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Sample records for compressible two-fluid model

  1. Analysis of time integration methods for the compressible two-fluid model for pipe flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Sanderse (Benjamin); I. Eskerud Smith (Ivar); M.H.W. Hendrix (Maurice)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyse different time integration methods for the two-fluid model and propose the BDF2 method as the preferred choice to simulate transient compressible multiphase flow in pipelines. Compared to the prevailing Backward Euler method, the BDF2 scheme has a significantly

  2. Two-fluid and parallel compressibility effects in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, L.E.; Park, W.

    1998-01-01

    The MHD, or single fluid, model for a plasma has long been known to provide a surprisingly good description of much of the observed nonlinear dynamics of confined plasmas, considering its simple nature compared to the complexity of the real system. On the other hand, some of the supposed agreement arises from the lack of the detailed measurements that are needed to distinguish MHD from more sophisticated models that incorporate slower time scale processes. At present, a number of factors combine to make models beyond MHD of practical interest. Computational considerations still favor fluid rather than particle models for description of the full plasma, and suggest an approach that starts from a set of fluid-like equations that extends MHD to slower time scales and more accurate parallel dynamics. This paper summarizes a set of two-fluid equations for toroidal (tokamak) geometry that has been developed and tested as the MH3D-T code [1] and some results from the model. The electrons and ions are described as separate fluids. The code and its original MHD version, MH3D [2], are the first numerical, initial value models in toroidal geometry that include the full 3D (fluid) compressibility and electromagnetic effects. Previous nonlinear MHD codes for toroidal geometry have, in practice, neglected the plasma density evolution, on the grounds that MHD plasmas are only weakly compressible and that the background density variation is weaker than the temperature variation. Analytically, the common use of toroidal plasma models based on aspect ratio expansion, such as reduced MHD, has reinforced this impression, since this ordering reduces plasma compressibility effects. For two-fluid plasmas, the density evolution cannot be neglected in principle, since it provides the basic driving energy for the diamagnetic drifts of the electrons and ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. It also strongly influences the parallel dynamics, in combination with the parallel thermal

  3. Two-fluid hydrodynamic model for semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Mortensen, N. Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2018-01-01

    The hydrodynamic Drude model (HDM) has been successful in describing the optical properties of metallic nanostructures, but for semiconductors where several different kinds of charge carriers are present an extended theory is required. We present a two-fluid hydrodynamic model for semiconductors...

  4. On Equilibria of the Two-fluid Model in Magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantzeskakis, Dimitri J.; Stratis, Ioannis G.; Yannacopoulos, Athanasios N.

    2004-01-01

    We show how the equilibria of the two-fluid model in magnetohydrodynamics can be described by the double curl equation and through the study of this equation we study some properties of these equilibria

  5. Approximate Riemann solver for the two-fluid plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumlak, U.; Loverich, J.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the simulation of plasma dynamics using the two-fluid plasma model. The two-fluid plasma model is more general than the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model often used for plasma dynamic simulations. The two-fluid equations are derived in divergence form and an approximate Riemann solver is developed to compute the fluxes of the electron and ion fluids at the computational cell interfaces and an upwind characteristic-based solver to compute the electromagnetic fields. The source terms that couple the fluids and fields are treated implicitly to relax the stiffness. The algorithm is validated with the coplanar Riemann problem, Langmuir plasma oscillations, and the electromagnetic shock problem that has been simulated with the MHD plasma model. A numerical dispersion relation is also presented that demonstrates agreement with analytical plasma waves

  6. Laszlo Tisza and the two-fluid model of superfluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balibar, Sébastien

    2017-11-01

    The "two-fluid model" of superfluidity was first introduced by Laszlo Tisza in 1938. On that year, Tisza published the principles of his model as a brief note in Nature and two articles in French in the Comptes rendus de l'Académie des sciences, followed in 1940 by two other articles in French in the Journal de physique et le Radium. In 1941, the two-fluid model was reformulated by Lev Landau on a more rigorous basis. Successive experiments confirmed the revolutionary idea introduced by Tisza: superfluid helium is indeed a surprising mixture of two fluids with independent velocity fields. His prediction of the existence of heat waves, a consequence of his model, was also confirmed. Then, it took several decades for the superfluidity of liquid helium to be fully understood.

  7. Generalized Roe's numerical scheme for a two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Raymond, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a mathematical and numerical study of a six equation two-fluid model. We will prove that the model is strictly hyperbolic due to the inclusion of the virtual mass force term in the phasic momentum equations. The two-fluid model is naturally written under a nonconservative form. To solve the nonlinear Riemann problem for this nonconservative hyperbolic system, a generalized Roe's approximate Riemann solver, is used, based on a linearization of the nonconservative terms. A Godunov type numerical scheme is built, using this approximate Riemann solver. 10 refs., 5 figs,

  8. A numerical method for a transient two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Coq, G.; Libmann, M.

    1978-01-01

    The transient boiling two-phase flow is studied. In nuclear reactors, the driving conditions for the transient boiling are a pump power decay or/and an increase in heating power. The physical model adopted for the two-phase flow is the two fluid model with the assumption that the vapor remains at saturation. The numerical method for solving the thermohydraulics problems is a shooting method, this method is highly implicit. A particular problem exists at the boiling and condensation front. A computer code using this numerical method allow the calculation of a transient boiling initiated by a steady state for a PWR or for a LMFBR

  9. Two-fluid model with droplet size distribution for condensing steam flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wróblewski, Włodzimierz; Dykas, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    The process of energy conversion in the low pressure part of steam turbines may be improved using new and more accurate numerical models. The paper presents a description of a model intended for the condensing steam flow modelling. The model uses a standard condensation model. A physical and a numerical model of the mono- and polydispersed wet-steam flow are presented. The proposed two-fluid model solves separate flow governing equations for the compressible, inviscid vapour and liquid phase. The method of moments with a prescribed function is used for the reconstruction of the water droplet size distribution. The described model is presented for the liquid phase evolution in the flow through the de Laval nozzle. - Highlights: • Computational Fluid Dynamics. • Steam condensation in transonic flows through the Laval nozzles. • In-house CFD code – two-phase flow, two-fluid monodispersed and polydispersed model.

  10. Two-fluid model stability, simulation and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bertodano, Martín López de; Clausse, Alejandro; Ransom, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the linear and nonlinear two-phase stability of the one-dimensional Two-Fluid Model (TFM) material waves and the numerical methods used to solve it. The TFM fluid dynamic stability is a problem that remains open since its inception more than forty years ago. The difficulty is formidable because it involves the combined challenges of two-phase topological structure and turbulence, both nonlinear phenomena. The one dimensional approach permits the separation of the former from the latter. The authors first analyze the kinematic and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with the simplified one-dimensional Fixed-Flux Model (FFM). They then analyze the density wave instability with the well-known Drift-Flux Model. They demonstrate that the Fixed-Flux and Drift-Flux assumptions are two complementary TFM simplifications that address two-phase local and global linear instabilities separately. Furthermore, they demonstrate with a well-posed FFM and a DFM two cases of nonlinear two-phase behavior that are ...

  11. Two-fluid model for locomotion under self-confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2017-09-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes ulcers in the stomach of humans by invading mucus layers protecting epithelial cells. It does so by chemically changing the rheological properties of the mucus from a high-viscosity gel to a low-viscosity solution in which it may self-propel. We develop a two-fluid model for this process of swimming under self-generated confinement. We solve exactly for the flow and the locomotion speed of a spherical swimmer located in a spherically symmetric system of two Newtonian fluids whose boundary moves with the swimmer. We also treat separately the special case of an immobile outer fluid. In all cases, we characterize the flow fields, their spatial decay, and the impact of both the viscosity ratio and the degree of confinement on the locomotion speed of the model swimmer. The spatial decay of the flow retains the same power-law decay as for locomotion in a single fluid but with a decreased magnitude. Independent of the assumption chosen to characterize the impact of confinement on the actuation applied by the swimmer, its locomotion speed always decreases with an increase in the degree of confinement. Our modeling results suggest that a low-viscosity region of at least six times the effective swimmer size is required to lead to swimming with speeds similar to locomotion in an infinite fluid, corresponding to a region of size above ≈25 μ m for Helicobacter pylori.

  12. Two-fluid model LES of a bubble column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahma N Reddy Vanga; Martin A Lopez de Bertodano; Eckhard Krepper; Alexandr Zaruba; Horst-Michael Prasser

    2005-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a rectangular bubble column operating in the dispersed bubbly regime has been numerically investigated using a two-fluid model Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Experimental data were obtained to validate the model. LES computational fluid dynamic calculations of the transient flow for the bubble column were performed to account for the turbulence in the liquid phase. The computational mesh is of the same scale as the bubble size. The sub grid-scale Reynolds stresses were calculated with the Smagorinsky model. Furthermore, the effect of the bubbles on the turbulence in the continuous phase was modeled using Sato's eddy viscosity model for bubble-induced turbulence. Mean quantities were computed by averaging over a time period that was longer than the dynamic time scales of the turbulence, in particular the void fraction and the average velocity of the bubbles. A systematic analysis of the effect of the interfacial momentum transfer terms on these quantities has been conducted. The bubble column was locally aerated using a sparger located in the center of the bottom plate. The experimental studies involve wire-mesh tomography measurements for void fraction and bubble size distributions and digital image processing of high speed camera images for estimation of bubble velocities, size distributions and flow patterns. Experiments were performed for various aspect ratios (height of water column to width ratio) and superficial gas velocities. It was found that the non-drag bubble forces play a very prominent role in the predicting the correct flow pattern and void fraction distributions. In the calculations, the lift force and the wall force were considered. A 'wall peak' in the time averaged void fraction distribution has been experimentally observed and this cannot be predicted without including these non-drag forces in the numerical calculations. In this paper, experimental data are compared with the results of the numerical simulations. (authors)

  13. Validation of Numerical Two-Fluid and Kinetic Plasma Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Barnes

    2011-03-25

    This was a four year grant commencing October 1, 2003 and finishing September 30, 2007. The funding was primarily used to support the work of the Principal Investigator, who collaborated with Profs. Scott Parker and John Cary at U. Colorado, and with two students, N. Xiang and J. Cheng also of U. Colorado. The technical accomplishments of this grant can be found in the publications listed in the final Section here. The main accomplishments of the grant work were: (1) Development and implementation of time-implicit two-fluid simulation methods in collaboration with the NIMROD team; and (2) Development and testing of a new time-implicit delta-f, energy-conserving method The basic two-fluid method, with many improvements is used in present NIMROD calculations. The energy-conserving delta-f method is under continuing development under contract between Coronado Consulting, a New Mexico sole proprietorship and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Vortex dynamics in the two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thouless, D. J.; Geller, M. R.; Vinen, W. F.; Fortin, J.-Y.; Rhee, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    We have used two-fluid dynamics to study the discrepancy between the work of Thouless, Ao, and Niu (TAN) and that of Iordanskii. In TAN no transverse force on a vortex due to normal fluid flow was found, whereas the earlier work found a transverse force proportional to normal fluid velocity u n and normal fluid density ρ n . We have linearized the time-independent two-fluid equations about the exact solution for a vortex, and find three solutions that are important in the region far from the vortex. Uniform superfluid flow gives rise to the usual superfluid Magnus force. Uniform normal fluid flow gives rise to no forces in the linear region, but does not satisfy reasonable boundary conditions at short distances. A logarithmically increasing normal fluid flow gives a viscous force. As in classical hydrodynamics, and as in the early work of Hall and Vinen, this logarithmic increase must be cut off by nonlinear effects at large distances; this gives a viscous force proportional to u n /lnu n , and a transverse contribution that goes like u n /(lnu n ) 2 , even in the absence of an explicit Iordanskii force. In the limit u n ->0 the TAN result is obtained, but at nonzero u n there are important corrections that were not found in TAN. We argue that the Magnus force in a superfluid at nonzero temperature is an example of a topological relation for which finite-size corrections may be large

  15. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  16. Development of bubble-induced turbulence model for advanced two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method. The two-fluid model is therefore useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in the large-scale domain such as rod bundles. However, since the two-fluid model includes a lot of constitutive equations verified by use of experimental results, it has problems that the result of analyses depends on accuracy of the constitutive equations. To solve these problems, an advanced two-fluid model has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this model, interface tracking method is combined with two-fluid model to accurately predict large interface structure behavior. Liquid clusters and bubbles larger than a computational cell are calculated using the interface tracking method, and those smaller than the cell are simulated by the two-fluid model. The constitutive equations to evaluate the effects of small bubbles or droplets on two-phase flow are also required in the advanced two-fluid model, just as with the conventional two-fluid model. However, the dependency of small bubbles and droplets on two-phase flow characteristics is relatively small, and fewer experimental results are required to verify the characteristics of large interface structures. Turbulent dispersion force model is one of the most important constitutive equations for the advanced two-fluid model. The turbulent dispersion force model has been developed by many researchers for the conventional two-fluid model. However, existing models implicitly include the effects of large bubbles and the deformation of bubbles, and are unfortunately not applicable to the advanced two-fluid model. In the previous study, the authors suggested the turbulent dispersion force model based on the analogy of Brownian motion. And the authors improved the turbulent dispersion force model in consideration of bubble-induced turbulence to improve the analysis results for small

  17. Statistical properties of three-dimensional two-fluid plasma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaisrani, M. Hasnain [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China); Xia, ZhenWei [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zou, Dandan, E-mail: ddzou@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of incompressible non-dissipative two-fluid plasma model is investigated through classical Gibbs ensemble methods. Liouville's theorem of phase space for each wave number is proved, and the absolute equilibrium spectra for Galerkin truncated two-fluid model are calculated. In two-fluid theory, the equilibrium is built on the conservation of three quadratic invariants: the total energy and the self-helicities for ions and electrons fluid, respectively. The implications of statistic equilibrium spectra with arbitrary ratios of conserved invariants are discussed.

  18. Mathematical modeling of impact of two metal plates using two-fluid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, P. S.; Fortova, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the development of the two-fluid mathematical model and the computational algorithm for the modeling of two metal plates impact. In one-dimensional case the governing system of equations comprises seven equations: three conservation laws for each fluid and transfer equation for the volume fraction of one of the fluids. Both fluids are considered to be compressible and equilibrium on velocities. Pressures equilibrium is used as fluids interface condition. The system has hyperbolic type but could not be written in the conservative form because of nozzling terms in the right-hand side of the equations. The algorithm is based on the Harten-Lax-van Leer numerical flux function. The robust computation in the presence of the interface boundary is carried out due to the special pressure relaxation procedure. The problem is solved using stiffened gas equations of state for each fluid. The parameters in the equations of state are calibrated using the results of computations using wide-range equations of state for the metals. In simulations of metal plates impact we get two shocks after the initial impact that propagate to the free surfaces of the samples. The characteristics of shock waves are close (maximum relative error in characteristics of shocks is not greater than 7%) to the data from the wide-range equations of states computations.

  19. Two-fluid modeling of thermal-hydraulic phenomena for best-estimate LWR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Andreani, M.

    1989-01-01

    Two-fluid formulation of the conservation equations has allowed modelling of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena and situations involving strong departures in thermal and velocity equilibrium between the phases. The paper reviews the state of the art in modelling critical flows, and certain phase separation phenomena, as well as post-dryout heat transfer situations. Although the two-fluid models and the codes have the potential for correctly modelling such situations, this potential has not always been fully used in practice. (orig.)

  20. Free surface modelling with two-fluid model and reduced numerical diffusion of the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strubelj, Luka; Tiselj, Izrok

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The free surface flows are successfully modelled with one of existing free surface models, such as: level set method, volume of fluid method (with/without surface reconstruction), front tracking, two-fluid model (two momentum equations) with modified interphase force and others. The main disadvantage of two-fluid model used for simulations of free surface flows is numerical diffusion of the interface, which can be significantly reduced using the method presented in this paper. Several techniques for reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface have been implemented in the volume of fluid model and are based on modified numerical schemes for advection of volume fraction near the interface. The same approach could be used also for two-fluid method, but according to our experience more successful reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface can be achieved with conservative level set method. Within the conservative level set method, continuity equation for volume fraction is solved and after that the numerical diffusion of the interface is reduced in such a way that the thickness of the interface is kept constant during the simulation. Reduction of the interface diffusion can be also called interface sharpening. In present paper the two-fluid model with interface sharpening is validated on Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Under assumptions of isothermal and incompressible flow of two immiscible fluids, we simulated a system with the fluid of higher density located above the fluid of smaller density in two dimensions. Due to gravity in the system, fluid with higher density moves below the fluid with smaller density. Initial condition is not a flat interface between the fluids, but a sine wave with small amplitude, which develops into a mushroom-like structure. Mushroom-like structure in simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability later develops to small droplets as result of numerical dispersion of interface (interface sharpening

  1. An implicit second order numerical method for two-fluid models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.

    1995-01-01

    We present an implicit upwind numerical method for a six equation two-fluid model based on a linearized Riemann solver. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe's scheme. Extension to second order accurate method is achieved using a piecewise linear approximation of the solution and a slope limiter method. For advancing in time, a linearized implicit integrating step is used. In practice this new numerical method has proved to be stable and capable of generating accurate non-oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid codes. (author)

  2. Two-Fluid Models for Simulating Dispersed Multiphase Flows-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.X. Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of two-fluid models for simulating dispersed multiphase flows (gas-particle, gas-droplet, bubble-liquid, liquid-particle flows by the present author within the last 20 years is systematically reviewed. The two-fluid models based on Reynolds expansion, time averaging and mass-weighed averaging, and also PDF transport equations are described. Different versions of two-phase turbulence models, including the unified second-order moment (USM and k-ε-kp models, the DSM-PDF model, the SOM-MC model, the nonlinear k-e-kp model, and the USM-Θ model for dense gas-particle flows and their application and experimental validation are discussed.

  3. Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1980-05-01

    A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions

  4. A development of two-fluid multifield model for low-quality boiling transition simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.W.; Choi, H.B.

    1998-09-01

    A three-dimensional two-fluid model has been developed using ensemble-averaging techniques. The two-fluid model was closed for two-phase bubbly flows using cell averaging which accounted for the dispersed phase distribution in the region of the averaging volume. The phasic interfacial momentum exchange includes the surface stress developed on the interface which is induced by the relative motion of the phases. Since no direct mean for validating the interfacial pressure model is available, the void wae data has been used. Since the presented model has been rigorously constitute for the bubbly two-phase flow of spherical bubbles, dilute two-phase flow situations, such as the subcooled boiling, can be realistically simulated by the presented local instantaneous form of the average equations. Finally, this model should be able to predict local thermal-hydraulic conditions under which the critical heat flux occurs. (author). 25 refs., 6 figs

  5. Study on application of two-fluid model in narrow annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Yang Yanhua; Zhao Hua

    2007-01-01

    The Chexal-Harrison two-phase wall and inter-phase friction models developed by EPRI newly and the simple two-phase wall and inter-phase heat transfer models put forward by the paper are used to set up the two-fluid model which is fitted for boiling heat transfer and flow in narrow annular channel. On the base of the two-fluid model, a thermal hydraulic code-THYME is accomplished. Then the thermal hydraulic characteristic of narrow annular channel is analyzed by RELAP5/MOD3.2 code and THYME code. Compared with experimental data, RELAP5/MOD3.2 underestimates the outlet steam, and the results of THYME is agreed with the experimental data. (authors)

  6. The assessment of two-fluid models using critical flow data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shome, B.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of two-phase flow is governed by the thermal-hydraulic transfers occurring across phasic interfaces. If correctly formulated, two-fluid models should yield all conceivable evolutions. Moreover, some experiments may be uniquely qualified for model assessment if they can isolate important closure models. This paper is primarily concerned with the possible assessment of the virtual mass force using air-water critical flow data, in which phase-change effects do not take place. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: (1) The closure parameters, other than those for cirtual mass, were found to have an insignificant effect on critical flow. In contrast, the void fraction profile and the slip ratio were observed to be sensitive to the virtual mass model. (2) It appears that air-water critical flow experiments may be effectively used for the assessment of the virtual mass force used in two-fluid models. In fact, such experiments are unique in their ability to isolate the spatial gradients in a vm models. It is hoped that this study will help stimulate the conduct of further critical flow experiments for the assessment of two fluid models

  7. Modified two-fluid model for the two-group interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaodong; Ishii, Mamoru; Kelly, Joseph M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a modified two-fluid model that is ready to be applied in the approach of the two-group interfacial area transport equation. The two-group interfacial area transport equation was developed to provide a mechanistic constitutive relation for the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model. In the two-group transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups: spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 while cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. Therefore, this transport equation can be employed in the flow regimes spanning from bubbly, cap bubbly, slug to churn-turbulent flows. However, the introduction of the two groups of bubbles requires two gas velocity fields. Yet it is not practical to solve two momentum equations for the gas phase alone. In the current modified two-fluid model, a simplified approach is proposed. The momentum equation for the averaged velocity of both Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles is retained. By doing so, the velocity difference between Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles needs to be determined. This may be made either based on simplified momentum equations for both Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles or by a modified drift-flux model

  8. Dirac mechanics and Landau two-fluid model in /sup 4/HeII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Gomez, J [Instituto Universitario Pedagogico de Caracas (Venezuela). Dept. de Matematica y Fisica

    1980-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the development of the Dirac formalism for singular systems when applied to the Landau two-fluid model in superfluid helium. Notably, the Hamiltonian density is weakly zero (in the sense of Dirac). We obtain the physical and gauge variables and show that all the constraints are of first class and hence that the Dirac bracket coincides with the Poisson bracket. The quantization of this system is left for a future paper.

  9. Performance prediction of high Tc superconducting small antennas using a two-fluid-moment method model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. G.; Khamas, S. K.; Kingsley, S. P.; Woods, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The radar cross section and Q factors of electrically small dipole and loop antennas made with a YBCO high Tc superconductor are predicted using a two-fluid-moment method model, in order to determine the effects of finite conductivity on the performances of such antennas. The results compare the useful operating bandwidths of YBCO antennas exhibiting varying degrees of impurity with their copper counterparts at 77 K, showing a linear relationship between bandwidth and impurity level.

  10. Modeling and analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities in two-phase flow using two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the practical importance of two-phase flow instabilities, especially in boiling water nuclear reactor technology, substantial efforts have been made to date to understand the physical phenomena governing such instabilities and to develop computational tools to model the dynamics of marginally-stable/unstable boiling systems. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrated methodology for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in boiling channels and systems. The major novel aspects of the proposed approach are: (a) it is based on the combined frequency-domain and time-domain methods, the former used to quantify stability margins and to determine the onset of instability conditions, the latter to study the nonlinear system response outside the stability boundaries identified using the nearly-exact results of the frequency-domain analysis; (b) the two-fluid model of two-phase flow has been used for the first time to analytically derive the boiling channel transfer functions for the parallel-channel and channel-to-channel instability modes. In this way, the major characteristics of a boiling system, including the onset-of-instability conditions, can be readily evaluated by using the qualitative frequency-domain approach, whereas the explicit time-domain integration is performed, if necessary, only for the operating conditions that have already been identified as unstable. Both methods use the same physical two-fluid model that, in one case, is linearized and used to derive a rigorous analytical solution in the complex domain, and, in the other case, is solved numerically using an algorithm developed especially for this purpose. The results using both methods have been compared against each other and extensively tested. The testing and validation of the new model included comparisons of the predicted steady-state distributions of major parameters and of the transient channel response against experimental data

  11. Numerical simulations of transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow using a pure two-fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A pure two-fluid model was used for investigating transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow. The well-posedness problem of the droplet phase governing equations was solved by applying an equation of state in the kinetic theory. A k-ε-kp turbulence model was used to simulate the turbulent compressible multiphase flow. Separation of boundary layer in front of the liquid jet was predicted with a separation shock induced. A bow shock was found to interact with the separation shock in the simulation result, and the adjustment of shock structure caused by the interaction described the whipping phenomena. The predicted penetration height showed good agreement with the empirical correlations. In addition, the turbulent kinetic energies of both the gas and droplet phases were presented for comparison, and effects of the jet-to-air momentum flux ratio and droplet diameter on the penetration height were also examined in this work.

  12. Application of a two fluid theoretical plasma transport model on current tokamak reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, E.; Fowler, T.K.

    1987-06-01

    In this work, the new theoretical transport models to TIBER II design calculations are described and the results are compared with recent experimental data in large tokamaks (TFTR, JET). Tang's method is extended to a two-fluid model treating ions and electrons separately. This allows for different ion and electron temperatures, as in recent low-density experiments in TFTR, and in the TIBER II design itself. The discussion is divided into two parts: (1) Development of the theoretical transport model and (2) calibration against experiments and application to TIBER II

  13. Numerical simulation of countercurrent flow based on two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.D. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China); School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, X.Y., E-mail: zxiaoying@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Using one-dimensional two-fluid model to help understanding counter-current flow two-phase flows. • Using surface tension model to make the one-dimensional two-fluid flow model well-posed. • Solving the governing equations with a modified SIMPLE algorithm. • Validating code with experimental data and applying it to vertical air/steam countercurrent flow condition - Abstract: In order to improve the understanding of counter-current two-phase flows, a transient analysis code is developed based on one-dimensional two-fluid model. A six equation model has been established and a two phase pressure model with surface tension term, wall drag force and interface shear terms have been used. Taking account of transport phenomenon, heat and mass transfer models of interface were incorporated. The staggered grids have been used in discretization of equations. For validation of the model and code, a countercurrent air-water problem in one experimental horizontal stratified flow has been considered firstly. Comparison of the computed results and the experimental one shows satisfactory agreement. As the full problem for investigation, one vertical pipe with countercurrent flow of steam-water and air-water at same boundary condition has been taken for study. The transient distribution of liquid fraction, liquid velocity and gas velocity for selected positions of steam-water and air-water problem were presented and discussed. The results show that these two simulations have similar transient behavior except that the distribution of gas velocity for steam-water problem have larger oscillation than the one for air-water. The effect of mesh size on wavy characteristics of interface surface was also investigated. The mesh size has significant influence on the simulated results. With the increased refinement, the oscillation gets stronger.

  14. A PISO-like algorithm to simulate superfluid helium flow with the two-fluid model

    CERN Document Server

    Soulaine, Cyprien; Allain, Hervé; Baudouy, Bertrand; Van Weelderen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a segregated algorithm to solve numerically the superfluid helium (He II) equations using the two-fluid model. In order to validate the resulting code and illustrate its potential, different simulations have been performed. First, the flow through a capillary filled with He II with a heated area on one side is simulated and results are compared to analytical solutions in both Landau and Gorter–Mellink flow regimes. Then, transient heat transfer of a forced flow of He II is investigated. Finally, some two-dimensional simulations in a porous medium model are carried out.

  15. Relaxation and Numerical Approximation of a Two-Fluid Two-Pressure Diphasic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambroso, A.; Chalons, Ch.; Galie, Th.; Chalons, Ch.; Coquel, F.; Coquel, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical approximation of the solutions of a two-fluid two-pressure model used in the modelling of two-phase flows. We present a relaxation strategy for easily dealing with both the nonlinearities associated with the pressure laws and the nonconservative terms that are inherently present in the set of convective equations and that couple the two phases. In particular, the proposed approximate Riemann solver is given by explicit formulas, preserves the natural phase space, and exactly captures the coupling waves between the two phases. Numerical evidences are given to corroborate the validity of our approach. (authors)

  16. Two-fluid model of the superconductivity in the BCS's theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangelov, J.

    1977-01-01

    The coefficients of Bogolubov-Valatin's transformation are chosen in accordance with the two-fluid model of superconductivity. The energy spectrum of superconducting quasi-particles is obtained as a solution of the linearized equation of motion of interacting particles. The energy distribution of the superconducting and normal quasi-particles is discussed from a new view-point. The correlation between the quasi-particles forming the Cooper's pair is discussed in accordance with the proposed ideas. The tunnelling of the normal quasi-particles in systems M-I-S and S 1 -I-S 2 is investigated qualitatively

  17. A three field two fluid CFD model for the bubbly-cap bubble regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Lopez de Bertodano; Xiaodong Sun; Mamoru Ishii; Asim Ulke

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The lateral phase distribution of a two phase duct flow in the cap bubble regime is analyzed with a three dimensional three field two-fluid CFD model based on the turbulent k-ε model for bubbly flows developed by Lopez de Bertodano et. al. [2]. The turbulent diffusion of the bubbles is the dominant phase distribution mechanism. A new analytic result is presented to support the development of the model for the bubble induced turbulent diffusion force. New experimental data obtained with a state-of-the-art four sensor miniature conductivity probe are used to validate the two-fluid model. The focus of this work is modeling the transport of the dispersed phase. Previous work (e.g., Lopez de Bertodano et. al.) was focused on the interfacial forces of drag, lift and virtual mass. However, the dispersion of the bubbles by the turbulent eddies of the continuous phase must be considered too. The rigorous formulation of a model for the turbulent dispersion of the bubbles results in a turbulent diffusion force which is obtained from a probability distribution function average (i.e., Boltzmann averaging) of the dispersed phase momentum equation. This force was recently applied to a turbulent bubbly jet with small bubbles (i.e., 1 mm diameter) without adjusting any coefficient. However, the application of this force to industrial conditions (i.e., larger bubbles) requires specific two-phase flow experimental data to calibrate the model due to the uncertainties of the flow around large bubbles. In particular the void distribution and the interfacial area concentration are measured in a mixture of big and small bubbles. The state-of-the-art miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probe developed by Kim et al. [3] is used to obtain the interfacial area concentration in complex two-phase flow situations. This probe can discriminate between small and large bubbles so it offers an opportunity to perform further developments of the multidimensional two-fluid

  18. Second order numerical method of two-fluid model of air-water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiselj, I.; Petelin, S.

    1995-01-01

    Model considered in this paper is six-equation two-fluid model used in computer code RELAP5. Air-water equations were taken in a code named PDE to avoid additional problems caused by condensation or vaporization. Terms with space derivatives were added in virtual mass term in momentum equations to ensure the hyperbolicity of the equations. Numerical method in PDE code is based on approximate Riemann solvers. Equations are solved on non-staggered grid with explicit time advancement and with upwind discretization of the convective terms in characteristic form of the equations. Flux limiters are used to find suitable combinations of the first (upwind) and the second order (Lax-Wendroff) discretization s which ensure second order accuracy on smooth solutions and damp oscillations around the discontinuities. Because of the small time steps required and because of its non-dissipative nature the scheme is suitable for the prediction of the fast transients: pressure waves, shock and rarefaction waves, water hammer or critical flow. Some preliminary results are presented for a shock tube problem and for Water Faucet problem - problems usually used as benchmarks for two-fluid computer codes. (author)

  19. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas–solids transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeleke, Najeem, E-mail: najm@psu.edu; Adewumi, Michael, E-mail: m2a@psu.edu; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-15

    Two-phase gas–solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas–solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe–Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  20. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas–solids transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase gas–solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas–solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe–Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  1. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas-solids transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-01

    Two-phase gas-solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas-solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe-Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  2. Spiral field inhibition of thermal conduction in two-fluid solar wind models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerney, S.; Barnes, A.

    1978-01-01

    The two-fluid solar wind equations, including inhibition of heat conduction by the spiral magnetic field, have been solved for steady radial flow, and the results are compared with those of our previous study of two-fluid models with straight interplanetary field lines. The main effects of the spiral field conduction cutoff are to bottle up electron heat inside 1 AU and to produce adiabatic electron (an proton) temperature profiles at large heliocentric distances. Otherwise, the spiral field models are nearly identical with straight field models with the same temperatures and velocity at 1 AU, except for models associated with very low coronal base densities (n 0 approx.10 6 cm -3 at 1R/sub s/). Low base density spiral models give a nearly isothermal electron temperature profile over 50--100 AU together with high velocities and temperatures at 1 AU. In general, high-velocity models do not agree well with observed high-velocity streams: lower-velocity states can be represented reasonably well at 1 AU, but only for very high proton temperatures (T/sub p/approx.2T/sub e/) at the coronal base. For spherically symmetric base conditions the straight field and spiral field models can be regarded, in lowest order, as approximations to the polar and equatorial three-dimensional flows, respectively. This viewpoint suggests a pole to equator electron temperature gradient in the region 1-10 AU, which would be associated with a meridional velocity of approx.0.5-1.0 km/s, diverging away from the equatorial plane. The formalism developed in this paper shows rather stringent limits to the mass loss rate for conductively driven winds and, in particular, illustrates that putative T Tauri outflows could not be conductively driven

  3. Exact closed-form solutions of a fully nonlinear asymptotic two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheviakov, Alexei F.

    2018-05-01

    A fully nonlinear model of Choi and Camassa (1999) describing one-dimensional incompressible dynamics of two non-mixing fluids in a horizontal channel, under a shallow water approximation, is considered. An equivalence transformation is presented, leading to a special dimensionless form of the system, involving a single dimensionless constant physical parameter, as opposed to five parameters present in the original model. A first-order dimensionless ordinary differential equation describing traveling wave solutions is analyzed. Several multi-parameter families of physically meaningful exact closed-form solutions of the two-fluid model are derived, corresponding to periodic, solitary, and kink-type bidirectional traveling waves; specific examples are given, and properties of the exact solutions are analyzed.

  4. Simulation of horizontal pipe two-phase slug flows using the two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Malca, Arturo J. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Nucleo de Simulacao Termohidraulica de Dutos (SIMDUT); Nieckele, Angela O. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2005-07-01

    Slug flow occurs in many engineering applications, mainly in the transport of hydrocarbon fluids in pipelines. The intermittency of slug flow causes severe unsteady loading on the pipelines carrying the fluids, which gives rise to design problems. Therefore, it is important to be able to predict the onset and development of slug flow as well as slug characteristics. The present work consists in the simulation of two-phase flow in slug pattern through horizontal pipes using the two-fluid model in its transient and one-dimensional form. The advantage of this model is that the flow field is allowed to develop naturally from a given initial conditions as part of the transient calculation; the slug evolves automatically as a product of the computed flow development. Simulations are then carried out for a large number of flow conditions that lead a slug flow. (author)

  5. Development of multidimensional two-fluid model code ACE-3D for evaluation of constitutive equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kamo, Hideki

    1996-11-01

    In order to perform design calculations for a passive safety reactor with good accuracy by a multidimensional two-fluid model, we developed an analysis code, ACE-3D, which can apply for evaluation of constitutive equations. The developed code has the following features: 1. The basic equations are based on 3-dimensional two-fluid model and the orthogonal or the cylindrical coordinate system can be selected. The fluid system is air-water or steam-water. 2. The basic equations are formulated by the finite-difference scheme of staggered mesh. The convection term is formulated by an upwind scheme and the diffusion term by a center-difference scheme. 3. Semi-implicit numerical scheme is adopted and the mass and the energy equations are treated equally in convergent steps for Jacobi equations. 4. The interfacial stress term consists of drag force, life force, turbulent dispersion force, wall force and virtual mass force. 5. A {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulent model for bubbly flow is incorporated as the turbulent model. The predictive capability of ACE-3D has been verified using a data-base for bubbly flow in a small-scale vertical pipe. In future, the constitutive equations will be improved with a data-base in a large vertical pipe developed in our laboratory and we have a plan to construct a reliable analytical tool through the improvement work, the progress of calculational speed with vector and parallel processing, the assessments for phase change terms and so on. This report describes the outline for the basic equations and the finite-difference equations in ACE-3D code and also the outline for the program structure. Besides, the results for the assessments of ACE-3D code for the small-scale pipe are summarized. (author)

  6. Development of multidimensional two-fluid model code ACE-3D for evaluation of constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime; Kamo, Hideki.

    1996-11-01

    In order to perform design calculations for a passive safety reactor with good accuracy by a multidimensional two-fluid model, we developed an analysis code, ACE-3D, which can apply for evaluation of constitutive equations. The developed code has the following features: 1. The basic equations are based on 3-dimensional two-fluid model and the orthogonal or the cylindrical coordinate system can be selected. The fluid system is air-water or steam-water. 2. The basic equations are formulated by the finite-difference scheme of staggered mesh. The convection term is formulated by an upwind scheme and the diffusion term by a center-difference scheme. 3. Semi-implicit numerical scheme is adopted and the mass and the energy equations are treated equally in convergent steps for Jacobi equations. 4. The interfacial stress term consists of drag force, life force, turbulent dispersion force, wall force and virtual mass force. 5. A κ-ε turbulent model for bubbly flow is incorporated as the turbulent model. The predictive capability of ACE-3D has been verified using a data-base for bubbly flow in a small-scale vertical pipe. In future, the constitutive equations will be improved with a data-base in a large vertical pipe developed in our laboratory and we have a plan to construct a reliable analytical tool through the improvement work, the progress of calculational speed with vector and parallel processing, the assessments for phase change terms and so on. This report describes the outline for the basic equations and the finite-difference equations in ACE-3D code and also the outline for the program structure. Besides, the results for the assessments of ACE-3D code for the small-scale pipe are summarized. (author)

  7. Advanced Semi-Implicit Method (ASIM) for hyperbolic two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Jae; Chung, Moon Sun

    2003-01-01

    Introducing the interfacial pressure jump terms based on the surface tension into the momentum equations of two-phase two-fluid model, the system of governing equations is turned mathematically into the hyperbolic system. The eigenvalues of the equation system become always real representing the void wave and the pressure wave propagation speeds as shown in the previous manuscript. To solve the interfacial pressure jump terms with void fraction gradients implicitly, the conventional semi-implicit method should be modified as an intermediate iteration method for void fraction at fractional time step. This Advanced Semi-Implicit Method (ASIM) then becomes stable without conventional additive terms. As a consequence, including the interfacial pressure jump terms with the advanced semi-implicit method, the numerical solutions of typical two-phase problems can be more stable and sound than those calculated exclusively by using any other terms like virtual mass, or artificial viscosity

  8. Implicit approximate Riemann solver for two fluid two phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Toumi, I.; Kumbaro, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the description of new numerical methods developed for the numerical treatment of two phase flow models with two velocity fields which are now widely used in nuclear engineering for design or safety calculations. These methods are finite volumes numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solver's concepts in order to define convective flux versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the communication will describe the numerical method for a three dimensional drift flux model and the extensions which were performed to make the numerical scheme implicit and to have fast running calculations of steady states. Such a scheme is now implemented in the FLICA-4 computer code devoted to 3-D steady state and transient core computations. We will present results obtained for a steady state flow with rod bow effect evaluation and for a Steam Line Break calculation were the 3-D core thermal computation was coupled with a 3-D kinetic calculation and a thermal-hydraulic transient calculation for the four loops of a Pressurized Water Reactor. The second part of the paper will detail the development of an equivalent numerical method based on an approximate Riemann Solver for a two fluid model with two momentum balance equations for the liquid and the gas phases. The main difficulty for these models is due to the existence of differential modelling terms such as added mass effects or interfacial pressure terms which make hyperbolic the model. These terms does not permit to write the balance equations system in a conservative form, and the classical theory for discontinuity propagation for non-linear systems cannot be applied. Meanwhile, the use of non-conservative products theory allows the study of discontinuity propagation for a non conservative model and this will permit the construction of a numerical scheme for two fluid two phase flow model. These different points will be detailed in that section which will be illustrated by

  9. Prediction of subcooled flow boiling characteristics using two-fluid Eulerian CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B., E-mail: gbribeiro@ieav.cta.br; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CFD multiphase model is used to predict subcooled flow boiling characteristics. • Better agreement is achieved for higher saturation pressures. • Onset of nucleate boiling and saturated boiling are well predicted. • CFD multiphase model tends to underestimate the void fraction. • Factors were adjusted in order to improve the void fraction results. - Abstract: The present study concerns a detailed analysis of flow boiling phenomena under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. Two different uniform heat fluxes and three saturation pressures were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m{sup 2} s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of the CFD technique for estimation of the wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Changes in factors applied in the modeling of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and bubble departure frequency were suggested, allowing a better prediction of the void fraction along the heated channel. The commercial CFD solver FLUENT 14.5 was used for the model implementation.

