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Sample records for compression ignition hcci

  1. Review of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engines and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) effects on HCCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akma Tuan Kamaruddin, Tengku Nordayana; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul; Sies, Mohsin Mohd

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development in ICE which leads to the new advanced combustion mode named Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). It explains regarding the theory and working principle of HCCI plus the difference of the process in gasoline and diesel fuelled engines. Many of pioneer and recent research works are discussed to get the current state of art about HCCI. It gives a better indication on the potential of this method in improving the fuel efficiency and emission produced by the vehicles' engine. Apart from the advantages, the challenges and future trend of this technology are also included. HCCI is applying few types of control strategy in producing the optimum performance. This paper looks into Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) as one of the control strategies.

  2. Fuels for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines. Automotive fuels survey. Part 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walwijk, M.

    2001-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a third mode of operation for internal combustion engines, beside spark ignition and conventional compression ignition. This report concentrates on the requirements that HCCI operation puts on fuels for these engines. For readers with limited time available, this summary describes the main findings. Policy makers that need some more background information may turn directly to chapter 7, 'Fuels for HCCI engines'. The rest of this report can be considered as a reference guide for more detailed information. The driving force to investigate HCCI engines is the potential of low emissions and simultaneously high energy efficiency. HCCI is gaining attention the last few years. However, HCCI engines are still in the research phase. After many experiments with prototype engines, people have now started working on computer simulations of the combustion process, to obtain a fundamental understanding of HCCI combustion and to steer future engine developments. In HCCI engines, an air/fuel mixture is prepared before it enters the combustion chamber. The homogeneous mixture is in the combustion chamber compressed to auto-ignition. Unlike in conventional engines, combustion starts at many different locations simultaneously and the speed of combustion is very high, so there is no flame front. Lean air/fuel mixtures (excess air) are used to control combustion speed. Because of the excess air, combustion temperature is relatively low, resulting in low NOx emissions. When the fuel is vaporised to a truly homogeneous mixture, complete combustion results in low particulate emissions. The most important advantages of HCCI engines are: - Emissions of NOx and particulates are very low. - Energy efficiency is high. It is comparable to diesel engines. - Many different fuels (one at a time) can be used in the HCCI concept. There are also some hurdles to overcome: - Controlling combustion is difficult, it complicates engine design

  3. Research on cylinder processes of gasoline homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofaru, Corneliu

    2017-10-01

    This paper is designed to develop a HCCI engine starting from a spark ignition engine platform. The engine test was a single cylinder, four strokes provided with carburetor. The results of experimental research on this version were used as a baseline for the next phase of the work. After that, the engine was modified for a HCCI configuration, the carburetor was replaced by a direct fuel injection system in order to control precisely the fuel mass per cycle taking into account the measured intake air-mass. To ensure that the air - fuel mixture auto ignite, the compression ratio was increased from 9.7 to 11.5. The combustion process in HCCI regime is governed by chemical kinetics of mixture of air-fuel, rein ducted or trapped exhaust gases and fresh charge. To modify the quantities of trapped burnt gases, the exchange gas system was changed from fixed timing to variable valve timing. To analyze the processes taking place in the HCCI engine and synthesizing a control system, a model of the system which takes into account the engine configuration and operational parameters are needed. The cylinder processes were simulated on virtual model. The experimental research works were focused on determining the parameters which control the combustion timing of HCCI engine to obtain the best energetic and ecologic parameters.

  4. Combustion visualization and experimental study on spark induced compression ignition (SICI) in gasoline HCCI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi; He Xu; Wang Jianxin; Shuai Shijin; Xu Fan; Yang Dongbo

    2010-01-01

    Spark induced compression ignition (SICI) is a relatively new combustion control technology and a promising combustion mode in gasoline engines with high efficiency. SICI can be divided into two categories, SACI and SI-CI. This paper investigated the SICI combustion process using combustion visualization and engine experiment respectively. Ignition process of SICI was captured by high speed photography in an optical engine with different compression ratios. The results show that SICI is a combustion mode combined with partly flame propagation and main auto-ignition. The spark ignites the local mixture near spark electrodes and the flame propagation occurs before the homogeneous mixture is auto-ignited. The heat release from central burned zone due to the flame propagation increases the in-cylinder pressure and temperature, resulting in the unburned mixture auto-ignition. The SICI combustion process can be divided into three stages of the spark induced stage, the flame propagation stage and the compression ignition stage. The SICI combustion mode is different from the spark ignition (SI) knocking in terms of the combustion and emission characteristics. Furthermore, three typical combustion modes including HCCI, SICI, SI, were compared on a gasoline direct injection engine with higher compression ratio and switchable cam-profiles. The results show that SICI has an obvious combustion characteristic with two-stage heat release and lower pressure rise rate. The SICI combustion mode can be controlled by spark timings and EGR rates and utilized as an effective method for high load extension on the gasoline HCCI engine. The maximum IMEP of 0.82 MPa can be achieved with relatively low NO x emission and high thermal efficiency. The SICI combustion mode can be applied in medium-high load region for high efficiency gasoline engines.

  5. Combustion visualization and experimental study on spark induced compression ignition (SICI) in gasoline HCCI engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhi, E-mail: wangzhi@tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He Xu; Wang Jianxin; Shuai Shijin; Xu Fan; Yang Dongbo [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Spark induced compression ignition (SICI) is a relatively new combustion control technology and a promising combustion mode in gasoline engines with high efficiency. SICI can be divided into two categories, SACI and SI-CI. This paper investigated the SICI combustion process using combustion visualization and engine experiment respectively. Ignition process of SICI was captured by high speed photography in an optical engine with different compression ratios. The results show that SICI is a combustion mode combined with partly flame propagation and main auto-ignition. The spark ignites the local mixture near spark electrodes and the flame propagation occurs before the homogeneous mixture is auto-ignited. The heat release from central burned zone due to the flame propagation increases the in-cylinder pressure and temperature, resulting in the unburned mixture auto-ignition. The SICI combustion process can be divided into three stages of the spark induced stage, the flame propagation stage and the compression ignition stage. The SICI combustion mode is different from the spark ignition (SI) knocking in terms of the combustion and emission characteristics. Furthermore, three typical combustion modes including HCCI, SICI, SI, were compared on a gasoline direct injection engine with higher compression ratio and switchable cam-profiles. The results show that SICI has an obvious combustion characteristic with two-stage heat release and lower pressure rise rate. The SICI combustion mode can be controlled by spark timings and EGR rates and utilized as an effective method for high load extension on the gasoline HCCI engine. The maximum IMEP of 0.82 MPa can be achieved with relatively low NO{sub x} emission and high thermal efficiency. The SICI combustion mode can be applied in medium-high load region for high efficiency gasoline engines.

  6. Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Samveg

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are one of the most promising engine technologies for the future of energy conversion from clean, efficient combustion. HCCI engines allow high efficiency and lower CO2 emission through the use of high compression ratios and the removal of intake throttle valves (like Diesel), and allow very low levels of urban pollutants like nitric oxide and soot (like Otto). These engines, however, are not without their challenges, such as low power density compared with other engine technologies, and a difficulty in controlling combustion timing. This dissertation first addresses the power output limits. The particular strategies for enabling high power output investigated in this dissertation focus on avoiding five critical limits that either damage an engine, drastically reduce efficiency, or drastically increase emissions: (1) ringing limits, (2) peak in-cylinder pressure limits, (3) misfire limits, (4) low intake temperature limits, and (5) excessive emissions limits. The research shows that the key factors that enable high power output, sufficient for passenger vehicles, while simultaneously avoiding the five limits defined above are the use of: (1) high intake air pressures allowing improved power output, (2) highly delayed combustion timing to avoid ringing limits, and (3) using the highest possible equivalence ratio before encountering ringing limits. These results are revealed by conducting extensive experiments spanning a wide range of operating conditions on a multi-cylinder HCCI engine. Second, this dissertation discusses strategies for effectively sensing combustion characteristics on a HCCI engine. For effective feedback control of HCCI combustion timing, a sensor is required to quantify when combustion occurs. Many laboratory engines use in-cylinder pressure sensors but these sensors are currently prohibitively expensive for wide-scale commercialization. Instead, ion sensors made from inexpensive sparkplugs

  7. Experimental study of combustion and emission characteristics of ethanol fuelled port injected homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar [Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2011-04-15

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is an alternative combustion concept for in reciprocating engines. The HCCI combustion engine offers significant benefits in terms of its high efficiency and ultra low emissions. In this investigation, port injection technique is used for preparing homogeneous charge. The combustion and emission characteristics of a HCCI engine fuelled with ethanol were investigated on a modified two-cylinder, four-stroke engine. The experiment is conducted with varying intake air temperature (120-150 C) and at different air-fuel ratios, for which stable HCCI combustion is achieved. In-cylinder pressure, heat release analysis and exhaust emission measurements were employed for combustion diagnostics. In this study, effect of intake air temperature on combustion parameters, thermal efficiency, combustion efficiency and emissions in HCCI combustion engine is analyzed and discussed in detail. The experimental results indicate that the air-fuel ratio and intake air temperature have significant effect on the maximum in-cylinder pressure and its position, gas exchange efficiency, thermal efficiency, combustion efficiency, maximum rate of pressure rise and the heat release rate. Results show that for all stable operation points, NO{sub x} emissions are lower than 10 ppm however HC and CO emissions are higher. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Pratapas; Daniel Mather; Anton Kozlovsky

    2007-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen's significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  9. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratapas, John; Mather, Daniel; Kozlovsky, Anton

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen’s significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  10. Utilization of waste heat from a HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) engine in a tri-generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabchi, N.; Khoshbakhti Saray, R.; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    The waste heat from exhaust gases and cooling water of Homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) are utilized to drive an ammonia-water cogeneration cycle (AWCC) and some heating processes, respectively. The AWCC is a combination of the Rankine cycle and an absorption refrigeration cycle. Considering the chemical kinetic calculations, a single zone combustion model is developed to simulate the natural gas fueled HCCI engine. Also, the performance of AWCC is simulated using the Engineering Equation Solver software (EES). Through combining these two codes, a detailed thermodynamic analysis is performed for the proposed tri-generation system and the effects of some main parameters on the performances of both the AWCC and the tri-generation system are investigated in detail. The cycle performance is then optimized for the fuel energy saving ratio (FESR). The enhancement in the FESR could be up to 28.56%. Under optimized condition, the second law efficiency of proposed system is 5.19% higher than that of the HCCI engine while the reduction in CO 2 emission is 4.067% as compared with the conventional separate thermodynamic systems. Moreover, the results indicate that the engine, in the tri-generation system and the absorber, in the bottoming cycle has the most contribution in exergy destruction. - Highlights: • A new thermodynamic tri-generation system is proposed for waste heat recovery of HCCI engine. • A single zone combustion model is developed to simulate the natural gas fueled HCCI engine. • The proposed tri-generation cycle is analyzed from the view points of both first and second laws of thermodynamics. • In the considered cycle, enhancements of 28.56% in fuel energy saving ratio and 5.19% in exergy efficiency are achieved

  11. Modeling and controller design architecture for cycle-by-cycle combustion control of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines – A comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathi, Morteza; Jahanian, Omid; Shahbakhti, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Addressing accuracy-speed compromise of HCCI representation is very important. • Phasing, load, exhaust temperature and emissions are the most important outputs. • Separability between the effects of the inputs on the outputs is of great interest. • Existing actuation systems combining inputs are favorable. • An HCCI controller should be a fast and robust one to become a viable solution. - Abstract: Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engines are advantageous in terms of good fuel economy and low levels of soot-nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. However, they are accompanied with some intrinsic challenges, the most important of which is the lack of any direct control method for ignition trigger. Thus, implementation of HCCI combustion is in fact a control problem, and an optimized control structure is required for attaining the inherent benefits of HCCI. The control structure consists of a proper representation of engine processes; a suitable selection of state variables; useful and applicable set of inputs, outputs and observers; appropriate fixed or variable set-points for controlled parameters; instrumentations including sensors and actuators; and an applicable control law implemented in a controller. The present paper aims at addressing these issues altogether by introducing HCCI engine control structure in progress and presenting highlights from literature. Research should result in appropriately controlled HCCI engines which can provide desired load at rated speed with acceptable performance and emissions characteristics.

  12. Miniature free-piston homogeneous charge compression ignition engine-compressor concept - Part II: modeling HCCI combustion in small scales with detailed homogeneous gas phase chemical kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichlmayr, H.T.; Kittelson, D.B.; Zachariah, M.R. [The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States). Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    Operational maps for crankshaft-equipped miniature homogeneous charge compression ignition engines are established using performance estimation, detailed chemical kinetics, and diffusion models for heat transfer and radical loss. In this study, radical loss was found to be insignificant. In contrast, heat transfer was found to be increasingly significant for 10, 1, and 0.1 W engines, respectively. Also, temperature-pressure trajectories and ignition delay time maps are used to explore relationships between engine operational parameters and HCCI. Lastly, effects of engine operating conditions and design on the indicated fuel conversion efficiency are investigated. (author)

  13. A modelling study into the effects of variable valve timing on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve DI homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrous, A-F.M.; Potrzebowski, A.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Xu, H.M.; Tsolakis, A.; Luszcz, P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion mode is a relatively new combustion technology that can be achieved by using specially designed cams with reduced lift and duration. The auto-ignition in HCCI engine can be facilitated by adjusting the timing of the exhaust-valve-closing and, to some extent, the timing of the intake-valve-opening so as to capture a proportion of the hot exhaust gases in the engine cylinder during the gas exchange process. The effects of variable valve timing strategy on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve direct injection HCCI engine were computationally investigated using a 1D fluid-dynamic engine cycle simulation code. A non-typical intake valve strategy was examined; whereby the intake valves were assumed to be independently actuated with the same valve-lift profile but at different timings. Using such an intake valves strategy, the obtained results showed that the operating range of the exhaust-valve-timing within which the HCCI combustion can be facilitated and maintained becomes much wider than that of the typical intake-valve-timing case. Also it was found that the engine parameters such as load and volumetric efficiency are significantly modified with the use of the non-typical intake-valve-timing. Additionally, the results demonstrated the potential of the non-typical intake-valve strategy in achieving and maintaining the HCCI combustion at much lower loads within a wide range of valve timings. Minimizing the pumping work penalty, and consequently improving the fuel economy, was shown as an advantage of using the non-typical intake-valve-timing with the timing of the early intake valve coupled with a symmetric degree of exhaust-valve-closing timing

  14. A modelling study into the effects of variable valve timing on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve DI homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrous, A-F.M. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lecturer at the Department of Mechanical Power Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Shebin El-Kom), Menoufiya University, Shebin El-Kom (Egypt); Potrzebowski, A.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Xu, H.M.; Tsolakis, A.; Luszcz, P. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion mode is a relatively new combustion technology that can be achieved by using specially designed cams with reduced lift and duration. The auto-ignition in HCCI engine can be facilitated by adjusting the timing of the exhaust-valve-closing and, to some extent, the timing of the intake-valve-opening so as to capture a proportion of the hot exhaust gases in the engine cylinder during the gas exchange process. The effects of variable valve timing strategy on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve direct injection HCCI engine were computationally investigated using a 1D fluid-dynamic engine cycle simulation code. A non-typical intake valve strategy was examined; whereby the intake valves were assumed to be independently actuated with the same valve-lift profile but at different timings. Using such an intake valves strategy, the obtained results showed that the operating range of the exhaust-valve-timing within which the HCCI combustion can be facilitated and maintained becomes much wider than that of the typical intake-valve-timing case. Also it was found that the engine parameters such as load and volumetric efficiency are significantly modified with the use of the non-typical intake-valve-timing. Additionally, the results demonstrated the potential of the non-typical intake-valve strategy in achieving and maintaining the HCCI combustion at much lower loads within a wide range of valve timings. Minimizing the pumping work penalty, and consequently improving the fuel economy, was shown as an advantage of using the non-typical intake-valve-timing with the timing of the early intake valve coupled with a symmetric degree of exhaust-valve-closing timing. (author)

  15. An experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio on the HCCI auto-ignition process of Primary Reference Fuels in an engine

    OpenAIRE

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand better the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine, the influence of some important parameters on the auto-ignition is investigated. The inlet temperature, the equivalence ratio and the compression ratio were varied and their influence on the pressure, the heat release and the ignition delays were measured, The inlet temperature was changed from 25 to 70 degrees C and the equivalence ratio from 0.18 to 0.41, while the compression ratio varied from 6 to 13.5. The fuels t...

  16. Evaluation of a combined cycle based on an HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine heat recovery employing two organic Rankine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaljani, M.; Saray, R. Khoshbakhti; Bahlouli, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a combined power cycle which includes a HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine and two ORCs (Organic Rankine Cycles) is introduced. In the proposed cycle, the waste heats from the engine cooling water and exhaust gases are utilized to drive the ORCs. A parametric study is conducted to show the effects of decision parameters on the performance and on the total cost rate of cycle. Results of the parametric study reveal that increasing the pinch point temperature difference of evaporator and temperature of the condenser leads to reduction in both exergy efficiency and total cost rate of the bottoming cycle. There is a specific evaporator temperature where exergy efficiency is improved, but the total cost rate of the bottoming cycle is maximized. Also, a multi-objective optimization strategy is performed to achieve the best system design parameters from both thermodynamic and economic aspects. The exergy efficiency and the total cost rate of the system have been considered as objective functions. Optimization results indicate that the exergy efficiency of the cycle increases from 44.96% for the base case to 46.02%. Also, approximately1.3% reduction in the cost criteria is achieved. Results of the multi-objective optimization justify the results obtained through the parametric study and demonstrate that the design parameters of both ORCs have conflict effect on the objective functions. - Highlights: • Two Organic Rankine bottoming cycles are coupled with an HCCI Engine. • Exergetic and Exergo-economic analysis of the bottoming cycle are reported. • The system is optimized using multi-objective genetic algorithm. • Objective functions are exergy efficiency and total cost rate of the system. • The exergy efficiency of the cycle increases from 44.96% to 46.02%.

  17. An experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio on the HCCI auto-ignition process of Primary Reference Fuels in an engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France); Cavadiasa, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France)

    2008-11-15

    In order to understand better the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine, the influence of some important parameters on the auto-ignition is investigated. The inlet temperature, the equivalence ratio and the compression ratio were varied and their influence on the pressure, the heat release and the ignition delays were measured. The inlet temperature was changed from 25 to 70 C and the equivalence ratio from 0.18 to 0.41, while the compression ratio varied from 6 to 13.5. The fuels that were investigated were PRF40 and n-heptane. These three parameters appeared to decrease the ignition delays, with the inlet temperature having the least influence and the compression ratio the most. A previously experimentally validated reduced surrogate mechanism, for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene, has been used to explain observations of the auto-ignition process. The same kinetic mechanism is used to better understand the underlying chemical and physical phenomena that make the influence of a certain parameter change according to the operating conditions. This can be useful for the control of the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine. (author)

  18. Auto-ignition modelling: analysis of the dilution effects by the unburnt gases and of the interactions with turbulence for diesel homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines; Modelisation de l'auto-inflammation: analyse des effets de la dilution par les gaz brules et des interactions avec la turbulence dediee aux moteurs Diesel a charge homogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, G.

    2005-09-15

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is an alternative engine combustion process that offers the potential for substantial reductions in both NO{sub x} and particulate matter still providing high Diesel-like efficiencies. Combustion in HCCI mode takes place essentially by auto-ignition. It is mainly controlled by the chemical kinetics. It is therefore necessary to introduce detailed chemistry effects in combustion CFD codes in order to properly model the HCCI combustion process. The objective of this work is to develop an auto-ignition model including detailed chemical kinetics and its interactions with turbulence. Also, a comprehensive study has been performed to analyze the chemical influence of CO and H{sub 2} residual species on auto-ignition, which can be present in the exhaust gases. A new auto-ignition model, TKI-PDF (Tabulated Kinetics for Ignition - with turbulent mixing interactions through a pdf approach) dedicated to RANS 3D engine combustion CFD calculations is proposed. The TKI-PDF model is formulated in order to accommodate the detailed chemical kinetics of auto-ignition coupled with turbulence/chemistry interactions. The complete model development and its validation against experimental results are presented in two parts. The first part of this work describes the detailed chemistry input to the model. The second part is dedicated to the turbulent mixing description. A method based on a progress variable reaction rate tabulation is used. A look-up table for the progress variable reaction rates has been built through constant volume complex chemistry simulations. Instantaneous local reaction rates inside the CFD computational cell are then calculated by linear interpolation inside the look-up table depending on the local thermodynamic conditions. In order to introduce the turbulent mixing effects on auto-ignition, a presumed pdf approach is used. The model has been validated in different levels. First, the detailed kinetic approach was

  19. A Study on the Effects of Compression Ratio, Engine Speed and Equivalence Ratio on HCCI Combustion of DME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion of Dimethyl Ether (DME). The study was performed as a parameter variation of engine speed and compression ratio on excess air ratios of approximately 2.5, 3 and 4. The compression ratio was...

  20. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion: Challenges and Proposed Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine and car manufacturers are experiencing the demand concerning fuel efficiency and low emissions from both consumers and governments. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI is an alternative combustion technology that is cleaner and more efficient than the other types of combustion. Although the thermal efficiency and NOx emission of HCCI engine are greater in comparison with traditional engines, HCCI combustion has several main difficulties such as controlling of ignition timing, limited power output, and weak cold-start capability. In this study a literature review on HCCI engine has been performed and HCCI challenges and proposed solutions have been investigated from the point view of Ignition Timing that is the main problem of this engine. HCCI challenges are investigated by many IC engine researchers during the last decade, but practical solutions have not been presented for a fully HCCI engine. Some of the solutions are slow response time and some of them are technically difficult to implement. So it seems that fully HCCI engine needs more investigation to meet its mass-production and the future research and application should be considered as part of an effort to achieve low-temperature combustion in a wide range of operating conditions in an IC engine.

  1. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr

    This thesis is based on experimental and numerical studies on the use of dimethyl ether (DME) in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process. The first paper in this thesis was published in 2007 and describes HCCI combustion of pure DME in a small diesel engine. The tests...... were designed to investigate the effect of engine speed, compression ratio and equivalence ratio on the combustion timing and the engine performance. It was found that the required compression ratio depended on the equivalence ratio used. A lower equivalence ratio requires a higher compression ratio...... before the fuel is burned completely, due to lower in-cylinder temperatures and lower reaction rates. The study provided some insight in the importance of operating at the correct compression ratio, as well as the operational limitations and emission characteristics of HCCI combustion. HCCI combustion...

  2. Numerical analysis of knock during HCCI in a high compression ratio methanol engine based on LES with detailed chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Xudong; Wang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Knock during HCCI in a high compression ratio methanol engine was modeled. • A detailed methanol mechanism was used to simulate the knocking combustion. • Compared with the SI engines, the HCCI knocking combustion burnt faster. • The reaction rate of HCO had two obvious peaks, one was positive, and another was negative. • Compared with the SI engines, the values of the reaction rates of CH 2 O, H 2 O 2 , and HO 2 were higher, and it had negative peaks. - Abstract: In this study, knock during HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) was studied based on LES (large eddy simulation) with methanol chemical kinetics (84-reaction, 21-species) in a high compression ratio methanol engine. The non-knocking and knocking combustion of SI (spark ignition) and HCCI engines were compared. The results showed that the auto-ignition spots were initially occurred near the combustion chamber wall. The knocking combustion burnt faster during HCCI than SI methanol engine. The HCO reaction rate was different from SI engine, it had two obvious peaks, one was positive peak, and another was negative peak. Compared with the SI methanol engine, in addition to the concentration of HCO, the concentrations of the other intermediate products and species such as CO, OH, CH 2 O, H 2 O 2 , HO 2 were increased significantly; the reaction rates of CH 2 O, H 2 O 2 , and HO 2 had negative peaks, and whose values were several times higher than SI methanol engine

  3. A Study on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Gasoline Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Makoto; Morikawa, Koji; Itoh, Jin; Saishu, Youhei

    A new engine concept consisting of HCCI combustion for low and midrange loads and spark ignition combustion for high loads was introduced. The timing of the intake valve closing was adjusted to alter the negative valve overlap and effective compression ratio to provide suitable HCCI conditions. The effect of mixture formation on auto-ignition was also investigated using a direct injection engine. As a result, HCCI combustion was achieved with a relatively low compression ratio when the intake air was heated by internal EGR. The resulting combustion was at a high thermal efficiency, comparable to that of modern diesel engines, and produced almost no NOx emissions or smoke. The mixture stratification increased the local A/F concentration, resulting in higher reactivity. A wide range of combustible A/F ratios was used to control the compression ignition timing. Photographs showed that the flame filled the entire chamber during combustion, reducing both emissions and fuel consumption.

  4. DNS Study of the Ignition of n-Heptane Fuel Spray under HCCI Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunliang; Rutland, Christopher J.

    2004-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the mixing and auto-ignition processes of n-heptane fuel spray in a turbulent field using a skeletal chemistry mechanism with 44 species and 112 reactions. For the solution of the carrier gas fluid, we use the Eulerian method, while for the fuel spray, the Lagrangian method is used. We use an eighth-order finite difference scheme to calculate spacial derivatives and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme for the time integration. The initial gas temperature is 926 K and the initial gas pressure is 30 atmospheres. The initial global equivalence ratio based on the fuel concentration is around 0.4. The initial droplet diameter is 60 macrons and the droplet temperature is 300 K. Evolutions of averaged temperature, species mass fraction, heat release and reaction rate are presented. Contours of temperature and species mass fractions are presented. The objective is to understand the mechanism of ignition under Homogeneous Charged Compression Ignition (HCCI) conditions, aiming at providing some useful information of HCCI combustion, which is one of the critical issues to be resolved.

  5. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL

    2008-05-27

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  6. Effect of oxygen content on n-heptane auto-ignition characteristics in a HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhijun; Kang, Zhe; Deng, Jun; Hu, Zongjie; Li, Liguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • n-Heptane HCCI combustion under air and oxygen intake was compared. • n-Heptane auto-ignition postponed due to higher specific heat capacity as oxygen increase. • The increment of heat release fraction during low temperature reaction is studied. • Oxygen enrichment lead to suppressed negative temperature coefficient. • The mechanism of low temperature reaction enhancement as oxygen increase is investigated. - Abstract: To take maximum advantage of the high efficiency of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion mode and internal combustion Rankine cycle concept, in this study, the n-heptane auto-ignition characteristics have been investigated using a compression ignition internal combustion Rankine cycle engine test bench and a zero-dimensional thermodynamic model coupled with a detailed kinetic model. The n-heptane auto-ignition process shows that under both air and oxygen intake, a typical two-stage combustion in which oxygen enrichment has very minor effects on the n-heptane high temperature reaction. The higher specific heat capacity of oxygen compared with nitrogen leads to an overall increased specific heat capacity, which lowers the in-cylinder temperature during compression stroke, thereby delaying the low temperature reaction initial timing. The higher oxygen content also improves the H-atom abstraction, first O_2 addition, second O_2 addition and peroxyalkylhydroperoxide isomerization, thereby improving the overall reaction rate and the heat release fraction of low temperature reaction. As a result, the in-cylinder temperature at the end of low temperature reaction also increases, thereby shortening significantly the negative temperature coefficient duration compared with a combustion cycle using air as oxidizer.

  7. A Study on the Effects of Compression Ratio, Engine Speed and Equivalence Ratio on HCCI Combustion of DME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion of Dimethyl Ether (DME). The study was performed as a parameter variation of engine speed and compression ratio on excess air ratios of approximately 2.5, 3 and 4. The compression ratio...... was adjusted in steps to find suitable regions of operation, and the effect of engine speed was studied at 1000, 2000 and 3000 RPM. It was found that leaner excess air ratios require higher compression ratios to achieve satisfactory combustion. Engine speed also affects operation significantly....

  8. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sendilvelan; S.Mohanamurugan

    2011-01-01

    Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA) in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combus...

  9. The development and experimental validation of a reduced ternary kinetic mechanism for the auto-ignition at HCCI conditions, proposing a global reaction path for ternary gasoline surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon; Amouroux, Jacques [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2009-02-15

    To acquire a high amount of information of the behaviour of the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) auto-ignition process, a reduced surrogate mechanism has been composed out of reduced n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene mechanisms, containing 62 reactions and 49 species. This mechanism has been validated numerically in a 0D HCCI engine code against more detailed mechanisms (inlet temperature varying from 290 to 500 K, the equivalence ratio from 0.2 to 0.7 and the compression ratio from 8 to 18) and experimentally against experimental shock tube and rapid compression machine data from the literature at pressures between 9 and 55 bar and temperatures between 700 and 1400 K for several fuels: the pure compounds n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene as well as binary and ternary mixtures of these compounds. For this validation, stoichiometric mixtures and mixtures with an equivalence ratio of 0.5 are used. The experimental validation is extended by comparing the surrogate mechanism to experimental data from an HCCI engine. A global reaction pathway is proposed for the auto-ignition of a surrogate gasoline, using the surrogate mechanism, in order to show the interactions that the three compounds can have with one another during the auto-ignition of a ternary mixture. (author)

  10. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    OpenAIRE

    Hanafi H.; Hasan M.M; Rahman M.M; Noor M.M; Kadirgama K.; Ramasamy D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend). A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5) and 10% ethanol (E10) (in vo...

  11. Fundamental Interactions in Gasoline Compression Ignition Engines with Fuel Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Benjamin Matthew

    Transportation accounted for 28% of the total U.S. energy demand in 2011, with 93% of U.S. transportation energy coming from petroleum. The large impact of the transportation sector on global climate change necessitates more-efficient, cleaner-burning internal combustion engine operating strategies. One such strategy that has received substantial research attention in the last decade is Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). Although the efficiency and emissions benefits of HCCI are well established, practical limits on the operating range of HCCI engines have inhibited their application in consumer vehicles. One such limit is at high load, where the pressure rise rate in the combustion chamber becomes excessively large. Fuel stratification is a potential strategy for reducing the maximum pressure rise rate in HCCI engines. The aim is to introduce reactivity gradients through fuel stratification to promote sequential auto-ignition rather than a bulk-ignition, as in the homogeneous case. A gasoline-fueled compression ignition engine with fuel stratification is termed a Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engine. Although a reasonable amount of experimental research has been performed for fuel stratification in GCI engines, a clear understanding of how the fundamental in-cylinder processes of fuel spray evaporation, mixing, and heat release contribute to the observed phenomena is lacking. Of particular interest is gasoline's pressure sensitive low-temperature chemistry and how it impacts the sequential auto-ignition of the stratified charge. In order to computationally study GCI with fuel stratification using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and chemical kinetics, two reduced mechanisms have been developed. The reduced mechanisms were developed from a large, detailed mechanism with about 1400 species for a 4-component gasoline surrogate. The two versions of the reduced mechanism developed in this work are: (1) a 96-species version and (2

  12. Ignition delay time correlation of fuel blends based on Livengood-Wu description

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi; Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    observed for combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) predictions between simulations performed with detailed chemistry and calculations using the developed ignition delay correlation.

  13. HCCI engine control and optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Killingsworth, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines have the benefit of high efficiency with low emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulates. These benefits are due to the autoignition process of the dilute mixture of fuel and air during compression. However, because there is no direct ignition trigger, control of ignition is inherently more difficult than in standard internal combustion engines. This difficulty necessitates that a feedback controller be used to keep the engine at a desi...

  14. Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2006-09-01

    The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its

  15. A reduced mechanism for predicting the ignition timing of a fuel blend of natural-gas and n-heptane in HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahlouli, Keyvan; Atikol, Ugur; Khoshbakhti Saray, R.; Mohammadi, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A two-stage reduction process is used to produce two reduced mechanisms. • The mechanisms are combined to develop a reaction mechanism for a fuel blend. • The genetic algorithm is used for optimization of reaction constants. • The developed reduced mechanism can be used to predict the ignition timing in HCCI engine for a fuel blend. - Abstract: One of the main challenges associated with homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engine application is the lack of direct control on ignition timing. One of the solutions to this problem is mixing two fuels with various properties at a variety of ratios on a cycle-by-cycle basis. In the current study, a reduced mechanism for a fuel blend of natural-gas and n-heptane is proposed. The approach is validated for the prediction of ignition timing in the HCCI combustion engine. A single-zone combustion model is used to simulate the HCCI engine. A two-stage reduction process is used to produce two reduced mechanisms of existing semi-detailed GRI-Mech. 3.0 mechanism that contains 53 species and 325 reactions and Golovichev’s mechanism consisting of 57 species and 290 reactions for natural gas and n-heptane fuels, respectively. Firstly, the unimportant species and related reactions are identified by employing the directed relation graph with error propagation (DRGEP) reduction method and then, to extend reduction, the principal component analysis (PCA) method is utilized. To evaluate the validity of the reduced mechanism, representative engine combustion parameters such as peak pressure, maximum heat release, and CA50 are used. The reduced mechanism of GRI-Mech. 3.0 mechanism, containing 19 species and 39 reactions, and the reduced mechanism of Golovichev’s mechanism, consisting of 40 species and 95 reactions, provide good prediction for the mentioned parameters in comparison with those of detailed mechanisms. The combination of the generated reduced mechanisms is used to develop a

  16. Development of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, Craig; Gonzalez, Manual; Russell, Durrett

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes activities related to the revised STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated June 2010 for the Development of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-05NT42415) project. In both the spark- (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) development activities covered in this program, the goal was to develop potential production-viable internal combustion engine system technologies that both reduce fuel consumption and simultaneously met exhaust emission targets. To be production-viable, engine technologies were also evaluated to determine if they would meet customer expectations of refinement in terms of noise, vibration, performance, driveability, etc. in addition to having an attractive business case and value. Prior to this activity, only proprietary theoretical / laboratory knowledge existed on the combustion technologies explored The research reported here expands and develops this knowledge to determine series-production viability. Significant SI and CI engine development occurred during this program within General Motors, LLC over more than five years. In the SI program, several engines were designed and developed that used both a relatively simple multi-lift valve train system and a Fully Flexible Valve Actuation (FFVA) system to enable a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Many technical challenges, which were unknown at the start of this program, were identified and systematically resolved through analysis, test and development. This report documents the challenges and solutions for each SOPO deliverable. As a result of the project activities, the production viability of the developed clean combustion technologies has been determined. At this time, HCCI combustion for SI engines is not considered production-viable for several reasons. HCCI combustion is excessively sensitive to control variables

  17. Comparison of Gasoline and Primary Reference Fuel in the Transition from HCCI to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Changle; Tunestal, Per; Tuner, Martin; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    Our previous research investigated the sensitivity of combustion phasing to intake temperature and injection timing during the transition from homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) to partially premixed combustion (PPC) fuelled with generic

  18. Validation of a reduced chemical mechanism coupled to CFD model in a 2-stroke HCCI engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, B.; Nuraini, A.

    2015-01-01

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion technology has demonstrated a profound potential to decrease both emissions and fuel consumption. In this way, the significance of the 2-stroke HCCI engine has been underestimated as it can provide more power stroke in comparison to a

  19. Auto-Ignition of Iso-Stoichiometric Blends of Gasoline-Ethanol-Methanol (GEM) in SI, HCCI and CI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad

    2017-03-28

    Gasoline-ethanol-methanol (GEM) blends, with constant stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratio (iso-stoichiometric blending rule) and equivalent to binary gasoline-ethanol blends (E2, E5, E10 and E15 in % vol.), were defined to investigate the effect of methanol and combined mixtures of ethanol and methanol when blended with three FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) Gasolines, I, J and A corresponding to RON 70.2, 73.8 and 83.9, respectively, and their corresponding Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs). A Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was used under Spark Ignition and Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignited modes. An ignition quality tester was utilized in the Compression Ignition mode. One of the promising properties of GEM blends, which are derived using the iso-stoichiometric blending rule, is that they maintain a constant octane number, which has led to the introduction of methanol as a drop-in fuel to supplement bio-derived ethanol. A constant RON/HCCI fuel number/derived Research octane number property was observed in all three combustion modes for high RON fuels, but for low RON fuels, the iso-stoichiometric blending rule for constant octane number did not appear to be valid. The chemical composition and octane number of the base fuel also influenced the behavior of the GEM blends under different conditions.

  20. Auto-Ignition of Iso-Stoichiometric Blends of Gasoline-Ethanol-Methanol (GEM) in SI, HCCI and CI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad; Naser, Nimal; Sarathy, Mani; Feijs, Jeroen; Morganti, Kai; Nyrenstedt, Gustav; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    Gasoline-ethanol-methanol (GEM) blends, with constant stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratio (iso-stoichiometric blending rule) and equivalent to binary gasoline-ethanol blends (E2, E5, E10 and E15 in % vol.), were defined to investigate the effect of methanol and combined mixtures of ethanol and methanol when blended with three FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) Gasolines, I, J and A corresponding to RON 70.2, 73.8 and 83.9, respectively, and their corresponding Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs). A Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was used under Spark Ignition and Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignited modes. An ignition quality tester was utilized in the Compression Ignition mode. One of the promising properties of GEM blends, which are derived using the iso-stoichiometric blending rule, is that they maintain a constant octane number, which has led to the introduction of methanol as a drop-in fuel to supplement bio-derived ethanol. A constant RON/HCCI fuel number/derived Research octane number property was observed in all three combustion modes for high RON fuels, but for low RON fuels, the iso-stoichiometric blending rule for constant octane number did not appear to be valid. The chemical composition and octane number of the base fuel also influenced the behavior of the GEM blends under different conditions.

  1. HCCI Engine Optimization and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf D. Reitz

    2005-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop methods to optimize and control Homogeneous-Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, with emphasis on diesel-fueled engines. HCCI offers the potential of nearly eliminating IC engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over Compression Ignition Direct Injection engines (CIDI) by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The project was initiated in January, 2002, and the present report is the final report for work conducted on the project through December 31, 2004. Periodic progress has also been reported at bi-annual working group meetings held at USCAR, Detroit, MI, and at the Sandia National Laboratories. Copies of these presentation materials are available on CD-ROM, as distributed by the Sandia National Labs. In addition, progress has been documented in DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Progress Reports for FY 2002, 2003 and 2004. These reports are included as the Appendices in this Final report.

  2. Emission Characteristics for a Homogeneous Charged Compression Ignition Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation Using Split Injection Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhee Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the serious issues caused by air pollution and global warming, emission regulations are becoming stricter. New technologies that reduce NOx and PM emissions are needed. To cope with these social exhaust gas regulation demands, many advanced countries are striving to develop eco-friendly vehicles in order to respond to stricter emissions regulations. The homogeneous charged compression ignition engine (HCCI incorporates a multi-stage combustion engine with multiple combustion modes, catalyst, direct fuel injection and partial mixing combustion. In this study, the HCCI combustion was applied to analyze and review the results of engines applying HCCI combustion without altering the conventional engine specifications. The optimization of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR and compression ratio changes provides an optimal fuel economy. In this study, potential for optimum economy within the range of IMEP 0.8 MPa has been evaluated.

  3. Fundamental phenomena affecting low temperature combustion and HCCI engines, high load limits and strategies for extending these limits

    KAUST Repository

    Saxena, Samveg; Bedoya, Ivá n D.

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature combustion (LTC) engines are an emerging engine technology that offers an alternative to spark-ignited and diesel engines. One type of LTC engine, the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, uses a well-mixed fuel–air charge like spark-ignited engines and relies on compression ignition like diesel engines. Similar to diesel engines, the use of high compression ratios and removal of the throttling valve in HCCI allow for high efficiency operation, thereby allowing lower CO2 emissions per unit of work delivered by the engine. The use of a highly diluted well-mixed fuel–air charge allows for low emissions of nitrogen oxides, soot and particulate matters, and the use of oxidation catalysts can allow low emissions of unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. As a result, HCCI offers the ability to achieve high efficiencies comparable with diesel while also allowing clean emissions while using relatively inexpensive aftertreatment technologies. HCCI is not, however, without its challenges. Traditionally, two important problems prohibiting market penetration of HCCI are 1) inability to achieve high load, and 2) difficulty in controlling combustion timing. Recent research has significantly mitigated these challenges, and thus HCCI has a promising future for automotive and power generation applications. This article begins by providing a comprehensive review of the physical phenomena governing HCCI operation, with particular emphasis on high load conditions. Emissions characteristics are then discussed, with suggestions on how to inexpensively enable low emissions of all regulated emissions. The operating limits that govern the high load conditions are discussed in detail, and finally a review of recent research which expands the high load limits of HCCI is discussed. Although this article focuses on the fundamental phenomena governing HCCI operation, it is also useful for understanding the fundamental phenomena in reactivity controlled

  4. Fundamental phenomena affecting low temperature combustion and HCCI engines, high load limits and strategies for extending these limits

    KAUST Repository

    Saxena, Samveg

    2013-10-01

    Low temperature combustion (LTC) engines are an emerging engine technology that offers an alternative to spark-ignited and diesel engines. One type of LTC engine, the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, uses a well-mixed fuel–air charge like spark-ignited engines and relies on compression ignition like diesel engines. Similar to diesel engines, the use of high compression ratios and removal of the throttling valve in HCCI allow for high efficiency operation, thereby allowing lower CO2 emissions per unit of work delivered by the engine. The use of a highly diluted well-mixed fuel–air charge allows for low emissions of nitrogen oxides, soot and particulate matters, and the use of oxidation catalysts can allow low emissions of unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. As a result, HCCI offers the ability to achieve high efficiencies comparable with diesel while also allowing clean emissions while using relatively inexpensive aftertreatment technologies. HCCI is not, however, without its challenges. Traditionally, two important problems prohibiting market penetration of HCCI are 1) inability to achieve high load, and 2) difficulty in controlling combustion timing. Recent research has significantly mitigated these challenges, and thus HCCI has a promising future for automotive and power generation applications. This article begins by providing a comprehensive review of the physical phenomena governing HCCI operation, with particular emphasis on high load conditions. Emissions characteristics are then discussed, with suggestions on how to inexpensively enable low emissions of all regulated emissions. The operating limits that govern the high load conditions are discussed in detail, and finally a review of recent research which expands the high load limits of HCCI is discussed. Although this article focuses on the fundamental phenomena governing HCCI operation, it is also useful for understanding the fundamental phenomena in reactivity controlled

  5. Universal autoignition models for designer fuels in HCCI combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersickel, A.; Boulouchos, K.; Wright, Y.M. [LAV - Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory - Institute of Energy Technology, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)], email: vandersickel@lav.mavt.ethz.ch

    2010-07-01

    In the energy sector, stringent regulations have been implemented on combustion emissions in order to address health and environmental concerns and help improve air quality. A novel combustion mode, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), can improve the emissions performance of an engine in terms of NOx and soot release over that of diesel while maintaining the same efficiencies. However, problems of ignition timing control arise with HCCI. The aim of this paper is to determine how fuel properties impact the HCCI ignition process and operating range. This study was carried out as part of a collaboration among several universities and automotive companies and 10 fuels were investigated experimentally and numerically using Arrhenius' model and a lumped reaction model. The two ignition models were successfully adapted to describe the behavior of the studied fuels; atomizer engine experiments validated their results. Further work will be conducted to optimize the reaction mechanism for the remaining process fuels.

  6. Experimental validation of concentration profiles in an HCCI engine, modelled by a multi-component kinetic mechanism: Outline for auto-ignition and emission control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim, E-mail: hatim-machrafi@enscp.f [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Universite de Liege, Thermodynamique des Phenomenes Irreversibles, 17, Allee du Six-Aout, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2010-10-15

    In order to contribute to the auto-ignition and emission control for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), a kinetic multi-component mechanism, containing 62 reactions and 49 species for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene is validated in this work, comparing for the concentration profiles of the fuel, the total hydrocarbons, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, acetaldehyde and iso-butene. These species are sampled during the combustion and quantified. For these measurements an automotive exhaust analyser, a gas chromatograph, coupled to a mass spectrometer and a flame ionisation detector are used, depending on the species to be measured. The fuel, total hydrocarbons, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, iso-butene and acetaldehyde showed a satisfactory quantitative agreement between the mechanism and the experiments. Both the experiments and the modelling results showed the same formation behaviour of the different species. An example is shown of how such a validated mechanism can provide for a set of information of the behaviour of the auto-ignition process and the emission control as a function of engine parameters.

  7. Experimental validation of concentration profiles in an HCCI engine, modelled by a multi-component kinetic mechanism: Outline for auto-ignition and emission control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machrafi, Hatim

    2010-01-01

    In order to contribute to the auto-ignition and emission control for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), a kinetic multi-component mechanism, containing 62 reactions and 49 species for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene is validated in this work, comparing for the concentration profiles of the fuel, the total hydrocarbons, O 2 , CO 2 , CO, acetaldehyde and iso-butene. These species are sampled during the combustion and quantified. For these measurements an automotive exhaust analyser, a gas chromatograph, coupled to a mass spectrometer and a flame ionisation detector are used, depending on the species to be measured. The fuel, total hydrocarbons, O 2 , CO 2 , iso-butene and acetaldehyde showed a satisfactory quantitative agreement between the mechanism and the experiments. Both the experiments and the modelling results showed the same formation behaviour of the different species. An example is shown of how such a validated mechanism can provide for a set of information of the behaviour of the auto-ignition process and the emission control as a function of engine parameters.

  8. Homogeneous charge compression ignition compared with Otto-Atkinson in a passenger car size engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Andreas

    2000-07-01

    The use of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) was investigated in an ordinary SI (spark ignition) engine, in this case a modified Volvo 850, working on one cylinder only, the others towed. The major purpose of this study was to examine whether there were the same kind of throttle losses in this engine as in a Diesel engine (Volvo TD 100). One reason for throttling is that HCCI causes very cold exhaust gases. The Diesel engine has a larger cylinder volume (1.6 compared to 0.5 litre), working at low engine speed (1000 rpm) and only two valves with comparably small area. The smaller Volvo 850 engine has four valves and was in this examination working at up to 3500 rpm. To make the engine run by HCCI following modifications were made. The compression was set to 20:1 by changing the piston. To affect the ignition an electrical heater was installed near the air inlet. Mixing iso-octane (ON 100) and N-heptane (ON 0) set the octane number. A couple of camshafts with different cam-profiles were used to achieve the right valve opening duration depending on which kind of combustion that was studied. There could then also be a comparison between Otto and HCCI combustion both working with wide-open throttle. To obtain comparable indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) the engine was working with late (LIVC) or early inlet valve closing (EIVC) at SI combustion. Measurements were taken involving in-cylinder pressure, temperature, speed, fuel-consumption, emissions etc. Regarding emissions there were special consideration taken to hydrocarbon and NO{sub x}, which are known to be extremely high respectively low with HCCI combustion. Important questions that should be answered were: * How does higher engine speed affect the combustion ?, * How does the engine size affect emissions ?, * How much is the valve area affecting gas exchange losses ?, and * How high is the efficiency with HCCI compared with Otto (LIVC/EIVC) ?. The best results are achieved at an indicated mean

  9. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sendilvelan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combustion rate controllable. Meanwhile, the periphery of the fuel-rich zone leads to fierce burning, which results in slightly high NOx emissions. The experiments were conducted in a modified single cylinder water-cooled diesel engine. In this experiment we use diesel, bio-diesel (Jatropha and gasoline as the fuel at different mixing ratios. HCCI has advantages in high thermal efficiency and low emissions and could possibly become a promising combustion method in internal combustion engines.

  10. Direct numerical simulations of ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities relevant to HCCI and SCCI combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minh Bau

    2015-12-01

    The effects of temperature and composition stratifications on the ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture at three initial mean temperatures under elevated pressure are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a 58-species reduced mechanism. Two-dimensional DNSs are performed by varying several key parameters: initial mean temperature, T0, and the variance of temperature and equivalence ratio (T\\' and φ\\') with different T-φcorrelations. It is found that for cases with φ\\' only, the overall combustion occurs more quickly and the mean heat release rate (HRR) increases more slowly with increasing φ\\' regardless of T0. For cases with T\\' only, however, the overall combustion is retarded/advanced in time with increasing T\\' for low/high T0 relative to the negative-temperature coefficient (NTC) regime resulting from a longer/shorter overall ignition delay of the mixture. For cases with uncorrelated T-φfields, the mean HRR is more distributed over time compared to the corresponding cases with T\\' or φ\\' only. For negatively-correlated cases, however, the temporal evolution of the overall combustion exhibits quite non-monotonic behavior with increasing T\\' and φ\\' depending on T0. All of these characteristics are found to be primarily related to the 0-D ignition delays of initial mixtures, the relative timescales between 0-D ignition delay and turbulence, and the dominance of the deflagration mode during the ignition. These results suggest that an appropriate combination of T\\' and φ\\' together with a well-prepared T-φdistribution can alleviate an excessive pressure-rise rate (PRR) and control ignition-timing in homogeneous charge compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion. In addition, critical species and reactions for the ignition of n-heptane/air mixture through the whole ignition process are estimated by comparing the temporal evolution of the mean mass fractions of important species with the overall reaction pathways of n

  11. A Review on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition and Low Temperature Combustion by Optical Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical diagnostics is an effective method to understand the physical and chemical reaction processes in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI and low temperature combustion (LTC modes. Based on optical diagnostics, the true process on mixing, combustion, and emissions can be seen directly. In this paper, the mixing process by port-injection and direct-injection are reviewed firstly. Then, the combustion chemical reaction mechanism is reviewed based on chemiluminescence, natural-luminosity, and laser diagnostics. After, the evolution of pollutant emissions measured by different laser diagnostic methods is reviewed and the measured species including NO, soot, UHC, and CO. Finally, a summary and the future directions on HCCI and LTC used optical diagnostics are presented.

  12. An experimental and numerical analysis of the HCCI auto-ignition process of primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel in an engine, varying the engine parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr-I' Ecole (France); Gilbert, Philippe [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr-I' Ecole (France)

    2008-11-15

    For a future HCCI engine to operate under conditions that adhere to environmental restrictions, reducing fuel consumption and maintaining or increasing at the same time the engine efficiency, the choice of the fuel is crucial. For this purpose, this paper presents an auto-ignition investigation concerning the primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel, in order to study the effect of linear alkanes, branched alkanes and aromatics on the auto-ignition. The auto-ignition of these fuels has been studied at inlet temperatures from 25 to 120 C, at equivalence ratios from 0.18 to 0.53 and at compression ratios from 6 to 13.5, in order to extend the range of investigation and to assess the usability of these parameters to control the auto-ignition. It appeared that both iso-octane and toluene delayed the ignition with respect to n-heptane, while toluene has the strongest effect. This means that aromatics have higher inhibiting effects than branched alkanes. In an increasing order, the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio had a promoting effect on the ignition delays. A previously experimentally validated reduced surrogate mechanism, for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene, has been used to explain observations of the auto-ignition process. (author)

  13. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  14. Experimental investigation of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion of biodiesel fuel with external mixture formation in a CI engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, D; Nagarajan, G; Ganesan, S

    2014-01-01

    In parallel to the interest in renewable fuels, there has also been increased interest in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. HCCI engines are being actively developed because they have the potential to be highly efficient and to produce low emissions. Even though HCCI has been researched extensively, few challenges still exist. These include controlling the combustion at higher loads and the formation of a homogeneous mixture. To obtain better homogeneity, in the present investigation external mixture formation method was adopted, in which the fuel vaporiser was used to achieve excellent HCCI combustion in a single cylinder air-cooled direct injection diesel engine. In continuation of our previous works, in the current study a vaporised jatropha methyl ester (JME) was mixed with air to form a homogeneous mixture and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke to analyze the combustion, emission and performance characteristics. To control the early ignition of JME vapor-air mixture, cooled (30 °C) Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technique was adopted. The experimental result shows 81% reduction in NOx and 72% reduction in smoke emission.

  15. A comparative experimental study on engine operating on premixed charge compression ignition and compression ignition mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhiogade Girish E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New combustion concepts have been recently developed with the purpose to tackle the problem of high emissions level of traditional direct injection Diesel engines. A good example is the premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A strategy in which early injection is used causing a burning process in which the fuel burns in the premixed condition. In compression ignition engines, soot (particulate matter and NOx emissions are an extremely unsolved issue. Premixed charge compression ignition is one of the most promising solutions that combine the advantages of both spark ignition and compression ignition combustion modes. It gives thermal efficiency close to the compression ignition engines and resolves the associated issues of high NOx and particulate matter, simultaneously. Premixing of air and fuel preparation is the challenging part to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. In the present experimental study a diesel vaporizer is used to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A vaporized diesel fuel was mixed with the air to form premixed charge and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke. Low diesel volatility remains the main obstacle in preparing premixed air-fuel mixture. Exhaust gas re-circulation can be used to control the rate of heat release. The objective of this study is to reduce exhaust emission levels with maintaining thermal efficiency close to compression ignition engine.

  16. Influence of fuel type, dilution and equivalence ratio on the emission reduction from the auto-ignition in an Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, TIPs - Fluid Physics, CP165/67, 50 Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Amouroux, Jacques [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    One technology that seems to be promising for automobile pollution reduction is the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). This technology still faces auto-ignition and emission-control problems. This paper focuses on the emission problem, since it is incumbent to realize engines that pollute less. For this purpose, this paper presents results concerning the measurement of the emissions of CO, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbons. HCCI conditions are used, with equivalence ratios between 0.26 and 0.54, inlet temperatures of 70 C and 120 C and compression ratios of 10.2 and 13.5, with different fuel types: gasoline, gasoline surrogate, diesel, diesel surrogate and mixtures of n-heptane/toluene. The effect of dilution is considered for gasoline, while the effect of the equivalence ratio is considered for all the fuels. No significant amount of NO{sub x} has been measured. It appeared that the CO, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbon emissions were reduced by decreasing the toluene content of the fuel and by decreasing the dilution. The opposite holds for CO{sub 2}. The reduction of the hydrocarbon emission appears to compete with the reduction of the CO{sub 2} emission. Diesel seemed to produce less CO and hydrocarbons than gasoline when auto-ignited. An example of emission reduction control is presented in this paper. (author)

  17. Prechamber Compression-Ignition Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Charles S; Collins, John H , Jr

    1938-01-01

    Single-cylinder compression-ignition engine tests were made to investigate the performance characteristics of prechamber type of cylinder head. Certain fundamental variables influencing engine performance -- clearance distribution, size, shape, and direction of the passage connecting the cylinder and prechamber, shape of prechamber, cylinder clearance, compression ratio, and boosting -- were independently tested. Results of motoring and of power tests, including several typical indicator cards, are presented.

  18. Quasi-Dimensional Modelling and Parametric Studies of a Heavy-Duty HCCI Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Pandey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A quasi-dimensional modelling study is conducted for the first time for a heavy duty, diesel-fuelled, multicylinder engine operating in HCCI mode. This quasidimensional approach involves a zero-dimensional single-zone homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion model along with a one-dimensional treatment of the intake and exhaust systems. A skeletal chemical kinetic scheme for n-heptane was used in the simulations. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR and compression ratio (CR were the two parameters that were altered in order to deal with the challenges of combustion phasing control and operating load range extension. Results from the HCCI mode simulations show good potential when compared to conventional diesel performance with respect to important performance parameters such as peak firing pressure, specific fuel consumption, peak pressure rise, and combustion noise. This study shows that HCCI combustion mode can be employed at part load of 25% varying the EGR rates between 0 and 60%.

  19. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  20. Combustion Characteristics of C5 Alcohols and a Skeletal Mechanism for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2015-10-27

    C5 alcohols are considered alternative fuels because they emit less greenhouse gases and fewer harmful pollutants. In this study, the combustion characteristics of 2-methylbutanol (2-methyl-1-butanol) and isopentanol (3-methyl-1-butanol) and their mixtures with primary reference fuels (PRFs) were studied using a detailed chemical kinetic model obtained from merging previously published mechanisms. Ignition delay times of the C5 alcohol/air mixtures were compared to PRFs at 20 and 40 atm. Reaction path analyses were conducted at intermediate and high temperatures to identify the most influential reactions controlling ignition of C5 alcohols. The direct relation graph with expert knowledge methodology was used to eliminate unimportant species and reactions in the detailed mechanism, and the resulting skeletal mechanism was tested at various homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine combustion conditions. These simulations were used to investigate the heat release characteristics of the methyl-substituted C5 alcohols, and the results show relatively strong reactions at intermediate temperatures prior to hot ignition. C5 alcohol blending in PRF75 in HCCI combustion leads to a significant decrease of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) and a delay of the main combustion. The heat release features demonstrated by C5 alcohols can be used to improve the design and operation of advanced engine technologies.

  1. Effects of Direct Fuel Injection Strategies on Cycle-by-Cycle Variability in a Gasoline Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Sample Entropy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Hunicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we summarize and analyze experimental observations of cyclic variability in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion in a single-cylinder gasoline engine. The engine was configured with negative valve overlap (NVO to trap residual gases from prior cycles and thus enable auto-ignition in successive cycles. Correlations were developed between different fuel injection strategies and cycle average combustion and work output profiles. Hypothesized physical mechanisms based on these correlations were then compared with trends in cycle-by-cycle predictability as revealed by sample entropy. The results of these comparisons help to clarify how fuel injection strategy can interact with prior cycle effects to affect combustion stability and so contribute to design control methods for HCCI engines.

  2. HCCI Combustion Engines Final Report CRADA No. TC02032.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lyford-Pike, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cummins Engine Company (Cwnmins), to advance the state of the art on HomogeneousCharge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines, resulting in a clean, high-efficiency alternative to diesel engines.

  3. An experimental and numerical analysis of the HCCI auto-ignition process of primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel in an engine, varying the engine parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon; Gilbert, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    For a future HCCI engine to operate under conditions that adhere to environmental restrictions, reducing fuel consumption and maintaining or increasing at the same time the engine efficiency, the choice of the fuel is crucial. For this purpose, this paper presents an auto-ignition investigation concerning the primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel, in order to study the effect of linear alkanes, branched alkanes and aromatics on the auto-ignition. The auto-ignition o...

