwise would not be activated during uniaxial testing, become operational. The plastic zone formation in single crystals has been tackled theoretically by Rice and his co-workers and only limited experimental work has been conducted in this area. The study of the stresses and strains in the vicinity of a FCC single crystal notch tip is of relatively recent origin. We present experimental and numerical investigation of 3D stress fields and evolution of slip sector boundaries near notches in FCC single crystal tension test specimens, and demonstrate that a 3D linear elastic finite element model that includes the effect of material anisotropy is shown to predict active slip planes and sectors accurately. The slip sector boundaries are shown to have complex curved shapes with several slip systems active simultaneously near the notch. Results are presented for surface and mid-plane of the specimens. The results demonstrate that accounting for 3D elastic anisotropy is very important for accurate prediction of slip activation near FCC single crystal notches loaded in tension. Results from the study will help establish guidelines for fatigue damage near single crystal notches.

  11. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  12. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  13. Mean field diffusion models for precipitation in crystalline GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany); Kimmerle, Sven-Joachim [Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Mathematics

    2009-07-01

    Based on a thermodynamically consistent model for precipitation in gallium arsenide crystals including surface tension and bulk stresses by Dreyer and Duderstadt, we propose different mathematical models to describe the size evolution of liquid droplets in a crystalline solid. The first class of models treats the diffusion-controlled regime of interface motion, while the second class is concerned with the interface-controlled regime of interface motion. Our models take care of conservation of mass and substance. We consider homogenised models, where different length scales of the experimental situation have been exploited in order to simplify the equations. These homogenised models generalise the well-known Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner model for Ostwald ripening. Mean field models capture the main properties of our system and are well adapted for numerics and further analysis. Numerical evidence suggests in which case which one of the two regimes might be appropriate to the experimental situation. (orig.)

  14. Development of Window-based program for analysis and visualization of two-dimensional stress field in digital photoelasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichet Pinit

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a Window-based framework for analyzing and visualizing two-dimensional stress field in digital photoelasticity. The program is implemented as stand-alone software. The program contains mainly two parts: computational part and visual part supplemented with several image-processing functions. The computation method used in the program for retrieval of photoelastic parameters (isoclinic and isochromatic parameters is the phase stepping method. The visualization links between the results and the user by a gray scale or color map of such parameters, which is very convenient to the user for physical interpretation. With the Windows-based framework, additional modules eithercomputation or visualization can be simply added to the program.

  15. Theoretical and numerical studies of crack initiation and propagation in rock masses under freezing pressure and far-field stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshui Kang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Water-bearing rocks exposed to freezing temperature can be subjected to freeze–thaw cycles leading to crack initiation and propagation, which are the main causes of frost damage to rocks. Based on the Griffith theory of brittle fracture mechanics, the crack initiation criterion, propagation direction, and crack length under freezing pressure and far-field stress are analyzed. Furthermore, a calculation method is proposed for the stress intensity factor (SIF of the crack tip under non-uniformly distributed freezing pressure. The formulae for the crack/fracture propagation direction and length of the wing crack under freezing pressure are obtained, and the mechanism for coalescence of adjacent cracks is investigated. In addition, the necessary conditions for different coalescence modes of cracks are studied. Using the topology theory, a new algorithm for frost crack propagation is proposed, which has the capability to define the crack growth path and identify and update the cracked elements. A model that incorporates multiple cracks is built by ANSYS and then imported into FLAC3D. The SIFs are then calculated using a FISH procedure, and the growth path of the freezing cracks after several calculation steps is demonstrated using the new algorithm. The proposed method can be applied to rocks containing fillings such as detritus and slurry.

  16. Soil mechanical stresses in high wheel load agricultural field traffic: a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    2017-01-01

    .6 and 0.9 m depths of a sandy loam soil at field capacity water content. The soil was ploughed annually to a depth of 0.25 m and was tested in the spring following autumn ploughing but before secondary tillage. The machinery tested was a tractor–trailer system for slurry application with a total weight...... to 300, 100 and 45 kPa at soil depths of 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m respectively. Comparing these with the data in the literature regarding soil strength and measured compaction effects on the soil studied, we conclude that the traffic event investigated is likely to induce serious effects on soil properties...

  17. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  18. Experiments with automata compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J.; Yu, S; Daley, M; Eramian, M G

    2001-01-01

    Several compression methods of finite-state automata are presented and evaluated. Most compression methods used here are already described in the literature. However, their impact on the size of automata has not been described yet. We fill that gap, presenting results of experiments carried out on

  19. Nonaffine deformation under compression and decompression of a flow-stabilized solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Carlos P.; Riehn, Robert; Daniels, Karen E.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the particle-scale transition from elastic deformation to plastic flow is central to making predictions about the bulk material properties and response of disordered materials. To address this issue, we perform experiments on flow-stabilized solids composed of micron-scale spheres within a microfluidic channel, in a regime where particle inertia is negligible. Each solid heap exists within a stress field imposed by the flow, and we track the positions of particles in response to single impulses of fluid-driven compression or decompression. We find that the resulting deformation field is well-decomposed into an affine field, with a constant strain profile throughout the solid, and a non-affine field. The magnitude of this non-affine response decays with the distance from the free surface in the long-time limit, suggesting that the distance from jamming plays a significant role in controlling the length scale of plastic flow. Finally, we observe that compressive pulses create more rearrangements than decompressive pulses, an effect that we quantify using the D\\text{min}2 statistic for non-affine motion. Unexpectedly, the time scale for the compression response is shorter than for decompression at the same strain (but unequal pressure), providing insight into the coupling between deformation and cage-breaking.

  20. Research of thermal processes in the soil during the development of oil fields in the Far North by the compression method with heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, A. S.; Tarasov, V. A.; Komkov, M. A.; Moiseev, V. A.; Timofeev, M. P.; Boyarskaya, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the hazard of adverse heat effect on permafrost soil as a result of viscous oil production in the Far North is studied with the method of thermocompression supply of superheated water steam to the oil-bearing layer. It is found that, due to the divergent nature of heat transfer and convective complex movement of air in the space between the tubing and the casing, the temperature of the latter in the area of load-bearing elements heated to 130°C is about 70°C. The heterogeneity of the temperature field is leveled up to 4-5% at a distance of 400-420 mm from the axis of the tubing. The thickness of the melting layer of ground ice within 90 days of operation of the tubing depends on the percentage of water-filled pores in the soil. With the minimum (10%) percentage of water-filled pores in the soil layer, the thickness of the ground ice melting layer for 90 days of operation of the tubing does not exceed 2.6 m.