  10. Prediction of subcooled flow boiling characteristics using two-fluid Eulerian CFD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD multiphase model is used to predict subcooled flow boiling characteristics. • Better agreement is achieved for higher saturation pressures. • Onset of nucleate boiling and saturated boiling are well predicted. • CFD multiphase model tends to underestimate the void fraction. • Factors were adjusted in order to improve the void fraction results. - Abstract: The present study concerns a detailed analysis of flow boiling phenomena under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. Two different uniform heat fluxes and three saturation pressures were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m"2 s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of the CFD technique for estimation of the wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Changes in factors applied in the modeling of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and bubble departure frequency were suggested, allowing a better prediction of the void fraction along the heated channel. The commercial CFD solver FLUENT 14.5 was used for the model implementation.

  11. Extended two-fluid model for simulating magneto-rheological fluid flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivaram, A C

    2011-01-01

    The current practice of designing magneto-rheological (MR) fluid-based devices is, to a large extent, based on simple phenomenological models like the Bingham model. Though useful for initial force or torque estimation and sizing, these models lack the capability to predict performance degradation due to changes in the particle volume fraction distribution. The present work demonstrates the use of the two-fluid model for predicting the particle volume fraction distribution inside a device in the absence of a field and proposes a novel modeling scheme which can simulate the fluid flow in the presence of a field. This modeling scheme can be used to (a) visualize flow patterns inside a device under various operating conditions, (b) predict the spatial distribution of particles inside a device after multiple operating cycles, (c) assist in estimating the extent of performance degradation due to non-uniform particle distribution and (d) enable testing of various design strategies to mitigate such performance issues using simulations. This is illustrated through numerical examples of a few case studies of typical MR device configurations

  12. Geometric analysis of the solutions of two-phase flows: two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestin, J.; Zeng, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains a lightly edited draft of a study of the two-fluid model in two-phase flow. The motivation for the study stems from the authors' conviction that the construction of a computer code for any model should be preceded by a geometrical analysis of the pattern of trajectories in the phase space appropriate for the model. Such a study greatly facilitates the understanding of the phenomenon of choking and anticipates the computational difficulties which arise from the existence of singularities. The report contains a derivation of the six conservation equations of the model which includes a consideration of the simplifications imposed on a one-dimensional treatment by the presence of boundary layers at the wall and between the phases. The model is restricted to one-dimensional adiabatic flows of a single substance present in two phases, but thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases is not assumed. The role of closure conditions is defined but no specific closure conditions, or explicit equations of state, are introduced

  13. Evaluation of Interfacial Heat Transfer Models for Flashing Flow with Two-Fluid CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiang Liao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of flashing flows is increased vastly by the interphase heat transfer as well as its coupling with mass and momentum transfers. A reliable heat transfer coefficient is the key in the modelling of such kinds of flows with the two-fluid model. An extensive literature survey on computational modelling of flashing flows has been given in previous work. The present work is aimed at giving a brief review on available theories and correlations for the estimation of interphase heat transfer coefficient, and evaluating them quantitatively based on computational fluid dynamics simulations of bubble growth in superheated liquid. The comparison of predictions for bubble growth rate obtained by using different correlations with the experimental as well as direct numerical simulation data reveals that the performance of the correlations is dependent on the Jakob number and Reynolds number. No generally applicable correlations are available. Both conduction and convection are important in cases of bubble rising and translating in stagnant liquid at high Jakob numbers. The correlations combining the analytical solution for heat diffusion and the theoretical relation for potential flow give the best agreement.

  14. The spiral field inhibition of thermal conduction in two-fluid solar wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerney, S.; Barnes, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reports on two-field models which include the inhibition of thermal conduction by the spiraling interplanetary field to determine whether any of the major conclusions obtained by Nerney and Barnes (1977) needs to be modified. Comparisons with straight field line models reveal that for most base conditions, the primary effect of the inhibition of thermal conduction is the bottling-up of heat in the electrons as well as the quite different temperature profiles at a large heliocentric radius. The spiral field solutions show that coronal hole boundary conditions do not correspond to states of high-speed streams as observed at 1 AU. The two-fluid models suggest that the spiral field inhibition of thermal conduction in the equatorial plane will generate higher gas pressures in comparison with flows along the solar rotation axis (between 1 and 10 AU). In particular, massive outflows of stellar winds, such as outflow from T Tauri stars, cannot be driven by thermal conduction. The conclusions of Nerney and Barnes remain essentially unchanged.

  15. Formation of intermediate shocks in both two-fluid and hybrid models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.; Hada, T.

    1991-01-01

    Intermediate shocks are shocks with shock frame fluid velocities greater than the Alfven speed ahead and less than the Alfven speed behind, or equivalently, across intermediate shocks the sign of the transverse component of the magnetic field changes. These shocks had been considered extraneous, or nonevolutionary, or unstable, and they had been thought not to correspond to physical reality [Germain, 1960; Jeffrey and Taniuti, 1964; Kantrowitz and Petschek, 1966]. However, it has been shown that intermediate shocks can be formed from continuous waves according to dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) [Wu, 1987, 1988a, b, 1990]. Thus according to the formation argument which requires that physical shocks be formed by the wave steepening process, the intermediate shocks should be considered physical. Here, intermediate shocks are studied in a two-fluid model that includes finite ion inertia dispersion and in a hybrid model in which the full ion dynamics is retained while the electrons are treated as a massless fluid. The authors show that in both models intermediate shocks can be formed through wave steepening, meaning that they are stable and possess shock structures

  16. Two-fluid model of the pulsar magnetosphere represented as an axisymmetric force-free dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrova, S.A., E-mail: petrova@rian.kharkov.ua [Institute of Radio Astronomy of the NAS of Ukraine, Mystetstv Str., 4, Kharkiv 61002 (Ukraine)

    2017-05-01

    Based on the exact dipolar solution of the pulsar equation the self-consistent two-fluid model of the pulsar magnetosphere is developed. We concentrate on the low-mass limit of the model, taking into account the radiation damping. As a result, we obtain the particle distributions sustaining the dipolar force-free configuration of the pulsar magnetosphere in case of a slight velocity shear of the electron and positron components. Over most part of the force-free region, the particles follow the poloidal magnetic field lines, with the azimuthal velocities being small. Close to the Y-point, however, the particle motion is chiefly azimuthal and the Lorentz-factor grows unrestrictedly. This may result in the very-high-energy emission from the vicinity of the Y-point and may also imply the magnetocentrifugal formation of a jet. As for the first-order quantities, the longitudinal accelerating electric field is found to change the sign, hinting at coexistence of the polar and outer gaps. Besides that, the components of the plasma conductivity tensor are derived and the low-mass analogue of the pulsar equation is formulated as well.

  17. Contribution to the modeling of particulate hypersonic flows. Study and validation of a discrete two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, M.

    2005-06-01

    This work dedicated to the study of the hypersonic re-entry of vehicles in the atmosphere crossing clouds of particles implies the study of two-fluid flow and it is shown that some developments can be applied to the two-fluid models used to describe the phase transformation occurring in a target irradiated by laser beams. The calculation of wall fluxes on hypersonic re-entry vehicles requires the modeling of the interactions with clouds. Two-fluid flows posing many physical and mathematical problems, one studies an alternative model due to Abgrall and Saurel: the discrete equation method (DEM). Three axis are chosen. The first proposes a finite volume discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations on hybrid grids adapted to the context. The second extends the DEM within a multi-fluid not-structured N-D framework. A limit study associates an original continuous model to him: it allows to modify usual two-fluid seven equations models to obtain a phasic entropy principle. In spite of good properties, the continuous description of the particles is unsuited to the problem. The last axis is a study of the follow-up of pointwise particles which does not allow realistic calculation of parietal fluxes. An original model, extending the usual hydro-erosion models, however makes it possible to evaluate rebounds, erosion of the body and wall fluxes. The appendices expose approximate and exact Riemann solvers between pure fluids, discretization of the Baer and Nunziato model, and relations describing the atmosphere, water and heat fluxes

  18. Modeling of an atomizer for two fluids; Modelacion de un atomizador de dos fluidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapia Ramirez, Zoili [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-09-01

    The work reported in this article presents the results of the effort to improve the basic understanding of the flow structure that is formed in a two fluid sprayer before and after the interaction between the sprayed fluid and the spraying fluid. The images in the interior of the mixing chamber of the atomizer are shown, which were taken with a high velocity video camera. Also the results of the numerical simulation of the internal flow obtained by means of a package of commercial modeling are shown. [Espanol] El trabajo reportado en este articulo presenta los resultados del esfuerzo por mejorar el entendimiento basico de la estructura del flujo que se forma en un atomizador de dos fluidos antes y despues de la interaccion entre el fluido atomizado y el fluido atomizante. Se muestran imagenes del flujo en el interior de la camara de mezclado del atomizador, las cuales fueron tomadas con una camara de video de alta velocidad. Tambien se incluyen los resultados de la simulacion numerica del flujo interno obtenidas por medio de un paquete de modelacion comercial.

  19. Basic Pilot Code Development for Two-Fluid, Three-Field Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Bae, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Chung, B. D.; Hwang, M.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, D. H.

    2006-03-01

    A basic pilot code for one-dimensional, transient, two-fluid, three-field model has been developed. Using 9 conceptual problems, the basic pilot code has been verified. The results of the verification are summarized below: - It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, bubbly flow, slug/churn turbulent flow, annular-mist flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. A mist flow was not simulated, but it seems that the basic pilot code can simulate mist flow conditions. - The pilot code was programmed so that the source terms of the governing equations and numerical solution schemes can be easily tested. - The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. - It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. - It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. - During the simulation of a two-phase flow, the calculation reaches a quasisteady state with small-amplitude oscillations. The oscillations seem to be induced by some numerical causes. The research items for the improvement of the basic pilot code are listed in the last section of this report

  20. Basic Pilot Code Development for Two-Fluid, Three-Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Bae, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Chung, B. D.; Hwang, M.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, D. H

    2006-03-15

    A basic pilot code for one-dimensional, transient, two-fluid, three-field model has been developed. Using 9 conceptual problems, the basic pilot code has been verified. The results of the verification are summarized below: - It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, bubbly flow, slug/churn turbulent flow, annular-mist flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. A mist flow was not simulated, but it seems that the basic pilot code can simulate mist flow conditions. - The pilot code was programmed so that the source terms of the governing equations and numerical solution schemes can be easily tested. - The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. - It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. - It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. - During the simulation of a two-phase flow, the calculation reaches a quasisteady state with small-amplitude oscillations. The oscillations seem to be induced by some numerical causes. The research items for the improvement of the basic pilot code are listed in the last section of this report.

  1. Analysis of the two-fluid model in fully-developed two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azpitarte, Osvaldo Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The two fluid model is analysed and applied to solve vertical fully-developed bubbly two-phase flows, both in laminar and turbulent conditions.The laminar model is reduced to two differential equations to solve the gas fraction (ε G ) and the velocity (υ L ).For the turbulent condition, a k - ε model for low Reynolds number is implemented, resulting in a set of differential equations to solve the four variables (ε G , υ L , k and ε) along the whole radial domain (including the laminar sub layer).For laminar condition, the system is initially reduced to a single non-dimensional ordinary equation (O D E) to solve ε G in the central region of the duct, without considering the effect of the wall.The equation is solved using Mathematic a.Analysing the solutions it can be concluded that an exact compensation of the applied pressure gradient with the hydrostatic force ρ e ff g occurs (ρ e ff : effective density of the mixture).This compensation implies that the value of ε G at the center of the duct only depends on the applied pressure gradient (dependency is linear), and that the ε G and υ L profiles are necessarily fl ato The complete problem is dealt numerically through the implementation of a finite element co deo The effect of the walls is included via a model of wall force.When the code is applied to a laminar condition, the conclusions previously obtained solving the O D E are confirmed.It is also possible to analyse the regime in which the pressure gradient is greater than the weight of the pure liquid, in which case a region of strictly zero void fraction develops surrounding the axis of the duct (in upward flow).When the code is applied to a turbulent condition, it is shown that the conclusions obtained for laminar condition can also be applied, but within a range of pressure gradient limited by two transition values (θ 1 and θ 2 ).An analysis of transitions θ 1 and θ 2 allows u s to conclude that their origin is a sudden increase of lateral

  2. Experimental Validation of Methanol Crossover in a Three-dimensional, Two-Fluid Model of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional, steady-state, two-fluid, multi-component and non-isothermal DMFC model has been developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.). It accounts for the presence of micro porous layers, non-equilibrium phase change, and methanol and water uptake in the i...

  3. Validation of Numerical Two-Fluid and Kinetic Plasma Models. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This was a four year grant commencing October 1, 2003 and finishing September 30, 2007. The funding was primarily used to support the work of the Principal Investigator, who collaborated with Profs. Scott Parker and John Cary at U. Colorado, and with two students, N. Xiang and J. Cheng also of U. Colorado. The technical accomplishments of this grant can be found in the publications listed in the final Section here. The main accomplishments of the grant work were: (1) Development and implementation of time-implicit two-fluid simulation methods in collaboration with the NIMROD team; and (2) Development and testing of a new time-implicit delta-f, energy-conserving method The basic two-fluid method, with many improvements is used in present NIMROD calculations. The energy-conserving delta-f method is under continuing development under contract between Coronado Consulting, a New Mexico sole proprietorship and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazarez-Candia, O.; Benitez-Centeno, O.C.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  5. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazarez-Candia, O., E-mail: ocazarez@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, Depto. de Metal-Mecanica, Calzada Tecnologico, No. 27, Zacatepec, Morelos 62780 (Mexico); Benitez-Centeno, O.C. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Depto. de Mecanica, Interior Internado Palmira s/n, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62490 (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, G. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av San Rafael Atlixco No 186, Col. Vicentina 55-534, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  6. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the open-quotes standardclose quotes κ-ε transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels

  7. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B. [Chalk River Laboratories (Canada); Unrau, D. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  8. Simple interphase drag model for numerical two-fluid modeling of two-phase flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, H.; Ransom, V.H.

    1984-01-01

    The interphase drag model that has been developed for RELAP5/MOD2 is based on a simple formulation having flow regime maps for both horizontal and vertical flows. The model is based on a conventional semi-empirical formulation that includes the product of drag coefficient, interfacial area, and relative dynamic pressure. The interphase drag model is implemented in the RELAP5/MOD2 light water reactor transient analysis code and has been used to simulate a variety of separate effects experiments to assess the model accuracy. The results from three of these simulations, the General Electric Company small vessel blowdown experiment, Dukler and Smith's counter-current flow experiment, and a Westinghouse Electric Company FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood experiment, are presented and discussed

  9. A modified two-fluid model for the application of two-group interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Kelly, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the modified two-fluid model that is ready to be applied in the approach of the two-group interfacial area transport equation. The two-group interfacial area transport equation was developed to provide a mechanistic constitutive relation for the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model. In the two-group transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups: spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 while cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. Therefore, this transport equation can be employed in the flow regimes spanning from bubbly, cap bubbly, slug to churn-turbulent flows. However, the introduction of the two groups of bubbles requires two gas velocity fields. Yet it is not desirable to solve two momentum equations for the gas phase alone. In the current modified two-fluid model, a simplified approach is proposed. The momentum equation for the averaged velocity of both Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles is retained. By doing so, the velocity difference between Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles needs to be determined. This may be made either based on simplified momentum equations for both Group-1 and Group-2 bubbles or by a modified drift-flux model

  10. MINI-TRAC code: a driver program for assessment of constitutive equations of two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Abe, Yutaka; Ohnuki, Akira; Murao, Yoshio

    1991-05-01

    MINI-TRAC code, a driver program for assessment of constitutive equations of two-fluid model, has been developed to perform assessment and improvement of constitutive equations of two-fluid model widely and efficiently. The MINI-TRAC code uses one-dimensional conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy based on the two-fluid model. The code can work on a personal computer because it can be operated with a core memory size less than 640 KB. The MINI-TRAC code includes constitutive equations of TRAC-PF1/MOD1 code, TRAC-BF1 code and RELAP5/MOD2 code. The code is modulated so that one can easily change constitutive equations to perform a test calculation. This report is a manual of the MINI-TRAC code. The basic equations, numerics, constitutive, equations included in the MINI-TRAC code will be described. The user's manual such as input description will be presented. The program structure and contents of main variables will also be mentioned in this report. (author)

  11. Implementation of wall film condensation model to two-fluid model in component thermal hydraulic analysis code CUPID - 15237

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Park, G.C.; Cho, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    In the containment of a nuclear reactor, the wall condensation occurs when containment cooling system and structures remove the mass and energy release and this phenomenon is of great importance to ensure containment integrity. If the phenomenon occurs in the presence of non-condensable gases, their accumulation near the condensate film leads to significant reduction in heat transfer during the condensation. This study aims at simulating the wall film condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas using CUPID, a computational multi-fluid dynamics code, which is developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components. In order to simulate the wall film condensation in containment, the code requires a proper wall condensation model and liquid film model applicable to the analysis of the large scale system. In the present study, the liquid film model and wall film condensation model were implemented in the two-fluid model of CUPID. For the condensation simulation, a wall function approach with heat and mass transfer analogy was applied in order to save computational time without considerable refinement for the boundary layer. This paper presents the implemented wall film condensation model and then, introduces the simulation result using CUPID with the model for a conceptual condensation problem in a large system. (authors)

  12. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  13. Analysis of two-phase flow inter-subchannel mass and momentum exchanges by the two-fluid model approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninokata, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Deguchi, A. [ENO Mathematical Analysis, Tokyo (Japan); Kawahara, A. [Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    A new void drift model for the subchannel analysis method is presented for the thermohydraulics calculation of two-phase flows in rod bundles where the flow model uses a two-fluid formulation for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. A void drift model is constructed based on the experimental data obtained in a geometrically simple inter-connected two circular channel test sections using air-water as working fluids. The void drift force is assumed to be an origin of void drift velocity components of the two-phase cross-flow in a gap area between two adjacent rods and to overcome the momentum exchanges at the phase interface and wall-fluid interface. This void drift force is implemented in the cross flow momentum equations. Computational results have been successfully compared to experimental data available including 3x3 rod bundle data.

  14. Water Balance Simulations of a PEM Fuel Cell Using a Two-Fluid Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, Madeleine; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2010-01-01

    A previously published computational multi-phase model of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell has been extended in order to account for the anode side and the electrolyte membrane. The model has been applied to study the water balance of a fuel cell during operation under various humidificat...... net water transport coefficient. Thus we can reduce flooding at the cathode and may obtain improved cell performance due to a better humidified membrane. The results also suggest that membrane dehydration may occur at either anode or cathode depending on the net water transport....

  15. Quantization of Friedmann cosmological models with two fluids: Dust plus radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto-Neto, N.; Sergio Santini, E.; Falciano, F.T.

    2005-01-01

    Friedmann models filled with non-interacting dust and radiation are quantized in the framework of the causal interpretation of quantum mechanics. Two main results are obtained: the formation of bounces, and the possibility of quantum creation of normal and exotic dust matter allowing transitions from exotic matter dominated eras to matter dominated ones

  16. A New Two-fluid Radiation-hydrodynamical Model for X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brent F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Wolfram, Kenneth D. [Naval Research Laboratory (retired), Washington, DC (United States); Becker, Peter A., E-mail: bwest@usna.edu, E-mail: kswolfram@gmail.com, E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA USA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Previous research centered on the hydrodynamics in X-ray pulsar accretion columns has largely focused on the single-fluid model, in which the super-Eddington luminosity inside the column decelerates the flow to rest at the stellar surface. This type of model has been relatively successful in describing the overall properties of the accretion flows, but it does not account for the possible dynamical effect of the gas pressure. On the other hand, the most successful radiative transport models for pulsars generally do not include a rigorous treatment of the dynamical structure of the column, instead assuming an ad hoc velocity profile. In this paper, we explore the structure of X-ray pulsar accretion columns using a new, self-consistent, “two-fluid” model, which incorporates the dynamical effect of the gas and radiation pressures, the dipole variation of the magnetic field, the thermodynamic effect of all of the relevant coupling and cooling processes, and a rigorous set of physical boundary conditions. The model has six free parameters, which we vary in order to approximately fit the phase-averaged spectra in Her X-1, Cen X-3, and LMC X-4. In this paper, we focus on the dynamical results, which shed new light on the surface magnetic field strength, the inclination of the magnetic field axis relative to the rotation axis, the relative importance of gas and radiation pressures, and the radial variation of the ion, electron, and inverse-Compton temperatures. The results obtained for the X-ray spectra are presented in a separate paper.

  17. Extinction properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The extinction spectra of a single-walled carbon nanotube are investigated, within the framework of the vector wave function method in conjunction with the hydrodynamic model. Both polarizations of the incident plane wave (TE and TM with respect to the x-z plane) are treated. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a two-dimensional electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account the different nature of the σ and π electrons. Numerical results show that strong interaction between the fluids gives rise to the splitting of the extinction spectra into two peaks in quantitative agreement with the π and σ + π plasmon energies.

  18. Quantum mechanical description of the two fluid model of liquid /sup 4/He solving the Bloch equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, P.C.W.; Lam, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors apply the U-matrix theory recently developed (Lam and Fung, Phys. Rev. A, vol.27, p.1760, 1983) to study certain physical properties of liquid /sup 4/He across a range of temperatures including the lambda -point. They propose a model for the chemical potential mu which is constant above T/sub lambda / but is a function of T below T/sub lambda /. They have discovered that the super-particles 'emerge' mathematically due to the uncommutability of the Hamiltonians at different temperatures, leading to a quantum mechanical description of the two-fluid model. Using the two-particle potential function deduced from scattering data, they have calculated numerically the approximate values of the number density for a range of temperatures starting from T/sub lambda /, taking the hard-core diameter Delta , 'effective chemical potential' mu ' as parameters

  19. Experimental Validation of Methanol Crossover in a Three-dimensional, Two-Fluid Model of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional, steady-state, two-fluid, multi-component and non-isothermal DMFC model has been developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.). It accounts for the presence of micro porous layers, non-equilibrium phase change, and methanol and water uptake...... in the ionomer phase of the catalytic layer, and detailed membrane transport of methanol and water. In order to verify the models ability to predict methanol crossover, simulation results are compared with experimental measurements under different current densities along with air and methanol stoichiometries....... Methanol crossover is indirectly measured based on the combined anode and cathode exhaust CO2 mole fraction and by accounting for the CO2 production at the anode as a function of current density. This approach is simple and assumes that all crossed over methanol is oxidized. Moreover, it takes CO2...

  20. Flux schemes for the two-fluid models of the trio-U code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbaro, A.; Seignole, V.; Ghidaglia, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    To solve the non-conservative system of the two-phase flow model in the TRIO-U two-phase flow module, a fully unstructured finite volume formulation is chosen, and the discretization is based on the concept of flux-scheme. Our method allows to determine whether hyperbolicity is necessary to have stable and convergent numerical computations. We discuss the necessity or not to consider all the differential transfer terms between the two-phases in the up-winding of the flux. Numerical results are presented in order to study out the influence of the pressure interface term in the stability, as well as in the up-winding of the flux. (author)

  1. A Simple Free Surface Tracking Model for Multi-dimensional Two-Fluid Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Yoon, Han Young

    2014-01-01

    The development in two-phase experiments devoted to find unknown phenomenological relationships modified conventional flow pattern maps into a sophisticated one and even extended to the multi-dimensional usage. However, for a system including a large void fraction gradient, such as a pool with the free surface, the flow patterns varies spatially throughout small number of cells and sometimes results in an unstable and unrealistic prediction of flows at the large gradient void fraction cells. Then, the numerical stability problem arising from the free surface is the major interest in the analyses of a passive cooling pool convecting the decay heat naturally, which has become a design issue to increase the safety level of nuclear reactors recently. In this research, a new and simple free surface tracking method combined with a simplified topology map is presented. The method modified the interfacial drag coefficient only for the cells defined as the free surface. The performance is shown by comparing the natural convection analysis of a small scale pool with respect to single- and two-phase condition. A simple free surface tracking model with a simplified topology map is developed

  2. Numerical simulation of transient, adiabatic, two-dimensional two-phase flow using the two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves Conti, T. das.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to simulate adiabatic, transient, two-dimensional two-phase flow. The two-fluid model is used to obtain the mass and momentum conservation equations. These are solved by an iterative algorithm emphoying a time-marching scheme. Based on the corrective procedure of Hirt and Harlow a poisson equation is derived for the pressure field. This equation is finite-differenced and solved by a suitable matrix inversion technique. In the absence of experiment results several numerical tests were made in order to chec accuracy, convergence and stability of the proposed method. Several tests were also performed to check whether the behavior of void fraction and phasic velocities conforms with previous observations. (Author) [pt

  3. Two-phase pressurized thermal shock investigations using a 3D two-fluid modeling of stratified flow with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.; Coste, P.; Bestion, D.; Boucker, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a local 3D two-fluid model for a turbulent stratified flow with/without condensation, which can be used to predict two-phase pressurized thermal shock, is presented. A modified turbulent K- model is proposed with turbulence production induced by interfacial friction. A model of interfacial friction based on a interfacial sublayer concept and three interfacial heat transfer models, namely, a model based on the small eddies controlled surface renewal concept (HDM, Hughes and Duffey, 1991), a model based on the asymptotic behavior of the Eddy Viscosity (EVM), and a model based on the Interfacial Sublayer concept (ISM) are implemented into a preliminary version of the NEPTUNE code based on the 3D module of the CATHARE code. As a first step to apply the above models to predict the two-phase thermal shock, the models are evaluated by comparison of calculated profiles with several experiments: a turbulent air-water stratified flow without interfacial heat transfer; a turbulent steam-water stratified flow with condensation; turbulence induced by the impact of a water jet in a water pool. The prediction results agree well with the experimental data. In addition, the comparison of three interfacial heat transfer models shows that EVM and ISM gave better prediction results while HDM highly overestimated the interfacial heat transfers compared to the experimental data of a steam water stratified flow

  4. Derivation of simplified basic equations of gas-liquid two-phase dispersed flow based on two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Tomiyama, Akio

    2004-01-01

    The simplified and physically reasonable basic equations for the gas-liquid dispersed flow were developed based on some appropriate assumptions and the treatment of dispersed phase as isothermal rigid particles. Based on the local instant formulation of mass, momentum and energy conservation of the dispersed flow, time-averaged equations were obtained assuming that physical quantities in the dispersed phase are uniform. These assumptions are approximately valid when phase change rate and/or chemical reaction rate are not so large at gas-liquid interface and there is no heat generation in within the dispersed phase. Detailed discussions were made on the characteristics of obtained basic equations and physical meanings of terms consisting the basic equations. It is shown that, in the derived averaged momentum equation, the terms of pressure gradient and viscous momentum diffusion do not appear and, in the energy equation, the term of molecular thermal diffusion heat flux does not appear. These characteristics of the derived equations were shown to be very consistent concerning the physical interpretation of the gas-liquid dispersed flow. Furthermore, the obtained basic equations are consistent with experiments for the dispersed flow where most of averaged physical quantities are obtained assuming that the distributions of those are uniform within the dispersed phase. Investigation was made on the problem whether the obtained basic equations are well-posed or ill-posed for the initial value problem. The eigenvalues of the simplified mass and momentum equations are calculated for basic equations obtained here and previous two-fluid basic equations with one pressure model. Well-posedness and ill-posedness are judged whether the eigenvalues are real or imaginary. The result indicated the newly developed basic equations always constitute the well-posed initial value problem while the previous two-fluid basic equations based on one pressure model constitutes ill

  5. Implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting in permeable microvessels: Comparison of two-fluid statistical transport model with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ChiBin, Zhang; XiaoHui, Lin, E-mail: lxh60@seu.edu.cn; ZhaoMin, Wang; ChangBao, Wang

    2017-03-15

    In experiments and theoretical analyses, this study examines the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) in microvessels. It also proposes a three-dimensional statistical transport model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels, which describes blood flow by the two-fluid (Casson and Newtonian) model. The model accounts for the permeable effect of the microvessel wall and the coupling effect between the blood flow and tissue fluid flow. The MDCPs move randomly through the microvessel, and their transport state is described by the Boltzmann equation. The regulated changes and factors affecting the CE of the MDCPs in the assisted magnetic targeting were obtained by solving the theoretical model and by experimental testing. The CE was negatively correlated with the blood flow velocity, and positively correlated with the external magnetic field intensity and microvessel permeability. The predicted CEs of the MDCPs were consistent with the experimental results. Additionally, under the same external magnetic field, the predicted CE was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model than in the model ignoring the permeability effect of the microvessel wall. - Highlights: • A model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels was established. • An experimental device was established, the CE of MDCPs was measured. • The predicted CE of MDCPs was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model.

  6. The effect of the virtual mass term on the stability of the two-fluid model against perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadashi; Kutika, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the virtual mass term on the stability of the two-fluid model against perturbations is studied. Three types of virtual mass term in the momentum equation are discussed: two types of objective form and a simplified form. The differential equation system with no virtual mass term is ill-posed and the solution is unstable against perturbations. By introducing an objective form of the virtual mass term derived by Drew et al., it is shown that the equation system is rendered to be well-posed. The equation system is shown to be ill-posed, however, when a more recent definition of virtual mass acceleration of Drew and Lahey is applied. With a simplified form of the virtual mass term, which is composed only of temporal acceleration terms, the equation system is well-posed or ill-posed depending on velocities. A linear stability analysis is also performed for the implicit upwind finite difference scheme. A hypothetical accelerated flow problem is then numerically simulated by solving the discretized equation systems. It is shown that the solution can be numerically unstable even for the cases when the differential equation system is well-posed. The numerical stability of the solution must therefore be judged based on the spectral radius of the discretized equation system. (orig.)

  7. Development of Non-staggered, semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme for a two-fluid, three-field model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Yoon, H. Y.; Bae, S. W

    2007-11-15

    A pilot code for one-dimensional, transient, two-fluid, three-field model has been developed. In this code, the semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme has been adapted to a 'non-staggered' grid. Using several conceptual problems, the numerical scheme has been verified. The results of the verifications are summarized below: - It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, two-phase mixture flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. A mist flow was not simulated, but it seems that the basic pilot code can simulate mist flow conditions. - The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. - It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. - It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. The non-staggered, semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme, which has been developed in this study, will be a starting point of a new code development that adopts an unstructured finite volume method.

  8. A multilevel simulation approach to derive the slip boundary condition of the solid phase in two-fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhi-Gang; Michaelides, Efstathios; Mao, Shaolin

    2011-11-01

    The simulation of particulate flows for industrial applications often requires the use of a two-fluid model (TFM), where the solid particles are considered as a separate continuous phase. One of the underlining uncertainties in the use of aTFM in multiphase computations comes from the boundary condition of the solid phase. The no-slip condition at a solid boundary is not a valid assumption for the solid phase. Instead, several researchers advocate a slip condition as a more appropriate boundary condition. However, the question on the selection of an exact slip length or a slip velocity coefficient is still unanswered. In the present work we propose a multilevel simulation approach to compute the slip length that is applicable to a TFM. We investigate the motion of a number of particles near a vertical solid wall, while the particles are in fluidization using a direct numerical simulation (DNS); the positions and velocities of the particles are being tracked and analyzed at each time step. It is found that the time- and vertical-space averaged values of the particle velocities converge, yielding velocity profiles that can be used to deduce the particle slip length close to a solid wall. This work was supported by a grant from the DOE-NETL (DE-NT0008064) and by a grant from NSF (HRD-0932339).

  9. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  10. Simulation results for a multirate mass transfer modell for immiscible displacement of two fluids in highly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecklenburg, Jan; Neuweiler, Insa; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus; Geiger, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Flow processes in geotechnical applications do often take place in highly heterogeneous porous media, such as fractured rock. Since, in this type of media, classical modelling approaches are problematic, flow and transport is often modelled using multi-continua approaches. From such approaches, multirate mass transfer models (mrmt) can be derived to describe the flow and transport in the "fast" or mobile zone of the medium. The porous media is then modeled with one mobile zone and multiple immobile zones, where the immobile zones are connected to the mobile zone by single rate mass transfer. We proceed from a mrmt model for immiscible displacement of two fluids, where the Buckley-Leverett equation is expanded by a sink-source-term which is nonlocal in time. This sink-source-term models exchange with an immobile zone with mass transfer driven by capillary diffusion. This nonlinear diffusive mass transfer can be approximated for particular imbibition or drainage cases by a linear process. We present a numerical scheme for this model together with simulation results for a single fracture test case. We solve the mrmt model with the finite volume method and explicit time integration. The sink-source-term is transformed to multiple single rate mass transfer processes, as shown by Carrera et. al. (1998), to make it local in time. With numerical simulations we studied immiscible displacement in a single fracture test case. To do this we calculated the flow parameters using information about the geometry and the integral solution for two phase flow by McWorther and Sunnada (1990). Comparision to the results of the full two dimensional two phase flow model by Flemisch et. al. (2011) show good similarities of the saturation breakthrough curves. Carrera, J., Sanchez-Vila, X., Benet, I., Medina, A., Galarza, G., and Guimera, J.: On matrix diffusion: formulations, solution methods and qualitative effects, Hydrogeology Journal, 6, 178-190, 1998. Flemisch, B., Darcis, M

  11. Conceptual OOP design of Pilot Code for Two-Fluid, Three-field Model with C++ 6.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, B. D.; Lee, Y. J.

    2006-09-01

    To establish the concept of the objective oriented program (OOP) design for reactor safety analysis code, the preliminary OOP design for PILOT code, which based on one dimensional two fluid three filed model, has been attempted with C++ language feature. Microsoft C++ language has been used since it is available as groupware utilization in KAERI. The language has can be merged with Compac Visual Fortran 6.6 in Visual Studio platform. In the development platform, C++ has been used as main language and Fortran has been used as mixed language in connection with C++ main drive program. The mixed language environment is a specific feature provided in visual studio. Existing Fortran source was utilized for input routine of reading steam table from generated file and routine of steam property calculation. The calling convention and passing argument from C++ driver was corrected. The mathematical routine, such as inverse matrix conversion and tridiagonal matrix solver, has been used as PILOT Fortran routines. Simple volume and junction utilized in PILOT code can be treated as objects, since they are the basic construction elements of code system. Other routines for overall solution scheme have been realized as procedure C functions. The conceptual design which consists of hydraulic loop, component, volume, and junction class has been described in the appendix in order to give the essential OOP structure of system safety analysis code. The attempt shows that many part of system analysis code can be expressed as objects, although the overall structure should be maintained as procedure functions. The encapsulation of data and functions within an object can provide many beneficial aspects in programming of system code

  12. Conceptual OOP design of Pilot Code for Two-Fluid, Three-field Model with C++ 6.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B. D.; Lee, Y. J

    2006-09-15

    To establish the concept of the objective oriented program (OOP) design for reactor safety analysis code, the preliminary OOP design for PILOT code, which based on one dimensional two fluid three filed model, has been attempted with C++ language feature. Microsoft C++ language has been used since it is available as groupware utilization in KAERI. The language has can be merged with Compac Visual Fortran 6.6 in Visual Studio platform. In the development platform, C++ has been used as main language and Fortran has been used as mixed language in connection with C++ main drive program. The mixed language environment is a specific feature provided in visual studio. Existing Fortran source was utilized for input routine of reading steam table from generated file and routine of steam property calculation. The calling convention and passing argument from C++ driver was corrected. The mathematical routine, such as inverse matrix conversion and tridiagonal matrix solver, has been used as PILOT Fortran routines. Simple volume and junction utilized in PILOT code can be treated as objects, since they are the basic construction elements of code system. Other routines for overall solution scheme have been realized as procedure C functions. The conceptual design which consists of hydraulic loop, component, volume, and junction class has been described in the appendix in order to give the essential OOP structure of system safety analysis code. The attempt shows that many part of system analysis code can be expressed as objects, although the overall structure should be maintained as procedure functions. The encapsulation of data and functions within an object can provide many beneficial aspects in programming of system code.