  4. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend. A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5 and 10% ethanol (E10 (in vol. under full load condition at variable engine speed ranging from 1000 to 2750 rpm with 250 rpm increment. The model was then validated with other researcher’s experimental result. Model consists of intake and exhaust systems, cylinder, head, valves and port geometries. Performance tests were conducted for volumetric efficiency, brake engine torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure, brake specific fuel consumption, and brake thermal efficiency, while exhaust emissions were analyzed for carbon monoxide (CO and unburned hydrocarbons (HC. The results showed that blending diesel with ethanol increases the volumetric efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while it decreases brake engine torque, brake power and brake mean effective pressure. In term of emission characteristics, the CO emissions concentrations in the engine exhaust decrease significantly with ethanol as additive. But for HC emission, its concentration increase when apply in high engine speed. In conclusion, using Ethanol as fuel additive blend with Diesel operating in HCCI shows a good result in term of performance and emission in low speed but not recommended to use in high speed engine. Ethanol-diesel blends need to researched more to make it commercially useable.

  5. AN EXPERIMENTAL NOX REDUCTION POTENTIAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PARTIAL HCCI APPLICATION, ON A HIGH PRESSURE FUEL INJECTION EQUIPPED DIESEL ENGINE BY IMPLEMENTING FUMIGATION OF GASOLINE PORT INJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    ERGENÇ, Alp Tekin; YÜKSEK, Levent; ÖZENER, Orkun; IŞIN, Övün

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the effects of partial HCCI (Homogeneous charge compression ignition) application on today's modern diesel engine tail pipe NOx emissions. Gasoline fumigation is supplied via a port fuel injection system located in the intake port of DI(Direct injection) diesel engine to maintain partial HCCI conditions and also diesel fuel injected directly into the combustion chamber before TDC(Top dead center). A single cylinder direct injection diesel research engine equipped w...

  6. Low Load Limit Extension for Gasoline Compression Ignition Using Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2018-04-03

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is widely studied for the benefits of simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO) and soot emissions without compromising the engine efficiency. Despite this advantage, the operational range for GCI is not widely expanded, as the auto-ignition of fuel at low load condition is difficult. The present study aims to extend the low load operational limit for GCI using negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy. The engine used for the current experimentation is a single cylinder diesel engine that runs at an idle speed of 800 rpm with a compression ratio of 17.3. The engine is operated at homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and partially premixed combustion (PPC) combustion modes with the corresponding start of injection (SOI) at 180 CAD (aTDC) and 30 CAD (aTDC), respectively. In the presented work, intake air temperature is used as control parameter to maintain combustion stability at idle and low load condition, while the intake air pressure is maintained at 1 bar (ambient). The engine is equipped with variable valve cam phasers that can phase both inlet and exhaust valves from the original timing. For the maximum cam phasing range (56 CAD) at a valve lift of 0.3 mm, the maximum allowable positive valve overlap was 20 CAD. In the present study, the exhaust cam is phased to 26 CAD and 6 CAD and the corresponding NVO is noted to be 10 CAD and 30 CAD, respectively. With exhaust cam phasing adjustment, the exhaust valve is closed early to retain hot residual gases inside the cylinder. As such, the in-cylinder temperature is increased and a reduction in the required intake air temperature to control combustion phasing is possible. For a constant combustion phasing of 3 CAD (aTDC), a minimum load of indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) = 1 bar is attained for gasoline (RON = 91) at HCCI and PPC modes. The coefficient of variance was observed to below 5% at these idle and low load conditions. At the minimum load point, the

  7. Variable valve timing in a homogenous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Keith E.; Faletti, James J.; Funke, Steven J.; Maloney, Ronald P.

    2004-08-03

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogenous charge compression ignition engines, in which fuel is injected when the cylinder piston is relatively close to the bottom dead center position for its compression stroke. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder during the compression stroke to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. The present invention utilizes internal exhaust gas recirculation and/or compression ratio control to control the timing of ignition events and combustion duration in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Thus, at least one electro-hydraulic assist actuator is provided that is capable of mechanically engaging at least one cam actuated intake and/or exhaust valve.

  8. Optical Study of Flow and Combustion in an HCCI Engine with Negative Valve Overlap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Trevor S [Jaguar Cars Ltd., Whitley Engineering Centre, Coventry. CV3 4LF (United Kingdom); Xu Hongming [Jaguar Cars Ltd., Whitley Engineering Centre, Coventry. CV3 4LF (United Kingdom); Richardson, Steve [Jaguar Cars Ltd., Whitley Engineering Centre, Coventry. CV3 4LF (United Kingdom); Wyszynski, Miroslaw L [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham. B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Megaritis, Thanos [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham. B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    One of the most widely used methods to enable Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion is using negative valve overlapping to trap a sufficient quantity of hot residual gas. The characteristics of air motion with specially designed valve events having reduced valve lift and durations associated with HCCI engines and their effect on subsequent combustion are not yet fully understood. In addition, the ignition process and combustion development in such engines are very different from those in conventional spark-ignition or diesel compression ignition engines. Very little data has been reported concerning optical diagnostics of the flow and combustion in the engine using negative valve overlapping. This paper presents an experimental investigation into the in-cylinder flow characteristics and combustion development in an optical engine operating in HCCI combustion mode. PIV measurements have been taken under motored engine conditions to provide a quantitative flow characterisation of negative valve overlap in-cylinder flows. The ignition and combustion process was imaged using a high resolution charge coupled device (CCD) camera and the combustion imaging data was supplemented by simultaneously recorded in-cylinder pressure data which assisted the analysis of the images. It is found that the flow characteristics with negative valve overlapping are less stable and more valve event driven than typical spark ignition in-cylinder flows, while the combustion initiation locations are not uniformly distributed.

  9. Study on gasoline HCCI engine equipped with electromagnetic variable valve timing system; Untersuchung an einem HCCI Verbrennungsmotor mit elektromagnetisch variablem Ventiltriebsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Y.; Awasaka, M.; Takanashi, J.; Kimura, N. [Honda R and D Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    First, this paper describes a study on the technology behind the electromagnetic variable valve timing system. This system provides highly efficient and stable valve opening/closing control. At first, the main purposes of this mechanism were nonthrottling technology that is expected to a reduction in fuel consumption and improving the engine torque with optimal valve timing on stichomythic spark ignited engine. In resent years, increasing attention has been paid to a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We also used this mechanism on HCCI study with controlling the amount of internal EGR and intake air. Schemes to extend the operational region of gasoline compression ignition were explored using single (optical) and 4-cylinder 4-stroke engines equipped with an electromagnetic variable valve timing system. This paper focuses mainly on the use of direct fuel injection devices (multi-hole and pintle types), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) through valve timing, and their effects on the compression ignition operating ranges, and emissions. Also considered is charge boost HCCI using a mechanical supercharger. (orig.)

  10. Use of a single-zone thermodynamic model with detailed chemistry to study a natural gas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junnian; Caton, Jerald A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Auto-ignition characteristics of a natural gas fueled HCCI engine. ► Engine speed had the greatest effect on the auto-ignition process. ► Increases of C 2 H 6 or C 3 H 8 improved the auto-ignition process. ► Engine performance was not sensitive to small changes in C 2 H 6 or C 3 H 8 . ► Nitric oxides concentrations decreased as engine speed or EGR level was increased. - Abstract: A single zone thermodynamic model with detailed chemical kinetics was used to simulate a natural gas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The model employed Chemkin and used chemical kinetics for natural gas with 53 species and 325 reactions. This simulation was used to complete analyses for a modified 0.4 L single cylinder engine. The engine possessed a compression ratio of 21.5:1, and had a bore and stroke of 86 and 75 mm, respectively. Several sets of parametric studies were completed to investigate the minimal initial temperature, engine performance, and nitric oxide emissions of HCCI engine operation. The results show significant changes in combustion characteristics with varying engine operating conditions. Effects of varying equivalence ratios (0.3–1.0), engine speeds (1000–4000 RPM), EGR (0–40%), and fuel compositions were determined and analyzed in detail. In particular, every 0.1 increase in equivalence ratio or 500 rpm increase in engine speed requires about a 5 K higher initial temperature for complete combustion, and leads to around 0.7 bar increase in IMEP.

  11. Dual-fuel HCCI operation with DME/LPG/gasoline/hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines include usage of the different type of fuels, ultra low nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions and improved fuel economy. Disadvantages include an excessive combustion rate, engine noise, and hydrocarbon and carbon emissions. An experiment on dual-fuel HCCI operation with dimethyl ether (DME)/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)/gasoline/hydrogen was presented. The advantages and disadvantages were first presented and the dual-fuel HCCI combustion engine was illustrated through an experimental apparatus. The experimental conditions were also presented in terms of engine speed, DME injection quantity, LPC injection quantity, and LPC composition. Experimental results were discussed for output performance and indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). It was concluded that the effect of LPG composition in a DME-LPG dual-fueled HCCI engine at various injection quantity and injective timing were observed. Specifically, it was found that propane was a more effective way to increase IMEP in this study, and that in a DME HCCI engine, higher load limit was extended by using LPG as an ignition inhibitor. tabs., figs.

  12. Controlling cyclic combustion timing variations using a symbol-statistics predictive approach in an HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazimirsaied, Ahmad; Koch, Charles Robert

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Misfire reduction in a combustion engine based on chaotic theory methods. ► Chaotic theory analysis of cyclic variation of a HCCI engine near misfire. ► Symbol sequence approach is used to predict ignition timing one cycle-ahead. ► Prediction is combined with feedback control to lower HCCI combustion variation. ► Feedback control extends the HCCI operating range into the misfire region. -- Abstract: Cyclic variation of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine near misfire is analyzed using chaotic theory methods and feedback control is used to stabilize high cyclic variations. Variation of consecutive cycles of θ Pmax (the crank angle of maximum cylinder pressure over an engine cycle) for a Primary Reference Fuel engine is analyzed near misfire operation for five test points with similar conditions but different octane numbers. The return map of the time series of θ Pmax at each combustion cycle reveals the deterministic and random portions of the dynamics near misfire for this HCCI engine. A symbol-statistic approach is used to predict θ Pmax one cycle-ahead. Predicted θ Pmax has similar dynamical behavior to the experimental measurements. Based on this cycle ahead prediction, and using fuel octane as the input, feedback control is used to stabilize the instability of θ Pmax variations at this engine condition near misfire.

  13. Effects of cetane number on HCCI combustion efficiency and emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, V.; Neill, W.S.; Guo, H.; Chippior, W.L. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Fairbridge, C. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Mitchell, K. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a form of internal combustion in which well-mixed fuel and oxidizer are compressed to the point of auto-ignition. This exothermic reaction releases chemical energy into a sensible form that can be transformed in an engine into work and heat. The effects of cetane number on HCCI combustion efficiency and emissions were examined in this presentation. The presentation discussed the experimental setup, fuels, experimental procedures, and results. The setup included an enhanced fuel injector/vaporizer consisting of an OEM gasoline port fuel injector, air blast for improved atomization, and heated section to improved vaporization. A minimally processed and low cetane number fuel derived from oil sands was used as the base fuel in the study. Two sets of experiments were devised and described to evaluate each test fuel. One set used controlled input conditions exhaust gas recirculation (EGR)-air-fuel ratio (AFR) while the other set employed controlled engine outputs (such as speed and load). Results were presented for hydroprocessing; cetane improver addition; blending with supercetane renewable diesel; and a comparison of fuels with similar cetane numbers. It was concluded that increasing the fuel cetane number shifted the AFR-EGR operating window for HCCI combustion towards higher AFT (leaner mixtures) and reduced the cyclic variations. tabs., figs.

  14. Reaction Mechanisms and HCCI Combustion Processes of Mixtures of n-Heptane and the Butanols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A reduced primary reference fuel (PRF-Alcohol-Di-tert-butyl Peroxide (DTBP mechanism with 108 species and 435 reactions, including sub-mechanisms of PRF, methanol, ethanol, DTBP and the four butanol isomers, is proposed for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine combustion simulations of butanol isomers/n-heptane mixtures. HCCI experiments fuelled with butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures on two different engines are conducted for the validation of proposed mechanism. The mechanism has been validated against shock tube ignition delays, laminar flame speeds, species profiles in premixed flames and engine HCCI combustion data, and good agreements with experimental results are demonstrated under various validation conditions. It is found that although the reactivity of neat tert-butanol is the lowest, mixtures of tert-butanol/n-heptane exhibit the highest reactivity among the butanol isomer/n-heptane mixtures if the n-heptane blending ratio exceeds 20% (mole. Kinetic analysis shows that the highest C-H bond energy in the tert-butanol molecule is partially responsible for this phenomenon. It is also found that the reaction tC4H9OH+CH3O2 =tC4H9O+CH3O2H plays important role and eventually produces the OH radical to promote the ignition and combustion. The proposed mechanism is able to capture HCCI combustion processes of the butanol/n-heptane mixtures under different operating conditions. In addition, the trend that tert-butanol /n-heptane has the highest reactivity is also captured in HCCI combustion simulations. The results indicate that the current mechanism can be used for HCCI engine predictions of PRF and alcohol fuels.

  15. Ohmic ignition of Neo-Alcator tokamak with adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Yuichi

    1992-01-01

    Ohmic ignition condition on axis of the DT tokamak plasma heated by minor radius and major radius adiabatic compression is studied assuming parabolic profiles for plasma parameters, elliptic plasma cross section, and Neo-Alcator confinement scaling. It is noticeable that magnetic compression reduces the necessary total plasma current for Ohmic ignition device. Typically in compact ignition tokamak of the minor radius of 0.47 m, major radius of 1.5 m and on-axis toroidal field of 20 T, the plasma current of 6.8 MA is sufficient for compression plasma, while that of 11.7 MA is for no compression plasma. Another example with larger major radius is also described. In such a device the large flux swing of Ohmic transformer is available for long burn. Application of magnetic compression saves the flux swing and thereby extends the burn time. (author)

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study of Jet Controlled Compression Ignition on Combustion Phasing Control in Diesel Premixed Compression Ignition Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Zhang; Wuqiang Long; Jiangping Tian; Yicong Wang; Xiangyu Meng

    2014-01-01

    In order to directly control the premixed combustion phasing, a Jet Controlled Compression Ignition (JCCI) for diesel premixed compression ignition systems is investigated. Experiments were conducted on a single cylinder natural aspirated diesel engine without EGR at 3000 rpm. Numerical models were validated by load sweep experiments at fixed spark timing. Detailed combustion characteristics were analyzed based on the BMEP of 2.18 bar. The simulation results showed that the high temperature j...

  17. Experimental optimization of a direct injection homogeneous charge compression ignition gasoline engine using split injections with fully automated microgenetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canakci, M. [Kocaeli Univ., Izmit (Turkey); Reitz, R.D. [Wisconsin Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is receiving attention as a new low-emission engine concept. Little is known about the optimal operating conditions for this engine operation mode. Combustion under homogeneous, low equivalence ratio conditions results in modest temperature combustion products, containing very low concentrations of NO{sub x} and particulate matter (PM) as well as providing high thermal efficiency. However, this combustion mode can produce higher HC and CO emissions than those of conventional engines. An electronically controlled Caterpillar single-cylinder oil test engine (SCOTE), originally designed for heavy-duty diesel applications, was converted to an HCCI direct injection (DI) gasoline engine. The engine features an electronically controlled low-pressure direct injection gasoline (DI-G) injector with a 60 deg spray angle that is capable of multiple injections. The use of double injection was explored for emission control and the engine was optimized using fully automated experiments and a microgenetic algorithm optimization code. The variables changed during the optimization include the intake air temperature, start of injection timing and the split injection parameters (per cent mass of fuel in each injection, dwell between the pulses). The engine performance and emissions were determined at 700 r/min with a constant fuel flowrate at 10 MPa fuel injection pressure. The results show that significant emissions reductions are possible with the use of optimal injection strategies. (Author)

  18. Autoignition characterization of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/n-butanol mixtures in a constant volume combustion device and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, Marc E.

    2013-12-19

    In this study, the autoignition behavior of primary reference fuels (PRF) and blends of n-heptane/n-butanol were examined in a Waukesha Fuel Ignition Tester (FIT) and a Homogeneous Charge Compression Engine (HCCI). Fourteen different blends of iso-octane, n-heptane, and n-butanol were tested in the FIT - 28 test runs with 25 ignition measurements for each test run, totaling 350 individual tests in all. These experimental results supported previous findings that fuel blends with high alcohol content can exhibit very different ignition delay periods than similarly blended reference fuels. The experiments further showed that n-butanol blends behaved unlike PRF blends when comparing the autoignition behavior as a function of the percentage of low reactivity component. The HCCI and FIT experimental results favorably compared against single and multizone models with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms - both an existing mechanism as well as one developed during this study were used. The experimental and modeling results suggest that that the FIT instrument is a valuable tool for analysis of high pressure, low temperature chemistry, and autoignition for future fuels in advanced combustion engines. Additionally, in both the FIT and engine experiments the fraction of low temperature heat release (fLTHR) was found to correlate very well with the crank angle of maximum heat release and shows promise as a useful metric for fuel reactivity in advanced combustion applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Investigation of a wet ethanol operated HCCI engine based on first and second law analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaliq, Abdul; Trivedi, Shailesh K.; Dincer, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a conceptual wet ethanol operated homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is proposed to shift the energy balance in favor of ethanol. The investigated option, HCCI engine is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Combined first and second law of thermodynamic approach is applied for a HCCI engine operating on wet ethanol and computational analysis is performed to investigate the effects of turbocharger compressor ratio, ambient temperature, and compressor adiabatic efficiency on first law efficiency, second law efficiency, and exergy destruction in each component. First law and second law efficiencies are found to be an increasing function of the turbocharger pressure ratio, while they are found to be a decreasing function of the ambient temperature. The effect of turbocharger pressure ratio on exergy destruction is found to be more significant than compressor efficiency and ambient temperature. Exergy analysis indicates that maximum exergy is destroyed in HCCI engine which represents about 90.09% of the total exergy destruction in the overall system. Around 4.39% exergy is destroyed by the process of heat transfer in fuel vaporizer and heat exchanger. Catalytic converter contributes about 4.08% of the total exergy destruction. This will provide some original information on the role of operating variables and will be quite useful in obtaining the optimum design of ethanol fuelled HCCI engines. - Highlights: → Direct utilization of wet ethanol in HCCI engines shift the energy balance in favor of ethanol. → First and second law efficiencies of wet ethanol operated HCCI engine increases with the increase in the turbocharger pressure ratio and its polytropic efficiency. → Second law analysis provides a suitable ranking among the components of the system in terms of exergy destruction. → Analysis of the results clearly showed that the highest irreversibility sources

  20. Investigation of spray characteristics from a low-pressure common rail injector for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kihyung; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2004-03-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion provides extremely low levels of pollutant emissions, and thus is an attractive alternative for future IC engines. In order to achieve a uniform mixture distribution within the engine cylinder, the characteristics of the fuel spray play an important role in the HCCI engine concept. It is well known that high-pressure common rail injection systems, mainly used in diesel engines, achieve poor mixture formation because of the possibility of direct fuel impingement on the combustion chamber surfaces. This paper describes spray characteristics of a low-pressure common rail injector which is intended for use in an HCCI engine. Optical diagnostics including laser diffraction and phase Doppler methods, and high-speed camera photography, were applied to measure the spray drop diameter and to investigate the spray development process. The drop sizing results of the laser diffraction method were compared with those of a phase Doppler particle analyser (PDPA) to validate the accuracy of the experiments. In addition, the effect of fuel properties on the spray characteristics was investigated using n-heptane, Stoddard solvent (gasoline surrogate) and diesel fuel because HCCI combustion is sensitive to the fuel composition. The results show that the injector forms a hollow-cone sheet spray rather than a liquid jet, and the atomization efficiency is high (small droplets are produced). The droplet SMD ranged from 15 to 30 µm. The spray break-up characteristics were found to depend on the fuel properties. The break-up time for n-heptane is shorter and the drop SMD is smaller than that of Stoddard solvent and diesel fuel.

  1. Hydrogen as an Auxiliary Fuel in Compression-Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Foster, H

    1936-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine whether a sufficient amount of hydrogen could be efficiently burned in a compression-ignition engine to compensate for the increase of lift of an airship due to the consumption of the fuel oil. The performance of a single-cylinder four-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine operating on fuel oil alone was compared with its performance when various quantities of hydrogen were inducted with the inlet air. Engine-performance data, indicator cards, and exhaust-gas samples were obtained for each change in engine-operating conditions.

  2. Flex Fuel Optimized SI and HCCI Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Guoming [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Schock, Harold [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Yang, Xiaojian [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Huisjen, Andrew [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Stuecken, Tom [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Moran, Kevin [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Zhen, Ren [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Zhang, Shupeng [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering; Opra, John [Chrysler Corporation, Auburn Hill, MI (United States); Reese, Ron [Chrysler Corporation, Auburn Hill, MI (United States)

    2013-12-20

    The central objective of the proposed work is to demonstrate an HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) capable SI (spark ignited) engine that is capable of fast and smooth mode transition between SI and HCCI combustion modes. The model-based control technique was used to develop and validate the proposed control strategy for the fast and smooth combustion mode transition based upon the developed control-oriented engine; and an HCCI capable SI engine was designed and constructed using production ready two-step valve-train with electrical variable valve timing actuating system. Finally, smooth combustion mode transition was demonstrated on a metal engine within eight engine cycles. The Chrysler turbocharged 2.0L I4 direct injection engine was selected as the base engine for the project and the engine was modified to fit the two-step valve with electrical variable valve timing actuating system. To develop the model-based control strategy for stable HCCI combustion and smooth combustion mode transition between SI and HCCI combustion, a control-oriented real-time engine model was developed and implemented into the MSU HIL (hardware-in-the-loop) simulation environment. The developed model was used to study the engine actuating system requirement for the smooth and fast combustion mode transition and to develop the proposed mode transition control strategy. Finally, a single cylinder optical engine was designed and fabricated for studying the HCCI combustion characteristics. Optical engine combustion tests were conducted in both SI and HCCI combustion modes and the test results were used to calibrate the developed control-oriented engine model. Intensive GT-Power simulations were conducted to determine the optimal valve lift (high and low) and the cam phasing range. Delphi was selected to be the supplier for the two-step valve-train and Denso to be the electrical variable valve timing system supplier. A test bench was constructed to develop control strategies for

  3. Experimental and Numerical Study of Jet Controlled Compression Ignition on Combustion Phasing Control in Diesel Premixed Compression Ignition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to directly control the premixed combustion phasing, a Jet Controlled Compression Ignition (JCCI for diesel premixed compression ignition systems is investigated. Experiments were conducted on a single cylinder natural aspirated diesel engine without EGR at 3000 rpm. Numerical models were validated by load sweep experiments at fixed spark timing. Detailed combustion characteristics were analyzed based on the BMEP of 2.18 bar. The simulation results showed that the high temperature jets of reacting active radical species issued from the ignition chamber played an important role on the onset of combustion in the JCCI system. The combustion of diesel pre-mixtures was initiated rapidly by the combustion products issued from the ignition chamber. Moreover, the flame propagation was not obvious, similar to that in Pre-mixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI. Consequently, spark timing sweep experiments were conducted. The results showed a good linear relationship between spark timing in the ignition chamber and CA10 and CA50, which indicated the ability for direct combustion phasing control in diesel PCCI. The NOx and soot emissions gradually changed with the decrease of spark advance angle. The maximum reduction of NOx and soot were both over 90%, and HC and CO emissions were increased.

  4. Evaluation of heat transfer correlations for HCCI engine modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soyhan, H.S.; Yasar, H.; Walmsley, H.; Head, B.; Kalghatgi, G.T.; Sorusbay, C.

    2009-01-01

    Combustion in HCCI engines is a controlled auto-ignition of well-mixed fuel, air and residual gas. The thermal conditions of the combustion chamber are governed by chemical kinetics strongly coupled with heat transfer from the hot gas to the walls. The heat losses have a critical effect on HCCI

  5. Numerical investigation of ethanol fuelled HCCI engine using stochastic reactor model. Part 2: Parametric study of performance and emissions characteristics using new reduced ethanol oxidation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Akhil, Nekkanti

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Newly developed reduced ethanol mechanism (47 species and 272 reactions) used. • Engine maps over wide range are developed for performance and emissions parameters. • HCCI operating range increases with compression ratio & decreases with engine speed. • Maximum combustion efficiency up to 99% and thermal efficiency up to 50% is achieved. • Maximum N_2O emission found up to 2.7 ppm and lower load have higher N_2O emission. - Abstract: Ethanol fuelled homogenous charge compression ignition engine offers a better alternative to tackle the problems of achieving higher engine efficiency and lower emissions using renewable fuel. Present study computationally investigates the HCCI operating range of ethanol at different compression ratios by varying inlet air temperature and engine speed using stochastic reactor model. A newly developed reduced ethanol oxidation mechanism with NO_x having 47 species and 272 reactions is used for simulation. HCCI operating range for compression ratios 17, 19 and 21 are investigated and found to be increasing with compression ratio. Simulations are conducted for engine speeds ranging from 1000 to 3000 rpm at different intake temperatures (range 365–465 K). Parametric study of combustion and emission characteristics is conducted and engine maps are developed at most efficient inlet temperatures. HCCI operating range is defined using combustion efficiency (>85%) and maximum pressure rise rate (<5 MPa/ms). In HCCI operating range, higher efficiency is found at higher engine loads and lower engine speeds. Emission characteristics of species (NO_x, N_2O, CO, CH_4, C_2H_4, C_2H_6, CH_3CHO, and HCHO) found in significant amount is also analysed for ethanol fulled HCCI engine. Emission maps for different species are presented and discussed for wide range of speed and load conditions. Some of unregulated species such as aldehydes are emitted in significantly higher quantities from ethanol fuelled HCCI engine at higher load

  6. Gasoline Engine HCCI Combustion - Extending the high load limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    There is an increasing global focus on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. For the automotive industry this means reducing CO2 emissions of the vehicles manufactured, which is synonymous with reducing their fuel consumption or adapting them for using renewable fuels. This thesis is based on a project aimed at improving the efficiency of gasoline engines in the lower load/speed region. The focus was mainly on a combustion strategy called homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), but also on homogeneous lean and stratified lean spark-ignited combustion. In contrast to traditional stoichiometric spark-ignited combustion, HCCI can operate with diluted mixtures, which leads to better cycle efficiency, smaller pumping losses and smaller heat losses. However, at relatively high loads, HCCI combustion becomes excessively rapid, generating in-cylinder pressure oscillations (ringing), which are perceived as noise by the human ear. The main objective of the project was to identify ways to avoid this ringing behaviour in order to increase the upper load limit of HCCI. This is vital to avoid the need for mode switches to spark-ignited combustion at higher loads and to operate the engine as much as possible in the more effective HCCI mode. The strategy for reducing ringing investigated most extensively in the project was charge stratification, achieved by injecting part of the fuel late in the compression stroke. Available literature on effects of this strategy gave conflicting indications, both positive and negative effects have been reported, depending on the type of fuel and engine used. It was soon found that the strategy is effective for reducing ringing, but with resulting increases of NOX emissions. Further, in order for the strategy to be effective, global air/fuel ratios must not be much leaner than stoichiometric. The increases in NOX emissions were countered by shifting the ratio towards stoichiometric using exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), allowing a three

  7. Low-Temperature Combustion of High Octane Fuels in a Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Duc Cung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gasoline compression ignition (GCI has been shown as one of the advanced combustion concepts that could potentially provide a pathway to achieve cleaner and more efficient combustion engines. Fuel and air in GCI are not fully premixed compared to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI, which is a completely kinetic-controlled combustion system. Therefore, the combustion phasing can be controlled by the time of injection, usually postinjection in a multiple-injection scheme, to mitigate combustion noise. Gasoline usually has longer ignition delay than diesel. The autoignition quality of gasoline can be indicated by research octane number (RON. Fuels with high octane tend to have more resistance to autoignition, hence more time for fuel-air mixing. In this study, three fuels, namely, aromatic, alkylate, and E30, with similar RON value of 98 but different hydrocarbon compositions were tested in a multicylinder engine under GCI combustion mode. Considerations of exhaust gas recirculating (EGR, start of injection, and boost were investigated to study the sensitivity of dilution, local stratification, and reactivity of the charge, respectively, for each fuel. Combustion phasing (location of 50% of fuel mass burned was kept constant during the experiments. This provides similar thermodynamic conditions to study the effect of fuels on emissions. Emission characteristics at different levels of EGR and lambda were revealed for all fuels with E30 having the lowest filter smoke number and was also most sensitive to the change in dilution. Reasonably low combustion noise (<90 dB and stable combustion (coefficient of variance of indicated mean effective pressure <3% were maintained during the experiments. The second part of this article contains visualization of the combustion process obtained from endoscope imaging for each fuel at selected conditions. Soot radiation signal from GCI combustion were strong during late injection and also more intense

  8. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another

  9. Standardized Gasoline Compression Ignition Fuels Matrix

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2018-04-03

    Direct injection compression ignition engines running on gasoline-like fuels have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition and diesel engines. The compression and lean combustion mode eliminates throttle losses yielding higher thermodynamic efficiencies and the better mixing of fuel/air due to the longer ignition delay times of the gasoline-like fuels allows better emission performance such as nitric oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). These gasoline-like fuels which usually have lower octane compared to market gasoline have been identified as a viable option for the gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engine applications due to its lower reactivity and lighter evaporation compared to diesel. The properties, specifications and sources of these GCI fuels are not fully understood yet because this technology is relatively new. In this work, a GCI fuel matrix is being developed based on the significance of certain physical and chemical properties in GCI engine operation. Those properties were chosen to be density, temperature at 90 volume % evaporation (T90) or final boiling point (FBP) and research octane number (RON) and the ranges of these properties were determined from the data reported in literature. These proposed fuels were theoretically formulated, while applying realistic constraints, using species present in real refinery streams. Finally, three-dimensional (3D) engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using the proposed GCI fuels and the similarities and differences were highlighted.

  10. Standardized Gasoline Compression Ignition Fuels Matrix

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Bakor, Radwan; AlRamadan, Abdullah; Almansour, Mohammed; Sim, Jaeheon; Ahmed, Ahfaz; Viollet, Yoann; Chang, Junseok

    2018-01-01

    Direct injection compression ignition engines running on gasoline-like fuels have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition and diesel engines. The compression and lean combustion mode eliminates throttle losses yielding higher thermodynamic efficiencies and the better mixing of fuel/air due to the longer ignition delay times of the gasoline-like fuels allows better emission performance such as nitric oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). These gasoline-like fuels which usually have lower octane compared to market gasoline have been identified as a viable option for the gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engine applications due to its lower reactivity and lighter evaporation compared to diesel. The properties, specifications and sources of these GCI fuels are not fully understood yet because this technology is relatively new. In this work, a GCI fuel matrix is being developed based on the significance of certain physical and chemical properties in GCI engine operation. Those properties were chosen to be density, temperature at 90 volume % evaporation (T90) or final boiling point (FBP) and research octane number (RON) and the ranges of these properties were determined from the data reported in literature. These proposed fuels were theoretically formulated, while applying realistic constraints, using species present in real refinery streams. Finally, three-dimensional (3D) engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using the proposed GCI fuels and the similarities and differences were highlighted.

  11. Identification of the dynamic operating envelope of HCCI engines using class imbalance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Nguyen, XuanLong; Sterniak, Jeff; Assanis, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a futuristic automotive engine technology that can significantly improve fuel economy and reduce emissions. HCCI engine operation is constrained by combustion instabilities, such as knock, ringing, misfires, high-variability combustion, and so on, and it becomes important to identify the operating envelope defined by these constraints for use in engine diagnostics and controller design. HCCI combustion is dominated by complex nonlinear dynamics, and a first-principle-based dynamic modeling of the operating envelope becomes intractable. In this paper, a machine learning approach is presented to identify the stable operating envelope of HCCI combustion, by learning directly from the experimental data. Stability is defined using thresholds on combustion features obtained from engine in-cylinder pressure measurements. This paper considers instabilities arising from engine misfire and high-variability combustion. A gasoline HCCI engine is used for generating stable and unstable data observations. Owing to an imbalance in class proportions in the data set, the models are developed both based on resampling the data set (by undersampling and oversampling) and based on a cost-sensitive learning method (by overweighting the minority class relative to the majority class observations). Support vector machines (SVMs) and recently developed extreme learning machines (ELM) are utilized for developing dynamic classifiers. The results compared against linear classification methods show that cost-sensitive nonlinear ELM and SVM classification algorithms are well suited for the problem. However, the SVM envelope model requires about 80% more parameters for an accuracy improvement of 3% compared with the ELM envelope model indicating that ELM models may be computationally suitable for the engine application. The proposed modeling approach shows that HCCI engine misfires and high-variability combustion can be predicted ahead of time

  12. Thermodynamic control-oriented modeling of cycle-to-cycle exhaust gas temperature in an HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghani Firoozabadi, M.; Shahbakhti, M.; Koch, C.R.; Jazayeri, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • First thermodynamic model in the literature to predict exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. • The model can be used for integrated control of HCCI combustion and exhaust temperature. • The model is experimentally validated at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. • Results show a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust temperatures. • Sensitivity of exhaust gas temperature to variation of engine variables is shown. - Abstract: Model-based control of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine exhaust temperature is a viable solution to optimize efficiency of both engine and the exhaust aftertreatment system. Low exhaust temperature in HCCI engines can limit the abatement of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in an exhaust aftertreatment system. A physical–empirical model is described for control of exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. This model captures cycle-to-cycle dynamics affecting exhaust temperature and is based on thermodynamic relations and semi-empirical correlations. It incorporates intake and exhaust gas flow dynamics, residual gas mixing, and fuel burn rate and is validated with experimental data from a single cylinder engine at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. The validation results indicate a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust gas temperature

  13. Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Voss, Fred

    1932-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the influence of fuel quality, injection advance angle, injection valve-opening pressure, inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed on the time lag of auto-ignition of a Diesel fuel oil in a single-cylinder compression-ignition engine as obtained from an analysis of indicator diagrams. Three cam-operated fuel-injection pumps, two pumps cams, and an automatic injection valve with two different nozzles were used. Ignition lag was considered to be the interval between the start of injection of the fuel as determined with a Stroborama and the start of effective combustion as determined from the indicator diagram, the latter being the point where 4.0 x 10(exp-6) pound of fuel had been effectively burned. For this particular engine and fuel it was found that: (1) for a constant start and the same rate of fuel injection up the point of cut-off, a variation in fuel quantity from 1.2 x 10(exp-4) to 4.1 x 10(exp-4) pound per cycle has no appreciable effect on the ignition lag; (2) injection advance angle increases or decreases the lag according to whether density, temperature, or turbulence has the controlling influence; (3) increase in valve-opening pressure slightly increases the lag; and (4) increase of inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed reduces the lag.

  14. Comparative study of oxihydrogen injection in turbocharged compression ignition engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barna, L.; Lelea, D.

    2018-01-01

    This document proposes for analysis, comparative study of the turbocharged, compression-ignition engine, equipped with EGR valve, operation in case the injection in intake manifold thereof a maximum flow rate of 1l/min oxyhydrogen resulted of water electrolysis, at two different injection pressures, namely 100 Pa and 3000 Pa, from the point of view of flue gas opacity. We found a substantial reduction of flue gas opacity in both cases compared to conventional diesel operation, but in different proportions.

  15. A new technology to overcome the limits of HCCI engine through fuel modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahng, GunWoong; Jang, Dongsoon; Kim, Youngtae; Shin, Misoo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Problems of HCCI engine can be overcome by adopting fuel modification. • Gasoline vapor with HHO gas showed drastic improvement of fuel efficiency. • Performance of single cylinder engine shows fuel efficiency more than double. - Abstract: The energy efficiency of internal combustion engine reached to about 30% only recently. To increase the efficiency, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) has been proposed, however, there is no available commercial engine yet. The main problem lies in the delayed heating rate in spite of fast reaction of homogeneous charged state of HCCI with excess air. To overcome this difficulty, a modification of fuel by vaporization of liquid gasoline with water electrolysis gas and air was adopted in order to warrant the fast and high temperature rise. Experiments were carried out with single cylinder engines supplied from the four different manufacturers. Experimental results show that fuel consumption was decreased by more than 50% compared to the case of supplying liquid fuel. It is believed it was due to the combined effects of the high and fast heating potential of water electrolysis gas together with the efficient turbulence mixing effect of vaporized fuel with excess air. By this method, the drawbacks caused by lean burn in the HCCI engine such as small power range can be overcome.

  16. GM's HCCI. In-vehicle experience with a future combustion system; GM's HCCI. Erfahrungen mit einem zukuenftigen Verbrennungssystem im Fahrzeugeinsatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritze, Stefan; Koenigstein, Achim [Adam Opel GmbH, Ruesselsheim (Germany); Rayl, Allen; Chang, Chen-Fang; Najt, Paul; Grebe, Uwe D. [General Motors LLC, Warren/Ponitac, MI (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) stands at General Motors (GM) for the auto-ignition of a homogeneous air-fuel mixture in a gasoline engine. HCCI enables unthrottle operation under part load conditions with the high potential for fuel consumption reduction at lowest NO{sub x} emission levels even with lean mixtures. It is capable to use worldwide available fuel qualities with conventional exhaust aftertreatment. Important requirements for the application in a vehicle are the realization of a large usable steady state map covering lowest engine loads including idle operation and an outstanding transient combustion performance in terms of robustness and responsiveness. The prerequisites to achieve this were set based on a spray-guided gasoline direct injection with a strategy to control the residuals by trapping and recompressing them in the combustion chamber and sensing of individual cylinder pressure. The main characteristics of the combustion system will be discussed. The application in a vehicle sets new targets in terms of engine controller requirements and the complexity of the control algorithms. Considering only indirect control of combustion being very sensitive against extraneous impacts, it becomes extremely challenging to realize robust transitions among the various operation modes. The results achieved with the integration of the presented HCCI combustion system in prototype vehicles of the midsize segment support the chosen development path. Further improvements can be expected considering the latest achievements of the combustion system development. (orig.)

  17. Optimization of operating conditions in the early direct injection premixed charge compression ignition regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, M.D.; Luijten, C.C.M.; Rijk, E.P.; Albrecht, B.A.; Baert, R.S.G.

    2009-01-01

    Early Direct Injection Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (EDI PCCI) is a widely researched combustion concept, which promises soot and CO2 emission levels of a spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engine, respectively. Application of this concept to a conventional CI engine using a

  18. A numerical study of HCCI combustion of PRF mixtures compared with PCCI experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wijngaarden, B.

    2008-09-15

    For automotive applications engines that produce less soot and NOx are desired. For that reason the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) principle is investigated all over the world, including the technical universities of Berlin (TUB) and Eindhoven. HCCI combines a homogeneous charge, as in an Otto engine with the autoignition principle of a Diesel engine. Auto-ignition and almost instantaneous combustion of a homogeneous charge leads to almost zero soot emissions, lower temperatures and thereby much lower NOx emissions. Auto-ignition timing however, depends on the fuel and its chemistry, which is very sensitive to the applied conditions, being pressure, temperature, equivalence ratio ({phi}), dilution with EGR and engine speed. To study this systematically a 0D model with PRF fuels is used (Primary Reference Fuels are n-heptane, iso-octane and mixtures). A 0D model is chosen because it excludes complex fluid dynamics and thereby allows the use of detailed combustion mechanisms, describing the (PRF) chemistry. Furthermore the model has a multi zone possibility to evaluate in-homogeneities of the charge. PRF fuels are used because n-heptane (CN=55) auto-ignites like a diesel and iso-octane (ON=100) approaches gasoline. For the PRF chemistry three combustion mechanisms were selected, of which two were validated showing a great difference in predicted ignition delay and sensitivity to changes. Furthermore the model was validated with a PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) experiment. Extensive comparisons with PCCI experiments from the TUB showed that when the moment of injection was used to launch the chemistry in the model, only the Soyhan mechanism predicted the ignition close to the experimental ignition moment. Furthermore a 7 zone model was able to approach the experimental CO and NOX emissions. Finally none of the mechanisms was able to predict a pressure profile similar to the experiments. More zones and or a better mechanism could improve

  19. Development of a new reduced hydrogen combustion mechanism with NO_x and parametric study of hydrogen HCCI combustion using stochastic reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Akhil, Nekkanti

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PDF based stochastic reactor model used for study of hydrogen HCCI engine. • New reduced hydrogen combustion mechanism with NOx developed (30 species and 253 reactions). • Mechanism predicts cylinder pressure and captures NO_x emission trend with sufficient accuracy. • Parametric study of hydrogen HCCI engine over wide range of speed and load conditions. • Hydrogen HCCI operating range increases with compression ratio & decreases with engine speed. - Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential alternative and renewable fuel for homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine to achieve higher efficiency and zero emissions of CO, unburned hydrocarbons as well as other greenhouse gases such as CO_2 and CH_4. In this study, a detailed hydrogen oxidation mechanism with NO_x was developed by incorporating additional species and NO_x reactions to the existing hydrogen combustion mechanism (10 species and 40 reactions). The detailed hydrogen combustion mechanism used in this study consists of 39 species and 311 reactions. A reduced mechanism consisting 30 species and 253 reactions was also developed by using directed relation graph (DRG) method from detailed mechanism. Developed mechanisms were validated with experimental data by HCCI engine simulation using stochastic reactor model. Sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the most important reactions in hydrogen combustion and NO_x formation in HCCI engine. Pathway analysis was also performed to analyze the important reaction pathways at different temperatures. Results revealed that H2 + HO2 [=] H + H2O2 and O2 + NNH [=] N2 + HO2 are the most significant reactions in the hydrogen HCCI combustion and NO_x formation respectively. Detailed parametric study of HCCI combustion was conducted using developed chemical kinetic model. Numerical simulations are performed at different engine operating condition by varying engine speed (1000–3000 rpm), intake air temperature (380–460 K), and compression

  20. Physical and chemical effects of low octane gasoline fuels on compression ignition combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Viollet, Yoann; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Im, Hong G.; Chang, Junseok

    2016-01-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines running on low octane gasoline fuels are considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. In this study, three fuels with different chemical and physical characteristics have

  1. Establishment of Combustion Model for Isooctane HCCI Marine Diesel Engine and Research on the Combustion Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Biao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion mode applied in marine diesel engine is expected to be one of alternative technologies to decrease nitrogen oxide (NOX emission and improve energy utilization rate. Applying the chemical-looping combustion (CLC mechanism inside the cylinder, a numerical study on the HCCI combustion process is performed taking a marine diesel engine as application object. The characteristic feature of combustion process is displayed. On this basis, the formation and emission of NOX are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate that the HCCI combustion mode always exhibit two combustion releasing heats: low-temperature reaction and high-temperature reaction. The combustion phase is divided into low-temperature reaction zone, high-temperature reaction zone and negative temperature coefficient (NTC zone. The operating conditions of the high compression ratio, high intake air temperature, low inlet pressure and small excess air coefficient would cause the high in-cylinder pressure which often leads engine detonation. The low compression ratio, low intake air temperature and big excess air coefficient would cause the low combustor temperature which is conducive to reduce NOX emissions. These technological means and operating conditions are expected to meet the NOX emissions limits in MARPOL73/78 Convention-Annex VI Amendment.

  2. Application of Dimethyl Ether in Compression Ignition Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene

    -Marathon. The diesel engine test results from 1995 showed that DME is a superb diesel fuel. DME is easy to ignite by compression ignition and it has a molecular structure that results in near-zero emission of particulates when burned. These are features of a fuel that are highly desirable in a diesel engine....... The challenges with DME as a diesel engine fuel are mainly related to poor lubricity and incompatibility with a range of elastomers commonly used for seals in fuel injection systems. This means that although DME burns well in a diesel engine designing a fuel injection system for DME is challenging. Since...... then studies have revealed that the injection pressure for DME does not have to be as high as with diesel to achieve satisfactory performance. This opens for a larger range of possibilities when designing injection systems. In the period from 2004 to 2009 the DME engine was perfected for use in the car DTU...

  3. Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M

    1933-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine the factors which control the combustion in a high-speed compression-ignition engine is presented. Indicator cards were taken with the Farnboro indicator and analyzed according to the tangent method devised by Schweitzer. The analysis show that in a quiescent combustion chamber increasing the time lag of auto-ignition increases the maximum rate of combustion. Increasing the maximum rate of combustion increases the tendency for detonation to occur. The results show that by increasing the air temperature during injection the start of combustion can be forced to take place during injection and so prevent detonation from occurring. It is shown that the rate of fuel injection does not in itself control the rate of combustion.

  4. Development of a simulation model for compression ignition engine running with ignition improved blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshkumar Ponnusamy Moranahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Automobile Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India. The present work describes the thermodynamic and heat transfer models used in a computer program which simulates the diesel fuel and ignition improver blend to predict the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with ignition improver blend using classical two zone approach. One zone consists of pure air called non burning zone and other zone consist of fuel and combustion products called burning zone. First law of thermodynamics and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield cylinder temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. Using the two zone combustion model the combustion parameters and the chemical equilibrium composition were determined. To validate the model an experimental investigation has been conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 12% by volume of 2- ethoxy ethanol blend with diesel fuel. Addition of ignition improver blend to diesel fuel decreases the exhaust smoke and increases the thermal efficiency for the power outputs. It was observed that there is a good agreement between simulated and experimental results and the proposed model requires low computational time for a complete run.

  5. Using gasoline in an advanced compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cracknell, R.F.; Ariztegui, J.; Dubois, T.; Hamje, H.D.C.; Pellegrini, L.; Rickeard, D.J.; Rose, K.D. [CONCAWE, Brussels (Belgium); Heuser, B. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Combustion Engines; Schnorbus, T.; Kolbeck, A.F. [FEV GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    Future vehicles will be required to improve their efficiency, reduce both regulated and CO{sub 2} emissions, and maintain acceptable driveability, safety, and noise. To achieve this overall performance, they will be configured with more advanced hardware, sensors, and control technologies that will also enable their operation on a broader range of fuel properties. Fuel flexibility has already been demonstrated in previous studies on a compression ignition bench engine and a demonstration vehicle equipped with an advanced engine management system, closed-loop combustion control, and air-path control strategies. An unresolved question is whether engines of this sort can also operate on market gasoline while achieving diesel-like efficiency and acceptable emissions and noise levels. In this study, a compression ignition bench engine having a higher compression ratio, optimised valve timing, advanced engine management system, and flexible fuel injection could be operated on a European gasoline over full to medium part loads. The combustion was sensitive to EGR rates, however, and optimising all emissions and combustion noise was a considerable challenge at lower loads. (orig.)

  6. DETAILED CHEMICAL KINETIC MODELING OF ISO-OCTANE SI-HCCI TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havstad, M A; Aceves, S M; McNenly, M J; Piggott, W T; Edwards, K D; Wagner, R M; Daw, C S; Finney, C A

    2009-10-12

    The authors describe a CHEMKIN-based multi-zone model that simulates the expected combustion variations in a single-cylinder engine fueled with iso-octane as the engine transitions from spark-ignited (ST) combustion to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. The model includes a 63-species reaction mechanism and mass and energy balances for the cylinder and the exhaust flow. For this study they assumed that the SI-to-HCCI transition is implemented by means of increasing the internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) at constant engine speed. This transition scneario is consistent with that implemented in previously reported experimental measurements on an experimental engine equipped with variable valve actuation. They find that the model captures many of the important experimental trends, including stable SI combustion at low EGR ({approx} 0.10), a transition to highly unstable combustion at intermediate EGR, and finally stable HCCI combustion at very high EGR ({approx} 0.75). Remaining differences between the predicted and experimental instability patterns indicate that there is further room for model improvement.

  7. Analysis of benefits of using internal exhaust gas recirculation in biogas-fueled HCCI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozarac, Darko; Vuilleumier, David; Saxena, Samveg; Dibble, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The influence of EGR on combustion of biogas fueled HCCI was investigated. • The aim was to reduce intake temperature requirement by internal EGR. • Combustion products caused the delay of combustion in similar conditions. • Internal EGR enabled by negative valve overlap increased cylinder temperature. • This increase was not enough to significantly reduce the intake temperature. - Abstract: This paper describes a numerical study that analyzed the influence of combustion products (CP) concentration on the combustion characteristics (combustion timing and combustion duration) of a biogas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine and the possibility of reducing the high intake temperature requirement necessary for igniting biogas in a HCCI engine by using internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) enabled by negative valve overlap (NVO). An engine model created in AVL Boost, and validated against experimental engine data, was used in this study. The results show, somewhat counter-intuitively, that when CP concentrations are increased the required intake temperature for maintaining the same combustion timing must be increased. When greater NVO is used to increase the in-cylinder CP concentration, the in-cylinder temperature does increase, but the chemical dilution influence of CP almost entirely counteracts this thermal effect. Additionally, it has been observed that with larger fractions of CP some instability of combustion in the calculation was obtained which indicates that the increase of internal EGR might produce some combustion instability

  8. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a dual fuel compression ignition engine operated with pilot Diesel fuel and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannakis, R.G.; Hountalas, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. These engines are known as dual fuel combustion engines, i.e. they use conventional Diesel fuel and a gaseous fuel as well. This technology is currently reintroduced, associated with efforts to overcome various difficulties of HCCI engines, using various fuels. The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using natural gas in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high autoignition temperature of natural gas is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under dual fuel conditions. The primary amount of fuel is the gaseous one, which is ignited by a pilot Diesel liquid injection. Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and dual fuel operation, revealing the effect of dual fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions

  9. Use of catalytic reforming to aid natural gas HCCI combustion in engines: experimental and modelling results of open-loop fuel reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peucheret, S.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Lehrle, R.S. [Future Power Systems Group, Mechanical Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Golunski, S. [Johnson Matthey, Technology Centre, Blount' s Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); Xu, H. [Jaguar Land Rover Research, Jaguar Land Rover W/2/021, Abbey Road, Coventry CV3 4LF (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    The potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process to deliver drastically reduced emissions of NO{sub x} and improved fuel economy from internal combustion engines is well known. The process is, however, difficult to initiate and control, especially when methane or natural gas are used as fuel. To aid the HCCI combustion of natural gas, hydrogen addition has been successfully used in this study. This hydrogen can be obtained from on-line reforming of natural gas. Methane reforming is achieved here by reaction with engine exhaust gas and air in a small scale monolith catalytic reactor. The benchmark quantity of H{sub 2} required to enhance the feasibility and engine load range of HCCI combustion is 10%. For low temperature engine exhaust gas, typical for HCCI engine operating conditions, experiments show that additional air is needed to produce this quantity. Experimental results from an open-loop fuel exhaust gas reforming system are compared with two different models of basic thermodynamic equilibria calculations. At the low reactor inlet temperatures needed for the HCCI application (approx. 400 deg C) the simplified three-reaction thermodynamic equilibrium model is in broad agreement with experimental results, while for medium (550-650 deg C) inlet temperature reforming with extra air added, the high hydrogen yields predicted from the multi-component equilibrium model are difficult to achieve in a practical reformer. (author)

  10. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D 3 He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D 3 He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R cm ) from the downshift of the shock-produced D 3 He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR

  11. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  12. Dynamic control of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Mehresh, Parag [Peoria, IL; Schuh, David [Peoria, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL

    2008-06-03

    A homogenous charge compression ignition engine is operated by compressing a charge mixture of air, exhaust and fuel in a combustion chamber to an autoignition condition of the fuel. The engine may facilitate a transition from a first combination of speed and load to a second combination of speed and load by changing the charge mixture and compression ratio. This may be accomplished in a consecutive engine cycle by adjusting both a fuel injector control signal and a variable valve control signal away from a nominal variable valve control signal. Thereafter in one or more subsequent engine cycles, more sluggish adjustments are made to at least one of a geometric compression ratio control signal and an exhaust gas recirculation control signal to allow the variable valve control signal to be readjusted back toward its nominal variable valve control signal setting. By readjusting the variable valve control signal back toward its nominal setting, the engine will be ready for another transition to a new combination of engine speed and load.

  13. Combustion characteristics of compressed natural gas/diesel dual-fuel turbocharged compressed ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenghua, L.; Longbao, Z.; Ziyan, W.; Jiang, R. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ. (China). Dept. of Automotive Engineering

    2003-09-01

    The combustion characteristics of a turbocharged natural gas and diesel dual-fuelled compression ignition (CI) engine are investigated. With the measured cylinder pressures of the engine operated on pure diesel and dual fuel, the ignition delay, effects of pilot diesel and engine load on combustion characteristics are analysed. Emissions of HC, CO, NO{sub x} and smoke are measured and studied too. The results show that the quantity of pilot diesel has important effects on the performance and emissions of a dual-fuel engine at low-load operating conditions. Ignition delay varies with the concentration of natural gas. Smoke is much lower for the developed dual-fuel engine under all the operating conditions. (Author)

  14. Development of compressed natural gas/diesel dual-fuel turbocharged compressed ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenghua, L.; Ziyan, W.; Jiang, R. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ. (China). Dept. of Automotive Engineering

    2003-09-01

    A natural gas and diesel dual-fuel turbocharged compression ignition (CI) engine is developed to reduce emissions of a heavy-duty diesel engine. The compressed natural gas (CNG) pressure regulator is specially designed to feed back the boost pressure to simplify the fuel metering system. The natural gas bypass improves the engine response to acceleration. The modes of diesel injection are set according to the engine operating conditions. The application of honeycomb mixers changes the flowrate shape of natural gas and reduces hydrocarbon (HC) emission under low-load and lowspeed conditions. The cylinder pressures of a CI engine fuelled with diesel and dual fuel are analysed. The introduction of natural gas makes the ignition delay change with engine load. Under the same operating conditions, the emissions of smoke and NO{sub x} from the dual-fuel engine are both reduced. The HC and CO emissions for the dual-fuel engine remain within the range of regulation. (Author)

  15. Performance Characterization and Auto-Ignition Performance of a Rapid Compression Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A rapid compression machine (RCM test bench is developed in this study. The performance characterization and auto-ignition performance tests are conducted at an initial temperature of 293 K, a compression ratio of 9.5 to 16.5, a compressed temperature of 650 K to 850 K, a driving gas pressure range of 0.25 MPa to 0.7 MPa, an initial pressure of 0.04 MPa to 0.09 MPa, and a nitrogen dilution ratio of 35% to 65%. A new type of hydraulic piston is used to address the problem in which the hydraulic buffer adversely affects the rapid compression process. Auto-ignition performance tests of the RCM are then performed using a DME–O2–N2 mixture. The two-stage ignition delay and negative temperature coefficient (NTC behavior of the mixture are observed. The effects of driving gas pressure, compression ratio, initial pressure, and nitrogen dilution ratio on the two-stage ignition delay are investigated. Results show that both the first-stage and overall ignition delays tend to increase with increasing driving gas pressure. The driving gas pressure within a certain range does not significantly influence the compressed pressure. With increasing compression ratio, the first-stage ignition delay is shortened, whereas the second-stage ignition delay is extended. With increasing initial pressure, both the first-stage and second-stage ignition delays are shortened. The second-stage ignition delay is shortened to a greater extent than that of the first-stage. With increasing nitrogen dilution ratio, the first-stage ignition delay is shortened, whereas the second-stage is extended. Thus, overall ignition delay presents different trends under various compression ratios and compressed pressure conditions.

  16. A comparison of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) strategies at high load, low speed conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavuri, Chaitanya; Paz, Jordan; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Targeting high load-low speed, optimizations of RCCI and GCI strategies were performed. • The two strategies were compared in terms of performance, controllability and stability. • The optimum cases had high gross indicated efficiency (∼47%) and low NOx emissions. • RCCI strategy showed better combustion control but had higher soot emissions. • GCI strategy was relatively more sensitive to fluctuations in charge conditions. - Abstract: Past research has shown that Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) combustion are promising approaches to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions. However, the benefits have generally been confined to mid-load operating conditions. To enable practical application, these approaches must be able to operate over the entire engine map. A particularly challenging area is high load, low speed operation. Accordingly, the present work uses detailed CFD modeling and engine experiments to compare RCCI and GCI combustion strategies at a high load, low speed condition. Computational optimizations of RCCI and GCI combustion were performed at 20 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and 1300 rev/min. The optimum points from the two combustion strategies were verified using engine experiments and were used to make the comparisons between RCCI and GCI combustion. The comparison showed that both the strategies had very similar combustion characteristics with a near top dead center injection initiating combustion. A parametric study was performed to identify the key input parameters that control combustion for the RCCI and GCI strategies. For both strategies, the combustion phasing could be controlled by the start of injection (SOI) timing of the near TDC injection. The short ignition delay of diesel fuel gave the RCCI strategy better control over combustion than the GCI strategy, but also had a simultaneous tradeoff with soot emissions. With the GCI

  17. Direct Injection Compression Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Carl L

    2006-09-25

    The underlying goal of this prqject was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome teclmological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the U.S. market. Fu1iher, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive teclmologies. Eight objectives were defmed to accomplish this goal: 1. Develop an interdisciplinary internal co1nbustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. 2. Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. 3. Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary cuniculum. 4. Promote strong interaction with indusuy, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. 5. Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. 6. Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. 7. Establish 'off-campus' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various indusuial sites. 8. Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

  18. Approaches to Improve Mixing in Compression Ignition Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boot, M.D.

    2010-04-20

    This thesis presents three approaches to suppress soot emissions in compression ignition (CI) engines. First, a fuel chemistry approach is proposed. A particular class of fuels - cyclic oxygenates - is identified which is capable of significantly reducing engine-out soot emissions. By means of experiments in 'closed' and optical engines, as well as on an industrial burner, two possible mechanisms are identified that could account for the observed reduction in soot: a) an extended ignition delay (ID) and b) a longer flame lift-length (FLoL). Further analysis of the available data suggests that both mechanisms are related to the inherently low reactivity of the fuel class in question. These findings are largely in line with data found in literature. In the second approach, it is attempted to reduce soot by adopting an alternative combustion concept: early direct injection premixed charge compression ignition (EDI PCCI). In this concept, fuel is injected relatively early in the compression stroke instead of conventional, close to top-dead-center (TDC), injection schemes. While the goal of soot reduction can indeed be achieved via this approach, an important drawback must be addressed before this concept can be considered practically viable. Due to the fact that combustion chamber temperature and pressure is relatively low early in the compression stroke, fuel impingement against the cylinder liner (wall-wetting) often occurs. Consequently, high levels of unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), oil dilution and poor efficiency are observed. Several strategies, combining a limited engine modification with dedicated air management and fueling settings, are investigated to tackle this drawback. All of these strategies, and especially their combination, resulted in significantly lower UHC emissions and improved fuel economy. Although UHC emissions are typically a tell-tale sign of wall-wetting, as mentioned earlier, the relation between these two has long been hypothetical

  19. Blending Octane Number of Ethanol on a Volume and Molar Basis in SI and HCCI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad Umer; Morganti, Kai; Masurier, Jean-Baptiste; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    The blending behavior of ethanol in five different hydrocarbon base fuels with octane numbers of approximately 70 and 84 was examined under Spark-Ignited (SI) and Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignited (HCCI) operating conditions. The Blending octane number (BON) was used to characterize the blending behavior on both a volume and molar basis. Previous studies have shown that the blending behavior of ethanol generally follows several well-established rules. In particular, non-linear blending effects are generally observed on a volume basis (i.e. BON > RON or MON of pure ethanol; 108 and 89, respectively), while linear blending effects are generally observed on a molar basis (i.e. BON = RON or MON of pure ethanol). This work firstly demonstrates that the non-linear volumetric blending effects traditionally observed under SI operating conditions are also observed under HCCI operating conditions. In keeping with previous studies, the degree of this non-linearity is shown to be a function of the base fuel composition and octane number. By contrast, the molar blending approach is shown to behave differently depending on the chosen combustion mode, with some non-linearity observed under HCCI operating conditions (i.e. BON RON or MON of pure ethanol). This suggests that the well-established blending rules for SI operating conditions may not always be relevant to other combustion modes that operate with globally lean or diluted air-fuel mixtures. This has implications for the design of future fuel specifications.