  13. The analysis of two-phase flow and heat transfer using a multidimensional, four field, two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, Richard T.; Drew, Donald A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the prediction of multidimensional multiphase flow and heat transfer phenomena using a four field, two-fluid model. It is shown that accurate mechanistic computational fluid dynamic (CFD) predictions are possible for a wide variety of adiabatic and diabatic flows using this computational model. In particular, the model is able to predict the bubbly air/water upflow data of Serizawa (Serizawa, A., 1974. Fluid dynamic characteristics of two-phase flow. Ph.D. thesis, (Nuclear Engineering), Kyoto University, Japan), the downflow data of Wang et al. (Wang, S.K., Lee, S.J., Lahey Jr., R.T., Jones, O.C., 1987. 3-D turbulence structure and phase distribution measurements in bubbly two-phase flows. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 13 (3), 327-343), the isosceles triangle upflow data of Lopez de Bertodano et al. (Lopez de Bertodano, M., Lahey Jr., R.T., Jones, O.C., 1994b. Phase distribution in bubbly two-phase flow in vertical ducts. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 20 (5), 805-818), the heated annular R-113 subcooled boiling data of Velidandala, et al. (Velidandla, V., Pulta, S., Roy, P., Kaira, S.P., 1995. Velocity field in turbulent subcooled boiling flow. ASME Preprint HTD-314, 107-123) and the R-113 CHF data of Hino and Ueda (Hino, R., Ueda, T., 1985. Studies on heat transfer and flow characteristics in subcooled boiling-part 2, flow characteristics. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 11, 283-297). It can also predict external two-phase flows, such as those for spreading two-phase jets (Bonetto, F., Lahey Jr., R.T., 1993. An experimental study on air carryunder due to a plunging liquid jet. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 19 (2), 281-294) and multiphase flows around the hull of naval surface ships (Carrica, P.M., Bonetto, F., Drew, D.A., Lahey, R.T., 1999. A polydispersed model for bubbly two-phase flow around a surface ship. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 25 (2), 257-305)

  14. Why the two-fluid model fails to predict the bed expansion characteristics of Geldart A particles in gas-fluidized beds: A tentative answers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Hoef, van der M.A.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that two-fluid models (TFMs) can successfully predict the hydrodynamics of Geldart B and D particles. However, up to now, TFM have failed to accurately describe the hydrodynamics of Geldart A particles inside bubbling gas-fluidized beds: Researchers have reported that bed expansions

  15. Why the two-fluid model fails to predict the bed expansion characteristics of Geldart A particles in gas-fluidized beds: A tentative answer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; van der Hoef, Martin Anton; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that two-fluid models (TFMs) can successfully predict the hydrodynamics of Geldart B and D particles. However, up to now, TFM have failed to accurately describe the hydrodynamics of Geldart A particles inside bubbling gas-fluidized beds: Researchers have reported that bed expansions

  16. Simulation of the two-fluid model on incompressible flow with Fractional Step method for both resolved and unresolved scale interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Xiaofei; Rigola, Joaquim; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Oliva, Assensi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two phase flow with free surface is solved by means of two-fluid model (TFM). • Fractional Step method and finite volume technique is used to solve TFM. • Conservative Level Set method reduces interface sharpening diffusion problem. • Cases including high density ratios and high viscosities validate the models. - Abstract: In the present paper, the Fractional Step method usually used in single fluid flow is here extended and applied for the two-fluid model resolution using the finite volume discretization. The use of a projection method resolution instead of the usual pressure-correction method for multi-fluid flow, successfully avoids iteration processes. On the other hand, the main weakness of the two fluid model used for simulations of free surface flows, which is the numerical diffusion of the interface, is also solved by means of the conservative Level Set method (interface sharpening) (Strubelj et al., 2009). Moreover, the use of the algorithm proposed has allowed presenting different free-surface cases with or without Level Set implementation even under coarse meshes under a wide range of density ratios. Thus, the numerical results presented, numerically verified, experimentally validated and converged under high density ratios, shows the capability and reliability of this resolution method for both mixed and unmixed flows

  17. A comprehensive Two-Fluid Model for Cavitation and Primary Atomization Modelling of liquid jets - Application to a large marine Diesel injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habchi, Chawki; Bohbot, Julien; Schmid, Andreas; Herrmann, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive two-fluid model is suggested in order to compute the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the primary atomization of liquid jets, simultaneously. This model has been applied to the computation of a typical large marine Diesel injector. The numerical results have shown a strong correlation between the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the ensuing spray orientation and atomization. Indeed, the results have confirmed the existence of an off-axis liquid core. This asymmetry is likely to be at the origin of the spray deviation observed experimentally. In addition, the primary atomization begins very close to the orifice exit as in the experiments, and the smallest droplets are generated due to cavitation pocket shape oscillations located at the same side, inside the orifice. (paper)

  18. A comprehensive Two-Fluid Model for Cavitation and Primary Atomization Modelling of liquid jets - Application to a large marine Diesel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habchi, Chawki; Bohbot, Julien; Schmid, Andreas; Herrmann, Kai

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive two-fluid model is suggested in order to compute the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the primary atomization of liquid jets, simultaneously. This model has been applied to the computation of a typical large marine Diesel injector. The numerical results have shown a strong correlation between the in-nozzle cavitating flow and the ensuing spray orientation and atomization. Indeed, the results have confirmed the existence of an off-axis liquid core. This asymmetry is likely to be at the origin of the spray deviation observed experimentally. In addition, the primary atomization begins very close to the orifice exit as in the experiments, and the smallest droplets are generated due to cavitation pocket shape oscillations located at the same side, inside the orifice.

  19. Numerical prediction of pressure loss in tight-lattice rod bundle by use of 3-dimensional two-fluid model simulation code ACE-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method or particle interaction method. Therefore, two-fluid model is useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in large-scale domain such as a rod bundle. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) develops three dimensional two-fluid model analysis code ACE-3D that adopts boundary fitted coordinate system in order to simulate complex shape flow channel. In this paper, boiling two-phase flow analysis in a tight-lattice rod bundle was performed by the ACE-3D. In the results, the void fraction, which distributes in outermost region of rod bundle, is lower than that in center region of rod bundle. The tendency of void fraction distribution agreed with the measurement results by neutron radiography qualitatively. To evaluate effects of two-phase flow model used in the ACE-3D, numerical simulation of boiling two-phase in tight-lattice rod bundle with no lift force model was also performed. In the results, the lift force model has direct effects on void fraction concentration in gap region, and pressure distribution in horizontal plane induced by void fraction distribution cause of bubble movement from the gap region to the subchannel region. The predicted pressure loss in the section that includes no spacer accorded with experimental results with around 10% of differences. The predicted friction pressure loss was underestimated around 20% of measured values, and the effect of the turbulence model is considered as one of the causes of this underestimation. (author)

  20. Analysis of the two-fluid model and the drift-flux model for numerical calculation of two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munkejord, Svend Tollak

    2006-05-11

    This thesis analyses models for two-phase flows and methods for the numerical resolution of these models. It is therefore one contribution to the development of reliable design tools for multiphase applications. Such tools are needed and expected by engineers in a range of fields, including in the oil and gas industry. The approximate Riemann solver of Roe has been studied. Roe schemes for three different two-phase flow models have been implemented in the framework of a standard numerical algorithm for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws. The schemes have been analysed by calculation of benchmark tests from the literature, and by comparison with each other. A Roe scheme for the four-equation one-pressure two-fluid model has been implemented, and a second-order extension based on wave decomposition and flux-difference splitting was shown to work well and to give improved results compared to the first-order scheme. The convergence properties of the scheme were tested on smooth and discontinuous solutions. A Roe scheme has been proposed for a five-equation two-pressure two-fluid model with pressure relaxation. The use of analogous numerical methods for the five-equation and four-equation models allowed for a direct comparison of a method with and without pressure relaxation. Numerical experiments demonstrated that the two approaches converged to the same results, but that the five-equation pressure-relaxation method was significantly more dissipative, particularly for contact discontinuities. Furthermore, even though the five-equation model with instantaneous pressure relaxation has real eigenvalues, the calculations showed that it produced oscillations for cases where the four-equation model had complex eigenvalues. A Roe scheme has been constructed for the drift-flux model with general closure laws. For the case of the Zuber-Findlay slip law describing bubbly flows, the Roe matrix is completely analytical. Hence the present Roe scheme is more efficient than

  1. Image potential in the interaction of fast ions with carbon nanotubes: A comparison between the one- and two-fluid hydrodynamic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karbunar, L.; Borka, D.; Radović, I.; Mišković, Z.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the interaction of protons with carbon nanotubes under channeling conditions. • We use the linearized, 2D, one-fluid and two-fluid hydrodynamic models. • The image potential for a proton moving parallel to the nanotube axis is calculated. • Results for the image potential are compared for different types of nanotubes. • We also compute the angular and spatial distributions of channeled protons. - Abstract: We study the interaction of charged particles with four different types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) under channeling conditions by means of the linearized, two dimensional, one-fluid and two-fluid hydrodynamic models. The models are used to calculate the image potential for protons moving parallel to the axis of the SWNTs at the speeds up to 10 a.u. Numerical results are obtained to show the influence of the damping factor, the nanotube radius, and the particle position on the image potential inside the nanotube. We also compute the spatial and angular distributions of protons and compare them for the two models

  2. Development of design technology on thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundle. 4. Large paralleled simulation by the advanced two-fluid model code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Takeharu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) has been developed. For thermal design of FLWR, it is necessary to develop analytical method to predict boiling transition of FLWR. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing three-dimensional two-fluid model analysis code ACE-3D, which adopts boundary fitted coordinate system to simulate complex shape channel flow. In this paper, as a part of development of ACE-3D to apply to rod bundle analysis, introduction of parallelization to ACE-3D and assessments of ACE-3D are shown. In analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle, even two-fluid model requires large number of computational cost, which exceeds upper limit of memory amount of 1 CPU. Therefore, parallelization was introduced to ACE-3D to divide data amount for analysis of large-scale domain among large number of CPUs, and it is confirmed that analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle can be performed by parallel computation with keeping parallel computation performance even using large number of CPUs. ACE-3D adopts two-phase flow models, some of which are dependent upon channel geometry. Therefore, analyses in the domains, which simulate individual subchannel and 37 rod bundle, are performed, and compared with experiments. It is confirmed that the results obtained by both analyses using ACE-3D show agreement with past experimental result qualitatively. (author)

  3. Nonlinear evolution of magnetic islands in a two fluid torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, L.E.; Park, W.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical model MH3D-T for the two fluid description of macroscopic evolution in a full three dimensional torus has been developed. Based on the perturbative drift ordering, generalized to arbitrary perturbation size, the model follows the full temperature evolution, including the thermal equilibration along the magnetic field. It contains the diamagnetic drifts, ion gyroviscous stress tensor, and the Hall term in Ohm's law. Electron inertia is neglected. The numerical model solves the same equations in a torus and in several simplified configurations. It has been benchmarked against the diamagnetic ω* i stabilization of the resistive m = 1, n = 1 reconnecting mode in a cylinder. The nonlinear evolution of resistive magnetic islands with m,n ≠ 1,1 in a cylinder is found to agree with previous analytic and reduced-torus results, which show that the diamagnetic rotation vanishes early in the island evolution and the saturated island size is determined by the same external driving factor Δ' as in MHD. The two fluid evolution in a full torus, however, differs from that in a cylinder and from the resistive MHD evolution. The poloidal rotation velocity undergoes a degree of poloidal momentum damping in the torus, even without neoclassical effects. The two fluid magnetic island grows faster, nonlinearly, than the resistive MHD island, and also couples different toroidal harmonics more effectively. Plasma compressibility and processes operating along the magnetic field play a much more important role than in MHD or in simple geometry. The two fluid model contains all the important neoclassical fluid effects except for the b circ ∇ circ Π parallelj viscous force terms. The addition of these terms is in progress

  4. Development, implementation and assessment of specific closure laws for inverted-annular film-boiling in a two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, F. de

    1994-10-01

    Inverted-annular film-boiling (IAFB) is one of the post-burnout heat transfer modes taking place, in particular, during the reflooding phase of the loss-of-coolant accident, when the liquid at the quench front is subcooled. Under IAFB conditions, a continuous liquid core is separated from the wall by a superheated vapour film. The heat transfer rate in IAFB is influenced by the flooding rate, liquid subcooling, pressure, and the wall geometry and temperature. These influences can be accounted by a two-fluid model with physically sound closure laws for mass, momentum and heat transfer between the wall, the vapour film, the vapour-liquid interface, and the liquid core. The applicability of existing IAFB two-fluid models is limited. This is attributed to shortcomings in the description of heat transfer within the liquid core, to use of certain correlations outside their validity range, and to a limited use of experimental information on IAFB. The usual approach has been to develop models employing generally applicable closure laws including, however, adjustable parameters, and to adjust these using global experimental results. The present approach has been to develop IAFB-specific closure laws in such a form that they could be adjusted separately using detailed, IAFB-relevant, experimental result. Steady-state results, including heat flux, wall temperature and void fraction data have been used for the adjustment. A key issue in IAFB modeling is to predict how the heat flux reaching the vapour-liquid interface is split into a liquid heating term and a vaporization term. In the model proposed, convective liquid heating is related to the liquid velocity relative to the interface, and not to the absolute liquid velocity, as in previous models. This relative velocity is deduced from the interfacial shear stress, using the liquid-interface friction law. With this modification, the prediction of the experimental trends is greatly improved. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  5. Simulations of intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions within relativistic mean-field two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Y.B.; Russkikh, V.N.; Pokrovsky, Y.E. Kurchatov; Ivanov, Y.B.; Russkikh, V.N.; Polrovsky, Y.E.; Henning, P.A.; Henning, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional realization of the relativistic mean-field 2-fluid model is described. The first results of analyzing the inclusive data on the yield of nuclear fragments and pions, as well as the Plastic-Ball rapidity distributions of nuclear fragments are presented. For comparison, the calculations within the conventional relativistic hydrodynamical model with the same mean fields are also performed. It is found that all the analysed observables, except the pion spectra, appeared to be fairly insensitive to the nuclear EOS. The sensitivity to the nuclear stopping power is slightly higher. The original sensitivity of the rapidity distributions to the stopping power is smeared out by the Plastic-Ball filter and selection criterion. Nevertheless, one can conclude that the stopping power induced by the Cugnon cross-sections is not quite sufficient for a more adequate reproduction of the experimental data. (authors)

  6. A two-fluid two-phase model for thermal-hydraulic analysis of a U-tube steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Huanjen; Chieng, Chingchang; Pei, Baushei; Wang, Songfeng

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code for Nuclear Steam Generators (ATHANS) was developed on the basis of the THERMIT-UTSG computer code for U-tube steam generators. The main features of the ATHANS model are as follows: (a) the equations are solved in cylindrical coordinates, (b) the number and the arrangement of the control volumes inside the steam generator can be chosen by the user, (c) the virtual mass effect is incorporated, and (d) the conjugate gradient squared method is employed to accelerate and improve the numerical convergence. The performance of the model is successfully validated by comparison with the test data from a Westinghouse model F steam generator at the Maanshan nuclear power plant. Better agreement with the test data can be obtained by a finer grid system using a cylindrical coordinate system and the virtual mass effect. With these advanced features, ATHANS provides the basic framework for further studies on the problems of steam generators, such as analyses of secondary-side corrosion and tube ruptures

  7. Lattice-Boltzmann Modeling of Community Challenge MicrofluidicExperiments to Evaluate the Effects of Wettability on Two-Fluid Flowin Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. T.; McClure, J. E.; Bruning, K.

    2017-12-01

    Variations in the wettability of a solid material are well known to affect the flow of two fluids in a porous media. However, thesemechanisms have not been modeled with high fidelity at the microscale and such mechanisms are typically not included in macroscalemodels. Recent experimental work by Zhao, MacMinn, and Juanes published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences(2016) has investigated two-fluid displacement in microfluidic cells. Displacement patterns were investigated as a function of thecontact angle and the capillary number for both drainage and imbibition. These results yielded new mechanistic understanding ofprocesses such as pore filling and post bridging, which were imaged at high resolution. In a challenge to the pore-scale modeling community,the authors of this work released their experimental data and encouraged an international set of modeling research groups tosimulate the conditions that were experimentally observed. The intent is to compare the results that materialize to shed new light on thestate-of-science in pore-scale simulation of these challenging and interesting flow systems. In this work, we summarize the experimentalfindings and report on initial efforts to simulate these community challenge experiments using a high-resolution lattice-Boltzmann method(LBM). A three-dimensional, multiple-relaxation-time color model based on a 19-site lattice is advanced in this work to matchexperimental conditions in a novel manner. A computational approach is implemented for the LBM method on hybrid CPU-GPU nodes and shown toscale near optimally. A new algorithm is described to match experimental boundary conditions. A grid-resolution study is performedto determine the resolution needed to determine grid-independent numerical approximations. Finally, the LBM simulation results arecompared to the highly resolved microfluidic experiments, displacement mechanisms are investigated, and observations and analysis of thetopological state

  8. A two-fluid model for vertical flow applied to CO2 injection wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linga, Gaute; Lund, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    Flow of CO2 in wells is associated with substantial variations in thermophysical properties downhole, due to the coupled transient processes involved: complex flow patterns, density changes, phase transitions, and heat transfer to and from surroundings. Large temperature variations can lead...... the well, including tubing, packer fluid, casing, cement or drilling mud, and rock formation. This enables prediction of the temperature in the well fluid and in each layer of the well. The model is applied to sudden shut-in and blowout cases of a CO2 injection well, where we employ the highly accurate...

  9. One-dimensional two-fluid model for wavy flow beyond the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability: Limit cycles and chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Bertodano, Martín, E-mail: bertodan@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Fullmer, William D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, U. of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2016-12-15

    A 1D TFM numerical simulation of near horizontal stratified two-phase flow is performed where the TFM, including surface tension and viscous stresses, is simplified to a two-equation model using the fixed-flux approximation. As the angle of inclination of the channel increases so does the driving body force, so the flow becomes KH unstable, and waves grow and develop nonlinearities. It is shown that these waves grow until they reach a limit cycle due to viscous dissipation at wave fronts. Upon further inclination of the channel, chaos is observed. The appearance of chaos in a 1D TFM implies a nonlinear process that transfers energy intermittently from long wavelengths where energy is produced to short wavelengths where energy is dissipated by viscosity, so that an averaged energy equilibrium in frequency space is attained. This is comparable to the well-known turbulent stability mechanism of the multi-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations, i.e., chaos implies Lyapunov stability, but in this case it is strictly a two-phase phenomenon.

  10. A biological compression model and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Minh Duc; Dix, Trevor I; Allison, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    A biological compression model, expert model, is presented which is superior to existing compression algorithms in both compression performance and speed. The model is able to compress whole eukaryotic genomes. Most importantly, the model provides a framework for knowledge discovery from biological data. It can be used for repeat element discovery, sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. We demonstrate that the model can handle statistically biased sequences and distantly related sequences where conventional knowledge discovery tools often fail.

  11. Large interface simulation in an averaged two-fluid code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, A.

    2006-01-01

    Different ranges of size of interfaces and eddies are involved in multiphase flow phenomena. Classical formalisms focus on a specific range of size. This study presents a Large Interface Simulation (LIS) two-fluid compressible formalism taking into account different sizes of interfaces. As in the single-phase Large Eddy Simulation, a filtering process is used to point out Large Interface (LI) simulation and Small interface (SI) modelization. The LI surface tension force is modelled adapting the well-known CSF method. The modelling of SI transfer terms is done calling for classical closure laws of the averaged approach. To simulate accurately LI transfer terms, we develop a LI recognition algorithm based on a dimensionless criterion. The LIS model is applied in a classical averaged two-fluid code. The LI transfer terms modelling and the LI recognition are validated on analytical and experimental tests. A square base basin excited by a horizontal periodic movement is studied with the LIS model. The capability of the model is also shown on the case of the break-up of a bubble in a turbulent liquid flow. The break-up of a large bubble at a grid impact performed regime transition between two different scales of interface from LI to SI and from PI to LI. (author) [fr

  12. Modeling Compressed Turbulence with BHR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Turbulence undergoing compression or expansion occurs in systems ranging from internal combustion engines to supernovae. One common feature in many of these systems is the presence of multiple reacting species. Direct numerical simulation data is available for the single-fluid, low turbulent Mach number case. Wu, et al. (1985) compared their DNS results to several Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. They also proposed a three-equation k - ɛ - τ model, in conjunction with a Reynolds-stress model. Subsequent researchers have proposed alternative corrections to the standard k - ɛ formulation. Here we investigate three variants of the BHR model (Besnard, 1992). BHR is a model for multi-species variable-density turbulence. The three variants are the linear eddy-viscosity, algebraic-stress, and full Reynolds-stress formulations. We then examine the predictions of the model for the fluctuating density field for the case of variable-density turbulence.

  13. Numerical analysis of ion temperature effects to the plasma wall transition using a one-dimensional two-fluid model. I. Finite Debye to ionization length ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2017-06-01

    A one-dimensional, two-fluid, steady state model is used for the analysis of ion temperature effects to the plasma-wall transition. In this paper, the model is solved for a finite ratio ɛ between the Debye and the ionization length, while in Part II [T. Gyergyek and J. Kovačič, Phys Plasmas 24, 063506 (2017)], the solutions for ɛ = 0 are presented. Ion temperature is treated as a given, independent parameter and it is included in the model as a boundary condition. It is shown that when the ion temperature larger than zero is selected, the ion flow velocity and the electric field at the boundary must be consistent with the selected ion temperature. A numerical procedure, how to determine such "consistent boundary conditions," is proposed, and a simple relation between the ion temperature and ion velocity at the boundary of the system is found. The effects of the ion temperature to the pre-sheath length, potential, ion temperature, and ion density drops in the pre-sheath and in the sheath are investigated. It is concluded that larger ion temperature results in a better shielding of the plasma from the wall. An attempt is made to include the ion heat flux qi into the model in its simplest form q i = - K ' /d T i d x , where K ' is a constant heat conduction coefficient. It is shown that inclusion of such a term into the energy transfer equation introduces an additional ion heating mechanism into the system and the ion flow then becomes isothermal instead of adiabatic even in the sheath.

  14. Validation of single-fluid and two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic models of the helicity injected torus spheromak experiment with the NIMROD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akcay, Cihan; Victor, Brian S.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Kim, Charlson C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a comparison study of 3-D pressureless resistive MHD (rMHD) and 3-D presureless two-fluid MHD models of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI). HIT-SI is a current drive experiment that uses two geometrically asymmetric helicity injectors to generate and sustain toroidal plasmas. The comparable size of the collisionless ion skin depth d i to the resistive skin depth predicates the importance of the Hall term for HIT-SI. The simulations are run with NIMROD, an initial-value, 3-D extended MHD code. The modeled plasma density and temperature are assumed uniform and constant. The helicity injectors are modeled as oscillating normal magnetic and parallel electric field boundary conditions. The simulations use parameters that closely match those of the experiment. The simulation output is compared to the formation time, plasma current, and internal and surface magnetic fields. Results of the study indicate 2fl-MHD shows quantitative agreement with the experiment while rMHD only captures the qualitative features. The validity of each model is assessed based on how accurately it reproduces the global quantities as well as the temporal and spatial dependence of the measured magnetic fields. 2fl-MHD produces the current amplification (I tor /I inj ) and formation time τ f demonstrated by HIT-SI with similar internal magnetic fields. rMHD underestimates (I tor /I inj ) and exhibits much a longer τ f . Biorthogonal decomposition (BD), a powerful mathematical tool for reducing large data sets, is employed to quantify how well the simulations reproduce the measured surface magnetic fields without resorting to a probe-by-probe comparison. BD shows that 2fl-MHD captures the dominant surface magnetic structures and the temporal behavior of these features better than rMHD

  15. An interfacial shear term evaluation study for adiabatic dispersed air–water two-phase flow with the two-fluid model using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Schlegel, J.P. [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Buchanan, J.R.; Hogan, K.J. [Bettis Laboratory, Naval Nuclear Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA (United States); Guilbert, P.W. [ANSYS UK Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Closure form of the interfacial shear term in three-dimensional form is investigated. • Assessment against adiabatic upward bubbly air–water flow data using CFD. • Effect of addition of the interfacial shear term on the phase distribution. - Abstract: In commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as ANSYS CFX and Fluent, the interfacial shear term is missing in the field momentum equations. The derivation of the two-fluid model (Ishii and Hibiki, 2011) indicates the presence of this term as a momentum source in the right hand side of the field momentum equation. The inclusion of this term is considered important for proper modeling of the interfacial momentum coupling between phases. For separated flows, such as annular flow, the importance of the shear term is understood in the one-dimensional (1-D) form as the major mechanism by which the wall shear is transferred to the gas phase (Ishii and Mishima, 1984). For gas dispersed two-phase flow CFD simulations, it is important to assess the significance of this term in the prediction of phase distributions. In the first part of this work, the closure of this term in three-dimensional (3-D) form in a CFD code is investigated. For dispersed gas–liquid flow, such as bubbly or churn-turbulent flow, bubbles are dispersed in the shear layer of the continuous phase. The continuous phase shear stress is mainly due to the presence of the wall and the modeling of turbulence through the Boussinesq hypothesis. In a 3-D simulation, the continuous phase shear stress can be calculated from the continuous fluid velocity gradient, so that the interfacial shear term can be closed using the local values of the volume fraction and the total stress of liquid phase. This form also assures that the term acts as an action-reaction force for multiple phases. In the second part of this work, the effect of this term on the volume fraction distribution is investigated. For testing the model two

  16. Bond graph modeling of centrifugal compression systems

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Nur; Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to model unsteady fluid dynamics in a compressor network by using a bond graph is presented. The model is intended in particular for compressor control system development. First, we develop a bond graph model of a single compression system. Bond graph modeling offers a different perspective to previous work by modeling the compression system based on energy flow instead of fluid dynamics. Analyzing the bond graph model explains the energy flow during compressor surge. Two pri...

  17. Physics Based Modeling of Compressible Turbulance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-07

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0345 PHYSICS -BASED MODELING OF COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE PARVIZ MOIN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report 09/13/2016...on the AFOSR project (FA9550-11-1-0111) entitled: Physics based modeling of compressible turbulence. The period of performance was, June 15, 2011...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Page 1 of 2FORM SF 298 11/10/2016https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll PHYSICS -BASED MODELING OF COMPRESSIBLE

  18. A Schur complement method for compressible two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Thu-Huyen; Ndjinga, Michael; Magoules, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we will report our recent efforts to apply a Schur complement method for nonlinear hyperbolic problems. We use the finite volume method and an implicit version of the Roe approximate Riemann solver. With the interface variable introduced in [4] in the context of single phase flows, we are able to simulate two-fluid models ([12]) with various schemes such as upwind, centered or Rusanov. Moreover, we introduce a scaling strategy to improve the condition number of both the interface system and the local systems. Numerical results for the isentropic two-fluid model and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in various 2D and 3D configurations and various schemes show that our method is robust and efficient. The scaling strategy considerably reduces the number of GMRES iterations in both interface system and local system resolutions. Comparisons of performances with classical distributed computing with up to 218 processors are also reported. (authors)

  19. A Comparison of the Computation Times of Thermal Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium Models of Droplet Field in a Two-Fluid Three-Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Cho, Heong Kyu; Kim, Jong Tae; Yoon, Han Young; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2007-12-15

    A computational model for transient, 3 dimensional 2 phase flows was developed by using 'unstructured-FVM-based, non-staggered, semi-implicit numerical scheme' considering the thermally non-equilibrium droplets. The assumption of the thermally equilibrium between liquid and droplets of previous studies was not used any more, and three energy conservation equations for vapor, liquid, liquid droplets were set up. Thus, 9 conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy were established to simulate 2 phase flows. In this report, the governing equations and a semi-implicit numerical sheme for a transient 1 dimensional 2 phase flows was described considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets. The comparison with the previous model considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets was also reported.

  20. Physical and numerical modeling of multidimensional liquid-vapor flows advanced two-fluid models, application to upwind finite volume methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seignole, V.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the work of thesis realized under the direction of Jean-Michel Ghidaglia (thesis director, ENS-Cachan) and of Anela Kumbaro (tutor, CEA) within the framework of the modeling of two-phase flows with OAP code. The report consists of two parts of unequal size: the first part concentrates on aspects related exclusively to two-phase flows, while the second one is devoted to the study of a numerical problem inherent to the resolution of two-phase flow systems, but whose action has a broader framework. (author)

  1. Error Resilient Video Compression Using Behavior Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacco R. Taal

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless and Internet video applications are inherently subjected to bit errors and packet errors, respectively. This is especially so if constraints on the end-to-end compression and transmission latencies are imposed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods to optimize the video compression parameters and the rate allocation of these applications that take into account residual channel bit errors. In this paper, we study the behavior of a predictive (interframe video encoder and model the encoders behavior using only the statistics of the original input data and of the underlying channel prone to bit errors. The resulting data-driven behavior models are then used to carry out group-of-pictures partitioning and to control the rate of the video encoder in such a way that the overall quality of the decoded video with compression and channel errors is optimized.

  2. Artificial Neural Network Model for Predicting Compressive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim T. Yousif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Compressive strength of concrete is a commonly used criterion in evaluating concrete. Although testing of the compressive strength of concrete specimens is done routinely, it is performed on the 28th day after concrete placement. Therefore, strength estimation of concrete at early time is highly desirable. This study presents the effort in applying neural network-based system identification techniques to predict the compressive strength of concrete based on concrete mix proportions, maximum aggregate size (MAS, and slump of fresh concrete. Back-propagation neural networks model is successively developed, trained, and tested using actual data sets of concrete mix proportions gathered from literature.    The test of the model by un-used data within the range of input parameters shows that the maximum absolute error for model is about 20% and 88% of the output results has absolute errors less than 10%. The parametric study shows that water/cement ratio (w/c is the most significant factor  affecting the output of the model.     The results showed that neural networks has strong potential as a feasible tool for predicting compressive strength of concrete.

  3. Gmz: a Gml Compression Model for Webgis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, A.; Rajan, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    Geography markup language (GML) is an XML specification for expressing geographical features. Defined by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), it is widely used for storage and transmission of maps over the Internet. XML schemas provide the convenience to define custom features profiles in GML for specific needs as seen in widely popular cityGML, simple features profile, coverage, etc. Simple features profile (SFP) is a simpler subset of GML profile with support for point, line and polygon geometries. SFP has been constructed to make sure it covers most commonly used GML geometries. Web Feature Service (WFS) serves query results in SFP by default. But it falls short of being an ideal choice due to its high verbosity and size-heavy nature, which provides immense scope for compression. GMZ is a lossless compression model developed to work for SFP compliant GML files. Our experiments indicate GMZ achieves reasonably good compression ratios and can be useful in WebGIS based applications.

  4. Compression Models for Plasma Focus Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Calusse, Alejandro; Ramos, Ruben; Rodriguez Palomino, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Using a numerical model that calculates the dynamics of Plasma Focus devices, we compared the results of three different compression models of the plasma pinch.One of the main objectives in this area is to develop a simplified model to calculate the neutron production of Plasma Focus devices, to study the influence of the main parameters in this neutron yield.The dynamics is thoroughly studied, and the model predicts fairly well values such as maximum currents and times for pinch collapse.Therefore, we evaluate here different models of pinch compression, to try to predict the neutron production with good agreement with the rest of the variables involved.To fulfill this requirement, we have experimental results of neutron production as a function of deuterium filling pressure in the chamber, and typical values of other main variables in the dynamics of the current sheet

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic motion of a two-fluid plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, J. W.

    2017-08-01

    The two-fluid Maxwell system couples frictionless electrons and ion fluids via Maxwell's equations. When the frequencies of light waves, Langmuir waves, and single-particle cyclotron motion are scaled to be asymptotically large, the two-fluid Maxwell system becomes a fast-slow dynamical system. This fast-slow system admits a formally exact single-fluid closure that may be computed systematically with any desired order of accuracy through the use of a functional partial differential equation. In the leading order approximation, the closure reproduces magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Higher order truncations of the closure give an infinite hierarchy of extended MHD models that allow for arbitrary mass ratio, as well as perturbative deviations from charge neutrality. The closure is interpreted geometrically as an invariant slow manifold in the infinite-dimensional two-fluid phase space, on which two-fluid motions are free of high-frequency oscillations. This perspective shows that the full closure inherits a Hamiltonian structure from the two-fluid theory. By employing infinite-dimensional Lie transforms, the Poisson bracket for the all-order closure may be obtained in the closed form. Thus, conservative truncations of the single-fluid closure may be obtained by simply truncating the single-fluid Hamiltonian. Moreover, the closed-form expression for the all-order bracket gives explicit expressions for a number of the full closure's conservation laws. Notably, the full closure, as well as any of its Hamiltonian truncations, admits a pair of independent circulation invariants.

  6. Validation of a two-fluid model used for the simulation of dense fluidized beds; Validation d`un modele a deux fluides applique a la simulation des lits fluidises denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelle, A.

    1997-02-17

    A two-fluid model applied to the simulation of gas-solid dense fluidized beds is validated on micro scale and on macro scale. Phase coupling is carried out in the momentum and energy transport equation of both phases. The modeling is built on the kinetic theory of granular media in which the gas action has been taken into account in order to get correct expressions of transport coefficients. A description of hydrodynamic interactions between particles in high Stokes number flow is also incorporated in the model. The micro scale validation uses Lagrangian numerical simulations viewed as numerical experiments. The first validation case refers to a gas particle simple shear flow. It allows to validate the competition between two dissipation mechanisms: drag and particle collisions. The second validation case is concerted with sedimenting particles in high Stokes number flow. It allows to validate our approach of hydrodynamic interactions. This last case had led us to develop an original Lagrangian simulation with a two-way coupling between the fluid and the particles. The macro scale validation uses the results of Eulerian simulations of dense fluidized bed. Bed height, particles circulation and spontaneous created bubbles characteristics are studied and compared to experimental measurement, both looking at physical and numerical parameters. (author) 159 refs.

  7. Numerical solver for compressible two-fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Naber (Jorick)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis report treats the development of a numerical solver for the simulation of flows of two non-mixing fluids described by the two-dimensional Euler equations. A level-set equation in conservative form describes the interface. After each time step the deformed level-set function is

  8. A biomechanical model of mammographic compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J H; Rajagopal, V; Nielsen, P M F; Nash, M P

    2008-02-01

    A number of biomechanical models have been proposed to improve nonrigid registration techniques for multimodal breast image alignment. A deformable breast model may also be useful for overcoming difficulties in interpreting 2D X-ray projections (mammograms) of 3D volumes (breast tissues). If a deformable model could accurately predict the shape changes that breasts undergo during mammography, then the model could serve to localize suspicious masses (visible in mammograms) in the unloaded state, or in any other deformed state required for further investigations (such as biopsy or other medical imaging modalities). In this paper, we present a validation study that was conducted in order to develop a biomechanical model based on the well-established theory of continuum mechanics (finite elasticity theory with contact mechanics) and demonstrate its use for this application. Experimental studies using gel phantoms were conducted to test the accuracy in predicting mammographic-like deformations. The material properties of the gel phantom were estimated using a nonlinear optimization process, which minimized the errors between the experimental and the model-predicted surface data by adjusting the parameter associated with the neo-Hookean constitutive relation. Two compressions (the equivalent of cranio-caudal and medio-lateral mammograms) were performed on the phantom, and the corresponding deformations were recorded using a MRI scanner. Finite element simulations were performed to mimic the experiments using the estimated material properties with appropriate boundary conditions. The simulation results matched the experimental recordings of the deformed phantom, with a sub-millimeter root-mean-square error for each compression state. Having now validated our finite element model of breast compression, the next stage is to apply the model to clinical images.

  9. Accounting for the Effect of Noncondensing Gases on Interphasic Heat and Mass Transfer in the Two-Fluid Model Used in the KORSAR Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudov, Yu. V.

    2018-03-01

    A model is presented of the interphasic heat and mass transfer in the presence of noncondensable gases for the KORSAR/GP design code. This code was developed by FGUP NITI and the special design bureau OKB Gidropress. It was certified by Rostekhnadzor in 2009 for numerical substantiation of the safety of reactor installations with VVER reactors. The model is based on the assumption that there are three types of interphasic heat and mass transfer of the vapor component: vapor condensation or evaporation on the interphase under any thermodynamic conditions of the phases, pool boiling of the liquid superheated above the saturation temperature at the total pressure, and spontaneous condensation in the volume of gas phase supercooled below the saturation temperature at the vapor partial pressure. Condensation and evaporation on the interphase continuously occur in a two-phase flow and control the time response of the interphase heat and mass transfer. Boiling and spontaneous condensation take place only at the metastable condition of the phases and run at a quite high speed. The procedure used for calculating condensation and evaporation on the interphase accounts for the combined diffusion and thermal resistance of mass transfer in all regimes of the two-phase flow. The proposed approach accounts for, in a natural manner, a decrease in the rate of steam condensation (or generation) in the presence of noncondensing components in the gas phase due to a decrease (or increase) in the interphase temperature relative to the saturation temperature at the vapor partial pressure. The model of the interphase heat transfer also accounts for the processes of dissolution or release of noncondensing components in or from the liquid. The gas concentration at the interphase and on the saturation curve is calculated by the Henry law. The mass transfer coefficient in gas dissolution is based on the heat and mass transfer analogy. Results are presented of the verification of the

  10. Comparison of drift-velocity and drag coefficient approaches for one-dimensional two-fluid models in bubbly flow regime and validation with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Zarzuela, C.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G. [Institute for Industrial Safety, Radiology and Environmental (ISIRYM), Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Peña-Monferrer, C.; Chiva, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana (Spain); Muñoz-Cobo, J.L., E-mail: congoque@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: cpena@uji.es [Institute for Energy Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    Two-phase flow simulation has been an extended research topic over the years due to the importance of predicting with accuracy the flow behavior within different installations, including nuclear power plants. Some of them are low pressure events, like low water pressure injection, nuclear refueling or natural circulation. This work is devoted to investigate the level of accuracy of the results when a two-phase flow experiment, which has been carried out at low pressure, is performed in a one-dimensional simulation code. In particular, the codes that have been selected to represent the experiment are the best-estimate system codes RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACE v5.0 patch4. The experiment consists in a long vertical pipe along which an air-water fluid in bubbly regime moves upwards in adiabatic conditions and atmospheric pressure. The simulations have been first performed in both codes with their original correlations, which are based on the drift flux model for the case of bubbly regime in vertical pipes. Then, a different implementation for the drag force has been undertaken, in order to perform a simulation with equivalent bubble diameter to the experiment. Results show that the calculation obtained from the codes are within the ranges of validity of the experiment with some discrepancies, which leads to the conclusion that the use of a drag correlation approach is more realistic than drift flux model. (author)

  11. Comparison of drift-velocity and drag coefficient approaches for one-dimensional two-fluid models in bubbly flow regime and validation with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Zarzuela, C.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Peña-Monferrer, C.; Chiva, S.; Muñoz-Cobo, J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Two-phase flow simulation has been an extended research topic over the years due to the importance of predicting with accuracy the flow behavior within different installations, including nuclear power plants. Some of them are low pressure events, like low water pressure injection, nuclear refueling or natural circulation. This work is devoted to investigate the level of accuracy of the results when a two-phase flow experiment, which has been carried out at low pressure, is performed in a one-dimensional simulation code. In particular, the codes that have been selected to represent the experiment are the best-estimate system codes RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACE v5.0 patch4. The experiment consists in a long vertical pipe along which an air-water fluid in bubbly regime moves upwards in adiabatic conditions and atmospheric pressure. The simulations have been first performed in both codes with their original correlations, which are based on the drift flux model for the case of bubbly regime in vertical pipes. Then, a different implementation for the drag force has been undertaken, in order to perform a simulation with equivalent bubble diameter to the experiment. Results show that the calculation obtained from the codes are within the ranges of validity of the experiment with some discrepancies, which leads to the conclusion that the use of a drag correlation approach is more realistic than drift flux model. (author)

  12. On the constitutive laws of 1-D, two-fluid, two-phase flow models: possible mathematical forms, restrictions resulting from basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boure, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    From both the theoretical and the practical points of view, the problem of constitutive laws is part and parcel of the modeling problem. In particular, the necessity to restore in the model, through topological laws, some of the information lost during the usual averaging process is emphasized. A new void fraction topological law is proposed. The limitations of the current assumption of uniform pressure within each phase in any cross section are also illustrated. The importance of proximity effects (neighborhood and history effects, related to characteristic lengths and times) is brought out. It results in the importance of the mathematical form of the constitutive laws. Possible mathematical forms for the transfer laws are reviewed. The last part of the paper is devoted to some restrictions, which are imposed on the transfer terms because of some basic principles: Indifference to Galilean changes of frame and to some changes of origins, second law of thermodynamics and hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, closure constraints. Practical recommendations are formulated

  13. The constitutive laws of one-dimensional, two-fluid models for two-phase flows - Possible mathematical forms - Restrictions resulting from basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boure, Jean.

    1978-05-01

    From both the theoretical and the practical points of view, the problem of constitutive laws is a part and parcel of the modeling problem. In particular, the necessity to restore in the model, through topological laws, some of the information lost during the usual averaging process is emphasized. It is shown that the customary 'void fraction' topological law Psub(V)=Psub(L) should be proscribed whenever propagation phenomena are involved. A new void fraction topological law is proposed. The limitations of the current assumption of constant pressure within any phase in any cross section are also illustrated. The importance of proximity effects (neighborhood and history effects, related to characteristic lengths and times) is brought out. It results in the importance of the mathematical form of the constitutive laws. Various approaches to the constitutive law problem and possible mathematical forms for the transfer laws are reviewed. The simplest form (transfert terms as functions of the dependent variables only) may have some usefulness if interpretation of the results in terms of propagation phenomena is banned. A good compromise between the necessity to take proximity effects into account and to obtain a tractable set of equations is carried out when so called 'differential terms' are introduced in the transfer laws. The last part of the paper is devoted to some restrictions, which are imposed to the transfer terms because of some basic principles: indifference to Galilean changes of frame and to some changes of origins, second law of thermodynamics and assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium, closure constraints. Practical recommendations are formulated [fr

  14. Analytic, two fluid, field reversed configuration equilibrium with sheared rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobehart, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A two fluid model is used to derive an analytical equilibrium for elongated field reversed configurations containing shear in both the electron and ion velocity profiles. Like some semiempirical models used previously, the analytical expressions obtained provide a satisfactory fit to the experimental results for all radii with a few key parameters. The present results reduce to the rigid rotor model and the infinite conductivity case for a specific choice of the parameters

  15. Statistical Compression for Climate Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, D.; Guinness, J.; Soh, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical climate model simulations run at high spatial and temporal resolutions generate massive quantities of data. As our computing capabilities continue to increase, storing all of the data is not sustainable, and thus is it important to develop methods for representing the full datasets by smaller compressed versions. We propose a statistical compression and decompression algorithm based on storing a set of summary statistics as well as a statistical model describing the conditional distribution of the full dataset given the summary statistics. We decompress the data by computing conditional expectations and conditional simulations from the model given the summary statistics. Conditional expectations represent our best estimate of the original data but are subject to oversmoothing in space and time. Conditional simulations introduce realistic small-scale noise so that the decompressed fields are neither too smooth nor too rough compared with the original data. Considerable attention is paid to accurately modeling the original dataset-one year of daily mean temperature data-particularly with regard to the inherent spatial nonstationarity in global fields, and to determining the statistics to be stored, so that the variation in the original data can be closely captured, while allowing for fast decompression and conditional emulation on modest computers.

  16. Modelling and numerical simulation of two-phase flows using the two-fluid two-pressure approach; Modelisation et simulation numerique des ecoulements diphasiques par une approche bifluide a deux pressions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemaud, V

    2007-03-15

    This thesis is devoted to the modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor flows. In order to describe these phase transition flows, a two-fluid two-pressure approach is considered. This description of the liquid-vapor mixing is associated to the seven-equation model introduced by Baer and Nunziato. This work investigates the properties of this model in order to simulate the phase transition flows occurring in nuclear engineering. First, a theoretical thermodynamic framework is constructed to describe the liquid-vapor mixing. Provided with this framework, various modelling choices are suggested for the interaction terms between the phases. These closure laws comply with an entropy inequality. The mathematical properties of this model are thereafter examined. The convective part is associated to a nonconservative hyperbolic system. First, we focus on the definition of its weak solutions. Several flow regimes for the two-phase mixing derive from this analysis. Such regimes for the two-phase flows are analogous to the torrential and fluvial regimes for the shallow-water equations. Furthermore, we establish the linear and nonlinear stabilities of the liquid-vapor equilibrium. Finally, the implementation of a turbulence model and the introduction of a reconstruction process for the interfacial area are investigated in order to refine the description of the interfacial transfers. Using a fractional step approach, a Finite Volume method is at last constructed to simulate this model. First, various nonconservative adaptations of standard Riemann solvers are developed to approach the convective part. Unlike the classic nonconservative framework, these schemes converge towards the same solution. Furthermore, a new relaxation scheme is proposed to approach the interfacial transfers. Provided with these schemes, the whole numerical method preserves the liquid-vapor equilibria. Using this numerical method, a careful comparison between the one- and two-pressure two-fluid

  17. Two-fluid equilibria with flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.

    1999-01-01

    The formalism is developed for flowing two-fluid equilibria. The equilibrium system is governed by a pair of second order partial differential equations for the magnetic stream function and the ion stream function plus a Bernoulli-like equation for the density. There are six arbitrary surface function. There are separate characteristic surfaces for each species, which are the guiding-center surfaces. This system is a generalization of the familiar Grad-Shafranov system for a single-fluid equilibrium without flow, which has only one equation and two arbitrary surface functions. In the case of minimum energy equilibria, the six surface functions take on particular forms. (author)

  18. Two-fluid mixing in a microchannel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yingzheng; Kim, Byoung Jae; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2004-01-01

    A numerical study of the mixing of two fluids (pure water and a solution of glycerol in water) in a microchannel was carried out. By varying the glycerol content of the glycerol/water solution, the variation in mixing behavior with changes in the difference in the properties of the two fluids (e.g., viscosity, density and diffusivity) was investigated. The mixing phenomena were tested for three micromixers: a squarewave mixer, a three-dimensional serpentine mixer and a staggered herringbone mixer. The governing equations of continuity, momentum and solute mass fraction were solved numerically. To evaluate mixing performance, a criterion index of mixing uniformity was proposed. In the systems considered, the Reynolds number based on averaged properties was Re=1 and 10. For low Reynolds number (Re=1), the mixing performance varied inversely with mass fraction of glycerol due to the dominance of molecular diffusion. The mixing performance deteriorated due to a significant reduction in the residence time of the fluid inside the mixers

  19. Theory of compressive modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Cha, Jae; Espinola, Richard L.; Krapels, Keith

    2013-05-01

    Modeling and Simulation (M&S) has been evolving along two general directions: (i) data-rich approach suffering the curse of dimensionality and (ii) equation-rich approach suffering computing power and turnaround time. We suggest a third approach. We call it (iii) compressive M&S (CM&S); because the basic Minimum Free-Helmholtz Energy (MFE) facilitating CM&S can reproduce and generalize Candes, Romberg, Tao & Donoho (CRT&D) Compressive Sensing (CS) paradigm as a linear Lagrange Constraint Neural network (LCNN) algorithm. CM&S based MFE can generalize LCNN to 2nd order as Nonlinear augmented LCNN. For example, during the sunset, we can avoid a reddish bias of sunlight illumination due to a long-range Rayleigh scattering over the horizon. With CM&S we can take instead of day camera, a night vision camera. We decomposed long wave infrared (LWIR) band with filter into 2 vector components (8~10μm and 10~12μm) and used LCNN to find pixel by pixel the map of Emissive-Equivalent Planck Radiation Sources (EPRS). Then, we up-shifted consistently, according to de-mixed sources map, to the sub-micron RGB color image. Moreover, the night vision imaging can also be down-shifted at Passive Millimeter Wave (PMMW) imaging, suffering less blur owing to dusty smokes scattering and enjoying apparent smoothness of surface reflectivity of man-made objects under the Rayleigh resolution. One loses three orders of magnitudes in the spatial Rayleigh resolution; but gains two orders of magnitude in the reflectivity, and gains another two orders in the propagation without obscuring smog . Since CM&S can generate missing data and hard to get dynamic transients, CM&S can reduce unnecessary measurements and their associated cost and computing in the sense of super-saving CS: measuring one & getting one's neighborhood free .

  20. Economic Modeling of Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Bo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the variable nature of wind resources, the increasing penetration level of wind power will have a significant impact on the operation and planning of the electric power system. Energy storage systems are considered an effective way to compensate for the variability of wind generation. This paper presents a detailed production cost simulation model to evaluate the economic value of compressed air energy storage (CAES in systems with large-scale wind power generation. The co-optimization of energy and ancillary services markets is implemented in order to analyze the impacts of CAES, not only on energy supply, but also on system operating reserves. Both hourly and 5-minute simulations are considered to capture the economic performance of CAES in the day-ahead (DA and real-time (RT markets. The generalized network flow formulation is used to model the characteristics of CAES in detail. The proposed model is applied on a modified IEEE 24-bus reliability test system. The numerical example shows that besides the economic benefits gained through energy arbitrage in the DA market, CAES can also generate significant profits by providing reserves, compensating for wind forecast errors and intra-hour fluctuation, and participating in the RT market.

  1. Two-fluid turbulence including electron inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrés, Nahuel, E-mail: nandres@iafe.uba.ar; Gómez, Daniel [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CC. 67, suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, Carlos; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    We present a full two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure, and electron inertia. According to this description, each plasma species introduces a new spatial scale: the ion inertial length λ{sub i} and the electron inertial length λ{sub e}, which are not present in the traditional MHD description. In the present paper, we seek for possible changes in the energy power spectrum in fully developed turbulent regimes, using numerical simulations of the two-fluid equations in two-and-a-half dimensions. We have been able to reproduce different scaling laws in different spectral ranges, as it has been observed in the solar wind for the magnetic energy spectrum. At the smallest wavenumbers where plain MHD is valid, we obtain an inertial range following a Kolmogorov k{sup −5∕3} law. For intermediate wavenumbers such that λ{sub i}{sup −1}≪k≪λ{sub e}{sup −1}, the spectrum is modified to a k{sup −7∕3} power-law, as has also been obtained for Hall-MHD neglecting electron inertia terms. When electron inertia is retained, a new spectral region given by k>λ{sub e}{sup −1} arises. The power spectrum for magnetic energy in this region is given by a k{sup −11∕3} power law. Finally, when the terms of electron inertia are retained, we study the self-consistent electric field. Our results are discussed and compared with those obtained in the solar wind observations and previous simulations.

  2. A multiphase compressible model for the simulation of multiphase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caltagirone, J.P.; Vincent, St.; Caruyer, C.

    2011-01-01

    A compressible model able to manage incompressible two-phase flows as well as compressible motions is proposed. After a presentation of the multiphase compressible concept, the new model and related numerical methods are detailed on fixed structured grids. The presented model is a 1-fluid model with a reformulated mass conservation equation which takes into account the effects of compressibility. The coupling between pressure and flow velocity is ensured by introducing mass conservation terms in the momentum and energy equations. The numerical model is then validated with four test cases involving the compression of an air bubble by water, the liquid injection in a closed cavity filled with air, a bubble subjected to an ultrasound field and finally the oscillations of a deformed air bubble in melted steel. The numerical results are compared with analytical results and convergence orders in space are provided. (authors)

  3. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, Marc, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matemàtiques i Informàtica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given.

  4. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis; Carbonell, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given

  5. Soil Compressibility Models for a Wide Stress Range

    KAUST Repository

    Chong, Song-Hun; Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Soil compressibility models with physically correct asymptotic void ratios are required to analyze situations that involve a wide stress range. Previously suggested models and other functions are adapted to satisfy asymptotic void ratios at low

  6. Efficient ECG Signal Compression Using Adaptive Heart Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Szilagyi, S

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive, heart-model-based electrocardiography (ECG) compression method. After conventional pre-filtering the waves from the signal are localized and the model's parameters are determined...

  7. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  8. Physical and numerical modelling of low mach number compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillerre, H.; Clerc, S.; Dabbene, F.; Cueto, O.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews various physical models that may be used to describe compressible flow at low Mach numbers, as well as the numerical methods developed at DRN to discretize the different systems of equations. A selection of thermal-hydraulic applications illustrate the need to take into account compressibility and multidimensional effects as well as variable flow properties. (authors)

  9. Integer Set Compression and Statistical Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, N. Jesper

    2014-01-01

    enumeration of elements may be arbitrary or random, but where statistics is kept in order to estimate probabilities of elements. We present a recursive subset-size encoding method that is able to benefit from statistics, explore the effects of permuting the enumeration order based on element probabilities......Compression of integer sets and sequences has been extensively studied for settings where elements follow a uniform probability distribution. In addition, methods exist that exploit clustering of elements in order to achieve higher compression performance. In this work, we address the case where...

  10. STOCHASTIC MODELING OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF PHOSPHORUS SLAG CONTENT CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Allahverdi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the common methods for quick determination of compressive strength as one of the most important properties for assessment of cement quality is to apply various modeling approaches. This study is aimed at finding a model for estimating the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements. For this purpose, the compressive strengths of chemically activated high phosphorus slag content cement prepared from phosphorus slag (80 wt.%, Portland cement (14 wt.% and a compound chemical activator containing sodium sulfate and anhydrite (6 wt.% were measured at various Blaine finenesses and curing times. Based on the obtained results, a primary stochastic model in terms of curing time and Blaine fineness has been developed. Then, another different dataset was used to incorporate composition variable including weight fractions of phosphorus slag, cement, and activator in the model. This model can be effectively used to predict the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements at various Blaine finenesses, curing times, and compositions.

  11. models for predicting compressive strength and water absorption

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    presents a mathematical model for predicting the compressive strength and water absorption of laterite-quarry dust cement block using ... building and construction of new infrastructure and .... In (6), R is a vector containing the real ratios of the.

  12. Mathematical modeling of compression processes in air-driven boosters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zeyu; Zhao Yuanyang; Li Liansheng; Shu Pengcheng

    2007-01-01

    The compressed air in normal pressure is used as the source of power of the air-driven booster. The continuous working of air-driven boosters relies on the difference of surface area between driven piston and driving piston, i.e., the different forces acting on the pistons. When the working surface area of the driving piston for providing power is greater than that of the driven piston for compressing gas, the gas in compression chamber will be compressed. On the basis of the first law of thermodynamics, the motion regulation of piston is analyzed and the mathematical model of compression processes is set up. Giving a calculating example, the vary trends of gas pressure and pistons' move in working process of booster have been gotten. The change of parameters at different working conditions is also calculated and compared. And the corresponding results can be referred in the design of air-driven boosters

  13. Potential Flow Model for Compressible Stratified Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydquist, Grant; Reckinger, Scott; Owkes, Mark; Wieland, Scott

    2017-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is an instability that occurs when a heavy fluid lies on top of a lighter fluid in a gravitational field, or a gravity-like acceleration. It occurs in many fluid flows of a highly compressive nature. In this study potential flow analysis (PFA) is used to model the early stages of RTI growth for compressible fluids. In the localized region near the bubble tip, the effects of vorticity are negligible, so PFA is applicable, as opposed to later stages where the induced velocity due to vortices generated from the growth of the instability dominate the flow. The incompressible PFA is extended for compressibility effects by applying the growth rate and the associated perturbation spatial decay from compressible linear stability theory. The PFA model predicts theoretical values for a bubble terminal velocity for single-mode compressible RTI, dependent upon the Atwood (A) and Mach (M) numbers, which is a parameter that measures both the strength of the stratification and intrinsic compressibility. The theoretical bubble terminal velocities are compared against numerical simulations. The PFA model correctly predicts the M dependence at high A, but the model must be further extended to include additional physics to capture the behavior at low A. Undergraduate Scholars Program - Montana State University.

  14. A compressibility based model for predicting the tensile strength of directly compressed pharmaceutical powder mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gavin K; Campbell, Jacqueline I; Roberts, Ron J

    2017-10-05

    A new model to predict the compressibility and compactability of mixtures of pharmaceutical powders has been developed. The key aspect of the model is consideration of the volumetric occupancy of each powder under an applied compaction pressure and the respective contribution it then makes to the mixture properties. The compressibility and compactability of three pharmaceutical powders: microcrystalline cellulose, mannitol and anhydrous dicalcium phosphate have been characterised. Binary and ternary mixtures of these excipients have been tested and used to demonstrate the predictive capability of the model. Furthermore, the model is shown to be uniquely able to capture a broad range of mixture behaviours, including neutral, negative and positive deviations, illustrating its utility for formulation design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Modeling of Compressible Droplets in a Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Boudin, Laurent; Desvilletter, Laurent; Motte, Renaud

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we are interested in a complex fluid-kinetic model that aims to take into account the compressibility of the droplets of the spray. The ambient fluid is described by Euler-like equations, in which the transfer of momentum and energy form the droplets is taken into account, while the spray is represented by a probability density function satisfying a Vlasov-like equation. Implicit terms crop up because of the compressibility of the droplets. After having derived...

  16. Theoretical models for describing longitudinal bunch compression in the neutralized drift compression experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion drivers for warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion applications use intense charge bunches which must undergo transverse and longitudinal compression in order to meet the requisite high current densities and short pulse durations desired at the target. The neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is used to study the longitudinal neutralized drift compression of a space-charge-dominated ion beam, which occurs due to an imposed longitudinal velocity tilt and subsequent neutralization of the beam’s space charge by background plasma. Reduced theoretical models have been used in order to describe the realistic propagation of an intense charge bunch through the NDCX device. A warm-fluid model is presented as a tractable computational tool for investigating the nonideal effects associated with the experimental acceleration gap geometry and voltage waveform of the induction module, which acts as a means to pulse shape both the velocity and line density profiles. Self-similar drift compression solutions can be realized in order to transversely focus the entire charge bunch to the same focal plane in upcoming simultaneous transverse and longitudinal focusing experiments. A kinetic formalism based on the Vlasov equation has been employed in order to show that the peaks in the experimental current profiles are a result of the fact that only the central portion of the beam contributes effectively to the main compressed pulse. Significant portions of the charge bunch reside in the nonlinearly compressing part of the ion beam because of deviations between the experimental and ideal velocity tilts. Those regions form a pedestal of current around the central peak, thereby decreasing the amount of achievable longitudinal compression and increasing the pulse durations achieved at the focal plane. A hybrid fluid-Vlasov model which retains the advantages of both the fluid and kinetic approaches has been

  17. Models for predicting compressive strength and water absorption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work presents a mathematical model for predicting the compressive strength and water absorption of laterite-quarry dust cement block using augmented Scheffe's simplex lattice design. The statistical models developed can predict the mix proportion that will yield the desired property. The models were tested for lack of ...

  18. Central upwind scheme for a compressible two-phase flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Munshoor; Saleem, M Rehan; Zia, Saqib; Qamar, Shamsul

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a compressible two-phase reduced five-equation flow model is numerically investigated. The model is non-conservative and the governing equations consist of two equations describing the conservation of mass, one for overall momentum and one for total energy. The fifth equation is the energy equation for one of the two phases and it includes source term on the right-hand side which represents the energy exchange between two fluids in the form of mechanical and thermodynamical work. For the numerical approximation of the model a high resolution central upwind scheme is implemented. This is a non-oscillatory upwind biased finite volume scheme which does not require a Riemann solver at each time step. Few numerical case studies of two-phase flows are presented. For validation and comparison, the same model is also solved by using kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS) and staggered central schemes. It was found that central upwind scheme produces comparable results to the KFVS scheme.

  19. Central upwind scheme for a compressible two-phase flow model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshoor Ahmed

    Full Text Available In this article, a compressible two-phase reduced five-equation flow model is numerically investigated. The model is non-conservative and the governing equations consist of two equations describing the conservation of mass, one for overall momentum and one for total energy. The fifth equation is the energy equation for one of the two phases and it includes source term on the right-hand side which represents the energy exchange between two fluids in the form of mechanical and thermodynamical work. For the numerical approximation of the model a high resolution central upwind scheme is implemented. This is a non-oscillatory upwind biased finite volume scheme which does not require a Riemann solver at each time step. Few numerical case studies of two-phase flows are presented. For validation and comparison, the same model is also solved by using kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS and staggered central schemes. It was found that central upwind scheme produces comparable results to the KFVS scheme.

  20. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for compressible fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai; Li Yingjun

    2011-01-01

    We present an energy-conserving multiple-relaxation-time finite difference lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows. The collision step is first calculated in the moment space and then mapped back to the velocity space. The moment space and corresponding transformation matrix are constructed according to the group representation theory. Equilibria of the nonconserved moments are chosen according to the need of recovering compressible Navier-Stokes equations through the Chapman-Enskog expansion. Numerical experiments showed that compressible flows with strong shocks can be well simulated by the present model. The new model works for both low and high speeds compressible flows. It contains more physical information and has better numerical stability and accuracy than its single-relaxation-time version. - Highlights: → We present an energy-conserving MRT finite-difference LB model. → The moment space is constructed according to the group representation theory. → The new model works for both low and high speeds compressible flows. → It has better numerical stability and wider applicable range than its SRT version.

  1. Modeling of the anode of a liquid-feed DMFC: Inhomogeneous compression effects and two-phase transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salaberri, Pablo A.; Vera, Marcos; Iglesias, Immaculada

    2014-01-01

    An isothermal two-phase 2D/1D across-the-channel model for the anode of a liquid-feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) is presented. The model takes into account the effects of the inhomogeneous assembly compression of the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL), including the spatial variations of porosity, diffusivity, permeability, capillary pressure, and electrical conductivity. The effective anisotropic properties of the GDL are evaluated from empirical data reported in the literature corresponding to Toray carbon paper TGP-H series. Multiphase transport is modeled according to the classical theory of porous media (two-fluid model), considering the effect of non-equilibrium evaporation and condensation of methanol and water. The numerical results evidence that the hydrophobic Leverett J-function approach is physically inconsistent to describe capillary transport in the anode of a DMFC when assembly compression effects are considered. In contrast, more realistic results are obtained when GDL-specific capillary pressure curves reflecting the mixed-wettability characteristics of GDLs are taken into account. The gas coverage factor at the GDL/channel interface also exhibits a strong influence on the gas-void fraction distribution in the GDL, which in turn depends on the relative importance between the capillary resistance induced by the inhomogeneous compression, Rc(∝ ∂pc / ∂ ε) , and the capillary diffusivity, Dbarc(∝ ∂pc / ∂ s) .

  2. Dark energy interacting with two fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Basicas y Matematicas, Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: slepe@ucv.cl; Pena, Francisco [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de La Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D Temuco (Chile)], E-mail: fcampos@ufro.cl

    2008-05-29

    A cosmological model of dark energy interacting with dark matter and another general component of the universe is investigated. We found general constraints on these models imposing an accelerated expansion. The same is also studied in the case for holographic dark energy.

  3. Grid studies for the simulation of resolved structures in an Eulerian two-fluid framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauss, Friederike, E-mail: f.gauss@hzdr.de; Lucas, Dirk; Krepper, Eckhard

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Elaborated Eulerian two-fluid methods may predict multiphase flow with large differences in interfacial length scales. • A study on the grid requirements of resolved structures in such two-fluid methods is presented. • The two-fluid results are only little dependent on the grid size. • The results justify the resolved treatment of flow structures covering only few grid cells. • A grid-dependent limit between resolved an modeled structures may be established. - Abstract: The influence of the grid size on the rise velocity of a single bubble simulated with an Eulerian two-fluid method is investigated. This study is part of the development of an elaborated Eulerian two-fluid framework, which is able to predict complex flow phenomena as arising in nuclear reactor safety research issues. Such flow phenomena cover a wide range of interfacial length scales. An important aspect of the simulation method is the distinction into small flow structures, which are modeled, and large structures, which are resolved. To investigate the requirements on the numerical grid for the simulation of such resolved structures the velocity of rising gas bubbles is a good example since theoretical values are available. It is well known that the rise velocity of resolved bubbles is clearly underestimated in a one-fluid approach if they span over only few numerical cells. In the present paper it is shown that in the case of the two-fluid model the bubble rise velocity depends only slightly on the grid size. This is explained with the use of models for the gas–liquid interfacial forces. Good approximations of the rise velocity and the bubble shape are obtained with only few grid points per bubble diameter. This result justifies the resolved treatment of flow structures, which cover only few grid cells. Thus, a limit for the distinction into resolved and modeled structures in the two-fluid context may be established.

  4. Soil Compressibility Models for a Wide Stress Range

    KAUST Repository

    Chong, Song-Hun

    2016-03-03

    Soil compressibility models with physically correct asymptotic void ratios are required to analyze situations that involve a wide stress range. Previously suggested models and other functions are adapted to satisfy asymptotic void ratios at low and high stress levels; all updated models involve four parameters. Compiled consolidation data for remolded and natural clays are used to test the models and to develop correlations between model parameters and index properties. Models can adequately fit soil compression data for a wide range of stresses and soil types; in particular, models that involve the power of the stress σ\\'β display higher flexibility to capture the brittle response of some natural soils. The use of a single continuous function avoids numerical discontinuities or the need for ad hoc procedures to determine the yield stress. The tangent stiffness-readily computed for all models-should not be mistaken for the small-strain constant-fabric stiffness. © 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  5. Compression-absorption (resorption) refrigerating machinery. Modeling of reactors; Machine frigorifique a compression-absorption (resorption). Modelisation des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, O; Feidt, M; Benelmir, R [LEMTA-UHP Nancy-1, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1998-12-31

    This paper is a series of transparencies presenting a comparative study of the thermal performances of different types of refrigerating machineries: di-thermal with vapor compression, tri-thermal with moto-compressor, with ejector, with free piston, adsorption-type, resorption-type, absorption-type, compression-absorption-type. A prototype of ammonia-water compression-absorption heat pump is presented and modeled. (J.S.)

  6. Compression-absorption (resorption) refrigerating machinery. Modeling of reactors; Machine frigorifique a compression-absorption (resorption). Modelisation des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, O.; Feidt, M.; Benelmir, R. [LEMTA-UHP Nancy-1, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a series of transparencies presenting a comparative study of the thermal performances of different types of refrigerating machineries: di-thermal with vapor compression, tri-thermal with moto-compressor, with ejector, with free piston, adsorption-type, resorption-type, absorption-type, compression-absorption-type. A prototype of ammonia-water compression-absorption heat pump is presented and modeled. (J.S.)

  7. Control of Stirling engine. Simplified, compressible model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, P. I.; Sokołowski, J.; Żochowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    A one-dimensional free boundary problem on a motion of a heavy piston in a tube filled with viscous gas is considered. The system of governing equations and boundary conditions is derived. The obtained system of differential equations can be regarded as a mathematical model of an exterior combustion engine. The existence of a weak solution to this model is proved. The problem of maximization of the total work of the engine is considered.

  8. Riemann-problem and level-set approaches for two-fluid flow computations I. Linearized Godunov scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Koren (Barry); M.R. Lewis; E.H. van Brummelen (Harald); B. van Leer

    2001-01-01

    textabstractA finite-volume method is presented for the computation of compressible flows of two immiscible fluids at very different densities. The novel ingredient in the method is a two-fluid linearized Godunov scheme, allowing for flux computations in case of different fluids (e.g., water and

  9. Dynamic model including piping acoustics of a centrifugal compression system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoirt, van J.; Jager, de A.G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with low frequency pulsation phenomena in full-scale centrifugal compression systems associated with compressor surge. The Greitzer lumped parameter model is applied to describe the dynamic behavior of an industrial compressor test rig and experimental evidence is provided for the

  10. Tension-compression asymmetry modelling: strategies for anisotropy parameters identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents details concerning the strategies and algorithms adopted in the fully implicit FE solver DD3IMP to model the orthotropic behavior of metallic sheets and the procedure for anisotropy parameters identification. The work is focused on the yield criterion developed by Cazacu, Plunkett and Barlat, 2006 [1], which accounts for both tension–compression asymmetry and orthotropic plastic behavior. The anisotropy parameters for a 2090-T3 aluminum alloy are identified accounting, or not, for the tension-compression asymmetry. The numerical simulation of a cup drawing is performed for this material, highlighting the importance of considering tension-compression asymmetry in the prediction of the earing profile, for materials with cubic structure, even if this phenomenon is relatively small.

  11. Analytical modeling of wet compression of gas turbine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Ko, Hyung-Jong; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    Evaporative gas turbine cycles (EvGT) are of importance to the power generation industry because of the potential of enhanced cycle efficiencies with moderate incremental cost. Humidification of the working fluid to result in evaporative cooling during compression is a key operation in these cycles. Previous simulations of this operation were carried out via numerical integration. The present work is aimed at modeling the wet-compression process with approximate analytical solutions instead. A thermodynamic analysis of the simultaneous heat and mass transfer processes that occur during evaporation is presented. The transient behavior of important variables in wet compression such as droplet diameter, droplet mass, gas and droplet temperature, and evaporation rate is investigated. The effects of system parameters on variables such as droplet evaporation time, compressor outlet temperature and input work are also considered. Results from this work exhibit good agreement with those of previous numerical work.

  12. Incorporating territory compression into population models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridley, J; Komdeur, J; Sutherland, WJ; Sutherland, William J.

    The ideal despotic distribution, whereby the lifetime reproductive success a territory's owner achieves is unaffected by population density, is a mainstay of behaviour-based population models. We show that the population dynamics of an island population of Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus

  13. On the phase transition nature in compressible Ising models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    The phase transition phenomenon is analysed in a compressible ferromagnetic Ising model at null field, through the mean-field approximation. The model studied is d-dimensional under the magnetic point of view and one-dimensional under the elastic point of view. This is achieved keeping the compressive interactions among the ions and rejecting annealing forces completely. The exchange parameter J is linear and the elastic potential quadratic in relation to the microscopic shifts of the lattice. In the one-dimensional case, this model shows no phase transition. In the two-dimensional case, the role of the S i spin of the i-the ion is crucial: a) for spin 1/2 the transitions are of second order; b) for spin 1, desides the second order transitions there is a three-critical point and a first-order transitions line. (L.C.) [pt

  14. Two-fluid Numerical Simulations of Solar Spicules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuźma, Błażej; Murawski, Kris; Kayshap, Pradeep; Wójcik, Darek [Group of Astrophysics, University of Maria Curie-Skłodowska, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Dwivedi, Bhola N., E-mail: blazejkuzma1@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2017-11-10

    We aim to study the formation and evolution of solar spicules by means of numerical simulations of the solar atmosphere. With the use of newly developed JOANNA code, we numerically solve two-fluid (for ions + electrons and neutrals) equations in 2D Cartesian geometry. We follow the evolution of a spicule triggered by the time-dependent signal in ion and neutral components of gas pressure launched in the upper chromosphere. We use the potential magnetic field, which evolves self-consistently, but mainly plays a passive role in the dynamics. Our numerical results reveal that the signal is steepened into a shock that propagates upward into the corona. The chromospheric cold and dense plasma lags behind this shock and rises into the corona with a mean speed of 20–25 km s{sup −1}. The formed spicule exhibits the upflow/downfall of plasma during its total lifetime of around 3–4 minutes, and it follows the typical characteristics of a classical spicule, which is modeled by magnetohydrodynamics. The simulated spicule consists of a dense and cold core that is dominated by neutrals. The general dynamics of ion and neutral spicules are very similar to each other. Minor differences in those dynamics result in different widths of both spicules with increasing rarefaction of the ion spicule in time.

  15. A unified wall function for compressible turbulence modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, K. C.; Chan, A.

    2018-05-01

    Turbulence modelling near the wall often requires a high mesh density clustered around the wall and the first cells adjacent to the wall to be placed in the viscous sublayer. As a result, the numerical stability is constrained by the smallest cell size and hence requires high computational overhead. In the present study, a unified wall function is developed which is valid for viscous sublayer, buffer sublayer and inertial sublayer, as well as including effects of compressibility, heat transfer and pressure gradient. The resulting wall function applies to compressible turbulence modelling for both isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions with the non-zero pressure gradient. Two simple wall function algorithms are implemented for practical computation of isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions. The numerical results show that the wall function evaluates the wall shear stress and turbulent quantities of wall adjacent cells at wide range of non-dimensional wall distance and alleviate the number and size of cells required.

  16. Modelling for Fuel Optimal Control of a Variable Compression Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Ylva

    2007-01-01

    Variable compression engines are a mean to meet the demand on lower fuel consumption. A high compression ratio results in high engine efficiency, but also increases the knock tendency. On conventional engines with fixed compression ratio, knock is avoided by retarding the ignition angle. The variable compression engine offers an extra dimension in knock control, since both ignition angle and compression ratio can be adjusted. The central question is thus for what combination of compression ra...

  17. Binaural model-based dynamic-range compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Stephan M A; Kortlang, Steffen; Grimm, Giso; Bisitz, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2018-01-26

    Binaural cues such as interaural level differences (ILDs) are used to organise auditory perception and to segregate sound sources in complex acoustical environments. In bilaterally fitted hearing aids, dynamic-range compression operating independently at each ear potentially alters these ILDs, thus distorting binaural perception and sound source segregation. A binaurally-linked model-based fast-acting dynamic compression algorithm designed to approximate the normal-hearing basilar membrane (BM) input-output function in hearing-impaired listeners is suggested. A multi-center evaluation in comparison with an alternative binaural and two bilateral fittings was performed to assess the effect of binaural synchronisation on (a) speech intelligibility and (b) perceived quality in realistic conditions. 30 and 12 hearing impaired (HI) listeners were aided individually with the algorithms for both experimental parts, respectively. A small preference towards the proposed model-based algorithm in the direct quality comparison was found. However, no benefit of binaural-synchronisation regarding speech intelligibility was found, suggesting a dominant role of the better ear in all experimental conditions. The suggested binaural synchronisation of compression algorithms showed a limited effect on the tested outcome measures, however, linking could be situationally beneficial to preserve a natural binaural perception of the acoustical environment.

  18. Mathematical well-posedness of a two-fluid equations for bubbly two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomio; Kataoka, Isao

    2000-01-01

    It is widely known that two-fluid equations used in most engineering applications do not satisfy the necessary condition for being mathematical well-posed as initial-value problems. In the case of stratified two-phase flows, several researchers have revealed that differential models satisfying the necessary condition are to be derived if the pressure difference between the phases is related to the spatial gradient of the void fraction through the effects of gravity or surface tension. While, in the case of dispersed two-phase flows, no physically reasonable method to derive mathematically well-posed two-fluid model has been proposed. In the present study, particularly focusing on the effect of interfacial pressure terms, we derived the mathematically closed form of the volume-averaged two-fluid model for bubbly two-phase flows. As a result of characteristic analyses, it was shown that the proposed two-fluid equations satisfy the necessary condition of mathematical well-posedness if the void fraction is sufficiently small. (author)

  19. A two-fluid study of oblique tearing modes in a force-free current sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akçay, Cihan, E-mail: akcay@lanl.gov; Daughton, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lukin, Vyacheslav S. [National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia 22230 (United States); Liu, Yi-Hsin [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Kinetic simulations have demonstrated that three-dimensional reconnection in collisionless regimes proceeds through the formation and interaction of magnetic flux ropes, which are generated due to the growth of tearing instabilities at multiple resonance surfaces. Since kinetic simulations are intrinsically expensive, it is desirable to explore the feasibility of reduced two-fluid models to capture this complex evolution, particularly, in the strong guide field regime, where two-fluid models are better justified. With this goal in mind, this paper compares the evolution of the collisionless tearing instability in a force-free current sheet with a two-fluid model and fully kinetic simulations. Our results indicate that the most unstable modes are oblique for guide fields larger than the reconnecting field, in agreement with the kinetic results. The standard two-fluid tearing theory is extended to address the tearing instability at oblique angles. The resulting theory yields a flat oblique spectrum and underestimates the growth of oblique modes in a similar manner to kinetic theory relative to kinetic simulations.