  20. Blending Octane Number of Ethanol on a Volume and Molar Basis in SI and HCCI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad Umer

    2017-10-08

    The blending behavior of ethanol in five different hydrocarbon base fuels with octane numbers of approximately 70 and 84 was examined under Spark-Ignited (SI) and Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignited (HCCI) operating conditions. The Blending octane number (BON) was used to characterize the blending behavior on both a volume and molar basis. Previous studies have shown that the blending behavior of ethanol generally follows several well-established rules. In particular, non-linear blending effects are generally observed on a volume basis (i.e. BON > RON or MON of pure ethanol; 108 and 89, respectively), while linear blending effects are generally observed on a molar basis (i.e. BON = RON or MON of pure ethanol). This work firstly demonstrates that the non-linear volumetric blending effects traditionally observed under SI operating conditions are also observed under HCCI operating conditions. In keeping with previous studies, the degree of this non-linearity is shown to be a function of the base fuel composition and octane number. By contrast, the molar blending approach is shown to behave differently depending on the chosen combustion mode, with some non-linearity observed under HCCI operating conditions (i.e. BON RON or MON of pure ethanol). This suggests that the well-established blending rules for SI operating conditions may not always be relevant to other combustion modes that operate with globally lean or diluted air-fuel mixtures. This has implications for the design of future fuel specifications.

  1. Study on the knock tendency and cyclical variations of a HCCI engine fueled with n-butanol/n-heptane blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Chunhua; Zhou, Jiawang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The HCCI combustion was achieved on an engine fueled by n-butanol/n-heptane blends. • The knock tendency and cyclical variation of the HCCI combustion were studied. • The knock tendency can be weakened by increasing the blending ratio of n-butanol. • The knock tendency and cyclical variation are sensitive to the combustion phasing. • Cyclical variation always shows an opposite trend with the knock tendency. - Abstract: The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion operation is conducted in the 2nd cylinder of a natural-aspirated four-stroke diesel engine. In the HCCI combustion mode, the n-butanol, n-heptane and their blends are injected into the intake port to form a lean homogeneous air-fuel mixture, which is consumed by the autoignition after compression. The objective of this study is to investigate the knock tendency and the cyclical variations of the HCCI engine. Experimental results show that the volume fraction of n-butanol affects the knock tendency greatly, which obviously decreases as the n-butanol volume fraction increases. The knocking combustion in the HCCI combustion is characterized by the high heat release rate (HRR). Both elevating the engine speed and raising the intake temperature contributes to an obvious increase in HRR and the knock tendency. But the HRR and knock tendency may slightly decrease when the engine speed reaches to 1400 rev/min and intake temperature reaches to 160 °C. Furthermore, the knock tendency can be weakened by increasing the excess air-fuel ratio. Cyclical variations of the HCCI engine are quantified by the coefficient of variation for the peak pressure (COV_P_m_a_x) and it exhibits an almost opposite trend to the knock tendency. The COV_P_m_a_x may considerably increase along with either increasing the blending ratio of n-butanol or increasing the excess air-fuel ratio. Moreover, it is reveled that the COV_P_m_a_x is sensitive to the relative position of peak HRR. The cyclical

  2. Effect of different heat transfer models on HCCI engine simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshat, Elaheh; Saray, Rahim Khoshbakhti

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new multi zone model is developed for HCCI combustion modeling. • New heat transfer model is used for prediction of heat transfer in HCCI engines. • Model can predict engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics well. • Appropriate mass and heat transfer models cause to accurate prediction of CO, UHC and NOx. - Abstract: Heat transfer from engine walls has an important role on engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics. The main focus of this study is offering a new relation for calculation of convective heat transfer from in-cylinder charge to combustion chamber walls of HCCI engines and providing the ability of new model in comparison with the previous models. Therefore, a multi zone model is developed for homogeneous charge compression ignition engine simulation. Model consists of four different types of zones including core zone, boundary layer zone, outer zones, which are between core and boundary layer, and crevice zone. Conductive heat transfer and mass transfer are considered between neighboring zones. For accurate calculation of initial conditions at inlet valve closing, multi zone model is coupled with a single zone model, which simulates gas exchange process. Various correlations are used as convective heat transfer correlations. Woschni, modified Woschni, Hohenberg and Annand correlations are used as convective heat transfer models. The new convection model, developed by authors, is used, too. Comparative analyses are done to recognize the accurate correlation for prediction of engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics in a wide range of operating conditions. The results indicate that utilization of various heat transfer models, except for new convective heat transfer model, leads to significant differences in prediction of in-cylinder pressure and exhaust emissions. Using Woschni, Chang and new model, convective heat transfer coefficient increases near top dead center, sharply

  3. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HOMOGENEOUS MIXTURE COMPRESSION IGNITION IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

    OpenAIRE

    ANTHONY OSWALDO ROQUE CCACYA

    2010-01-01

    Com o intuito de reduzir as emissões e melhorar a combustão em uma maior faixa de rotação e carga de um motor, foi proposto o estudo da combustão por compressão de misturas homogêneas (HCCI), este processo apresenta altas eficiências e baixas emissões, principalmente de NOx e fuligem. Assim, o objetivo do presente trabalho é a determinação das faixas de operação estável em um motor diesel, de alta taxa de compressão (20:1). O combustível utilizado foi gasolina tipo A, tendo em vista a sua gra...

  4. Comparison of Gasoline and Primary Reference Fuel in the Transition from HCCI to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Changle

    2017-10-10

    Our previous research investigated the sensitivity of combustion phasing to intake temperature and injection timing during the transition from homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) to partially premixed combustion (PPC) fuelled with generic gasoline. The results directed particular attention to the relationship between intake temperature and combustion phasing which reflected the changing of stratification level with the injection timing. To confirm its applicability with the use of different fuels, and to investigate the effect of fuel properties on stratification formation, primary reference fuels (PRF) were tested using the same method: a start of injection sweep from -180° to -20° after top dead center with constant combustion phasing by tuning the intake temperature. The present results are further developed compared with those of our previous work, which were based on generic gasoline. In the present work, a three-stage fuel-air stratification development process was observed during the transition from HCCI to PPC. Moreover, a transition stage was observed between the HCCI and PPC stages. Within this transition stage, both the combustion and emission characteristics deteriorated. The allocation of this transition area was mainly determined by the geometric design of the fuel injector and combustion chamber. Some differences in charge stratification were observed between the PRF and gasoline. The NO emissions of the PRF were comparable to those of gasoline. However, the NO emissions surged during the transition stage, indicating that the PRF combustion was probably more stratified. The soot emissions from PRF and gasoline were both much higher in the PPC than the HCCI mode, though the PRF produced much less soot than did gasoline in the PPC mode.

  5. Fuel octane effects in the partially premixed combustion regime in compression ignition engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildingsson, L.; Kalghatgi, G.T.; Tait, N.; Johansson, B.H.; Harrison, A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has showed that it may be advantageous to use fuels of lower cetane numbers compared to today's diesel fuels in compression ignition engines. The benefits come from the longer ignition delays that these fuels have. There is more time available for the fuel and air to mix before

  6. Low Load Limit Extension for Gasoline Compression Ignition Using Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; AlRamadan, Abdullah S.; Vedharaj, S; An, Yanzhao; Sim, Jaeheon; Chang, Junseok; Johansson, Bengt

    2018-01-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is widely studied for the benefits of simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO) and soot emissions without compromising the engine efficiency. Despite this advantage, the operational range for GCI

  7. Comparison of combustion characteristics of n-butanol/ethanol–gasoline blends in a HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Bang-Quan; Liu, Mao-Bin; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The blends with alcohol autoignite early in the conditions highly diluted by exhaust. • n-Butanol is more reactive than ethanol in the blend with the same alcohol content. • Autoignition timing delays with retarding IVO timing for all alcohol–gasoline blends. • Advanced autoignition for the blends with alcohol leads to lower thermal efficiency. - Abstract: As a sustainable biofuel, n-butanol can be used in conventional spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI) engines in order to reduce the dependence on fossil fuel. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a novel combustion to improve the thermal efficiency of conventional SI engines at part loads. To understand the effect of alcohol structure on HCCI combustion under stoichiometric conditions highly diluted by exhaust gases, the combustion characteristics of n-butanol, ethanol and their blends with gasoline were investigated on a single cylinder port fuel injection gasoline engine with fixed intake/exhaust valve lifts at the same operating conditions in this study. The results show that autoignition timing for alcohol–gasoline blends is dependent on alcohol types and its concentration in the blend, engine speed and intake valve opening (IVO)/exhaust valve closing (EVC) timing. In the operating conditions with the residual gases more than 38% by mass in the mixture, alcohol–gasoline blends autoignite more easily than gasoline. Autoignition timing for n-butanol–gasoline blend is earlier than that for ethanol–gasoline blend with the same alcohol volume fraction at 1500 rpm in most cases while the autoignition timings for the blends with alcohol are relatively close at 2000 rpm at the same IVO/EVC timing. Combustion stability is improved with advanced EVC timing at a fixed IVO timing, which is benefit for the improvement in the thermal efficiency in the case of alcohol–gasoline blends. In addition, n-butanol–gasoline blends autoignite earlier than their ethanol

  8. THE EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO VARIATIONS ON THE ENGINE PERFORMANCE PARAMETRES IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup SEKMEN

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of the spark ignition engines may be increased by changing the geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging in cylinders. The designed geometrical compression ratio can be realized as an effective compression ratio under the full load and full open throttle conditions since the effective compression ratio changes with the amount of charging into the cylinder in spark ignition engines. So, this condition of the spark ignition engines forces designers to change their geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging into the cylinder for improvement of performance and fuel economy. In order to improve the combustion efficiency, fuel economy, power output, exhaust emissions at partial loads, compression ratio must be increased; but, under high load and low speed conditions to prevent probable knock and hard running the compression ratio must be decreased gradually. In this paper, relation of the performance parameters to compression ratio such as power, torque, specific fuel consumption, cylindir pressure, exhaust gas temperature, combustion chamber surface area/volume ratio, thermal efficiency, spark timing etc. in spark ignition engines have been investigated and using of engines with variable compression ratio is suggested to fuel economy and more clear environment.

  9. A parametric investigation of hydrogen hcci combustion using a multi-zone model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komninos, N.P.; Hountalas, D.T.; Rakopoulos, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the effect of various operating variables of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine fueled with hydrogen, using a multi-zone model developed by the authors. The multi-zone model consists of zones, which are allotted spatial locations within the combustion chamber. The model takes into account heat transfer between the zones and the combustion chamber walls, providing a spatial temperature distribution during the closed part of the engine cycle, i.e. compression, combustion and expansion. Mass transfer between zones is also accounted for, based on the geometric configuration of the zones, and includes the flow of mass in and out of the crevice regions, represented by the crevice zone. Combustion is incorporated using chemical kinetics based on a chemical reaction mechanism for the oxidation of hydrogen. This chemical reaction mechanism also includes the reactions for nitrogen oxides formation. Using the multi-zone model a parametric investigation is conducted, in order to determine the effect of engine speed, equivalence ratio, compression ratio, inlet pressure and inlet temperature, on the performance, combustion characteristics and emissions of an HCCI engine fueled with hydrogen

  10. Naphtha vs. dieseline – The effect of fuel properties on combustion homogeneity in transition from CI combustion towards HCCI

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2018-03-20

    The scope of this research study pertains to compare the combustion and emission behavior between naphtha and dieseline at different combustion modes. In this study, US dieseline (50% US diesel + 50% RON 91 gasoline) and EU dieseline (45% EU diesel + 55% RON 97 gasoline) with derived cetane number (DCN) of 36 are selected for experimentation in an optical engine. Besides naphtha and dieseline, PRF60 is also tested as a surrogate fuel for naphtha. For the reported fuel with same RON = 60, the effect of physical properties on combustion homogeneity when moving from homogenized charge compression ignition (HCCI) to compression ignition (CI) combustion is studied.The combustion phasing of naphtha at an intake air temperature of 95 °C is taken as the baseline data. The engine experimental results show that higher and lower intake air temperature is required for dieseline mixtures to have same combustion phasing as that of naphtha at HCCI and CI conditions due to the difference in the physical properties. Especially at HCCI mode, due to wider distillation range of dieseline, the evaporation of the fuel is affected so that the gas phase mixture becomes too lean to auto-ignite. However, at partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions, all test fuels required almost same intake air temperature to match up with the combustion phasing of baseline naphtha. From the rate of heat release and combustion images, it was found that naphtha and PRF60 showed improved premixed combustion when compared dieseline mixtures. The stratification analysis shows that combustion is more stratified for dieseline whereas it is premixed for naphtha and PRF60. The level of stratification linked with soot emission showed that soot concentration is higher at stratified CI combustion whereas near zero soot emissions were noted at PPC mode.

  11. Direct numerical simulations of ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities relevant to HCCI and SCCI combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minh Bau; Yu, Gwang Hyeon; Lu, Tianfeng; Chung, Suk-Ho; Yoo, Chun Sang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of temperature and composition stratifications on the ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture at three initial mean temperatures under elevated pressure are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a 58-species

  12. Experimental validation of a kinetic multi-component mechanism in a wide HCCI engine operating range for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene: Influence of EGR parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machrafi, Hatim

    2008-01-01

    The parameters that are present in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) are believed to provide an important contribution to control the auto-ignition process of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) in an engine. For the investigation of the behaviour of the auto-ignition process, a kinetic multi-component mechanism has been developed in former work, containing 62 reactions and 49 species for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene. This paper presents an experimental validation of this mechanism, comparing the calculated pressure, heat release, ignition delays and CO 2 emissions with experimental data performed on a HCCI engine. The validation is performed in a broad range of EGR parameters by varying the dilution by N 2 and CO 2 from 0 to 46 vol.%, changing the EGR temperature from 30 to 120 deg. C, altering the addition of CO and NO from 0 to 170 ppmv and varying the addition of CH 2 O from 0 to 1400 ppmv. These validations were performed respecting the HCCI conditions for the inlet temperature and the equivalence ratio. The results showed that the mechanism is validated experimentally in dilution ranges going up to 21-30 vol.%, depending on the species of dilution and over the whole range of the EGR temperature. The mechanism is validated over the whole range of CO and CH 2 O addition. As for the addition of NO, the mechanism is validated quantitatively up to 50 ppmv and qualitatively up to 170 ppmv

  13. Self-ignition and oxidation of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 K at high pressure: experimental study with fast compression machine and modeling; Autoinflammation et oxydation de divers hydrocarbures entre 600 et 1000 K a haute pression: etude experimentale en machine a compression rapide et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribaucour, M.

    2002-12-01

    Low- and intermediate-temperature oxidation and self-ignition of hydrocarbons play a major role in spark ignition, diesel and HCCI (homogenous charge compression ignition) engines. A deep understanding of the chemistry linked with both phenomena is necessary to improve the engines efficiency and to reduce the formation of pollutants. This document treats of works about the self-ignition and oxidation at high pressure of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 deg. K. The experimental tool used is a fast compression machine fitted with a fast sampling system for the measurement of self-ignition delays and of the concentrations of intermediate oxidation products. The advantages and limitations of this tool are discussed. The self-ignition of various hydrocarbons is compared using pre-defined data which characterize the phenomenologies like cold flames, negative temperature coefficients and self-ignition limits. The hydrocarbons considered are pure or binary mixtures of alkanes, pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The development of high pressure oxidation reaction schemes of alkanes between 600 and 1000 deg. K is described. It is directly based on the analysis of intermediate oxidation products. This methodology is also applied to pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The construction of detailed thermo-kinetic models of oxidation and the modeling of phenomena are made for n-butane, n-heptane, for the 3 pentane isomers, for pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. Finally, the perspectives of future works are evoked. They concern new modeling and new methodologies to be applied in more predictive thermo-kinetic models and the reduction of detailed models in order to include them inside fluid dynamics codes. (J.S.)

  14. Confinement requirements for OHMIC-compressive ignition of a Spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.; Gilligan, J.; Miley, G.

    1980-01-01

    The Moving Plasmoid Reactor (MPR) is an attractive alternative magnetic fusion scheme in which Spheromak plasmoids are envisioned to be formed, compressed, burned, and expanded as the plasmoids translate through a series of linear reactor modules. Although auxiliary heating of the plasmoids may be possible, the MPR scenario would be especially interesting if ohmic decay and compression along were sufficient to heat the plasmoids to an ignition temperature. In the present work, we will study the transport conditions under which a Spheromak plasmoid could be expected to reach ignition via a combination of ohmic and compression heating

  15. Confinement requirements for ohmic-compressive ignition of a Spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Moving Plasmoid Reactor (MPR) is an attractive alternative magnetic fusion scheme in which Spheromak plasmoids are envisioned to be formed, compressed, burned, and expanded as the plasmoids translate through a series of linear reactor modules. Although auxiliary heating of the plasmoids may be possible, the MPR scenario would be especially interesting if ohmic decay and compression alone is sufficient to heat the plasmoids to an ignition temperature. In the present work, we examine the transport conditions under which a Spheromak plasmoid can be expected to reach ignition via a combination of ohmic and compression heating

  16. Investigation the performance of 0-D and 3-d combustion simulation softwares for modelling HCCI engine with high air excess ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Coşkun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, performance of zero and three dimensional simulations codes that used for simulate a homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine fueled with Primary Reference Fuel PRF (85% iso-octane and 15% n-heptane were investigated. 0-D code, called as SRM Suite (Stochastic Reactor Model which can simulate engine combustion by using stochastic reactor model technique were used. Ansys-Fluent which can simulate computational fluid dynamics (CFD was used for 3-D engine combustion simulations. Simulations were evaluated for both commercial codes in terms of combustion, heat transfer and emissions in a HCCI engine. Chemical kinetic mechanisms which developed by Tsurushima including 33 species and 38 reactions for surrogate PRF fuel were used for combustion simulations. Analysis showed that both codes have advantages over each other.

  17. Internal combustion engines a detailed introduction to the thermodynamics of spark and compression ignition engines, their design and development

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Rowland S

    1979-01-01

    Internal Combustion of Engines: A Detailed Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Spark and Compression Ignition Engines, Their Design and Development focuses on the design, development, and operations of spark and compression ignition engines. The book first describes internal combustion engines, including rotary, compression, and indirect or spark ignition engines. The publication then discusses basic thermodynamics and gas dynamics. Topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics; internal energy and enthalpy diagrams; gas mixtures and homocentric flow; and state equation. The text ta

  18. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the “failure of ignition” of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  19. Hydrofluoric acid burn resulting from ignition of gas from a compressed air duster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Jones, LouAnn; Caruso, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    A young female suffered burns to her hand after the ignition of gas from a compressed air duster. After debridement and dressing, the patient continued to have pain out of proportion to injury that was refractory to intravenous morphine. The material safety data sheet revealed that the chemical used was 1,1-difluoroethane. High temperatures can cause decompensation to form hydrofluoric acid. Calcium gluconate gel was applied topically to the patient's burns, which caused prompt and complete relief of her pain. A review of different compressed air duster products revealed that the main ingredient in each was a halogenated hydrocarbon. Although not considered flammable, all products have warnings regarding the possibility of ignition under various circumstances. Ignition of the gas in compressed air cleaners not only can cause flame burns, it can also cause chemical damage from exposure to hydrogen and fluoride ions. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary to prevent severe injury.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Hollow-Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-29

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition (SI) engines. Lean-burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677). The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677; Chang et al., 2013, "Fuel Economy Potential of Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) Combustion With Naphtha Fuel," SAE Technical Paper No. 2013-01-2701). The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition (CI) engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using converge as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been

  1. Study of ignition in a high compression ratio SI (spark ignition) methanol engine using LES (large eddy simulation) with detailed chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Xudong; Wang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Methanol has been recently used as an alternative to conventional fuels for internal combustion engines in order to satisfy some environmental and economical concerns. In this paper, the ignition in a high compression ratio SI (spark ignition) methanol engine was studied by using LES (large eddy simulation) with detailed chemical kinetics. A 21-species, 84-reaction methanol mechanism was adopted to simulate the auto-ignition process of the methanol/air mixture. The MIT (minimum ignition temperature) and MIE (minimum ignition energy) are two important properties for designing safety standards and understanding the ignition process of combustible mixtures. The effects of the flame kernel size, flame kernel temperature and equivalence ratio were also examined on MIT, MIE and IDP (ignition delay period). The methanol mechanism was validated by experimental test. The simulated results showed that the flame kernel size, temperature and energy dramatically affected the values of the MIT, MIE and IDP for a methanol/air mixture, the value of the ignition delay period was not only related to the flame kernel energy, but also to the flame kernel temperature. - Highlights: • We used LES (large eddy simulation) coupled with detailed chemical kinetics to simulate methanol ignition. • The flame kernel size and temperature affected the minimum ignition temperature. • The flame kernel temperature and energy affected the ignition delay period. • The equivalence ratio of methanol–air mixture affected the ignition delay period

  2. A Comprehensive Numerical Study on Effects of Natural Gas Composition on the Operation of an HCCI Engine Une étude numérique complète sur les effets de la composition du gaz naturel carburant sur le réglage d’un moteur HCCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahanian O.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine is a promising idea to reduce fuel consumption and engine emissions. Natural Gas (NG, usually referred as clean fuel, is an appropriate choice for HCCI engines due to its suitable capability of making homogenous mixture with air. However, varying composition of Natural Gas strongly affects the auto-ignition characteristics of in-cylinder mixture and the performance of the HCCI engine. This paper has focused on the influence of Natural Gas composition on engine operation in HCCI mode. Six different compositions of Natural Gas (including pure methane have been considered to study the engine performance via a thermo-kinetic zero-dimensional model. The simulation code covers the detailed chemical kinetics of Natural Gas combustion, which includes Zeldovich extended mechanism to evaluate NOx emission. Validations have been made using experimental data from other works to ensure the accuracy needed for comparison study. The equivalence ratio and the compression ratio are held constant but the engine speed and mixture initial temperature are changed for comparison study. Results show that the peak value of pressure/temperature of in-cylinder mixture is dependent of fuel Wobbe number. Furthermore, engine gross indicated power is linearly related to fuel Wobbe number. Gross indicated work, gross mean effective pressure, and NOx are the other parameters utilized to compare the performance of engine using different fuel compositions. Le moteur HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, ou à allumage par compression d’une charge homogène est une idée prometteuse pour réduire la consommation de carburant et les émissions polluantes. Le gaz naturel, considéré généralement comme un carburant propre, est un choix approprié pour les moteurs HCCI en raison de sa capacité à former avec l’air un mélange homogène. Cependant, la composition du gaz naturel influe fortement sur les caract

  3. Numerical investigation of ethanol fuelled HCCI engine using stochastic reactor model. Part 1: Development of a new reduced ethanol oxidation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Akhil, Nekkanti

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Stochastic reactor model used for numerical study of HCCI engine. • New reduced oxidation mechanism with NOx developed (47 species and 272 reactions). • Mechanism predicts cylinder pressure and heat release with sufficient accuracy. • Mechanism was able to capture the trend in NO x emission with sufficient accuracy. - Abstract: Ethanol is considered a potential biofuel for internal combustion engines. In this study, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) simulations of ethanol engine experiments were performed using stochastic reactor model (SRM). Detailed ethanol oxidation mechanism is developed by including NO x reaction in existing detailed oxidation mechanism with 57 species and 383 reactions. Detailed ethanol mechanism with NO x used in this study contains 76 species and 495 reactions. This mechanism was reduced by direct relation graph (DRG) method, which was validated with the experimental results. Existing Lu’s 40-species skeletal mechanism with NO formation were also compared with detailed and reduced mechanisms for predicting maximum cylinder pressure, maximum heat release rate and crank angle position of maximum cylinder pressure in HCCI engine. Reduced mechanism developed in this study exhibited the best resemblance with the experimental data. This reduced mechanism was also validated by measured engine cylinder pressure curves and measured ignition delays in constant volume reactors. The results showed that reduced mechanism is capable of predicting HCCI engine performance parameters with sufficient accuracy. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the influential reactions in ethanol oxidation. Results also show that detailed and reduced mechanism was able to predict NO x emission in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  4. Combustion characteristics of lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus oil in a partial premixed charge compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Alagumalai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Indeed, the development of alternate fuels for use in internal combustion engines has traditionally been an evolutionary process in which fuel-related problems are met and critical fuel properties are identified and their specific limits defined to resolve the problem. In this regard, this research outlines a vision of lemongrass oil combustion characteristics. In a nut-shell, the combustion phenomena of lemongrass oil were investigated at engine speed of 1500 rpm and compression ratio of 17.5 in a 4-stroke cycle compression ignition engine. Furthermore, the engine tests were conducted with partial premixed charge compression ignition-direct injection (PCCI-DI dual fuel system to profoundly address the combustion phenomena. Analysis of cylinder pressure data and heat-release analysis of neat and premixed lemongrass oil were demonstrated in-detail and compared with conventional diesel. The experimental outcomes disclosed that successful ignition and energy release trends can be obtained from a compression ignition engine fueled with lemongrass oil.

  5. Compression ignition of light naphtha and its multicomponent surrogate under partially premixed conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Y.; Dawood, A.; Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, B.; Chang, J.; Sarathy, M.; Johansson, B.

    2017-01-01

    Light naphtha is the light distillate from crude oil and can be used in compression ignition (CI) engines; its low boiling point and octane rating (RON = 64.5) enable adequate premixing. This study investigates the combustion characteristics of light naphtha (LN) and its multicomponent surrogate

  6. Numerical Simulations of Hollow Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-11

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Lean burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel [1]. The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco [1, 2]. The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using CONVERGE as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been tested and compared with the experimental data. An optimum combination has been identified and applied in the combusting GCI simulations. Linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) breakup model and modified Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) break models proved to work the best for the investigated injector. Comparisons between various existing spray models and a parametric study have been carried out to study the effects of various spray parameters. The fuel effects have been tested by using three different primary reference fuel (PRF

  7. The effect of the composition of hydrocarbon streams on physical properties and HCCI combustion performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieleciak, R. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada); Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CanmetENERGY

    2009-07-01

    Advanced combustion engines have been developed in tandem with evolving fuels and combustion strategies. Advanced analytical methods such as NMR and two dimensional gas chromatography (2D-GC) are also becoming both more powerful and easier to use. Statistical analysis can be used to link the very complex fuel analysis data sets from these methods to fuel chemistry, fuel properties and engine performance. This poster highlighted a study that applied an advanced statistical analysis technique to 2D-GC data for 17 oil sands derived fuels and correlated results to measured fuel chemical/physical properties, and then to HCCI engine performance. In the HCCI mode, ignition occurs by compression of the homogeneous fuel/air mixture. Advanced combustion strategies must satisfy the need for high efficiency, low emissions, and drivability. The 2D-GC was shown to be an emerging analytical technique which separates compounds in fuels to enable the identification of individual compounds and group compounds by chemistry and boiling points. The Q(2d)RPR technique allows correlations to be developed between the 2D-GC data and fuel chemical / physical properties and engine performance data. tabs., figs.

  8. Natural-gas fueled spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engine performance and emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korakianitis, T.; Namasivayam, A.M.; Crookes, R.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Natural gas is a fossil fuel that has been used and investigated extensively for use in spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Compared with conventional gasoline engines, SI engines using natural gas can run at higher compression ratios, thus producing higher thermal efficiencies but also increased nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions, while producing lower emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO). These engines also produce relatively less power than gasoline-fueled engines because of the convergence of one or more of three factors: a reduction in volumetric efficiency due to natural-gas injection in the intake manifold; the lower stoichiometric fuel/air ratio of natural gas compared to gasoline; and the lower equivalence ratio at which these engines may be run in order to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. High NO{sub x} emissions, especially at high loads, reduce with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, EGR rates above a maximum value result in misfire and erratic engine operation. Hydrogen gas addition increases this EGR threshold significantly. In addition, hydrogen increases the flame speed of the natural gas-hydrogen mixture. Power levels can be increased with supercharging or turbocharging and intercooling. Natural gas is used to power CI engines via the dual-fuel mode, where a high-cetane fuel is injected along with the natural gas in order to provide a source of ignition for the charge. Thermal efficiency levels compared with normal diesel-fueled CI-engine operation are generally maintained with dual-fuel operation, and smoke levels are reduced significantly. At the same time, lower NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions, as well as higher HC and CO emissions compared with normal CI-engine operation at low and intermediate loads are recorded. These trends are caused by the low charge temperature and increased ignition delay, resulting in low combustion temperatures. Another factor is

  9. Performance Characterization and Auto-Ignition Performance of a Rapid Compression Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Liu; Hongguang Zhang; Zhicheng Shi; Haitao Lu; Guangyao Zhao; Baofeng Yao

    2014-01-01

    A rapid compression machine (RCM) test bench is developed in this study. The performance characterization and auto-ignition performance tests are conducted at an initial temperature of 293 K, a compression ratio of 9.5 to 16.5, a compressed temperature of 650 K to 850 K, a driving gas pressure range of 0.25 MPa to 0.7 MPa, an initial pressure of 0.04 MPa to 0.09 MPa, and a nitrogen dilution ratio of 35% to 65%. A new type of hydraulic piston is used to address the problem in which the hydraul...

  10. Intermediate temperature heat release in an HCCI engine fueled by ethanol/n-heptane mixtures: An experimental and modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Vuilleumier, David

    2014-03-01

    This study examines intermediate temperature heat release (ITHR) in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines using blends of ethanol and n-heptane. Experiments were performed over the range of 0-50% n-heptane liquid volume fractions, at equivalence ratios 0.4 and 0.5, and intake pressures from 1.4bar to 2.2bar. ITHR was induced in the mixtures containing predominantly ethanol through the addition of small amounts of n-heptane. After a critical threshold, additional n-heptane content yielded low temperature heat release (LTHR). A method for quantifying the amount of heat released during ITHR was developed by examining the second derivative of heat release, and this method was then used to identify trends in the engine data. The combustion process inside the engine was modeled using a single-zone HCCI model, and good qualitative agreement of pre-ignition pressure rise and heat release rate was found between experimental and modeling results using a detailed n-heptane/ethanol chemical kinetic model. The simulation results were used to identify the dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR, as well as to verify the chemical basis behind the quantification of the amount of ITHR in the experimental analysis. The dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR were found to be H-atom abstraction from n-heptane by OH and the addition of fuel radicals to O2. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  11. Experimental and numerical analysis of the performance and exhaust gas emissions of a biogas/n-heptane fueled HCCI engine

    KAUST Repository

    Kozarac, Darko; Taritas, Ivan; Vuilleumier, David; Saxena, Samveg; Dibble, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    The use of highly reactive fuel as an ignition promoter enables operation of biogas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine at low intake temperatures with practical control of combustion phasing. In order to gain some insight into this operation mode the influence of addition of n-heptane on combustion, performance, emissions and control of combustion phasing of a biogas fueled HCCI engine is experimentally researched and presented in this paper. Additionally, the performance analysis of the practical engine solution for such operation is estimated by using the numerical simulation of entire engine. The results showed that the introduction of highly reactive fuel results with a significant change in operating conditions and with a change in optimum combustion phasing. The addition of n-heptane resulted in lower nitrogen oxides and increased carbon monoxide emissions, while the unburned hydrocarbons emissions were strongly influenced by combustion phasing and at optimal conditions are lowered compared to pure biogas operation. The results also showed a practical operation range for strategies that use equivalence ratio as a control of load. Simulation results showed that the difference in performance between pure biogas and n-heptane/biogas operation is even greater when the practical engine solution is taken into account.

  12. Intermediate temperature heat release in an HCCI engine fueled by ethanol/n-heptane mixtures: An experimental and modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Vuilleumier, David; Kozarac, Darko; Mehl, Marco; Saxena, Samveg; Pitz, William J.; Dibble, Robert W.; Chen, Jyhyuan; Sarathy, Mani

    2014-01-01

    This study examines intermediate temperature heat release (ITHR) in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines using blends of ethanol and n-heptane. Experiments were performed over the range of 0-50% n-heptane liquid volume fractions, at equivalence ratios 0.4 and 0.5, and intake pressures from 1.4bar to 2.2bar. ITHR was induced in the mixtures containing predominantly ethanol through the addition of small amounts of n-heptane. After a critical threshold, additional n-heptane content yielded low temperature heat release (LTHR). A method for quantifying the amount of heat released during ITHR was developed by examining the second derivative of heat release, and this method was then used to identify trends in the engine data. The combustion process inside the engine was modeled using a single-zone HCCI model, and good qualitative agreement of pre-ignition pressure rise and heat release rate was found between experimental and modeling results using a detailed n-heptane/ethanol chemical kinetic model. The simulation results were used to identify the dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR, as well as to verify the chemical basis behind the quantification of the amount of ITHR in the experimental analysis. The dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR were found to be H-atom abstraction from n-heptane by OH and the addition of fuel radicals to O2. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  13. Experimental and numerical analysis of the performance and exhaust gas emissions of a biogas/n-heptane fueled HCCI engine

    KAUST Repository

    Kozarac, Darko

    2016-09-12

    The use of highly reactive fuel as an ignition promoter enables operation of biogas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine at low intake temperatures with practical control of combustion phasing. In order to gain some insight into this operation mode the influence of addition of n-heptane on combustion, performance, emissions and control of combustion phasing of a biogas fueled HCCI engine is experimentally researched and presented in this paper. Additionally, the performance analysis of the practical engine solution for such operation is estimated by using the numerical simulation of entire engine. The results showed that the introduction of highly reactive fuel results with a significant change in operating conditions and with a change in optimum combustion phasing. The addition of n-heptane resulted in lower nitrogen oxides and increased carbon monoxide emissions, while the unburned hydrocarbons emissions were strongly influenced by combustion phasing and at optimal conditions are lowered compared to pure biogas operation. The results also showed a practical operation range for strategies that use equivalence ratio as a control of load. Simulation results showed that the difference in performance between pure biogas and n-heptane/biogas operation is even greater when the practical engine solution is taken into account.

  14. Numerical parametric investigations of a gasoline fuelled partially-premixed compression-ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemati, Arash [Islamic Azad University, Miyaneh Branch, Miyaneh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilarya, Shahram; Jafarmadar, Samad; Khatamenjhad, Hassan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Vahid [Islamic Azad University, Ajagshir Branch, Ajabshir (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Parametric studies of a heavy duty direct injection (DI) gasoline fueled compression ignition (CI) engine combustion are presented. Gasoline because of its higher ignition delay has much lower soot emission in comparison with diesel fuel. Using double injection strategy reduces the maximum heat release rate that leads to nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction. A three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was employed and compared with experimental data. The model results show a good agreement with experimental data. The effect of injection characteristics such as, injection duration, main SOI timing, and nozzle hole size investigated on combustion and emissions.

  15. Fuel Vaporization and Its Effect on Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1933-01-01

    The tests discussed in this report were conducted to determine whether or not there is appreciable vaporization of the fuel injected into a high-speed compression-ignition engine during the time available for injection and combustion. The effects of injection advance angle and fuel boiling temperature were investigated. The results show that an appreciable amount of the fuel is vaporized during injection even though the temperature and pressure conditions in the engine are not sufficient to cause ignition either during or after injection, and that when the conditions are such as to cause ignition the vaporization process affects the combustion. The results are compared with those of several other investigators in the same field.

  16. Mixture preparation and combustion in an optically-accessible HCCI, diesel engine; La preparation du melange et de la combustion dans un moteur Diesel, HCCI a acces optique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashdan, J.; Bruneaux, G. [Institut Francais du Petrole, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    2006-07-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging techniques have been applied in order to study the mixture preparation and combustion process in a single cylinder, optically-accessible homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. In particular, the influence of piston bowl geometry on the in-cylinder mixture distribution and subsequent combustion process has been investigated. A new optically-accessible piston design enabled the application of LIF diagnostics directly within the combustion chamber bowl. Firstly, laser-induced exciplex fluorescence (LIEF) was exploited in order to characterise the in-cylinder fuel spray and vapour distribution. Subsequently a detailed study of the two-stage HCCI combustion process was conducted by a combination of direct chemiluminescence imaging, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the intermediate species formaldehyde (CH{sub 2}O) which is present during the cool flame and LIF of the OH radical which is subsequently present in the reaction and burned gas zones at higher temperature. Finally, spectrometry measurements were performed with the objective of determining the origin of the emitting species of the chemiluminescence signal. The experiments were performed on a single cylinder optical engine equipped with a direct-injection, common rail injection system and narrow angle injector. The experimental results presented reveal the significant role of the combustion chamber geometry on the mixture preparation and combustion characteristics for late HCCI injection strategies particularly in such cases where liquid impingement is unavoidable. Planar LIF 355 imaging revealed the presence of the intermediate species formaldehyde allowing the temporal and spatial detection of auto-ignition precursors prior to the signal observed by chemiluminescence in the early stages of the cool flame. Formaldehyde was then rapidly consumed at the start of main combustion which was marked not only by the increase in the main heat release

  17. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10 4 T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ∼50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities

  18. Impact of thermodynamic properties and heat loss on ignition of transportation fuels in rapid compression machines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2018-01-30

    Rapid compression machines (RCM) are extensively used to study autoignition of a wide variety of fuels at engine relevant conditions. Fuels ranging from pure species to full boiling range gasoline and diesel can be studied in an RCM to develop a better understanding of autoignition kinetics in low to intermediate temperature ranges. In an RCM, autoignition is achieved by compressing a fuel/oxidizer mixture to higher pressure and temperature, thereby initiating chemical reactions promoting ignition. During these experiments, the pressure is continuously monitored and is used to deduce significant events such as the end of compression and the onset of ignition. The pressure profile is also used to assess the temperature evolution of the gas mixture with time using the adiabatic core hypothesis and the heat capacity ratio of the gas mixture. In such RCM studies, real transportation fuels containing many components are often represented by simpler surrogate fuels. While simpler surrogates such as primary reference fuels (PRFs) and ternary primary reference fuel (TPRFs) can match research and motor octane number of transportation fuels, they may not accurately replicate thermodynamic properties (including heat capacity ratio). This non-conformity could exhibit significant discrepancies in the end of compression temperature, thereby affecting ignition delay (τign) measurements. Another aspect of RCMs that can affect τign measurement is post compression heat loss, which depends on various RCM parameters including geometry, extent of insulation, pre-heating temperature etc. To, better understand the effects of these non-chemical kinetic parameters on τign, thermodynamic properties of a number of FACE G gasoline surrogates were calculated and simulated in a multi-zone RCM model. The problem was further investigated using a variance based analysis and individual sensitivities were calculated. This study highlights the effects on τign due to thermodynamic properties of

  19. Impact of thermodynamic properties and heat loss on ignition of transportation fuels in rapid compression machines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz; Hantouche, Mireille; Khurshid, Muneeb; Mohamed, Samah; Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir; Roberts, William L.; Knio, Omar; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Rapid compression machines (RCM) are extensively used to study autoignition of a wide variety of fuels at engine relevant conditions. Fuels ranging from pure species to full boiling range gasoline and diesel can be studied in an RCM to develop a better understanding of autoignition kinetics in low to intermediate temperature ranges. In an RCM, autoignition is achieved by compressing a fuel/oxidizer mixture to higher pressure and temperature, thereby initiating chemical reactions promoting ignition. During these experiments, the pressure is continuously monitored and is used to deduce significant events such as the end of compression and the onset of ignition. The pressure profile is also used to assess the temperature evolution of the gas mixture with time using the adiabatic core hypothesis and the heat capacity ratio of the gas mixture. In such RCM studies, real transportation fuels containing many components are often represented by simpler surrogate fuels. While simpler surrogates such as primary reference fuels (PRFs) and ternary primary reference fuel (TPRFs) can match research and motor octane number of transportation fuels, they may not accurately replicate thermodynamic properties (including heat capacity ratio). This non-conformity could exhibit significant discrepancies in the end of compression temperature, thereby affecting ignition delay (τign) measurements. Another aspect of RCMs that can affect τign measurement is post compression heat loss, which depends on various RCM parameters including geometry, extent of insulation, pre-heating temperature etc. To, better understand the effects of these non-chemical kinetic parameters on τign, thermodynamic properties of a number of FACE G gasoline surrogates were calculated and simulated in a multi-zone RCM model. The problem was further investigated using a variance based analysis and individual sensitivities were calculated. This study highlights the effects on τign due to thermodynamic properties of

  20. An investigation of partially premixed compression ignition combustion using gasoline and spark assistance

    OpenAIRE

    Benajes Calvo, Jesus Vicente; García Martínez, Antonio; Doménech Llopis, Vicente; Durret, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays the automotive scientific community and companies are focusing part of their efforts on the investigation of new combustion modes in Compression Ignition (Cl) engines, mainly based on the use of locally lean air fuel mixtures. This characteristic, combined with exhaust gas recirculation, provides low combustion temperatures that reduce pollutant formation. However these combustion concepts have some shortcomings, related to combustion phasing control and combustion stability under th...

  1. Functional Group Analysis for Diesel-like Mixing-Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Blendstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; McCormick, Robert L.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Fioroni, Gina; George, Anthe; Albrecht, Karl O.

    2016-12-30

    This report addresses the suitability of hydrocarbon and oxygenate functional groups for use as a diesel-like fuel blending component in an advanced, mixing-controlled, compression ignition combustion engine. The functional groups are chosen from those that could be derived from a biomass feedstock, and represent a full range of chemistries. This first systematic analysis of functional groups will be of value to all who are pursuing new bio-blendstocks for diesel-like fuels.

  2. Over compression influence to the performances of the spark ignition engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakosi, E.; Talif, S. G.; Manolache, G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and experimental results of some procedures used in improving the performances of the automobile spark ignition engines. The study uses direct injection and high over-compression applied to a standard engine. To this purpose, the paper contains both the constructive solutions and the results obtained from the test bed concerning the engine power indices, fuel consumption and exhaust emissions.

  3. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, H.; Lee, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Shiroto, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Sunahara, A.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Pérez, F.; Patel, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm"2. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  4. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, H. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lee, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Shiroto, T.; Ohnishi, N. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Sunahara, A. [Institute of Laser Technology, Nishi-ku, Osaka (Japan); Beg, F. N. [University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Pérez, F. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, Cedex (France); Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm{sup 2}. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  5. Use of a non-edible vegetable oils as an alternative fuel in compression ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraj, S.; Ramadhas, A.S.; Muraleedharan, C.

    2006-01-01

    Shortage of petroleum fuels is assumed predominance globally and hence efforts are being made in every country to look for alternative fuels, especially for running internal compression ignition engines. However, the limited availability of edible vegetable oils in excess amounts is a limiting factors, which limits their large usage as an alternative fuel. A remedy for this is the use of non-edible oils obtained mainly from seeds, which are otherwise dumped as waste material. An effort is made here to use rubber seed oil as fuel in compression ignition engine at various proportions, mixed with diesel oil. The performance and emission characteristics of the engine are measured under dual fuel operation. The compression ignition engine could be run satisfactorily without any noticeable problem, even with 100% rubber seed oil. A multi-layer artificial neural network model was developed for predicting the performance and emission characteristics of the engine under dual fuel operation. Experimental data has been used to train the network. The predicted engine performance and emission characteristics obtained by neural network model are validated by using the experimental data. The neural network model is found to be quite efficient in predicting engine performance and emission characteristics. It has been found that 60-80% diesel replacement by rubber seed oil is the optimum in order to get maximum engine performance and minimum exhaust emission

  6. THE EFFECT OF VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO ON FUEL CONSUMPTION IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup SEKMEN

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to lack of energy sources in the world, we are obliged to use our current energy sources in the most efficient way. Therefore, in the automotive industry, research works to manufacture more economic cars in terms of fuelconsumption and environmental friendly cars, at the same time satisfying the required performance have been intensively increasing. Some positive results have been obtained by the studies, aimed to change the compression ratio according to the operating conditions of engine. In spark ignition engines in order to improve the combustion efficiency, fuel economy and exhaust emission in the partial loads, the compression ratio must be increased; but, under the high load and low speed conditions to prevent probable knock and hard running compression ratio must be decreased slightly. In this paper, various research works on the variable compression ratio with spark ignition engines, the effects on fuel economy, power output and thermal efficiency have been investigated. According to the results of the experiments performed with engines having variable compression ratio under the partial and mid-load conditions, an increase in engine power, a decrease in fuel consumption, particularly in partial loads up to 30 percent of fuel economy, and also severe reductions of some exhaust emission values were determined.

  7. Characterization of Diesel and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion in a Rapid Compression-Expansion Machine using OH* Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sundar Rajan; Srinivasan, Kalyan Kumar; Stegmeir, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Direct-injection compression ignition combustion of diesel and gasoline were studied in a rapid compression-expansion machine (RCEM) using high-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging. The RCEM (bore = 84 mm, stroke = 110-250 mm) was used to simulate engine-like operating conditions at the start of fuel injection. The fuels were supplied by a high-pressure fuel cart with an air-over-fuel pressure amplification system capable of providing fuel injection pressures up to 2000 bar. A production diesel fuel injector was modified to provide a single fuel spray for both diesel and gasoline operation. Time-resolved combustion pressure in the RCEM was measured using a Kistler piezoelectric pressure transducer mounted on the cylinder head and the instantaneous piston displacement was measured using an inductive linear displacement sensor (0.05 mm resolution). Time-resolved, line-of-sight OH* chemiluminescence images were obtained using a Phantom V611 CMOS camera (20.9 kHz @ 512 x 512 pixel resolution, ~ 48 μs time resolution) coupled with a short wave pass filter (cut-off ~ 348 nm). The instantaneous OH* distributions, which indicate high temperature flame regions within the combustion chamber, were used to discern the characteristic differences between diesel and gasoline compression ignition combustion. The authors gratefully acknowledge facilities support for the present work from the Energy Institute at Mississippi State University.

  8. Gasoline compression ignition approach to efficient, clean and affordable future engines

    KAUST Repository

    Kalghatgi, Gautam

    2017-04-03

    The worldwide demand for transport fuels will increase significantly but will still be met substantially (a share of around 90%) from petroleum-based fuels. This increase in demand will be significantly skewed towards commercial vehicles and hence towards diesel and jet fuels, leading to a probable surplus of lighter low-octane fuels. Current diesel engines are efficient but expensive and complicated because they try to reduce the nitrogen oxide and soot emissions simultaneously while using conventional diesel fuels which ignite very easily. Gasoline compression ignition engines can be run on gasoline-like fuels with a long ignition delay to make low-nitrogen-oxide low-soot combustion very much easier. Moreover, the research octane number of the optimum fuel for gasoline compression ignition engines is likely to be around 70 and hence the surplus low-octane components could be used without much further processing. Also, the final boiling point can be higher than those of current gasolines. The potential advantages of gasoline compression ignition engines are as follows. First, the engine is at least as efficient and clean as current diesel engines but is less complicated and hence could be cheaper (lower injection pressure and after-treatment focus on control of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions rather than on soot and nitrogen oxide emissions). Second, the optimum fuel requires less processing and hence would be easier to make in comparison with current gasoline or diesel fuel and will have a lower greenhouse-gas footprint. Third, it provides a path to mitigate the global demand imbalance between heavier fuels and lighter fuels that is otherwise projected and improve the sustainability of refineries. The concept has been well demonstrated in research engines but development work is needed to make it feasible on practical vehicles, e.g. on cold start, adequate control of exhaust carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and control of noise at medium to high loads

  9. Laser-assisted homogeneous charge ignition in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dhananjay Kumar; Weinrotter, Martin; Kofler, Henrich; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar; Wintner, Ernst

    2009-06-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a very promising future combustion concept for internal combustion engines. There are several technical difficulties associated with this concept, and precisely controlling the start of auto-ignition is the most prominent of them. In this paper, a novel concept to control the start of auto-ignition is presented. The concept is based on the fact that most HCCI engines are operated with high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates in order to slow-down the fast combustion processes. Recirculated exhaust gas contains combustion products including moisture, which has a relative peak of the absorption coefficient around 3 μm. These water molecules absorb the incident erbium laser radiations ( λ=2.79 μm) and get heated up to expedite ignition. In the present experimental work, auto-ignition conditions are locally attained in an experimental constant volume combustion chamber under simulated EGR conditions. Taking advantage of this feature, the time when the mixture is thought to "auto-ignite" could be adjusted/controlled by the laser pulse width optimisation, followed by its resonant absorption by water molecules present in recirculated exhaust gas.

  10. Neutral-beam requirements for compression-boosted ignited tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, D.R.; Jassby, D.L.; Kreischer, K.

    1977-12-01

    Neutral-beam energies of 200 to 500-keV D 0 may be required to insure adequate penetration into the center of ignition-sized tokamak plasmas. However, the beam energy requirement can be reduced by using a start-up scenario in which the final plasma is formed by major-radius compression of a beam-heated plasma whose density-radius product, na, is determined by satisfactory neutral-beam penetration. ''Compression boosting'' is attractive only for plasmas in which ntau/sub E/ increases with na, because a major-radius compression C increases na by C 3 / 2 . The dependence on C of beam energy and beam power for plasmas which obey ''empirical scaling laws'' of the type ntau/sub E/ varies as (na) 2 is analyzed. The dependences on C of stored magnetic energy and TF-coil power dissipation are also determined. It is found that a compression ratio of 1.5 to attain the ignited plasma permits adequate penetration by 150-keV D 0 beams

  11. Direct numerical simulations of exhaust gas recirculation effect on multistage autoignition in the negative temperature combustion regime for stratified HCCI flow conditions by using H2O2 addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asrag, Hossam A.; Ju, Yiguang

    2013-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a stratified flow in a homogeneous compression charge ignition (HCCI) engine are performed to investigate the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and temperature/mixture stratification effects on the autoignition of synthetic dimethyl ether (DME) in the negative temperature combustion region. Detailed chemistry for a DME/air mixture is employed and solved by a hybrid multi-time scale (HMTS) algorithm to reduce the computational cost. The effect of ? to mimic the EGR effect on autoignition are studied. The results show that adding ? enhances autoignition by rapid OH radical pool formation (34-46% reduction in ignition delay time) and changes the ignition heat release rates at different ignition stages. Sensitivity analysis is performed and the important reactions pathways affecting the autoignition are specified. The DNS results show that the scales introduced by thermal and mixture stratifications have a strong effect after the low temperature chemistry (LTC) ignition especially at the locations of high scalar dissipation rates. Compared to homogenous ignition, stratified ignitions show similar first autoignition delay times, but 18% reduction in the second and third ignition delay times. The results also show that molecular transport plays an important role in stratified low temperature ignition, and that the scalar mixing time scale is strongly affected by local ignition in the stratified flow. Two ignition-kernel propagation modes are observed: a wave-like, low-speed, deflagrative mode and a spontaneous, high-speed, ignition mode. Three criteria are introduced to distinguish these modes by different characteristic time scales and Damkhöler numbers using a progress variable conditioned by an ignition kernel indicator. The low scalar dissipation rate flame front is characterized by high displacement speeds and high mixing Damkhöler number. The proposed criteria are applied successfully at the different ignition stages and

  12. An Experimental and Numerical Study of N-Dodecane/Butanol Blends for Compression Ignition Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Wakale, Anil Bhaurao; Mohamed, Samah; Naser, Nimal; Jaasim, Mohammed; Banerjee, Raja; Im, Hong G.; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Alcohols are potential blending agents for diesel that can be effectively used in compression ignition engines. This work investigates the use of n-butanol as a blending component for diesel fuel using experiments and simulations. Dodecane was selected as a surrogate for diesel fuel and various concentrations of n-butanol were added to study ignition characteristics. Ignition delay times for different n-butanol/dodecane blends were measured using the ignition quality tester at KAUST (KR-IQT). The experiments were conducted at pressure of 21 and 18 bar, temperature ranging from 703-843 K and global equivalence ratio of 0.85. A skeletal mechanism for n-dodecane and n-butanol blends with 203 species was developed for numerical simulations. The mechanism was developed by combining n-dodecane skeletal mechanism containing 106 species and a detailed mechanism for all the butanol isomers. The new mixture mechanism was validated for various pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio using a 0-D homogeneous reactor model from CHEMKIN for pure base fuels (n-dodecane and butanol). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE was used to further validate the new mechanism. The new mechanism was able to reproduce the experimental results from IQT at different pressure and temperature conditions.

  13. An Experimental and Numerical Study of N-Dodecane/Butanol Blends for Compression Ignition Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Wakale, Anil Bhaurao

    2018-04-03

    Alcohols are potential blending agents for diesel that can be effectively used in compression ignition engines. This work investigates the use of n-butanol as a blending component for diesel fuel using experiments and simulations. Dodecane was selected as a surrogate for diesel fuel and various concentrations of n-butanol were added to study ignition characteristics. Ignition delay times for different n-butanol/dodecane blends were measured using the ignition quality tester at KAUST (KR-IQT). The experiments were conducted at pressure of 21 and 18 bar, temperature ranging from 703-843 K and global equivalence ratio of 0.85. A skeletal mechanism for n-dodecane and n-butanol blends with 203 species was developed for numerical simulations. The mechanism was developed by combining n-dodecane skeletal mechanism containing 106 species and a detailed mechanism for all the butanol isomers. The new mixture mechanism was validated for various pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio using a 0-D homogeneous reactor model from CHEMKIN for pure base fuels (n-dodecane and butanol). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE was used to further validate the new mechanism. The new mechanism was able to reproduce the experimental results from IQT at different pressure and temperature conditions.

  14. LES/FMDF of turbulent jet ignition in a rapid compression machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Schock, Harold; Toulson, Elisa; Jaberi, Farhad; CFD; Engine Research Labs, Michigan State University Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent Jet Ignition (TJI) is an efficient method for initiating and controlling combustion in combustion systems, e.g. internal combustion engines. It enables combustion in ultra-lean mixtures by utilizing hot product turbulent jets emerging from a pre-chamber combustor as the ignition source for the main combustion chamber. Here, we study the TJI-assisted ignition and combustion of lean methane-air mixtures in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) for various flow/combustion conditions with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) computational model. In the LES/FMDF model, the filtered form of compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity, while the FMDF transport equation is solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (species mass fraction and temperature) field. The LES/FMDF data are used to study the physics of TJI and combustion in RCM. The results show the very complex behavior of the reacting flow and the flame structure in the pre-chamber and RCM.

  15. Effect of biodiesel on the performance and combustion parameters of a turbocharged compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.; Baluch, A.H.; Chao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Direct injection compression ignition engines have proved to be the best option in heavy duty applications like transportation and power generation ,but rapid depleting sources of conventional fossil fuels, their rising prices and ever increasing environmental issues are the major concerns. Alternative fuels, particularly bio fuels are receiving increasing attention during the last few years. Biodiesel has already been commercialized in the transport sector. In the present work, a turbocharged intercooled and DI diesel engine has been alternatively fuelled with biodiesel and its 20% blend with commercial diesel. The experimental results show that BSFC, maximum combustion pressure and start of injection angle increase; on the other hand BSEC, maximum rate of pressure rise, ignition lag and premixed combustion amount decrease however HRR duration remains almost unaffected in the case of biodiesel as compared to commercial diesel. (author)

  16. Global reaction mechanism for the auto-ignition of full boiling range gasoline and kerosene fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersickel, A.; Wright, Y. M.; Boulouchos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Compact reaction schemes capable of predicting auto-ignition are a prerequisite for the development of strategies to control and optimise homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines. In particular for full boiling range fuels exhibiting two stage ignition a tremendous demand exists in the engine development community. The present paper therefore meticulously assesses a previous 7-step reaction scheme developed to predict auto-ignition for four hydrocarbon blends and proposes an important extension of the model constant optimisation procedure, allowing for the model to capture not only ignition delays, but also the evolutions of representative intermediates and heat release rates for a variety of full boiling range fuels. Additionally, an extensive validation of the later evolutions by means of various detailed n-heptane reaction mechanisms from literature has been presented; both for perfectly homogeneous, as well as non-premixed/stratified HCCI conditions. Finally, the models potential to simulate the auto-ignition of various full boiling range fuels is demonstrated by means of experimental shock tube data for six strongly differing fuels, containing e.g. up to 46.7% cyclo-alkanes, 20% napthalenes or complex branched aromatics such as methyl- or ethyl-napthalene. The good predictive capability observed for each of the validation cases as well as the successful parameterisation for each of the six fuels, indicate that the model could, in principle, be applied to any hydrocarbon fuel, providing suitable adjustments to the model parameters are carried out. Combined with the optimisation strategy presented, the model therefore constitutes a major step towards the inclusion of real fuel kinetics into full scale HCCI engine simulations.