  20. Two-fluid hydrodynamic modes in a trapped superfluid gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, E.; Griffin, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the collisional region at finite temperatures, the collective modes of superfluids are described by the Landau two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. This region can now be probed over the entire BCS-Bose-Einstein-condensate crossover in trapped Fermi superfluids with a Feshbach resonance, including the unitarity region. Building on the approach initiated by Zaremba, Nikuni, and Griffin in 1999 for trapped atomic Bose gases, we present a variational formulation of two-fluid hydrodynamic collective modes based on the work of Zilsel in 1950 developed for superfluid helium. Assuming a simple variational Ansatz for the superfluid and normal fluid velocities, the frequencies of the hydrodynamic modes are given by solutions of coupled algebraic equations, with constants only involving spatial integrals over various equilibrium thermodynamic derivatives. This variational approach is both simpler and more physical than a direct attempt to solve the Landau two-fluid differential equations. Our two-fluid results are shown to reduce to those of Pitaevskii and Stringari for a pure superfluid at T=0

  1. Grain breakage under uniaxial compression, through 3D DEM modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader François

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A breakable grain model is presented, using the concept of particles assembly. Grains of polyhedral shapes are generated, formed by joining together tetrahedral subgrains using cohesive bonds. Single grain crushing simulations are performed for multiple values of the intra-granular cohesion to study the effect on the grain’s strength. The same effect of intra-granular cohesion is studied under oedometric compression on samples of around 800 grains, which allows the evaluation of grain breakage model on the macroscopic behaviour. Grain size distribution curves and grain breakage ratios are monitored throughout the simulations.

  2. Bacterial DNA Sequence Compression Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando J. Pinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the advances in DNA sequencing techniques have contributed to an unprecedented growth of genomic data. This fact has increased the interest in DNA compression, not only from the information theory and biology points of view, but also from a practical perspective, since such sequences require storage resources. Several compression methods exist, and particularly, those using finite-context models (FCMs have received increasing attention, as they have been proven to effectively compress DNA sequences with low bits-per-base, as well as low encoding/decoding time-per-base. However, the amount of run-time memory required to store high-order finite-context models may become impractical, since a context-order as low as 16 requires a maximum of 17.2 x 109 memory entries. This paper presents a method to reduce such a memory requirement by using a novel application of artificial neural networks (ANN to build such probabilistic models in a compact way and shows how to use them to estimate the probabilities. Such a system was implemented, and its performance compared against state-of-the art compressors, such as XM-DNA (expert model and FCM-Mx (mixture of finite-context models , as well as with general-purpose compressors. Using a combination of order-10 FCM and ANN, similar encoding results to those of FCM, up to order-16, are obtained using only 17 megabytes of memory, whereas the latter, even employing hash-tables, uses several hundreds of megabytes.

  3. Compressing climate model simulations: reducing storage burden while preserving information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit; Baker, Allison; Xu, Haiying; Clyne, John; Li, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Climate models, which are run at high spatial and temporal resolutions, generate massive quantities of data. As our computing capabilities continue to increase, storing all of the generated data is becoming a bottleneck, which negatively affects scientific progress. It is thus important to develop methods for representing the full datasets by smaller compressed versions, which still preserve all the critical information and, as an added benefit, allow for faster read and write operations during analysis work. Traditional lossy compression algorithms, as for example used for image files, are not necessarily ideally suited for climate data. While visual appearance is relevant, climate data has additional critical features such as the preservation of extreme values and spatial and temporal gradients. Developing alternative metrics to quantify information loss in a manner that is meaningful to climate scientists is an ongoing process still in its early stages. We will provide an overview of current efforts to develop such metrics to assess existing algorithms and to guide the development of tailored compression algorithms to address this pressing challenge.

  4. Modeling the mechanical and compression properties of polyamide/elastane knitted fabrics used in compression sportswear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maqsood, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    A compression sportswear fabric should have excellent stretch and recovery properties in order to improve the performance of the sportsman. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of elastane linear density and loop length on the stretch, recovery, and compression properties of the

  5. JPEG2000 COMPRESSION CODING USING HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Jiang; Wu Chengke

    2005-01-01

    In order to apply the Human Visual System (HVS) model to JPEG2000 standard,several implementation alternatives are discussed and a new scheme of visual optimization isintroduced with modifying the slope of rate-distortion. The novelty is that the method of visual weighting is not lifting the coefficients in wavelet domain, but is complemented by code stream organization. It remains all the features of Embedded Block Coding with Optimized Truncation (EBCOT) such as resolution progressive, good robust for error bit spread and compatibility of lossless compression. Well performed than other methods, it keeps the shortest standard codestream and decompression time and owns the ability of VIsual Progressive (VIP) coding.

  6. Extreme Compression and Modeling of Bidirectional Texture Function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Filip, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 10 (2007), s. 1859-1865 ISSN 0162-8828 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400750407; GA MŠk 1M0572; GA AV ČR IAA2075302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 507752 - MUSCLE Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2C06019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Rough texture * 3D texture * BTF * texture synthesis * texture modeling * data compression Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 3.579, year: 2007 http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/TPAMI.2007.1139

  7. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    , and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures......An approach to modelling unsteady compressible flow that is primarily one dimensional is presented. The approach was developed for creating distributed models of machines with reciprocating pistons but it is not limited to this application. The approach is based on the integral form of the unsteady...... conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum applied to a staggered mesh consisting of two overlapping strings of control volumes. Loss mechanisms can be included directly in the governing equations of models by including them as terms in the conservation laws. Heat transfer, flow friction...

  8. A dynamic model of a photovoltaic vapour compression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renno, C.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic simulation of a photovoltaic vapour compression system is presented in this paper. In particular, there are several options to convert solar energy into refrigeration effect such as the absorption cycle, the thermo-mechanical refrigeration systems, the regenerative desiccant process or the steam jet system. This effect can also be produced by a conventional vapor compression cycle in which the compressor is driven by an electric motor supplied by means of photovoltaic cells. It is also possible to produce the cooling effect adopting the thermoelectric refrigeration, with electricity supplied by means of photovoltaic cells. Absorption and solar mechanical systems are necessarily larger and require extensive plumbing and electrical connections. The dynamic model allows to obtain some characteristic temperatures of the photovoltaic system and the energy consumptions with and without load perturbations. This model results a useful tool to study the dynamic working, for example, of photovoltaic refrigerators used in rural areas and remote islands, for their simple structure and low costs, to preserve foodstuffs, vaccines and other life saving medicines. (author)

  9. Confined compressive strength model of rock for drilling optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangchao Shi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The confined compressive strength (CCS plays a vital role in drilling optimization. On the basis of Jizba's experimental results, a new CCS model considering the effects of the porosity and nonlinear characteristics with increasing confining pressure has been developed. Because the confining pressure plays a fundamental role in determining the CCS of bottom-hole rock and because the theory of Terzaghi's effective stress principle is founded upon soil mechanics, which is not suitable for calculating the confining pressure in rock mechanics, the double effective stress theory, which treats the porosity as a weighting factor of the formation pore pressure, is adopted in this study. The new CCS model combined with the mechanical specific energy equation is employed to optimize the drilling parameters in two practical wells located in Sichuan basin, China, and the calculated results show that they can be used to identify the inefficient drilling situations of underbalanced drilling (UBD and overbalanced drilling (OBD.

  10. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenghai; Hsu, Andrew T

    2003-07-01

    A three-dimensional compressible lattice Boltzmann model is formulated on a cubic lattice. A very large particle-velocity set is incorporated in order to enable a greater variation in the mean velocity. Meanwhile, the support set of the equilibrium distribution has only six directions. Therefore, this model can efficiently handle flows over a wide range of Mach numbers and capture shock waves. Due to the simple form of the equilibrium distribution, the fourth-order velocity tensors are not involved in the formulation. Unlike the standard lattice Boltzmann model, no special treatment is required for the homogeneity of fourth-order velocity tensors on square lattices. The Navier-Stokes equations were recovered, using the Chapman-Enskog method from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) lattice Boltzmann equation. The second-order discretization error of the fluctuation velocity in the macroscopic conservation equation was eliminated by means of a modified collision invariant. The model is suitable for both viscous and inviscid compressible flows with or without shocks. Since the present scheme deals only with the equilibrium distribution that depends only on fluid density, velocity, and internal energy, boundary conditions on curved wall are easily implemented by an extrapolation of macroscopic variables. To verify the scheme for inviscid flows, we have successfully simulated a three-dimensional shock-wave propagation in a box and a normal shock of Mach number 10 over a wedge. As an application to viscous flows, we have simulated a flat plate boundary layer flow, flow over a cylinder, and a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil cascade.

  11. Collisionless two-fluid theory of toroidal ηi stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondt, J.; Weiland, J.

    1989-01-01

    A collisionless two-fluid theory based on a fourteen-moment generalization of the 'double-adiabatic' equations is developed to lowest order in the Larmor radius parameter, and applied to derive the toroidal η i stability boundary for all values of the ratio of the density gradient scale length divided by the field curvature length. The present model is an improvement over existing collisional two-fluid models in view of the collisionless nature of the η i instability, while retaining the advantage over kinetic theory of the practability of mode-coupling simulations. The linear stability boundary, linear growth rate and real frequency agree fairly accurately with draft-kinetic theory

  12. Steam generator transient studies using a simplified two-fluid computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, P.; Bhatnagar, R.; Ram, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified two-fluid computer code has been used to simulate reactor-side (or primary-side) transients in a PWR steam generator. The disturbances are modelled as ramp inputs for pressure, internal energy and mass flow-rate for the primary fluid. The CPU time for a transient duration of 4 s is approx. 10 min on a DEC-1090 computer system. The results are thermodynamically consistent and encouraging for further studies. (author)

  13. Two-fluid static spherical configurations with linear mass function in the Einstein-Cartan theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallakhmetov, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the Einstein-Cartan theory, two-fluid static spherical configurations with linear mass function are considered. One of these modelling anisotropic matter distributions within star and the other fluid is a perfect fluid representing a source of torsion. It is shown that the solutions of the Einstein equations for anisotropic relativistic spheres in General Relativity may generate the solutions in the Einstein-Cartan theory. Some exact solutions are obtained

  14. Nonlinear full two-fluid study of m=0 sausage instabilities in an axisymmetric Z pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loverich, J.; Shumlak, U.

    2006-01-01

    A nonlinear full five-moment two-fluid model is used to study axisymmetric instabilities in a Z pinch. When the electron velocity due to the current J is greater than the ion acoustic speed, high wave-number sausage instabilities develop that initiate shock waves in the ion fluid. This condition corresponds to a pinch radius on the order of a few ion Larmor radii

  15. Linear waves in two-fluid relativistic gasdynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrikov, M.B.; Solov'ev, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the development of a theory of waves propagating in a two-component gaseous medium. In all cases considered the authors use only the method of two-fluid relativistic electromagnetic gasdynamics in the framework of the special relativity theory. They pay special attention to the problem of the interaction in a mixture of both neutral and charged gases when they move relative to one another. This interaction is for charged gases responsible for the appearance of ohmic resistance to an electrical current

  16. Torque Modeling and Control of a Variable Compression Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Bergström, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The SAAB variable compression engine is a new engine concept that enables the fuel consumption to be radically cut by varying the compression ratio. A challenge with this new engine concept is that the compression ratio has a direct influence on the output torque, which means that a change in compression ratio also leads to a change in the torque. A torque change may be felt as a jerk in the movement of the car, and this is an undesirable effect since the driver has no control over the compre...

  17. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, M., E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  18. Neutronic analysis of two-fluid thorium molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frybort, Jan; Vocka, Radim

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate features of the two-fluid MSBR through a parametric study and compare its properties to one-fluid MSBR concepts. The starting point of the analysis is the original ORNL 1000 MWe reactor design, although simplified to some extent. We studied the influence of dimensions of distinct reactor parts - fuel and fertile channels radius, plenum height, design etc. - on fundamental reactor properties: breeding ratio and doubling time, reactor inventory, graphite lifetime, and temperature feedback coefficients. The calculations were carried out using MCNP5 code. Based on obtained results we proposed an improved reactor design. Our results show clear advantages of the concept with two separate fluoride salts if compared to the one fluid concept in breading, doubling time, and temperature feedback coefficients. Limitations of the two-fluid concept - particularly the graphite lifetime - are also pointed out. The reactor design can be a subject of further optimizations, namely from the viewpoint of reactor safety. (author)

  19. Bayesian model calibration of ramp compression experiments on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Hund, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Bayesian model calibration (BMC) is a statistical framework to estimate inputs for a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to dynamic experiments which must be coupled with numerical simulations to interpret the results. Often, dynamic experiments are diagnosed using velocimetry and this output can be modeled using a hydrocode. Several calibration issues unique to this type of scenario including the functional nature of the output, uncertainty of nuisance parameters within the simulation, and model discrepancy identifiability are addressed, and a novel BMC process is proposed. As a proof of concept, we examine experiments conducted on Sandia National Laboratories' Z-machine which ramp compressed tantalum to peak stresses of 250 GPa. The proposed BMC framework is used to calibrate the cold curve of Ta (with uncertainty), and we conclude that the procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Genuine two-fluid computations of laser-plasma interaction for generation of nonlinear force driven plasma blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafari, F.; Yazdani, E.; Malekynia, B.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Anomalous interaction of picosecond laser pulses of terawatt to petawatt power is due to suppression of relativistic self-focusing if prepulses are cut-off by a contrast ratio higher than 10 8 . Resulting non-linear ponderomotive forces induced at the skin-layer interaction of a short laser-pulse with a proper preplasma layer produced by the laser prepulse in front of a solid target accelerate two thin (a few μm) quasi-neutral plasma blocks, propagating in forward and backward directions, backward moving against the laser light (ablation) and forward moving into the target. This compressed block produces an ion current density of above 10 11 A/cm 2 . This may support the requirement to produce a fast ignition deuterium tritium fusion at densities not much higher than the solid state by a single shot pw-ps laser pulse. With studying skin-layer subrelativistic interaction of a short (≤ 1 ps) laser pulse with an initial Rayleigh density profile in genuine two-fluid hydrodynamic model, time and spatial distributions of ion block temperature are presented.

  1. A Computational model for compressed sensing RNAi cellular screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Hua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi becomes an increasingly important and effective genetic tool to study the function of target genes by suppressing specific genes of interest. This system approach helps identify signaling pathways and cellular phase types by tracking intensity and/or morphological changes of cells. The traditional RNAi screening scheme, in which one siRNA is designed to knockdown one specific mRNA target, needs a large library of siRNAs and turns out to be time-consuming and expensive. Results In this paper, we propose a conceptual model, called compressed sensing RNAi (csRNAi, which employs a unique combination of group of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to knockdown a much larger size of genes. This strategy is based on the fact that one gene can be partially bound with several small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and conversely, one siRNA can bind to a few genes with distinct binding affinity. This model constructs a multi-to-multi correspondence between siRNAs and their targets, with siRNAs much fewer than mRNA targets, compared with the conventional scheme. Mathematically this problem involves an underdetermined system of equations (linear or nonlinear, which is ill-posed in general. However, the recently developed compressed sensing (CS theory can solve this problem. We present a mathematical model to describe the csRNAi system based on both CS theory and biological concerns. To build this model, we first search nucleotide motifs in a target gene set. Then we propose a machine learning based method to find the effective siRNAs with novel features, such as image features and speech features to describe an siRNA sequence. Numerical simulations show that we can reduce the siRNA library to one third of that in the conventional scheme. In addition, the features to describe siRNAs outperform the existing ones substantially. Conclusions This csRNAi system is very promising in saving both time and cost for large-scale RNAi

  2. Objective models of compressed breast shapes undergoing mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve Si Jia; Patel, Bhavika; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography based on objective analysis, that are capable of accurately representing breast shapes in acquired clinical images and generating new, clinically realistic shapes. Methods: An automated edge detection algorithm was used to catalogue the breast shapes of clinically acquired cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) view mammograms from a large database of digital mammography images. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on these shapes to reduce the information contained within the shapes to a small number of linearly independent variables. The breast shape models, one of each view, were developed from the identified principal components, and their ability to reproduce the shape of breasts from an independent set of mammograms not used in the PCA, was assessed both visually and quantitatively by calculating the average distance error (ADE). Results: The PCA breast shape models of the CC and MLO mammographic views based on six principal components, in which 99.2% and 98.0%, respectively, of the total variance of the dataset is contained, were found to be able to reproduce breast shapes with strong fidelity (CC view mean ADE = 0.90 mm, MLO view mean ADE = 1.43 mm) and to generate new clinically realistic shapes. The PCA models based on fewer principal components were also successful, but to a lesser degree, as the two-component model exhibited a mean ADE = 2.99 mm for the CC view, and a mean ADE = 4.63 mm for the MLO view. The four-component models exhibited a mean ADE = 1.47 mm for the CC view and a mean ADE = 2.14 mm for the MLO view. Paired t-tests of the ADE values of each image between models showed that these differences were statistically significant (max p-value = 0.0247). Visual examination of modeled breast shapes confirmed these results. Histograms of the PCA parameters associated with the six principal components were fitted with Gaussian distributions. The six

  3. Objective models of compressed breast shapes undergoing mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Steve Si Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University and Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Patel, Bhavika [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Departments of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To develop models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography based on objective analysis, that are capable of accurately representing breast shapes in acquired clinical images and generating new, clinically realistic shapes. Methods: An automated edge detection algorithm was used to catalogue the breast shapes of clinically acquired cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) view mammograms from a large database of digital mammography images. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on these shapes to reduce the information contained within the shapes to a small number of linearly independent variables. The breast shape models, one of each view, were developed from the identified principal components, and their ability to reproduce the shape of breasts from an independent set of mammograms not used in the PCA, was assessed both visually and quantitatively by calculating the average distance error (ADE). Results: The PCA breast shape models of the CC and MLO mammographic views based on six principal components, in which 99.2% and 98.0%, respectively, of the total variance of the dataset is contained, were found to be able to reproduce breast shapes with strong fidelity (CC view mean ADE = 0.90 mm, MLO view mean ADE = 1.43 mm) and to generate new clinically realistic shapes. The PCA models based on fewer principal components were also successful, but to a lesser degree, as the two-component model exhibited a mean ADE = 2.99 mm for the CC view, and a mean ADE = 4.63 mm for the MLO view. The four-component models exhibited a mean ADE = 1.47 mm for the CC view and a mean ADE = 2.14 mm for the MLO view. Paired t-tests of the ADE values of each image between models showed that these differences were statistically significant (max p-value = 0.0247). Visual examination of modeled breast shapes confirmed these results. Histograms of the PCA parameters associated with the six principal components were fitted with Gaussian distributions. The six

  4. Objective models of compressed breast shapes undergoing mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Steve Si Jia; Patel, Bhavika; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography based on objective analysis, that are capable of accurately representing breast shapes in acquired clinical images and generating new, clinically realistic shapes. Methods: An automated edge detection algorithm was used to catalogue the breast shapes of clinically acquired cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) view mammograms from a large database of digital mammography images. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on these shapes to reduce the information contained within the shapes to a small number of linearly independent variables. The breast shape models, one of each view, were developed from the identified principal components, and their ability to reproduce the shape of breasts from an independent set of mammograms not used in the PCA, was assessed both visually and quantitatively by calculating the average distance error (ADE). Results: The PCA breast shape models of the CC and MLO mammographic views based on six principal components, in which 99.2% and 98.0%, respectively, of the total variance of the dataset is contained, were found to be able to reproduce breast shapes with strong fidelity (CC view mean ADE = 0.90 mm, MLO view mean ADE = 1.43 mm) and to generate new clinically realistic shapes. The PCA models based on fewer principal components were also successful, but to a lesser degree, as the two-component model exhibited a mean ADE = 2.99 mm for the CC view, and a mean ADE = 4.63 mm for the MLO view. The four-component models exhibited a mean ADE = 1.47 mm for the CC view and a mean ADE = 2.14 mm for the MLO view. Paired t-tests of the ADE values of each image between models showed that these differences were statistically significant (max p-value = 0.0247). Visual examination of modeled breast shapes confirmed these results. Histograms of the PCA parameters associated with the six principal components were fitted with Gaussian distributions. The six

  5. Two-fluid equations for a nuclear system with arbitrary motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Jae [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Doo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Ocean nuclear systems include a seabed-type plant, a floating-type plant, and a nuclear-propulsion ship. We asked ourselves, 'What governing equations should be used for ocean nuclear systems?' Since ocean nuclear systems are apt to move arbitrarily, the two-fluid model must be formulated in the non-inertial frame of reference that is undergoing acceleration with respect to an inertial frame. Two-phase flow systems with arbitrary motions are barely reported. Kim et al. (1996) added the centripetal and Euler acceleration forces to the homogeneous equilibrium momentum equation embedded in the RETRAN code. However, they did not look into the mass and energy equations. The purpose of this study is to derive general two-fluid equations in the non-inertial frame of reference, which can be used for safety analysis of ocean nuclear systems. The two-fluid equation forms for scalar properties such as mass, internal energy, and enthalpy equation in the moving frame are the same as those in the absolute frame. On the other hand, the fictitious effect must be included in the momentum equation.

  6. Advanced Fluid Reduced Order Models for Compressible Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezaur, Irina Kalashnikova [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fike, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Barone, Matthew F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maddix, Danielle [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mussoni, Erin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Balajewicz, Maciej [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes fiscal year (FY) 2017 progress towards developing and implementing within the SPARC in-house finite volume flow solver advanced fluid reduced order models (ROMs) for compressible captive-carriage flow problems of interest to Sandia National Laboratories for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons components. The proposed projection-based model order reduction (MOR) approach, known as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Least- Squares Petrov-Galerkin (LSPG) method, can substantially reduce the CPU-time requirement for these simulations, thereby enabling advanced analyses such as uncertainty quantification and de- sign optimization. Following a description of the project objectives and FY17 targets, we overview briefly the POD/LSPG approach to model reduction implemented within SPARC . We then study the viability of these ROMs for long-time predictive simulations in the context of a two-dimensional viscous laminar cavity problem, and describe some FY17 enhancements to the proposed model reduction methodology that led to ROMs with improved predictive capabilities. Also described in this report are some FY17 efforts pursued in parallel to the primary objective of determining whether the ROMs in SPARC are viable for the targeted application. These include the implemen- tation and verification of some higher-order finite volume discretization methods within SPARC (towards using the code to study the viability of ROMs on three-dimensional cavity problems) and a novel structure-preserving constrained POD/LSPG formulation that can improve the accuracy of projection-based reduced order models. We conclude the report by summarizing the key takeaways from our FY17 findings, and providing some perspectives for future work.

  7. Polar-coordinate lattice Boltzmann modeling of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuandong; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Li, Yingjun; Succi, Sauro

    2014-01-01

    We present a polar coordinate lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for compressible flows. A method to recover the continuum distribution function from the discrete distribution function is indicated. Within the model, a hybrid scheme being similar to, but different from, the operator splitting is proposed. The temporal evolution is calculated analytically, and the convection term is solved via a modified Warming-Beam (MWB) scheme. Within the MWB scheme a suitable switch function is introduced. The current model works not only for subsonic flows but also for supersonic flows. It is validated and verified via the following well-known benchmark tests: (i) the rotational flow, (ii) the stable shock tube problem, (iii) the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, and (iv) the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. As an original application, we studied the nonequilibrium characteristics of the system around three kinds of interfaces, the shock wave, the rarefaction wave, and the material interface, for two specific cases. In one of the two cases, the material interface is initially perturbed, and consequently the RM instability occurs. It is found that the macroscopic effects due to deviating from thermodynamic equilibrium around the material interface differ significantly from those around the mechanical interfaces. The initial perturbation at the material interface enhances the coupling of molecular motions in different degrees of freedom. The amplitude of deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium around the shock wave is much higher than those around the rarefaction wave and material interface. By comparing each component of the high-order moments and its value in equilibrium, we can draw qualitatively the main behavior of the actual distribution function. These results deepen our understanding of the mechanical and material interfaces from a more fundamental level, which is indicative for constructing macroscopic models and other kinds of kinetic models.

  8. Numerical modeling of accelerated, pre-compressed CTs in RACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.; Logan, B.G.; McLean, H.S.; Molvik, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical modeling of accelerated compact toroids in the RACE experiment has motivated the development and application of a wide range of computational tools. These tools have included the zero-dimensional RAC code for fast parameter and design studies, and the two-dimensional, Eulerian, axisymmetric, magneto-hydrodynamic code, HAM, used to model plasma ring formation in magnetized plasma guns and acceleration in straight cylindrical electrodes. Extension of the RACE geometry to include converging conical electrodes motivated the development of a new two-dimensional, Lagrangian, axisymmetric, magnetohydrodynamic code, TRAC. The code includes optional initialization of the ring magnetic fields to a Taylor-equilibrium profile as well as self-consistent external capacitor bank driving circuit. Stability of initial field configurations with toroidal mode number > 0 may also be determined. The new code is particularly suited for predicting the behavior of accelerated plasma rings in arbitrarily shaped conical electrodes, since the restriction to a rectilinear mesh is removed. In particular, application of the code to the new pre-compression geometry in the RACE experiment is discussed and compared with experimental results

  9. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-01

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The yield

  10. Modelling and simulation of the compressible turbulence in supersonic shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezengar, Dominique

    1997-02-01

    This research thesis addresses the modelling of some specific physical problems of fluid mechanics: compressibility (issue of mixing layers), large variations of volumetric mass (boundary layers), and anisotropy (compression ramps). After a presentation of the chosen physical modelling and numerical approximation, the author pays attention to flows at the vicinity of a wall, and to boundary conditions. The next part addresses existing compressibility models and their application to the calculation of supersonic mixing layers. A critical assessment is also performed through calculations of boundary layers and of compression ramps. The next part addresses problems related to large variations of volumetric mass which are not taken by compressibility models into account. A modification is thus proposed for the diffusion term, and is tested for the case of supersonic boundary layers and of mixing layers with high density rates. Finally, anisotropy effects are addressed through the implementation of Explicit Algebraic Stress k-omega Turbulence models (EARSM), and their tests on previously studied cases [fr

  11. mathematical model for the optimization of compressive strength

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    cement and sand either wholly or partially without adverse effect on the strength properties of the ... sandcrete block, compressive strength, laterite, scheffe's theory. 1. Introduction ... that for the properties of a q-component mix- ture which ...

  12. Modeling DPOAE input/output function compression: comparisons with hearing thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Shaum P

    2014-09-01

    Basilar membrane input/output (I/O) functions in mammalian animal models are characterized by linear and compressed segments when measured near the location corresponding to the characteristic frequency. A method of studying basilar membrane compression indirectly in humans involves measuring distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) I/O functions. Previous research has linked compression estimates from behavioral growth-of-masking functions to hearing thresholds. The aim of this study was to compare compression estimates from DPOAE I/O functions and hearing thresholds at 1 and 2 kHz. A prospective correlational research design was performed. The relationship between DPOAE I/O function compression estimates and hearing thresholds was evaluated with Pearson product-moment correlations. Normal-hearing adults (n = 16) aged 22-42 yr were recruited. DPOAE I/O functions (L₂ = 45-70 dB SPL) and two-interval forced-choice hearing thresholds were measured in normal-hearing adults. A three-segment linear regression model applied to DPOAE I/O functions supplied estimates of compression thresholds, defined as breakpoints between linear and compressed segments and the slopes of the compressed segments. Pearson product-moment correlations between DPOAE compression estimates and hearing thresholds were evaluated. A high correlation between DPOAE compression thresholds and hearing thresholds was observed at 2 kHz, but not at 1 kHz. Compression slopes also correlated highly with hearing thresholds only at 2 kHz. The derivation of cochlear compression estimates from DPOAE I/O functions provides a means to characterize basilar membrane mechanics in humans and elucidates the role of compression in tone detection in the 1-2 kHz frequency range. American Academy of Audiology.

  13. Impact of multilayered compression bandages on sub-bandage interface pressure: a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khaburi, J; Nelson, E A; Hutchinson, J; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2011-03-01

    Multi-component medical compression bandages are widely used to treat venous leg ulcers. The sub-bandage interface pressures induced by individual components of the multi-component compression bandage systems are not always simply additive. Current models to explain compression bandage performance do not take account of the increase in leg circumference when each bandage is applied, and this may account for the difference between predicted and actual pressures. To calculate the interface pressure when a multi-component compression bandage system is applied to a leg. Use thick wall cylinder theory to estimate the sub-bandage pressure over the leg when a multi-component compression bandage is applied to a leg. A mathematical model was developed based on thick cylinder theory to include bandage thickness in the calculation of the interface pressure in multi-component compression systems. In multi-component compression systems, the interface pressure corresponds to the sum of the pressures applied by individual bandage layers. However, the change in the limb diameter caused by additional bandage layers should be considered in the calculation. Adding the interface pressure produced by single components without considering the bandage thickness will result in an overestimate of the overall interface pressure produced by the multi-component compression systems. At the ankle (circumference 25 cm) this error can be 19.2% or even more in the case of four components bandaging systems. Bandage thickness should be considered when calculating the pressure applied using multi-component compression systems.

  14. The compressed breast during mammography and breast tomosynthesis: in vivo shape characterization and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Ruiz, A.; Agasthya, G.A.; Sechopoulos, I.

    2017-01-01

    To characterize and develop a patient-based 3D model of the compressed breast undergoing mammography and breast tomosynthesis. During this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 50 women were recruited to undergo 3D breast surface imaging with structured light (SL) during breast compression, along

  15. Local invariants in non-ideal flows of neutral fluids and two-fluid plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou

    2018-03-01

    The main objective is the locally invariant geometric object of any (magneto-)fluid dynamics with forcing and damping (nonideal), while more attention is paid to the untouched dynamical properties of two-fluid fashion. Specifically, local structures, beyond the well-known "frozen-in" to the barotropic flows of the generalized vorticities, of the two-fluid model of plasma flows are presented. More general non-barotropic situations are also considered. A modified Euler equation [T. Tao, "Finite time blowup for Lagrangian modifications of the three-dimensional Euler equation," Ann. PDE 2, 9 (2016)] is also accordingly analyzed and remarked from the angle of view of the two-fluid model, with emphasis on the local structures. The local constraints of high-order differential forms such as helicity, among others, find simple formulation for possible practices in modeling the dynamics. Thus, the Cauchy invariants equation [N. Besse and U. Frisch, "Geometric formulation of the Cauchy invariants for incompressible Euler flow in flat and curved spaces," J. Fluid Mech. 825, 412 (2017)] may be enabled to find applications in non-ideal flows. Some formal examples are offered to demonstrate the calculations, and particularly interestingly the two-dimensional-three-component (2D3C) or the 2D passive scalar problem presents that a locally invariant Θ = 2θζ, with θ and ζ being, respectively, the scalar value of the "vertical velocity" (or the passive scalar) and the "vertical vorticity," may be used as if it were the spatial density of the globally invariant helicity, providing a Lagrangian prescription to control the latter in some situations of studying its physical effects in rapidly rotating flows (ubiquitous in atmosphere of astrophysical objects) with marked 2D3C vortical modes or in purely 2D passive scalars.

  16. Study of blood flow in several benchmark micro-channels using a two-fluid approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Yang, Fang; Antaki, James F.; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in a vessel whose characteristic dimension (e.g., its diameter) is in the range of 20 to 500 microns, blood behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid, exhibiting complex phenomena, such as shear-thinning, stress relaxation, and also multi-component behaviors, such as the Fahraeus effect, plasma-skimming, etc. For describing these non-Newtonian and multi-component characteristics of blood, using the framework of mixture theory, a two-fluid model is applied, where the plasma is treated ...

  17. On the ground state of a model for compressed helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    In the problem of the “compressed helium atom”, the boundary condition that the wave function ψ must vanish at infinity (r = ∞), is replaced by: ψ = 0 at a finite r = r0. This problem is solved by a variational method, which for the limiting case of the free atom (r0 → ∞) coincides with one of

  18. SSWL and BWL: finite element models of compressed magnetic field current generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, T.J.; Leeman, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Documentation is presented for two new computer codes modeling the behavior of compressed magnetic field current generators. Code output results for the typical generator configurations are presented and compared to experimental results. (auth)

  19. Numerical Modeling of Compressible Flow and Its Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    such that the plate centerline corresponded to z = 0. The medium grid was then constructed from the coarse grid using a cubic spline to divide each...implicit terms were linearized in the standard thin layer manner. The implicit terms were evaluated with second- order spatial accuracy, yielding a...compression ramp. The configuration included a flat- plate region to develop an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer at Mach 2.25, which was validated

  20. A SECOND-ORDER DIVERGENCE-CONSTRAINED MULTIDIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SCHEME FOR RELATIVISTIC TWO-FLUID ELECTRODYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Takanobu, E-mail: amano@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    A new multidimensional simulation code for relativistic two-fluid electrodynamics (RTFED) is described. The basic equations consist of the full set of Maxwell’s equations coupled with relativistic hydrodynamic equations for separate two charged fluids, representing the dynamics of either an electron–positron or an electron–proton plasma. It can be recognized as an extension of conventional relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD). Finite resistivity may be introduced as a friction between the two species, which reduces to resistive RMHD in the long wavelength limit without suffering from a singularity at infinite conductivity. A numerical scheme based on HLL (Harten–Lax–Van Leer) Riemann solver is proposed that exactly preserves the two divergence constraints for Maxwell’s equations simultaneously. Several benchmark problems demonstrate that it is capable of describing RMHD shocks/discontinuities at long wavelength limit, as well as dispersive characteristics due to the two-fluid effect appearing at small scales. This shows that the RTFED model is a promising tool for high energy astrophysics application.

  1. A two-fluid interpretation of low frequency modes in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Haas, F.A.

    1983-01-01

    The linear stability of low frequency modes (ω/ωsub(ci) << 1) of a dissipationless two-fluid cylindrical analogue of Tokamak is investigated. The eigenvalue problem comprises a coupled first-order and second-order differential equation. Given certain plausible assumptions, the case of an internal resonant point is solved analytically. The resulting modes and frequencies are qualitatively similar to those observed. The analogue of the MHD uniform current model is solved exactly and the usual MHD marginal stability boundary is shown to be modified. More general considerations show, that even in the absence of dissipation, the magnetic field is not ''frozen'' to the ions or the electrons. Furthermore, in general the MHD equations can only be recovered by a limiting process which is inappropriate to Tokamaks. For very low frequencies (ω << ω*), however, single and two-fluid theories predict the same magnetic field structure but different electric fields. The present analysis which covers frequencies from zero to ωsub(Alfven), including drift and acoustic frequencies predicts that both discrete and continuum modes can be unstable which is in contrast to ideal MHD. (author)

  2. Analysis of subcooled boiling with the two-fluid particle interaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Noriyuki; Horie, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Tsunoyama, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    A particle interaction method called MPS (the Moving Particle Semi-implicit method), which formulates the differential operators in Navier-Stokes' equation as interactions between particles characterized by a kernel function, has been developed in recent years. We have extended this method to a two-fluid system with a potential-type surface tension in order to analyze the two-phase flow without experimental correlation. This extended method (Two-Fluid MPS: TF-MPS) was successfully applied to a subcooled boiling experiment. The most important element in any effective subcooled boiling model is to be able to accurately calculate where significant void fraction appears, that is, the location of the void departure point. The location of the initial void ejection into the subcooled liquid core can be determined fairly well experimentally and conventionally is given in terms of a critical subcooling. We investigated the relation between Stanton and Peclet numbers at the void departure point in the calculated results with TF-MPS method, varying the inlet water velocity to change Peclet number. (author)

  3. A Constitutive Model for Unsaturated soils based on a Compressibility Framework dependent on Suction and Degree of Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitarenios Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Modified Cam Clay model is extended to account for the behaviour of unsaturated soils using Bishop’s stress. To describe the Loading – Collapse behaviour, the model incorporates a compressibility framework with suction and degree of saturation dependent compression lines. For simplicity, the present paper describes the model in the triaxial stress space with characteristic simulations of constant suction compression and triaxial tests, as well as wetting tests. The model reproduces an evolving post yield compressibility under constant suction compression, and thus, can adequately describe a maximum of collapse.

  4. Assessment of compressive failure process of cortical bone materials using damage-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Theng Pin; R Koloor, S S; Djuansjah, J R P; Abdul Kadir, M R

    2017-02-01

    The main failure factors of cortical bone are aging or osteoporosis, accident and high energy trauma or physiological activities. However, the mechanism of damage evolution coupled with yield criterion is considered as one of the unclear subjects in failure analysis of cortical bone materials. Therefore, this study attempts to assess the structural response and progressive failure process of cortical bone using a brittle damaged plasticity model. For this reason, several compressive tests are performed on cortical bone specimens made of bovine femur, in order to obtain the structural response and mechanical properties of the material. Complementary finite element (FE) model of the sample and test is prepared to simulate the elastic-to-damage behavior of the cortical bone using the brittle damaged plasticity model. The FE model is validated in a comparative method using the predicted and measured structural response as load-compressive displacement through simulation and experiment. FE results indicated that the compressive damage initiated and propagated at central region where maximum equivalent plastic strain is computed, which coincided with the degradation of structural compressive stiffness followed by a vast amount of strain energy dissipation. The parameter of compressive damage rate, which is a function dependent on damage parameter and the plastic strain is examined for different rates. Results show that considering a similar rate to the initial slope of the damage parameter in the experiment would give a better sense for prediction of compressive failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Wavelet transform-vector quantization compression of supercomputer ocean model simulation output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, J N; Brislawn, C M

    1992-11-12

    We describe a new procedure for efficient compression of digital information for storage and transmission purposes. The algorithm involves a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition of the data set, followed by vector quantization of the wavelet transform coefficients using application-specific vector quantizers. The new vector quantizer design procedure optimizes the assignment of both memory resources and vector dimensions to the transform subbands by minimizing an exponential rate-distortion functional subject to constraints on both overall bit-rate and encoder complexity. The wavelet-vector quantization method, which originates in digital image compression. is applicable to the compression of other multidimensional data sets possessing some degree of smoothness. In this paper we discuss the use of this technique for compressing the output of supercomputer simulations of global climate models. The data presented here comes from Semtner-Chervin global ocean models run at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and at the Los Alamos Advanced Computing Laboratory.