  17. Experimental validation of a kinetic multi-component mechanism in a wide HCCI engine operating range for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene: Influence of EGR parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris/ Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-11-15

    The parameters that are present in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) are believed to provide an important contribution to control the auto-ignition process of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) in an engine. For the investigation of the behaviour of the auto-ignition process, a kinetic multi-component mechanism has been developed in former work, containing 62 reactions and 49 species for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene. This paper presents an experimental validation of this mechanism, comparing the calculated pressure, heat release, ignition delays and CO{sub 2} emissions with experimental data performed on a HCCI engine. The validation is performed in a broad range of EGR parameters by varying the dilution by N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} from 0 to 46 vol.%, changing the EGR temperature from 30 to 120 C, altering the addition of CO and NO from 0 to 170 ppmv and varying the addition of CH{sub 2}O from 0 to 1400 ppmv. These validations were performed respecting the HCCI conditions for the inlet temperature and the equivalence ratio. The results showed that the mechanism is validated experimentally in dilution ranges going up to 21-30 vol.%, depending on the species of dilution and over the whole range of the EGR temperature. The mechanism is validated over the whole range of CO and CH{sub 2}O addition. As for the addition of NO, the mechanism is validated quantitatively up to 50 ppmv and qualitatively up to 170 ppmv. (author)

  18. Effects of In-Cylinder Mixing on Low Octane Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir; Sim, Jaeheon; Viollet, Yoann; Im, Hong G.; Chang, Junseok

    2016-01-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and in the volatility range of gasoline fuels. In this study, we have investigated the effect of different injection timings at part-load conditions using light naphtha stream in single cylinder engine experiments in the GCI combustion mode with injection pressure of 130 bar. A toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) was used as a surrogate for the light naphtha in the engine simulations performed here. A physical surrogate based on the evaporation characteristics of the light naphtha has been developed and its properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. Full cycle GCI computational fluid dynamics (CFD) engine simulations have been successfully performed while changing the start of injection (SOI) timing from -50° to -11 ° CAD aTDC. The effect of SOI on mixing and combustion phasing was investigated using detailed equivalence ratio-temperature maps and ignition delay times. Both experimental and computational results consistently showed that an SOI of -30° CAD aTDC has the most advanced combustion phasing (CA50), with the highest NOx emission. The effects of the SOI on the fuel containment in the bowl of the piston, the ignition delay time, combustion rate and emissions have been carefully examined through the CFD calculations. It was found that the competition between the equivalence ratio and temperature is the controlling parameter in determining the combustion phasings.

  19. Effects of In-Cylinder Mixing on Low Octane Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2016-04-05

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and in the volatility range of gasoline fuels. In this study, we have investigated the effect of different injection timings at part-load conditions using light naphtha stream in single cylinder engine experiments in the GCI combustion mode with injection pressure of 130 bar. A toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) was used as a surrogate for the light naphtha in the engine simulations performed here. A physical surrogate based on the evaporation characteristics of the light naphtha has been developed and its properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. Full cycle GCI computational fluid dynamics (CFD) engine simulations have been successfully performed while changing the start of injection (SOI) timing from -50° to -11 ° CAD aTDC. The effect of SOI on mixing and combustion phasing was investigated using detailed equivalence ratio-temperature maps and ignition delay times. Both experimental and computational results consistently showed that an SOI of -30° CAD aTDC has the most advanced combustion phasing (CA50), with the highest NOx emission. The effects of the SOI on the fuel containment in the bowl of the piston, the ignition delay time, combustion rate and emissions have been carefully examined through the CFD calculations. It was found that the competition between the equivalence ratio and temperature is the controlling parameter in determining the combustion phasings.

  20. Exergoeconomic analysis and multi-objective optimization of an ejector refrigeration cycle powered by an internal combustion (HCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Mohsen; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.; Khoshbakhti Saray, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ejector refrigeration systems powered by HCCI engine is proposed. • A new two-dimensional model is developed for the ejector. • Multi-objective optimization is performed for the proposed system. • Pareto frontier is plotted for multi-objective optimization. - Abstract: Ejector refrigeration systems powered by low-grade heat sources have been an attractive research subject for a lot of researchers. In the present work the waste heat from exhaust gases of a HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) engine is utilized to drive the ejector refrigeration system. Considering the frictional effects on the ejector wall, a new two-dimensional model is developed for the ejector. Energy, exergy and exergoeconomic analysis performed for the proposed system using the MATLAB software. In addition, considering the exergy efficiency and the product unit cost of the system as objective functions, a multi-objective optimization is performed for the system to find the optimum design variables including the generator, condenser and evaporator temperatures. The product unit cost is minimized while the exergy efficiency is maximized using the genetic algorithm. The optimization results are obtained as a set of optimal points and the Pareto frontier is plotted for multi-objective optimization. The results of the optimization show that ejector refrigeration cycle is operating at optimum state based on exergy efficiency and product unit cost when generator, condenser and evaporator work at 94.54 °C, 33.44 °C and 0.03 °C, respectively

  1. Controlled auto-ignition characteristics of methane-air mixture in a rapid intake compression and expansion machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyubaek; Jeong, Dongsoo [Engine Research Team, Eco-Machinery Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 104 Sinseongno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea); Moon, Gunfeel [Department of Clean Environmental system, University of Science and Technology, 52 Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea); Bae, Choongsik [Engine Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 GuSeong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

    2010-10-15

    The characteristics of controlled auto-ignition (CAI) were investigated with a methane-air mixture and simulated residual gas, that represents internal exhaust gas recirculation (IEGR). Supply systems were additionally installed on the conventional rapid compression machine (RCM), and this modified machine - a rapid intake compression and expansion machine (RICEM) - was able to simulate an intake stroke for the evaluation of controlled auto-ignition with fuel-air mixture. The fuel-air mixture and the simulated residual gas were introduced separately into the combustion chamber through the spool valves. Various IEGR rates and temperatures of the IEGR gas were tested. The initial reaction and the development in controlled auto-ignition combustion were compared with spark-ignited combustion by visualization with a high-speed digital camera. Under the controlled auto-ignition operation, multi-point ignition and faster combustion were observed. With increasing the temperature of IEGR gas, the auto-ignition timing was advanced and burning duration was shortened. The higher rate of IEGR had the same effects on the combustion of the controlled auto-ignition. However, this trend was reversed with more than 47 per cent of IEGR. (author)

  2. Possibility to Increase Biofuels Energy Efficiency used for Compression Ignition Engines Fueling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin D. Iclodean

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the possibilities of optimizing the use of biofuels in terms of energy efficiency in compression ignition (CI engines fueling. Based on the experimental results was determinate the law of variation of the rate of heat released by the combustion process for diesel fuel and different blends of biodiesel. Using this law, were changed parameters of the engine management system (fuel injection law and was obtain increased engine performance (in terms of energy efficiency for use of different biofuel blends.

  3. Compression Ratio and Catalyst Aging Effects on Aqueous Ethanol Ignition (Year 2): Part 1. Compression Ratio Effects on Aqueous Ethanol Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The lean burning of water ethanol blends has the potential to reduce NOx, CO, and HC emissions while reducing the ethanol fermentation production cost of distillation and dehydration. The torch style ignition produced by the catalytic igniter allows ...

  4. Improving the performance of a compression ignition engine by directing flow of inlet air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Carlton

    1946-01-01

    The object of this report is to present the results of tests performed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effect on engine performance of directing the flow of the inlet air to a 5-inch by 7-inch cylinder, solid injection, compression ignition engine, After a few preliminary tests, comparative runs were made at a speed of 1500 r.p.m. with and without directed air flow. It was found that directing the flow of the inlet air toward the fuel injection valve gave steadier engine operation, and an appreciable increase in power, and decreased fuel consumption. The results indicate the possibility of improving the performance of a given type of combustion chamber without changing its shape and with no change in valve timing. They would also seem to prove that directional turbulence, set up before the inlet valve of a four-stroke cycle engine, continues in the engine cylinder throughout the compression stroke.

  5. Variations in speciated emissions from spark-ignition and compression-ignition motor vehicles in California's south coast air basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Eric M; Zielinska, Barbara; Campbell, David E; Arnott, W Patrick; Sagebiel, John C; Mazzoleni, Lynn; Chow, Judith C; Gabele, Peter A; Crews, William; Snow, Richard; Clark, Nigel N; Wayne, W Scott; Lawson, Douglas R

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Gasoline/Diesel PM Split Study examined the sources of uncertainties in using an organic compound-based chemical mass balance receptor model to quantify the contributions of spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engine exhaust to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5). This paper presents the chemical composition profiles of SI and CI engine exhaust from the vehicle-testing portion of the study. Chemical analysis of source samples consisted of gravimetric mass, elements, ions, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) by the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) and Speciation Trends Network (STN) thermal/optical methods, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, steranes, alkanes, and polar organic compounds. More than half of the mass of carbonaceous particles emitted by heavy-duty diesel trucks was EC (IMPROVE) and emissions from SI vehicles contained predominantly OC. Although total carbon (TC) by the IMPROVE and STN protocols agreed well for all of the samples, the STN/IMPROVE ratios for EC from SI exhaust decreased with decreasing sample loading. SI vehicles, whether low or high emitters, emitted greater amounts of high-molecular-weight particulate PAHs (benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and coronene) than did CI vehicles. Diesel emissions contained higher abundances of two- to four-ring semivolatile PAHs. Diacids were emitted by CI vehicles but are also prevalent in secondary organic aerosols, so they cannot be considered unique tracers. Hopanes and steranes were present in lubricating oil with similar composition for both gasoline and diesel vehicles and were negligible in gasoline or diesel fuels. CI vehicles emitted greater total amounts of hopanes and steranes on a mass per mile basis, but abundances were comparable to SI exhaust normalized to TC emissions within measurement uncertainty. The combustion-produced high-molecular-weight PAHs were found in used

  6. Compression ignition of low-octane gasoline: Life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Han; Liu, Feiqi; Liu, Zongwei; Zhao, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A process-based, well-to-wheel conceptualized life cycle assessment model is established. • The impacts of using low-octane gasoline on compression ignition engines are examined. • Life cycle energy consumption and GHG emissions reductions are 24.6% and 21.6%. • Significant technical and market barriers are still to be overcome. - Abstract: The use of low-octane gasoline on Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engines is considered as a competitive alternative to the conventional vehicle propulsion technologies. In this study, a process-based, well-to-wheel conceptualized life cycle assessment model is established to estimate the life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the conventional gasoline-Spark Ignition (SI) and low-octane gasoline-GCI pathways. It is found that compared with the conventional pathway, the low-octane gasoline-GCI pathway leads to a 24.6% reduction in energy consumption and a 22.8% reduction in GHG emissions. The removal of the isomerization and catalytic reforming units in the refinery and the higher energy efficiency in the vehicle use phase are the substantial drivers behind the reductions. The results indicate that by promoting the use of low-octane gasoline coupled with the deployment of GCI vehicles, considerable reductions of energy consumption and GHG emissions in the transport sector can be achieved. However, significant technical and market barriers are still to be overcome. The inherent problems of NO_x and PM exhaust emissions associated with GCI engines need to be further addressed with advanced combustion techniques. Besides, the yield of low-octane gasoline needs to be improved through adjusting the refinery configurations.

  7. Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Variable Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Jatropha curcas Ethyl Ester Blends at Different Compression Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine performance and emission characteristics of unmodified biodiesel fueled diesel engines are highly influenced by their ignition and combustion behavior. In this study, emission and combustion characteristics were studied when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B40 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 17.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The change of compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1 resulted in 27.1%, 27.29%, 26.38%, 28.48%, and 34.68% increase in cylinder pressure for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions. Higher peak heat release rate increased by 23.19%, 14.03%, 26.32%, 21.87%, and 25.53% for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The delay period decreased by 21.26%, CO emission reduced by 14.28%, and NOx emission increased by 22.84% for B40 blends at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. It is concluded that Jatropha oil ester can be used as fuel in diesel engine by blending it with diesel fuel.

  8. CFD modeling of two-stage ignition in a rapid compression machine: Assessment of zero-dimensional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Gaurav [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Raju, Mandhapati P. [General Motor R and D Tech Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In modeling rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments, zero-dimensional approach is commonly used along with an associated heat loss model. The adequacy of such approach has not been validated for hydrocarbon fuels. The existence of multi-dimensional effects inside an RCM due to the boundary layer, roll-up vortex, non-uniform heat release, and piston crevice could result in deviation from the zero-dimensional assumption, particularly for hydrocarbons exhibiting two-stage ignition and strong thermokinetic interactions. The objective of this investigation is to assess the adequacy of zero-dimensional approach in modeling RCM experiments under conditions of two-stage ignition and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) response. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are conducted for n-heptane ignition in an RCM and the validity of zero-dimensional approach is assessed through comparisons over the entire NTC region. Results show that the zero-dimensional model based on the approach of 'adiabatic volume expansion' performs very well in adequately predicting the first-stage ignition delays, although quantitative discrepancy for the prediction of the total ignition delays and pressure rise in the first-stage ignition is noted even when the roll-up vortex is suppressed and a well-defined homogeneous core is retained within an RCM. Furthermore, the discrepancy is pressure dependent and decreases as compressed pressure is increased. Also, as ignition response becomes single-stage at higher compressed temperatures, discrepancy from the zero-dimensional simulations reduces. Despite of some quantitative discrepancy, the zero-dimensional modeling approach is deemed satisfactory from the viewpoint of the ignition delay simulation. (author)

  9. A RCCI operational limits assessment in a medium duty compression ignition engine using an adapted compression ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; Pastor, José V.; García, Antonio; Boronat, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • RCCI with CR 12.75 reaches up to 80% load fulfilling mechanical limits. • Ultra-low levels in NOx and soot emissions are obtained in the whole engine map. • Ultra-high levels of CO and uHC have been measured overall at low load. • RCCI improves fuel consumption from 25% to 80% engine loads comparing with CDC. - Abstract: Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition concept offers an ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions with a high thermal efficiency. This work investigates the capabilities of this low temperature combustion concept to work on the whole map of a medium duty engine proposing strategies to solve its main challenges. In this sense, an extension to high loads of the concept without exceeding mechanical stress as well as a mitigation of carbon oxide and unburned hydrocarbons emissions at low load together with a fuel consumption penalty have been identified as main Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition drawbacks. For this purpose, a single cylinder engine derived from commercial four cylinders medium-duty engine with an adapted compression ratio of 12.75 is used. Commercial 95 octane gasoline was used as a low reactivity fuel and commercial diesel as a high reactivity fuel. Thus, the study consists of two different parts. Firstly, the work is focused on the development and evaluation of an engine map trying to achieve the maximum possible load without exceeding a pressure rise rate of 15 bar/CAD. The second part holds on improving fuel consumption and carbon oxide and unburned hydrocarbons emissions at low load. Results suggest that it is possible to achieve up to 80% of nominal conventional diesel combustion engine load without overpassing the constraints of pressure rise rate (below 15 bar/CAD) and maximum pressure peak (below 190 bar) while obtaining ultra-low levels of nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. Regarding low load challenges, it has developed a particular methodology sweeping the gasoline-diesel blend together

  10. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart Zzzz of... - Operating Limitations for New and Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions, Existing Non-Emergency Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP, and New and Reconstructed 4SLB Burn Stationary RICE â¥250 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2b Table 2b to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2a to Subpart Zzzz of... - Emission Limitations for New and Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP and New and Reconstructed 4SLB Stationary RICE â¥250 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2a Table 2a to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP and New and Reconstructed 4SLB Stationary RICE...

  12. Numerical Investigation Into Effect of Fuel Injection Timing on CAI/HCCI Combustion in a Four-Stroke GDI Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Zhao, Hua; Jiang, Xi; Kalian, Navin

    2006-02-01

    The Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) combustion, also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), was achieved by trapping residuals with early exhaust valve closure in conjunction with direct injection. Multi-cycle 3D engine simulations have been carried out for parametric study on four different injection timings in order to better understand the effects of injection timings on in-cylinder mixing and CAI combustion. The full engine cycle simulation including complete gas exchange and combustion processes was carried out over several cycles in order to obtain the stable cycle for analysis. The combustion models used in the present study are the Shell auto-ignition model and the characteristic-time combustion model, which were modified to take the high level of EGR into consideration. A liquid sheet breakup spray model was used for the droplet breakup processes. The analyses show that the injection timing plays an important role in affecting the in-cylinder air/fuel mixing and mixture temperature, which in turn affects the CAI combustion and engine performance.

  13. Ozone applied to the homogeneous charge compression ignition engine to control alcohol fuels combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masurier, J.-B.; Foucher, F.; Dayma, G.; Dagaut, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ozone was useful to control combustion phasing of alcohol fuels in HCCI engine. • Ozone helps to improve the combustion and advance its phasing. • Butanol is more impacted by ozone than methanol and ethanol. • HCCI combustion parameters may be controlled by managing ozone concentration. • Kinetics demonstrates that alcohol fuels are initially oxidized by O-atoms. - Abstract: The present investigation examines the impact of seeding the intake of an HCCI engine with ozone, one of the most oxidizing chemical species, on the combustion of three alcohol fuels: methanol, ethanol and n-butanol. The research was performed through engine experiments and constant volume computations. The results showed that increasing the ozone concentration led to an improvement in combustion coupled with a combustion advance. It was also observed, by comparing the results for each fuel selected, that n-butanol is the most impacted by ozone seeding and methanol the least. Further analyses of the experimental results showed that the alcohol fuel combustion can be controlled with ozone, which presents an interesting potential. Finally, computation results confirmed the experimental results observed. They also showed that in presence of ozone, alcohol fuels are not initially oxidized by molecular oxygen but by O-atoms coming from the ozone decomposition.

  14. Autoignition of straight-run naphtha: A promising fuel for advanced compression ignition engines

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2017-11-24

    Naphtha, a low-octane distillate fuel, has been proposed as a promising low-cost fuel for advanced compression ignition engine technologies. Experimental and modelling studies have been conducted in this work to assess autoignition characteristics of naphtha for use in advanced engines. Ignition delay times of a certified straight-run naphtha fuel, supplied by Haltermann Solutions, were measured in a shock tube and a rapid comparison machine over wide ranges of experimental conditions (20 and 60 bar, 620–1223 K, ϕ = 0.5, 1 and 2). The Haltermann straight-run naphtha (HSRN) has research octane number (RON) of 60 and motor octane number (MON) of 58.3, with carbon range spanning C3–C9. Reactivity of HSRN was compared, via experiments and simulations, with three suitably formulated surrogates: a two-component PRF (n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, a three-component TPRF (toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, and a six-component surrogate. All surrogates reasonably captured the ignition delays of HSRN at high and intermediate temperatures. However, at low temperatures (T < 750 K), the six-component surrogate performed the best in emulating the reactivity of naphtha fuel. Temperature sensitivity and rate of production analyses revealed that the presence of cyclo-alkanes in naphtha inhibits the overall fuel reactivity. Zero-dimensional engine simulations showed that PRF is a good autoignition surrogate for naphtha at high engine loads, however, the six-component surrogate is needed to match the combustion phasing of naphtha at low engine loads.

  15. Autoignition of straight-run naphtha: A promising fuel for advanced compression ignition engines

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed; Issayev, Gani; Badra, Jihad; Voice, Alexander K.; Giri, Binod; Djebbi, Khalil; Ahmed, Ahfaz; Sarathy, Mani; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Naphtha, a low-octane distillate fuel, has been proposed as a promising low-cost fuel for advanced compression ignition engine technologies. Experimental and modelling studies have been conducted in this work to assess autoignition characteristics of naphtha for use in advanced engines. Ignition delay times of a certified straight-run naphtha fuel, supplied by Haltermann Solutions, were measured in a shock tube and a rapid comparison machine over wide ranges of experimental conditions (20 and 60 bar, 620–1223 K, ϕ = 0.5, 1 and 2). The Haltermann straight-run naphtha (HSRN) has research octane number (RON) of 60 and motor octane number (MON) of 58.3, with carbon range spanning C3–C9. Reactivity of HSRN was compared, via experiments and simulations, with three suitably formulated surrogates: a two-component PRF (n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, a three-component TPRF (toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, and a six-component surrogate. All surrogates reasonably captured the ignition delays of HSRN at high and intermediate temperatures. However, at low temperatures (T < 750 K), the six-component surrogate performed the best in emulating the reactivity of naphtha fuel. Temperature sensitivity and rate of production analyses revealed that the presence of cyclo-alkanes in naphtha inhibits the overall fuel reactivity. Zero-dimensional engine simulations showed that PRF is a good autoignition surrogate for naphtha at high engine loads, however, the six-component surrogate is needed to match the combustion phasing of naphtha at low engine loads.

  16. Experimental investigation on the effect of intake air temperature and air-fuel ratio on cycle-to-cycle variations of HCCI combustion and performance parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar [Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Combustion in HCCI engines is a controlled auto ignition of well-mixed fuel, air and residual gas. Since onset of HCCI combustion depends on the auto ignition of fuel/air mixture, there is no direct control on the start of combustion process. Therefore, HCCI combustion becomes unstable rather easily, especially at lower and higher engine loads. In this study, cycle-to-cycle variations of a HCCI combustion engine fuelled with ethanol were investigated on a modified two-cylinder engine. Port injection technique is used for preparing homogeneous charge for HCCI combustion. The experiments were conducted at varying intake air temperatures and air-fuel ratios at constant engine speed of 1500 rpm and P-{theta} diagram of 100 consecutive combustion cycles for each test conditions at steady state operation were recorded. Consequently, cycle-to-cycle variations of the main combustion parameters and performance parameters were analyzed. To evaluate the cycle-to-cycle variations of HCCI combustion parameters, coefficient of variation (COV) of every parameter were calculated for every engine operating condition. The critical optimum parameters that can be used to define HCCI operating ranges are 'maximum rate of pressure rise' and 'COV of indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP)'. (author)

  17. Study of emissions for a compression ignition engine fueled with a mix of DME and diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurchiş, Bogdan; Nicolae, Burnete; Călin, Iclodean; Nicolae Vlad, Burnete

    2017-10-01

    Currently, there is a growing demand for diesel engines, primarily due to the relatively low fuel consumption compared to spark-ignition engines. However, these engines have a great disadvantage in terms of pollution because they produce solid particles that ultimately form particulate matter (PM), which has harmful effects on human health and also on the environment. The toxic emissions from the diesel engine exhaust, like particulate matter (PM) and NOx, generated by the combustion of fossil fuels, lead to the necessity to develop green fuels which on one hand should be obtained from regenerative resources and on the other hand less polluting. In this paper, the authors focused on the amount of emissions produced by a diesel engine when running with a fuel mixture consisting of diesel and DME. Dimethyl ether (DME) is developed mainly by converting natural gas or biomass to synthesis gas (syngas). It is an extremely attractive resource for the future used in the transport industry, given that it can be obtained at low costs from renewable resources. Using DME mixed with diesel for the combustion process, besides the fact that it produces less smoke, the emission levels of particulate matter is reduced compared to diesel and in some situations, NOx emissions may decrease. DME has a high enough cetane number to perform well as a compression-ignition fuel but due to the poor lubrication and viscosity, it is difficult to be used as the main fuel for combustion

  18. COMBUSTION ANALYSIS OF ALGAL OIL METHYL ESTER IN A DIRECT INJECTION COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARIRAM V.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Algal oil methyl ester was derived from microalgae (Spirulina sp. The microalga was cultivated in BG 11 media composition in a photobioreactor. Upon harvesting, the biomass was filtered and dried. The algal oil was obtained by a two step solvent extraction method using hexane and ether solvent. Cyclohexane was added to biomass to expel the remaining algal oil. By this method 92% of algal oil is obtained. Transesterification process was carried out to produce AOME by adding sodium hydroxide and methanol. The AOME was blended with straight diesel in 5%, 10% and 15% blend ratio. Combustion parameters were analyzed on a Kirloskar single cylinder direct injection compression ignition engine. The cylinder pressure characteristics, the rate of pressure rise, heat release analysis, performance and emissions were studied for straight diesel and the blends of AOME’s. AOME 15% blend exhibits significant variation in cylinder pressure and rate of heat release.

  19. Efficiency and exhaust gas analysis of variable compression ratio spark ignition engine fuelled with alternative fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshaiah, N. [Mechanical Engineering Department, M.I.T.S, Madanapalle, Angallu-517325, A.P. (India)

    2010-07-01

    Considering energy crises and pollution problems today, investigations have been concentrated on decreasing fuel consumption by using alternative fuels and on lowering the concentration of toxic components in combustion products. In the present work, the variable compression ratio spark ignition engine designed to run on gasoline has been tested with pure gasoline, LPG (Isobutene), and gasoline blended with ethanol 10%, 15%, 25% and 35% by volume. Also, the gasoline mixed with kerosene at 15%, 25% and 35% by volume without any engine modifications has been tested and presented the result. Brake thermal and volumetric efficiency variation with brake load is compared and presented. CO and CO2 emissions have been also compared for all tested fuels.

  20. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaughnessy, D. A., E-mail: shaughnessy2@llnl.gov; Moody, K. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Grant, P. M.; Gostic, J. M.; Torretto, P. C.; Wooddy, P. T.; Bandong, B. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Despotopulos, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Radiochemistry Program, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,γ) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of {sup 198m+g}Au and {sup 196g}Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF.

  1. Increasing the Air Charge and Scavenging the Clearance Volume of a Compression-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanogle, J A; Hicks, C W; Foster, H H

    1934-01-01

    The object of the investigation presented in this report was to determine the effects of increasing the air charge and scavenging the clearance volume of a 4-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine having a vertical-disk form combustion chamber. Boosting the inlet-air pressure with normal valve timing increased the indicated engine power in proportion to the additional air inducted and resulted in smoother engine operation with less combustion shock. Scavenging the clearance volume by using a valve overlap of 145 degrees and an inlet-air boost pressure of approximately 2 1/2 inches of mercury produced a net increase in performance for clear exhaust operation of 33 percent over that obtained with normal valve timing and the same boost pressure. The improved combustion characteristics result in lower specific fuel consumption, and a clearer exhaust.

  2. Validation of a zero-dimensional and two-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikulski, M.; Wierzbicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to reduce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of

  3. 76 FR 25246 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression-Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1042 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression- Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR Correction Correction In rule document 2011-8794 appearing on pages 20550-20551 in the issue of Wednesday, April 13, 2011, make the following correction: Sec. 1042...

  4. 76 FR 26620 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression-Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1042 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression- Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR Correction Correction In rule correction document C1-2011-8794 appearing on page 25246 in the issue of Wednesday, May 4, 2011, make the following correction: Sec. 1042.901...

  5. 76 FR 20550 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression-Ignition Engines and Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1042 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression- Ignition Engines and Vessels CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part... service, whichever comes first. (2) For vessels with no Category 3 engines, a vessel that has been...

  6. 75 FR 37310 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Nonroad Compression-Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1039 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Nonroad Compression- Ignition Engines CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1000 to End... for my engines in model year 2014 and earlier? * * * * * Table 2 of Sec. 1039.102--Interim Tier 4...

  7. Ignition studies of two low-octane gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2017-07-24

    Low-octane gasolines (RON ∼ 50–70 range) are prospective fuels for gasoline compression ignition (GCI) internal combustion engines. GCI technology utilizing low-octane fuels has the potential to significantly improve well-to-wheel efficiency and reduce the transportation sector\\'s environmental footprint by offsetting diesel fuel usage in compression ignition engines. In this study, ignition delay times of two low-octane FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE I and FACE J, were measured in a shock tube and a rapid compression machine over a broad range of engine-relevant conditions (650–1200 K, 20 and 40 bar and ϕ = 0.5 and 1). The two gasolines are of similar octane ratings with anti-knock index, AKI = (RON + MON)/2, of ∼ 70 and sensitivity, S = RON–MON, of ∼ 3. However, the molecular compositions of the two gasolines are notably different. Experimental ignition delay time results showed that the two gasolines exhibited similar reactivity over a wide range of test conditions. Furthermore, ignition delay times of a primary reference fuel (PRF) surrogate (n-heptane/iso-octane blend), having the same AKI as the FACE gasolines, captured the ignition behavior of these gasolines with some minor discrepancies at low temperatures (T < 700 K). Multi-component surrogates, formulated by matching the octane ratings and compositions of the two gasolines, emulated the autoignition behavior of gasolines from high to low temperatures. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine simulations were used to show that the PRF and multi-component surrogates exhibited similar combustion phasing over a wide range of engine operating conditions.

  8. DT ignition in a Z pinch compressed by an imploding liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, L.; Bernal, L.; Linhart, J.G.; Verri, G.

    2001-01-01

    It has been shown that an m=0 instability of a Z pinch carrying a current of the order of 10 MA with a rise time of less than 10 ns can generate a spark capable of igniting a fusion detonation in the adjacent DT plasma channel. A possible method for generating such currents, necessary for the implosion of an initial large radius, low temperature Z pinch, can be a radial implosion of a cylindrical fast liner. The problem has been addressed in previous publications without considering the role played by an initially impressed m=0 perturbation, a mechanism indispensable for the generation of a spark. The liner-Z pinch dynamics can be solved at several levels of physical model completeness. The first corresponds to a zero dimensional model in which the liner has a given mass per unit length and a zero thickness, the plasma is compressed adiabatically and is isotropic, and there are no energy losses or Joule heating. The second level is one dimensional. The Z pinch plasma is described by the full set of MHD, two-fluid equations. The liner is treated first as thin and incompressible, and subsequently it is assumed that it has a finite thickness and is composed of a heavy ion plasma, having an artificial but realistic equation of state. Both plasma and liner are considered uniform in the Z direction and only DT reactions are considered. It is shown that, given sufficient energy and speed of the liner, the Z pinch can reach a volume ignition. The third level is two dimensional. Plasma and liner are treated as in the second level but either the Z pinch or the liner is perturbed by an m=0 non-uniformity. Provided the liner energy is high enough and the initial m=0 perturbation is correctly chosen, the final neck plasma can act as a spark for DT ignition. It is also shown that the liner energy required for generating a spark and the subsequent detonation propagation are considerably less than in the case of volume ignition. (author)

  9. A spectroscopy study of gasoline partially premixed compression ignition spark assisted combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, J.V.; García-Oliver, J.M.; García, A.; Micó, C.; Durrett, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► PPC combustion combined with spark assistance and gasoline fuel on a CI engine. ► Chemiluminescence of different chemical species describes the progress of combustion reaction. ► Spectra of a novel combustion mode under SACI conditions is described. ► UV–Visible spectrometry, high speed imaging and pressure diagnostic were employed for analysis. - Abstract: Nowadays many research efforts are focused on the study and development of new combustion modes, mainly based on the use of locally lean air–fuel mixtures. This characteristic, combined with exhaust gas recirculation, provides low combustion temperatures that reduces pollutant formation and increases efficiency. However these combustion concepts have some drawbacks, related to combustion phasing control, which must be overcome. In this way, the use of a spark plug has shown to be a good solution to improve phasing control in combination with lean low temperature combustion. Its performance is well reported on bibliography, however phenomena involving the combustion process are not completely described. The aim of the present work is to develop a detailed description of the spark assisted compression ignition mode by means of application of UV–Visible spectrometry, in order to improve insight on the combustion process. Tests have been performed in an optical engine by means of broadband radiation imaging and emission spectrometry. The engine hardware is typical of a compression ignition passenger car application. Gasoline was used as the fuel due to its low reactivity. Combining broadband luminosity images with pressure-derived heat-release rate and UV–Visible spectra, it was possible to identify different stages of the combustion reaction. After the spark discharge, a first flame kernel appears and starts growing as a premixed flame front, characterized by a low and constant heat-release rate in combination with the presence of remarkable OH radical radiation. Heat release increases

  10. Experimental investigation of gasoline compression ignition combustion in a light-duty diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeper, C. Paul

    Due to increased ignition delay and volatility, low temperature combustion (LTC) research utilizing gasoline fuel has experienced recent interest [1-3]. These characteristics improve air-fuel mixing prior to ignition allowing for reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot (or particulate matter, PM). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Engine Research Center (Ra et al. [4, 5]) have validated these attributes and established baseline operating parameters for a gasoline compression ignition (GCI) concept in a light-duty diesel engine over a large load range (3-16 bar net IMEP). In addition to validating these computational results, subsequent experiments at the Engine Research Center utilizing a single cylinder research engine based on a GM 1.9-liter diesel engine have progressed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition processes, and established the capability of critical controlling input parameters to better control GCI operation. The focus of this thesis can be divided into three segments: 1) establishment of operating requirements in the low-load operating limit, including operation sensitivities with respect to inlet temperature, and the capabilities of injection strategy to minimize NOx emissions while maintaining good cycle-to-cycle combustion stability; 2) development of novel three-injection strategies to extend the high load limit; and 3) having developed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition kinetics, and how changes in physical processes (e.g. engine speed effects, inlet pressure variation, and air-fuel mixture processes) affects operation, develop operating strategies to maintain robust engine operation. Collectively, experimental results have demonstrated the ability of GCI strategies to operate over a large load-speed range (3 bar to 17.8 bar net IMEP and 1300-2500 RPM, respectively) with low emissions (NOx and PM less than 1 g/kg-FI and 0.2 g/kg-FI, respectively), and low

  11. Physical and chemical effects of low octane gasoline fuels on compression ignition combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2016-09-30

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines running on low octane gasoline fuels are considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. In this study, three fuels with different chemical and physical characteristics have been investigated in single cylinder engine running in GCI combustion mode at part-load conditions both experimentally and numerically. The studied fuels are: Saudi Aramco light naphtha (SALN) (Research octane number (RON) = 62 and final boiling point (FBP) = 91 °C), Haltermann straight run naphtha (HSRN) (RON = 60 and FBP = 140 °C) and a primary reference fuel (PRF65) (RON = 65 and FBP = 99 °C). Injection sweeps, where the start of injection (SOI) is changed between −60 and −11 CAD aTDC, have been performed for the three fuels. Full cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were executed using PRFs as chemical surrogates for the naphtha fuels. Physical surrogates based on the evaporation characteristics of the naphtha streams have been developed and their properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. It was found that the three fuels have similar combustion phasings and emissions at the conditions tested in this work with minor differences at SOI earlier than −30 CAD aTDC. These trends were successfully reproduced by the CFD calculations. The chemical and physical effects were further investigated numerically. It was found that the physical characteristics of the fuel significantly affect the combustion for injections earlier than −30 CAD aTDC because of the low evaporation rates of the fuel because of the higher boiling temperature of the fuel and the colder in-cylinder air during injection. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  12. Energetic and exergetic analyses of a variable compression ratio spark ignition gas engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaheri, A.; Esfahanian, V.; Salavati-Zadeh, A.; Darzi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of CR and λ on CNG SI ICE 1st and 2nd law analyses are experimentally studied. • The performance of pure methane and a real CNG are observed and compared. • The ratio of actual to Otto cycle thermal efficiencies is 0.78 for all cases. • At least 25.5% of destructed availability is due to combustion irreversibility. • With decrease in methane content, CNG shows more combustion irreversibility. - Abstract: Considering the significance of obtaining higher efficiencies from internal combustion engines (ICE) along with the growing role of natural gas as a fuel, the present work is set to explore the effects of compression ratio (CR hereafter) and air/fuel equivalence ratio (AFER hereafter) on the energy and exergy potentials in a gas-fueled spark ignition internal combustion engine. Experiments are carried out using a single cylinder, port injection, water cooled, variable compression ratio (VCR hereafter), spark ignition engine at a constant engine speed of 2000 rpm. The study involves CRs of 12, 14 and 16 and 10 AFERs between 0.8 and 1.25. Pure methane is utilized for the analysis. In addition, a natural gas blend with the minimum methane content among Iranian gas sources is also tested in order to investigate the effect of real natural gas on findings. The energy analysis involves input fuel power, indicated power and losses due to high temperature of exhaust gases and their unburned content, blow-by and heat loss. The exergy analysis is carried out for availability input and piston, exhaust, and losses availabilities along with destructed entropy. The analysis indicates an increase in the ratio of thermo-mechanical exhaust availability to fuel availability by CR with a maximum near stoichiometry, whereas it is shown that chemical exhaust exergy is not dependent on CR and reduces with AFER. In addition, it is indicated that the ratio of actual cycle to Otto cycle thermal efficiencies is about constant (about 0.784) with changing CR

  13. Gaseous and particle emissions from an ethanol fumigated compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surawski, Nicholas C.; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Brown, Richard J.; Situ, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ethanol fumigation system fitted on a direct injection compression ignition engine. ► Ethanol substitutions up to 40% (by energy) were achieved. ► Gaseous and particle emissions were measured at intermediate speed. ► PM and NO emissions significantly reduced, whilst CO and HC increased. ► The number of particles emitted generally higher with ethanol fumigation. - Abstract: A 4-cylinder Ford 2701C test engine was used in this study to explore the impact of ethanol fumigation on gaseous and particle emission concentrations. The fumigation technique delivered vaporised ethanol into the intake manifold of the engine, using an injector, a pump and pressure regulator, a heat exchanger for vaporising ethanol and a separate fuel tank and lines. Gaseous (Nitric oxide (NO), Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbons (HC)) and particulate emissions (particle mass (PM 2.5 ) and particle number) testing was conducted at intermediate speed (1700 rpm) using 4 load settings with ethanol substitution percentages ranging from 10% to 40% (by energy). With ethanol fumigation, NO and PM 2.5 emissions were reduced, whereas CO and HC emissions increased considerably and particle number emissions increased at most test settings. It was found that ethanol fumigation reduced the excess air factor for the engine and this led to increased emissions of CO and HC, but decreased emissions of NO. PM 2.5 emissions were reduced with ethanol fumigation, as ethanol has a very low “sooting” tendency. This is due to the higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of this fuel, and also because ethanol does not contain aromatics, both of which are known soot precursors. The use of a diesel oxidation catalyst (as an after-treatment device) is recommended to achieve a reduction in the four pollutants that are currently regulated for compression ignition engines. The increase in particle number emissions with ethanol fumigation was due to the formation of volatile (organic) particles

  14. Experimental investigation of hydrogen energy share improvement in a compression ignition engine using water injection and compression ratio reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, V.; Subramanian, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy efficiency (EE) increased with increase in hydrogen (H_2) energy share. • H_2 energy share increased from 19% to 79% with combined CR reduction and water. • In-cylinder temperature decreased significantly with water addition and CR reduction. • HC, CO, smoke and NO_x emissions with water and CR are lower than base diesel. - Abstract: This study deals with the effect of water addition on enhancement of maximum hydrogen energy share in a compression ignition engine (7.4 kW rated power at 1500 rpm) under dual fuel mode. The specific water consumption (SWC) was varied from 130 to 480 g/kW h in step of 70 g/kW h using manifold and port injection methods. Subsequently, the combined effect of reduction of compression ratio (CR) of the engine (from 19.5:1 (base) to 16.5:1 and 15.4:1) along with water addition on further enhancement of hydrogen energy share is investigated. The hydrogen energy share was limited to 18.8% with conventional dual fuel mode due to knocking. However, the energy share increased to 66.5% with water addition (maximum SWC: 480 g/kW h), and 79% with combined control strategies (SWC of 340 g/kW h and CR reduction to 16.5:1). Thermal efficiency of the engine under water added dual fuel mode is higher than base diesel mode (single fuel mode), but it is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode without water. The efficiency of the engine with reduced CR and water addition is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode, however at the CR of 16.5:1 and SWC of 340 g/kW h, the efficiency is comparable with base diesel mode efficiency. Hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, smoke, and oxides of nitrogen emissions of the engine with water addition (340 g/kW h) and CR reduction (to 16.5:1) decreased significantly as compared to base diesel mode, but slightly higher than conventional dual fuel mode.

  15. Examining Methods to Reduce Wall-Wetting under HCCI conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Erp, D.D.T.M.

    2009-01-15

    HCCI engines (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are very promising in the reduction of soot and NOx, but several problems must be tackled. Collision of the liquid fuel spray against the cylinder wall (Wall-wetting) is a major problem. Low gas temperatures and low gas densities (typical 600 - 800 K and 5 - 7.4 kg/m{sup 3}) at the moment of the fuel injection slow down the evaporation process of the liquid fuel in the spray and causes wall-wetting. This report investigates different promising measures that can reduce the penetration of the liquid fuel core, in order to prevent wall-wetting. From literature it turns out that the measures, listed below, are the most promising for liquid core length (LL) reduction without changing the design of the injector or the engine design: Increasing the fuel temperature, Changing the fuel pressure, Decrease of injector hole diameter, Multiple injections (first very short injections are examined). Each of the measures will be investigated by a liquid length prediction model (Siebers) and in an experimental setup, the EHPC (Eindhoven High Pressure Cell). A high pressure vessel with optical access makes it possible to visualize the liquid core and the vapor phase of the fuel spray by Mie and Schlieren, respectively. Changes to the setup are made to heat up the fuel up to 120C. Furthermore, changes to the fuel spray visualization techniques have been made. Where in previous experiments the Mie and Schlieren techniques were carried out separately from each other, in this work both visualization techniques are combined to save measurement time and to deal with the same experimental conditions. The combined recording of Mie and Schlieren works well for high gas temperatures and densities. But the combined technique fails for low gas temperatures and densities (below 700K and 7.4 kg/m3), due to the poor contrast between the liquid core and the vapor phase. In further examination of liquid length reducing measures, only the Mie

  16. Modeling of heat release and emissions from droplet combustion of multi component fuels in compression ignition engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsson, Anders

    emissions from the compression ignition engines (CI engines or diesel engines) are continuously increased. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. The complex combustion process of a compression ignition engine may be divided...... it is well suited for optical line of sight diagnostics in both pre and post combustion regions. The work also includes some preliminary studies of radiant emissions from helium stabilized ethylene/air and methane/oxygen flames. It is demonstrated that nano particles below the sooting threshold actually...... of ethylene/air flames well known from the experimental work, was used for the model validation. Two cases were helium stabilized flames with φ = 1 and 2.14. The third case was an unstable flame with φ = 2.14. The unstable case was used to test whether a transient model would be able to predict the frequency...

  17. Numerical investigation of the impact of gas composition on the combustion process in a dual-fuel compression-ignition engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikulski, M.; Wierzbicki, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses the model of operation of a dual-fuel compression-ignition engine, powered by gaseous fuel with an initial dose of diesel fuel as the ignition inhibitor. The study used a zero-dimensional multiphase mathematical model of a dual-fuel engine to simulate the impact of enhancing

  18. ANALYSIS OF OPERATING PARAMETERS AND INDICATORS OF A COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH LPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GARBALA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibilities for using alternative fuels to power vehicles equipped with compression ignition (CI engines (diesel. Systems for using such fuels have been discussed. Detailed analysis and research covered the LPG STAG autogas system, which is used to power dual-fuel engine units (LPG+diesel. A description of the operation of the autogas system and installation in a vehicle has been presented. The basic algorithms of the controller, which is an actuating element of the whole system, have been discussed. Protection systems of a serial production engine unit to guarantee its factorycontrolled durability standards have been presented. A long-distance test drive and examinations of the engine over 150,000 km in a Toyota Hilux have been performed. Operating parameters and performance indicators of the engine with STAG LPG+diesel fuelling have been verified. Directions and perspectives for the further development of such a system in diesel-powered cars have been also indicated.

  19. Studies on biogas-fuelled compression ignition engine under dual fuel mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahla, Sunil Kumar; Singla, Varun; Sandhu, Sarbjot Singh; Dhir, Amit

    2018-04-01

    Experimental investigation has been carried out to utilize biogas as an alternative source of energy in compression ignition (CI) engine under dual fuel operational mode. Biogas was inducted into the inlet manifold at different flow rates along with fresh air through inlet manifold and diesel was injected as a pilot fuel to initiate combustion under dual fuel mode. The engine performance and emission characteristics of dual fuel operational mode were analyzed at different biogas flow rates and compared with baseline conventional diesel fuel. Based upon the improved performance and lower emission characteristics under the dual fuel operation, the optimum flow rate of biogas was observed to be 2.2 kg/h. The lower brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and higher brake-specific energy consumption (BSEC) were noticed with biogas-diesel fuel under dual fuel mode when compared with neat diesel operation. Test results showed reduced NO x emissions and smoke opacity level in the exhaust tailpipe emissions. However, higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were noticed under dual fuel mode at entire engine loads when compared with baseline fossil petro-diesel. Hence, the use of low-cost gaseous fuel such as biogas would be an economically viable proposition to address the current and future problems of energy scarcity and associated environmental concerns.

  20. Boosted performance of a compression-ignition engine with a displaced piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Charles S; Foster, Hampton H

    1936-01-01

    Performance tests were made using a rectangular displacer arranged so that the combustion air was forced through equal passages at either end of the displacer into the vertical-disk combustion chamber of a single-cylinder, four-stroke-cycle compression-ignition test engine. After making tests to determine optimum displacer height, shape, and fuel-spray arrangement, engine-performance tests were made at 1,500 and 2,000 r.p.m. for a range of boost pressures from 0 to 20 inches of mercury and for maximum cylinder pressures up to 1,150 pounds per square inch. The engine operation for boosted conditions was very smooth, there being no combustion shock even at the highest maximum cylinder pressures. Indicated mean effective pressures of 240 pounds per square inch for fuel consumptions of 0.39 pound per horsepower-hour have been readily reproduced during routine testing at 2,000 r.p.m. at a boost pressure of 20 inches of mercury.

  1. Performance, emission and combustion analysis of a compression ignition engine using biofuel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ors Ilker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects on performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of adding biodiesel and bioethanol to diesel fuel. Diesel fuel and blend fuels were tested in a water-cooled compression ignition engine with direct injection. Test results showed that brake specific fuel consumption and volumetric efficiency increased by about 30.6% and 3.7%, respectively, with the addition of bioethanol to binary blend fuels. The results of the blend fuel’s combustion analysis were similar to the diesel fuel’s results. Bioethanol increased maximal in-cylinder pressure compared to biodiesel and diesel fuel at both 1400 rpm and 2800 rpm. Emissions of CO increased by an amount of about 80% for fuels containing a high level of bioethanol when compared to CO emissions for diesel fuel. Using biodiesel, NO emissions increased by an average of 31.3%, HC emissions decreased by an average of 39.25%, and smoke opacity decreased by an average of 6.5% when compared with diesel fuel. In addition, when using bioethanol, NO emissions and smoke opacity decreased by 55% and 17% on average, respectively, and HC emissions increased by an average of 53% compared with diesel fuel.

  2. Biodiesel from plant seed oils as an alternate fuel for compression ignition engines-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, C; Ramesh, M; Murugesan, A; Panneerselvam, N; Subramaniam, D; Bharathiraja, M

    2016-12-01

    The modern scenario reveals that the world is facing energy crisis due to the dwindling sources of fossil fuels. Environment protection agencies are more concerned about the atmospheric pollution due to the burning of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel research is getting augmented because of the above reasons. Plant seed oils (vegetable oils) are cleaner, sustainable, and renewable. So, it can be the most suitable alternative fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the availability of different types of plant seed oils, several methods for production of biodiesel from vegetable oils, and its properties. The different types of oils considered in this review are cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) oil, ginger oil, eucalyptus oil, rice bran oil, Calophyllum inophyllum, hazelnut oil, sesame oil, clove stem oil, sardine oil, honge oil, polanga oil, mahua oil, rubber seed oil, cotton seed oil, neem oil, jatropha oil, egunsi melon oil, shea butter, linseed oil, Mohr oil, sea lemon oil, pumpkin oil, tobacco seed oil, jojoba oil, and mustard oil. Several methods for production of biodiesel are transesterification, pre-treatment, pyrolysis, and water emulsion are discussed. The various fuel properties considered for review such as specific gravity, viscosity, calorific value, flash point, and fire point are presented. The review also portrays advantages, limitations, performance, and emission characteristics of engine using plant seed oil biodiesel are discussed. Finally, the modeling and optimization of engine for various biofuels with different input and output parameters using artificial neural network, response surface methodology, and Taguchi are included.

  3. Effect of Combustion-chamber Shape on the Performance of a Prechamber Compression-ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Collins, J H , Jr

    1934-01-01

    The effect on engine performance of variations in the shape of the prechamber, the shape and direction of the connecting passage, the chamber volume using a tangential passage, the injection system, and the direction od the fuel spray in the chamber was investigated using a 5 by 7 inch single-cylinder compression-ignition engine. The results show that the performance of this engine can be considerably improved by selecting the best combination of variables and incorporating them in a single design. The best combination as determined from these tests consisted of a disk-shaped chamber connected to the cylinder by means of a flared tangential passage. The fuel was injected through a single-orifice nozzle directed normal to the air swirl and in the same plane. At an engine speed of 1,500 r.p.m. and with the theoretical fuel quantity for no excess air, the engine developed a brake mean effective pressure of 115 pounds per square inch with a fuel consumption of 0.49 pound per brake horsepower-hour and an explosion pressure of 820 pounds per square inch. A brake mean effective pressure of 100 pounds per square inch with a brake-fuel consumption of 0.44 pound per horsepower-hour at 1,500 r.p.m. was obtained.

  4. Engine performance and emission of compression ignition engine fuelled with emulsified biodiesel-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawa, W. N.; Mamat, R.; Najafi, G.; Majeed Ali, O.; Aziz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The depletion of fossil fuel and environmental pollution has become world crucial issues in current era. Biodiesel-water emulsion is one of many possible approaches to reduce emissions. In this study, emulsified biodiesel with 4%, 6% and 8% of water contents were prepared to be used as fuel in a direct injection compression ignition engine. The performance indicator such as brake power, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and emissions such as NOx and particulate matter (PM) were investigated. The engine was set at constant speed of 2500 rpm and load from 20% to 60%. All the results were compared to B5 (blend of 95% petroleum diesel and 5% palm oil biodiesel) biodiesel. At low load, the BSFC decrease by 12.75% at 4% water ratio and decreased by 1.5% at 6% water ratio. However, the BSFC increases by 17.19% with increasing water ratio to 8% compared to B5. Furthermore, there was no significant decrease in brake power and BTE at 60% load. For 20% and 40% load there was some variance regarding to brake power and BTE. Significant reduction in NOx and PM emissions by 73.87% and 20.00% respectively were achieved with increasing water ratio to 8%. Overall, it is observed that the emulsified of biodiesel-water is an appropriate alternative fuel method to reduce emissions.

  5. Characterization and effect of using Mahua oil biodiesel as fuel in compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilan, N.; Ashok Babu, T. P.; Reddy, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in India, to search for suitable alternative fuels that are environment friendly. This led to the choice of Mahua Oil (MO) as one of the main alternative fuels to diesel. In this investigation, Mahua Oil Biodiesel (MOB) and its blend with diesel were used as fuel in a single cylinder, direct injection and compression ignition engine. The MOB was prepared from MO by transesterification using methanol and potassium hydroxide. The fuel properties of MOB are close to the diesel and confirm to the ASTM standards. From the engine test analysis, it was observed that the MOB, B5 and B20 blend results in lower CO, HC and smoke emissions as compared to diesel. But the B5 and B20 blends results in higher efficiency as compared to MOB. Hence MOB or blends of MOB and diesel (B5 or B20) can be used as a substitute for diesel in diesel engines used in transportation as well as in the agriculture sector.

  6. Combustion and emissions characteristics of a compression ignition engine fueled with n-butanol blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusri, I. M.; Mamat, R.; Ali, O. M.; Aziz, A.; Akasyah, M. K.; Kamarulzaman, M. K.; Ihsan, C. K.; Mahmadul, H. M.; Rosdi, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The use of biomass based renewable fuel, n-butanol blends for compression ignition (CI) engine has attracted wide attention due to its superior properties such as better miscibility, higher energy content, and cetane number. In this present study the use of n-butanol 10% blends (Bu10) with diesel fuel has been tested using 4-cylinder, 4-stroke common rail direct injection CI engine to investigate the combustion and emissions of the blended fuels. Based on the tested engine at BMEP=3.5Bar Bu10 fuel indicates lower first and second peak pressure by 5.4% and 2.4% for engine speed 1000rpm and 4.4% and 2.1% for engine speed 2500rpm compared to diesel fuel respectively. Percentage reduction relative to diesel fuel at engine speeds 1000rpm and 2500rpm for Bu10: Exhaust temperature was 7.5% and 5.2% respectively; Nitrogen oxides (NOx) 73.4% and 11.3% respectively.

  7. An investigation of the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition engine operating with biodiesel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, D.; Tesfa, B.; Yuan, X.; Wang, R.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation has been carried out on the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The experiment was conducted on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine which runs with biodiesel (B50 and B100) and pure diesel. The signals of acoustic, vibration and in-cylinder pressure were measured during the experiment. To correlate the combustion process and the acoustic characteristics, both phenomena have been investigated. The acoustic analysis resulted in the sound level being increased with increasing of engine loads and speeds as well as the sound characteristics being closely correlated to the combustion process. However, acoustic signals are highly sensitive to the ambient conditions and intrusive background noise. Therefore, the spectral subtraction was employed to minimize the effects of background noise in order to enhance the signal to noise ratio. In addition, the acoustic characteristics of CI engine running with different fuels (biodiesel blends and diesel) was analysed for comparison. The results show that the sound energy level of acoustic signals is slightly higher when the engine fuelled by biodiesel and its blends than that of fuelled by normal diesel. Hence, the acoustic characteristics of the CI engine will have useful information for engine condition monitoring and fuel content estimation.

  8. Performance of compression ignition engine with indigenous castor oil bio diesel in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Castor oil available indigenously in Pakistan was converted successfully to bio diesel and blended to 10% quantity (by volume) with high speed mineral diesel (HSD) fuel. This fuel was tested in a compression-ignition engine in order to assess its environmental emissions as well as engine performance parameters. The blended fuel was found to give lower environmental emissions in most accounts except for higher CO/sub 2/ and higher NOx. In addition, three engine performance parameters were assessed; which were engine brake power, engine torque and exhaust temperature. In the first two cases, blended bio diesel fuel gave lower figures than pure mineral diesel due to lower calorific value. However, its higher flash point resulted in higher engine exhaust temperatures than pure mineral diesel. Overall, in terms of engine performance, castor oil bio diesel (from non edible oil of castor bean -growing on marginal lands of Pakistan) fared better in comparison to canola oil bio diesel (from expensive edible oil) and can be recommended for further tests at higher blend ratios. (author)

  9. Straight vegetable oils usage in a compression ignition engine - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, R.D.; Murthy, M.S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, National Institute of Technology, Silchar 788010, Assam (India)

    2010-12-15

    The ever increasing fossil fuel usage and cost, environmental concern has forced the world to look for alternatives. Straight vegetable oils in compression ignition engine are a ready solution available, however, with certain limitations and with some advantages as reported by many researchers. A comprehensive and critical review is presented specifically pertaining to straight vegetable oils usage in diesel engine. A detailed record of historical events described. Research carried out specifically under Indian conditions and international research work on the usage of straight vegetable oils in the diesel engine is separately reviewed. Many researchers have reported that straight vegetable oils in small percentage blends with diesel when used lower capacity diesel engines have shown great promise with regards to the thermal performance as well exhaust emissions. This has been explained in detail. Finally based on the review of international as well as Indian research a SWOT analysis is carried out. The review concludes that there is still scope for research in this area. (author)

  10. Application of ORC power station to increase electric power of gas compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocarski Szymon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the calculation results of efficiency of the subcritical low temperature ORC power station powered by waste heat resulting from the process of cooling a stationary compression ignition engine. The source of heat to supply the ORC power station is the heat in a form of water jet cooling the engine at a temperature of 92°C, and the exhaust gas stream at a temperature of 420°C. The study considers three variants of systems with the ORC power stations with different ways of using heat source. The first variant assumes using just engine cooling water to power the ORC station. In the second variant the ORC system is powered solely by a heat flux from the combustion gases by means of an intermediary medium - thermal oil, while the third variant provides the simultaneous management of both heat fluxes to heat the water stream as a source of power supply to the ORC station. The calculations were made for the eight working media belonging both to groups of so-called dry media (R218, R1234yf, R227ea and wet media (R32, R161, R152a, R134a, R22.

  11. Dual-Fuel Combustion for Future Clean and Efficient Compression Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Benajes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stringent emissions limits introduced for internal combustion engines impose a major challenge for the research community. The technological solution adopted by the manufactures of diesel engines to meet the NOx and particle matter values imposed in the EURO VI regulation relies on using selective catalytic reduction and particulate filter systems, which increases the complexity and cost of the engine. Alternatively, several new combustion modes aimed at avoiding the formation of these two pollutants by promoting low temperature combustion reactions, are the focus of study nowadays. Among these new concepts, the dual-fuel combustion mode known as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI seems more promising because it allows better control of the combustion process by means of modulating the fuel reactivity depending on the engine operating conditions. The present experimental work explores the potential of different strategies for reducing the energy losses with RCCI in a single-cylinder research engine, with the final goal of providing the guidelines to define an efficient dual-fuel combustion system. The results demonstrate that the engine settings combination, piston geometry modification, and fuel properties variation are good methods to increase the RCCI efficiency while maintaining ultra-low NOx and soot emissions for a wide range of operating conditions.