  6. Dataset on predictive compressive strength model for self-compacting concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofuyatan, O M; Edeki, S O

    2018-04-01

    The determination of compressive strength is affected by many variables such as the water cement (WC) ratio, the superplasticizer (SP), the aggregate combination, and the binder combination. In this dataset article, 7, 28, and 90-day compressive strength models are derived using statistical analysis. The response surface methodology is used toinvestigate the effect of the parameters: Varying percentages of ash, cement, WC, and SP on hardened properties-compressive strengthat 7,28 and 90 days. Thelevels of independent parameters are determinedbased on preliminary experiments. The experimental values for compressive strengthat 7, 28 and 90 days and modulus of elasticity underdifferent treatment conditions are also discussed and presented.These dataset can effectively be used for modelling and prediction in concrete production settings.

  7. Bayesian model calibration of computational models in velocimetry diagnosed dynamic compression experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hund, Lauren [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are being performed on complicated materials using increasingly complex drivers. The data produced in these experiments are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down; requiring the solution of an inverse problem. A common measurement in dynamic experiments is an interface velocity as a function of time, and often this functional output can be simulated using a hydrodynamics code. Bayesian model calibration is a statistical framework to estimate inputs into a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to measurements of this type. In this article, we apply Bayesian model calibration to high pressure (250 GPa) ramp compression measurements in tantalum. We address several issues speci c to this calibration including the functional nature of the output as well as parameter and model discrepancy identi ability. Speci cally, we propose scaling the likelihood function by an e ective sample size rather than modeling the autocorrelation function to accommodate the functional output and propose sensitivity analyses using the notion of `modularization' to assess the impact of experiment-speci c nuisance input parameters on estimates of material properties. We conclude that the proposed Bayesian model calibration procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences on the equation of state parameters for tantalum.

  8. Gyro-fluid and two-fluid theory and simulations of edge-localized-modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X. Q.; Dimits, A.; Joseph, I.; Umansky, M. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Xi, P. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Xia, T. Y.; Gui, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Kim, S. S.; Park, G. Y.; Rhee, T.; Jhang, H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); Dudson, B. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Snyder, P. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    This paper reports on the theoretical and simulation results of a gyro-Landau-fluid extension of the BOUT++ code, which contributes to increasing the physics understanding of edge-localized-modes (ELMs). Large ELMs with low-to-intermediate-n peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes are significantly suppressed due to finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects when the ion temperature increases. For type-I ELMs, it is found from linear simulations that retaining complete first order FLR corrections as resulting from the incomplete “gyroviscous cancellation” in Braginskii's two-fluid model is necessary to obtain good agreement with gyro-fluid results for high ion temperature cases (T{sub i}≽3 keV) when the ion density has a strong radial variation, which goes beyond the simple local model of ion diamagnetic stabilization of ideal ballooning modes. The maximum growth rate is inversely proportional to T{sub i} because the FLR effect is proportional to T{sub i}. The FLR effect is also proportional to toroidal mode number n, so for high n cases, the P-B mode is stabilized by FLR effects. Nonlinear gyro-fluid simulations show results that are similar to those from the two-fluid model, namely that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which drives the collapse of the pedestal pressure. Due to the additional FLR-corrected nonlinear E × B convection of the ion gyro-center density, for a ballooning-dominated equilibrium the gyro-fluid model further limits the radial spreading of ELMs. In six-field two fluid simulations, the parallel thermal diffusivity is found to prevent the ELM encroachment further into core plasmas and therefore leads to steady state L-mode profiles. The simulation results show that most energy is lost via ion channel during an ELM event, followed by particle loss and electron energy loss. Because edge plasmas have significant spatial inhomogeneities and complicated boundary conditions, we have developed a fast non-Fourier method for the computation of

  9. Study of blood flow in several benchmark micro-channels using a two-fluid approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Yang, Fang; Antaki, James F; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2015-10-01

    It is known that in a vessel whose characteristic dimension (e.g., its diameter) is in the range of 20 to 500 microns, blood behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid, exhibiting complex phenomena, such as shear-thinning, stress relaxation, and also multi-component behaviors, such as the Fahraeus effect, plasma-skimming, etc. For describing these non-Newtonian and multi-component characteristics of blood, using the framework of mixture theory, a two-fluid model is applied, where the plasma is treated as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells (RBCs) are treated as shear-thinning fluid. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation incorporating the constitutive model was implemented using OpenFOAM® in which benchmark problems including a sudden expansion and various driven slots and crevices were studied numerically. The numerical results exhibited good agreement with the experimental observations with respect to both the velocity field and the volume fraction distribution of RBCs.

  10. The compressed breast during mammography and breast tomosynthesis: in vivo shape characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Alejandro; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-09-01

    To characterize and develop a patient-based 3D model of the compressed breast undergoing mammography and breast tomosynthesis. During this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 50 women were recruited to undergo 3D breast surface imaging with structured light (SL) during breast compression, along with simultaneous acquisition of a tomosynthesis image. A pair of SL systems were used to acquire 3D surface images by projecting 24 different patterns onto the compressed breast and capturing their reflection off the breast surface in approximately 12-16 s. The 3D surface was characterized and modeled via principal component analysis. The resulting surface model was combined with a previously developed 2D model of projected compressed breast shapes to generate a full 3D model. Data from ten patients were discarded due to technical problems during image acquisition. The maximum breast thickness (found at the chest-wall) had an average value of 56 mm, and decreased 13% towards the nipple (breast tilt angle of 5.2°). The portion of the breast not in contact with the compression paddle or the support table extended on average 17 mm, 18% of the chest-wall to nipple distance. The outermost point along the breast surface lies below the midline of the total thickness. A complete 3D model of compressed breast shapes was created and implemented as a software application available for download, capable of generating new random realistic 3D shapes of breasts undergoing compression. Accurate characterization and modeling of the breast curvature and shape was achieved and will be used for various image processing and clinical tasks.

  11. An approach to modeling tensile–compressive asymmetry for martensitic shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, Wael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the asymmetric tensile–compressive behavior of shape memory alloys is modeled based on the mathematical framework of Raniecki and Mróz (2008 Acta Mech. 195 81–102). The framework allows the definition of smooth, non-symmetric, pressure-insensitive yield functions that are used here to incorporate tensile–compressive modeling capabilities into the Zaki–Moumni (ZM) model for shape memory materials. It is found that, despite some increased complexity, the generalized model is capable of producing satisfactory results that agree with uniaxial experimental data taken from the literature

  12. Compression-based aggregation model for medical web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammary, Dhiah; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Many organizations such as hospitals have adopted Cloud Web services in applying their network services to avoid investing heavily computing infrastructure. SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) is the basic communication protocol of Cloud Web services that is XML based protocol. Generally,Web services often suffer congestions and bottlenecks as a result of the high network traffic that is caused by the large XML overhead size. At the same time, the massive load on Cloud Web services in terms of the large demand of client requests has resulted in the same problem. In this paper, two XML-aware aggregation techniques that are based on exploiting the compression concepts are proposed in order to aggregate the medical Web messages and achieve higher message size reduction.

  13. Modeling fibrous biological tissues with a general invariant that excludes compressed fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewei; Ogden, Ray W.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2018-01-01

    Dispersed collagen fibers in fibrous soft biological tissues have a significant effect on the overall mechanical behavior of the tissues. Constitutive modeling of the detailed structure obtained by using advanced imaging modalities has been investigated extensively in the last decade. In particular, our group has previously proposed a fiber dispersion model based on a generalized structure tensor. However, the fiber tension-compression switch described in that study is unable to exclude compressed fibers within a dispersion and the model requires modification so as to avoid some unphysical effects. In a recent paper we have proposed a method which avoids such problems, but in this present study we introduce an alternative approach by using a new general invariant that only depends on the fibers under tension so that compressed fibers within a dispersion do not contribute to the strain-energy function. We then provide expressions for the associated Cauchy stress and elasticity tensors in a decoupled form. We have also implemented the proposed model in a finite element analysis program and illustrated the implementation with three representative examples: simple tension and compression, simple shear, and unconfined compression on articular cartilage. We have obtained very good agreement with the analytical solutions that are available for the first two examples. The third example shows the efficacy of the fibrous tissue model in a larger scale simulation. For comparison we also provide results for the three examples with the compressed fibers included, and the results are completely different. If the distribution of collagen fibers is such that it is appropriate to exclude compressed fibers then such a model should be adopted.

  14. Investigation of turbulence models with compressibility corrections for hypersonic boundary flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pressure work, pressure-dilatation, and dilatation-dissipation (Sarkar, Zeman, and Wilcox models to hypersonic boundary flows are investigated. The flat plate boundary layer flows of Mach number 5–11 and shock wave/boundary layer interactions of compression corners are simulated numerically. For the flat plate boundary layer flows, original turbulence models overestimate the heat flux with Mach number high up to 10, and compressibility corrections applied to turbulence models lead to a decrease in friction coefficients and heating rates. The pressure work and pressure-dilatation models yield the better results. Among the three dilatation-dissipation models, Sarkar and Wilcox corrections present larger deviations from the experiment measurement, while Zeman correction can achieve acceptable results. For hypersonic compression corner flows, due to the evident increase of turbulence Mach number in separation zone, compressibility corrections make the separation areas larger, thus cannot improve the accuracy of calculated results. It is unreasonable that compressibility corrections take effect in separation zone. Density-corrected model by Catris and Aupoix is suitable for shock wave/boundary layer interaction flows which can improve the simulation accuracy of the peak heating and have a little influence on separation zone.

  15. Characterization of cell mechanical properties by computational modeling of parallel plate compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, J P

    2009-11-01

    A substantial body of work has been reported in which the mechanical properties of adherent cells were characterized using compression testing in tandem with computational modeling. However, a number of important issues remain to be addressed. In the current study, using computational analyses, the effect of cell compressibility on the force required to deform spread cells is investigated and the possibility that stiffening of the cell cytoplasm occurs during spreading is examined based on published experimental compression test data. The effect of viscoelasticity on cell compression is considered and difficulties in performing a complete characterization of the viscoelastic properties of a cell nucleus and cytoplasm by this method are highlighted. Finally, a non-linear force-deformation response is simulated using differing linear viscoelastic properties for the cell nucleus and the cell cytoplasm.

  16. A Constitutive Model for Unsaturated soils based on a Compressibility Framework dependent on Suction and Degree of Saturation

    OpenAIRE

    Sitarenios Panagiotis; Kavvadas Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Modified Cam Clay model is extended to account for the behaviour of unsaturated soils using Bishop’s stress. To describe the Loading – Collapse behaviour, the model incorporates a compressibility framework with suction and degree of saturation dependent compression lines. For simplicity, the present paper describes the model in the triaxial stress space with characteristic simulations of constant suction compression and triaxial tests, as well as wetting tests. The model reproduces an evo...

  17. Three-dimensional two-fluid numerical treatment of a reactor vessel in TRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liles, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    A three-dimensional two-fluid finite difference model has been used in TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) to represent a pressurized water reactor vessel. Mesh cells may be blocked off completely to represent large flow obstructions such as downcomer walls. The hydrodynamic volumes and flow areas may also be reduced in order to provide a porous matrix simulation of smaller scale strucuture. The finite difference equations are semi-implicit so that stability time scales are associated with material movement and not wave propagation. The block matrix structure is reduced during the implicit pass to a single element seven stripe system which is easily solved iteratively. This procedure has successfully performed numerous simulations of both full sized reactor accidents and smaller scale experments. It has proven to be a useful feature of the TRAC effort

  18. A study of solid wall models for weakly compressible SPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.valizadeh@monash.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800 (Australia); Monaghan, Joseph J., E-mail: joe.monaghan@monash.edu [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with a comparison of two methods of treating solid wall boundaries in the weakly compressible (SPH) method. They have been chosen because of their wide use in simulations. These methods are the boundary force particles of Monaghan and Kajtar [24] and the use of layers of fixed boundary particles. The latter was first introduced by Morris et al. [26] but has since been improved by Adami et al. [1] whose algorithm involves interpolating the pressure and velocity from the actual fluid to the boundary particles. For each method, we study the effect of the density diffusive terms proposed by Molteni and Colagrossi [19] and modified by Antuono et al. [3]. We test the methods by a series of simulations commencing with the time-dependent spin-down of fluid within a cylinder and the behaviour of fluid in a box subjected to constant acceleration at an angle to the walls of the box, and concluding with a dam break over a triangular obstacle. In the first two cases the results from the two methods can be compared to analytical solutions while, in the latter case, they can be compared with experiments and other methods. These results show that the method of Adami et al. together with density diffusion is in very satisfactory agreement with the experimental results and is, overall, the best of the methods discussed here.

  19. Assessment of the impact of modeling axial compression on PET image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, Martin A; Reader, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    To comprehensively evaluate both the acceleration and image-quality impacts of axial compression and its degree of modeling in fully 3D PET image reconstruction. Despite being used since the very dawn of 3D PET reconstruction, there are still no extensive studies on the impact of axial compression and its degree of modeling during reconstruction on the end-point reconstructed image quality. In this work, an evaluation of the impact of axial compression on the image quality is performed by extensively simulating data with span values from 1 to 121. In addition, two methods for modeling the axial compression in the reconstruction were evaluated. The first method models the axial compression in the system matrix, while the second method uses an unmatched projector/backprojector, where the axial compression is modeled only in the forward projector. The different system matrices were analyzed by computing their singular values and the point response functions for small subregions of the FOV. The two methods were evaluated with simulated and real data for the Biograph mMR scanner. For the simulated data, the axial compression with span values lower than 7 did not show a decrease in the contrast of the reconstructed images. For span 11, the standard sinogram size of the mMR scanner, losses of contrast in the range of 5-10 percentage points were observed when measured for a hot lesion. For higher span values, the spatial resolution was degraded considerably. However, impressively, for all span values of 21 and lower, modeling the axial compression in the system matrix compensated for the spatial resolution degradation and obtained similar contrast values as the span 1 reconstructions. Such approaches have the same processing times as span 1 reconstructions, but they permit significant reduction in storage requirements for the fully 3D sinograms. For higher span values, the system has a large condition number and it is therefore difficult to recover accurately the higher

  20. A weakly compressible formulation for modelling liquid-gas sloshing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development and extension of free-surface modelling techniques with the purpose of improving the modelling accuracy for liquid-gas sloshing. Considering high density ratio fluids under low Mach number conditions...

  1. Constructing a unique two-phase compressibility factor model for lean gas condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moayyedi, Mahmood; Gharesheikhlou, Aliashghar [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azamifard, Arash; Mosaferi, Emadoddin [Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Generating a reliable experimental model for two-phase compressibility factor in lean gas condensate reservoirs has always been demanding, but it was neglected due to lack of required experimental data. This study presents the main results of constructing the first two-phase compressibility factor model that is completely valid for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs. Based on a wide range of experimental data bank for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs, a unique two-phase compressibility factor model was generated using design of experiments (DOE) method and neural network technique (ANN). Using DOE, a swift cubic response surface model was generated for two-phase compressibility factor as a function of some selected fluid parameters for lean gas condensate fluids. The proposed DOE and ANN models were finally validated using four new independent data series. The results showed that there is a good agreement between experimental data and the proposed models. In the end, a detailed comparison was made between the results of proposed models.

  2. Constructing a unique two-phase compressibility factor model for lean gas condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moayyedi, Mahmood; Gharesheikhlou, Aliashghar; Azamifard, Arash; Mosaferi, Emadoddin

    2015-01-01

    Generating a reliable experimental model for two-phase compressibility factor in lean gas condensate reservoirs has always been demanding, but it was neglected due to lack of required experimental data. This study presents the main results of constructing the first two-phase compressibility factor model that is completely valid for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs. Based on a wide range of experimental data bank for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs, a unique two-phase compressibility factor model was generated using design of experiments (DOE) method and neural network technique (ANN). Using DOE, a swift cubic response surface model was generated for two-phase compressibility factor as a function of some selected fluid parameters for lean gas condensate fluids. The proposed DOE and ANN models were finally validated using four new independent data series. The results showed that there is a good agreement between experimental data and the proposed models. In the end, a detailed comparison was made between the results of proposed models

  3. Statistical modelling of compression and fatigue damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    A statistical computational model of strength and damage of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites under compressive and cyclic compressive loading is presented in this paper. The model is developed on the basis of the Budiansky–Fleck fiber kinking condition, continuum damage mechanics...... concept and the Monte-Carlo method. The effects of fiber misalignment variability, fiber clustering, load sharing rules on the damage in composite are studied numerically. It is demonstrated that the clustering of fibers has a negative effect of the damage resistance of a composite. Further, the static...

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations of Compressible Ising Models: Do We Understand Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, D. P.; Dünweg, B.; Laradji, M.; Tavazza, F.; Adler, J.; Cannavaccioulo, L.; Zhu, X.

    Extensive Monte Carlo simulations have begun to shed light on our understanding of phase transitions and universality classes for compressible Ising models. A comprehensive analysis of a Landau-Ginsburg-Wilson hamiltonian for systems with elastic degrees of freedom resulted in the prediction that there should be four distinct cases that would have different behavior, depending upon symmetries and thermodynamic constraints. We shall provide an account of the results of careful Monte Carlo simulations for a simple compressible Ising model that can be suitably modified so as to replicate all four cases.

  5. On the continuum theory of the two-fluid solar wind for small mass ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    The continuum theory for the two-fluid solar wind is considered. The fluid is assumed to be a fully ionized neutral plasma of electrons and protons which is compressible, viscous and heat conducting with a constant Prandtl number and a viscosity proportional to (temperature) sup(ω), ω > 1. The gas is under the influence of a gravitational field centred on the Sun. It is assumed that the bulk velocity (at any point) is the same for both electrons and protons, but that an energy transfer can occur between the two species due to binary (Coulomb) collisions. The equations are non-dimensionalized and it is shown that the natural parameter to use in the construction of an asymptotic solution is the mass ratio. The limit mass ratio → zero corresponds to the small Prandtl number limit for the one-fluid theory developed by Johnson (Proc. R. Soc. (Lond) A; 347:537 (1976)). By using the method of matched asymptotic expansions, a solution is constructed that starts from the base of the corona and extends out to a diffuse shock layer. The results obtained exactly parallel the one-fluid theory and many details are identified and absorbed into this analysis. It is shown how the temperatures in the corona eventually become the well-known behaviours: rsup(-2/7) (electrons), rsup(-6/7) (protons) when ω = 5/2 and r is the radial coordinate. However, the continuum theory will probably have failed in the shock layer region - the more so since this occurs at about 100 light years distance - and further mathematical details are omitted. The numerical estimates given here compare tolerably well with the observed data and very favourably with other work on the same equations. (author)

  6. Noise variation by compressive stress on the model core of power transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizokami, Masato, E-mail: mizokami.g76.masato@jp.nssmc.com; Kurosaki, Yousuke

    2015-05-01

    The reduction of audible noise generated by cores for power transformers has been required due to environmental concern. It is known that compressive stress in the rolling direction of electrical steel affects magnetostriction and it can result in an increase in noise level. In this research, the effect of compressive stress to noise was investigated on a 3-phase 3-limb model core. Compressive stress was applied in the rolling direction of the limbs from the outside of the core. It increased the sound pressure levels and the slope of the rise was about 2 dBA/MPa. Magnetostriction on single sheet samples was also measured under compressive stress and the harmonic components of the magnetostriction were compared with those of noise. It revealed that the variation in magnetostriction with compressive stress did not entirely correspond to that in noise. In one of the experiments, localized bending happened on one limb during compressing the core. While deformation of the core had not been intended, the noise was measured. The deformation increased the noise by more than 10 dBA and it occurred on most of the harmonic components. - Highlights: • Audible noise was measured on a model core to which compressive stress was applied. • The stress in the rolling direction of the steel causes a rise in noise level. • The slope of the rise in sound pressure level up to 2.5 MPa is about 2 dBA/MPa. • Variation in magnetostriction by stress does not entirely agree with that in noise. • Bend arisen in the core causes an extreme increase in noise.

  7. Noise variation by compressive stress on the model core of power transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizokami, Masato; Kurosaki, Yousuke

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of audible noise generated by cores for power transformers has been required due to environmental concern. It is known that compressive stress in the rolling direction of electrical steel affects magnetostriction and it can result in an increase in noise level. In this research, the effect of compressive stress to noise was investigated on a 3-phase 3-limb model core. Compressive stress was applied in the rolling direction of the limbs from the outside of the core. It increased the sound pressure levels and the slope of the rise was about 2 dBA/MPa. Magnetostriction on single sheet samples was also measured under compressive stress and the harmonic components of the magnetostriction were compared with those of noise. It revealed that the variation in magnetostriction with compressive stress did not entirely correspond to that in noise. In one of the experiments, localized bending happened on one limb during compressing the core. While deformation of the core had not been intended, the noise was measured. The deformation increased the noise by more than 10 dBA and it occurred on most of the harmonic components. - Highlights: • Audible noise was measured on a model core to which compressive stress was applied. • The stress in the rolling direction of the steel causes a rise in noise level. • The slope of the rise in sound pressure level up to 2.5 MPa is about 2 dBA/MPa. • Variation in magnetostriction by stress does not entirely agree with that in noise. • Bend arisen in the core causes an extreme increase in noise

  8. Biomechanical evaluation of a second generation headless compression screw for ankle arthrodesis in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somberg, Andrew Max; Whiteside, William K; Nilssen, Erik; Murawski, Daniel; Liu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Many types of screws, plates, and strut grafts have been utilized for ankle arthrodesis. Biomechanical testing has shown that these constructs can have variable stiffness. More recently, headless compression screws have emerged as an evolving method of achieving compression in various applications but there is limited literature regarding ankle arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical stability provided by a second generation fully threaded headless compression screw compared to a standard headed, partially threaded cancellous screw in a cadaveric ankle arthrodesis model. Twenty fresh frozen human cadaver specimens were subjected to simulated ankle arthrodesis with either three standard cancellous-bone screws (InFix 7.3mm) or with three headless compression screws (Acumed Acutrak 2 7.5mm). The specimens were subjected to cyclic loading and unloading at a rate of 1Hz, compression of 525 Newtons (N) and distraction of 20N for a total of 500 cycles using an electromechanical load frame (Instron). The amount of maximum distraction was recorded as well as the amount of motion that occurred through 1, 10, 50, 100, and 500 cycles. No significant difference (p=0.412) was seen in the amount of distraction that occurred across the fusion site for either screw. The average maximum distraction after 500 cycles was 201.9μm for the Acutrak 2 screw and 235.4μm for the InFix screw. No difference was seen throughout each cycle over time for the Acutrak 2 screw (p-value=0.988) or the InFix screw (p-value=0.991). Both the traditional InFix type screw and the second generation Acumed Acutrak headless compression screws provide adequate fixation during ankle arthrodesis under submaximal loads. There is no demonstrable difference between traditional cannulated partially threaded screws and headless compression screws studied in this model. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Monte Carlo model for mean glandular dose evaluation in spot compression mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Antonio; Dance, David R; van Engen, Ruben E; Young, Kenneth C; Russo, Paolo; Di Lillo, Francesca; Mettivier, Giovanni; Bliznakova, Kristina; Fei, Baowei; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-07-01

    To characterize the dependence of normalized glandular dose (DgN) on various breast model and image acquisition parameters during spot compression mammography and other partial breast irradiation conditions, and evaluate alternative previously proposed dose-related metrics for this breast imaging modality. Using Monte Carlo simulations with both simple homogeneous breast models and patient-specific breasts, three different dose-related metrics for spot compression mammography were compared: the standard DgN, the normalized glandular dose to only the directly irradiated portion of the breast (DgNv), and the DgN obtained by the product of the DgN for full field irradiation and the ratio of the mid-height area of the irradiated breast to the entire breast area (DgN M ). How these metrics vary with field-of-view size, spot area thickness, x-ray energy, spot area and position, breast shape and size, and system geometry was characterized for the simple breast model and a comparison of the simple model results to those with patient-specific breasts was also performed. The DgN in spot compression mammography can vary considerably with breast area. However, the difference in breast thickness between the spot compressed area and the uncompressed area does not introduce a variation in DgN. As long as the spot compressed area is completely within the breast area and only the compressed breast portion is directly irradiated, its position and size does not introduce a variation in DgN for the homogeneous breast model. As expected, DgN is lower than DgNv for all partial breast irradiation areas, especially when considering spot compression areas within the clinically used range. DgN M underestimates DgN by 6.7% for a W/Rh spectrum at 28 kVp and for a 9 × 9 cm 2 compression paddle. As part of the development of a new breast dosimetry model, a task undertaken by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the European Federation of Organizations of Medical Physics

  10. On use of image quality metrics for perceptual blur modeling: image/video compression case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae H.; Olson, Jeffrey T.; Preece, Bradley L.; Espinola, Richard L.; Abbott, A. Lynn

    2018-02-01

    Linear system theory is employed to make target acquisition performance predictions for electro-optical/infrared imaging systems where the modulation transfer function (MTF) may be imposed from a nonlinear degradation process. Previous research relying on image quality metrics (IQM) methods, which heuristically estimate perceived MTF has supported that an average perceived MTF can be used to model some types of degradation such as image compression. Here, we discuss the validity of the IQM approach by mathematically analyzing the associated heuristics from the perspective of reliability, robustness, and tractability. Experiments with standard images compressed by x.264 encoding suggest that the compression degradation can be estimated by a perceived MTF within boundaries defined by well-behaved curves with marginal error. Our results confirm that the IQM linearizer methodology provides a credible tool for sensor performance modeling.

  11. Research on compressive sensing reconstruction algorithm based on total variation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-xuan; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Tinghua; Du, Lin

    2017-12-01

    Compressed sensing for breakthrough Nyquist sampling theorem provides a strong theoretical , making compressive sampling for image signals be carried out simultaneously. In traditional imaging procedures using compressed sensing theory, not only can it reduces the storage space, but also can reduce the demand for detector resolution greatly. Using the sparsity of image signal, by solving the mathematical model of inverse reconfiguration, realize the super-resolution imaging. Reconstruction algorithm is the most critical part of compression perception, to a large extent determine the accuracy of the reconstruction of the image.The reconstruction algorithm based on the total variation (TV) model is more suitable for the compression reconstruction of the two-dimensional image, and the better edge information can be obtained. In order to verify the performance of the algorithm, Simulation Analysis the reconstruction result in different coding mode of the reconstruction algorithm based on the TV reconstruction algorithm. The reconstruction effect of the reconfigurable algorithm based on TV based on the different coding methods is analyzed to verify the stability of the algorithm. This paper compares and analyzes the typical reconstruction algorithm in the same coding mode. On the basis of the minimum total variation algorithm, the Augmented Lagrangian function term is added and the optimal value is solved by the alternating direction method.Experimental results show that the reconstruction algorithm is compared with the traditional classical algorithm based on TV has great advantages, under the low measurement rate can be quickly and accurately recovers target image.

  12. Evaluation of two-fluid and drift flux thermohydraulics in APROS code environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, J.; Karppinen, I.; Haenninen, M.; Ylijoki, J.

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of the thermohydraulic solutions in APROS are considered for the nuclear power plant modelling. The thermohydraulic model of the APROS plant analyzer includes three levels of solutions, homogeneous 3-equation model, 5-equation drift flux model and 6-equation two-fluid model. In practical modelling of versatile process systems different approaches are selected for different types of the power plant sections. The 3-equation model is used for turbines and auxiliary systems. The 5-equation model and 6-equation model are alternative models for main process sections of the primary and secondary sides. The 5-equation model has been typically selected for the real time applications and the 6-equation model for the safety analysis applications. The validation needs for both approaches are the same. Because the change of the solution mode is an easy task in APROS, the validation tasks are typically performed in parallel for 5-equation and 6-equation models. By calculating in parallel with both models systematic errors in solutions may be pointed out. The testing against both separate effects tests and integral tests is an essential part in the thermohydraulics. In different plant applications different physical features are important. The analysis requirements vary from one application to another. When nodalizations together with increased computer speed are growing up, the earlier validation cases may be insufficient. That is why the content of the code has to be known in detail. Such an expertise in the code development has to be gained that properties of the code against other thermohydraulics codes are known. (author)

  13. A control oriental model for combined compression-ejector refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiapeng; Wang, Lei; Jia, Lei; Li, Zhen; Zhao, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A control oriental model for combined compression-ejector refrigeration system is proposed. • The pressure pulsating phenomenon in the system is investigated based on the model. • The results show that the model can reflect the system performance under variable operating conditions. - Abstract: Combined compression-ejector refrigeration systems have attracted lots of attention in recent years. In order to improve the running stability of the complex refrigeration system, it is necessary to obtain a simple and accuracy mathematical model for system control. In this paper, a control oriental model for combined compression ejector system is proposed. By analyzing the inner relationship between compressor and ejector, a hybrid model is built based on thermodynamic principles and lumped parameter method. Comparing with traditional theoretical models, the model is more suitable for system control due to its simpler structure and less parameters. Then the pressure pulsating phenomenon inside the piping system between compressor and ejector is investigated based on the model. The effectiveness of the proposed model is validated by experimental data. It is shown that the model can reflect the system performance under variable operating conditions.

  14. Analytical model for super-compression of multi-structured pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, T.; Niu, K.

    1975-09-01

    We present a one-dimensional analytical model which can be applied to the super-compression of the multistructured pellet. The main result shows that the time dependence of the input power E for the optimal compression is given by E proportional to (1 - t/tsub(s))sup(-3(G+1)/2G) where G=(rho 1 /rho 2 )sup(1/4), rho 1 and rho 2 are the densities of the D-T fuel and the high Z material respectively, and tsub(s) if the characteristic time interval. (auth.)

  15. Improvements of an objective model of compressed breasts undergoing mammography: Generation and characterization of breast shapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Ruiz, A.; Feng, S.S.J.; Zelst, J.C.M. van; Vreemann, S.; Mann, J.R.; D'Orsi, C.J.; Sechopoulos, I.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a set of accurate 2D models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography or breast tomosynthesis, based on objective analysis, to accurately characterize mammograms with few linearly independent parameters, and to generate novel clinically realistic paired cranio-caudal (CC) and

  16. A discrete fibre dispersion method for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of fibrous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewei; Ogden, Ray W; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2018-01-01

    Recently, micro-sphere-based methods derived from the angular integration approach have been used for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of soft biological tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that many of the widely used numerical integration schemes over the unit sphere are inaccurate for large deformation problems even without excluding fibres under compression. Thus, in this study, we propose a discrete fibre dispersion model based on a systematic method for discretizing a unit hemisphere into a finite number of elementary areas, such as spherical triangles. Over each elementary area, we define a representative fibre direction and a discrete fibre density. Then, the strain energy of all the fibres distributed over each elementary area is approximated based on the deformation of the representative fibre direction weighted by the corresponding discrete fibre density. A summation of fibre contributions over all elementary areas then yields the resultant fibre strain energy. This treatment allows us to exclude fibres under compression in a discrete manner by evaluating the tension-compression status of the representative fibre directions only. We have implemented this model in a finite-element programme and illustrate it with three representative examples, including simple tension and simple shear of a unit cube, and non-homogeneous uniaxial extension of a rectangular strip. The results of all three examples are consistent and accurate compared with the previously developed continuous fibre dispersion model, and that is achieved with a substantial reduction of computational cost. © 2018 The Author(s).

  17. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of

  18. Compressive system identification of LTI and LTV ARX models: The limited data set case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanandaij, B. M.; Vincent, T. L.; Wakin, M. B.; Toth, R.; Poolla, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider identifying Auto Regressive with eXternal input (ARX) models for both Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) and Linear Time-Variant (LTV) systems. We aim at doing the identification from the smallest possible number of observations. This is inspired by the field of Compressive

  19. Modeling two-stage bunch compression with wakefields: Macroscopic properties and microbunching instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In a two-stage compression and acceleration system, where each stage compresses a chirped bunch in a magnetic chicane, wakefields affect high-current bunches. The longitudinal wakes affect the macroscopic energy and current profiles of the compressed bunch and cause microbunching at short wavelengths. For macroscopic wavelengths, impedance formulas and tracking simulations show that the wakefields can be dominated by the resistive impedance of coherent edge radiation. For this case, we calculate the minimum initial bunch length that can be compressed without producing an upright tail in phase space and associated current spike. Formulas are also obtained for the jitter in the bunch arrival time downstream of the compressors that results from the bunch-to-bunch variation of current, energy, and chirp. Microbunching may occur at short wavelengths where the longitudinal space-charge wakes dominate or at longer wavelengths dominated by edge radiation. We model this range of wavelengths with frequency-dependent impedance before and after each stage of compression. The growth of current and energy modulations is described by analytic gain formulas that agree with simulations.

  20. A compression-based model of musical learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    for the most satisfying (usually the most economical) interpretation of the new work. This is modelled as the modification of a pre-existing program, P, that computes some corpus (i.e., a compact encoding of the corpus), so that it can additionally compute the object to be interpreted. In other words...... in musical perception. The feasibility of this view is demonstrated in a computational model which is applied to the first book of J. S. Bach’s Das Wohltemperirte Clavier. This model pre-processes the data using the author’s PS13s1 pitch spelling algorithm [4,5], then applies a modified version of the author......’s COSIATEC algorithm [6] to derive compact encodings of works that maximise reuse of previous encodings. The resulting analyses will be presented and discussed. References [1] Pomerantz, J. R. and Kubovy, M. (1986). Theoretical approaches to perceptual organization: Simplicity and likelihood principles. In...

  1. A two-fluid approximation for calculating the cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, Uros

    1994-01-01

    We present a simplified treatment for calculating the cosmic microwave background anisotropy power spectrum in adiabatic models. It consists of solving for the evolution of a two-fluid model until the epoch of recombination and then integrating over the sources to obtain the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. The approximation is useful both for a physical understanding of CMB anisotropies as well as for a quantitative analysis of cosmological models. Comparison with exact calculations shows that the accuracy is typically 10%-20% over a large range of angles and cosmological models, including those with curvature and cosmological constant. Using this approximation we investigate the dependence of the CMB anisotropy on the cosmological parameters. We identify six dimensionless parameters that uniquely determine the anisotropy power spectrum within our approximation. CMB experiments on different angular scales could in principle provide information on all these parameters. In particular, mapping of the Doppler peaks would allow an independent determination of baryon mass density, matter mass density, and the Hubble constant.

  2. Two-fluid electromagnetic simulations of plasma-jet acceleration with detailed equation-of-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Bruner, N.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new particle-based two-fluid fully electromagnetic algorithm suitable for modeling high density (n i ∼ 10 17 cm -3 ) and high Mach number laboratory plasma jets. In this parameter regime, traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques are challenging due to electron timescale and lengthscale constraints. In this new approach, an implicit field solve allows the use of large timesteps while an Eulerian particle remap procedure allows simulations to be run with very few particles per cell. Hall physics and charge separation effects are included self-consistently. A detailed equation of state (EOS) model is used to evolve the ion charge state and introduce non-ideal gas behavior. Electron cooling due to radiation emission is included in the model as well. We demonstrate the use of these new algorithms in 1D and 2D Cartesian simulations of railgun (parallel plate) jet accelerators using He and Ar gases. The inclusion of EOS and radiation physics reduces the electron temperature, resulting in higher calculated jet Mach numbers in the simulations. We also introduce a surface physics model for jet accelerators in which a frictional drag along the walls leads to axial spreading of the emerging jet. The simulations demonstrate that high Mach number jets can be produced by railgun accelerators for a variety of applications, including high energy density physics experiments.

  3. Two-fluid electromagnetic simulations of plasma-jet acceleration with detailed equation-of-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Bruner, N. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We describe a new particle-based two-fluid fully electromagnetic algorithm suitable for modeling high density (n{sub i} {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) and high Mach number laboratory plasma jets. In this parameter regime, traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques are challenging due to electron timescale and lengthscale constraints. In this new approach, an implicit field solve allows the use of large timesteps while an Eulerian particle remap procedure allows simulations to be run with very few particles per cell. Hall physics and charge separation effects are included self-consistently. A detailed equation of state (EOS) model is used to evolve the ion charge state and introduce non-ideal gas behavior. Electron cooling due to radiation emission is included in the model as well. We demonstrate the use of these new algorithms in 1D and 2D Cartesian simulations of railgun (parallel plate) jet accelerators using He and Ar gases. The inclusion of EOS and radiation physics reduces the electron temperature, resulting in higher calculated jet Mach numbers in the simulations. We also introduce a surface physics model for jet accelerators in which a frictional drag along the walls leads to axial spreading of the emerging jet. The simulations demonstrate that high Mach number jets can be produced by railgun accelerators for a variety of applications, including high energy density physics experiments.