  12. MTU series 1600 HCCI engine with extremely low exhaust emissions over the entire engine map; HCCI-Motor der MTU Baureihe 1600 mit extrem niedrigen Abgasemissionen im gesamten Motorkennfeld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teetz, Christoph; Bergmann, Dirk; Sauer, Christina; Schneemann, Arne [MTU, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Eichmeier, Johannes; Spicher, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). IFKM

    2012-11-01

    The main challenge when developing off-highway engines is to keep emissions within the limits to apply in the future while maintaining low fuel consumption and low CO{sub 2} output. In the USA in particular, diesel engines in the 130 - 560 kW power range are to be subject from 2014 to EPA Tier 4 legislation, which imposes limits of 0.4 g/kWh for NO{sub x} and 0.02 g/kWh for particulate matter. Diesel units can only satisfy those requirements using a combination of in-engine measures and exhaust aftertreatment systems (SCR, particulate filters), which makes them a good deal more complex and expensive. In the face of CO{sub 2} emissions regulations and the growing demand for diesel fuel, greater emphasis is now being placed on alternative fuels. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition or 'HCCI' provides an alternative to complex exhaust aftertreatment systems which generates virtually no soot or nitrous oxide emissions. It does, however, present new challenges with respect to combustion control and engine load. Up to the present, it has not been possible to exploit the full potential of this combustion process over the entire engine map, since the high ignition performance of diesel fuel at high loads results in excessively early combustion and inadmissible pressure gradients. The pre-development department of MTU Friedrichshafen worked with the Institute of Internal Combustion Engines at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to devise a research prototype for an industrial application which would allow semi-homogenous combustion with controlled self-ignition over the full engine map. The engine is based on a 6-cylinder version of the MTU Series 1600 unit and has a rated output of 300 kW. The fuels - gasoline or ethanol and diesel - are mixed in such a way as to avoid the disadvantages associated with most HCCI processes. Since the use of ethanol also enhances combustion efficiency, it has a two-fold positive effect on the CO{sub 2} situation. With

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of hetero-/homogeneous combustion-based HCCI of methane–air mixtures in free-piston micro-engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Baofang; Gao, Xuhui; Xu, Deguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Single-shot experiments and a transient model of micro-engine were presented. • Coupled combustion can significantly improve in-cylinder temperatures. • Coupled combustion can reduce mass losses and compression ratios. • Heterogeneous reactions cause earlier ignition. • Heat losses result in higher mass losses. - Abstract: The hetero-/homogenous combustion-based HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) of fuel–lean methane–air mixtures over alumina-supported platinum catalysts was investigated experimentally and numerically in free-piston micro-engines without ignition sources. Single-shot experiments were carried out in the purely homogeneous and coupled hetero-/homogeneous combustion modes, involved temperature measurements, capturing the visible combustion image sequences, exhaust gas analysis, and the physicochemical characterization of catalysts. Simulations were performed with a two-dimensional transient model that includes detailed hetero-/homogeneous chemistry and transport, leakage, and free-piston motion to gain physical insight and to explore the hetero-/homogeneous combustion characteristics. The micro-engine performance concerning combustion efficiency, mass loss, energy density, and free-piston dynamics was investigated. The results reveal that both purely homogeneous and coupled hetero-/homogeneous combustion of methane–air mixtures in a narrow cylinder with a diameter of 3 mm and a height of approximately 0.3 mm are possible. The coupled hetero-/homogeneous mode can not only significantly improve the combustion efficiency, in-cylinder temperature and pressure, output power and energy density, but also reduce the mass loss because of its lower compression ratio and less time spent around TDC (top dead center) and during the expansion stroke, indicating that this coupled mode is a promising combustion scheme for micro-engine. Heat losses result in higher mass losses. Heterogeneous reactions cause earlier ignition

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of ion signals in boosted HCCI combustion using cesium and potassium acetate additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J. Hunter; Butt, Ryan H.; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Dibble, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • HCCI engine experiments show that CsOAc and KOAc additives increased the ion SNR. • The ion signal is more apparent at higher equivalence ratios. • An increase in intake pressure produces a decrease in the ion signal. • Use of metal acetates as additives yielded reductions in IMEP g and maximum ROHR. • A numerical model predicted peak ion signal, CA50, and p intake dependence. - Abstract: A sparkplug ion sensor can be used to measure the ion current in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, providing insight into the ion chemistry inside the cylinders during combustion. HCCI engines typically operate at lean equivalence ratios (ϕ) at which the ion current becomes increasingly indistinguishable from background noise. This paper investigates the effect of fuel additives on the ion signal at low equivalence ratios, determines side effects of metal acetate addition, and validates numerical model for ionization chemistry. Cesium acetate (CsOAc) and potassium acetate (KOAc) were used as additives to ethanol as the primary fuel. Concentration levels of 100, 200, and 400 mg/L of metal acetate-in-ethanol are investigated at equivalence ratios of 0.08, 0.20, and 0.30. The engine experiments were conducted at a boosted intake pressure of 1.8 bar absolute and compared to naturally aspirated results. Combustion timing was maintained at 2.5° after top-dead-center (ATDC), as defined by the crank angle degree (CAD) where 50% of the cumulative heat release occurs (CA50). CsOAc consistently produced the strongest ion signals at all conditions when compared to KOAc. The ion signal was found to decrease with increased intake pressure; an increase in the additive concentration increased the ion signal for all cases. However, the addition of the metal acetates decreased the gross indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP g ), maximum rate of heat release (ROHR), and peak cylinder pressure. Experimental results were used to validate ion chemistry

  15. Combustion performance, flame, and soot characteristics of gasoline–diesel pre-blended fuel in an optical compression-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Joonho; Lee, Jong Tae; Kwon, Sang Il; Park, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Gasoline–diesel pre-blended fuel was investigated in an optical direct-injection diesel engine. • KIVA3V-CHEMKIN code modeled blended fuel spray and combustion with discrete multi-component model. • Flame and soot characteristics in the combustion chamber were shown by optical kits. • Combustion performance and soot emissions for gasoline–diesel blended fuel were discussed. - Abstract: Among the new combustion technologies available for internal combustion engines to enhance performance and reduce exhausted emissions, the homogeneous charge compression ignition method is one of the most effective strategies for the compression-ignition engine. There are some challenges to realize the homogeneous charge compression ignition method in the compression-ignition engine. The use of gasoline–diesel blended fuel has been suggested as an alternative strategy to take advantages of homogeneous charge compression ignition while overcoming its challenges. Gasoline and diesel fuels are reference fuels for the spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines, respectively, both of which are widely used. The application of both these fuels together in the compression-ignition engine has been investigated using a hybrid injection system combining port fuel injection (gasoline) and direct injection (diesel); this strategy is termed reactivity controlled compression ignition. However, the pre-blending of gasoline and diesel fuels for direct injection systems has been rarely studied. For the case of direct injection of pre-blended fuel into the cylinder, various aspects of blended fuels should be investigated, including their spray breakup, fuel/air mixing, combustion development, and emissions. In the present study, the use of gasoline–diesel pre-blended fuel in an optical single-cylinder compression-ignition engine was investigated under various conditions of injection timing and pressure. Furthermore, KIVA-3V release 2 code was employed to model the

  16. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of the highest compression inertial confinement fusion ignition experiment from the National Ignition Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The recently completed National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) showed significant discrepancies between post-shot simulations of implosion performance and experimentally measured performance, particularly in thermonuclear yield. This discrepancy between simulation and observation persisted despite concerted efforts to include all of the known sources of performance degradation within a reasonable two-dimensional (2-D), and even three-dimensional (3-D), simulation model, e.g., using measured surface imperfections and radiation drives adjusted to reproduce observed implosion trajectories [Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056318 (2013)]. Since the completion of the NIC, several effects have been identified that could explain these discrepancies and that were omitted in previous simulations. In particular, there is now clear evidence for larger than anticipated long-wavelength radiation drive asymmetries and a larger than expected perturbation seeded by the capsule support tent. This paper describes an updated suite of one-dimensional (1-D), 2-D, and 3-D simulations that include the current best understanding of these effects identified since the NIC, as applied to a specific NIC shot. The relative importance of each effect on the experimental observables is compared. In combination, these effects reduce the simulated-to-measured yield ratio from 125:1 in 1-D to 1.5:1 in 3-D, as compared to 15:1 in the best 2-D simulations published previously. While the agreement with the experimental data remains imperfect, the comparison to the data is significantly improved and suggests that the largest sources for the previous discrepancies between simulation and experiment are now being included.

  17. Numerical Investigation of a Gasoline-Like Fuel in a Heavy-Duty Compression Ignition Engine Using Global Sensitivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Pinaki; Probst, Daniel; Pei, Yuanjiang; Zhang, Yu; Traver, Michael; Cleary, David; Som, Sibendu

    2017-03-28

    Fuels in the gasoline auto-ignition range (Research Octane Number (RON) > 60) have been demonstrated to be effective alternatives to diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Such fuels allow more time for mixing with oxygen before combustion starts, owing to longer ignition delay. Moreover, by controlling fuel injection timing, it can be ensured that the in-cylinder mixture is “premixed enough” before combustion occurs to prevent soot formation while remaining “sufficiently inhomogeneous” in order to avoid excessive heat release rates. Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) has the potential to offer diesel-like efficiency at a lower cost and can be achieved with fuels such as low-octane straight run gasoline which require significantly less processing in the refinery compared to today’s fuels. To aid the design and optimization of a compression ignition (CI) combustion system using such fuels, a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) was conducted to understand the relative influence of various design parameters on efficiency, emissions and heat release rate. The design parameters included injection strategies, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) fraction, temperature and pressure at intake valve closure and injector configuration. These were varied simultaneously to achieve various targets of ignition timing, combustion phasing, overall burn duration, emissions, fuel consumption, peak cylinder pressure and maximum pressure rise rate. The baseline case was a three-dimensional closed-cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with a sector mesh at medium load conditions. Eleven design parameters were considered and ranges of variation were prescribed to each of these. These input variables were perturbed in their respective ranges using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to generate a set of 256 CFD simulations and the targets were calculated from the simulation results. GSA was then applied as a screening tool to identify the input parameters having the most

  18. Future combustion technology for synthetic and renewable fuels in compression ignition engines (REFUEL). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakko-Saksa, P.; Brink, A.; Happonen, M. [and others

    2012-07-01

    This domestic project, Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Compression Ignition Engines (ReFuel), was part of a Collaborative Task 'Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Transport' of International Energy Agency (IEA) Combustion Agreement. This international Collaborative Task is coordinated by Finland. The three-year (2009-2011) prooject was a joint research project with Aalto University (Aalto), Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and Aabo Akademi University (AAU). The project was funded by TEKES, Waertsilae Oyj, Agro Sisu Power, Aker Arctic Technology Oy and the research partners listed above. Modern renewable diesel fuels have excellent physical and chemical properties, in comparison to traditional crude oil based fuels. Purely paraffinic fuels do not contain aromatic compounds and they are totally sulphur free. Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil (HVO) was studied as an example of paraffinic high cetane number (CN) diesel fuels. HVO has no storage and low temperature problems like the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) have. The combustion properties are better than those of crude oil based fuels and FAME, because they have very high cetane numbers and contain no polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). With low HVO density, viscosity and distillation temperatures, these advantageous properties allow far more advanced combustion strategies, such as very high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates or extreme Miller timings, than has been possible with current fossil fuels. The implementation of these advanced combustion technologies, together with the novel renewable diesel fuel, brought significant nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), particulate matter (PM) emission reductions with no efficiency losses. (orig.)

  19. Applicability of dimethyl ether (DME) in a compression ignition engine as an alternative fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Su Han; Lee, Chang Sik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Overall characteristics of DME fueled engine are reviewed. • Fuel properties characteristics of DME are introduced. • New technologies for DME vehicle are systemically reviewed. • Research trends for the development of DME vehicle in the world are introduced. - Abstract: From the perspectives of environmental conservation and energy security, dimethyl-ether (DME) is an attractive alternative to conventional diesel fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This review article deals with the application characteristics of DME in CI engines, including its fuel properties, spray and atomization characteristics, combustion performance, and exhaust emission characteristics. We also discuss the various technological problems associated with its application in actual engine systems and describe the field test results of developed DME-fueled vehicles. Combustion of DME fuel is associated with low NO x , HC, and CO emissions. In addition, PM emission of DME combustion is very low due to its molecular structure. Moreover, DME has superior atomization and vaporization characteristics than conventional diesel. A high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate can be used in a DME engine to reduce NO x emission without any increase in soot emission, because DME combustion is essentially soot-free. To decrease NO x emission, engine after-treatment devices, such as lean NO x traps (LNTs), urea-selective catalytic reduction, and the combination of EGR and catalyst have been applied. To use DME fuel in automotive vehicles, injector design, fuel feed pump, and the high-pressure injection pump have to be modified, combustion system components, including sealing materials, have to be rigorously designed. To use DME fuel in the diesel vehicles, more research is required to enhance its calorific value and engine durability due to the low lubricity of DME, and methods to reduce NO x emission are also required

  20. The use of modified tyre derived fuel for compression ignition engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilusa, T J

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated physical and chemical modification of tyre-derived fuel oil (TDFO) obtained from pyrolysis of waste tyres and rubber products for application as an alternative fuel for compression ignition engines (CIE's). TDFO collected from a local waste tyre treatment facility was refined via a novel "oxidative gas-phase fractional distillation over 13× molecular sieves" to recover the light to medium fractions of the TDFO while oxidising and capturing some sulphur compounds in a gas phase. This was followed by desulphurization and chemical modification to improve cetane number, kinematic viscosity and fuel stability. The resulting fuel was tested in an ADE407T truck engine to compare its performance with petroleum diesel fuel. It was discovered that gas phase oxidative fractional distillation reduces the low boiling point sulphur compounds in TDFO such as mercaptans. Using petroleum diesel fuel as a reference, it was observed that the produced fuel has a lower cetane number, flash point and viscosity. On storage the fuel tends to form fibrous microstructures as a result of auto-oxidation of asphaltenes present in the fuel. Mixtures of alkyl nitrate, vinyl acetate, methacrylic anhydride, methyl-tert butyl ether, n-hexane and n-heptane were used to chemically modify the fuel in accordance with the minimum fuel specifications as per SANS 342. The engine performance tests results did not show any sign of engine ceasing or knocking effect. The power-torque trend was very consistent and compared well with petroleum diesel fuelled engine. The levels of total sulphur are still considerably high compared to other cleaner fuel alternatives derived from zero sulphur sources. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Advances for laser ignition of internal combustion and rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.

    2011-01-01

    field laser physics. Unfortunately, there is no standard definition for the plasma threshold in the literature. Consequently, a clear definition of the focal volume is missing. For this reason it was tried to find a theoretical formula for the volume. This formula is based on the assumption that the focal volume encloses the space where the threshold intensity is higher than Ith =I0/2 or, alternatively, Ith = I0/e2. Laser energy transmission is one of the most important loss factors during plasma development by laser-induced optical breakdown and provides important information about the energy contained in the plasma. Hence, a number of plasma experiments were carried out. In our experiments is was found that for decreasing focal volume the plasma threshold energy (MPE) and the energy transmission can be reduced respectively. In order to investigate the possibility if laser-induced ignition can be made more efficient with respect to the laser pulse energy, several ignition experiments were performed. For these experiments a combustion chamber was employed at a filling pressure of 11 bar and a temperature of 110 o C involving different focal sizes. The thermal ignition experiments were carried out to demonstrate in principle the feasibility of thermal ignition via resonant absorption of IR radiation. By evaluating these results with respect to laser ignition of engines, it is conceivable to employ laser thermal ignition as an innovative ignition mechanism. As in HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) engines and rocket engines, ignition occurs at specific elevated pressures and temperatures, it can be assumed that the ignition energies are in the range between 20 to 100 mJ. Furthermore, different laser ignition system concepts were developed and evaluated regarding to their qualification for rocket engine ignition. As a consequence of its highest rating in our study, resonant ignition should be considered an interesting alternative to laser spark ignition

  2. Internal combustion engine report: Spark ignited ICE GenSet optimization and novel concept development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Blarigan, P. Van [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    In this manuscript the authors report on two projects each of which the goal is to produce cost effective hydrogen utilization technologies. These projects are: (1) the development of an electrical generation system using a conventional four-stroke spark-ignited internal combustion engine generator combination (SI-GenSet) optimized for maximum efficiency and minimum emissions, and (2) the development of a novel internal combustion engine concept. The SI-GenSet will be optimized to run on either hydrogen or hydrogen-blends. The novel concept seeks to develop an engine that optimizes the Otto cycle in a free piston configuration while minimizing all emissions. To this end the authors are developing a rapid combustion homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine using a linear alternator for both power take-off and engine control. Targeted applications include stationary electrical power generation, stationary shaft power generation, hybrid vehicles, and nearly any other application now being accomplished with internal combustion engines.

  3. Schlieren-based temperature measurement inside the cylinder of an optical spark ignition and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiferis, Pavlos; Charalambides, Alexandros; Hardalupas, Yannis; Soulopoulos, Nikolaos; Taylor, A M K P; Urata, Yunichi

    2015-05-10

    Schlieren [Schlieren and Shadowgraphy Techniques (McGraw-Hill, 2001); Optics of Flames (Butterworths, 1963)] is a non-intrusive technique that can be used to detect density variations in a medium, and thus, under constant pressure and mixture concentration conditions, measure whole-field temperature distributions. The objective of the current work was to design a schlieren system to measure line-of-sight (LOS)-averaged temperature distribution with the final aim to determine the temperature distribution inside the cylinder of internal combustion (IC) engines. In a preliminary step, we assess theoretically the errors arising from the data reduction used to determine temperature from a schlieren measurement and find that the total error, random and systematic, is less than 3% for typical conditions encountered in the present experiments. A Z-type, curved-mirror schlieren system was used to measure the temperature distribution from a hot air jet in an open air environment in order to evaluate the method. Using the Abel transform, the radial distribution of the temperature was reconstructed from the LOS measurements. There was good agreement in the peak temperature between the reconstructed schlieren and thermocouple measurements. Experiments were then conducted in a four-stroke, single-cylinder, optical spark ignition engine with a four-valve, pentroof-type cylinder head to measure the temperature distribution of the reaction zone of an iso-octane-air mixture. The engine optical windows were designed to produce parallel rays and allow accurate application of the technique. The feasibility of the method to measure temperature distributions in IC engines was evaluated with simulations of the deflection angle combined with equilibrium chemistry calculations that estimated the temperature of the reaction zone at the position of maximum ray deflection as recorded in a schlieren image. Further simulations showed that the effects of exhaust gas recirculation and air

  4. Analysis of Transition from HCCI to CI via PPC with Low Octane Gasoline Fuels Using Optical Diagnostics and Soot Particle Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    An, Yanzhao; Vallinayagam, R; Vedharaj, S; Masurier, Jean-Baptiste; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    In-cylinder visualization, combustion stratification, and engine-out particulate matter (PM) emissions were investigated in an optical engine fueled with Haltermann straight-run naphtha fuel and corresponding surrogate fuel. The combustion mode was transited from homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) to conventional compression ignition (CI) via partially premixed combustion (PPC). Single injection strategy with the change of start of injection (SOI) from early to late injections was employed. The high-speed color camera was used to capture the in-cylinder combustion images. The combustion stratification was analyzed based on the natural luminosity of the combustion images. The regulated emission of unburned hydrocarbon (UHC), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NO) were measured to evaluate the combustion efficiency together with the in-cylinder rate of heat release. Soot mass concentration was measured and linked with the combustion stratification and the integrated red channel intensity of the high-speed images for the soot emissions. The nucleation nanoscale particle number and the particle size distribution were sampled to understand the effect of combustion mode switch.

  5. Analysis of Transition from HCCI to CI via PPC with Low Octane Gasoline Fuels Using Optical Diagnostics and Soot Particle Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    An, Yanzhao

    2017-10-10

    In-cylinder visualization, combustion stratification, and engine-out particulate matter (PM) emissions were investigated in an optical engine fueled with Haltermann straight-run naphtha fuel and corresponding surrogate fuel. The combustion mode was transited from homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) to conventional compression ignition (CI) via partially premixed combustion (PPC). Single injection strategy with the change of start of injection (SOI) from early to late injections was employed. The high-speed color camera was used to capture the in-cylinder combustion images. The combustion stratification was analyzed based on the natural luminosity of the combustion images. The regulated emission of unburned hydrocarbon (UHC), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NO) were measured to evaluate the combustion efficiency together with the in-cylinder rate of heat release. Soot mass concentration was measured and linked with the combustion stratification and the integrated red channel intensity of the high-speed images for the soot emissions. The nucleation nanoscale particle number and the particle size distribution were sampled to understand the effect of combustion mode switch.

  6. Ignition delay time correlation of fuel blends based on Livengood-Wu description

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2017-08-17

    In this work, a universal methodology for ignition delay time (IDT) correlation of multicomponent fuel mixtures is reported. The method is applicable over wide ranges of temperatures, pressures, and equivalence ratios. n-Heptane, iso-octane, toluene, ethanol and their blends are investigated in this study because of their relevance to gasoline surrogate formulation. The proposed methodology combines benefits from the Livengood-Wu integral, the cool flame characteristics and the Arrhenius behavior of the high-temperature ignition delay time to suggest a simple and comprehensive formulation for correlating the ignition delay times of pure components and blends. The IDTs of fuel blends usually have complex dependences on temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio and composition of the blend. The Livengood-Wu integral is applied here to relate the NTC region and the cool flame phenomenon. The integral is further extended to obtain a relation between the IDTs of fuel blends and pure components. Ignition delay times calculated using the proposed methodology are in excellent agreement with those simulated using a detailed chemical kinetic model for n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, ethanol and blends of these components. Finally, very good agreement is also observed for combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) predictions between simulations performed with detailed chemistry and calculations using the developed ignition delay correlation.

  7. Impact of Formaldehyde Addition on Auto-Ignition in Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Kazunari; Ando, Hiromitsu; Furutani, Masahiro; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    By employing a direct-injection diesel engine equipped with a common-rail type of injection system, by adding formaldehyde (CH2O) to the intake air, and by changing the fuel-injection timing, the compression ratio and the intake-air temperature, a mechanism for CH2O as a fuel additive to affect auto-ignition was discussed. Unlike an HCCI type of engine, the diesel engine can expose an air-fuel mixture only to a limited range of the in-cylinder temperature before the ignition, and can separate low- and high-temperature parts of the mechanism. When low-temperature oxidation starts at a temperature above 900K, there are cases that the CH2O advances the ignition timing. Below 900K, to the contrary, it always retards the timing. It is because, above 900K, a part of the CH2O changes into CO together with H2O2 as an ignition promoter. Below 900K, on the other hand, the CH2O itself acts as an OH radical scavenger against cool-flame reaction, from the beginning of low-temperature oxidation. Then, the engine was modified for its extraordinary function as a gasoline-knocking generator, in order that an effect of CH2O on knocking could be discussed. The CH2O retards the onset of auto-ignition of an end gas. Judging from a large degree of the retardation, the ignition is probably triggered below 900K.

  8. The effect of additives on properties, performance and emission of biodiesel fuelled compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashedul, H.K.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Ashraful, A.M.; Ashrafur Rahman, S.M.; Shahir, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel additives significantly improve the quality of biodiesel and its blends. • Fuel additives used to enhance biodiesel properties. • Fuel saving from optimized vehicle performance and economy with the use of additives. • Emission reduction from fuel system cleanliness and combustion optimization. - Abstract: With growing concern over greenhouse gases there is increasing emphasis on reducing CO 2 emissions. Despite engine efficiency improvements plus increased dieselization of the fleet, increasing vehicle numbers results in increasing CO 2 emissions. To reserve this trend the fuel source must be changed to renewable fuels which are CO 2 neutral. As a renewable, sustainable and alternative fuel for compression ignition engines, biodiesel is widely accepted as comparable fuel to diesel in diesel engines. This is due to several factors like decreasing the dependence on imported petroleum, reducing global warming, increasing lubricity, and reducing substantially the exhaust emissions from diesel engine. However, there is a major disadvantage in the use of biodiesel as it has lower heating value, higher density and higher viscosity, higher fuel consumption and higher NO X emission, which limits its application. Here fuel additives become essential and indispensable tools not only to minimize these drawbacks but also generate specified products to meet the regional and international standards. Fuel additives can contribute towards fuel economy and emission reduction either directly or indirectly. Their use enable vehicle performance to be maintained at, or near, optimum over the lifetime of the vehicle. A variety of additives are used in automotive biodiesel fuel to meet specification limits and to enhance quality. For example, metal based additives, oxygenated additives, antioxidants, cetane number improvers, lubricity improvers and cold flow improvers are used to meet specifications and quality. This article is a literature review of the effect

  9. Effect of hydroxy (HHO) gas addition on performance and exhaust emissions in compression ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Ali Can; Uludamar, Erinc; Aydin, Kadir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, hydroxy gas (HHO) was produced by the electrolysis process of different electrolytes (KOH{sub (aq)}, NaOH{sub (aq)}, NaCl{sub (aq)}) with various electrode designs in a leak proof plexiglass reactor (hydrogen generator). Hydroxy gas was used as a supplementary fuel in a four cylinder, four stroke, compression ignition (CI) engine without any modification and without need for storage tanks. Its effects on exhaust emissions and engine performance characteristics were investigated. Experiments showed that constant HHO flow rate at low engine speeds (under the critical speed of 1750 rpm for this experimental study), turned advantages of HHO system into disadvantages for engine torque, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) emissions and specific fuel consumption (SFC). Investigations demonstrated that HHO flow rate had to be diminished in relation to engine speed below 1750 rpm due to the long opening time of intake manifolds at low speeds. This caused excessive volume occupation of hydroxy in cylinders which prevented correct air to be taken into the combustion chambers and consequently, decreased volumetric efficiency was inevitable. Decreased volumetric efficiency influenced combustion efficiency which had negative effects on engine torque and exhaust emissions. Therefore, a hydroxy electronic control unit (HECU) was designed and manufactured to decrease HHO flow rate by decreasing voltage and current automatically by programming the data logger to compensate disadvantages of HHO gas on SFC, engine torque and exhaust emissions under engine speed of 1750 rpm. The flow rate of HHO gas was measured by using various amounts of KOH, NaOH, NaCl (catalysts). These catalysts were added into the water to diminish hydrogen and oxygen bonds and NaOH was specified as the most appropriate catalyst. It was observed that if the molality of NaOH in solution exceeded 1% by mass, electrical current supplied from the battery increased dramatically due to the too much

  10. A turbulent time scale based k–ε model for probability density function modeling of turbulence/chemistry interactions: Application to HCCI combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroteaux, Fadila; Pommier, Pierre-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turbulent time evolution is introduced in stochastic modeling approach. ► The particles number is optimized trough a restricted initial distribution. ► The initial distribution amplitude is modeled by magnitude of turbulence field. -- Abstract: Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine technology is known as an alternative to reduce NO x and particulate matter (PM) emissions. As shown by several experimental studies published in the literature, the ideally homogeneous mixture charge becomes stratified in composition and temperature, and turbulent mixing is found to play an important role in controlling the combustion progress. In a previous study, an IEM model (Interaction by Exchange with the Mean) has been used to describe the micromixing in a stochastic reactor model that simulates the HCCI process. The IEM model is a deterministic model, based on the principle that the scalar value approaches the mean value over the entire volume with a characteristic mixing time. In this previous model, the turbulent time scale was treated as a fixed parameter. The present study focuses on the development of a micro-mixing time model, in order to take into account the physical phenomena it stands for. For that purpose, a (k–ε) model is used to express this micro-mixing time model. The turbulence model used here is based on zero dimensional energy cascade applied during the compression and the expansion cycle; mean kinetic energy is converted to turbulent kinetic energy. Turbulent kinetic energy is converted to heat through viscous dissipation. Besides, in this study a relation to calculate the initial heterogeneities amplitude is proposed. The comparison of simulation results against experimental data shows overall satisfactory agreement at variable turbulent time scale

  11. IMPLEMENTATION OF DIOXANE AND DIESEL FUEL BLENDS TO REDUCE EMISSION AND TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF THE COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    SENDILVELAN S.; SUNDAR RAJ C.

    2017-01-01

    Performance of a compression ignition engine fuelled with 1, 4 Dioxane- diesel blends is evaluated. A single-cylinder, air-cooled, direct injection diesel engine developing a power output of 5.2 kW at 1500 rev/min is used. Base data is generated with standard diesel fuel subsequently; five fuel blends namely 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 percentages by volume of diesel and dioxane were prepared and tested in the diesel engine. Engine performance and emission data were used to optimize ...

  12. The syngas production by partial oxidation using a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yoon Cheol; Lim, Mun Sup; Chun, Young Nam

    2009-01-01

    It is essential to develop the environment-friendly alternative energies urgently considering the limited fossil fuel and the global warming caused by environmental destruction. In this research, the new technology was studied to produce syngas from methane or simulated biogas with a HCCI reforming engine. The purpose is to provide the basics for the research on biogas treatment mainly comprising of methane and carbon dioxide, the cause of global warming. This experiment was conducted on the changes in syngas concentration according to the variations of oxygen/methane ratio, total flow rate, intake heating temperature, CO 2 in mixture and oxygen enrichment with partial oxidation. Through the parametric screening studies, optimum conditions and their results in this study was taken as follows; The maximum content of syngas was; 27.4% at 0.3 of oxygen/methane ratio, 32.38% at 117.3 L/min of total flow rate, and 35.83% at 355 C of intake heating temperature. 41.06% of syngas was produced at 50.33% of oxygen enrichment ratio. (author)

  13. Effects of ethanol added fuel on exhaust emissions and combustion in a premixed charge compression ignition diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yungjin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of diesel engines for vehicle has been increasing recently due to its higher thermal efficiency and lower CO2 emission level. However, in the case of diesel engine, NOx increases in a high temperature combustion region and particulate matter is generated in a fuel rich region. Therefore, the technique of PCCI (premixed charge compression ignition is often studied to get the peak combustion temperature down and to make a better air-fuel mixing. However it also has got a limited operating range and lower engine power produced by the wall wetting and the difficulty of the ignition timing control. In this research, the effect of injection strategies on the injected fuel behavior, combustion and emission characteristics in a PCCI engine were investigated to find out the optimal conditions for fuel injection, and then ethanol blended diesel fuel was used to control the ignition timing. As a result, the combustion pressures and ROHR (rate of heat release of the blended fuel became lower, however, IMEP showed fewer differences. Especially in the case of triple injection, smoke could be reduced a little and NOx emission decreased a lot by using the ethanol blended fuel simultaneously without much decreasing of IMEP compared to the result of 100% diesel fuel.

  14. N-decane-air end-gas auto-ignition induced by flame propagation in a constant volume chamber: Influence of compression history

    OpenAIRE

    Quintens , Hugo; Strozzi , Camille; Zitoun , Ratiba; Bellenoue , Marc

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The present study aims at characterizing the end-gas auto-ignition of n-decane – air mixtures induced by a flame propagation in a constant volume chamber. A numerical tool is developed, and the study is first focused on academic compressions, e.g. at constant rate of pressure rise. Thermodynamic conditions of transition from deflagration to auto-ignition are first determined, and the involved physical processes are highlighted. A square section combustion chamber is th...

  15. Chemical kinetic insights into the ignition dynamics of n-hexane

    KAUST Repository

    Tingas, Alexandros

    2017-10-13

    Normal alkanes constitute a significant fraction of transportation fuels, and are the primary drivers of ignition processes in gasoline and diesel fuels. Low temperature ignition of n-alkanes is driven by a complex sequence of oxidation reactions, for which detailed mechanisms are still being developed. The current study explores the dynamics of low-temperature ignition of n-hexane/air mixtures, and identifies chemical pathways that characterize the combustion process. Two chemical kinetic mechanisms were selected as a comparative study in order to better understand the role of specific reaction sequences in ignition dynamics: one mechanism including a new third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (recently proposed by Wang et al. 2017), while the other without (Zhang et al. 2015). The analysis is conducted by applying tools generated from the computational singular perturbation (CSP) approach to two distinct ignition phenomena: constant volume and compression ignition. In both cases, the role of the third sequential O2 addition reactions proves to be significant, although it is found to be much more pronounced in the constant volume cases compared to the HCCI. In particular, in the constant volume ignition case, reactions present in the third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (e.g., KDHP  →  products + OH) contribute significantly to the explosivity of the mixture; when accounted for along with reactions P(OOH)2 + O2  →  OOP(OOH)2 and OOP(OOH)2  →  KDHP + OH, they decrease ignition delay time of the mixture by up to 40%. Under HCCI conditions, in the first-stage ignition, the third-O2 addition reactions contribute to the process, although their role decays with time and becomes negligible at the end of the first stage. The second ignition stage is dominated almost exclusively by hydrogen-related chemistry.

  16. Performance analysis of exhaust heat recovery using organic Rankine cycle in a passenger car with a compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilvacs, M.; Prisecaru, T.; Pop, H.; Apostol, V.; Prisecaru, M.; Pop, E.; Popescu, Gh; Ciobanu, C.; Mohanad, A.; Alexandru, A.

    2016-08-01

    Compression ignition engines transform approximately 40% of the fuel energy into power available at the crankshaft, while the rest part of the fuel energy is lost as coolant, exhaust gases and other waste heat. An organic Rankine cycle (ORC) can be used to recover this waste heat. In this paper, the characteristics of a system combining a compression ignition engine with an ORC which recover the waste heat from the exhaust gases are analyzed. The performance map of the diesel engine is measured on an engine test bench and the heat quantities wasted by the exhaust gases are calculated over the engine's entire operating region. Based on this data, the working parameters of ORC are defined, and the performance of a combined engine-ORC system is evaluated across this entire region. The results show that the net power of ORC is 6.304kW at rated power point and a maximum of 10% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption can be achieved.

  17. Impact of Biodiesel Blends and Di-Ethyl-Ether on the Cold Starting Performance of a Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Clenci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of biodiesel fuel in compression ignition engines has the potential to reduce CO2, which can lead to a reduction in global warming and environmental hazards. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel, as it is made from renewable resources. Many studies have been conducted to assess the impact of biodiesel use on engine performances. Most of them were carried out in positive temperature conditions. A major drawback associated with the use of biodiesel, however, is its poor cold flow properties, which have a direct influence on the cold starting performance of the engine. Since diesel engine behavior at negative temperatures is an important quality criterion of the engine’s operation, one goal of this paper is to assess the starting performance at −20 °C of a common automotive compression ignition engine, fueled with different blends of fossil diesel fuel and biodiesel. Results showed that increasing the biodiesel blend ratio generated a great deterioration in engine startability. Another goal of this study was to determine the biodiesel blend ratio limit at which the engine would not start at −20 °C and, subsequently, to investigate the impact of Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE injection into the intake duct on the engine’s startability, which was found to be recovered.

  18. On Cyclic Variability in a Residual Effected HCCI Engine with Direct Gasoline Injection during Negative Valve Overlap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Hunicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study contributes towards describing the nature of cycle-by-cycle variability in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI engines. Experimental measurements were performed using a single cylinder research engine operated in the negative valve overlap (NVO mode and fuelled with direct gasoline injection. Both stoichiometric and lean mixtures were applied in order to distinguish between different exhaust-fuel reactions during the NVO period and their propagation into the main event combustion. The experimental results show that the mode of cycle-by-cycle variability depends on the NVO phenomena. Under stoichiometric mixture conditions, neither variability in the main event indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP nor the combustion timing was affected by the NVO phenomena; however, long period oscillations in IMEP were observed. In contrast, for lean mixture, where fuel oxidation during the NVO period took place, distinctive correlations between NVO phenomena and the main event combustion parameters were observed. A wavelet analysis revealed the presence of both long-term and short-term oscillations in IMEP, in accordance with the extent of NVO phenomena. Characteristic patterns in IMEP were recognized using an in-house algorithm.

  19. Effect of diesel pre-injection timing on combustion and emission characteristics of compression ignited natural gas engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Min; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Hongfei; An, Tao; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-injection timing on combustion and emission of CING engine are studied. • Closely pre-injection operations leads to increase of combustion intensity. • Early pre-injection operations leads to lower combustion intensity. • Early pre-injection modes provide better NO x emission. - Abstract: Pre-injection strategy is considered to be one of the most important ways to improve diesel engine performance, emission and combustion. It is the same important factor in pilot diesel compression ignition natural gas (CING) engine. In this study, effects of pre-injection timing on combustion and emission performances were experimentally studied in a CING engine which was modified from a turbocharged six-cylinder diesel engine. The experiments were conducted at constant speed of 1400 rpm and different engine loads with a constant fuel injection pressure of 1100 bar. Main injection timing was fixed at 10 °CA BTDC in the advance process of pre-injection timing. The cylinder pressure, heart release rate (HRR), pressure rise rate (PRR), start of combustion (SOC) and coefficient of variation (COV IMEP ), as well as NO x , HC and CO emissions were analyzed. The results indicated that closely pre-injection operations lead to the advance of SOC which intensified combustion of in-cylinder mixture, thereby resulting in higher cylinder pressure, HRR and PRR, as well higher NO x emissions and lower HC and CO emissions. However, early pre-injection operations lead to lower cylinder pressure, HRR and PRR due to decreasing in combustion intensity. Pre-injection timing of 70 °CA BTDC is a conversion point in which influence of pre-injection fuel on ignition and combustion of natural gas nearly disappeared and lowest NO x emission could be obtained. Compared with single injection ignition mode, NO x emissions at the conversion point were reduced by 33%, 38% and 7% at engine load of 38%, 60% and 80% respectively. This is important for the conditions that ignition fuel

  20. Development of HCCI Engines for Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene; Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    This report has been prepared for the Danish Energy Agency. It summarizes the results of the project entitled: “Development of HCCI engines for DME”. The project has been financed by “EFP 06”. The chapters about theoretical and experimental studies have been written using the language and termino......This report has been prepared for the Danish Energy Agency. It summarizes the results of the project entitled: “Development of HCCI engines for DME”. The project has been financed by “EFP 06”. The chapters about theoretical and experimental studies have been written using the language...

  1. Simulating HCCI Blending Octane Number of Primary Reference Fuel with Ethanol

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Eshan

    2017-03-28

    The blending of ethanol with primary reference fuel (PRF) mixtures comprising n-heptane and iso-octane is known to exhibit a non-linear octane response; however, the underlying chemistry and intermolecular interactions are poorly understood. Well-designed experiments and numerical simulations are required to understand these blending effects and the chemical kinetic phenomenon responsible for them. To this end, HCCI engine experiments were previously performed at four different conditions of intake temperature and engine speed for various PRF/ethanol mixtures. Transfer functions were developed in the HCCI engine to relate PRF mixture composition to autoignition tendency at various compression ratios. The HCCI blending octane number (BON) was determined for mixtures of 2-20 vol % ethanol with PRF70. In the present work, the experimental conditions were considered to perform zero-dimensional HCCI engine simulations with detailed chemical kinetics for ethanol/PRF blends. The simulations used the actual engine geometry and estimated intake valve closure conditions to replicate the experimentally measured start of combustion (SOC) for various PRF mixtures. The simulated HCCI heat release profiles were shown to reproduce the experimentally observed trends, specifically on the effectiveness of ethanol as a low temperature chemistry inhibitor at various concentrations. Detailed analysis of simulated heat release profiles and the evolution of important radical intermediates (e.g., OH and HO) were used to show the effect of ethanol blending on controlling reactivity. A strong coupling between the low temperature oxidation reactions of ethanol and those of n-heptane and iso-octane is shown to be responsible for the observed blending effects of ethanol/PRF mixtures.

  2. Simulating HCCI Blending Octane Number of Primary Reference Fuel with Ethanol

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Eshan; Waqas, Muhammad; Johansson, Bengt; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    The blending of ethanol with primary reference fuel (PRF) mixtures comprising n-heptane and iso-octane is known to exhibit a non-linear octane response; however, the underlying chemistry and intermolecular interactions are poorly understood. Well-designed experiments and numerical simulations are required to understand these blending effects and the chemical kinetic phenomenon responsible for them. To this end, HCCI engine experiments were previously performed at four different conditions of intake temperature and engine speed for various PRF/ethanol mixtures. Transfer functions were developed in the HCCI engine to relate PRF mixture composition to autoignition tendency at various compression ratios. The HCCI blending octane number (BON) was determined for mixtures of 2-20 vol % ethanol with PRF70. In the present work, the experimental conditions were considered to perform zero-dimensional HCCI engine simulations with detailed chemical kinetics for ethanol/PRF blends. The simulations used the actual engine geometry and estimated intake valve closure conditions to replicate the experimentally measured start of combustion (SOC) for various PRF mixtures. The simulated HCCI heat release profiles were shown to reproduce the experimentally observed trends, specifically on the effectiveness of ethanol as a low temperature chemistry inhibitor at various concentrations. Detailed analysis of simulated heat release profiles and the evolution of important radical intermediates (e.g., OH and HO) were used to show the effect of ethanol blending on controlling reactivity. A strong coupling between the low temperature oxidation reactions of ethanol and those of n-heptane and iso-octane is shown to be responsible for the observed blending effects of ethanol/PRF mixtures.

  3. Performance and emission characteristics of a DI compression ignition engine operated on Honge, Jatropha and sesame oil methyl esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banapurmath, N.R.; Tewari, P.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.V.B. College of Engineering and Technology, Vidyanagar, Poona-Bangalore Road, Hubli 580031 (India); Hosmath, R.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, K.L.E' s C.E.T., Belgaum (India)

    2008-09-15

    The high viscosity of vegetable oils leads to problem in pumping and spray characteristics. The inefficient mixing of vegetable oils with air contributes to incomplete combustion. The best way to use vegetable oils as fuel in compression ignition (CI) engines is to convert it into biodiesel. Biodiesel is a methyl or ethyl ester of fatty acids made from vegetable oils (both edible and non-edible) and animal fat. The main resources for biodiesel production can be non-edible oils obtained from plant species such as Pongamia pinnata (Honge oil), Jatropha curcas (Ratanjyot), Hevea brasiliensis (Rubber) and Calophyllum inophyllum (Nagchampa). Biodiesel can be used in its pure form or can be blended with diesel to form different blends. It can be used in CI engines with very little or no engine modifications. This is because it has properties similar to mineral diesel. This paper presents the results of investigations carried out on a single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct-injection, CI engine operated with methyl esters of Honge oil, Jatropha oil and sesame oil. Comparative measures of brake thermal efficiency, smoke opacity, HC, CO, NO{sub X}, ignition delay, combustion duration and heat release rates have been presented and discussed. Engine performance in terms of higher brake thermal efficiency and lower emissions (HC, CO, NO{sub X}) with sesame oil methyl ester operation was observed compared to methyl esters of Honge and Jatropha oil operation. (author)

  4. Validation of a zero-dimensional and 2-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to re-duce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of liquid fuel injected directly into the cylinder acts as the ignition inhibitor of the gaseous fuel. Achieving the optimum combustion process in such an engine requires the application of advanced control algorithms which require mathematical modelling support. In response to the growing demand for new simulation tools, a 0-D model of a dual-fuel engine was proposed and validated. The validation was performed in a broad range of engine operating points, including various speeds and load condition, as well as different natural gas/diesel blend ratios. It was demonstrated that the average model calculation error within the entire cycle did not exceed 6.2%, and was comparable to the measurement results cycle to cycle variations. The maximum model calculation error in a single point of a cycle was 15% for one of the complex (multipoint injection cases. In other cases, it did not exceed 11%.

  5. IMPLEMENTATION OF DIOXANE AND DIESEL FUEL BLENDS TO REDUCE EMISSION AND TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF THE COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SENDILVELAN S.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance of a compression ignition engine fuelled with 1, 4 Dioxane- diesel blends is evaluated. A single-cylinder, air-cooled, direct injection diesel engine developing a power output of 5.2 kW at 1500 rev/min is used. Base data is generated with standard diesel fuel subsequently; five fuel blends namely 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 percentages by volume of diesel and dioxane were prepared and tested in the diesel engine. Engine performance and emission data were used to optimize the blends for reducing emission and improving performance. Results show improved performance with B10 blends compared to neat fuel for all conditions of the engine. Other blends recorded marginal decrease in brake thermal efficiency. The maximum efficiency for B30, B50 blends at peak load are 26.3%, 25.2% respectively against 29.1% for sole fuel. NOx emissions were found to be high or the blends. Peak pressure and rate of pressure rise are increased with increase in dioxane ratio due to improved combustion rate. Heat release pattern shows higher premixed combustion rate with the blends. Higher ignition delay and lower combustion duration are found with all blends than neat diesel fuel.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Combustion and Knock in a Dual Fuel Gas/Diesel Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gharehghani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional compression ignition engines can easily be converted to a dual fuel mode of operation using natural gas as main fuel and diesel oil injection as pilot to initiate the combustion. At the same time, it is possible to increase the output power by increasing the diesel oil percentage. A detailed performance and combustion characteristic analysis of a heavy duty diesel engine has been studied in dual fuel mode of operation where natural gas is used as the main fuel and diesel oil as pilot. The influence of intake pressure and temperature on knock occurrence and the effects of initial swirl ratio on heat release rate, temperature-pressure and emission levels have been investigated in this study. It is shown that an increase in the initial swirl ratio lengthens the delay period for auto-ignition and extends the combustion period while it reduces NOx. There is an optimum value of the initial swirl ratio for a certain mixture intake temperature and pressure conditions that can achieve high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions while decreases the tendency to knock. Simultaneous increase of intake pressure and initial swirl ratio could be the solution to power loss and knock in dual fuel engine.

  7. Reduction of HCCI combustion noise through piston crown design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    . The largest and most consistent reduction in noise level was however achieved with a diesel bowl type piston. The increased surface area as well as the larger crevice volumes of the experimental piston crowns generally resulted in lower IMEP than the flat piston. While the crevice volumes can be reduced...... away from the engine. The experiments were conducted in a diesel engine that was run in HCCI combustion mode with a fixed quantity of DME as fuel. The results show that combustion knock is effectively suppressed by limiting the size of the volume in which the combustion occurs. Splitting...... the compression volume into four smaller volumes placed between the perimeter of the piston and the cylinder liner increased the noise to a higher level than that generated with a flat piston crown. This was due to resonance between the four volumes. Using eight volumes instead decreased the noise. The noise...

  8. A study of diesel-hydrogen fuel exhaust emissions in a compression ignition engine/generator assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karri, V.; Hafez, H.A.; Kirkegaard, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    A compression engine and duel-fuel supply system was studied in order to determine the influence of hydrogen gas on a diesel engine's exhaust system. Commercially available solenoid valves and pulse actuators were used in a customized mechatronic control unit (MICU) to inject the hydrogen gas into the cylinders during the experiments. The MICU was designed as a generic external attachment. Diesel fuel was used to ignite the hydrogen gas-air mixture after compression. Various different electrical loads were then applied using an alternator in order to stimulate the engine governor and control diesel flow. Results of the study showed that measured carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxide (NO x ) loads of exhaust emissions increased, while emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) decreased. Results also showed that higher temperatures and levels of NO x occurred when hydrogen was mixed with the induced air. It was concluded that higher levels of hydrogen may be needed to reduce emissions. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  9. Compression Ignition Engines - revolutionary technology that has civilized frontiers all over the globe from the Industrial Revolution into the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Anthony Ciatti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The history, present and future of the compression ignition engine is a fascinating story that spans over 100 years, from the time of Rudolf Diesel to the highly regulated and computerized engines of the 21st Century. The development of these engines provided inexpensive, reliable and high power density machines to allow transportation, construction and farming to be more productive with less human effort than in any previous period of human history. The concept that fuels could be consumed efficiently and effectively with only the ignition of pressurized and heated air was a significant departure from the previous coal-burning architecture of the 1800s. Today, the compression ignition engine is undergoing yet another revolution. The equipment that provides transport, builds roads and infrastructure, and harvests the food we eat needs to meet more stringent requirements than ever before. How successfully 21st Century engineers are able to make compression ignition engine technology meet these demands will be of major influence in assisting developing nations (with over 50% of the world’s population achieve the economic and environmental goals they seek.

  10. Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included

  11. Ignition properties of n-butane and iso-butane in a rapid compression machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersen, S.; Mokhov, A. V.; Darmeveil, J. H.; Levinsky, H. B.

    Autoignition delay times of n-butane and iso-butane have been measured in a Rapid Compression Machine in the temperature range 660-1010 K, at pressures varying from 14 to 36 bar and at equivalence ratios phi = 1.0 and phi = 0.5. Both butane isomers exhibit a negative-temperature-coefficient (NTC)

  12. Reduced Gasoline Surrogate (Toluene/n-Heptane/iso-Octane) Chemical Kinetic Model for Compression Ignition Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2018-04-03

    Toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) (mixture of toluene, iso-octane and heptane) is a suitable surrogate to represent a wide spectrum of real fuels with varying octane sensitivity. Investigating different surrogates in engine simulations is a prerequisite to identify the best matching mixture. However, running 3D engine simulations using detailed models is currently impossible and reduction of detailed models is essential. This work presents an AramcoMech reduced kinetic model developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for simulating complex TPRF surrogate blends. A semi-decoupling approach was used together with species and reaction lumping to obtain a reduced kinetic model. The model was widely validated against experimental data including shock tube ignition delay times and premixed laminar flame speeds. Finally, the model was utilized to simulate the combustion of a low reactivity gasoline fuel under partially premixed combustion conditions.

  13. Reduced Gasoline Surrogate (Toluene/n-Heptane/iso-Octane) Chemical Kinetic Model for Compression Ignition Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Atef, Nour; Alfazazi, Adamu; Badra, Jihad; Zhang, Yu; Tzanetakis, Tom; Pei, Yuanjiang

    2018-01-01

    Toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) (mixture of toluene, iso-octane and heptane) is a suitable surrogate to represent a wide spectrum of real fuels with varying octane sensitivity. Investigating different surrogates in engine simulations is a prerequisite to identify the best matching mixture. However, running 3D engine simulations using detailed models is currently impossible and reduction of detailed models is essential. This work presents an AramcoMech reduced kinetic model developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for simulating complex TPRF surrogate blends. A semi-decoupling approach was used together with species and reaction lumping to obtain a reduced kinetic model. The model was widely validated against experimental data including shock tube ignition delay times and premixed laminar flame speeds. Finally, the model was utilized to simulate the combustion of a low reactivity gasoline fuel under partially premixed combustion conditions.

  14. Spark ignition engine performance and emissions in a high compression engine using biogas and methane mixtures without knock occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Montoya Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to use biogas in an internal combustion engine with high compression ratio and in order to get a high output thermal efficiency, this investigation used a diesel engine with a maximum output power 8.5 kW, which was converted to spark ignition mode to use it with gaseous fuels. Three fuels were used: Simulated biogas, biogas enriched with 25% and 50% methane by volume. After conversion, the output power of the engine decreased by 17.64% when using only biogas, where 7 kW was the new maximum output power of the engine. The compression ratio was kept at 15.5:1, and knocking did not occur during engine operation. Output thermal efficiency operating the engine in SI mode with biogas enriched with 50% methane was almost the same compared with the engine running in diesel-biogas dual mode at full load and was greater at part loads. The dependence of the diesel pilot was eliminated when biogas was used in the engine converted in SI mode. The optimum condition of experiment for the engine without knocking was using biogas enriched with 50% methane, with 12 degrees of spark timing advance and equivalence ratio of 0.95, larger output powers and higher values of methane concentration lead the engine to knock operation. The presence of CO2 allows operating engines at high compression ratios with normal combustion conditions. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and unburnt methane all in g/kWh decreased when the biogas was enriched with 50% methane.

  15. Prediction of an optimum biodiesel-diesel blended fuel for compression ignition engine using GT-power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.; Shah, F.H.; Shahid, E.M.; Gardezi, S.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a turbocharged direct-injection compression ignition (CI) engine model using fluid-dynamic engine simulation codes through a simulating tool known as GT Power. The model was first fueled with diesel, and then with various blends of biodiesel and diesel by allotting suitable parameters to predict an optimum blended fuel. During the optimization, main focus was on the engine performance, combustion, and one of the major regulated gaseous pollutants known as oxides of nitrogen (NOx). The combustion parameters such as Premix Duration (DP), Main Duration (DM), Premix Fraction (FP), Main Exponent (EM) and ignition delay (ID) affect the start of injection (SOI) angle, and thus played significant role in the prediction of optimum blended fuel. The SOI angle ranging from 5.2 to 5.7 degree crank angle (DCA) measured before top dead center (TDC) revealed an optimum biodiesel-diesel blend known as B20 (20% biodiesel and 80% diesel by volume). B20 exhibited the minimum possible NOx emissions, better combustion and acceptable engine performance. Moreover, experiments were performed to validate the simulated results by fueling the engine with B20 fuel and operating it on AC electrical dynamometer. Both the experimental and simulated results were in good agreement revealing maximum deviations of only 3%, 3.4%, 4.2%, and 5.1% for NOx, maximum combustion pressure (MCP), engine brake power (BP), and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), respectively. Meanwhile, a positive correlation was found between MCP and NOx showing that both the parameters are higher at lower speeds, relative to higher engine speeds. (author)

  16. Combustion characteristics of lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) oil in a partial premixed charge compression ignition engine

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash Alagumalai

    2015-01-01

    Indeed, the development of alternate fuels for use in internal combustion engines has traditionally been an evolutionary process in which fuel-related problems are met and critical fuel properties are identified and their specific limits defined to resolve the problem. In this regard, this research outlines a vision of lemongrass oil combustion characteristics. In a nut-shell, the combustion phenomena of lemongrass oil were investigated at engine speed of 1500 rpm and compression ratio of 17....

  17. Modeling and Simulation of a Free-Piston Engine with Electrical Generator Using HCCI Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrbai, Mohammad

    governing equations represent a single zone perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) which contain a perfect mixing ideal gas mixture. The chemical kinetics approach is applied using Cantera/ MATLABRTM toolbox, which presents the combustion process. In this research, a homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) at different operational conditions is used. HCCI engines have high efficiencies and low emissions and can work within a wide range of fuels. The results have been presented in a multi-cycle simulation and a parametric study forms. In the case of the multi-cycle simulation, a 100 cycles of the engine operation have been simulated. The overall work that is delivered to the electrical generator presents 47% of the total fuel energy. The model indicates an average frequency of 125 Hz along the operational cycles. In order to eliminate the cyclic variations and ensure a continuous operation, a proportional derivative (PD) controller has been employed. The controller adjusts the generator load in order to minimize the difference between the bottom dead center (BDC) locations along the operation cycles. The PD controller shows weakness in achieving the full steady state operation, for this purpose; a proportional integral (PI) controller has been implemented. The PI controller seeks to achieve a specific compression ratio. The results show that; the PI controller indicates unique behavior after 15 cycles of operation where the model ended to fluctuate between two compression ratios only. The complex relation between the thermodynamics and the dynamics of the engine is the greatest challenge in examining the effectiveness of the PI controller. In the parametric investigations, EGR examinations show that NOx emission is reduced to less than the half, as 30 % of EGR is used; this occurs due to the EGR thermal and dilution effects, which cause significant drop in the peak bulk temperature and CO emissions as well. Under the applied conditions, EGR has the ability to raise the work

  18. Combustion and emission characteristics of Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) fuelled with naphtha and gasoline in wide load range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Buyu; Wang, Zhi; Shuai, Shijin; Yang, Hongqiang; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Naphtha MPCI can operate stably in wide load range from 0.4 MPa to 1.4 MPa of IMEP. • Naphtha MPCI can achieve high thermal efficiency due to low exhaust loss. • Gasoline MPCI has low heat transfer loss than CDC and naphtha MPCI. • MPCI can produce low NO x emissions (<0.4 g/kW h) with the EGR ratio less than 30%. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of naphtha (RON = 65.6) and commercial gasoline (RON = 94.0) on Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) mode. The experiment is conducted on a single cylinder research diesel engine with compression ratio of 16.7. The engine is operated at an engine speed of 1600 rpm for the IMEP from 0.4 to 1.4 MPa. Commercial diesel (CN = 56.5) is also tested in Conventional Diesel Combustion (CDC) mode as a baseline. At each operating point, the injection strategy and intake conditions are adjusted to meet with the criteria (NO x < 0.4 g/kW h, soot < 0.06 m −1 , MPRR < 1 MPa/deg and CA50 < 20 CAD ATDC). The typical two-stage combustion characteristics of MPCI are obtained in both naphtha and gasoline. Stable combustion is achieved by naphtha in wide load range, while the engine fuelled with gasoline cannot operate stably at 0.4 MPa IMEP. The COV of IMEP of gasoline MPCI is higher than that of naphtha and diesel. However, gasoline has the low MPRR and the retarded CA50 at medium and high loads due to its longest ignition delay. As a result of low exhaust loss for naphtha and low heat transfer loss for gasoline, the thermal efficiencies are higher for both naphtha and gasoline in MPCI mode than diesel in CDC mode, even though diesel has the highest combustion efficiency. The separated combustion in MPCI leads to low cylinder temperature, and moderate EGR ratio (less than 30%) is needed to control NO x emissions under the limit of EURO VI

  19. The influence of different auto-ignition modes on the behavior of pressure waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Han; Yao, Anren; Yao, Chunde

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Modes of pressure oscillations in knocking, HCCI and super knock are recognized. • Three representative auto-ignition modes in engines are proposed. • A new method of “Energy Injected” is brought into understanding pressure wave. • Simulation results revealed the decisive factors for these three auto-ignition modes. • Different modes lead to different pressure wave behaviors damaging engines. - Abstract: For internal combustion engines, the knock of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engines, the conventional knock of gasoline engines and the super knock are all caused by the auto-ignition of unburned mixture which leads to the oscillation burning, but their Maximal Pressure Oscillation Amplitude (MPOA) and Maximum Pressure Rising Rate (MPRR) are totally different. In order to explore the reason, we propose three typical auto-ignition modes and then bring up the method of “Energy Injected” (EI) which is based on the experiment measured heat release rate. Through changing the heat source term in the energy equation for different auto-ignition modes, we conducted a series of numerical simulations for these three modes. After that, the following pressure oscillations can be compared and analyzed. The numerical simulation results show that different combustion pressure waves with different oscillation characteristics come from different auto-ignition modes, thus the macroscopic MPRR and MPOA are totally different. Furthermore, the method of “EI” based on the experiment measured heat release rate can accurately and rapidly help to research the formation and propagation of pressure waves in the engine combustion chamber.

  20. Combustion Homogeneity and Emission Analysis during the Transition from CI to HCCI for FACE I Gasoline

    KAUST Repository

    Vedharaj, S.

    2017-10-10

    Low temperature combustion concepts are studied recently to simultaneously reduce NOX and soot emissions. Optical studies are performed to study gasoline PPC in CI engines to investigate in-cylinder combustion and stratification. It is imperative to perform emission measurements and interpret the results with combustion images. In this work, we attempt to investigate this during the transition from CI to HCCI mode for FACE I gasoline (RON = 70) and its surrogate, PRF70. The experiments are performed in a single cylinder optical engine that runs at a speed of 1200 rpm. Considering the safety of engine, testing was done at lower IMEP (3 bar) and combustion is visualized using a high-speed camera through a window in the bottom of the bowl. From the engine experiments, it is clear that intake air temperature requirement is different at various combustion modes to maintain the same combustion phasing. While a fixed intake air temperature is required at HCCI condition, it varies at PPC and CI conditions between FACE I gasoline and PRF70. Three zones are identified 1) SOI = -180 to -80 CAD (aTDC) is HCCI zone 2) SOI = -40 to -20 CAD (aTDC) is PPC zone 3) After SOI = -15 CAD (aTDC) is CI zone. Combustion duration, ignition delay, start of combustion and CA90 (crank angle at which 90% of fuel burnt) are comparable between FACE I gasoline and PRF70. The combustion images show a prominent soot flame at CI condition, while only blue coloured premixed flames are visible at PPC condition for both the fuels. PRF70 seems to have a pronounced premixed effect when compared to FACE I gasoline at early injections, showing a decreased level of stratification. NOX emission and soot concentration decreases from CI condition and attains a constant zero value at HCCI condition for both FACE I gasoline and PRF70. CO and CO2 emissions matches between FACE I gasoline and PRF70 at PPC and CI condition, while CO emission is lower for PRF70 at HCCI condition.

  1. Combustion Homogeneity and Emission Analysis during the Transition from CI to HCCI for FACE I Gasoline

    KAUST Repository

    Vedharaj, S.; Vallinayagam, R; An, Yanzhao; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Chang, Junseok; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    Low temperature combustion concepts are studied recently to simultaneously reduce NOX and soot emissions. Optical studies are performed to study gasoline PPC in CI engines to investigate in-cylinder combustion and stratification. It is imperative to perform emission measurements and interpret the results with combustion images. In this work, we attempt to investigate this during the transition from CI to HCCI mode for FACE I gasoline (RON = 70) and its surrogate, PRF70. The experiments are performed in a single cylinder optical engine that runs at a speed of 1200 rpm. Considering the safety of engine, testing was done at lower IMEP (3 bar) and combustion is visualized using a high-speed camera through a window in the bottom of the bowl. From the engine experiments, it is clear that intake air temperature requirement is different at various combustion modes to maintain the same combustion phasing. While a fixed intake air temperature is required at HCCI condition, it varies at PPC and CI conditions between FACE I gasoline and PRF70. Three zones are identified 1) SOI = -180 to -80 CAD (aTDC) is HCCI zone 2) SOI = -40 to -20 CAD (aTDC) is PPC zone 3) After SOI = -15 CAD (aTDC) is CI zone. Combustion duration, ignition delay, start of combustion and CA90 (crank angle at which 90% of fuel burnt) are comparable between FACE I gasoline and PRF70. The combustion images show a prominent soot flame at CI condition, while only blue coloured premixed flames are visible at PPC condition for both the fuels. PRF70 seems to have a pronounced premixed effect when compared to FACE I gasoline at early injections, showing a decreased level of stratification. NOX emission and soot concentration decreases from CI condition and attains a constant zero value at HCCI condition for both FACE I gasoline and PRF70. CO and CO2 emissions matches between FACE I gasoline and PRF70 at PPC and CI condition, while CO emission is lower for PRF70 at HCCI condition.

  2. Off-road compression-ignition engine emission regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999 : guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    This guide explained the requirements for Off-Road Compression Ignition Engine Emission Regulations established under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The regulations are enforced by Environment Canada, which authorizes and monitors the use of the national emissions mark. The regulations prescribe standards for off-road engines that operate as reciprocating, internal combustion engines, other than those that operate under characteristics similar to the Otto combustion cycle and that use a spark plug or other sparking device. The regulations apply to engines that are typically diesel-fuelled and found in construction, mining, farming and forestry machines such as tractors, excavators and log skidders. Four different types of persons are potentially affected by the regulations: Canadian engine manufacturers; distributors of Canadian engines or machines containing Canadian engines; importers of engines or machines for the purpose of sale; and persons not in companies importing engines or machines. Details of emission standards were presented, as well as issues concerning evidence of conformity, importing engines, and special engine cases. Compliance and enforcement details were reviewed, as well as applicable standards and provisions for emission control systems and defeat devices; exhaust emissions; crankcase and smoke emissions; and adjustable parameters. Details of import declarations were reviewed, as well as issues concerning defects and maintenance instructions. 4 tabs., 4 figs

  3. Performance of a Compression-ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber Having High-Velocity Air Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1931-01-01

    Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.

  4. Application of multicriteria decision making methods to compression ignition engine efficiency and gaseous, particulate, and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawski, Nicholas C; Miljevic, Branka; Bodisco, Timothy A; Brown, Richard J; Ristovski, Zoran D; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2013-02-19

    Compression ignition (CI) engine design is subject to many constraints, which present a multicriteria optimization problem that the engine researcher must solve. In particular, the modern CI engine must not only be efficient but must also deliver low gaseous, particulate, and life cycle greenhouse gas emissions so that its impact on urban air quality, human health, and global warming is minimized. Consequently, this study undertakes a multicriteria analysis, which seeks to identify alternative fuels, injection technologies, and combustion strategies that could potentially satisfy these CI engine design constraints. Three data sets are analyzed with the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations and Geometrical Analysis for Interactive Aid (PROMETHEE-GAIA) algorithm to explore the impact of (1) an ethanol fumigation system, (2) alternative fuels (20% biodiesel and synthetic diesel) and alternative injection technologies (mechanical direct injection and common rail injection), and (3) various biodiesel fuels made from 3 feedstocks (i.e., soy, tallow, and canola) tested at several blend percentages (20-100%) on the resulting emissions and efficiency profile of the various test engines. The results show that moderate ethanol substitutions (~20% by energy) at moderate load, high percentage soy blends (60-100%), and alternative fuels (biodiesel and synthetic diesel) provide an efficiency and emissions profile that yields the most "preferred" solutions to this multicriteria engine design problem. Further research is, however, required to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) emissions with alternative fuels and to deliver technologies that do not significantly reduce the median diameter of particle emissions.

  5. Physicochemical characterization of particulate emissions from a compression ignition engine employing two injection technologies and three fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawski, N C; Miljevic, B; Ayoko, G A; Roberts, B A; Elbagir, S; Fairfull-Smith, K E; Bottle, S E; Ristovski, Z D

    2011-07-01

    Alternative fuels and injection technologies are a necessary component of particulate emission reduction strategies for compression ignition engines. Consequently, this study undertakes a physicochemical characterization of diesel particulate matter (DPM) for engines equipped with alternative injection technologies (direct injection and common rail) and alternative fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel, a 20% biodiesel blend, and a synthetic diesel). Particle physical properties were addressed by measuring particle number size distributions, and particle chemical properties were addressed by measuring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Particle volatility was determined by passing the polydisperse size distribution through a thermodenuder set to 300 °C. The results from this study, conducted over a four point test cycle, showed that both fuel type and injection technology have an impact on particle emissions, but injection technology was the more important factor. Significant particle number emission (54%-84%) reductions were achieved at half load operation (1% increase-43% decrease at full load) with the common rail injection system; however, the particles had a significantly higher PAH fraction (by a factor of 2 to 4) and ROS concentrations (by a factor of 6 to 16) both expressed on a test-cycle averaged basis. The results of this study have significant implications for the health effects of DPM emissions from both direct injection and common rail engines utilizing various alternative fuels.

  6. Certain investigation in a compression ignition engine using rice bran methyl ester fuel blends with ethanol additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study and analysis, the physical properties such as calorific value, viscosity, flash, and fire point temperatures of rice bran oil methyl ester were found. The rice bran oil biodiesel has been prepared by transesterification process from pure rice bran oil in the presence of methanol and NaOH. Moreover, property enhancement of rice bran oil methyl ester was also made by adding different additives such as ethanol in various proportions. Rice bran oil methyl ester with 1, 3, and 5% ethanol were analyzed for its fuel properties. The effects of diesel-B20ROME blends with ethanol additive of 1, 3, and 5% on a compression ignition engine were examined considering its emissions. It is found that the increase in biodiesel concentration in the fuel blend influences CO2 and NOx emissions. On the other hand CO and HC emissions are reduced. It is interesting to observe the emission as ethanol-B20ROME blends, reduces CO2 and NOx which are the major contributors to global warming. As the NOx and CO2 can be reduced drastically by the proposed blends, the global warming can be reduced considerably.

  7. Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Compression Ignition Engine Operating on Blends of Castor Oil Biodiesel-Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Roopesh; Sharma, Pushpendra Kumar; Singh, Aditya Narayan; Agrawal, Yadvendra Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Diesel vehicles are the nerves and veins of transportation, particularly in developing countries. With the rapid rate of modernization, increasing demand of fuel is inevitable. The exponential increase in fuel prices and the scarcity of its supply from the environment have promoted interest in the development of alternative sources of fuel. In this work, genus Ricinus communis L. was studied in order to delimit their potential as a raw material for biodiesel production. Further, castor oil, ethyl ester were prepared by transesterification using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as a catalyst and tested on a four-stroke, single-cylinder compression ignition engine. The test was carried out at a constant speed of 3000 rpm at different loads. The results represent a substantial decrease in carbon monoxide (CO) emission with an increasing biodiesel percentage. The reduction of CO in B05, B10, B15 and B20 averaged 11.75, 22.02, 24.23 and 28.79 %, respectively, compared to mineral diesel. The emission results of the comparative test indicated that CO, oxygen (O2) and smoke density emissions are found to be lower when the engine is filled with B05, B10, B15 and B20 as compared to mineral diesel, while carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) with B05, B10, B15 and B20 are found to increase marginally. Brake thermal efficiency and brake specific fuel consumption decrease and increase respectively in biodiesel with different blends in comparison of mineral diesel.

  8. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a compression ignition engine using liquefied petroleum gas-Diesel blended fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, D.H.; Bian, Y.ZH.; Ma, ZH.Y.; Zhang, CH.H.; Liu, SH.Q.

    2007-01-01

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially smoke and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection (DI) Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. The use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using LPG in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high auto-ignition temperature of LPG is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under LPG-Diesel blended fuel conditions, using LPG-Diesel blended fuels with various blended rates (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%). Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and blended fuels, revealing the effect of blended fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions

  9. An overview of engine durability and compatibility using biodiesel–bioethanol–diesel blends in compression-ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharma, S.; Ong, Hwai Chyuan; Masjuki, H.H.; Sebayang, A.H.; Silitonga, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects on engine performance and emission depend on biofuel properties. • The engine performance can improve and emission reduces with biofuel as the fuel. • Biofuel can ensure the long term engine durability and materials of diesel engine. • Feasibility of biofuel carried out extended periods in corrosion behaviour. • Biofuel appears to reduce life-cycle cost efficiencies for the alternative fuel. - Abstract: The realization of declining fossil fuel supplies and the adverse impact of fossil fuels on the environment has accelerated research and development activities in renewable energy sources and technologies. Biofuels are renewable fuels made from edible, non-edible or waste oils, as well as animal fats and algae, and these fuels have been proven to be good substitutes for fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Bioethanol and biodiesels have gained worldwide attention in order to address environmental issues associated with fossil fuels, provide energy security, reduce imports and rural employment, as well as improve agricultural economy. Bioethanol has high oxygen content and octane content up to 35% and 108, respectively and hence, it increases oxygenation and improves combustion of fuel. In addition, bioethanol has lower vaporization pressure, which reduces the risks associated with evaporative emissions. In contrast, biodiesel has good lubricity, which helps protect the surface of engine components from wear and friction. The use of biodiesel–bioethanol–petroleum diesel blends poses a greater challenge with regards to improving the compatibility of the materials with the fuel system in compression ignition (CI) and spark ignition (SI) engines. In this work, the technical conditions of an engine (i.e. engine deposits, wear of the engine components and quality of the lubrication oil) are assessed by the application of with biodiesel–bioethanol–petroleum diesel blends. It is deemed important to evaluate the effects of

  10. Experimental investigations of effects of EGR on performance and emissions characteristics of CNG fueled reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Kalsi, Sunmeet; Subramanian, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • NO_x emission decreased drastically in RCCI engine with EGR. • CO and HC emissions decreased with 8% EGR. • Smoke emission increased with EGR but is still less than base diesel. • Brake thermal efficiency does not change with EGR up to 15% • 8% EGR is optimum based on less CO, HC, NO_x except smoke. - Abstract: Experimental: tests were carried out on a single cylinder diesel engine (7.4 kW rated power at 1500 rpm) under dual fuel mode (CNG-Diesel) with EGR (exhaust gas recirculation). Less reacting fuel (CNG) was injected inside the intake manifold using timed manifold gas injection system whereas high reactive diesel fuel was directly injected into the engine’s cylinder for initiation of ignition. EGR at different percentages (8%, 15% and 30%) was inducted to the engine through intake manifold and tests were conducted at alternator power output of 2 kW and 5 kW. The engine can operate under dual fuel mode with maximum CNG energy share of 85% and 92% at 5 kW and 2 kW respectively. The brake thermal efficiency of diesel engine improved marginally at 5 kW power output under conventional dual fuel mode with the CNG share up to 37% whereas the efficiency did not change with up to 15% EGR however it decreased beyond the EGR percentage. NO_x emission in diesel engine under conventional dual fuel mode decreased significantly and it further decreased drastically with EGR. The notable point emerged from this study is that CO and HC emissions, which are major problems at part load in reactivity controlled compression ignition engine (RCCI), decreased with 8% EGR along with further reduction of NO_x. However, smoke emission is marginally higher with EGR than without EGR but it is still less than conventional mode (Diesel alone). The new concept emerged from this study is that CO and HC emissions of RCCI engine at part load can be reduced using EGR.

  11. On the effects of fuel properties and injection timing in partially premixed compression ignition of low octane fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Nimal

    2017-06-29

    A better understanding on the effects of fuel properties and injection timing is required to improve the performance of advanced engines based on low temperature combustion concepts. In this work, an experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the effects of physical and chemical kinetic properties of low octane fuels and their surrogates in partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) engines. The main objective was to identify the relative importance of physical versus chemical kinetic properties in predicting practical fuel combustion behavior across a range of injection timings. Two fuel/surrogate pairs were chosen for comparison: light naphtha (LN) versus the primary reference fuel (PRF) with research octane number of 65 (PRF 65), and FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) I gasoline versus PRF 70. Two sets of parametric studies were conducted: the first varied the amount of injected fuel mass at different injection timings to match a fixed combustion phasing, and the second maintained the same injected fuel mass at each injection timing to assess resulting combustion phasing changes. Full-cycle computational fluid dynamic engine simulations were conducted by accounting for differences in the physical properties of the original and surrogate fuels, while employing identical chemical kinetics. The simulations were found to capture trends observed in the experiments, while providing details on spatial mixing and chemical reactivity for different fuels and injection timings. It was found that differences in physical properties become increasingly important as injection timing was progressively delayed from premixed conditions, and this was rationalized by analysis of mixture stratification patterns resulting from injection of fuels with different physical properties. The results suggest that accurate descriptions of both physical and chemical behavior of fuels are critical in predictive simulations of PPCI engines for a wide range of

  12. Exploration of waste cooking oil methyl esters (WCOME as fuel in compression ignition engines: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kathirvel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ever growing human population and the corresponding economic development of mankind have caused a relentless surge in the energy demand of the world. The fast diminishing fossil fuel reserves and the overdependence of petroleum based fuels have already prompted the world to look for alternate sources of energy to offset the fuel crisis in the future. Waste Cooking Oil Methyl Ester (WCOME has proven itself as a viable alternate fuel that can be used in Compression Ignition (CI engines due to its low cost, non-toxicity, biodegradability and renewable nature. It also contributes a minimum amount of net greenhouse gases, such as CO2, SO2 and NO emissions to the atmosphere. The main objective of this paper is to focus on the study of the performance, combustion and emission parameters of CI engines using WCOME and to explore the possibility of utilizing WCOME blends with diesel extensively in place of diesel. The production methods used for transesterification play a vital role in the physiochemical properties of the methyl esters produced. Various production intensification technologies such as hydrodynamic cavitation and ultrasonic cavitation were employed to improve the yield of the methyl esters during transesterification. This review includes the study of WCOME from different origins in various types of diesel engines. Most of the studies comply with the decrease in carbon monoxide (CO emissions and the increase in brake thermal efficiency while using WCOME in CI engines. Many researchers reported slight increase in the emissions of oxides of nitrogen. ANN modeling has been widely used to predict the process variables of the diesel engine while using WCOME. The versatility of ANN modeling was proven by the minimum error percentages of the actual and predicted values of the performance and emission characteristics.

  13. On the effects of fuel properties and injection timing in partially premixed compression ignition of low octane fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Nimal; Jaasim, Mohammed; Atef, Nour; Chung, Suk-Ho; Im, Hong G.; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding on the effects of fuel properties and injection timing is required to improve the performance of advanced engines based on low temperature combustion concepts. In this work, an experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the effects of physical and chemical kinetic properties of low octane fuels and their surrogates in partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) engines. The main objective was to identify the relative importance of physical versus chemical kinetic properties in predicting practical fuel combustion behavior across a range of injection timings. Two fuel/surrogate pairs were chosen for comparison: light naphtha (LN) versus the primary reference fuel (PRF) with research octane number of 65 (PRF 65), and FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) I gasoline versus PRF 70. Two sets of parametric studies were conducted: the first varied the amount of injected fuel mass at different injection timings to match a fixed combustion phasing, and the second maintained the same injected fuel mass at each injection timing to assess resulting combustion phasing changes. Full-cycle computational fluid dynamic engine simulations were conducted by accounting for differences in the physical properties of the original and surrogate fuels, while employing identical chemical kinetics. The simulations were found to capture trends observed in the experiments, while providing details on spatial mixing and chemical reactivity for different fuels and injection timings. It was found that differences in physical properties become increasingly important as injection timing was progressively delayed from premixed conditions, and this was rationalized by analysis of mixture stratification patterns resulting from injection of fuels with different physical properties. The results suggest that accurate descriptions of both physical and chemical behavior of fuels are critical in predictive simulations of PPCI engines for a wide range of

  14. Direct numerical simulations of the ignition of lean primary reference fuel/air mixtures with temperature inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minhbau

    2013-10-01

    The effects of fuel composition, thermal stratification, and turbulence on the ignition of lean homogeneous primary reference fuel (PRF)/air mixtures under the conditions of constant volume and elevated pressure are investigated by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a new 116-species reduced kinetic mechanism. Two-dimensional DNSs were performed in a fixed volume with a two-dimensional isotropic velocity spectrum and temperature fluctuations superimposed on the initial scalar fields with different fuel compositions to elucidate the influence of variations in the initial temperature fluctuation and turbulence intensity on the ignition of three different lean PRF/air mixtures. In general, it was found that the mean heat release rate increases slowly and the overall combustion occurs fast with increasing thermal stratification regardless of the fuel composition under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. In addition, the effect of the fuel composition on the ignition characteristics of PRF/air mixtures was found to vanish with increasing thermal stratification. Chemical explosive mode (CEM), displacement speed, and Damköhler number analyses revealed that the high degree of thermal stratification induces deflagration rather than spontaneous ignition at the reaction fronts, rendering the mean heat release rate more distributed over time subsequent to thermal runaway occurring at the highest temperature regions in the domain. These analyses also revealed that the vanishing of the fuel effect under the high degree of thermal stratification is caused by the nearly identical propagation characteristics of deflagrations of different PRF/air mixtures. It was also found that high intensity and short-timescale turbulence can effectively homogenize mixtures such that the overall ignition is apt to occur by spontaneous ignition. These results suggest that large thermal stratification leads to smooth operation of homogeneous charge compression-ignition (HCCI

  15. Effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the performance and emission characteristics of a spark ignition engine using hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, M.A.R. [University of Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-12-01

    The present energy situation has stimulated active research interest in non-petroleum and non-polluting fuels, particularly for transportation, power generation, and agricultural sectors. Researchers have found that hydrogen presents the best and an unprecedented solution to the energy crises and pollution problems, due to its superior combustion qualities and availability. This paper discusses analytically and provides data on the effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the engine performance, emissions and pre-ignition limits of a spark ignition engine operating on hydrogen fuel. These data are important in order to understand the interaction between engine performance and emission parameters, which will help engine designers when designing for hydrogen. (author)

  16. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost effective physical

  17. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O.

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost

  18. Session 4: On-board exhaust gas reforming for improved performance of natural gas HCCI engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amieiro, A.; Golunski, S.; James, D. [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Sonning Common, Reading (United Kingdom); Miroslaw, Wyszynski; Athanasios, Megaritis; Peucheret, S. [Birmingham Univ., School of Engineering, Future Power Systems Research Group (United Kingdom); Hongming, Xu [Jaguar Cars Ltd, W/2/021 Engineering Centre, Whitley, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    water, oxygen and methane have been studied, as a function of space velocity, allowing us to assess the relative contributions of partial oxidation, steam reforming and water gas shift to the overall process of hydrogen formation. From this study we are able to identify the optimum auto-thermal conditions for the reforming process, and predict the behaviour of the reformer under different phases of engine operation. The reforming catalyst has been scaled up from a packed bed of granules to a full-sized monolithic reactor, which has been close-coupled with a Jaguar V6 engine. This integrated prototype has been tested with the engine running on natural gas in HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) mode. The reformer adds 5-15% hydrogen to the recirculated exhaust gas, resulting in substantial improvements in the performance and emissions of the engine. (authors)

  19. Effect of fuel injection parameters on combustion stability and emissions of a mineral diesel fueled partially premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Ayush; Singh, Akhilendra Pratap; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • NOx and PM emissions were lowest at 700 bar fuel injection pressure (FIP). • PCCI showed lower knocking than compression ignition combustion mode. • Increasing FIP reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides and smoke opacity in PCCI mode. • Increasing FIP reduced nucleation mode particle concentration. • Increasing FIP with advanced main injection timings improved PCCI combustion. - Abstract: This experimental study focuses on developing new combustion concept for compression ignition (CI) engines by achieving partially homogeneous charge, leading to low temperature combustion (LTC). Partially premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion is a single-stage phenomenon, with combustion shifting towards increasingly premixed combustion phase, resulting in lower in-cylinder temperatures. PCCI leads to relatively lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) simultaneously. To investigate combustion, performance and emission characteristics of the PCCI engine, experiments were performed in a mineral diesel fueled single cylinder research engine, which was equipped with flexible fuel injection equipment (FIE). Effects of fuel injection pressure (FIP) were investigated by changing the FIP from 400 bar to 1000 bar. Experiments were carried out by varying start of main injection (SoMI) timings (from 12° to 24° before top dead center (bTDC)), when using single pilot injection. This experimental study included detailed investigations of particulate characteristics such as particulate number-size distribution using engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS), particulate bound trace metal analysis using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), and soot morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PCCI combustion improved with increasing FIP (up to 700 bar) due to superior fuel atomization however further increasing FIP deteriorated PCCI combustion and engine performance due to intense

  20. Experimental study of hot electrons propagation and energy deposition in solid or laser-shock compressed targets: applications to fast igniter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisani, F.

    2000-02-01

    In the fast igniter scheme, a recent approach proposed for the inertial confinement fusion, the idea is to dissociate the fuel ignition phase from its compression. The ignition phase would be then achieved by means of an external energy source: a fast electron beam generated by the interaction with an ultra-intense laser. The main goal of this work is to study the mechanisms of the hot electron energy transfer to the compressed fuel. We intent in particular to study the role of the electric and collisional effects involved in the hot electron propagation in a medium with properties similar to the compressed fuel. We carried out two experiments, one at the Vulcan laser facility (England) and the second one at the new LULI 100 TW laser (France). During the first experiment, we obtained the first results on the hot electron propagation in a dense and hot plasma. The innovating aspect of this work was in particular the use of the laser-shock technique to generate high pressures, allowing the strongly correlated and degenerated plasma to be created. The role of the electric and magnetic effects due to the space charge associated with the fast electron beam has been investigated in the second experiment. Here we studied the propagation in materials with different electrical characteristics: an insulator and a conductor. The analysis of the results showed that only by taking into account simultaneously the two propagation mechanisms (collisions and electric effects) a correct treatment of the energy deposition is possible. We also showed the importance of taking into account the induced modifications due to the electrons beam crossing the target, especially the induced heating. (author)

  1. Miniature free-piston homogeneous charge compression ignition engine-compressor concept - Part I: performance estimation and design considerations unique to small dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichlmayr, H.T.; Kittelson, D.B.; Zachariah, M.R. [The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States). Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    Research and development activities pertaining to the development of a 10 W, homogeneous charge compression ignition free-piston engine-compressor are presented. Emphasis is place upon the miniature engine concept and design rationale. Also, a crankcase-scavenged, two-stroke engine performance estimation method (slider-crank piston motion) is developed and used to explore the influence of engine operating conditions and geometric parameters on power density and establish plausible design conditions. The minimization of small-scale effects such as enhanced heat transfer, is also explored. (author)

  2. Simple model of the indirect compression of targets under conditions close to the national ignition facility at an energy of 1.5 MJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The possibility of the analysis and interpretation of the reported experiments with the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry has been studied. The problem of the energy balance in a target and the determination of the laser energy that should be used in the spherical model of the target has been considered. The results of action of pulses differing in energy and time profile (“low-foot” and “high-foot” regimes) have been analyzed. The parameters of the compression of targets with a high-density carbon ablator have been obtained. The results of the simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements and correspond to the range of the observed parameters. The set of compared results can be expanded, in particular, for a more detailed determination of the parameters of a target near the maximum compression of the capsule. The physical foundation of the possibility of using the one-dimensional description is the necessity of the closeness of the last stage of the compression of the capsule to a one-dimensional process. The one-dimensional simulation of the compression of the capsule can be useful in establishing the boundary behind which two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation should be used.

  3. An assessment of the dual-mode reactivity controlled compression ignition/conventional diesel combustion capabilities in a EURO VI medium-duty diesel engine fueled with an intermediate ethanol-gasoline blend and biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; García, Antonio; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier; Balloul, Iyad; Pradel, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reactivity controlled compression ignition regime utilized from 25% to 35% load. • Dual-mode reduces the regeneration periods of the diesel particulate filter. • The use of near-term available biofuels allows good performance and emissions. • Dual-mode leads to 2% greater efficiency than diesel combustion at high engine speeds. - Abstract: This work investigates the capabilities of the dual-mode reactivity controlled compression ignition/conventional diesel combustion engine operation to cover the full operating range of a EURO VI medium-duty diesel engine with compression ratio of 17.5:1. This concept is based on covering all the engine map switching between the reactivity controlled compression ignition and the conventional diesel combustion operating modes. Specifically, the benefits of reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion are exploited whenever possible according to certain restrictions, while the conventional diesel combustion operation is used to cover the zones of the engine map in which the reactivity controlled compression ignition operation is limited. The experiments were conducted using a single-cylinder research diesel engine derived from the multi-cylinder production engine. In addition, considering the mandatory presence of biofuels in the future context of road transport and the ability of ethanol to be blended with gasoline, the low reactivity fuel used in the study is a blend of 20% ethanol by volume with 80% of 95 octane number gasoline. Moreover, a diesel containing 7% of biodiesel has been used as high reactivity fuel. Firstly, a reactivity controlled compression ignition mapping is performed to check the operational limits of the concept in this engine platform. Later, based on the results, the potential of the dual-mode concept is discussed. Results suggest that, under the constraints imposed, reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion can be utilized between 25% and 35% load. In this region

  4. Study of the Injection Control Strategies of a Compression Ignition Free Piston Engine Linear Generator in a One-Stroke Starting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihua Feng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a compression ignition (CI free piston engine linear generator (FPLG, injection timing is one of the most important parameters that affect its performance, especially for the one-stroke starting operation mode. In this paper, two injection control strategies are proposed using piston position and velocity signals. It was found experimentally that the injection timing’s influence on the compression ratio, the peak in-cylinder gas pressure and the indicated work (IW is different from that of traditional reciprocating CI engines. The maximum IW of the ignition starting cylinder, say left cylinder (LC and the right cylinder (RC are 132.7 J and 138.1 J, respectively. The thermal-dynamic model for simulating the working processes of the FPLG are built and verified by experimental results. The numerical simulation results show that the running instability and imbalance between LC and RC are the obvious characters when adopting the injection strategy of the velocity feedback. These could be solved by setting different triggering velocity thresholds for the two cylinders. The IW output from the FPLG under this strategy is higher than that of adopting the position feedback strategy, and the maximum IW of the RC could reach 162.3 J. Under this strategy, the prototype is able to achieve better starting conditions and could operate continuously for dozens of cycles.

  5. Combustion Characteristics of C5 Alcohols and a Skeletal Mechanism for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo; Chung, Suk-Ho; Lu, Tianfeng; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    ) and their mixtures with primary reference fuels (PRFs) were studied using a detailed chemical kinetic model obtained from merging previously published mechanisms. Ignition delay times of the C5 alcohol/air mixtures were compared to PRFs at 20 and 40 atm. Reaction

  6. Optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions for compression ignition engine fueled with pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seokhwon; Jeon, Joonho; Park, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel was used with direct injection system. • KIVA-CHEMKIN code modeled dual-fuel fuel spray and combustion processes with discrete multi-component model. • The characteristics of Combustion and emission on pre-blended fuel was investigated with various fuel reactivities. • Optimization of combustion chamber shape improved combustion performance of the gasoline-diesel blended fuel engine. - Abstract: In this study, experiments and numerical simulations were used to improve the fuel efficiency of compression ignition engine using a gasoline-diesel blended fuel and an optimization technology. The blended fuel is directly injected into the cylinder with various blending ratios. Combustion and emission characteristics were investigated to explore the effects of gasoline ratio on fuel blend. The present study showed that the advantages of gasoline-diesel blended fuel, high thermal efficiency and low emission, were maximized using the numerical optimization method. The ignition delay and maximum pressure rise rate increased with the proportion of gasoline. As the gasoline fraction increased, the combustion duration and the indicated mean effective pressure decreased. The homogeneity of the fuel-air mixture was improved due to longer ignition delay. Soot emission was significantly reduced up to 90% compared to that of conventional diesel. The nitrogen oxides emissions of the blended fuel increased slightly when the start of injection was retarded toward top dead center. For the numerical study, KIVA-CHEMKIN multi-dimensional CFD code was used to model the combustion and emission characteristics of gasoline-diesel blended fuel. The micro genetic algorithm coupled with the KIVA-CHEMKIN code were used to optimize the combustion chamber shape and operating conditions to improve the combustion performance of the blended fuel engine. The optimized chamber geometry enhanced the fuel efficiency, for a level of nitrogen oxides

  7. Direct numerical simulations of the ignition of a lean biodiesel/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities at high pressure and intermediate temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minhbau

    2014-11-01

    on the HCCI combustion is made to clarify each effect. These results suggest that temperature and composition stratifications together with a well-designed T s(-) φ{symbol} correlation can alleviate an excessive rate of pressure rise and control the ignition-timing in homogeneous charge compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  8. Attempt of multiple stage injection with EGR for high load operation of a premixed compression ignition engine; Tadan funsha ni yoru yokongo asshuku chakka kikan no unten ryoiki kakudai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Akagawa, H. [New ACE Institute Co. Ltd., Tsukuba (Japan); Tsujimura, K. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-01-25

    By injecting fuel at the very early stage of compression stroke and thus creating homogeneous lean mixture before ignition, (PREDIC ; PREmixed lean DIesel Combustion), simultaneous reduction of NO{sub x} and smoke was obtained. However, since increasing the mixture equivalence ratio cause knocking, it was difficult to operate at higher load conditions. In this study, in order to reduce combustion rate at high load conditions in a premixed compression ignition engine, multiple stage injection method and EGR were combined, and heterogeneous mixture was made before ignition. The engine test results showed that NO{sub x} emissions could be reduced to less than 50 ppm, without knocking even at full load conditions. In addition, smoke emissions were also maintained below invisible level. It can be understood that the premixing of fuel was advanced, smoke was reduced, and EGR rate was increased, resulting lower heat release rate and NO{sub x} emissions. (author)

  9. Performance and emission characteristics of a turbocharged spark-ignition hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas engine under wide open throttle operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fanhua; Wang, Mingyue; Jiang, Long; Deng, Jiao; Chen, Renzhe; Naeve, Nashay; Zhao, Shuli [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-11-15

    This paper investigates the effect of various hydrogen ratios in HCNG (hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas) fuels on performance and emission characteristics at wide open throttle operating conditions using a turbocharged spark-ignition natural gas engine. The experimental data was taken at hydrogen fractions of 0%, 30% and 55% by volume and was conducted under different excess air ratio ({lambda}) at MBT operating conditions. It is found that under various {lambda}, the addition of hydrogen can significantly reduce CO, CH{sub 4} emissions and the NO{sub x} emission remain at an acceptable level when ignition timing is optimized. Using the same excess air ratio, as more hydrogen is added the power, exhaust temperatures and max cylinder pressure decrease slowly until the mixture's lower heating value remains unchanged with the hydrogen enrichment, then they rise gradually. In addition, the early flame development period and the flame propagation duration are both shorter, and the indicated thermal efficiency and maximum heat release rate both increase with more hydrogen addition. (author)

  10. Numerical Study of Natural Gas/Diesel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion with Large Eddy Simulation and Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Hasan Kakaee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a comparative study is performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES and Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS turbulence models on a natural gas/diesel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI engine. The numerical results are validated against the available research work in the literature. The RNG (Re-Normalization Group k − ε and dynamic structure models are employed to model turbulent flow for RANS and LES simulations, respectively. Parameters like the premixed natural gas mass fraction, the second start of injection timing (SOI2 of diesel and the engine speed are studied to compare performance of RANS and LES models on combustion and pollutant emissions prediction. The results obtained showed that the LES and RANS model give almost similar predictions of cylinder pressure and heat release rate at lower natural gas mass fractions and late SOI2 timings. However, the LES showed improved capability to predict the natural gas auto-ignition and pollutant emissions prediction compared to RANS model especially at higher natural gas mass fractions.

  11. Biodiesel production from Cynara cardunculus L. and Brassica carinata A. Braun seeds and their suitability as fuels in compression ignition engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania De Domenico

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of energy crops can provide environmental benefits and may represent an opportunity to improve agriculture in areas considered at low productivity. In this work, we studied the energy potential of two species (Brassica carinata A. Braun and Cynara cardunculus L. and their seed oil productivity under different growth conditions. Furthermore, the biodiesel from the oil extracted from the seeds of these species was produced and analysed in term of utilisation as fuels in compression ignition engines. In particular, the spray penetration and shape ratio were measured in a constant-volume chamber and compared with the results obtained with a standard diesel fuel. These results were obtained using a standard common rail injection system at different injection pressure, injection duration, and constant-volume chamber pressure.

  12. Study of high load operation limit for premixed compression ignition engine; Yokongo asshuku chakka kikan no kofuka unten genkai ni kansuru kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazaki, N. [Isuzu Advanced Engineering Center Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Akagawa, H. [Nissan Diesel Motor Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Tsujimura, K. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Miyamoto, T.

    2000-11-25

    NO{sub x} emission was remarkably reduced by PREDIC (PREmixed lean DIesel Combustion) system in which fuel was injected at very early stage of compression stroke and the major part of the fuel is considered to be burned with self-ignition of premixed charge around TDC. However PREDIC system had some problems, a restriction of a high load operation was one of these problems. In order to investigate the combustion characteristics of PREDIC at the richer operation limit, a test engine was operated with gaseous fuel-air mixture where less heterogeneous mixture can be formed than that of conventional diesel engines. A steep pressure rise or the abrupt increase in NO{sub x} emission determined the richer operation limit. This was at 2 to 2.4 of excess air ratio. Supercharging operation enabled the high load operation more than 2.4 of excess air ratio. (author)

  13. Effects of air jet duration and timing on the combustion characteristics of high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition combustion mode in a hybrid pneumatic engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Wuqiang; Meng, Xiangyu; Tian, Jiangping; Tian, Hua; Cui, Jingchen; Feng, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3-D CFD model of the power cylinder in HPE was developed. • High-pressure air JCCI combustion mode includes two-stage high-temperature reaction. • The combustion phasing of the pre-mixture is controllable via the SOJ timing. • There exists an optimum SOJ timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration. - Abstract: The high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition (JCCI) combustion mode was employed to control the premixed diesel compression ignition combustion phasing by using the compound thermodynamic cycle under all operating conditions, which is accomplished in a hybrid pneumatic engine (HPE). A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation coupled with reduced n-heptane chemical kinetics mechanism has been applied to investigate the effects of high-pressure air jet duration and the start of jet (SOJ) timing on the combustion characteristics in the power cylinder of HPE. By sweeping the high-pressure air jet durations from 6 to 14 °CA and SOJ timings from −12 °CA ATDC to the top dead center (TDC) under the air jet temperatures of 400 and 500 K, respectively, the low- and high-temperature reactions, combustion efficiency, as well as the combustion phasing and burning duration have been analyzed in detail. The results illustrated that a longer air jet duration results in a higher peak in the first-stage high-temperature reaction, and the short air jet duration of 6 °CA can lead to a higher combustion efficiency. The SOJ timing sweep results showed that there exists an optimum timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration.

  14. On the effect of Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) injection upon the cold starting of a biodiesel fuelled compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clenci, Adrian; Niculescu, Rodica; Iorga-Simǎn, Victor; Tricǎ, Alina; Danlos, Amélie

    2017-02-01

    The use of biodiesel fuel in compression ignition engines has the potential to reduce CO2, which can lead to a reduction in global warming and environmental hazards. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel, as it is made from renewable resources. A major drawback associated with the use of biodiesel, however, is its poor cold flow properties, which have a direct influence on the cold starting performance of the engine. This paper is a consequence of a study on assessing the cold-starting performance of a compression ignition engine fueled with different blends of fossil diesel fuel and biodiesel. Through experimental investigations, it was found that the engine starting at -20°C was no longer possible in the case of using B50 (50% diesel + 50% biofuel made from sunflower oil). In order to "force" the engine starting in this particular situation, Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) was injected into the intake manifold. DEE being a highly flammable substance, the result was a sudden and explosive engine starting, the peak pressure in the monitored cylinder in the first successful engine cycle being almost twice the one which is usually considered as normal. Thus, to explain the observed phenomena, we launched this work relying on the analysis of the in-cylinder instantaneous pressure evolution, which was acquired during cranking, stabilizing and idling phases. Moreover, since the cause of the sudden and explosive engine starting was the DEE, by using a CFD approach, we also obtained results regarding the inter-cylinder distribution of the injected DEE.

  15. Effect of engine load and biogas flow rate to the performance of a compression ignition engine run in dual-fuel (dieselbiogas) mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, H.

    2018-02-01

    The Government of Indonesia (GoI) has released a target on reduction Green Houses Gases emissions (GHG) by 26% from level business-as-usual by 2020, and the target can be up to 41% by international supports. In the energy sector, this target can be reached effectively by promoting fossil fuel replacement or blending with biofuel. One of the potential solutions is operating compression ignition (CI) engine in dual-fuel (diesel-biogas) mode. In this study effects of engine load and biogas flow rate on the performance and exhaust gas emissions of a compression ignition engine run in dual-fuel mode are investigated. In the present study, the used biogas is refined with methane content 70% of volume. The objectives are to explore the optimum operating condition of the CI engine run in dual-fuel mode. The experiments are performed on a four-strokes CI engine with rated output power of 4.41 kW. The engine is tested at constant speed 1500 rpm. The engine load varied from 600W to 1500W and biogas flow rate varied from 0 L/min to 6 L/min. The results show brake thermal efficiency of the engine run in dual-fuel mode is better than pure diesel mode if the biogas flow rates are 2 L/min and 4 L/min. It is recommended to operate the present engine in a dual-fuel mode with biogas flow rate of 4 L/min. The consumption of diesel fuel can be replaced up to 50%.

  16. Effect of main injection timing for controlling the combustion phasing of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine using a new dual injection strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Pranab; Subbarao, P.M.V.; Subrahmanyam, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new dual injection concept is developed by minimum geometry modification. • The occurrence of combustion parameters strongly depend on main injection timing. • At higher load, premixed equivalence ratio dominates over main injection timing. • Retarded of main injection timing tends to retard combustion phasing. • Slightly retarded main injection timing is recommended to avoid intense knocking. - Abstract: Homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion of diesel fuel is implemented using a novel dual injection strategy. A new experimental technique is developed to modify a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine to run on homogeneous combustion mode. Effect of main injection timing is investigated covering a range from 26 to 8 crank angle degrees before top dead center with an interval of 3°. Retarded main injection timing is identified as a control strategy for delaying combustion phasing and a means of controlled combustion phasing of direct injection homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion. Two load conditions were investigated and it was observed that at higher load, start of combustion depends more on fuel air equivalence ratio than main injection timing, whereas at low load, it significantly varies with varying main injection timing. Significant improvements in smoke and oxides of nitrogen emissions are observed when compared with the baseline conventional combustion. By studying different combustion parameters, it is observed that there is an improvement in performance and emissions with marginal loss in thermal efficiency when the main injection timing is 20° before top dead center. This is identified as the optimum main injection timing for such homogeneous combustion under the same operating condition

  17. Experimental investigation of performance, exhaust emission and combustion parameters of stationary compression ignition engine using ethanol fumigation in dual fuel mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamuwa, D.K.; Sharma, D.; Soni, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potential of renewable fuels as diesel replacement is being emphasized. • Effect of ethanol fumigation on the performance of diesel engine is investigated. • NOx, CO_2 and smoke decreases with simultaneous increase in HC and CO. • Increase in ignition delay with decrease in combustion duration for ethanol substitution observed. - Abstract: Dwindling reserves and steeply increasing prices of the fossil-fuels, concern over climatic change due to release of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and the strict environmental regulations have motivated the researchers for the search for renewable alternative fuel that has clean burning characteristics and may be produced indigenously. Alcohols, being oxygenated fuel improve the combustion and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, thus enhancing agrarian economies and encouraging national economy as a whole. The objective of this paper is to investigate the thermal performance, exhaust emissions and combustion behaviour of small capacity compression ignition engine using fumigated ethanol. Fumigated ethanol at different flow rates is supplied to the cylinder during suction with the help of a simplified low cost ethanol fuelling system. With ethanol fumigation, brake thermal efficiency decreased upto 11.2% at low loads due to deteriorated combustion, whereas improved combustion increased efficiency up to 6% at higher loads, as compared to pure diesel. Maximum reduction of 22%, 41% and 27% respectively in nitrogen oxide, smoke and carbon-di-oxide emissions with simultaneous increase in hydrocarbon and carbon-mono-oxide emissions upto maximum of 144% and 139% respectively for different rates of ethanol fumigation have been observed, when compared to pure diesel operation. This is due to the changes in physico-chemical properties of air fuel mixture, viz combustion temperature, oxygen concentration, latent heat of vaporisation, fuel distribution, cetane number and ignition delay, that occurred with addition of

  18. TOPSIS-based parametric optimization of compression ignition engine performance and emission behavior with bael oil blends for different EGR and charge inlet temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniappan, Krishnamoorthi; Rajalingam, Malayalamurthi

    2018-05-02

    The demand for higher fuel energy and lesser exhaust emissions of diesel engines can be achieved by fuel being used and engine operating parameters. In the present work, effects of engine speed (RPM), injection timing (IT), injection pressure (IP), and compression ratio (CR) on performance and emission characteristics of a compression ignition (CI) engine were investigated. The ternary test fuel of 65% diesel + 25% bael oil + 10% diethyl ether (DEE) was used in this work and test was conducted at different charge inlet temperature (CIT) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All the experiments are conducted at the tradeoff engine load that is 75% engine load. When operating the diesel engine with 320 K CIT, brake thermal efficiency (BTE) is improved to 28.6%, and carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions have been reduced to 0.025% and 12.5 ppm at 18 CR. The oxide of nitrogen (NOx) has been reduced to 240 ppm at 1500 rpm for 30% EGR mode. Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) method is frequently used in multi-factor selection and gray correlation analysis method is used to study uncertain of the systems.

  19. Engine performance, combustion, and emissions study of biomass to liquid fuel in a compression-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunkoya, Dolanimi; Fang, Tiegang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Renewable biomass to liquid (BTL) fuel was tested in a direct injection diesel engine. • Engine performance, in-cylinder pressure, and exhaust emissions were measured. • BTL fuel reduces pollutant emission for most conditions compared with diesel and biodiesel. • BTL fuel leads to high thermal efficiency and lower fuel consumption compared with diesel and biodiesel. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of diesel, biodiesel and biomass to liquid (BTL) fuels are investigated in a single-cylinder diesel engine at a fixed speed (2000 rpm) and three engine loads corresponding to 0 bar, 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The engine performance, in-cylinder combustion, and exhaust emissions were measured. Results show an increase in indicated work for BTL and biodiesel at 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP when compared to diesel but a decrease at 0 bar. Lower mechanical efficiency was observed for BTL and biodiesel at 1.26 bar BMEP but all three fuels had roughly the same mechanical efficiency at 3.77 bar BMEP. BTL was found to have the lowest brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and the highest brake thermal efficiency (BTE) among the three fuels tested. Combustion profiles for the three fuels were observed to vary depending on the engine load. Biodiesel was seen to have the shortest ignition delay among the three fuels regardless of engine loads. Diesel had the longest ignition delay at 0 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP but had the same ignition delay as BTL at 1.26 bar BMEP. At 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP, BTL had the lowest HC emissions but highest HC emissions at no load conditions when compared to biodiesel and diesel. When compared to diesel and biodiesel BTL had lower CO and CO 2 emissions. At 0 bar and 1.26 bar BMEP, BTL had higher NOx emissions than diesel fuel but lower NOx than biodiesel at no load conditions. At the highest engine load tested, NOx emissions were observed to be highest for diesel fuel but lowest for BTL. At 1

  20. Decreasing the emissions of a partially premixed gasoline fueled compression ignition engine by means of injection characteristics and EGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemati Arash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is presented in order to elucidate some numerical investigations related to a partially premixed gasoline fuelled engine by means of three dimensional CFD code. Comparing with the diesel fuel, gasoline has lower soot emission because of its higher ignition delay. The application of double injection strategy reduces the maximum heat release rate and leads to the reduction of NOx emission. For validation of the model, the results for the mean in-cylinder pressure, H.R.R., NOx and soot emissions are compared with the corresponding experimental data and show good levels of agreement. The effects of injection characteristics such as, injection duration, spray angle, nozzle hole diameter, injected fuel temperature and EGR rate on combustion process and emission formation are investigated yielding the determination of the optimal point thereafter. The results indicated that optimization of injection characteristics leads to simultaneous reduction of NOx and soot emissions with negligible change in IMEP.

  1. Notion Of Artificial Labs Slow Global Warming And Advancing Engine Studies Perspectives On A Computational Experiment On Dual-Fuel Compression-Ignition Engine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonye K. Jack

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To appreciate clean energy applications of the dual-fuel internal combustion engine D-FICE with pilot Diesel fuel to aid public policy formulation in terms of present and future benefits to the modern transportation stationary power and promotion of oil and gas green- drilling the brief to an engine research team was to investigate the feasible advantages of dual-fuel compression-ignition engines guided by the following concerns i Sustainable fuel and engine power delivery ii The requirements for fuel flexibility iii Low exhausts emissions and environmental pollution iv Achieving low specific fuel consumption and economy for maximum power v The comparative advantages over the conventional Diesel engines vi Thermo-economic modeling and analysis for the optimal blend as basis for a benefitcost evaluation Planned in two stages for reduced cost and fast turnaround of results - initial preliminary stage with basic simple models and advanced stage with more detailed complex modeling. The paper describes a simplified MATLAB based computational experiment predictive model for the thermodynamic combustion and engine performance analysis of dual-fuel compression-ignition engine studies operating on the theoretical limited-pressure cycle with several alternative fuel-blends. Environmental implications for extreme temperature moderation are considered by finite-time thermodynamic modeling for maximum power with predictions for pollutants formation and control by reaction rates kinetics analysis of systematic reduced plausible coupled chemistry models through the NCN reaction pathway for the gas-phase reactions classes of interest. Controllable variables for engine-out pollutants emissions reduction and in particular NOx elimination are identified. Verifications and Validations VampV through Performance Comparisons were made using a clinical approach in selection of StrokeBore ratios greater-than and equal-to one amp88051 low-to-high engine speeds and medium

  2. Comparative evaluation of the effect of sweet orange oil-diesel blend on performance and emissions of a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S. M. Ashrafur; Hossain, F. M.; Van, Thuy Chu; Dowell, Ashley; Islam, M. A.; Rainey, Thomas J.; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Brown, Richard J.

    2017-06-01

    In 2014, global demand for essential oils was 165 kt and it is expected to grow 8.5% per annum up to 2022. Every year Australia produces approximately 1.5k tonnes of essential oils such as tea tree, orange, lavender, eucalyptus oil, etc. Usually essential oils come from non-fatty areas of plants such as the bark, roots, heartwood, leaves and the aromatic portions (flowers, fruits) of the plant. For example, orange oil is derived from orange peel using various extraction methods. Having similar properties to diesel, essential oils have become promising alternate fuels for diesel engines. The present study explores the opportunity of using sweet orange oil in a compression ignition engine. Blends of sweet orange oil-diesel (10% sweet orange oil, 90% diesel) along with neat diesel fuel were used to operate a six-cylinder diesel engine (5.9 litres, common rail, Euro-III, compression ratio 17.3:1). Some key fuel properties such as: viscosity, density, heating value, and surface tension are presented. Engine performance (brake specific fuel consumption) and emission parameters (CO, NOX, and Particulate Matter) were measured to evaluate running with the blends. The engine was operated at 1500 rpm (maximum torque condition) with different loads. The results from the property analysis showed that sweet orange oil-diesel blend exhibits lower density, viscosity and surface tension and slightly higher calorific value compared to neat diesel fuel. Also, from the engine test, the sweet orange oil-diesel blend exhibited slightly higher brake specific fuel consumption, particulate mass and particulate number; however, the blend reduced the brake specific CO emission slightly and brake specific NOX emission significantly compared to that of neat diesel.

  3. Performance and specific emissions contours throughout the operating range of hydrogen-fueled compression ignition engine with diesel and RME pilot fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Imran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance and emissions contours of a hydrogen dual fueled compression ignition (CI engine with two pilot fuels (diesel and rapeseed methyl ester, and compares the performance and emissions iso-contours of diesel and rapeseed methyl ester (RME single fueling with diesel and RME piloted hydrogen dual fueling throughout the engines operating speed and power range. The collected data have been used to produce iso-contours of thermal efficiency, volumetric efficiency, specific oxides of nitrogen (NOX, specific hydrocarbons (HC and specific carbon dioxide (CO2 on a power-speed plane. The performance and emission maps are experimentally investigated, compared, and critically discussed. Apart from medium loads at lower and medium speeds with diesel piloted hydrogen combustion, dual fueling produced lower thermal efficiency everywhere across the map. For diesel and RME single fueling the maximum specific NOX emissions are centered at the mid speed, mid power region. Hydrogen dual fueling produced higher specific NOX with both pilot fuels as compared to their respective single fueling operations. The range, location and trends of specific NOX varied significantly when compared to single fueling cases. The volumetric efficiency is discussed in detail with the implications of manifold injection of hydrogen analyzed with the conclusions drawn.

  4. A Comparative study on VOCs and aldehyde-ketone emissions from a spark Ignition vehicle fuelled on compressed natural gas and gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, an experimental study was conducted on a spark ignition (SI) vehicle fuelled on compressed natural gas (CNG), and gasoline to compare the unregulated emissions such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehyde-ketones or carbonyls. In the meantime, ozone forming potential (OFP) of pollutants was also calculated on the basis of their specific reactivity (SR). The vehicle was run on a chassis dynamometer following the Chinese National Standards test scheduled for light duty vehicle (LDV) emissions. According to the results, total aldehyde-ketones were increased by 39.4% due to the substantial increase in formaldehyde and acrolein + acetone emissions, while VOCs and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene) reduced by 85.2 and 86% respectively, in case of CNG fuelled vehicle as compared to gasoline vehicle. Although total aldehyde-ketones were higher with CNG relative to gasoline, their SR was lower due decrease in acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, and methacrolein species having higher maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values. The SR of VOCs and aldehyde-ketones emitted from CNG fuelled vehicle was decreased by above 10% and 32% respectively, owing to better physicochemical properties and more complete burning of CNG as compared to gasoline. (author)

  5. Effect of fuel oxygen on the energetic and exergetic efficiency of a compression ignition engine fuelled separately with palm and karanja biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, Jibanananda; Misra, Rahul Dev

    2014-01-01

    Exergy analysis of any thermodynamic system can take care of the limitations of energy analysis such as irreversible losses, their magnitude and the source of thermodynamic inefficiencies apart from energy losses. In the present study, both the analyses along with heat release analysis are conducted on a natural aspirated diesel engine fuelled separately with palm biodiesel (PB), karanja biodiesel (KB), and petrodiesel (PD) using the experimental data. Since the engine performs best at about 85% loading condition, the energetic and exergetic performance parameters of the engine are evaluated at 85% loading condition for each type of fuel. The aim of the study is to determine the effect of fuel oxygen on energy and exergy efficiencies of a CI (compression ignition) engine. Various exergy losses, exergy destruction and their ratios associated with the heat transfer through cooling water, radiation, exhaust gas, friction, and some uncounted exergy destruction are investigated. Apart from exergy loss due to heat transfer; the uncounted exergy destruction (due to combustion) also plays a major role in the system inefficiency. Based on the comparative assessment of the obtained results, it is concluded that a better combustion with less irreversibility is possible with the increase in O 2 content in the fuel. - Highlights: • Efficiency of a CI engine increases with the increase in oxygen quantity in the fuel. • Irreversibility of a CI engine decreases with increase in oxygen content in the fuel. • Palm biodiesel performs better than karanja biodiesel and petrodiesel for a CI engine

  6. A computational investigation of diesel and biodiesel combustion and NOx formation in a light-duty compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zihan [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Srinivasan, Kalyan K. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krishnan, Sundar R. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Som, Sibendu [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research

    2012-04-24

    Diesel and biodiesel combustion in a multi-cylinder light duty diesel engine were simulated during a closed cycle (from IVC to EVO), using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE, coupled with detailed chemical kinetics. The computational domain was constructed based on engine geometry and compression ratio measurements. A skeletal n-heptane-based diesel mechanism developed by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and a reduced biodiesel mechanism derived and validated by Luo and co-workers were applied to model the combustion chemistry. The biodiesel mechanism contains 89 species and 364 reactions and uses methyl decanoate, methyl-9- decenoate, and n-heptane as the surrogate fuel mixture. The Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) spray breakup model for diesel and biodiesel was calibrated to account for the differences in physical properties of the fuels which result in variations in atomization and spray development characteristics. The simulations were able to capture the experimentally observed pressure and apparent heat release rate trends for both the fuels over a range of engine loads (BMEPs from 2.5 to 10 bar) and fuel injection timings (from 0° BTDC to 10° BTDC), thus validating the overall modeling approach as well as the chemical kinetic models of diesel and biodiesel surrogates. Moreover, quantitative NOx predictions for diesel combustion and qualitative NOx predictions for biodiesel combustion were obtained with the CFD simulations and the in-cylinder temperature trends were correlated to the NOx trends.

  7. Performance and Emission Investigations of Jatropha and Karanja Biodiesels in a Single-Cylinder Compression-Ignition Engine Using Endoscopic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistri, Gayatri K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Longman, Douglas; Agarwal, Avinash K.

    2015-09-07

    Biofuels produced from non-edible sources that are cultivated on marginal lands represent a viable source of renewable and carbon-neutral energy. In this context, biodiesel obtained from Jatropha and Karanja oil seeds have received significant interest, especially in South Asian subcontinent. Both of these fuels are produced from non-edible plant seeds with high oil content, which can be grown on marginal lands. In this research, we have investigated the performance and emission characteristics of Jatropha and Karanja methyl esters (biodiesel) and their blends with diesel. Another objective is to examine the effect of long-term storage on biodiesel’s oxidative stability. The biodiesels were produced at Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, (IIT Kanpur), India, and the engine experiments were performed in a single cylinder, 4-stroke, compression ignition engine at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Chicago. An endoscope was used to visualize in-cylinder combustion events and examine the soot distribution. The effects of fuel and start of injection (SOI) on engine performance and emissions were investigated. Results indicated that ignition delay was shorter with biodiesel. Consequently the cylinder pressure and premixed heat release were higher for diesel compared to biodiesel. Engine performance data for biodiesel (J100, K100) and biodiesel blends (J30, K30) showed an increase in break thermal efficiency (BTE) (10.9%, 7.6% for biodiesel and blend, respectively), BSFC (13.1% and 5.6%), and NOx emission (9.8% and 12.9%), and a reduction in BSHC (8.64% and 12.9%), and BSCO (15.56% and 4.0%). The soot analysis from optical images qualitatively showed that biodiesel and blends produced less soot compared to diesel. The temperature profiles obtained from optical imaging further supported higher NOx in biodiesels and their blends compared to diesel. Additionally, the data indicated that retarding the injection timing leads to higher BSFC, but lower flame temperatures

  8. Pulse heating and ignition for off-centre ignited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, A.I.; Takabe, H.; Mima, K.

    1999-01-01

    An off-centre ignition model has been used to study the ignition conditions for laser targets related to the fast ignition scheme. A 2-D hydrodynamic code has been used, including alpha particle heating. The main goal of the study is the possibility of obtaining a high gain ICF target with fast ignition. In order to determine the ignition conditions, samples with various compressed core densities having different spark density-radius product (i.e. areal density) values were selected. The study was carried out in the presence of an external heating source, with a constant heating rate. A dependence of the ignition conditions on the heating rate of the external pulse is demonstrated. For a given set of ignition conditions, our simulation showed that an 11 ps pulse with 17 kJ of injected energy into the spark area was required to achieve ignition for a compressed core with a density of 200 g/cm 3 and 0.5 g/cm 2 spark areal density. It is shown that the ignition conditions are highly dependent on the heating rate of the external pulse. (author)

  9. Target design for shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurtz, G; Ribeyre, X; Lafon, M

    2010-01-01

    The conventional approach of laser driven inertial fusion involves the implosion of cryogenic shells of deuterium-tritium ice. At sufficiently high implosion velocities, the fuel ignites by itself from a central hot spot. In order to reduce the risks of hydrodynamic instabilities inherent to large implosion velocities, it was proposed to compress the fuel at low velocity, and ignite the compressed fuel by means of a convergent shock wave driven by an intense spike at the end of the laser pulse. This scheme, known as shock ignition, reduces the risks of shell break-up during the acceleration phase, but it may be impeded by a low coupling efficiency of the laser pulse with plasma at high intensities. This work provides a relationship between the implosion velocity and the laser intensity required to ignite the target by a shock. The operating domain of shock ignition at different energies is described.

  10. Combustion optimization and HCCI modeling for ultra low emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koten, Hasan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Zafer Gul, M. [Marmara University Mechanical Engineering Department (Turkey)], E-mail: hasan.koten@marmara.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    With the coming shortage of fossil fuels and the rising concerns over the environment it is important to develop new technologies both to reduce energy consumption and pollution at the same time. In the transportation sector, new combustion processes are under development to provide clean diesel combustion with no particulate or NOx emissions. However, these processes have issues such as limited power output, high levels of unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide emissions. The aim of this paper is to present a methodology for optimizing combustion performance. The methodology consists of the use of a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization tool; homogeneous charge compression ignition engine cases were studied with the ECFM-3Z combustion model. Results showed that injected fuel mass led to a decrease in power output, a finding which is in keeping with previous research. This paper presented on optimization tool which can be useful in improving the combustion process.