  4. Two-fluid 2.5D code for simulations of small scale magnetic fields in the lower solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantschitsch, Isabell; Amerstorfer, Ute; Thalmann, Julia Katharina; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Lemmerer, Birgit

    2015-08-01

    Our aim is to investigate magnetic reconnection as a result of the time evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the solar chromosphere. A new numerical two-fluid code was developed, which will perform a 2.5D simulation of the dynamics from the upper convection zone up to the transition region. The code is based on the Total Variation Diminishing Lax-Friedrichs method and includes the effects of ion-neutral collisions, ionisation/recombination, thermal/resistive diffusivity as well as collisional/resistive heating. What is innovative about our newly developed code is the inclusion of a two-fluid model in combination with the use of analytically constructed vertically open magnetic flux tubes, which are used as initial conditions for our simulation. First magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) tests have already shown good agreement with known results of numerical MHD test problems like e.g. the Orszag-Tang vortex test, the Current Sheet test or the Spherical Blast Wave test. Furthermore, the single-fluid approach will also be applied to the initial conditions, in order to compare the different rates of magnetic reconnection in both codes, the two-fluid code and the single-fluid one.

  5. Compressibility effects for the AGARD-B model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tuling, S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of the flow topologies over the 60° delta wing of the AGARD-B model at Mach 0·80 has revealed that vortex bursting occurs between 13°-15° angle-of-attack, while vortex separation occurs above 18°. These aerodynamic features have...

  6. Progress with lossy compression of data from the Community Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Baker, A.; Hammerling, D.; Li, S.; Clyne, J.

    2017-12-01

    Climate models, such as the Community Earth System Model (CESM), generate massive quantities of data, particularly when run at high spatial and temporal resolutions. The burden of storage is further exacerbated by creating large ensembles, generating large numbers of variables, outputting at high frequencies, and duplicating data archives (to protect against disk failures). Applying lossy compression methods to CESM datasets is an attractive means of reducing data storage requirements, but ensuring that the loss of information does not negatively impact science objectives is critical. In particular, test methods are needed to evaluate whether critical features (e.g., extreme values and spatial and temporal gradients) have been preserved and to boost scientists' confidence in the lossy compression process. We will provide an overview on our progress in applying lossy compression to CESM output and describe our unique suite of metric tests that evaluate the impact of information loss. Further, we will describe our processes how to choose an appropriate compression algorithm (and its associated parameters) given the diversity of CESM data (e.g., variables may be constant, smooth, change abruptly, contain missing values, or have large ranges). Traditional compression algorithms, such as those used for images, are not necessarily ideally suited for floating-point climate simulation data, and different methods may have different strengths and be more effective for certain types of variables than others. We will discuss our progress towards our ultimate goal of developing an automated multi-method parallel approach for compression of climate data that both maximizes data reduction and minimizes the impact of data loss on science results.

  7. A discrete model for compressible flows in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Metayer, O.; Massol, A.; Favrie, N.; Hank, S.

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the building of a discrete model able to describe and to predict the evolution of complex gas flows in heterogeneous media. In many physical applications, large scales numerical simulation is no longer possible because of a lack of computing resources. Indeed the medium topology may be complex due to the presence of many obstacles (walls, pipes, equipments, geometric singularities etc.). Aircraft powerplant compartments are examples where topology is complex due to the presence of pipes, ducts, coolers and other equipment. Other important examples are gas explosions and large scale dispersion of hazardous materials in urban places, cities or underground involving obstacles such as buildings and various infrastructures. In all cases efficient safety responses are required. Then a new discrete model is built and solved in reasonable execution times for large cells volumes including such obstacles. Quantitative comparisons between experimental and numerical results are shown for different significant test cases, showing excellent agreement.

  8. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-Bing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method. PMID:24696649

  9. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  10. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  11. Application of a New Hybrid RANS/LES Modeling Paradigm to Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Todd; Pederson, Clark; Haering, Sigfried; Moser, Robert

    2017-11-01

    It is well-known that traditional hybrid RANS/LES modeling approaches suffer from a number of deficiencies. These deficiencies often stem from overly simplistic blending strategies based on scalar measures of turbulence length scale and grid resolution and from use of isotropic subgrid models in LES regions. A recently developed hybrid modeling approach has shown promise in overcoming these deficiencies in incompressible flows [Haering, 2015]. In the approach, RANS/LES blending is accomplished using a hybridization parameter that is governed by an additional model transport equation and is driven to achieve equilibrium between the resolved and unresolved turbulence for the given grid. Further, the model uses an tensor eddy viscosity that is formulated to represent the effects of anisotropic grid resolution on subgrid quantities. In this work, this modeling approach is extended to compressible flows and implemented in the compressible flow solver SU2 (http://su2.stanford.edu/). We discuss both modeling and implementation challenges and show preliminary results for compressible flow test cases with smooth wall separation.

  12. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas....... Furthermore, the presence of irreducible liquid water is taken into account. In order to account for compression, porous media morphology variations are specified based on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) through-plane strain and intrusion which are stated as a function of compression. These morphology...... variations affect gas and liquid water transport, and hence liquid water distribution and the risk of blocking active sites. Hence, water transport is studied under GDL compression in order to investigate the qualitative effects. Two simulation cases are compared; one with and one without compression....

  13. Modelling studies for influence factors of gas bubble in compressed air energy storage in aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Chaobin; Zhang, Keni; Li, Cai; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    CAES (Compressed air energy storage) is credited with its potential ability for large-scale energy storage. Generally, it is more convenient using deep aquifers than employing underground caverns for energy storage, because of extensive presence of aquifers. During the first stage in a typical process of CAESA (compressed air energy storage in aquifers), a large amount of compressed air is injected into the target aquifer to develop an initial space (a gas bubble) for energy storage. In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of aquifer's permeability, geological structure and operation parameters on the formation of gas bubble and the sustainability for the later cycling operation. The SCT (system cycle times) was designed as a parameter to evaluate the reservoir performance and the effect of operation parameters. Simulation results for pressure and gas saturation results of basic model confirm the feasibility of compressed air energy storage in aquifers. The results of different permeability cases show that, for a certain scale of CAESA system, there is an optimum permeability range for a candidate aquifer. An aquifer within this permeability range will not only satisfy the injectivity requirement but also have the best energy efficiency. Structural impact analysis indicates that the anticline structure has the best performance to hold the bubble under the same daily cycling schedule with the same initial injected air mass. In addition, our results indicate that the SCT shows a logarithmic growth as the injected air mass increase. During the formation of gas bubble, compressed air should be injected into aquifers with moderate rate and the injection can be done in several stages with different injection rate to avoid onset pressure. - Highlights: • Impact of permeability, geological structure, operation parameters was investigated. • With certain air production rate, an optimum permeability exists for performance.

  14. Balanced sparse model for tight frames in compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsong Liu

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing has shown to be promising to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging. In this new technology, magnetic resonance images are usually reconstructed by enforcing its sparsity in sparse image reconstruction models, including both synthesis and analysis models. The synthesis model assumes that an image is a sparse combination of atom signals while the analysis model assumes that an image is sparse after the application of an analysis operator. Balanced model is a new sparse model that bridges analysis and synthesis models by introducing a penalty term on the distance of frame coefficients to the range of the analysis operator. In this paper, we study the performance of the balanced model in tight frame based compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging and propose a new efficient numerical algorithm to solve the optimization problem. By tuning the balancing parameter, the new model achieves solutions of three models. It is found that the balanced model has a comparable performance with the analysis model. Besides, both of them achieve better results than the synthesis model no matter what value the balancing parameter is. Experiment shows that our proposed numerical algorithm constrained split augmented Lagrangian shrinkage algorithm for balanced model (C-SALSA-B converges faster than previously proposed algorithms accelerated proximal algorithm (APG and alternating directional method of multipliers for balanced model (ADMM-B.

  15. Control volume based modelling in one space dimension of oscillating, compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach for modelling unsteady, primarily one-dimensional, compressible flow. The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are applied to a staggered mesh of control volumes and loss mechanisms are included directly as extra terms. Heat transfer, flow friction, and multidim...... are presented. The capabilities of the approach are illustrated with an example solution and an experimental validation of a Stirling engine model....

  16. Improvement of the instability of compressible lattice Boltzmann model by shockdetecting sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esfahanian, Vahid [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghadyani, Mohsen [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Recently, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has drawn attention as an alternative and promising numerical technique for simulating fluid flows. The stability of LBM is a challenging problem in the simulation of compressible flows with different types of embedded discontinuities. This study, proposes a complementary scheme for simulating inviscid flows by a compressible lattice Boltzmann model in order to improve the instability using a shock-detecting procedure. The advantages and disadvantages of using a numerical hybrid filter on the primitive or conservative variables, in addition to, macroscopic or mesoscopic variables are investigated. The study demonstrates that the robustness of the utilized LB model is improved for inviscid compressible flows by implementation of the complementary scheme on mesoscopic variables. The validity of the procedure to capture shocks and resolve contact discontinuity and rarefaction waves in well-known benchmark problems is investigated. The numerical results show that the scheme is capable of generating more robust solutions in the simulation of compressible flows and prevents the formation of oscillations. Good agreements are obtained for all test cases.

  17. Improvement of the instability of compressible lattice Boltzmann model by shockdetecting sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Ghadyani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has drawn attention as an alternative and promising numerical technique for simulating fluid flows. The stability of LBM is a challenging problem in the simulation of compressible flows with different types of embedded discontinuities. This study, proposes a complementary scheme for simulating inviscid flows by a compressible lattice Boltzmann model in order to improve the instability using a shock-detecting procedure. The advantages and disadvantages of using a numerical hybrid filter on the primitive or conservative variables, in addition to, macroscopic or mesoscopic variables are investigated. The study demonstrates that the robustness of the utilized LB model is improved for inviscid compressible flows by implementation of the complementary scheme on mesoscopic variables. The validity of the procedure to capture shocks and resolve contact discontinuity and rarefaction waves in well-known benchmark problems is investigated. The numerical results show that the scheme is capable of generating more robust solutions in the simulation of compressible flows and prevents the formation of oscillations. Good agreements are obtained for all test cases.

  18. Dynamic characterization and modeling of magneto-rheological elastomers under compressive loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Jeong-Hoi; Khan, Fazeel; Jang, Dong-Doo; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of the research reported in this paper has been to characterize and model the compression properties of magneto-rheological elastomers (MREs). MRE samples were fabricated by curing a two-component elastomer resin with 30% content of 10 µm sized iron particles by volume. In order to vary the magnetic field during compressive testing, a test fixture was designed and fabricated in which two permanent magnets could be variably positioned on either side of the specimen. Changing the distance between the magnets of the fixture allowed the strength of the magnetic field passing uniformly through the sample to be varied. Using this test setup and a dynamic test frame, a series of compression tests of MRE samples were performed, by varying the magnetic field and the frequency of loading. The results show that the MR effect (per cent increase in the material 'stiffness') increases as the magnetic field increases and the loading frequency increases within the range of the magnetic field and input frequency considered in this study. Furthermore, a phenomenological model was developed to capture the dynamic behaviors of the MREs under compression loadings. (technical note)

  19. Dynamic characterization and modeling of magneto-rheological elastomers under compressive loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, J H; Khan, F; Jang, D D; Jung, H J

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to characterize and model the compression properties of Magneto-Rheological Elastomers (MREs). MRE samples were fabricated by curing a two component elastomer resin with 30% content of 10 μm sized iron particles by volume. In order to vary the magnetic field during compressive testing, a test fixture was designed and fabricated in which two permanent magnets could be variably positioned on either side of the specimen. By changing the distance between the magnets, the fixture allowed for varying the magnetic field that passes uniformly through the sample. Using this test setup and a dynamic test frame, a series of compression tests of MRE samples was performed by varying the magnetic field and frequency of loading. The results show the MR effect (percent increase in the materials 'stiffness') increases as the magnetic field increases and loading frequency increases within the range of the magnetic field and input frequency considered in this study. Furthermore, a phenomenological model was developed to capture the dynamic behaviours of the MREs under compression loadings.

  20. On the modeling of gas flow through porous compression packings used in valve stuffing-boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazeminia, Mehdi; Bouzid, Abdel-Hakim

    2015-01-01

    Predicting leak rate through porous compression packing rings is a significant challenge for the design of packed stuffing boxes. Although few studies have been conducted to predict the leak rate through these seals, there is no comprehensive standard procedure to be used to design compression packings for a maximum tolerated leak for a given application. With the ubiquitous use of the yarned packing rings and the strict regulations on fugitive emissions and the new environment protection laws quantification of leak rate through yarned stuffing boxes becomes more than necessary and a tightness criteria based design procedure must be developed. In this study a new approach to predict leak rate through compression packing rings has been developed. It is based on Darcy's model to which Klinkenberg slip effect is incorporated. The predicted leak rates are compared to those measured experimentally using two different graphite-based packing rings subjected to different compression levels and pressures. A good agreement is found between the predicted and the measured leak rates which illustrates the validity of the developed model. (author)

  1. The wet compression technology for gas turbine power plants: Thermodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, Stefano; Pierfederici, Alessandro; Trucco, Angela

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines from a thermodynamic point of view the effects of wet compression on gas turbine power plants, particularly analysing the influence of ambient conditions on the plant performance. The results of the mathematical model, implemented in 'Matlab' software, have been compared with the simulation results presented in literature and in particular the values of the 'evaporative rate', proposed in Araimo et al. [L. Araimo, A. Torelli, Thermodynamic analysis of the wet compression process in heavy duty gas turbine compressors, in: Proceedings of the 59th ATI Annual Congress, Genova, 2004, pp. 1249-1263; L. Araimo, A. Torelli, Wet compression technology applied to heavy duty gas turbines - GT power augmentation and efficiency upgrade, in: Proceedings of the 59th ATI Annual Congress, Genova, 2004, pp. 1265-1277] by 'Gas Turbines Department' of Ansaldo Energia S.p.A., have been taken into account to validate the model. The simulator permits to investigate the effects of the fogging and wet compression techniques and estimate the power and efficiency gain of heavy duty gas turbines operating in hot and arid conditions

  2. Study of blood flow in several benchmark micro-channels using a two-fluid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Yang, Fang; Antaki, James F.; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in a vessel whose characteristic dimension (e.g., its diameter) is in the range of 20 to 500 microns, blood behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid, exhibiting complex phenomena, such as shear-thinning, stress relaxation, and also multi-component behaviors, such as the Fahraeus effect, plasma-skimming, etc. For describing these non-Newtonian and multi-component characteristics of blood, using the framework of mixture theory, a two-fluid model is applied, where the plasma is treated as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells (RBCs) are treated as shear-thinning fluid. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation incorporating the constitutive model was implemented using OpenFOAM® in which benchmark problems including a sudden expansion and various driven slots and crevices were studied numerically. The numerical results exhibited good agreement with the experimental observations with respect to both the velocity field and the volume fraction distribution of RBCs. PMID:26240438

  3. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  4. Decay in chest compression quality due to fatigue is rare during prolonged advanced life support in a manikin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørshol Conrad A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to measure chest compression decay during simulated advanced life support (ALS in a cardiac arrest manikin model. Methods 19 paramedic teams, each consisting of three paramedics, performed ALS for 12 minutes with the same paramedic providing all chest compressions. The patient was a resuscitation manikin found in ventricular fibrillation (VF. The first shock terminated the VF and the patient remained in pulseless electrical activity (PEA throughout the scenario. Average chest compression depth and rate was measured each minute for 12 minutes and divided into three groups based on chest compression quality; good (compression depth ≥ 40 mm, compression rate 100-120/minute for each minute of CPR, bad (initial compression depth 120/minute or decay (change from good to bad during the 12 minutes. Changes in no-flow ratio (NFR, defined as the time without chest compressions divided by the total time of the ALS scenario over time was also measured. Results Based on compression depth, 5 (26%, 9 (47% and 5 (26% were good, bad and with decay, respectively. Only one paramedic experienced decay within the first two minutes. Based on compression rate, 6 (32%, 6 (32% and 7 (37% were good, bad and with decay, respectively. NFR was 22% in both the 1-3 and 4-6 minute periods, respectively, but decreased to 14% in the 7-9 minute period (P = 0.002 and to 10% in the 10-12 minute period (P Conclusions In this simulated cardiac arrest manikin study, only half of the providers achieved guideline recommended compression depth during prolonged ALS. Large inter-individual differences in chest compression quality were already present from the initiation of CPR. Chest compression decay and thereby fatigue within the first two minutes was rare.

  5. On mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of transient compressible flow across open boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rian, Kjell Erik

    2003-07-01

    In numerical simulations of turbulent reacting compressible flows, artificial boundaries are needed to obtain a finite computational domain when an unbounded physical domain is given. Artificial boundaries which fluids are free to cross are called open boundaries. When calculating such flows, non-physical reflections at the open boundaries may occur. These reflections can pollute the solution severely, leading to inaccurate results, and the generation of spurious fluctuations may even cause the numerical simulation to diverge. Thus, a proper treatment of the open boundaries in numerical simulations of turbulent reacting compressible flows is required to obtain a reliable solution for realistic conditions. A local quasi-one-dimensional characteristic-based open-boundary treatment for the Favre-averaged governing equations for time-dependent three-dimensional multi-component turbulent reacting compressible flow is presented. A k-{epsilon} model for turbulent compressible flow and Magnussen's EDC model for turbulent combustion is included in the analysis. The notion of physical boundary conditions is incorporated in the method, and the conservation equations themselves are applied on the boundaries to complement the set of physical boundary conditions. A two-dimensional finite-difference-based computational fluid dynamics code featuring high-order accurate numerical schemes was developed for the numerical simulations. Transient numerical simulations of the well-known, one-dimensional shock-tube problem, a two-dimensional pressure-tower problem in a decaying turbulence field, and a two-dimensional turbulent reacting compressible flow problem have been performed. Flow- and combustion-generated pressure waves seem to be well treated by the non-reflecting subsonic open-boundary conditions. Limitations of the present open-boundary treatment are demonstrated and discussed. The simple and solid physical basis of the method makes it both favourable and relatively easy to

  6. Experimental investigation and empirical modelling of FDM process for compressive strength improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop K. Sood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modelling (FDM is gaining distinct advantage in manufacturing industries because of its ability to manufacture parts with complex shapes without any tooling requirement and human interface. The properties of FDM built parts exhibit high dependence on process parameters and can be improved by setting parameters at suitable levels. Anisotropic and brittle nature of build part makes it important to study the effect of process parameters to the resistance to compressive loading for enhancing service life of functional parts. Hence, the present work focuses on extensive study to understand the effect of five important parameters such as layer thickness, part build orientation, raster angle, raster width and air gap on the compressive stress of test specimen. The study not only provides insight into complex dependency of compressive stress on process parameters but also develops a statistically validated predictive equation. The equation is used to find optimal parameter setting through quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO. As FDM process is a highly complex one and process parameters influence the responses in a non linear manner, compressive stress is predicted using artificial neural network (ANN and is compared with predictive equation.

  7. Modeling of Single and Dual Reservoir Porous Media Compressed Gas (Air and CO2) Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Liu, H.; Borgia, A.; Pan, L.

    2017-12-01

    Intermittent renewable energy sources are causing increasing demand for energy storage. The deep subsurface offers promising opportunities for energy storage because it can safely contain high-pressure gases. Porous media compressed air energy storage (PM-CAES) is one approach, although the only facilities in operation are in caverns (C-CAES) rather than porous media. Just like in C-CAES, PM-CAES operates generally by injecting working gas (air) through well(s) into the reservoir compressing the cushion gas (existing air in the reservoir). During energy recovery, high-pressure air from the reservoir is mixed with fuel in a combustion turbine to produce electricity, thereby reducing compression costs. Unlike in C-CAES, the storage of energy in PM-CAES occurs variably across pressure gradients in the formation, while the solid grains of the matrix can release/store heat. Because air is the working gas, PM-CAES has fairly low thermal efficiency and low energy storage density. To improve the energy storage density, we have conceived and modeled a closed-loop two-reservoir compressed CO2 energy storage system. One reservoir is the low-pressure reservoir, and the other is the high-pressure reservoir. CO2 is cycled back and forth between reservoirs depending on whether energy needs to be stored or recovered. We have carried out thermodynamic and parametric analyses of the performance of an idealized two-reservoir CO2 energy storage system under supercritical and transcritical conditions for CO2 using a steady-state model. Results show that the transcritical compressed CO2 energy storage system has higher round-trip efficiency and exergy efficiency, and larger energy storage density than the supercritical compressed CO2 energy storage. However, the configuration of supercritical compressed CO2 energy storage is simpler, and the energy storage densities of the two systems are both higher than that of PM-CAES, which is advantageous in terms of storage volume for a given

  8. Compressing an Ensemble with Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2015-04-02

    One of the main challenges when working with modern climate model ensembles is the increasingly larger size of the data produced, and the consequent difficulty in storing large amounts of spatio-temporally resolved information. Many compression algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific data sets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a different, statistics-based approach that explicitly accounts for the space-time dependence of the data for annual global three-dimensional temperature fields in an initial condition ensemble. The set of estimated parameters is small (compared to the data size) and can be regarded as a summary of the essential structure of the ensemble output; therefore, it can be used to instantaneously reproduce the temperature fields in an ensemble with a substantial saving in storage and time. The statistical model exploits the gridded geometry of the data and parallelization across processors. It is therefore computationally convenient and allows to fit a non-trivial model to a data set of one billion data points with a covariance matrix comprising of 10^18 entries.

  9. Compressing an Ensemble with Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano; Genton, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges when working with modern climate model ensembles is the increasingly larger size of the data produced, and the consequent difficulty in storing large amounts of spatio-temporally resolved information. Many compression algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific data sets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a different, statistics-based approach that explicitly accounts for the space-time dependence of the data for annual global three-dimensional temperature fields in an initial condition ensemble. The set of estimated parameters is small (compared to the data size) and can be regarded as a summary of the essential structure of the ensemble output; therefore, it can be used to instantaneously reproduce the temperature fields in an ensemble with a substantial saving in storage and time. The statistical model exploits the gridded geometry of the data and parallelization across processors. It is therefore computationally convenient and allows to fit a non-trivial model to a data set of one billion data points with a covariance matrix comprising of 10^18 entries.

  10. Physical and numerical modeling of multidimensional liquid-vapor flows advanced two-fluid models, application to upwind finite volume methods; Modelisation physique et numerique d'ecoulements eau-vapeur multidimensionnels modeles bifluides avances, application de methodes de volumes finis decentres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seignole, V

    2005-07-01

    This report presents the work of thesis realized under the direction of Jean-Michel Ghidaglia (thesis director, ENS-Cachan) and of Anela Kumbaro (tutor, CEA) within the framework of the modeling of two-phase flows with OAP code. The report consists of two parts of unequal size: the first part concentrates on aspects related exclusively to two-phase flows, while the second one is devoted to the study of a numerical problem inherent to the resolution of two-phase flow systems, but whose action has a broader framework. (author)

  11. Physical and numerical modeling of multidimensional liquid-vapor flows advanced two-fluid models, application to upwind finite volume methods; Modelisation physique et numerique d'ecoulements eau-vapeur multidimensionnels modeles bifluides avances, application de methodes de volumes finis decentres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seignole, V

    2005-07-01

    This report presents the work of thesis realized under the direction of Jean-Michel Ghidaglia (thesis director, ENS-Cachan) and of Anela Kumbaro (tutor, CEA) within the framework of the modeling of two-phase flows with OAP code. The report consists of two parts of unequal size: the first part concentrates on aspects related exclusively to two-phase flows, while the second one is devoted to the study of a numerical problem inherent to the resolution of two-phase flow systems, but whose action has a broader framework. (author)

  12. Supplementary Material for: Compressing an Ensemble With Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano; Genton, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific datasets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a

  13. An exponential material model for prediction of the flow curves of several AZ series magnesium alloys in tension and compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fereshteh-Saniee, F.; Barati, F.; Badnava, H.; Fallah Nejad, Kh.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The exponential model can represent flow behaviors of AZ series Mg alloys very well. ► Strain rate sensitivities of AZ series Mg alloys in compression are nearly the same. ► Effect of zinc element on tensile activation energy is higher than on compressive one. ► Activation energies of AZ80 and AZ81 in tension were greater than in compression. ► Tensile and compressive rate sensitivities of AZ80 are not close to each other. -- Abstract: This paper is concerned with flow behaviors of several magnesium alloys, such as AZ31, AZ80 and AZ81, in tension and compression. The experiments were performed at elevated temperatures and for various strain rates. In order to eliminate the effect of inhomogeneous deformation in tensile and compression tests, the Bridgeman’s and numerical correction factors were respectively employed. A two-section exponential mathematical model was also utilized for prediction of flow stresses of different magnesium alloys in tension and compression. Moreover, based on the compressive flow model proposed, the peak stress and the relevant true strain could be estimated. The true stress and strain of the necking point can also be predicted using the corresponding relations. It was found that the flow behaviors estimated by the exponential flow model were encouragingly in very good agreement with experimental findings.

  14. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    OpenAIRE

    Hanafi H.; Hasan M.M; Rahman M.M; Noor M.M; Kadirgama K.; Ramasamy D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend). A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5) and 10% ethanol (E10) (in vo...

  15. Wavelet Compressed PCA Models for Real-Time Image Registration in Augmented Reality Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Cooper; Kent Wise; John Cooper; Makarand Deo

    2015-01-01

    The use of augmented reality (AR) has shown great promise in enhancing medical training and diagnostics via interactive simulations. This paper presents a novel method to perform accurate and inexpensive image registration (IR) utilizing a pre-constructed database of reference objects in conjunction with a principal component analysis (PCA) model. In addition, a wavelet compression algorithm is utilized to enhance the speed of the registration process. The proposed method is used to perform r...

  16. Electromechanical modeling and experimental analysis of a compression-based piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, wireless sensor networks have been widely used in the field of structure health monitoring of civil, mechanical, and aerospace systems. Currently, most wireless sensor networks are battery-powered and it is costly and unsustainable for maintenance because of the requirement for frequent battery replacements. As an attempt to address such issue, this article theoretically and experimentally studies a compression-based piezoelectric energy harvester using a multilayer stack configuration, which is suitable for civil infrastructure system applications where large compressive loads occur, such as heavily vehicular loading acting on pavements. In this article, we firstly present analytical and numerical modeling of the piezoelectric multilayer stack under axial compressive loading, which is based on the linear theory of piezoelectricity. A two-degree-of-freedom electromechanical model, considering both the mechanical and electrical aspects of the proposed harvester, was developed to characterize the harvested electrical power under the external electrical load. Exact closed-form expressions of the electromechanical models have been derived to analyze the mechanical and electrical properties of the proposed harvester. The theoretical analyses are validated through several experiments for a test prototype under harmonic excitations. The test results exhibit very good agreement with the analytical analyses and numerical simulations for a range of resistive loads and input excitation levels.

  17. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  18. Numerical study of two-fluid flowing equilibria of helicity-driven spherical torus plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanki, T.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    2004-01-01

    Two-fluid flowing equilibrium configurations of a helicity-driven spherical torus (HD-ST) are numerically determined by using the combination of the finite difference and the boundary element methods. It is found from the numerical results that electron fluids near the central conductor are tied to an external toroidal field and ion fluids are not. The magnetic configurations change from the high-q HD-ST (q>1) with paramagnetic toroidal field and low-β (volume average β value, ∼ 2%) through the helicity-driven spheromak and RFP (reverse field pinch) to the ultra low-q HD-ST (0 ∼ 18%) as the external toroidal field at the inner edge regions decreases and reverses the sign. The two-fluid effects are more significant in this equilibrium transition when the ion diamagnetic drift is dominant in the flowing two-fluid. (authors)

  19. Two-Fluid and Resistive Nonlinear Simulations of Tokamak Equilibrium, Stability, and Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.; Sovinec, C.; Breslau, J.; Ferraro, N.; Hudson, S.; King, J.; Kruger, S.; Ramos, J.; Schnack, D.

    2008-01-01

    The NIMROD and M3D/M3D-C1 codes now each have both a resistive MHD and a two-fluid (2F) capability including gyroviscosity and Hall terms. We describe: (1) a nonlinear 3D verification test in the resistive MHD regime in which the two codes are in detailed agreement, (2) new studies that illuminate the effect of two-fluid physics on spontaneous rotation in tokamaks, (3) studies of nonlinear reconnection in regimes of relevance to fusion plasmas with peak nonlinear reconnection rates that are essentially independent of the resistivity, and (4) linear two-fluid tearing mode calculations including electron mass that agree with analytic studies over a wide range of parameter regimes

  20. Two-fluid effects on pressure-driven modes in a heliotron device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.; Goto, R.; Hatori, T.

    2014-10-01

    Two-fluid effects on the ballooning or pressure-driven unstable modes are studied numerically to understand physics in linear and nonlinear evolution of them in a heliotron device. Full 3D simulations for β 0 = 5% unstable magnetic configuration of the large helical device show that the introduction of the two-fluid term brings about broader radial profile and higher growth rate in the linear stage of the evolution, weakened parallel heat conduction, and lead to a saturation profile worse than that in the single-fluid MHD simulation. The numerical results show that suppression of high wave-number modes enhance the growth of low wave-number modes. The two-fluid effects and a plausible mild saturation of ballooning modes is discussed. (author)

  1. Warped Linear Prediction of Physical Model Excitations with Applications in Audio Compression and Instrument Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Alexis; Fukudome, Kimitoshi

    2004-12-01

    A sound recording of a plucked string instrument is encoded and resynthesized using two stages of prediction. In the first stage of prediction, a simple physical model of a plucked string is estimated and the instrument excitation is obtained. The second stage of prediction compensates for the simplicity of the model in the first stage by encoding either the instrument excitation or the model error using warped linear prediction. These two methods of compensation are compared with each other, and to the case of single-stage warped linear prediction, adjustments are introduced, and their applications to instrument synthesis and MPEG4's audio compression within the structured audio format are discussed.

  2. Modeling of the Tension and Compression Behavior of Sintered 316L Using Micro Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroszko Michał

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the method of numerical modeling of the tension and compression behavior of sintered 316L. In order to take into account the shape of the mesostructures of materials in the numerical modeling, X-ray microtomography was used. Based on the micro-CT images, three-dimensional geometrical models mapped shapes of the porosity were generated. To the numerical calculations was used finite element method. Based on the received stress and strain fields was described the mechanism of deformation of the materials until fracture. The influence of material discontinuities at the mesoscopic scale on macromechanical properties of the porous materials was investigated.

  3. Exploring Potential Foreshocks on Highly Compressed Patches in a Rate-and-State Fault Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, N.; Lapusta, N.

    2015-12-01

    On both natural and laboratory faults, some mainshocks are preceded by foreshocks. Such foreshocks may be triggered by aseismic processes of the mainshock nucleation at fault heterogeneities such as bumps, as inferred in some laboratory experiments. We explore a rate-and-state fault model in which potential foreshocks occur on patches of elevated normal compression (by a factor of 5 to 10) within a larger velocity-weakening (VW) region, using 3D numerical simulations of long-term earthquake sequences and aseismic slip. We find that this model produces isolated microseismicity during the nucleation of a larger-scale seismic event, under the following conditions: (i) Patch diameter D is comparable to or larger than the patch nucleation size h*patch; (ii) D is much smaller than the nucleation size h*main for the larger-scale VW region; otherwise, a patch-hosted event simply starts the larger-scale event; (iii) the patches are sufficiently separated to prevent them triggering each other nearly instantaneously. Hence the nucleation sizes h*main and h*patch need to be substantially different, by a factor of around 10 in our simulations so far, and potentially much more. The aforementioned separation of scales can be achieved by assigning high levels of compression on the patches. However, one would expect unrealistically large stress drops for events on such patches. Remarkably, in this model, we find that the stress drops of the patch-hosted events are reasonable and roughly constant, despite a wide variation in the patch compression, due to patch ruptures extending into the surrounding VW region. Furthermore, for D close to h*patch, a substantial part of the stress change on the patch occurs aseismically. Our current work is directed towards quantifying and explaining these trends, as well as exploring whether the microseismicity occurring on highly compressed patches due to nucleation-induced creep has any observable differences from other events.

  4. A Parallel Two-fluid Code for Global Magnetic Reconnection Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslau, J.A.; Jardin, S.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a new algorithm for the computation of two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluid studies of magnetic reconnection in plasmas. It has been implemented on several parallel platforms and shows good scalability up to 32 CPUs for reasonable problem sizes. A fixed, nonuniform rectangular mesh is used to resolve the different spatial scales in the reconnection problem. The resistive MHD version of the code uses an implicit/explicit hybrid method, while the two-fluid version uses an alternating-direction implicit (ADI) method. The technique has proven useful for comparing several different theories of collisional and collisionless reconnection

  5. When is the Anelastic Approximation a Valid Model for Compressible Convection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboussiere, T.; Curbelo, J.; Labrosse, S.; Ricard, Y. R.; Dubuffet, F.

    2017-12-01

    Compressible convection is ubiquitous in large natural systems such Planetary atmospheres, stellar and planetary interiors. Its modelling is notoriously more difficult than the case when the Boussinesq approximation applies. One reason for that difficulty has been put forward by Ogura and Phillips (1961): the compressible equations generate sound waves with very short time scales which need to be resolved. This is why they introduced an anelastic model, based on an expansion of the solution around an isentropic hydrostatic profile. How accurate is that anelastic model? What are the conditions for its validity? To answer these questions, we have developed a numerical model for the full set of compressible equations and compared its solutions with those of the corresponding anelastic model. We considered a simple rectangular 2D Rayleigh-Bénard configuration and decided to restrict the analysis to infinite Prandtl numbers. This choice is valid for convection in the mantles of rocky planets, but more importantly lead to a zero Mach number. So we got rid of the question of the interference of acoustic waves with convection. In that simplified context, we used the entropy balances (that of the full set of equations and that of the anelastic model) to investigate the differences between exact and anelastic solutions. We found that the validity of the anelastic model is dictated by two conditions: first, the superadiabatic temperature difference must be small compared with the adiabatic temperature difference (as expected) ɛ = Δ TSA / delta Ta << 1, and secondly that the product of ɛ with the Nusselt number must be small.

  6. Rheological-dynamical continuum damage model for concrete under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical model for the prediction of concrete response under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification is presented in this paper. The proposed approach, referred to as the rheological-dynamical continuum damage model, combines rheological-dynamical analogy and damage mechanics. Within the framework of this approach the key continuum parameters such as the creep coefficient, Poisson’s ratio and damage variable are functionally related. The critical values of the creep coefficient and damage variable under peak stress are used to describe the failure mode of the concrete cylinder. The ultimate strain is determined in the post-peak regime only, using the secant stress-strain relation from damage mechanics. The post-peak branch is used for the energy analysis. Experimental data for five concrete compositions were obtained during the examination presented herein. The principal difference between compressive failure and tensile fracture is that there is a residual stress in the specimens, which is a consequence of uniformly accelerated motion of load during the examination of compressive strength. The critical interpenetration displacements and crushing energy are obtained theoretically based on the concept of global failure analysis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 174027: Computational Mechanics in Structural Engineering i br. TR 36017: Utilization of by-products and recycled waste materials in concrete composites for sustainable construction development in Serbia: Investigation and environmental assessment of possible applications

  7. Mechanical response of common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seeds under quasi-static compression: Experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasseldine, Benjamin P J; Gao, Chao; Collins, Joseph M; Jung, Hyun-Do; Jang, Tae-Sik; Song, Juha; Li, Yaning

    2017-09-01

    The common millet (Panicum miliaceum) seedcoat has a fascinating complex microstructure, with jigsaw puzzle-like epidermis cells articulated via wavy intercellular sutures to form a compact layer to protect the kernel inside. However, little research has been conducted on linking the microstructure details with the overall mechanical response of this interesting biological composite. To this end, an integrated experimental-numerical-analytical investigation was conducted to both characterize the microstructure and ascertain the microscale mechanical properties and to test the overall response of kernels and full seeds under macroscale quasi-static compression. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to examine the microstructure of the outer seedcoat and nanoindentation was performed to obtain the material properties of the seedcoat hard phase material. A multiscale computational strategy was applied to link the microstructure to the macroscale response of the seed. First, the effective anisotropic mechanical properties of the seedcoat were obtained from finite element (FE) simulations of a microscale representative volume element (RVE), which were further verified from sophisticated analytical models. Then, macroscale FE models of the individual kernel and full seed were developed. Good agreement between the compression experiments and FE simulations were obtained for both the kernel and the full seed. The results revealed the anisotropic property and the protective function of the seedcoat, and showed that the sutures of the seedcoat play an important role in transmitting and distributing loads in responding to external compression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling of video traffic in packet networks, low rate video compression, and the development of a lossy+lossless image compression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayood, K.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, X.

    1992-01-01

    During this reporting period we have worked on three somewhat different problems. These are modeling of video traffic in packet networks, low rate video compression, and the development of a lossy + lossless image compression algorithm, which might have some application in browsing algorithms. The lossy + lossless scheme is an extension of work previously done under this grant. It provides a simple technique for incorporating browsing capability. The low rate coding scheme is also a simple variation on the standard discrete cosine transform (DCT) coding approach. In spite of its simplicity, the approach provides surprisingly high quality reconstructions. The modeling approach is borrowed from the speech recognition literature, and seems to be promising in that it provides a simple way of obtaining an idea about the second order behavior of a particular coding scheme. Details about these are presented.

  9. Monte Carlo Studies of Phase Separation in Compressible 2-dim Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S. J.; Landau, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    Using high resolution Monte Carlo simulations, we study time-dependent domain growth in compressible 2-dim ferromagnetic (s=1/2) Ising models with continuous spin positions and spin-exchange moves [1]. Spins interact with slightly modified Lennard-Jones potentials, and we consider a model with no lattice mismatch and one with 4% mismatch. For comparison, we repeat calculations for the rigid Ising model [2]. For all models, large systems (512^2) and long times (10^ 6 MCS) are examined over multiple runs, and the growth exponent is measured in the asymptotic scaling regime. For the rigid model and the compressible model with no lattice mismatch, the growth exponent is consistent with the theoretically expected value of 1/3 [1] for Model B type growth. However, we find that non-zero lattice mismatch has a significant and unexpected effect on the growth behavior.Supported by the NSF.[1] D.P. Landau and K. Binder, A Guide to Monte Carlo Simulations in Statistical Physics, second ed. (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2005).[2] J. Amar, F. Sullivan, and R.D. Mountain, Phys. Rev. B 37, 196 (1988).