  11. Effect of the use of olive–pomace oil biodiesel/diesel fuel blends in a compression ignition engine: Preliminary exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, I.; Quintana, C.E.; Ruiz, J.J.; Cruz-Peragón, F.; Dorado, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Olive–pomace oil (OPO) biodiesel constitute a new second-generation biofuel. • Exergy efficiency and performance of OPO biodiesel, straight and blended with diesel fuel was evaluated. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided similar performance parameters. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided similar exergy efficiency compared to diesel fuel. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided no exergy cost increment compared to diesel fuel. - Abstract: Although biodiesel is among the most studied biofuels for diesel engines, it is usually produced from edible oils, which gives way to controversy between the use of land for fuel and food. For this reason, residues like olive–pomace oil are considered alternative raw materials to produce biodiesel that do not compete with the food industry. To gain knowledge about the implications of its use, olive–pomace oil methyl ester, straight and blended with diesel fuel, was evaluated as fuel in a direct injection diesel engine Perkins AD 3-152 and compared to the use of fossil diesel fuel. Performance curves were analyzed at full load and different speed settings. To perform the exergy balance of the tested fuels, the operating conditions corresponding to maximum engine power values were considered. It was found that the tested fuels offer similar performance parameters. When straight biodiesel was used instead of diesel fuel, maximum engine power decreased to 5.6%, while fuel consumption increased up to 7%. However, taking into consideration the Second Law of the Thermodynamics, the exergy efficiency and unitary exergetic cost reached during the operation of the engine under maximum power condition for the assessed fuels do not display significant differences. Based on the exergy results, it may be concluded that olive–pomace oil biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel may substitute the use of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines without any exergy cost increment

  12. Investigating the reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion strategy in a natural gas/diesel fueled engine with a pre-chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahi, Mohammad Mahdi; Esfahanian, Vahid; Gharehghani, Ayatallah; Mirsalim, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel combustion strategy, RCCI with a pre-chamber, is proposed and investigated. • The proposed strategy extends the RCCI operating range to use less intake air temperatures. • The new concept extends the RCCI operating range to use lower portions of the active fuel. • The proposed strategy is sensitive to engine load and is more efficient for high loads. - Abstract: Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) concept has been proven to be a promising combustion mode for the next generations of internal combustion engines. This strategy is still subject of extensive studies to overcome its operational limitations. In the present work, the effect of using a pre-chamber to extend some operating ranges in a RCCI engine is investigated using coupled multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. To accomplish this, the combustion and flow field in a single cylinder engine with a pre-chamber, working in RCCI mode and fueled with natural gas/diesel are numerically modeled. Experimental data is used to validate the simulation results and then, combustion characteristics and engine emissions in some various operating regions, in terms of initial temperature, fuel equivalence ratio and portions of the two fuels are discussed. The results reveal that the proposed strategy provides the ability to extend the engine operating ranges to use lower intake temperatures, even to 50 K lower for some cases, and also using a larger portion of natural gas instead of diesel fuel. On the other hand, the new strategy could result in incomplete combustion and formation of related emissions in low loads, but for higher engine loads it shows better combustion characteristics.

  13. Combined effects of cooled EGR and a higher geometric compression ratio on thermal efficiency improvement of a downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jianye; Xu, Min; Li, Tie; Gao, Yi; Wang, Jiasheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments for the effects of cooled EGR and two compression ratios (CR) on fuel efficiency were conducted. • The mechanism for the observed fuel efficiency behaviors by cooled EGR and high CR was clarified. • Cooled EGR offers more fuel efficiency improvement than elevating CR from 9.3 to 10.9. • Combining 18–25% cooled EGR with 10.9 CR lead to 2.1–3.5% brake thermal efficiency improvements. - Abstract: The downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. However, the boosted engine is typically designed at a lower geometric compression ratio (CR) due to the increased knock tendency in comparison to naturally aspirated engines, limiting the potential of improving fuel economy. On the other hand, cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has drawn attention due to the potential to suppress knock and improve fuel economy. Combing the effects of boosting, increased CR and cooled EGR to further improve fuel economy within acceptable knock tolerance has been investigated using a 2.0 L downsized boosted SIDI engine over a wide range of engine operating conditions from 1000 rpm to 3000 rpm at low to high loads. To clarify the mechanism of this complicated effects, the first law of thermodynamics analysis was conducted with the inputs from GT-Power® engine simulation. Experiment results indicate that cooled EGR provides more brake thermal efficiency improvement than increasing geometric CR from 9.3 to 10.9. The benefit of brake thermal efficiency from the higher CR is limited to low load conditions. The attributes for improving brake thermal efficiency by cooled EGR include reduced heat transfer loss, reduced pumping work and increased ratio of specific heats for all the engine operating conditions, as well as higher degree of constant volume heat release only for the knock-limited high load conditions. The combined effects of 18–25% cooled EGR

  14. Progress of impact ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.

    2010-11-01

    In impact ignition scheme, a portion of the fuel (the impactor) is accelerated to a super-high velocity, compressed by convergence, and collided with a precompressed main fuel. This collision generates shock waves in both the impactor and the main fuel. Since the density of the impactor is generally much lower than that of the main fuel, the pressure balance ensures that the shock-heated temperature of the impactor is significantly higher than that of the main fuel. Hence, the impactor can reach ignition temperature and thus become an igniter. Here we report major new results on recent impact ignition research: (1) A maximum velocity ∼ 1000 km/s has been achieved under the operation of NIKE KrF laser at Naval Research Laboratory (laser wavelength=0.25μm) in the use of a planar target made of plastic and (2) We have performed two-dimensional simulation for burn and ignition to show the feasibility of the impact ignition. (author)

  15. Magnetically Assisted Fast Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, W.-M.; Gibbon, P.; Sheng, Z.-M.; Li, Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Fast ignition (FI) is investigated via integrated particle-in-cell simulation including both generation andtransport of fast electrons, where petawatt ignition lasers of 2 ps and compressed targets of a peak density of300 g cm−3 and areal density of 0.49 g cm−2 at the core are taken. When a 20 MG static magnetic field isimposed across a conventional cone-free target, the energy coupling from the laser to the core is enhancedby sevenfold and reaches 14%. This value even exceeds that obtained u...

  16. An effort to enhance hydrogen energy share in a compression ignition engine under dual-fuel mode using low temperature combustion strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, V.; Subramanian, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H 2 energy share increased from 18% with DDM to 36% with WDM (water injection). • H 2 energy share improved marginally with retarded injection timing mode (RDM). • Energy efficiency increased with increasing amount of H 2 in dual-fuel engine. • NO x emission decreased with water injection and retarded pilot fuel injection. • HC, CO and smoke emissions increased slightly with low temperature combustion. - Abstract: A limited hydrogen (H 2 ) energy share due to knocking is the major hurdle for effective utilization of H 2 in compression ignition (CI) engines under dual-fuel operation. The present study aims at improvement of H 2 energy share in a 7.4 kW direct injection CI engine under dual-fuel mode with two low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies; (i) retarded pilot fuel injection timing and (ii) water injection. Experiments were carried out under conventional strategies of diesel dual-fuel mode (DDM) and B20 dual-fuel mode (BDM); and LTC strategies of retarded injection timing dual-fuel mode (RDM) and water injected dual-fuel mode (WDM). The results explored that the H 2 energy share increased significantly from 18% with conventional DDM to 24, and 36% with RDM, and WDM respectively. The energy efficiency increased with increasing H 2 energy share under dual-fuel operation; however, for a particular energy share of 18% H 2 , it decreased from 34.8% with DDM to 33.7% with BDM, 32.7% with WDM and 29.9% with RDM. At 18% H 2 energy share, oxides of nitrogen emission decreased by 37% with RDM and 32% with WDM as compared to conventional DDM due to reduction of in-cylinder temperature, while it increased slightly about 5% with BDM. It is emerged from the study that water injection technique is the viable option among all other strategies to enhance the H 2 energy share in the engine with a slight penalty of increase in smoke, hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide emissions

  17. Methodology to estimate the threshold in-cylinder temperature for self-ignition of fuel during cold start of Diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broatch, A.; Ruiz, S.; Margot, X.; Gil, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cold startability of automotive direct injection (DI) Diesel engines is frequently one of the negative features when these are compared to their closest competitor, the gasoline engine. This situation worsens with the current design trends (engine downsizing) and the emerging new Diesel combustion concepts, such as HCCI, PCCI, etc., which require low compression ratio engines. To mitigate this difficulty, pre-heating systems (glow plugs, air heating, etc.) are frequently used and their technologies have been continuously developed. For the optimum design of these systems, the determination of the threshold temperature that the gas should have in the cylinder in order to provoke the self-ignition of the fuel injected during cold starting is crucial. In this paper, a novel methodology for estimating the threshold temperature is presented. In this methodology, experimental and computational procedures are adequately combined to get a good compromise between accuracy and effort. The measurements have been used as input data and boundary conditions in 3D and 0D calculations in order to obtain the thermodynamic conditions of the gas in the cylinder during cold starting. The results obtained from the study of two engine configurations -low and high compression ratio- indicate that the threshold in-cylinder temperature is a single temperature of about 415 o C.

  18. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-12-29

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times. Such measurements may potentially be affected by some non-ideal phenomena. The purpose of this work is to measure long ignition delay times for fuels exhibiting negative temperature coefficient (NTC) and to assess the impact of shock tube non-idealities on ignition delay data. Ignition delay times of n-heptane and n-hexane were measured over the temperature range of 650 – 1250 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Driver gas tailoring and long length of shock tube driver section were utilized to measure ignition delay times as long as 32 ms. Measured ignition delay times agree with chemical kinetic models at high (> 1100 K) and low (< 700 K) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature range (700 – 1100 K), however, significant discrepancies are observed between the measurements and homogeneous ignition delay simulations. It is postulated, based on experimental observations, that localized ignition kernels could affect the ignition delay times at the intermediate temperatures, which lead to compression (and heating) of the bulk gas and result in expediting the overall ignition event. The postulate is validated through simple representative computational fluid dynamic simulations of post-shock gas mixtures which exhibit ignition advancement via a hot spot. The results of the current work show that ignition delay times measured by shock tubes may be affected by non-ideal phenomena for certain conditions of temperature, pressure and fuel reactivity. Care must, therefore, be exercised in using such data for chemical kinetic model development and validation.

  19. Ignition experiment - alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1979-10-01

    This report comprises three short papers on cost estimates, integral burn time and alternative versions of Tokamak ignition experiments. These papers were discussed at the ZEPHYR workshop with participants from IPP Garching, MIT Cambridge and PPPL Princeton (Garching July 30 - August 2 1979) (Chapters A, B, C). It is shown, that starting from a practical parameter independent minimum integral burn time of Tokamak ignition experiments (some 10 3 s) by adding a shield for protection of the magnet insulation (permitted neutron dose 10 9 rad) an integral burn time of some 10 4 s can be achieved for only about 30% more outlay. For a substantially longer integral burn time the outlay approaches rather quickly that for a Tokamak reactor. Some examples for alternatives to ZEPHYR are being given, including some with low or no compression. In a further chapter D some early results of evaluating an ignition experiment on the basis of the energy confinement scaling put forward by Coppi and Mazzucato are presented. As opposed to the case of the Alcator scaling used in chapters A through C the minimum integral burn time of Tokamak ignition experiments here depends on the plasma current. Provided neutral injectors up to about 160 keV are available compression boosting is not required with this scaling. The results presented have been obtained neglecting the effects of the toroidal field ripple. (orig.) 891 HT/orig. 892 RKD [de

  20. High-Gain Shock Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K.; Bailey, D.; Lambert, M.; MacKinnon, A.; Blackfield, D.; Comley, A.; Schurtz, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Lebel, E.; Casner, A.; Craxton, R. S.; Betti, R.; McKenty, P.; Anderson, K.; Theobald, W.; Schmitt, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Shock ignition offers the possibility for a near-term test of high-gain ICF on the NIF at less than 1MJ drive energy and with day-1 laser hardware. We will summarize the status of target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the R&D program to be performed in order to test the potential of a shock-ignited target on NIF. In shock ignition, compressed fuel is separately ignited by a late-time laser-driven shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, simulations indicate that fusion energy gains of 60 may be achievable at laser energies around 0.5MJ. Like fast ignition, shock ignition offers high gain but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and focusing requirements. Conventional symmetry and stability constraints apply, thus a key immediate step towards attempting shock ignition on NIF is to demonstrate adequacy of low-mode uniformity and shock symmetry under polar drive

  1. Autoignition characterization of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/n-butanol mixtures in a constant volume combustion device and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, Marc E.; Sarathy, Mani; Má rchese, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    -octane, n-heptane, and n-butanol were tested in the FIT - 28 test runs with 25 ignition measurements for each test run, totaling 350 individual tests in all. These experimental results supported previous findings that fuel blends with high alcohol content

  2. Physical studies of fast ignition in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X T; Cai, Hong-bo; Wu, Si-zhong; Cao, Li-hua; Zhang, Hua; He, Ming-qing; Chen, Mo; Wu, Jun-feng; Zhou, Cang-tao; Zhou, Wei-Min; Shan, Lian-qiang; Wang, Wei-wu; Zhang, Feng; Bi, Bi; Zhao, Zong-qing; Gu, Yu-qiu; Zhang, Bao-han; Wang, Wei; Fang, Zhi-heng; Lei, An-le

    2015-01-01

    Fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion is one of the important goals today, in addition to central hot spot ignition in China. The SG-IIU and PW laser facilities are coupled to investigate the hot spot formation for fast ignition. The SG-III laser facility is almost completed and will be coupled with tens kJ PW lasers for the demonstration of fast ignition. In recent years, for physical studies of fast ignition, we have been focusing on the experimental study of implosion symmetry, M-band radiation preheating and mixing, advanced fast ignition target design, and so on. In addition, the modeling capabilities and code developments enhanced our ability to perform the hydro-simulation of the compression implosion, and the particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid-PIC simulation of the generation, transport and deposition of relativistic electron beams. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding the critical issues of fast ignition. (paper)

  3. Simultaneous reduction of NOx and smoke using stratified charge compression ignition; Sojo kongoki no asshuku chakka ni yoru NOx smoke no doji teige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Akagawa, H. [New ACE Institute Co. Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Tsujimura, K. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-12-25

    Simultaneous reduction of NO{sub x} and smoke under high load conditions could be obtained by MULDIC (MULtiple stage DIesel Combustion) where mixture was made stratified before ignition. In this investigation of the basic characteristics of MULDIC, gaseous fuels (DME, Propane) were charged into the intake air which led to the creation of homogeneous lean mixture, and liquid fuel was injected into the cylinder and made rich mixture. The results of the engine test showed that NO{sub x} emissions could be reduced to less than 100 ppm and smoke emissions were also maintained 0 FSN even at higher loads. Moreover, homogeneous rich mixture test results showed that low smoke combustion could be obtained under equivalence ratio of 1.6. In MULDIC, increasing the ignition delay period of injected fuel, soot formation rate was decreased, because over rich region was avoided. (author)

  4. Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The objectives for this project are as follows: Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for compression ignition (CI), homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engines; and Combine component models into surrogate fuel models to represent real transportation fuels. Use them to model low-temperature combustion strategies in HCCI, RCCI, and CI engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency.

  5. Effects of premixed diethyl ether (DEE) on combustion and exhaust emissions in a HCCI-DI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinar, Can; Can, Ozer; Sahin, Fatih; Yucesu, H. Serdar

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of premixed ratio of diethyl ether (DEE) on the combustion and exhaust emissions of a single-cylinder, HCCI-DI engine were investigated. The experiments were performed at the engine speed of 2200 rpm and 19 N m operating conditions. The amount of the premixed DEE was controlled by a programmable electronic control unit (ECU) and the DEE injection was conducted into the intake air charge using low pressure injector. The premixed fuel ratio (PFR) of DEE was changed from 0% to 40% and results were compared to neat diesel operation. The percentages of premixed fuel were calculated from the energy ratio of premixed DEE fuel to total energy rate of the fuels. The experimental results show that single stage ignition was found with the addition of premixed DEE fuel. Increasing and phasing in-cylinder pressure and heat release were observed in the premixed stage of the combustion. Lower diffusion combustion was also occurred. Cycle-to cycle variations were very small with diesel fuel and 10% DEE premixed fuel ratio. Audible knocking occurred with 40% DEE premixed fuel ratio. NO x -soot trade-off characteristics were changed and improvements were found simultaneously. NO x and soot emissions decreased up to 19.4% and 76.1%, respectively, while exhaust gas temperature decreased by 23.8%. On the other hand, CO and HC emissions increased.

  6. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  7. Analysis of cyclic variations during mode switching between spark ignition and controlled auto-ignition combustion operations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, T; Zhao, H; Xie, H; He, B

    2014-01-01

    © IMechE 2014. Controlled auto-ignition, also known as homogeneous charge compression ignition, has been the subject of extensive research because of their ability to provide simultaneous reductions in fuel consumption and NOx emissions from a gasoline engine. However, due to its limited operation range, switching between controlled auto-ignition and spark ignition combustion is needed to cover the complete operating range of a gasoline engine for passenger car applications. Previous research...

  8. Physics of ignition for ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindl, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The implosion of an ICF capsule must accomplish both compression of the main fuel to several hundred grams per cubic centimeter and heating and compression of the central region of the fuel to ignition. This report discusses the physics of these conditions

  9. Multidimensional modeling of the effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on exergy terms in an HCCI engine fueled with a mixture of natural gas and diesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarmadar, Samad; Nemati, Peyman; Khodaie, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The exergy efficiency decreases by 41.3%. • The irreversibility increases by 46.80%. • The cumulative heat loss exergy decreases by 68.10%. • The cumulative work exergy decreases by 63.4%. • The exhaust losses exergy increases by 28.79%. - Abstract: One of the most important issues in HCCI engines is auto-ignition timing control. EGR introduction into intake charge can be a method to control combustion phasing and its duration. In the current study, a FORTRAN-based code which includes 10 species (O_2, N_2, H_2O, CO_2, CO, H_2, OH, O, N, NO) associated with combustion products was employed to study the exergy analysis in a dual fuel (natural gas + diesel) HCCI engine at four EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) mass fractions (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%) while the diesel fuel amount was held constant. In order to achieve this task, a 3-D CFD code was employed to model the energy balance during a closed cycle of running engine simulation. Moreover, an efficient Extend Coherent Flame Model-Three Zone model (ECFM-3Z) method was employed to analyze the combustion process. With crank positions at different EGR mass fractions, the exergy terms were identified and calculated separately. It was found that as EGR mass fraction increased from 0% to 30% (in 10% increment steps), exergy efficiency decreased from 48.9% to 28.7%. Furthermore, with the change in EGR mass fraction, the cumulative heat loss exergy decreased from 10.1% to 5.64% of mixture fuels chemical exergy.

  10. Numerical simulation and validation of SI-CAI hybrid combustion in a CAI/HCCI gasoline engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyan; Xie, Hui; Xie, Liyan; Zhang, Lianfang; Li, Le; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Hua

    2013-02-01

    SI-CAI hybrid combustion, also known as spark-assisted compression ignition (SACI), is a promising concept to extend the operating range of CAI (Controlled Auto-Ignition) and achieve the smooth transition between spark ignition (SI) and CAI in the gasoline engine. In this study, a SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) has been constructed on the basis of the 3-Zones Extended Coherent Flame Model (ECFM3Z). An ignition model is included to initiate the ECFM3Z calculation and induce the flame propagation. In order to precisely depict the subsequent auto-ignition process of the unburned fuel and air mixture independently after the initiation of flame propagation, the tabulated chemistry concept is adopted to describe the auto-ignition chemistry. The methodology for extracting tabulated parameters from the chemical kinetics calculations is developed so that both cool flame reactions and main auto-ignition combustion can be well captured under a wider range of thermodynamic conditions. The SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) is then applied in the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3-D CFD) engine simulation. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data obtained from a single cylinder VVA engine. The detailed analysis of the simulations demonstrates that the SI-CAI hybrid combustion process is characterised with the early flame propagation and subsequent multi-site auto-ignition around the main flame front, which is consistent with the optical results reported by other researchers. Besides, the systematic study of the in-cylinder condition reveals the influence mechanism of the early flame propagation on the subsequent auto-ignition.

  11. <研究論文>DME燃料による予混合圧縮自己着火機関の特性

    OpenAIRE

    嶽間沢, 秀孝

    2009-01-01

    It converted so that a small engine could be operated by Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion with dimethyl ether (DME). It is difficult to control auto-ignition timing in HCCI combustion. The sound performances and the exhaust temperature of compression ignition combustion engine fueled with DME and diesel fuel were investigated. As a result, it succeeded in continuous smokeless operation of an efficient internal combustion engine by DME homogeneous charge system.

  12. Electron transport and shock ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, A R; Tzoufras, M, E-mail: t.bell1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) offers one possible route to commercial energy generation. In the proposed 'shock ignition' route to fusion, the target is compressed at a relatively low temperature and then ignited using high intensity laser irradiation which drives a strong converging shock into the centre of the fuel. With a series of idealized calculations we analyse the electron transport of energy into the target, which produces the pressure responsible for driving the shock. We show that transport in shock ignition lies near the boundary between ablative and heat front regimes. Moreover, simulations indicate that non-local effects are significant in the heat front regime and might lead to increased efficiency by driving the shock more effectively and reducing heat losses to the plasma corona.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of an HCCI engine based system running on natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djermouni, Mohamed; Ouadha, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic analysis of an HCCI based system has been carried out. • A thermodynamic model has been developed taking into account the gas composition resulting from the combustion process. • The specific heat of the working fluid is temperature dependent. - Abstract: This paper attempts to carry out a thermodynamic analysis of a system composed of a turbocharged HCCI engine, a mixer, a regenerator and a catalytic converter within the meaning of the first and the second law of thermodynamics. For this purpose, a thermodynamic model has been developed taking into account the gas composition resulting from the combustion process and the specific heat temperature dependency of the working fluid. The analysis aims in particular to examine the influence of the compressor pressure ratio, ambient temperature, equivalence ratio, engine speed and the compressor isentropic efficiency on the performance of the HCCI engine. Results show that thermal and exergetic efficiencies increase with increasing the compressor pressure ratio. However, the increase of the ambient temperature involves a decrease of the engine efficiencies. Furthermore, the variation of the equivalence ratio improves considerably both thermal and exergetic efficiencies. As expected, the increase of the engine speed enhances the engine performances. Finally, an exergy losses mapping of the system show that the maximum exergy losses occurs in the HCCI engine

  14. Blending Behavior of Ethanol with PRF 84 and FACE A Gasoline in HCCI Combustion Mmode

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad Umer; Atef, Nour; Singh, Eshan; Masurier, Jean-Baptiste; Sarathy, Mani; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    but the chemical effect responsible for the non-linear blending behavior of ethanol with PRF 84 and FACE A was not understood. Hence, in this study the experimental measurements were simulated using zero-dimensional HCCI engine model with detailed chemistry

  15. Research on the combustion, energy and emission parameters of diesel fuel and a biomass-to-liquid (BTL) fuel blend in a compression-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimkus, Alfredas; Žaglinskis, Justas; Rapalis, Paulius; Skačkauskas, Paulius

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Researched physical–chemical and performance properties of diesel fuel and BTL blend (85/15 V/V). • BTL additive reduced Brake Specific Fuel Consumption, improved engine efficiency. • Simpler BTL molecular chains and lower C/H ratio reduced CO_2 emission and smokiness. • Higher cetane number of BTL reduced heat release in beginning of combustion and NO_x emission. • Advanced start of fuel injection caused reduced fuel consumption and smokiness, increased NO_x emission. - Abstract: This paper presents the comparable research results of the physical–chemical and direct injection (DI) diesel engine properties of diesel fuel and BTL (biomass-to-liquid) blend (85/15 V/V). The energy, ecological and in-cylinder parameters were analysed under medium engine speed and brake torque load regimes; the start of fuel injection was also adjusted. After analysis of the engine bench tests and simulation with AVL BOOST software, it was observed that the BTL additive shortened the fuel ignition delay phase, reduced the heat release in the pre-mixed intensive combustion phase, reduced the nitrogen oxide (NO_x) concentration in the engine exhaust gases and reduced the thermal and mechanical load of the crankshaft mechanism. BTL additive reduced the rates of carbon dioxide (CO_2), incompletely burned hydrocarbons (HC) emission and smokiness due to its chemical composition and combustion features. BTL also reduced Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC, g/kW h) and improved engine efficiency (η_e); however, the volumetric fuel consumption changed due to the lower density of BTL. The start of fuel injection was adjusted for maximum engine efficiency; concomitantly, reductions in the CO_2 concentration, HC concentration and smokiness were achieved. However, the NO_x and thermo-mechanical engine load increased.

  16. Blending Octane Number of Ethanol in HCCI, SI and CI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad

    2016-10-17

    The effect of ethanol blended with three FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, I, J and A corresponding to RON 70.3, 71.8 and 83.5, respectively, were compared to PRF70 and PRF84 with the same ethanol concentrations, these being 2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% by volume. A Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was used to understand the blending effect of ethanol with FACE gasolines and PRFs in spark-ignited and homogeneous charge compression ignited mode. Blending octane numbers (BON) were obtained for both the modes. All the fuels were also tested in an ignition quality tester to obtain Blending Derived Cetane numbers (BDCN). It is shown that fuel composition and octane number are important characteristics of all the base fuels that have a significant impact on octane increase with ethanol. The dependency of octane number for the base fuel on the blending octane number depended on the combustion mode operated. The aromatic composition in the base fuel, effects blending octane number of the mixture, for fuels with higher aromatic content lower blending octane numbers were observed for ethanol concentration.

  17. Blending Octane Number of Ethanol in HCCI, SI and CI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad; Naser, Nimal; Sarathy, Mani; Morganti, Kai; Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    The effect of ethanol blended with three FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, I, J and A corresponding to RON 70.3, 71.8 and 83.5, respectively, were compared to PRF70 and PRF84 with the same ethanol concentrations, these being 2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% by volume. A Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was used to understand the blending effect of ethanol with FACE gasolines and PRFs in spark-ignited and homogeneous charge compression ignited mode. Blending octane numbers (BON) were obtained for both the modes. All the fuels were also tested in an ignition quality tester to obtain Blending Derived Cetane numbers (BDCN). It is shown that fuel composition and octane number are important characteristics of all the base fuels that have a significant impact on octane increase with ethanol. The dependency of octane number for the base fuel on the blending octane number depended on the combustion mode operated. The aromatic composition in the base fuel, effects blending octane number of the mixture, for fuels with higher aromatic content lower blending octane numbers were observed for ethanol concentration.

  18. Modelling for Fuel Optimal Control of a Variable Compression Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Ylva

    2007-01-01

    Variable compression engines are a mean to meet the demand on lower fuel consumption. A high compression ratio results in high engine efficiency, but also increases the knock tendency. On conventional engines with fixed compression ratio, knock is avoided by retarding the ignition angle. The variable compression engine offers an extra dimension in knock control, since both ignition angle and compression ratio can be adjusted. The central question is thus for what combination of compression ra...

  19. Fast ignition breakeven scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan

    2005-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations have been performed to determine scaling laws for fast ignition break even of a hot spot formed by energetic particles created by a short pulse laser. Hot spot break even is defined to be when the fusion yield is equal to the total energy deposited in the hot spot through both the initial compression and the subsequent heating. In these simulations, only a small portion of a previously compressed mass of deuterium-tritium fuel is heated on a short time scale, i.e., the hot spot is tamped by the cold dense fuel which surrounds it. The hot spot tamping reduces the minimum energy required to obtain break even as compared to the situation where the entire fuel mass is heated, as was assumed in a previous study [S. A. Slutz, R. A. Vesey, I. Shoemaker, T. A. Mehlhorn, and K. Cochrane, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3483 (2004)]. The minimum energy required to obtain hot spot break even is given approximately by the scaling law E T = 7.5(ρ/100) -1.87 kJ for tamped hot spots, as compared to the previously reported scaling of E UT = 15.3(ρ/100) -1.5 kJ for untamped hotspots. The size of the compressed fuel mass and the focusability of the particles generated by the short pulse laser determines which scaling law to use for an experiment designed to achieve hot spot break even

  20. Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is ∼0.5 cm diameter by ∼1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a ∼2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger targets and longer

  1. Antiproton fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    With 180 MJ/microg, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. The use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule and produce high target gains with only modest compression of the main fuel is investigated. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. This can be considered in-situ fast ignition as it obviates the need for the external injection of the ignition energy. In the first of two candidate schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low-energy ion beam. In the second, autocatalytic scheme, the antiprotons are preemplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, the author estimates that ∼10 12 antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition within the ignitor zone. In addition to eliminating the need for a second, energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central ignition without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or Hohlraum debris. However, in addition to the practical difficulties of storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a speculative scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in an external, optimized facility. Estimates suggest that the electrical wall plug energy per pulse required for the separate production of the antiprotons is of the same order as that required for the conventional slow compression driver

  2. Vehicle Integrated Photovoltaics for Compression Ignition Vehicles: An Experimental Investigation of Solar Alkaline Water Electrolysis for Improving Diesel Combustion and a Solar Charging System for Reducing Auxiliary Engine Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Garry Inocentes

    Vehicle-integrated photovoltaic electricity can be applied towards aspiration of hydrogen-oxygen-steam gas produced through alkaline electrolysis and reductions in auxiliary alternator load for reducing hydrocarbon emissions in low nitrogen oxide indirect-injection compression-ignition engines. Aspiration of 0.516 ± 0.007 liters-per-minute of gas produced through alkaline electrolysis of potassium-hydroxide 2wt.% improves full-load performance; however, part-load performance decreases due to auto-ignition of aspirated gas prior to top-dead center. Alternator load reductions offer improved part-load and full-load performance with practical limitations resulting from accessory electrical loads. In an additive approach, solar electrolysis can electrochemically convert solar photovoltaic electricity into a gas comprised of stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen gas. Aspiration of this hydrogen-oxygen gas enhances combustion properties decreasing emissions and increased combustion efficiency in light-duty diesel vehicles. The 316L stainless steel (SS) electrolyser plates are arranged with two anodes and three cathodes space with four bipolar plates delineating four stacks in parallel with five cells per stack. The electrolyser was tested using potassium hydroxide 2 wt.% and hydronium 3wt.% at measured voltage and current inputs. The flow rate output from the reservoir cell was measured in parallel with the V and I inputs producing a regression model correlating current input to flow rate. KOH 2 wt.% produced 0.005 LPM/W, while H9O44 3 wt.% produced less at 0.00126 LPM/W. In a subtractive approach, solar energy can be used to charge a larger energy storage device, as is with plug-in electric vehicles, in order to alleviate the engine of the mechanical load placed upon it by the vehicles electrical accessories through the alternator. Solar electrolysis can improve part-load emissions and full-load performance. The average solar-to-battery efficiency based on the OEM rated

  3. Development of a pre-ignition submodel for hydrogen engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Baghdadi, Sadiq [University of Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-10-15

    In hydrogen-fuelled spark ignition engine applications, the onset of pre-ignition remains one of the prime limitations that needs to be addressed to avoid its incidence and achieve superior performance. This paper describes a new pre-ignition submodel for engine modelling codes. The effects of changes in key operating variables, such as compression ratio, spark timing, intake pressure, and temperature on pre-ignition limiting equivalence ratios are established both analytically and experimentally. With the established pre-ignition model, it is possible not only to investigate whether pre-ignition is observed with changing operating and design parameters, but also to evaluate those parameters' effects on the maximum possible pre-ignition intensity. (author)

  4. Ignition delay times of Gasoline Distillation Cuts measured with Ignition Quality Tester

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Nimal

    2017-04-21

    Tailoring fuel properties to maximize the efficiency of internal combustion engines is a way towards achieving cleaner combustion systems. In this work, the ignition properties of various gasoline fuel distillation cuts are analyzed to better understand fuel properties of the full boiling range fuel. An advanced distillation column (ADC) provides a more realistic representation of volatility characteristics, which can be modeled using equilibrium thermodynamic methods. The temperature reported is that of the liquid, as opposed to the vapor temperature in conventional ASTM D86 distillation standard. Various FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) gasolines were distilled and various cuts were obtained. The separated fractions were then tested in an ignition quality tester (IQT) to see the effect of chemical composition of different fractions on their ignition delay time. Fuels with lower aromatic content showed decreasing ignition delay time with increasing boiling point (i.e., molecular weight). However, fuels with higher aromatic content showed an initial decrease in ignition delay time with increasing boiling point, followed by drastic increase in ignition delay time due to fractions containing aromatics. This study also provides an understanding on contribution of different fractions to the ignition delay time of the fuel, which provides insights into fuel stratification utilized in gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines to tailor heat release rates.

  5. Comportamento de um motor de ignição por compressão trabalhando com óleo Diesel e gás natural A dual fuel compression ignition engine performance, running with Diesel fuel and natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Schlosser

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A previsível escassez de petróleo aliada a uma consciência ecológica está levando pesquisadores a procurar novas fontes de energia e processos de combustão mais eficientes e menos poluentes. Entre os combustíveis menos poluentes está o gás natural, cujo consumo aumenta ano a ano. Os motores de combustão interna são transformadores de energia que têm baixa eficiência de conversão. Este trabalho avaliou um motor Diesel, bicombustível, movido a Diesel e gás natural. Nesse motor, a energia provém, basicamente, da combustão do gás natural. O Diesel tem a função de produzir o início da combustão do gás, que é o combustível principal. Assim, haverá uma substituição parcial de óleo Diesel por gás natural, aumentando o rendimento da combustão. Inicialmente, foi feito um ensaio-testemunha, somente com óleo Diesel e após foram feitos ensaios, com três repetições, para variadas proporções de óleo Diesel, gás natural e ângulos de avanço da injeção. O melhor desempenho foi obtido para 22% de óleo Diesel em relação ao máximo débito da bomba injetora e 13 L min-1 de gás natural com ângulo de avanço de injeção original (21º. Nesse caso, a potência média aumentou 14%, e o consumo específico (medido em valores monetários diminuiu 46% em relação ao ensaio-testemunha.The foresight of a petroleum shortage and an ecological conscience is moving scientists to look for new sources of energy and to develop more efficient combustion processes and reduced emissions. Natural gas is a reduced emission fuel, whose consumption increases every year. The present work evaluates a dual fuel compression ignition engine. The major portion of the fuel burned is natural gas. The Diesel fuel acts as combustion starter, which ignites under the compression heat. Diesel fuel is used only as an ignition source. The partial substitution of Diesel fuel by natural gas increases the combustion efficiency and achieves significant

  6. Experimental study of hot electrons propagation and energy deposition in solid or laser-shock compressed targets: applications to fast igniter; Etude experimentale de la propagation et du depot d'energie d'electrons rapides dans une cible solide ou comprimee par choc laser: application a l'allumeur rapide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisani, F

    2000-02-15

    In the fast igniter scheme, a recent approach proposed for the inertial confinement fusion, the idea is to dissociate the fuel ignition phase from its compression. The ignition phase would be then achieved by means of an external energy source: a fast electron beam generated by the interaction with an ultra-intense laser. The main goal of this work is to study the mechanisms of the hot electron energy transfer to the compressed fuel. We intent in particular to study the role of the electric and collisional effects involved in the hot electron propagation in a medium with properties similar to the compressed fuel. We carried out two experiments, one at the Vulcan laser facility (England) and the second one at the new LULI 100 TW laser (France). During the first experiment, we obtained the first results on the hot electron propagation in a dense and hot plasma. The innovating aspect of this work was in particular the use of the laser-shock technique to generate high pressures, allowing the strongly correlated and degenerated plasma to be created. The role of the electric and magnetic effects due to the space charge associated with the fast electron beam has been investigated in the second experiment. Here we studied the propagation in materials with different electrical characteristics: an insulator and a conductor. The analysis of the results showed that only by taking into account simultaneously the two propagation mechanisms (collisions and electric effects) a correct treatment of the energy deposition is possible. We also showed the importance of taking into account the induced modifications due to the electrons beam crossing the target, especially the induced heating. (author)

  7. Stability of Ignition Transients

    OpenAIRE

    V.E. Zarko

    1991-01-01

    The problem of ignition stability arises in the case of the action of intense external heat stimuli when, resulting from the cut-off of solid substance heating, momentary ignition is followed by extinction. Physical pattern of solid propellant ignition is considered and ignition criteria available in the literature are discussed. It is shown that the above mentioned problem amounts to transient burning at a given arbitrary temperature distribution in the condensed phase. A brief survey...

  8. Gain curves and hydrodynamic modeling for shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition of a precompressed thermonuclear fuel by means of a converging shock is now considered as a credible scheme to obtain high gains for inertial fusion energy. This work aims at modeling the successive stages of the fuel time history, from compression to final thermonuclear combustion, in order to provide the gain curves of shock ignition (SI). The leading physical mechanism at work in SI is pressure amplification, at first by spherical convergence, and by collision with the shock reflected at center during the stagnation process. These two effects are analyzed, and ignition conditions are provided as functions of the shock pressure and implosion velocity. Ignition conditions are obtained from a non-isobaric fuel assembly, for which we present a gain model. The corresponding gain curves exhibit a significantly lower ignition threshold and higher target gains than conventional central ignition.

  9. Numerical investigation on the combined effects of varying piston bowl geometries and ramp injection rate-shapes on the combustion characteristics of a kerosene-diesel fueled direct injection compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Zhao, Feiyang; Yu, Wenbin; Mohan, Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of injection rate-shaping on heat-release is significant with less turbulence. • Two peak heat-releases are seen for the shallow-depth re-entrant piston. • Significant combustion phasing occurs with kerosene usage and high turbulence. - Abstract: In this work, the combustion characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition (DICI) engine fueled with kerosene-diesel blends, using different piston bowl geometries together with varying injection rate-shapes were investigated. A total of three combustion bowl geometries, namely the omega combustion chamber (OCC), the shallow-depth combustion chamber (SCC) and the shallow-depth re-entrant combustion chamber (SRCC), were used together with six different ramp injection rate-shapes and pure diesel, kerosene-diesel and pure kerosene fuels. It is seen that the SRCC geometry, which has the shortest throat length, gives the highest turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and this resulted in two peak heat-releases, with a primary peak heat-release during the premixed combustion phase and a secondary peak heat-release during the mixing-controlled combustion phase. In addition, the SCC geometry gives rather distinct premixed combustion and mixing-controlled combustion phases due to the fact that combustion is predominantly controlled by the injected fuel spray itself because of less turbulence. Also, when kerosene is used in place of diesel, the heat-release during the premixed combustion phase increases and diminishes during the mixing-controlled and late combustion phases. It is interesting to note that the effect of injection rate-shaping on the heat-release rate is more obvious for bowl geometries that generate less TKE. Moreover, bowl geometries that generate higher TKEs as well as fuels with lower viscosities generally give lower carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and higher nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions. More importantly, it is possible to achieve low NO and CO emissions simultaneously by using the

  10. Shock ignition targets: gain and robustness vs ignition threshold factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Antonelli, Luca; Schiavi, Angelo; Picone, Silvia; Volponi, Gian Marco; Marocchino, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Shock ignition is a laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion scheme, in which the stages of compression and hot spot formation are partly separated. The hot spot is created at the end of the implosion by a converging shock driven by a final ``spike'' of the laser pulse. Several shock-ignition target concepts have been proposed and relevant gain curves computed (see, e.g.). Here, we consider both pure-DT targets and more facility-relevant targets with plastic ablator. The investigation is conducted with 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations. We determine ignition threshold factors ITF's (and their dependence on laser pulse parameters) by means of 1D simulations. 2D simulations indicate that robustness to long-scale perturbations increases with ITF. Gain curves (gain vs laser energy), for different ITF's, are generated using 1D simulations. Work partially supported by Sapienza Project C26A15YTMA, Sapienza 2016 (n. 257584), Eurofusion Project AWP17-ENR-IFE-CEA-01.

  11. Numerical Analysis of the Interaction between Thermo-Fluid Dynamics and Auto-Ignition Reaction in Spark Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijyo, Katsuya; Nishiwaki, Kazuie; Yoshihara, Yoshinobu

    The CFD simulations were performed integrating the low-temperature oxidation reaction. Analyses were made with respect to the first auto-ignition location in the case of a premixed-charge compression auto-ignition in a laminar flow field and in the case of the auto-ignition in an end gas during an S. I. Engine combustion process. In the latter simulation, the spatially-filtered transport equations were solved to express fluctuating temperatures in a turbulent flow in consideration of strong non-linearity to temperature in the reaction equations. It is suggested that the first auto-ignition location does not always occur at higher-temperature locations and that the difference in the locations of the first auto-ignition depends on the time period during which the local end gas temperature passes through the region of shorter ignition delay, including the NTC region.

  12. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  13. Fusion ignition via a magnetically-assisted fast ignition approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, W. -M.; Gibbon, P.; Sheng, Z. -M.; Li, Y. T.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made towards laser-driven fusion ignition via different schemes, including direct and indirect central ignition, fast ignition, shock ignition, and impact ignition schemes. However, to reach ignition conditions, there are still various technical and physical challenges to be solved for all these schemes. Here, our multi-dimensional integrated simulation shows that the fast-ignition conditions could be achieved when two 2.8 petawatt heating laser pulses counter-pr...

  14. Nova Upgrade program: ignition and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, E.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is addressing the critical physics and technology issues directed toward demonstrating and exploiting ignition and propagating burn to high gain with ICF targets for both defense and civilian applications. Nova is the primary U.S. facility employed in the study of the X-ray-driven (indirect drive) approach to ICF. Nova's principal objective is to demonstrate that laser-driven hohlraums can achieve the conditions of driver-target coupling efficiency, driver irradiation symmetry, driver pulseshaping, target preheat, and hydrodynamic stability required by hot-spot ignition and fuel compression to realize a fusion gain. (author)

  15. Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes “day one” NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

  16. Modelling auto ignition of hydrogen in a jet ignition pre-chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boretti, Alberto A. [School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, PO Box 663, Ballarat, Victoria 3353 (Australia)

    2010-04-15

    Spark-less jet ignition pre-chambers are enablers of high efficiencies and load control by quantity of fuel injected when coupled with direct injection of main chamber fuel, thus permitting always lean burn bulk stratified combustion. Towards the end of the compression stroke, a small quantity of hydrogen is injected within the pre-chamber, where it mixes with the air entering from the main chamber. Combustion of the air and fuel mixture then starts within the pre-chamber because of the high temperature of the hot glow plug, and then jets of partially combusted hot gases enter the main chamber igniting there in the bulk, over multiple ignition points, lean stratified mixtures of air and fuel. The paper describes the operation of the spark-less jet ignition pre-chamber coupling CFD and CAE engine simulations to allow component selection and engine performance evaluation. (author)

  17. Fast-shock ignition: a new approach to inertial confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Farahbod

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  A new concept for inertial confinement fusion called fast-shock ignition (FSI is introduced as a credible scheme in order to obtain high target gain. In the proposed model, the separation of fuel ignition into two successive steps, under the suitable conditions, reduces required ignitor energy for the fuel ignition. The main procedure in FSI concept is compressing the fuel up to stagnation. Then, two high intensity short pulse laser spikes with energy and power lower than those required for shock ignition (SI and fast ignition (FI with a proper delay time are launched at the fuel which increases the central hot-spot temperature and completes the ignition of the precompressed fuel. The introduced semi-analytical model indicates that with fast-shock ignition, the total required energy for compressing and igniting the fuel can be slightly reduced in comparison to pure shock ignition. Furthermore, for fuel mass greater than , the target energy gain increases up to 15 percent and the contribution of fast ignitor under the proper conditions could be decreased about 20 percent compared with pure fast ignition. The FSI scheme is beneficial from technological considerations for the construction of short pulse high power laser drivers. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition over pure shock ignition in terms of figure of merit can be more than 1.3.

  18. Premixed Turbulent Combustion in High Reynolds Number Regimes of Thickened Flamelets and Distributed Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    multiple Damkohler or Karlovitz numbers to account for auto - ignition and other types of chemistry, (d)… For example, residence time is important since...First, the rapid compression of reactants within a shock tube or an HCCI engine is known to rapidly elevate the temperature of the reactants above...the ignition temperature, causing reactions to become distributed in space [4]. Alden et al. reported broad CH zones within an HCCI engine experiment

  19. Blending Behavior of Ethanol with PRF 84 and FACE A Gasoline in HCCI Combustion Mmode

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad Umer

    2017-09-04

    The blending of ethanol with PRF (Primary reference fuel) 84 was investigated and compared with FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) A gasoline surrogate which has a RON of 83.9. Previously, experiments were performed at four HCCI conditions but the chemical effect responsible for the non-linear blending behavior of ethanol with PRF 84 and FACE A was not understood. Hence, in this study the experimental measurements were simulated using zero-dimensional HCCI engine model with detailed chemistry in CHEMKIN PRO. Ethanol was used as an octane booster for the above two base fuels in volume concentration of 0%, 2%, 5% and 10%. The geometrical data and the intake valve closure conditions were used to match the simulated combustion phasing with the experiments. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) was detected by performing heat release analysis. LTHR formation depended on the base fuel type and the engine operating conditions suggesting that the base fuel composition has an important role in the formation of LTHR. The effect of ethanol on LTHR was explained by low temperature chemistry reactions and OH/HO evolution. A strong correlation of low temperature oxidation reactions of base fuels with ethanol was found to be responsible for the observed blending effects.

  20. Hot Surface Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Tursyn, Yerbatyr; Goyal, Vikrant; Benhidjeb-Carayon, Alicia; Simmons, Richard; Meyer, Scott; Gore, Jay P.

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable hot surface ignition of flammable liquids is one of the hazards in ground and air transportation vehicles, which primarily occurs in the engine compartment. In order to evaluate the safety and sustainability of candidate replacement fuels with respect to hot surface ignition, a baseline low lead fuel (Avgas 100 LL) and four experimental unleaded aviation fuels recommended for reciprocating aviation engines were considered. In addition, hot surface ignition properties of the gas tu...

  1. An optimized chemical kinetic mechanism for HCCI combustion of PRFs using multi-zone model and genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshat, Elaheh; Saray, Rahim Khoshbakhti

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new chemical kinetic mechanism for PRFs HCCI combustion is developed. • New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. • Engine-related combustion and performance parameters are predicted accurately. • Engine unburned HC and CO emissions are predicted by the model properly. - Abstract: Development of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms is required for HCCI combustion and emissions prediction to be used in engine development. The main purpose of this study is development of a new chemical kinetic mechanism for primary reference fuels (PRFs) HCCI combustion, which can be applied to combustion models to predict in-cylinder pressure and exhaust CO and UHC emissions, accurately. Hence, a multi-zone model is developed for HCCI engine simulation. Two semi-detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms those are suitable for premixed combustion are used for n-heptane and iso-octane HCCI combustion simulation. The iso-octane mechanism contains 84 species and 484 reactions and the n-heptane mechanism contains 57 species and 296 reactions. A simple interaction between iso-octane and n-heptane is considered in new mechanism. The multi-zone model is validated using experimental data for pure n-heptane and iso-octane. A new mechanism is prepared by combination of these two mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane blended fuel, which includes 101 species and 594 reactions. New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. Mechanism contains low temperature heat release region, which decreases with increasing octane number. The results showed that the optimized chemical kinetic mechanism is capable of predicting engine-related combustion and performance parameters. Also after implementing the optimized mechanism, engine unburned HC and CO emissions predicted by the model are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data

  2. Fast ignition schemes for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, C.

    2003-01-01

    The controlled production of a local hot spot in super-compressed deuterium + tritium fuel is examined in details. Relativistic electron beams (REB) in the MeV and proton beams in the few tens MeV energy range produced by PW-lasers are respectively considered. A strong emphasis is given to the propagation issues due to large density gradients in the outer core of compressed fuel. A specific attention is also paid to the final and complete particle stopping resulting in hot spot generation as well as to the interplay of collective vs. particle stopping at the entrance channel on the low density side in plasma target. Moreover, REB production and fast acceleration mechanisms are also given their due attention. Proton fast ignition looks promising as well as the wedged (cone angle) approach circumventing most of transport uncertainties between critical layer and hot spot. Global engineering perspectives for fast ignition scenario (FIS) driven inertial confinement fusion are also detailed. (author)

  3. Reaching ignition in the tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-06-01

    This review covers the following areas: (1) the physics of burning plasmas, (2) plasma physics requirements for reaching ignition, (3) design studies for ignition devices, and (4) prospects for an ignition project

  4. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, S. A.; Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-01-01

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25

  5. Linear induction accelerator requirements for ion fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, G.

    1998-01-01

    Fast ignition (fast heating of DT cores afief compression) reduces driver energy (by 10 X or more) by reducing the implosion velocity and energy for a given fuel compression ratio. For any type of driver that can deliver the ignition energy fast enough, fast ignition increases the target gain compared to targets using fast implosions for central ignition, as long as the energy to heat the core after compression is comparable to or less than the slow compression energy, and as long as the coupling efficiency of the fast ignitor beam to heat the core is comparable to the overall efficiency of compressing the core (in terms of beam energy-to-DT-efficiency). Ion driven fast ignition, compared to laser-driven fast ignition, has the advantage of direct (dE/dx) deposition of beam energy to the DT, eliminating inefficiencies for conversion into hot electrons, and direct ion heating also has a more favorable deposition profile with the Bragg-peak near the end of an ion range chosen to be deep inside a compressed DT core. While Petawatt laser experiments at LLNL have demonstrated adequate light-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency, it is not yet known if light and hot electrons can channel deeply enough to heat a small portion of a IOOOxLD compressed DT core to ignition. On the other hand, lasers with chirped-pulse amplification giving thousand-fold pulse compressions have been demonstrated to produce the short pulses, small focal spots and Petawatt peak powers approaching those required for fast ignition, whereas ion accelerators that can produce sufficient beam quality for similar compression ratios and focal spot sizes of ion bunches have not yet been demonstrated, where an imposed coherent velocity tilt plays the analogous role for beam compression as does frequency chirp with lasers. Accordingly, it is the driver technology, not the target coupling physics, that poses the main challenge to ion-driven fast ignition. As the mainline HIF program is concentrating on

  6. Ignition probabilities for Compact Ignition Tokamak designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; Goldston, R.J.

    1989-09-01

    A global power balance code employing Monte Carlo techniques had been developed to study the ''probability of ignition'' and has been applied to several different configurations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). Probability distributions for the critical physics parameters in the code were estimated using existing experimental data. This included a statistical evaluation of the uncertainty in extrapolating the energy confinement time. A substantial probability of ignition is predicted for CIT if peaked density profiles can be achieved or if one of the two higher plasma current configurations is employed. In other cases, values of the energy multiplication factor Q of order 10 are generally obtained. The Ignitor-U and ARIES designs are also examined briefly. Comparisons of our empirically based confinement assumptions with two theory-based transport models yield conflicting results. 41 refs., 11 figs

  7. Present status of Fast Ignition Realization EXperiment (FIREX) and inertial fusion energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azechi, H.; Fujimoto, Y.; Fujioka, S.

    2012-11-01

    Controlled thermonuclear ignition and subsequent burn will be demonstrated in a couple of years on the central ignition scheme. Fast ignition has the high potential to ignite a fuel using only about one tenth of laser energy necessary to the central ignition. This compactness may largely accelerate inertial fusion energy development. One of the most advanced fast ignition programs is the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX). The goal of its first phase is to demonstrate ignition temperature of 5 keV, followed by the second phase to demonstrate ignition-and-burn. The second series experiment of FIREX-I from late 2010 to early 2011 has demonstrated a high (≈20%) coupling efficiency from laser to thermal energy of the compressed core, suggesting that one can achieve the ignition temperature at the laser energy below 10 kJ. Given the demonstrations of the ignition temperature at FIREX-I and the ignition-and-burn at the National Ignition Facility, the inertial fusion research would then shift from the plasma physics era to power generation era. (author)

  8. Progress towards ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, M. J.; Patel, P. K.; Lindl, J. D.; Atherton, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Landen, O. L.; Moses, E. I.; Springer, P. T.; Benedetti, R.; Bernstein, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-07-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory includes a precision laser system now capable of delivering 1.8 MJ at 500 TW of 0.35-μm light to a target. NIF has been operational since March 2009. A variety of experiments have been completed in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and inertial fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support its missions with nearly 60 X-ray, optical, and nuclear diagnostic systems. A primary goal of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the NIF was to implode a low-Z capsule filled with ∼0.2 mg of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel via laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion and demonstrate fusion ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn with a net energy gain of ∼5–10 (fusion yield/input laser energy). This requires assembling the DT fuel into a dense shell of ∼1000 g/cm{sup 3} with an areal density (ρR) of ∼1.5 g/cm{sup 2}, surrounding a lower density hot spot with a temperature of ∼10 keV and a ρR ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, or approximately an α-particle range. Achieving these conditions demand precise control of laser and target parameters to allow a low adiabat, high convergence implosion with low ablator fuel mix. We have demonstrated implosion and compressed fuel conditions at ∼80–90% for most point design values independently, but not at the same time. The nuclear yield is a factor of ∼3–10× below the simulated values and a similar factor below the alpha dominated regime. This paper will discuss the experimental trends, the possible causes of the degraded performance (the off-set from the simulations), and the plan to understand and resolve the underlying physics issues.

  9. Ignition tuning for the National Ignition Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landen O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of the indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion [1] tuning campaigns [2] is to maximize the probability of ignition by experimentally correcting for likely residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics [3] used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models, and by checking for and resolving unexpected shot-to-shot variability in performance [4]. This has been started successfully using a variety of surrogate capsules that set key laser, hohlraum and capsule parameters to maximize ignition capsule implosion velocity, while minimizing fuel adiabat, core shape asymmetry and ablator-fuel mix.

  10. Ignition and burn propagation with suprathermal electron auxiliary heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Shensheng; Wu Yanqing

    2000-01-01

    The rapid development in ultrahigh-intensity lasers has allowed the exploration of applying an auxiliary heating technique in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. It is hoped that, compared with the 'standard fast ignition' scheme, raising the temperature of a hot-spot over the ignition threshold based on the shock-heated temperature will greatly reduce the required output energy of an ignition ultrahigh-intensity pulse. One of the key issues in ICF auxiliary heating is: how can we transport the exogenous energy efficiently into the hot-spot of compressed DT fuel? A scheme is proposed with three phases. First, a partial-spherical-shell capsule, such as double-conical target, is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high-density fuel configuration with a hot-spot of temperature lower than the ignition threshold. Second, a hole is bored through the shell outside the hot-spot by suprathermal electron explosion boring. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons produced in the high-intensity ignition laser-plasma interactions. Calculations with a simple hybrid model show that the new scheme can possibly lead to ignition and burn propagation with a total drive energy of a few tens of kilojoules and an output energy as low as hundreds of joules for a single ignition ultrahigh-intensity pulse. (author)

  11. Fast ignition: Physics progress in the US fusion energy program and prospects for achieving ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.; Andersen, C.; Cowan, T.

    2003-01-01

    Fast ignition (FI) has significant potential advantages for inertial fusion energy and it is therefore being studied as an exploratory concept in the US fusion energy program. FI is based on short pulse isochoric heating of pre-compressed DT by intense beams of laser accelerated MeV electrons or protons. Recent experimental progress in the study of these two heating processes is discussed. The goal is to benchmark new models in order to predict accurately the requirements for full-scale fast ignition. An overview is presented of the design and experimental testing of a cone target implosion concept for fast ignition. Future prospects and conceptual designs for larger scale FI experiments using planned high energy petawatt upgrades of major lasers in the US are outlined. A long-term road map for FI is defined. (author)

  12. Blending Octane Number of Toluene with Gasoline-like and PRF Fuels in HCCI Combustion Mode

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad Umer

    2018-04-03

    Future internal combustion engines demand higher efficiency but progression towards this is limited by the phenomenon called knock. A possible solution for reaching high efficiency is Octane-on-Demand (OoD), which allows to customize the antiknock quality of a fuel through blending of high-octane fuel with a low octane fuel. Previous studies on Octane-on-Demand highlighted efficiency benefits depending on the combination of low octane fuel with high octane booster. The author recently published works with ethanol and methanol as high-octane fuels. The results of this work showed that the composition and octane number of the low octane fuel is significant for the blending octane number of both ethanol and methanol. This work focuses on toluene as the high octane fuel (RON 120). Aromatics offers anti-knock quality and with high octane number than alcohols, this work will address if toluene can provide higher octane enhancement. Our aim is to investigate the impact of three gasoline-like fuels and two Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs). More specifically, fuels are FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) I, FACE J, FACE A, PRF 70 and PRF 84. A CFR engine was used to conduct the experiments in HCCI mode. For this combustion mode, the engine operated at four specific conditions based on RON and MON conditions. The octane numbers corresponding to four HCCI numbers were obtained for toluene concentration of 0, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Results show that the blending octane number of toluene varies non-linearly and linearly with the increase in toluene concentration depending on the base fuel, experimental conditions and the concentration of toluene. As a result, the blending octane number can range from close to 150 with a small fraction of toluene to a number closer to that of toluene, 120, with larger fractions.

  13. Acoustic Igniter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  14. High frequency ignition arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canup, R E

    1977-03-03

    The invention concerns an HF ignition arrangement for combustion engines with a transistor oscillator. As this oscillator requires a current of 10A, with peak currents up to about 50A, it is not sensible to take this current through the remote ignition switch for switching it on and off. According to the invention the HF high voltage transformer of the ignition is provided with a control winding, which only requires a few milliamps DC and which can therefore be switched via the ignition switch. If the ignition switch is in the 'running' position, then a premagnetising DC current flows through the control winding, which suppresses the oscillation of the oscillator which has current flowing through it, until this current is interrupted by the interruptor contacts controlled by the combustion engine, so that the oscillations of the oscillator start immediately; the oscillator only continues to oscillate during the period during which the interruptor contacts controlled by the machine are open and interrupt the premagnetisation current. The control winding is short circuited in the 'off' position of the ignition switch.

  15. National Ignition Facility design focuses on optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Atherton, L.J.; Paisner, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Sometime in the year 2002, scientists at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will focus 192 separate high-power ultraviolet laser beams onto a tiny capsule of deuterium and tritium, heating and compressing the material until it ignites and burns with a burst of fusion energy. The mission of NIF, which will contain the largest laser in the world, is to obtain fusion ignition and gain and to use inertial confinement fusion capabilities in nuclear weapons science experiments. The physics data provided by NIF experiments will help scientists ensure nuclear weapons reliability without the need for actual weapons tests; basic sciences such as astrophysics will also benefit. The facility faces stringent weapons-physics user requirements demanding peak pulse powers greater than 750 TW at 0.35 microm (only 500 TW is required for target ignition), pulse durations of 0.1 to 20 ns, beam steering on the order of several degrees, and target isolation from residual 1- and 0.5-microm radiation. Additional requirements include 50% fractional encircled beam energy in a 100-microm-diameter spot, with 95% encircled in a 200-microm spot. The weapons-effects community requires 1- and 0.5-microm light on target, beam steering to widely spaced targets, a target chamber accommodating oversized objects, well-shielded diagnostic areas, and elimination of stray light in the target chamber. The beamline design, amplifier configuration and requirements for optics are discussed here

  16. Ignition tuning for the National Ignition Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Landen O.; Edwards J.; Haan S.W.; Lindl J.D.; Boehly T.R.; Bradley D.K.; Callahan D.A.; Celliers P.M.; Dewald E.L.; Dixit S.; Doeppner T.; Eggert J.; Farley D.; Frenje J.A.; Glenn S.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion [1] tuning campaigns [2] is to maximize the probability of ignition by experimentally correcting for likely residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics [3] used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models, and by checking for and resolving unexpected shot-to-shot variability in performance [4]. This has been started successfully using a variety of surrogate capsules that set key laser, hohlraum and caps...

  17. Innovative ICF scheme-impact fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Nagatomo, H.; Sakaiya, T.; Karasik, M.; Gardner, J.; Bates, J.

    2007-01-01

    A totally new ignition scheme for ICF, impact fast ignition (IFI), is proposed [1], in which the compressed DT main fuel is to be ignited by impact collision of another fraction of separately imploded DT fuel, which is accelerated in the hollow conical target. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation results in full geometry are presented, in which some key physical parameters for the impact shell dynamics such as 10 8 cm/s of the implosion velocity, 200- 300 g/cm 3 of the compressed density, and the converted temperature beyond 5 keV are demonstrated. As the first step toward the proof-of-principle of IFI, we have conducted preliminary experiments under the operation of GEKKO XII/HYPER laser system to achieve a hyper-velocity of the order of 108 cm/s. As a result we have observed a highest velocity, 6.5 x 10 7 cm/s, ever achieved. Furthermore, we have also done the first integrated experiments using the target and observed substantial amount of neutron yields. Reference: [1] M. Murakami and Nagatomo, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. A 544(2005) 67

  18. Study of the shock ignition scheme in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Shock Ignition (SI) scheme is an alternative to classical ignition schemes in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Its singularity relies on the relaxation of constraints during the compression phase and fulfilment of ignition conditions by launching a short and intense laser pulse (∼500 ps, ∼300 TW) on the pre-assembled fuel at the end of the implosion.In this thesis, it has been established that the SI process leads to a non-isobaric fuel configuration at the ignition time thus modifying the ignition criteria of Deuterium-Tritium (DT) against the conventional schemes. A gain model has been developed and gain curves have been inferred and numerically validated. This hydrodynamical modeling has demonstrated that the SI process allows higher gain and lower ignition energy threshold than conventional ignition due to the high hot spot pressure at ignition time resulting from the ignitor shock propagation.The radiative hydrodynamic CHIC code developed at the CELIA laboratory has been used to determine parametric dependences describing the optimal conditions for target design leading to ignition. These numerical studies have enlightened the potential of SI with regards to saving up laser energy, obtain high gains but also to safety margins and ignition robustness.Finally, the results of the first SI experiments performed in spherical geometry on the OMEGA laser facility (NY, USA) are presented. An interpretation of the experimental data is proposed from mono and bidimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Then, different trails are explored to account for the differences observed between experimental and numerical data and alternative solutions to improve performances are suggested. (author) [fr

  19. The volume ignition for ICF ignition target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y. S.; He, X. T.; Yu, M.

    1997-01-01

    Compared with central model, volume ignition has no hot spot, avoids the mixing at the hot-cold interface, the α-particle escaping, and the high convergence, greatly reduces the sharp demanding for uniformity. In laser indirect driving, from theoretical estimation and computational simulation, we have proved that using a tamper with good heat resistance, the DT fuel can be ignited in LTE at ∼3 KeV and then evolves to the non-LTE ignition at >5 KeV. In this case, 1 MJ radiation energy in the hohlraum could cause near 10 MJ output for a pellet with 0.2 mg DT fuel. We have compared results with and without α-particle transport, it shows that in the condition of ρR>0.5 g/cm 2 of DT fuel, both have the same results. For the system with ρR≅0.5 g/cm 2 we can use α-particle local deposition scheme. The non-uniformly doped tamper with density ρ≅1-5 g/cc can reduce mixing due to the small convergence ratio. The input energy is deposited in DT and tamper during the implosion, we try to reduce the tamper energy by changing the ratio of CH and doped Au and the thickness of the tamper

  20. Fast ignition: Dependence of the ignition energy on source and target parameters for particle-in-cell-modelled energy and angular distributions of the fast electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellei, C.; Divol, L.; Kemp, A. J.; Key, M. H.; Larson, D. J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Tabak, M.; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The energy and angular distributions of the fast electrons predicted by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations differ from those historically assumed in ignition designs of the fast ignition scheme. Using a particular 3D PIC calculation, we show how the ignition energy varies as a function of source-fuel distance, source size, and density of the pre-compressed fuel. The large divergence of the electron beam implies that the ignition energy scales with density more weakly than the ρ{sup −2} scaling for an idealized beam [S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999)], for any realistic source that is at some distance from the dense deuterium-tritium fuel. Due to the strong dependence of ignition energy with source-fuel distance, the use of magnetic or electric fields seems essential for the purpose of decreasing the ignition energy.

  1. Probability of ignition - a better approach than ignition margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.K.; Perkins, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a figure of merit - the probability of ignition - is proposed for the characterization of the ignition performance of projected ignition tokamaks. Monte Carlo and analytic models have been developed to compute the uncertainty distribution function for ignition of a given tokamak design, in terms of the uncertainties inherent in the tokamak physics database. A sample analysis with this method indicates that the risks of not achieving ignition may be unacceptably high unless the accepted margins for ignition are increased. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 12 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Shock ignition of thermonuclear fuel: principles and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.; Schmitt, A.J.; Canaud, B.; Betti, R.; Perkins, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Shock ignition is an approach to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) in which the stages of compression and hot spot formation are partly separated. The fuel is first imploded at a lower velocity than in conventional ICF. Close to stagnation, an intense laser spike drives a strong converging shock, which contributes to hot spot formation. Shock ignition shows potentials for high gain at laser energies below 1 MJ, and could be tested on the National Ignition Facility or Laser MegaJoule. Shock ignition principles and modelling are reviewed in this paper. Target designs and computer-generated gain curves are presented and discussed. Limitations of present studies and research needs are outlined. (special topic)

  3. The effects of key parameters on the transition from SI combustion to HCCI combustion in a two-stroke free piston linear engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Nguyen Ba; Lim, Ocktaeck; Iida, Norimasa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A free piston engine is modeled and simulated by three mathematical models. • The models include dynamic model, linear alternator model and thermodynamic model. • The SI-HCCI transition is successful if the key parameters are adjusted suitably. • Spring stiffness has a strong influence on reducing peak temperature in HCCI mode. • Adjusting spark timing helps the SI-HCCI transition to be more convenient. - Abstract: An investigation was conducted to examine the effects of key parameters such as intake temperature, equivalence ratio, engine load, intake pressure, spark timing and spring stiffness on the transition from SI combustion to HCCI combustion in a two-stroke free piston linear engine. Operation of the free piston engine was simulated based on the combination of three mathematical models including a dynamic model, a linear alternator model and a thermodynamic model. These mathematical models were combined and solved by a program written in Fortran. To validate the mathematical models, the simulation results were compared with experimental data in the SI mode. For the transition from SI combustion to HCCI combustion, the simulation results show that if the equivalence ratio is decreased, the intake temperature and engine load should be increased to get a successful SI-HCCI transition. However, the simulation results also show that the in-cylinder pressure is decreased, while the peak in-cylinder temperature in HCCI mode is increased significantly if the intake temperature is increased so much. Beside the successful SI-HCCI transition, the increase of intake pressure from P in = 1.1 bar to P in = 1.6 bar is one of solutions to reduce peak in-cylinder temperature in HCCI mode. However, the simulation results also indicate that if the intake pressure is increased so much (P in = 1.6 bar), the engine knocking problem is occurred. Adjusting spring stiffness from k = 2.9 N/mm to k = 14.7 N/mm is also considered one of useful solutions for

  4. An experimental study for the effects of boost pressure on the performance and exhaust emissions of a DI-HCCI gasoline engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafa Canakci [Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Education

    2008-07-15

    As an alternative combustion mode, the HCCI combustion has some benefits compared to conventional SI and CI engines, such as low NOx emission and high thermal efficiency. However, this combustion mode can produce higher UHC and CO emissions than those of conventional engines. In the naturally aspirated HCCI engines, the low engine output power limits its use in the current engine technologies. Intake air pressure boosting is a common way to improve the engine output power which is widely used in high performance SI and CI engine applications. Therefore, in this study, the effect of inlet air pressure on the performance and exhaust emissions of a DI-HCCI gasoline engine has been investigated after converting a heavy-duty diesel engine to a HCCI direct-injection gasoline engine. The experiments were performed at three different inlet air pressures while operating the engine at the same equivalence ratio and intake air temperature as in normally aspirated HCCI engine condition at different engine speeds. The SOI timing was set dependently to achieve the maximum engine torque at each test condition. The effects of inlet air pressure both on the emissions such as CO, UHC and NOx and on the performance parameters such as BSFC, torque, thermal and combustion efficiencies have been discussed. The relationships between the emissions are also provided. 34 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Cluster induced ignition - A new approach to inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, T.; Mendonca, J.T.; Batani, D.; Bernardinello, A.

    2001-01-01

    An ultra intense laser interaction with clusters produce energetic ions and electrons in MeV range due to cluster explosion. Here we discuss the possibility of harnessing these particle energies to heat a part of the pre compressed DT fuel to ignition condition. In this article we are striving to present the principle concept and the preliminary results are discussed. (author)

  6. Researches on Preliminary Chemical Reactions in Spark-Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-06-01

    compression type, without ignition, the resulting preliminary reactions being detectable and meas- urable thermometrically . Contents I. Influence of Preliminary...thoroughly insulated be- tween the carburettor and the engine, by aluminium foil and asbestos. -I -I " I" I ’I il i~ " !, I I 1𔃻I I’ ) To enable the

  7. Physics of laser-plasma interaction for shock ignition of fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonchuk, V T; Colaïtis, A; Vallet, A; Llor Aisa, E; Duchateau, G; Nicolaï, Ph; Ribeyre, X

    2016-01-01

    The shock ignition scheme is an alternative approach, which aims to achieve ignition of fusion reactions in two subsequent steps: first, the target is compressed at a low implosion velocity and second, a strong converging shock is launched during the stagnation phase and ignites the hot spot. In this paper we describe the major elements of this scheme and recent achievements concerning the laser-plasma interaction, the crucial role of hot electrons in the shock generation, the shock amplification in the imploding shell and the ignition conditions. (paper)

  8. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  9. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  10. Local Limit Phenomena, Flow Compression, and Fuel Cracking Effects in High-Speed Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    e.g. local extinction and re- ignition , interactions between flow compression and fast-reaction induced dilatation (reaction compression ), and to...time as a function of initial temperature in constant-pressure auto - ignition , and (b) the S-curves of perfectly stirred reactors (PSRs), for n...mechanism. The reduction covered auto - ignition and perfectly stirred reactors for equivalence ratio range of 0.5~1.5, initial temperature higher than

  11. Volume ignition of laser driven fusion pellets and double layer effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicchitelli, L.; Eliezer, S.; Goldsworthy, M.P.; Green, F.; Hora, H.; Ray, P.S.; Stening, R.J.; Szichman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The realization of an ideal volume compression of laser-irradiated fusion pellets opens the possibility for an alternative to spark ignition proposed for many years for inertial confinement fusion. A re-evaluation of the difficulties of the central spark ignition of laser driven pellets is given. The alternative volume compression theory, together with volume burn and volume ignition, have received less attention and are re-evaluated in view of the experimental verification generalized fusion gain formulas, and the variation of optimum temperatures derived at self-ignition. Reactor-level DT fusion with MJ-laser pulses and volume compression to 50 times the solid-state density are estimated. Dynamic electric fields and double layers at the surface and in the interior of plasmas result in new phenomena for the acceleration of thermal electrons to suprathermal electrons. Double layers also cause a surface tension which stabilizes against surface wave effects and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. (author)

  12. Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: a path towards inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2009-01-01

    the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed (Lindl 1998 Inertial Confinement Fusion: the Quest for Ignition and Energy Gain Using Indirect Drive (New York: American Institute of Physics)) and has a high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and fast ignition concepts (Tabak et al 1994 Phys. Plasmas 1 1626-34, Tabak et al 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 057305). Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. This paper summarizes the design, performance and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present laser inertial confinement fusion-fission energy (LIFE) as a path to achieve carbon-free sustainable energy.

  13. Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: a path towards inertial fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2009-10-01

    the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed (Lindl 1998 Inertial Confinement Fusion: the Quest for Ignition and Energy Gain Using Indirect Drive (New York: American Institute of Physics)) and has a high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and fast ignition concepts (Tabak et al 1994 Phys. Plasmas 1 1626-34, Tabak et al 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 057305). Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. This paper summarizes the design, performance and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present laser inertial confinement fusion-fission energy (LIFE) as a path to achieve carbon-free sustainable energy.

  14. The Low Load Limit of Gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) - Experiments in a Light Duty Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Borgqvist, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The decreasing oil supply, more stringent pollutant legislations and strong focus on decreasing carbon dioxide emissions drives the research of more efficient and clean combustion engines. One such combustion engine concept is Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) which potentially achieves high efficiency and low NOx and soot emissions. One practical realization of HCCI in SI engines is to use a variable valve train to trap hot residual gases in order to increase the temperature of ...

  15. Shock ignition of high gain inertial fusion capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurtz, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Lebel, E.; Casner, A.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Inertial Confinement Fusion relies on the compression of small amounts of an equimolar mix of Deuterium and Tritium (DT) up to volumic masses of several hundreds of g/cm 3 . Such high densities are obtained by means of the implosion of a spherical shell made of cryogenic DT fuel. In the conventional scheme a hot spot is formed in the central part of the pellet at the end of the implosion. If the pressure of this hot spot is large enough (several hundreds of Gbars), thermonuclear heating occurs with a characteristic time shorter than the hydrodynamic confinement time and the target self ignites. Since the central hot spot pressure results from the conversion of the shell kinetic energy into thermal energy, the threshold for the ignition of a given mass of DT is a direct function of the implosion velocity. Typical implosion velocities for central self ignition are of the order of 400 km/s. Such high velocities imply both a strong acceleration of the shell and the use of large aspect ration shells in order to optimize the hydrodynamic efficiency of the implosion, at least in direct drive. These two features strongly enhance the risk of shell beak up at time of acceleration under the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore the formation of the hot spot may itself the unstable, this reducing its effective mass. High compression may be achieved at much lower velocities, thus reducing the energy budget and enhancing the implosion safety, but the corresponding fuel assembly requires an additional heating in order to reach ignition. This heating may be obtained from a 70-100 kJ laser pulse, delivered in 10-15 ps (Fast Ignition). An alternative idea is to boost up the central pressure of a target imploded at a sub-ignition velocity by means of a convergent strong shock launched at the end of the compression phase. This Shock Ignition (SI) concept has been suggested in 1983 by Scherbakov et al. More recently, R. Betti et al. developed

  16. Cyclopentane combustion. Part II. Ignition delay measurements and mechanism validation

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2017-06-12

    This study reports cyclopentane ignition delay measurements over a wide range of conditions. The measurements were obtained using two shock tubes and a rapid compression machine, and were used to test a detailed low- and high-temperature mechanism of cyclopentane oxidation that was presented in part I of this study (Al Rashidi et al., 2017). The ignition delay times of cyclopentane/air mixtures were measured over the temperature range of 650–1350K at pressures of 20 and 40atm and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. The ignition delay times simulated using the detailed chemical kinetic model of cyclopentane oxidation show very good agreement with the experimental measurements, as well as with the cyclopentane ignition and flame speed data available in the literature. The agreement is significantly improved compared to previous models developed and investigated at higher temperatures. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were performed to provide insights into the ignition-controlling chemistry at low, intermediate and high temperatures. The results obtained in this study confirm that cycloalkanes are less reactive than their non-cyclic counterparts. Moreover, cyclopentane, a high octane number and high octane sensitivity fuel, exhibits minimal low-temperature chemistry and is considerably less reactive than cyclohexane. This study presents the first experimental low-temperature ignition delay data of cyclopentane, a potential fuel-blending component of particular interest due to its desirable antiknock characteristics.

  17. Cyclopentane combustion. Part II. Ignition delay measurements and mechanism validation

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El; Má rmol, Juan C.; Banyon, Colin; Sajid, Muhammad Bilal; Mehl, Marco; Pitz, William J.; Mohamed, Samah; Alfazazi, Adamu; Lu, Tianfeng; Curran, Henry J.; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    This study reports cyclopentane ignition delay measurements over a wide range of conditions. The measurements were obtained using two shock tubes and a rapid compression machine, and were used to test a detailed low- and high-temperature mechanism of cyclopentane oxidation that was presented in part I of this study (Al Rashidi et al., 2017). The ignition delay times of cyclopentane/air mixtures were measured over the temperature range of 650–1350K at pressures of 20 and 40atm and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. The ignition delay times simulated using the detailed chemical kinetic model of cyclopentane oxidation show very good agreement with the experimental measurements, as well as with the cyclopentane ignition and flame speed data available in the literature. The agreement is significantly improved compared to previous models developed and investigated at higher temperatures. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were performed to provide insights into the ignition-controlling chemistry at low, intermediate and high temperatures. The results obtained in this study confirm that cycloalkanes are less reactive than their non-cyclic counterparts. Moreover, cyclopentane, a high octane number and high octane sensitivity fuel, exhibits minimal low-temperature chemistry and is considerably less reactive than cyclohexane. This study presents the first experimental low-temperature ignition delay data of cyclopentane, a potential fuel-blending component of particular interest due to its desirable antiknock characteristics.

  18. Features of a point design for Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, M; Clark, D; Town, R P J; Key, M H; Amendt, P; Ho, D; Meeker, D J; Shay, H D; Lasinski, B F; Kemp, A; Divol, L; Mackinnon, A J; Patel, P; Strozzi, D; Grote, D P

    2010-01-01

    Fast Ignition is an inertial fusion scheme in which fuel is first assembled and then heated to the ignition temperature with an external heating source. In this note we consider cone and shell implosions where the energy supplied by short pulse lasers is transported to the fuel by electrons. We describe possible failure modes for this scheme and how to overcome them. In particular, we describe two sources of cone tip failure, an axis jet driven from the compressed fuel mass and hard photon preheat leaking through the implosion shell, and laser prepulse that can change the position of laser absorption and the angular distribution of the emitted electrons.

  19. Features of a point design for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabak, M.; Clark, D.; Town, R.J.; Key, M.H.; Amendt, P.; Ho, D.; Meeker, D.J.; Shay, H.D.; Lasinski, B.F.; Kemp, A.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Patel, P.; Strozzi, D.; Grote, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Fast Ignition is an inertial fusion scheme in which fuel is first assembled and then heated to the ignition temperature with an external heating source. In this note we consider cone and shell implosions where the energy supplied by short pulse lasers is transported to the fuel by electrons. We describe possible failure modes for this scheme and how to overcome them. In particular, we describe two sources of cone tip failure, an axis jet driven from the compressed fuel mass and hard photon preheat leaking through the implosion shell, and laser prepulse that can change the position of laser absorption and the angular distribution of the emitted electrons.

  20. Opportunities for Integrated Fast Ignition program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, A. J.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Tabak, M.; Town, R.; Gregori, G.; Patel, P. K.; Snavely, R.; Freeman, R. R.; Stephens, R. B.; Beg, F.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments designed to investigate the physics of particle transport and heating of dense plasmas have been carried out in an number of facilities around the world since the publication of the fast ignition concept in 1997. To date a number of integrated experiments, examining the capsule implosion and subsequent heating have been carried out on the Gekko facility at the Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE) Osaka, Japan. The coupling of energy by the short pulse into the pre-compressed core in these experiments was very encouraging. More facilities capable of carrying out integrated experiments are currently under construction: Firex at ILEm the Omega EP facility at the University of Rochester, Z PW at Sandia National Lab, LIL in France and eventually high energy PW beams on the NIF. This presentation will review the current status of experiments in this area and discuss the capabilities of integrated fast ignition research that will be required to design the proof of principle and scaling experiments for fast ignition to be carried on the NIF. (Author)

  1. Plasma engineering assessments of compact ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Confinement, startup sequences, and fast-alpha particle effects are assessed for a class of compact tokamak ignition experiments having high toroidal magnetic fields (8 to 12 T) and high toroidal currents (7 to 10 MA). The uncertainties in confinement scaling are spanned through examples of performance with an optimistic model based on ohmically heated plasmas and a pessimistic model that includes confinement degradation by both auxiliary and alpha heating. The roles of neoclassical resistivity enhancement and sawtooth behavior are also evaluated. Copper toroidal field coils place restrictions on pulse lengths due to resistive heating, so a simultaneous rampup of the toroidal field and plasma current is proposed as a means of compressing the startup phase and lengthening the burn phase. If the ignition window is small, fast-alpha particle physics is restricted to the high-density regime where a short slowing-down time leads to low fast-particle density and pressure contributions. Under more optimistic confinement, a larger ignition margin broadens the range of alpha particle physics that can be addressed. These issues are illustrated through examples of transport simulations for a set of machine parameters called BRAND-X, which typify the designs under study

  2. Plasma engineering assessments of compact ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Confinement, startup sequences, and fast-alpha particle effects are assessed for a class of compact tokamak ignition experiments having high toroidal magnetic fields (8-12 T) and high toroidal currents (7-10 MA). The uncertainties in confinement scaling are spanned through examples of performance with an optimistic model based on ohmically heated plasmas and a pessimistic model that includes confinement degradation by both auxiliary and alpha heating. The roles of neoclassical resistivity enhancement and sawtooth behavior are also evaluated. Copper toroidal field coils place restrictions on pulse lengths due to resistive heating, so a simultaneous rampup of the toroidal field and plasma current is proposed as a means of compressing the startup phase and lengthening the burn phase. If the ignition window is small, fast-alpha particle physics is restricted to the high-density regime where a short slowing-down time leads to low fast-particle density and pressure contributions. Under more optimistic confinement, a larger ignition margin broadens the range of alpha particle physics that can be addressed. These issues are illustrated through examples of transport simulations for a set of machine parameters called BRAND-X, which typify the designs under study

  3. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative

  4. Update on Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay Keller; Gurpreet Singh

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. Recent experimental results of diesel combustion research will be discussed and a description will be given of our HCCI experimental program and of our HCCI modeling work

  5. Ignition and fusion burn in fast ignition scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    1998-01-01

    The target physics of fast ignition is briefly reviewed by focusing on the ignition and fusion burn in the off-center ignition scheme. By the use of a two dimensional hydrodynamic code with an alpha heating process, the ignition condition is studied. It is shown that the ignition condition of the off-center ignition scheme coincides with that of the the central isochoric model. After the ignition, a nuclear burning wave is seen to burn the cold main fuel with a velocity of 2 - 3 x 10 8 cm/s. The spark energy required for the off-center ignition is 2 - 3 kJ or 10 - 15 kJ for the core density of 400 g/cm 3 or 200 g/cm 3 , respectively. It is demonstrated that a core gain of more than 2,000 is possible for a core energy of 100 kJ with a hot spark energy of 13 kJ. The requirement for the ignition region's heating time is also discussed by modeling a heating source in the 2-D code. (author)

  6. Experimental study of biogas combustion in an HCCI engine for power generation with high indicated efficiency and ultra-low NOx emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedoya, Iván D.; Saxena, Samveg; Cadavid, Francisco J.; Dibble, Robert W.; Wissink, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this paper, we study biogas combustion in an HCCI engine operating at 1800 rpm. ► At low loads, slight changes in inlet conditions strongly affect cyclic variations. ► At high loads, slight changes in inlet conditions strongly affect ringing intensity. ► Indicated efficiency at high loads is close to 45% and IMEP g is close to 7.5 bar. ► NO x emissions are below the US-2010 limit of 0.27 g/kW h. - Abstract: Combustion parameters and the main exhaust emissions from a biogas fueled HCCI engine are investigated in this study. The study was conducted on a 4-cylinder, 1.9L Volkswagen TDI Diesel engine, which was modified to run in HCCI mode with biogas by means of inlet charge temperature control, boosted intake pressure, and a sonic flow device upstream of the inlet manifold to control biogas composition and the equivalence ratio. For simulating typical power generation conditions, the engine was coupled to an AC motor generator operating at 1800 rpm. In the startup process, gasoline was used in HCCI mode for all cylinders. During the tests, biogas was used in cylinders 2 and 3, and gasoline was used in cylinders 1 and 4 to allow for more stable engine coolant and oil temperatures. The tests were performed through an experimental factorial design to evaluate the effect of inlet charge temperature, boost pressures, and the equivalence ratio of the biogas–air mixture on HCCI combustion parameters and emissions. For biogas at lower equivalence ratios, slight increases in inlet charge temperature and boost pressures enhanced combustion parameters and reduced CO and HC emissions. For biogas at higher equivalence ratios, the effects of inlet charge conditions on HCCI combustion and CO and HC emissions were attenuated; however, ringing intensities and NO x emissions were increased with higher inlet charge temperature and higher boosted pressures. The maximum gross indicated mean effective pressure was 7.4 bar, the maximum gross indicated

  7. Ignition characteristics of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran: An experimental and kinetic study

    KAUST Repository

    Tripathi, Rupali

    2016-10-15

    The present paper elucidates oxidation behavior of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF), a novel second-generation biofuel. New experimental data sets for 2-MTHF including ignition delay time measurements in two different combustion reactors, i.e. rapid compression machine and high-pressure shock tube, are presented. Measurements for 2-MTHF/oxidizer/diluent mixtures were performed in the temperature range of . 639-1413 K, at pressures of 10, 20, and 40 bar, and at three different equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. A detailed chemical kinetic model describing both low-and high-temperature chemistry of 2-MTHF was developed and validated against new ignition delay measurements and already existing flame species profiles and ignition delay measurements. The mechanism provides satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. For identifying key reactions at various combustion conditions and to attain a better understanding of the combustion behavior, reaction path and sensitivity analyses were performed.

  8. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celliers P.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  9. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celliers, P.M.; Robey, H.F.; Boehly, T.R.; Alger, E.; Azevedo, S.; Berzins, L.V.; Bhandarkar, S.D.; Bowers, M.W.; Brereton, S.J.; Callahan, D.; Castro, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Choate, C.; Clark, D.; Coffee, K.R.; Datte, P.S.; Dewald, E.L.; DiNicola, P.; Dixit, S.; Doeppner, T.; Dzenitis, E.; Edwards, M.J.; Eggert, J.H.; Fair, J.; Farley, D.R.; Frieders, G.; Gibson, C.R.; Giraldez, E.; Haan, S.; Haid, B.; Hamza, A.V.; Haynam, C.; Hicks, D.G.; Holunga, D.M.; Horner, J.B.; Jancaitis, K.; Jones, O.S.; Kalantar, D.; Kline, J.L.; Krauter, K.G.; Kroll, J.J.; LaFortune, K.N.; Pape, S.L.; Malsbury, T.; Maypoles, E.R.; Milovich, J.L.; Moody, J.D.; Moreno, K.; Munro, D.H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R.E.; Parham, T.; Pollaine, S.; Radousky, H.B.; Ross, G.F.; Sater, J.; Schneider, M.B.; Shaw, M.; Smith, R.F.; Thomas, C.A.; Throop, A.; Town, R.J.; Trummer, D.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Walters, C.F.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C.; Young, B.K.; Atherton, L.J.; Collins, G.W.; Landen, O.L.; Lindl, J.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Moses, E.I.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a reentrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  10. Effects of Energy Deposition Characteristics on Localised Forced Ignition of Homogeneous Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipal Patel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the characteristic width of the energy deposition profile and the duration of energy deposition by the ignitor on localised forced ignition of stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures have been analysed using simplified chemistry three-dimensional compressible Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS for different values of root-mean-square turbulent velocity fluctuation. The localised forced ignition is modelled using a source term in the energy transport equation, which deposits energy in a Gaussian manner from the centre of the ignitor over a stipulated period of time. It has been shown that the width of ignition energy deposition and the duration over which ignition energy is deposited have significant influences on the success of ignition and subsequent flame propagation. An increase in the width of ignition energy deposition (duration of energy deposition for a given amount of ignition energy has been found to have a detrimental effect on the ignition event, which may ultimately lead to misfire. Moreover, an increase in u′ gives rise to augmented heat transfer rate from the hot gas kernel, which in turn leads to a reduction in the extent of overall burning for both stoichiometric and fuel-lean homogeneous mixtures but the detrimental effects of high values of u′ on localised ignition are particularly prevalent for fuel-lean mixtures.

  11. Central ignition scenarios for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

    1986-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining ignition in TFTR by means of very centrally peaked density profiles is examined. It is shown that local central alpha heating can be made to exceed local central energy losses (''central ignition'') under global conditions for which Q greater than or equal to 1. Time dependent 1-D transport simulations show that the normal global ignition requirements are substantially relaxed for plasmas with peaked density profiles. 18 refs., 18 figs

  12. Investigation of fusion gain in fast ignition with conical targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Tabatabaei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast ignition is a new scheme for inertial confinement fusion (ICF. In this scheme, at first the interaction of ultraintense laser beam with the hohlraum wall surrounding a capsule containing deuterium-tritium (D-T fuel causes implosion and compression of fuel to high density and then laser produced protons penetrate in the compressed fuel and deposit their energy in it as the ignition hot spot is created. In this paper, following the energy gain of spherical target and considering relationship of the burn fraction to burn duration, we have obtained the energy gain of conical targets characterized by the angle β, and found a hemispherical capsule (β=π/2 has a gain as high as 96% of that of the whole spherical capsule. The results obtained in this study are qualitatively consistent with Atzeni et al.'s studies of simulations.

  13. A prediction study of a spark ignition supercharged hydrogen engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. Sadiq.; Al-Janabi, Haroun A.K. Shahad

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen is found to be a suitable alternative fuel for spark ignition engines with certain drawbacks, such as high NO x emission and small power output. However, supercharging may solve such problems. In this study, the effects of equivalence ratio, compression ratio and inlet pressure on the performance and NO x emission of a four stroke supercharged hydrogen engine have been analyzed using a specially developed computer program. The results are verified and compared with experimental data obtained from tests on a Ricardo E6/US engine. A chart specifying the safe operation zone of the hydrogen engine has been produced. The safe operation zone means no pre-ignition, acceptable NO x emission, high engine efficiency and lower specific fuel consumption in comparison with the gasoline engine. The study also shows that supercharging is a more effective method to increase the output of a hydrogen engine rather than increasing the compression ratio of the engine at the knock limited equivalence ratio

  14. Experimental and numerical assessment of ignition delay period for pure diesel and biodiesel B20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhaidhawi, Mohanad; Brabec, Marek; Lucian, Miron; Chiriac, Radu; Bădescu, Viorel

    2017-10-01

    The ignition delay period for a compression ignition engine fueled alternatively with pure diesel and with biodiesel B20 has been experimentally and numerically investigated. The engine was operated under full load conditions for two speeds, 1400 rpm speed for maximum brake torque and 2400 rpm speed for maximum brake power. Different parameters suggested as important to define the start of combustion have been considered before the acceptance of a certain evaluation technique of ignition delay. Correlations between these parameters were analyzed and concluded about the best method to identify the start of combustion. The experimental results were further compared with the ignition delay predicted by some correlations. The results showed that the determined ignition delays are in good agreement with those of the Arrhenius type expressions for pure diesel fuel, while for biodiesel B20 the correlation results are significantly different than the experimental results.

  15. Auto-ignition generated combustion. Pt. 2. Thermodynamic fundamentals; Verbrennungssteuerung durch Selbstzuendung. T. 2. Experimentelle Analyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, P. [Paris-6 Univ. (France). Lab. de Mecanique Physique; Morin, C. [Paris-6 Univ. (France); Mokhtari, S.

    2004-02-01

    The combustion initiation by auto-ignition demonstrates benefits in NO{sub x} reduction and in process stability for both spark-ignited and compression ignited engines. Based on the better thermodynamic particularities of the auto-ignition, which have been presented in the first part, the characteristics of this process are demonstrated in the second part by experimental analysis. For comparison with similar studies, the analyses have been carried out in base of a two stroke loop scavenged spark-ignition single cylinder engine. (orig.) [German] Die Steuerung der Verbrennung durch Selbstzuendung zeigt Vorteile bezueglich Senkung der NO{sub x}-Emission und Prozessstabilitaet, sowohl bei Otto- als auch bei Dieselmotoren. Auf Grundlage der thermodynamischen Besonderheiten der Selbstzuendvorgaenge, die im ersten Teil praesentiert wurden, erfolgt im zweiten Teil eine experimentelle Betrachtung der Prozesscharakteristika. Zur Vergleichbarkeit mit aehnlichen Untersuchungen wird die experimentelle Analyse auf Basis eines Zweitakt-Einzylinder-Ottomotors mit Umkehrspuelung durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  16. IIT MMAE Dept. Research project the homogeneous charge thermal ignition (HCTI) engine

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech Menal, Joan Ignasi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays the main kinds of engines that are used in ground transportation are, gasoline Spark Ignition engines and diesel Compression Ignition engines. As every day more fuel is being used by a growing number of vehicles, fuel dependency growth and a growing concern for our environment health, it is a crucial point to gain in fuel efficiency for ground transportation engines. Many approaches are being investigated, but we will focus in one kind that we call the HCTI, homogeneous charge the...

  17. Fast ignition studies at Osaka University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K. A.

    2007-01-01

    After the invention of the chirped pulse amplification technique [1], the extreme conditions of matters have become available in laboratory spaces and can be studied with the use of ultra intense laser pulse (UILP) with a high energy. One such example is the fast ignition [2] where UILP is used to heat a highly compressed fusion fuel core within 1-10 pico-seconds before the core disassembles. It is predicted possible with use of 50-100 kJ lasers for both imploding the fuel and heating [2] to attain a large fusion gain. Fast ignition was shown to be a promising new scheme for laser fusion [3] with a PW (= 10 1 5 W) UILP and GEKKO XII laser systems at Osaka. Many new physics have been found with use of UILP in a relativistic parameter regime during the process of the fast ignition studies. UILP can penetrate into over-dense plasma for a couple hundred microns distance with a self-focusing and relativistic transparency effects. Hot electrons of 1-100 MeV can be easily created and are under studies for its spectral and emission angle controls. Strong magnetic fields of 10's of MGauss are created to guide these hot electrons along the target surface [4]. Based on these results, a new and largest UILP laser machine of 10 kJ energy at PW UILP peak power is under construction to test if we can achieve the sub-ignition fusion condition at Osaka University. The machine requires challenging optical technologies such as large size (0.9 m) gratings, tiling these gratings for UILP compression; segmenting four large UILP beams to obtain diffraction limited focal spot. We would like to over-view all of these activities. References [1]D. STRICKLAND and G. MOUROU, Opt. Commun., 56, 219 (1985) [2] S. ATZENI et al., Phys Plasmas, 6, 3316 (1999) [3] R. KODAMA, K.A. TANAKA et al., Nature, 418, 933 (2002) [4] A.L. LEI, K.A. TANAKA et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 96, 255006(2006) ; H. HABARA, K.A. TANAKA et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 97, 095004 (2006)

  18. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  19. Intermediate species measurement during iso-butanol auto-ignition

    KAUST Repository

    Ji, Weiqi

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 The Combustion Institute.Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This work presents the time histories of intermediate species during the auto-ignition of iso-butanol at high pressure and intermediate temperature conditions obtained using a rapid compression machine and recently developed fast sampling system. Iso-butanol ignition delays were acquired for iso-butanol/O2 mixture with an inert/O2 ratio of 7.26, equivalence ratio of 0.4, in the temperature range of 840-950 K and at pressure of 25 bar. Fast sampling and gas chromatography were used to acquire and quantify the intermediate species during the ignition delay of the same mixture at P = 25.3 bar and T = 905 K. The ignition delay times and quantitative measurements of the mole fraction time histories of methane, ethene, propene, iso-butene, iso-butyraldehyde, iso-butanol, and carbon monoxide were compared with predictions from the detailed mechanisms developed by Sarathy et al., Merchant et al., and Cai et al. It is shown that while the Sarathy mechanism well predicts the overall ignition delay time, it overpredicts ethene by a factor of 6-10, underpredicts iso-butene by a factor of 2, and overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde by a factor of 2. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify the reactions responsible for the observed inadequacy. The rates of iso-butanol hydrogen atom abstraction by OH radical and the beta-scission reactions of hydroxybutyl radicals were updated based on recently published quantum calculation results. Significant improvements were achieved in predicting ignition delay at high pressures (25 and 30 bar) and the species concentrations of ethene and iso-butene. However, the updated mechanism still overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde concentrations. Also, the updated mechanism degrades the prediction in ignition delay at lower pressure (15 bar) compared to the original mechanism developed by Sarathy et al.

  20. Compositional effects on the ignition of FACE gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Kukkadapu, Goutham; Mehl, Marco; Javed, Tamour; Ahmed, Ahfaz; Naser, Nimal; Tekawade, Aniket; Kosiba, Graham; Alabbad, Mohammed; Singh, Eshan; Park, Sungwoo; Rashidi, Mariam Al; Chung, Suk-Ho; Roberts, William L.; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    As regulatory measures for improved fuel economy and decreased emissions are pushing gasoline engine combustion technologies towards extreme conditions (i.e., boosted and intercooled intake with exhaust gas recirculation), fuel ignition characteristics become increasingly important for enabling stable operation. This study explores the effects of chemical composition on the fundamental ignition behavior of gasoline fuels. Two well-characterized, high-octane, non-oxygenated FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE F and FACE G, having similar antiknock indices but different octane sensitivities and chemical compositions are studied. Ignition experiments were conducted in shock tubes and a rapid compression machine (RCM) at nominal pressures of 20 and 40. atm, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1.0, and temperatures ranging from 650 to 1270. K. Results at temperatures above 900. K indicate that ignition delay time is similar for these fuels. However, RCM measurements below 900. K demonstrate a stronger negative temperature coefficient behavior for FACE F gasoline having lower octane sensitivity. In addition, RCM pressure profiles under two-stage ignition conditions illustrate that the magnitude of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) increases with decreasing fuel octane sensitivity. However, intermediate-temperature heat release is shown to increase as fuel octane sensitivity increases. Various surrogate fuel mixtures were formulated to conduct chemical kinetic modeling, and complex multicomponent surrogate mixtures were shown to reproduce experimentally observed trends better than simpler two- and three-component mixtures composed of n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene. Measurements in a Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) engine demonstrated that the multicomponent surrogates accurately captured the antiknock quality of the FACE gasolines. Simulations were performed using multicomponent surrogates for FACE F and G to reveal the underlying chemical

  1. Compositional effects on the ignition of FACE gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2016-05-08

    As regulatory measures for improved fuel economy and decreased emissions are pushing gasoline engine combustion technologies towards extreme conditions (i.e., boosted and intercooled intake with exhaust gas recirculation), fuel ignition characteristics become increasingly important for enabling stable operation. This study explores the effects of chemical composition on the fundamental ignition behavior of gasoline fuels. Two well-characterized, high-octane, non-oxygenated FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE F and FACE G, having similar antiknock indices but different octane sensitivities and chemical compositions are studied. Ignition experiments were conducted in shock tubes and a rapid compression machine (RCM) at nominal pressures of 20 and 40. atm, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1.0, and temperatures ranging from 650 to 1270. K. Results at temperatures above 900. K indicate that ignition delay time is similar for these fuels. However, RCM measurements below 900. K demonstrate a stronger negative temperature coefficient behavior for FACE F gasoline having lower octane sensitivity. In addition, RCM pressure profiles under two-stage ignition conditions illustrate that the magnitude of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) increases with decreasing fuel octane sensitivity. However, intermediate-temperature heat release is shown to increase as fuel octane sensitivity increases. Various surrogate fuel mixtures were formulated to conduct chemical kinetic modeling, and complex multicomponent surrogate mixtures were shown to reproduce experimentally observed trends better than simpler two- and three-component mixtures composed of n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene. Measurements in a Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) engine demonstrated that the multicomponent surrogates accurately captured the antiknock quality of the FACE gasolines. Simulations were performed using multicomponent surrogates for FACE F and G to reveal the underlying chemical

  2. Intermediate species measurement during iso-butanol auto-ignition

    KAUST Repository

    Ji, Weiqi; Zhang, Peng; He, Tanjin; Wang, Zhi; Tao, Ling; He, Xin; Law, Chung K.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Combustion Institute.Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This work presents the time histories of intermediate species during the auto-ignition of iso-butanol at high pressure and intermediate temperature conditions obtained using a rapid compression machine and recently developed fast sampling system. Iso-butanol ignition delays were acquired for iso-butanol/O2 mixture with an inert/O2 ratio of 7.26, equivalence ratio of 0.4, in the temperature range of 840-950 K and at pressure of 25 bar. Fast sampling and gas chromatography were used to acquire and quantify the intermediate species during the ignition delay of the same mixture at P = 25.3 bar and T = 905 K. The ignition delay times and quantitative measurements of the mole fraction time histories of methane, ethene, propene, iso-butene, iso-butyraldehyde, iso-butanol, and carbon monoxide were compared with predictions from the detailed mechanisms developed by Sarathy et al., Merchant et al., and Cai et al. It is shown that while the Sarathy mechanism well predicts the overall ignition delay time, it overpredicts ethene by a factor of 6-10, underpredicts iso-butene by a factor of 2, and overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde by a factor of 2. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify the reactions responsible for the observed inadequacy. The rates of iso-butanol hydrogen atom abstraction by OH radical and the beta-scission reactions of hydroxybutyl radicals were updated based on recently published quantum calculation results. Significant improvements were achieved in predicting ignition delay at high pressures (25 and 30 bar) and the species concentrations of ethene and iso-butene. However, the updated mechanism still overpredicts iso-butyraldehyde concentrations. Also, the updated mechanism degrades the prediction in ignition delay at lower pressure (15 bar) compared to the original mechanism developed by Sarathy et al.

  3. Analysis of core plasma heating and ignition by relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Clarification of the pre-compressed plasma heating by fast electrons produced by relativistic laser-plasma interaction is one of the most important issues of the fast ignition scheme in ICF. On the basis of overall calculations including the heating process, both by relativistic hot electrons and alpha-particles, and the hydrodynamic evolution of bulk plasma, we examine the feature of core plasma heating and the possibility of ignition. The deposition of the electron energy via long-range collective mode, i.e. Langmuir wave excitation, is shown to be comparable to that through binary electron-electron collisions; the calculation neglecting the wave excitation considerably underestimates the core plasma heating. The ignition condition is also shown in terms of the intensity I(h) and temperature T(h) of hot electrons. It is found that I(h) required for ignition increases in proportion to T(h). For efficiently achieving the fast ignition, electron beams with relatively 'low' energy (e.g.T(h) below 1 MeV) are desirable. (author)

  4. Low fuel convergence path to ignition on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M. J.; Molvig, Kim; Gianakon, T. A.; Woods, C. N.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Schmidt, D. W.; Dodd, E. S.; Zylstra, Alex; Scheiner, B.; McKenty, P.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D.; Betti, R.; Michel, T.

    2017-10-01

    A novel concept for achieving ignition on the NIF is proposed that obviates current issues plaguing single-shell high-convergence capsules. A large directly-driven Be shell is designed to robustly implode two nested internal shells by efficiently converting 1.7MJ of laser energy from a 6 ns, low intensity laser pulse, into a 1 ns dynamic pressure pulse to ignite and burn a central liquid DT core after a fuel convergence of only 9. The short, low intensity laser pulse mitigates LPI allowing more uniform laser drive of the target and eliminates hot e-, preheat and laser zooming issues. Preliminary rad-hydro simulations predict ignition initiation with 90% maximum inner shell velocity, before deceleration Rayleigh-Taylor growth can cause significant pusher shell mix into the compressed DT fuel. The gold inner pusher shell reduces pre-ignition radiation losses from the fuel allowing ignition to occur at 2.5keV. Further 2D simulations show that the short pulse design results in a spatially uniform kinetic drive that is tolerant to variations in laser cone power. A multi-pronged effort, in collaboration with LLE, is progressing to optimize this design for NIF's PDD laser configuration. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-FG02-051ER54810.

  5. Turbulent spark-jet ignition in SI gas fuelled engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pielecha Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains a thermodynamic analysis of a new combustion system that allows the combustion of stratified gas mixtures with mean air excess coefficient in the range 1.4-1.8. Spark ignition was used in the pre-chamber that has been mounted in the engine cylinder head and contained a rich mixture out of which a turbulent flow of ignited mixture is ejected. It allows spark-jet ignition and the turbulent combustion of the lean mixture in the main combustion chamber. This resulted in a two-stage combustion system for lean mixtures. The experimental study has been conducted using a single-cylinder test engine with a geometric compression ratio ε = 15.5 adapted for natural gas supply. The tests were performed at engine speed n = 2000 rpm under stationary engine load when the engine operating parameters and toxic compounds emissions have been recorded. Analysis of the results allowed to conclude that the evaluated combustion system offers large flexibility in the initiation of charge ignition through an appropriate control of the fuel quantities supplied into the pre-chamber and into the main combustion chamber. The research concluded with determining the charge ignition criterion for a suitably divided total fuel dose fed to the cylinder.

  6. Compact ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.; Coppi, B.; Nassi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on high magnetic field experiments which can be designed to investigate D-T ignition conditions based on present-day experimental results and theoretical understanding of plasma phenomena. The key machine elements are: large plasma currents, compact dimensions, tight aspect ratios, moderate elongations and significant triangularities of the plasma column. High plasma densities, strong ohmic heating, the needed degree of energy confinement, good plasma purity and robust stability against ideal and resistive instabilities can be achieved simultaneously. The Ignitor design incorporates all these characteristics and involves magnet technology developments, started with the Alcator experiment, that use cryogenically cooled normal conductors

  7. Influence of Compression Ratio on High Load Performance and Knock Behavior for Gasoline Port-Fuel Injection, Natural Gas Direct Injection and Blended Operation in a Spark Ignition Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamminger, Michael; Sevik, James; Scarcelli, Riccardo; Wallner, Thomas; Hall, Carrie

    2017-03-28

    Natural Gas (NG) is an alternative fuel which has attracted a lot of attention recently, in particular in the US due to shale gas availability. The higher hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratio, compared to gasoline, allows for decreasing carbon dioxide emissions throughout the entire engine map. Furthermore, the high knock resistance of NG allows increasing the efficiency at high engine loads compared to fuels with lower knock resistance. NG direct injection (DI) allows for fuel to be added after intake valve closing (IVC) resulting in an increase in power density compared to an injection before IVC. Steady-state engine tests were performed on a single-cylinder research engine equipped with gasoline (E10) port-fuel injection (PFI) and NG DI to allow for in-cylinder blending of both fuels. Knock investigations were performed at two discrete compression ratios (CR), 10.5 and 12.5. Operating conditions span mid-load, wide-open-throttle and boosted conditions, depending on the knock response of the fuel blend. Blended operation was performed using E10 gasoline and NG. An additional gasoline type fuel (E85) with higher knock resistance than E10 was used as a high-octane reference fuel, since the octane rating of E10-NG fuel blends is unknown. Spark timing was varied at different loads under stoichiometric conditions in order to study the knock response as well as the effects on performance and efficiency. As anticipated, results suggest that the knock resistance can be increased significantly by increasing the NG amount. Comparing the engine operation with the least knock resistant fuel, E10 PFI, and the fuel blend with the highest knock resistance, 75% NG DI, shows an increase in indicated mean effective pressure of about 9 bar at CR 12.5. The usage of reference fuels with known knock characteristics allowed an assessment of knock characteristic of intermediate E10-NG blend levels. Mathematical correlations were developed allowing characterizing the occurrence of knocking

  8. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  9. Thermofluidic compression effects to achieve combustion in a low-compression scramjet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, A. F.; Wheatley, V.; Jahn, I.

    2017-12-01

    The compression provided by a scramjet inlet is an important parameter in its design. It must be low enough to limit thermal and structural loads and stagnation pressure losses, but high enough to provide the conditions favourable for combustion. Inlets are typically designed to achieve sufficient compression without accounting for the fluidic, and subsequently thermal, compression provided by the fuel injection, which can enable robust combustion in a low-compression engine. This is investigated using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes numerical simulations of a simplified scramjet engine designed to have insufficient compression to auto-ignite fuel in the absence of thermofluidic compression. The engine was designed with a wide rectangular combustor and a single centrally located injector, in order to reduce three-dimensional effects of the walls on the fuel plume. By varying the injected mass flow rate of hydrogen fuel (equivalence ratios of 0.22, 0.17, and 0.13), it is demonstrated that higher equivalence ratios lead to earlier ignition and more rapid combustion, even though mean conditions in the combustor change by no more than 5% for pressure and 3% for temperature with higher equivalence ratio. By supplementing the lower equivalence ratio with helium to achieve a higher mass flow rate, it is confirmed that these benefits are primarily due to the local compression provided by the extra injected mass. Investigation of the conditions around the fuel plume indicated two connected mechanisms. The higher mass flow rate for higher equivalence ratios generated a stronger injector bow shock that compresses the free-stream gas, increasing OH radical production and promoting ignition. This was observed both in the higher equivalence ratio case and in the case with helium. This earlier ignition led to increased temperature and pressure downstream and, consequently, stronger combustion. The heat release from combustion provided thermal compression in the combustor, further

  10. 100 TW CPA Nd: Glass laser for fast ignition research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, H.; Daido, H.; Jitsuno, T.

    2001-01-01

    A 100 TW chirped pulse amplification (CPA) Nd:glass laser has been developed to investigate the fast ignition concept. The ultrashort-pulse (60 TW, 42 J, 0.7 ps) was focused on plane targets, plane targets with preformed plasma, and high density compressed plasmas produced by the GEKKO-XII (12 beam, 20 kJ) laser. Focus intensity of >10 19 W/cm 2 has been achieved. (author)

  11. Compression stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call your health insurance or prescription plan: Find out if they pay for compression stockings. Ask if your durable medical equipment benefit pays for compression stockings. Get a prescription from your doctor. Find a medical equipment store where they can ...

  12. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.

    2009-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm 3 -sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  13. Fast-ignition heavy-ion fusion target by jet impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, P.; Ogando, F.; Eliezer, S.; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new target design for HIF, based on the fast-ignition principles, is proposed. Unlike the previous designs proposed so far, in this case just one energy source is needed to drive the whole process to ignition. The ultra-fast deposition of energy onto the compressed core is produced in this case by hypervelocity jets generated during the process. The collision of jets converts their kinetic energy into thermal energy of the nuclear fuel, which is expected to produce ignition under proper design. The process is studied in this paper, describing its most relevant features like jet production and later collision

  14. Plasma physics study and laser development for the fast ignition realization experiment (FIREX) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azechi, H.; Mima, K.; Fujimoto, Y.

    2008-10-01

    Since the approval of the first phase of Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX-I), we have devoted our efforts on designing advanced targets and constructing the world highest-energy Peta Watt laser. The new target design has the following features. The coupling efficiency from the heating laser to the thermal energy of the compressed core plasma can be increased by the two ways:1) Low-Z foam layer on the inner surface of the cone for optimum absorption. 2) Double cone. Electrons generated in the inner surface of the double cone will return by sheathe potential generated between two cones. The implosion performance can be improved by three ways: 3) Low-Z plastic layer on the outer surface of the cone may suppress the expansion of the Au cone that flows into the interior of the compressed core. 4) Br doped plastic ablator may significantly moderate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, making implosion more stable. 5) Evacuation of the target center to prevent gas jets from destroying the cone tip. For project robustness, we also explore 6) impact ignition scheme that eliminates complexity of laser-plasma interaction while keeping the compactness advantage of fast ignition. The fully integrated fast ignition experiment is scheduled on 2009. If subsequent FIREX-II will start as proposed, the ignition and burn will be demonstrated shortly after the ignition at NIF and LMJ, providing a scientific database of both central and fast ignition. (author)

  15. Tokamak and RFP ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma model is applied to calculate numerically transport- confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady-state operation tokamak. The CIT tokamak and RFP ignition conditions are examined. Physics differences between RFP and tokamaks, and their consequences for a DT ignition machine, are discussed. The ignition RFP, compared to a tokamak, has many physics advantages, including ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, low ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits), and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic fields, larger aspect ratios, and smaller plasma cross sections translate into significant cost reductions for both ignition and power reactor. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present confinement scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. The 4-MA ZTH was expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data three order of magnitude above ZT-40M results, and if the present scaling held, to achieve a DT-equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q=1. A basecase RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. The Ignition Target for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, L J; Moses, E I; Carlisle, K; Kilkenny, J

    2007-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>10 8 K), pressures (10-GBar) and matter densities (> 100 g/cm 3 ). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. An overview of the campaign for ignition will be presented, along with technologies for target fabrication, assembly and metrology and advances in growth and x-ray imaging of DT ice layers. The sum of these efforts represents a quantum leap in target precision, characterization, manufacturing rate and flexibility over current state-of-the-art

  17. Piezoelectrically Initiated Pyrotechnic Igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quince, Asia; Dutton, Maureen; Hicks, Robert; Burnham, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a pyrotechnic initiator and piezoelectric initiation system. The device will be capable of being initiated mechanically; resisting initiation by EMF, RF, and EMI (electromagnetic field, radio frequency, and electromagnetic interference, respectively); and initiating in water environments and space environments. Current devices of this nature are initiated by the mechanical action of a firing pin against a primer. Primers historically are prone to failure. These failures are commonly known as misfires or hang-fires. In many cases, the primer shows the dent where the firing pin struck the primer, but the primer failed to fire. In devices such as "T" handles, which are commonly used to initiate the blowout of canopies, loss of function of the device may result in loss of crew. In devices such as flares or smoke generators, failure can result in failure to spot a downed pilot. The piezoelectrically initiated ignition system consists of a pyrotechnic device that plugs into a mechanical system (activator), which on activation, generates a high-voltage spark. The activator, when released, will strike a stack of electrically linked piezo crystals, generating a high-voltage, low-amperage current that is then conducted to the pyro-initiator. Within the initiator, an electrode releases a spark that passes through a pyrotechnic first-fire mixture, causing it to combust. The combustion of the first-fire initiates a primary pyrotechnic or explosive powder. If used in a "T" handle, the primary would ramp the speed of burn up to the speed of sound, generating a shock wave that would cause a high explosive to go "high order." In a flare or smoke generator, the secondary would produce the heat necessary to ignite the pyrotechnic mixture. The piezo activator subsystem is redundant in that a second stack of crystals would be struck at the same time with the same activation force, doubling the probability of a first strike spark generation. If the first

  18. Forced Ignition Study Based On Wavelet Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, E.; Valorani, M.; Paolucci, S.; Zikoski, Z.

    2011-05-01

    The control of ignition in a rocket engine is a critical problem for combustion chamber design. Therefore it is essential to fully understand the mechanism of ignition during its earliest stages. In this paper the characteristics of flame kernel formation and initial propagation in a hydrogen-argon-oxygen mixing layer are studied using 2D direct numerical simulations with detailed chemistry and transport properties. The flame kernel is initiated by adding an energy deposition source term in the energy equation. The effect of unsteady strain rate is studied by imposing a 2D turbulence velocity field, which is initialized by means of a synthetic field. An adaptive wavelet method, based on interpolating wavelets is used in this study to solve the compressible reactive Navier- Stokes equations. This method provides an alternative means to refine the computational grid points according to local demands of the physical solution. The present simulations show that in the very early instants the kernel perturbed by the turbulent field is characterized by an increased burning area and a slightly increased rad- ical formation. In addition, the calculations show that the wavelet technique yields a significant reduction in the number of degrees of freedom necessary to achieve a pre- scribed solution accuracy.

  19. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  20. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  1. On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.; Betti, R.; Schurtz, G.P.; Craxton, R.S.; Dunne, A.M.; LaFortune, K.N.; Schmitt, A.J.; McKenty, P.W.; Bailey, D.S.; Lambert, M.A.; Ribeyre, X.; Theobald, W.R.; Strozzi, D.J.; Harding, D.R.; Casner, A.; Atzemi, S.; Erbert, G.V.; Andersen, K.S.; Murakami, M.; Comley, A.J.; Cook, R.C.; Stephens, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term (∼3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of ∼60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around ∼0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R and D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

  2. The National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Moses, E.; Warner, B.; Sorem, M.; Soures, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest construction project ever undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF consists of 192 forty-centimeter-square laser beams and a 10-m-diameter target chamber. NIF is being designed and built by an LLNL-led team from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Rochester, and LLNL. Physical construction began in 1997. The Laser and Target Area Building and the Optics Assembly Building were the first major construction activities, and despite several unforeseen obstacles, the buildings are now 92% complete and have been done on time and within cost. Prototype component development and testing has proceeded in parallel. Optics vendors have installed full-scale production lines and have done prototype production runs. The assembly and integration of the beampath infrastructure has been reconsidered and a new approach has been developed. This paper will discuss the status of the NIF project and the plans for completion. (author)

  3. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  4. Reversed field pinch ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma models are described and used to calculated numerically the transport confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady state operation points for both the reversed field pinch (RFP) and the tokamak. The models are used to examine the CIT tokamak ignition conditions and the RFP experimental and ignition conditions. Physics differences between RFPs and tokamaks and their consequences for a D-T ignition machine are discussed. Compared with a tokamak, the ignition RFP has many physics adva