  10. In vitro burn model illustrating heat conduction patterns using compressed thermal papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Yong; Jung, Sung-No; Kwon, Ho

    2015-01-01

    To date, heat conduction from heat sources to tissue has been estimated by complex mathematical modeling. In the present study, we developed an intuitive in vitro skin burn model that illustrates heat conduction patterns inside the skin. This was composed of tightly compressed thermal papers with compression frames. Heat flow through the model left a trace by changing the color of thermal papers. These were digitized and three-dimensionally reconstituted to reproduce the heat conduction patterns in the skin. For standardization, we validated K91HG-CE thermal paper using a printout test and bivariate correlation analysis. We measured the papers' physical properties and calculated the estimated depth of heat conduction using Fourier's equation. Through contact burns of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 seconds on porcine skin and our burn model using a heated brass comb, and comparing the burn wound and heat conduction trace, we validated our model. The heat conduction pattern correlation analysis (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.846, p < 0.001) and the heat conduction depth correlation analysis (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.93, p < 0.001) showed statistically significant high correlations between the porcine burn wound and our model. Our model showed good correlation with porcine skin burn injury and replicated its heat conduction patterns. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. Development, implementation and assessment of specific, two-fluid closure laws for inverted-annular film-boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachard, F. de [Laboratory for Thermal Hydraulics, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    Inverted-Annular Film-Boiling (IAFB) is one of the post-burnout heat transfer modes taking place during the reflooding phase of the loss-of-coolant accident, when the liquid at the quench front is subcooled. Under IAFB conditions, a continuous, liquid core is separated from the wall by a superheated vapour film. the heat transfer rate in IAFB is influenced by the flooding rate, liquid subcooling, pressure, and the wall geometry and temperature. These influences can be accounted by a two-fluid model with physically sound closure laws for mass, momentum and heat transfers between the wall, the vapour film, the vapour-liquid interface, and the liquid core. Such closure laws have been developed and adjusted using IAFB-relevant experimental results, including heat flux, wall temperature and void fraction data. The model is extensively assessed against data from three independent sources. A total of 46 experiments have been analyzed. The overall predictions are good. The IAFB-specific closure laws proposed have also intrinsic value, and may be used in other two-fluid models. They should allow to improve the description of post-dryout, low quality heat transfer by the safety codes.

  12. Impact of particle density and initial volume on mathematical compression models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2000-01-01

    In the calculation of the coefficients of compression models for powders either the initial volume or the particle density is introduced as a normalising factor. The influence of these normalising factors is, however, widely different on coefficients derived from the Kawakita, Walker and Heckel...... equations. The problems are illustrated by investigations on compaction profiles of 17 materials with different molecular structures and particle densities. It is shown that the particle density of materials with covalent bonds in the Heckel model acts as a key parameter with a dominating influence...

  13. STEADY-STATE modeling and simulation of pipeline networks for compressible fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.H. Costa

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model and an algorithm for the simulation of pipeline networks with compressible fluids. The model can predict pressures, flow rates, temperatures and gas compositions at any point of the network. Any network configuration can be simulated; the existence of cycles is not an obstacle. Numerical results from simulated data on a proposed network are shown for illustration. The potential of the simulator is explored by the analysis of a pressure relief network, using a stochastic procedure for the evaluation of system performance.

  14. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability of a thermal interface in a two-fluid plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Bond, D.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, Ravi; Pullin, D. I.

    2017-01-01

    We computationally investigate the Richtmyer–Meshkov instability of a density interface with a single-mode perturbation in a two-fluid, ion–electron plasma with no initial magnetic field. Self-generated magnetic fields arise subsequently. We study

  15. Modeling Drift Compression in an Integrated Beam Experiment for Heavy-Ion-Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Celata, C. M.; Yu, S. S.

    2003-10-01

    The Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) is an induction accelerator being designed to further develop the science base for heavy-ion fusion. The experiment is being developed jointly by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. One conceptual approach would first accelerate a 0.5-1 A beam of singly charged potassium ions to 5 MeV, impose a head-to-tail velocity tilt to compress the beam longitudinally, and finally focus the beam radiallly using a series of quadrupole lenses. The lengthwise compression is a critical step because the radial size must be controlled as the current increases, and the beam emittance must be kept minimal. The work reported here first uses the moment-based model HERMES to design the drift-compression beam line and to assess the sensitivity of the final beam profile to beam and lattice errors. The particle-in-cell code WARP is then used to validate the physics design, study the phase-space evolution, and quantify the emittance growth.

  16. Comparing the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of thermal and ion-species interfaces in two-fluid plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Vincent; Bond, Daryl; Li, Yuan; Samtaney, Ravi; Pullin, Dale

    2017-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) of a shock accelerated perturbed density interface is important in both inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics, where the materials involved are typically in the plasma state. Initial density interfaces can be due to either temperature or ion-species discontinuities. If the Atwood number of the interfaces and specific heat ratios of the fluids are matched, these two cases behave similarly when modeled using the equations of either hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. In the two-fluid ion-electron plasma model, however, there is a significant difference between them: In the thermal interface case, there is a discontinuity in electron density that is also subject to the RMI, while for the ion-species interface case there is not. It will be shown via ideal two-fluid plasma simulations that this causes substantial differences in the dynamics of the flow between the two cases. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  17. Compression-recovery model of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator guided by X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Rajput, Krishn Gopal

    2017-10-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators play a key role in enhancing the cycle life of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries by maintaining the elastic characteristics under a defined level of compression force with the plates of the electrodes. Inevitably, there are inherent challenges to maintain the required level of compression characteristics of AGM separators during the charge and discharge of the battery. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) analytical model for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators by formulating a direct relationship with the constituent fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators has successfully included the fiber slippage criterion and internal friction losses. The presented work uses, for the first time, 3D data of fiber orientation from X-ray micro-computed tomography, for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of compression-recovery behavior of AGM samples with defined fiber orientation characteristics. In general, the theory agreed reasonably well with the experimental results of AGM samples in both dry and wet states. Through theoretical modeling, fiber volume fraction was established as one of the key structural parameters that modulates the compression hysteresis of an AGM separator.

  18. Modeling compressible multiphase flows with dispersed particles in both dense and dilute regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, T.; St. Clair, J.; Balachandar, S.

    2018-05-01

    Many important explosives and energetics applications involve multiphase formulations employing dispersed particles. While considerable progress has been made toward developing mathematical models and computational methodologies for these flows, significant challenges remain. In this work, we apply a mathematical model for compressible multiphase flows with dispersed particles to existing shock and explosive dispersal problems from the literature. The model is cast in an Eulerian framework, treats all phases as compressible, is hyperbolic, and satisfies the second law of thermodynamics. It directly applies the continuous-phase pressure gradient as a forcing function for particle acceleration and thereby retains relaxed characteristics for the dispersed particle phase that remove the constituent material sound velocity from the eigenvalues. This is consistent with the expected characteristics of dispersed particle phases and can significantly improve the stable time-step size for explicit methods. The model is applied to test cases involving the shock and explosive dispersal of solid particles and compared to data from the literature. Computed results compare well with experimental measurements, providing confidence in the model and computational methods applied.

  19. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  20. Compressible flow modelling in unstructured mesh topologies using numerical methods developed for incompressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, A.; Mechitoua, N.; Duplex, J.

    1995-01-01

    The R and D thermal hydraulic codes, notably the finite difference codes Melodie (2D) and ESTET (3D) or the 2D and 3D versions of the finite element code N3S were initially developed for incompressible, possibly dilatable, turbulent flows, i.e. those where density is not pressure-dependent. Subsequent minor modifications to these finite difference code algorithms enabled extension of their scope to subsonic compressible flows. The first applications in both single-phase and two flow contexts have now been completed. This paper presents the techniques used to adapt these algorithms for the processing of compressible flows in an N3S type finite element code, whereby complex geometries normally difficult to model in finite difference meshes could be successfully dealt with. The development of version 3.0 of he N3S code led to dilatable flow calculations at lower cost. On this basis, a 2-D prototype version of N3S was programmed, tested and validated, drawing maximum benefit from Cray vectorization possibilities and from physical, numerical or data processing experience with other fluid dynamics codes, such as Melodie, ESTET or TELEMAC. The algorithms are the same as those used in finite difference codes, but their formulation is variational. The first part of the paper deals with the fundamental equations involved, expressed in basic form, together with the associated digital method. The modifications to the k-epsilon turbulence model extended to compressible flows are also described. THe second part presents the algorithm used, indicating the additional terms required by the extension. The third part presents the equations in integral form and the associated matrix systems. The solutions adopted for calculation of the compressibility related terms are indicated. Finally, a few representative applications and test cases are discussed. These include subsonic, but also transsonic and supersonic cases, showing the shock responses of the digital method. The application of

  1. Improvements of an objective model of compressed breasts undergoing mammography: Generation and characterization of breast shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Alejandro; Feng, Steve Si Jia; van Zelst, Jan; Vreemann, Suzan; Mann, Jessica Rice; D'Orsi, Carl Joseph; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-06-01

    To develop a set of accurate 2D models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography or breast tomosynthesis, based on objective analysis, to accurately characterize mammograms with few linearly independent parameters, and to generate novel clinically realistic paired cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views of the breast. We seek to improve on an existing model of compressed breasts by overcoming detector size bias, removing the nipple and non-mammary tissue, pairing the CC and MLO views from a single breast, and incorporating the pectoralis major muscle contour into the model. The outer breast shapes in 931 paired CC and MLO mammograms were automatically detected with an in-house developed segmentation algorithm. From these shapes three generic models (CC-only, MLO-only, and joint CC/MLO) with linearly independent components were constructed via principal component analysis (PCA). The ability of the models to represent mammograms not used for PCA was tested via leave-one-out cross-validation, by measuring the average distance error (ADE). The individual models based on six components were found to depict breast shapes with accuracy (mean ADE-CC = 0.81 mm, ADE-MLO = 1.64 mm, ADE-Pectoralis = 1.61 mm), outperforming the joint CC/MLO model (P ≤ 0.001). The joint model based on 12 principal components contains 99.5% of the total variance of the data, and can be used to generate new clinically realistic paired CC and MLO breast shapes. This is achieved by generating random sets of 12 principal components, following the Gaussian distributions of the histograms of each component, which were obtained from the component values determined from the images in the mammography database used. Our joint CC/MLO model can successfully generate paired CC and MLO view shapes of the same simulated breast, while the individual models can be used to represent with high accuracy clinical acquired mammograms with a small set of parameters. This is the first

  2. Fast modeling of flux trapping cascaded explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Zhang, Jiande; Chen, Dongqun; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2013-01-01

    To predict the performance of flux trapping cascaded flux compression generators, a calculation model based on an equivalent circuit is investigated. The system circuit is analyzed according to its operation characteristics in different steps. Flux conservation coefficients are added to the driving terms of circuit differential equations to account for intrinsic flux losses. To calculate the currents in the circuit by solving the circuit equations, a simple zero-dimensional model is used to calculate the time-varying inductance and dc resistance of the generator. Then a fast computer code is programmed based on this calculation model. As an example, a two-staged flux trapping generator is simulated by using this computer code. Good agreements are achieved by comparing the simulation results with the measurements. Furthermore, it is obvious that this fast calculation model can be easily applied to predict performances of other flux trapping cascaded flux compression generators with complex structures such as conical stator or conical armature sections and so on for design purpose.

  3. Structural changes in latosols of the cerrado region: II - soil compressive behavior and modeling of additional compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo da Costa Severiano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently in Brazil, as in other parts of the world, the concern is great with the increase of degraded agricultural soil, which is mostly related to the occurrence of soil compaction. Although soil texture is recognized as a very important component in the soil compressive behaviors, there are few studies that quantify its influence on the structural changes of Latosols in the Brazilian Cerrado region. This study aimed to evaluate structural changes and the compressive behavior of Latosols in Rio Verde, Goiás, through the modeling of additional soil compaction. The study was carried out using five Latosols with very different textures, under different soil compaction levels. Water retention and soil compression curves, and bearing capacity models were determined from undisturbed samples collected on the B horizons. Results indicated that clayey and very clayey Latosols were more susceptible to compression than medium-textured soils. Soil compression curves at density values associate with edaphic functions were used to determine the beneficial pressure (σ b , i.e., pressure with optimal water retention, and critical pressure (σcrMAC, i.e., pressure with macroporosity below critical levels. These pressure values were higher than the preconsolidation pressure (σp, and therefore characterized as additional compaction. Based on the compressive behavior of these Latosols, it can be concluded that the combined preconsolidation pressure, beneficial pressure and critical pressure allow a better understanding of compression processes of Latosols.

  4. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  5. Modeling the Plasma Flow in the Inner Heliosheath with a Spatially Varying Compression Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, G. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Livadiotis, G. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    2017-03-20

    We examine a semi-analytical non-magnetic model of the termination shock location previously developed by Exarhos and Moussas. In their study, the plasma flow beyond the shock is considered incompressible and irrotational, thus the flow potential is analytically derived from the Laplace equation. Here we examine the characteristics of the downstream flow in the heliosheath in order to resolve several inconsistencies existing in the Exarhos and Moussas model. In particular, the model is modified in order to be consistent with the Rankine–Hugoniot jump conditions and the geometry of the termination shock. It is shown that a shock compression ratio varying along the latitude can lead to physically correct results. We describe the new model and present several simplified examples for a nearly spherical, strong termination shock. Under those simplifications, the upstream plasma is nearly adiabatic for large (∼100 AU) heliosheath thickness.

  6. Analysis of the `Biarez Favre' and `Burland' models for the compressibility of remoulded clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Jean-Louis; Hattab, Mahdia

    2008-01-01

    This study aims at comparing the prediction by the Biarez and Favre model as well as by the more recent Burland one, established for reconstituted normally consolidated clays submitted to oedometric loading. The former, proposed in the 1970s, uses the liquidity index IL, and while the latter introduces a parameter, Iv, which is a normalised void index based on two characteristic void ratios ( e100* and e1000*) corresponding to the oedometric curve of σv=100 kPa and σv=1000 kPa. The aim of these models is to predict the compressibility parameters based on the identification of parameters represented by the Atterberg limits ( wL, wP, Ip) as well as of other physical parameters such as the void ratio e or the natural water content wnat, taking into account the effective overburden pressure σv. These models, which represent the intrinsic properties of clays under compression, are compared with two experimental curves, the first one representing remoulded and reconstituted clay, and the other one a deepwater clay sediment taken from the Gulf of Guinea at a depth of 700 m.

  7. Rapid maxillary anterior teeth retraction en masse by bone compression: a canine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chufeng Liu

    Full Text Available The present study sought to establish an animal model to study the feasibility and safety of rapid retraction of maxillary anterior teeth en masse aided by alveolar surgery in order to reduce orthodontic treatment time.Extraction of the maxillary canine and alveolar surgery were performed on twelve adult beagle dogs. After that, the custom-made tooth-borne distraction devices were placed on beagles' teeth. Nine of the dogs were applied compression at 0.5 mm/d for 12 days continuously. The other three received no force as the control group. The animals were killed in 1, 14, and 28 days after the end of the application of compression.The tissue responses were assessed by craniometric measurement as well as histological examination. Gross alterations were evident in the experimental group, characterized by anterior teeth crossbite. The average total movements of incisors within 12 days were 4.63±0.10 mm and the average anchorage losses were 1.25±0.12 mm. Considerable root resorption extending into the dentine could be observed 1 and 14 days after the compression. But after consolidation of 28 days, there were regenerated cementum on the dentine. There was no apparent change in the control group. No obvious tooth loosening, gingival necrosis, pulp degeneration, or other adverse complications appeared in any of the dogs.This is the first experimental study for testing the technique of rapid anterior teeth retraction en masse aided by modified alveolar surgery. Despite a preliminary animal model study, the current findings pave the way for the potential clinical application that can accelerate orthodontic tooth movement without many adverse complications.It may become a novel method to shorten the clinical orthodontic treatment time in the future.

  8. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Ibna Zahid, Zubayer

    2016-01-01

    Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE) platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A tot...

  9. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability of a thermal interface in a two-fluid plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Bond, D.

    2017-11-03

    We computationally investigate the Richtmyer–Meshkov instability of a density interface with a single-mode perturbation in a two-fluid, ion–electron plasma with no initial magnetic field. Self-generated magnetic fields arise subsequently. We study the case where the density jump across the initial interface is due to a thermal discontinuity, and select plasma parameters for which two-fluid plasma effects are expected to be significant in order to elucidate how they alter the instability. The instability is driven via a Riemann problem generated precursor electron shock that impacts the density interface ahead of the ion shock. The resultant charge separation and motion generates electromagnetic fields that cause the electron shock to degenerate and periodically accelerate the electron and ion interfaces, driving Rayleigh–Taylor instability. This generates small-scale structures and substantially increases interfacial growth over the hydrodynamic case.

  10. Mathematical modelling and numerical resolution of multi-phase compressible fluid flows problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagoutiere, Frederic

    2000-01-01

    This work deals with Eulerian compressible multi-species fluid dynamics, the species being either mixed or separated (with interfaces). The document is composed of three parts. The first parts devoted to the numerical resolution of model problems: advection equation, Burgers equation, and Euler equations, in dimensions one and two. The goal is to find a precise method, especially for discontinuous initial conditions, and we develop non dissipative algorithms. They are based on a downwind finite-volume discretization under some stability constraints. The second part treats of the mathematical modelling of fluids mixtures. We construct and analyse a set of multi-temperature and multi-pressure models that are entropy, symmetrizable, hyperbolic, not ever conservative. In the third part, we apply the ideas developed in the first part (downwind discretization) to the numerical resolution of the partial differential problems we have constructed for fluids mixtures in the second part. We present some numerical results in dimensions one and two. (author) [fr

  11. Effect of aggregates on the magnetization property of ferrofluids: A model of gaslike compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li, Yan Huang, Xiaodong Liu, Yueqing Lin, Lang Bai and Qiang Li

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of field-induced aggregation of particles on the magnetization property of ferrofluids is investigated. From the viewpoint of energy, magnetizability of ferrofluids is more complicated than predicted by Langevin theory because the aggregation, i.e., the transition of ferrofluid microstructure, would consume the energy of the applied magnetic field. For calculating the effect of aggregates on the magnetization of ferrofluids, a model of gaslike compression (MGC is proposed to simulate the evolution of the aggregate structure. In this model, the field-induced colloidal particles aggregating in ferrofluids is equivalent to the "gas of the particles" being compressed by the applied magnetic field. The entropy change of the ferrofluid microstructure is proportional to the particle volume fraction in field-induced aggregates phivH. On the basis of the known behavior of ferrofluid magnetization and the aggregate structure determined from the present experiments, phivH is obtained and found to depend on the aggregating characteristic parameter of ferrofluid particles γ in addition to the particle volume fraction in ferrofluids phiv and the strength of applied magnetic field H. The effect of the nonmagnetic surface layer of ferrofluid particles is also studied. The theory of MGC conforms to our experimental results better than Langevin theory.

  12. A Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Model of Jointed Hard Rock for Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy resources such as wind and solar are intermittent, which causes instability when being connected to utility grid of electricity. Compressed air energy storage (CAES provides an economic and technical viable solution to this problem by utilizing subsurface rock cavern to store the electricity generated by renewable energy in the form of compressed air. Though CAES has been used for over three decades, it is only restricted to salt rock or aquifers for air tightness reason. In this paper, the technical feasibility of utilizing hard rock for CAES is investigated by using a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM modelling of nonisothermal gas flow. Governing equations are derived from the rules of energy balance, mass balance, and static equilibrium. Cyclic volumetric mass source and heat source models are applied to simulate the gas injection and production. Evaluation is carried out for intact rock and rock with discrete crack, respectively. In both cases, the heat and pressure losses using air mass control and supplementary air injection are compared.

  13. Strain Rate Dependent Behavior and Modeling for Compression Response of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper investigates the stress-strain characteristics of Hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC composites under dynamic compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB for strain rates in the range of 25 to 125 s-1. Three types of fibers - hooked ended steel fibers, monofilament crimped polypropylene fibers and staple Kevlar fibers were used in the production of HFRC composites. The influence of different fibers in HFRC composites on the failure mode, dynamic increase factor (DIF of strength, toughness and strain are also studied. Degree of fragmentation of HFRC composite specimens increases with increase in the strain rate. Although the use of high percentage of steel fibers leads to the best performance but among the hybrid fiber combinations studied, HFRC composites with relatively higher percentage of steel fibers and smaller percentage of polypropylene and Kevlar fibers seem to reflect the equally good synergistic effects of fibers under dynamic compression. A rate dependent analytical model is proposed for predicting complete stress-strain curves of HFRC composites. The model is based on a comprehensive fiber reinforcing index and complements well with the experimental results.

  14. Two-fluid dusty shocks: simple benchmarking problems and applications to protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2018-05-01

    The key role that dust plays in the interstellar medium has motivated the development of numerical codes designed to study the coupled evolution of dust and gas in systems such as turbulent molecular clouds and protoplanetary discs. Drift between dust and gas has proven to be important as well as numerically challenging. We provide simple benchmarking problems for dusty gas codes by numerically solving the two-fluid dust-gas equations for steady, plane-parallel shock waves. The two distinct shock solutions to these equations allow a numerical code to test different forms of drag between the two fluids, the strength of that drag and the dust to gas ratio. We also provide an astrophysical application of J-type dust-gas shocks to studying the structure of accretion shocks on to protoplanetary discs. We find that two-fluid effects are most important for grains larger than 1 μm, and that the peak dust temperature within an accretion shock provides a signature of the dust-to-gas ratio of the infalling material.

  15. On Active Surge Control of Compression Systems via Characteristic Linearization and Model Nonlinearity Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes S.M. Simamora

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple approach of active surge control of compression systems is presented. Specifically, nonlinear components of the pressure ratio and rotating speed states of the Moore-Greitzer model are transferred into the input vectors. Subsequently, the compressor characteristic is linearized into two modes, which describe the stable region and the unstable region respectively. As a result, the system’s state and input matrices both appear linear, to which linear realization and analysis are applicable. A linear quadratic regulator plus integrator is then chosen as closed-loop controller. By simulation it was shown that the modified model and characteristics can describe surge behavior, while the closed-loop controller can stabilize the system in the unstable operating region. The last-mentioned was achieved when massflow was 5.38 per cent less than the surge point.

  16. Modeling the Compression of Merged Compact Toroids by Multiple Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ron; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A fusion propulsion scheme has been proposed that makes use of the merging of a spherical distribution of plasma jets to dynamically form a gaseous liner. The gaseous liner is used to implode a magnetized target to produce the fusion reaction in a standoff manner. In this paper, the merging of the plasma jets to form the gaseous liner is investigated numerically. The Los Alamos SPHINX code, based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to model the interaction of the jets. 2-D and 3-D simulations have been performed to study the characteristics of the resulting flow when these jets collide. The results show that the jets merge to form a plasma liner that converge radially which may be used to compress the central plasma to fusion conditions. Details of the computational model and the SPH numerical methods will be presented together with the numerical results.

  17. Finite-element modeling of compression and gravity on a population of breast phantoms for multimodality imaging simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y; Samei, E; Segars, W P

    2016-05-01

    The authors are developing a series of computational breast phantoms based on breast CT data for imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a program that will allow a user to alter the phantoms to simulate the effect of gravity and compression of the breast (craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique) making the phantoms applicable to multimodality imaging. This application utilizes a template finite-element (FE) breast model that can be applied to their presegmented voxelized breast phantoms. The FE model is automatically fit to the geometry of a given breast phantom, and the material properties of each element are set based on the segmented voxels contained within the element. The loading and boundary conditions, which include gravity, are then assigned based on a user-defined position and compression. The effect of applying these loads to the breast is computed using a multistage contact analysis in FEBio, a freely available and well-validated FE software package specifically designed for biomedical applications. The resulting deformation of the breast is then applied to a boundary mesh representation of the phantom that can be used for simulating medical images. An efficient script performs the above actions seamlessly. The user only needs to specify which voxelized breast phantom to use, the compressed thickness, and orientation of the breast. The authors utilized their FE application to simulate compressed states of the breast indicative of mammography and tomosynthesis. Gravity and compression were simulated on example phantoms and used to generate mammograms in the craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique views. The simulated mammograms show a high degree of realism illustrating the utility of the FE method in simulating imaging data of repositioned and compressed breasts. The breast phantoms and the compression software can become a useful resource to the breast imaging research community. These phantoms can then be used to evaluate and compare imaging

  18. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  19. Optimal chest compression rate in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a prospective, randomized crossover study using a manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hwa; Ryu, Ji Ho; Min, Mun Ki; Kim, Yong In; Park, Maeng Real; Yeom, Seok Ran; Han, Sang Kyoon; Park, Seong Wook

    2016-08-01

    When performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 min, whereas the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines recommend a rate of between 100 and 120 min. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of chest compression that fulfilled various quality indicators, thereby determining the optimal rate of compression. Thirty-two trainee emergency medical technicians and six paramedics were enrolled in this study. All participants had been trained in basic life support. Each participant performed 2 min of continuous compressions on a skill reporter manikin, while listening to a metronome sound at rates of 100, 120, 140, and 160 beats/min, in a random order. Mean compression depth, incomplete chest recoil, and the proportion of correctly performed chest compressions during the 2 min were measured and recorded. The rate of incomplete chest recoil was lower at compression rates of 100 and 120 min compared with that at 160 min (P=0.001). The numbers of compressions that fulfilled the criteria for high-quality CPR at a rate of 120 min were significantly higher than those at 100 min (P=0.016). The number of high-quality CPR compressions was the highest at a compression rate of 120 min, and increased incomplete recoil occurred with increasing compression rate. However, further studies are needed to confirm the results.

  20. Modeling and control of tissue compression and temperature for automation in robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Utkarsh; Li, Baichun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used widely due to its various benefits that includes reduced patient trauma and increased dexterity and ergonomics for the operating surgeon. Making the whole or part of the surgical procedure autonomous increases patient safety and will enable the robotic surgery platform to be used in telesurgery. In this work, an Electrosurgery procedure that involves tissue compression and application of heat such as the coaptic vessel closure has been automated. A MIMO nonlinear model characterizing the tissue stiffness and conductance under compression was feedback linearized and tuned PID controllers were used to control the system to achieve both the displacement and temperature constraints. A reference input for both the constraints were chosen as a ramp and hold trajectory which reflect the real constraints that exist in an actual surgical procedure. Our simulations showed that the controllers successfully tracked the reference trajectories with minimal deviation and in finite time horizon. The MIMO system with controllers developed in this work can be used to drive a surgical robot autonomously and perform electrosurgical procedures such as coaptic vessel closures.

  1. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  2. A micromechanical four-phase model to predict the compressive failure surface of cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Caporale,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a micromechanical model is used in order to predict the failure surface of cement concrete subject to multi-axial compression. In the adopted model, the concrete material is schematised as a composite with the following constituents: coarse aggregate (gravel, fine aggregate (sand and cement paste. The cement paste contains some voids which grow during the loading process. In fact, the non-linear behavior of the concrete is attributed to the creation of cracks in the cement paste; the effect of the cracks is taken into account by introducing equivalent voids (inclusions with zero stiffness in the cement paste. The three types of inclusions (namely gravel, sand and voids have different scales, so that the overall behavior of the concrete is obtained by the composition of three different homogenizations; in the sense that the concrete is regarded as the homogenized material of the two-phase composite constituted of the gravel and the mortar; in turn, the mortar is the homogenized material of the two-phase composite constituted of the sand inclusions and a (porous cement paste matrix; finally, the (porous cement paste is the homogenized material of the two-phase composite constituted of voids and the pure paste. The pure paste represents the cement paste before the loading process, so that it does not contain voids or other defects due to the loading process. The abovementioned three homogenizations are realized with the predictive scheme of Mori-Tanaka in conjunction with the Eshelby method. The adopted model can be considered an attempt to find micromechanical tools able to capture peculiar aspects of the cement concrete in load cases of uni-axial and multi-axial compression. Attributing the non-linear behavior of concrete to the creation of equivalent voids in the cement paste provides correspondence with many phenomenological aspects of concrete behavior. Trying to improve this correspondence, the influence of the parameters of the

  3. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Rahim Hematiyan, Mohammad; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.

  4. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Hematiyan, Mohammad Rahim; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2015-01-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost ® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney–Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%. (paper)

  5. Equilibrium properties of simple metal thin films in the self-compressed stabilized jellium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, T; Payami, M

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we have applied the self-compressed stabilized jellium model to predict the equilibrium properties of isolated thin Al, Na and Cs slabs. To make a direct correspondence to atomic slabs, we have considered only those L values that correspond to n-layered atomic slabs with 2≤n≤20, for surface indices (100), (110), and (111). The calculations are based on the density functional theory and self-consistent solution of the Kohn-Sham equations in the local density approximation. Our results show that firstly, the quantum size effects are significant for slabs with sizes smaller than or near to the Fermi wavelength of the valence electrons λ(F), and secondly, some slabs expand while others contract with respect to the bulk spacings. Based on the results, we propose a criterion for realization of significant quantum size effects that lead to expansion of some thin slabs. For more justification of the criterion, we have tested it on Li slabs for 2≤n≤6. We have compared our Al results with those obtained from using all-electron or pseudo-potential first-principles calculations. This comparison shows excellent agreements for Al(100) work functions, and qualitatively good agreements for the other work functions and surface energies. These agreements justify the way we have used the self-compressed stabilized jellium model for the correct description of the properties of simple metal slab systems. On the other hand, our results for the work functions and surface energies of large- n slabs are in good agreement with those obtained from applying the stabilized jellium model for semi-infinite systems. In addition, we have performed the slab calculations in the presence of surface corrugation for selected Al slabs and have shown that the results are worsened.

  6. Global molecular changes in a tibial compression induced ACL rupture model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiun C; Sebastian, Aimy; Murugesh, Deepa K; Hatsell, Sarah; Economides, Aris N; Christiansen, Blaine A; Loots, Gabriela G

    2017-03-01

    Joint injury causes post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). About ∼50% of patients rupturing their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) will develop PTOA within 1-2 decades of the injury, yet the mechanisms responsible for the development of PTOA after joint injury are not well understood. In this study, we examined whole joint gene expression by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) at 1 day, 1-, 6-, and 12 weeks post injury, in a non-invasive tibial compression (TC) overload mouse model of PTOA that mimics ACL rupture in humans. We identified 1446 genes differentially regulated between injured and contralateral joints. This includes known regulators of osteoarthritis such as MMP3, FN1, and COMP, and several new genes including Suco, Sorcs2, and Medag. We also identified 18 long noncoding RNAs that are differentially expressed in the injured joints. By comparing our data to gene expression data generated using the surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) PTOA model, we identified several common genes and shared mechanisms. Our study highlights several differences between these two models and suggests that the TC model may be a more rapidly progressing model of PTOA. This study provides the first account of gene expression changes associated with PTOA development and progression in a TC model. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:474-485, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Global molecular changes in a tibial compression induced ACL rupture model of post‐traumatic osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiun C.; Sebastian, Aimy; Murugesh, Deepa K.; Hatsell, Sarah; Economides, Aris N.; Christiansen, Blaine A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Joint injury causes post‐traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). About ∼50% of patients rupturing their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) will develop PTOA within 1–2 decades of the injury, yet the mechanisms responsible for the development of PTOA after joint injury are not well understood. In this study, we examined whole joint gene expression by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) at 1 day, 1‐, 6‐, and 12 weeks post injury, in a non‐invasive tibial compression (TC) overload mouse model of PTOA that mimics ACL rupture in humans. We identified 1446 genes differentially regulated between injured and contralateral joints. This includes known regulators of osteoarthritis such as MMP3, FN1, and COMP, and several new genes including Suco, Sorcs2, and Medag. We also identified 18 long noncoding RNAs that are differentially expressed in the injured joints. By comparing our data to gene expression data generated using the surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) PTOA model, we identified several common genes and shared mechanisms. Our study highlights several differences between these two models and suggests that the TC model may be a more rapidly progressing model of PTOA. This study provides the first account of gene expression changes associated with PTOA development and progression in a TC model. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:474–485, 2017. PMID:27088242

  8. High-speed video analysis improves the accuracy of spinal cord compression measurement in a mouse contusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournely, Marion; Petit, Yvan; Wagnac, Éric; Laurin, Jérôme; Callot, Virginie; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2018-01-01

    Animal models of spinal cord injuries aim to utilize controlled and reproducible conditions. However, a literature review reveals that mouse contusion studies using equivalent protocols may show large disparities in the observed impact force vs. cord compression relationship. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate possible sources of bias in these measurements. The specific objective was to improve spinal cord compression measurements using a video-based setup to detect the impactor-spinal cord time-to-contact. A force-controlled 30kDyn unilateral contusion at C4 vertebral level was performed in six mice with the Infinite Horizon impactor (IH). High-speed video was used to determine the time-to-contact between the impactor tip and the spinal cord and to compute the related displacement of the tip into the tissue: the spinal cord compression and the compression ratio. Delayed time-to-contact detection with the IH device led to an underestimation of the cord compression. Compression values indicated by the IH were 64% lower than those based on video analysis (0.33mm vs. 0.88mm). Consequently, the mean compression ratio derived from the device was underestimated when compared to the value derived from video analysis (22% vs. 61%). Default time-to-contact detection from the IH led to significant errors in spinal cord compression assessment. Accordingly, this may explain some of the reported data discrepancies in the literature. The proposed setup could be implemented by users of contusion devices to improve the quantative description of the primary injury inflicted to the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling and optimization of seawater desalination process using mechanical vapour compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Kravchenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of global climate changes shortage of fresh water becomes an urgent problem for an increasing number of the countries. One of the most perspective technologies of a desalting of sea water is the mechanical vapour compression (MVC providing low energy consumption due to the principle of a heat pump. Aim: The aim of this research is to identify the reserves of efficiency increasing of the desalination systems based on mechanical vapour compression by optimization of the scheme and parameters of installations with MVC. Materials and Methods: The new type of desalination installation is offered which main element is the heat exchanger of the latent heat. Sea water after preliminary heating in heat exchangers comes to the evaporator-condenser where receives the main amount of heat from the condensed steam. A part of sea water evaporates, and the strong solution of salt (brine goes out of the evaporator, and after cooling is dumped back in the sea. The formed steam is compressed by the compressor and comes to the condenser. An essential singularity of this scheme is that condensation happens at higher temperature, than evaporation. Thanks to this the heat, which is comes out at devaporation, is used for evaporation of sea water. Thereby, in this class of desalination installations the principle of a heat pump is implemented. Results: For achievement of a goal the following tasks were solved: the mathematical model of installations with MVC is modified and supplemented; the scheme of heat exchangers switching is modified; influence of design data of desalination installation on the cost of an inventory and the electric power is investigated. The detailed analysis of the main schemes of installation and mathematical model allowed defining ways of decrease in energy consumption and the possible merit value. Influence of two key parameters - a specific power of the compressor and a specific surface area of the evaporator-condenser - on a

  10. Compressive failure model for fiber composites by kink band initiation from obliquely aligned, shear-dislocated fiber breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, J.; Phoenix, S.L. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    2005-04-01

    Predicting compressive failure of a unidirectional fibrous composite is a longstanding and challenging problem that we study from a new perspective. Motivated by previous modelling of tensile failure as well as experimental observations on compressive failures in single carbon fibers, we develop a new micromechanical model for the compressive failure process in unidirectional, planar composites. As the compressive load is increased, random fiber failures are assumed to occur due to statistically distributed flaws, analogous to what occurs in tension. These breaks are often shear-mode failures with slanted surfaces that induce shear dislocations, especially when they occur in small groups aligned obliquely. Our model includes interactions of dislocated and neighboring intact fibers through a system of fourth-order, differential equations governing transverse deformation, and also allows for local matrix plastic yielding and debonding from the fiber near and within the dislocation arrays. Using the Discrete Fourier Transform method, we find a 'building-block' analytical solution form, which naturally embodies local length scales of fiber microbuckling and instability. Based on the influence function, superposition approach, a computationally efficient scheme is developed to model the evolution of fiber and matrix stresses. Under increasing compressive strain the simulations show that matrix yielding and debonding crucially lead to large increases in bending strains in fibers next to small groups of obliquely aligned, dislocated breaks. From the paired locations of maximum fiber bending in flanking fibers, the triggering of an unstable kink band becomes realistic. The geometric features of the kink band, such as the fragment lengths and orientation angles, will depend on the fiber and matrix mechanical and geometric properties. In carbon fiber-polymer matrix systems our model predicts a much lower compressive failure stress than obtained from Rosen

  11. One-dimensional model of steady, compressible channel flow with mass, momentum, and energy addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, S.C.

    1976-09-01

    A one-dimensional model of steady, compressible channel flow with mass, momentum and energy addition is discussed. An exact solution to the governing equations was found and from it a similarity parameter relating dimensionless mass, momentum and energy addition identified. This similarity parameter is used to make two flows having different dimensionless mass, momentum and energy additions equivalent. Application of the similarity parameter to the LASL Intense Neutron Source experiment and the Sandia simulation of that experiment results in an expression relating the dimensionless mass addition of combustible gas required in the Sandia experiment to dimensionless energy addition in the LASL experiment. Results of the analysis indicate that the Sandia experiment can realistically simulate the energy addition in the LASL Intense Neutron Source experiment

  12. Integrated modeling for optimized regional transportation with compressed natural gas fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A. Gabbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transportation represents major energy consumption where fuel is considered as a primary energy source. Recent development in the vehicle technology revealed possible economical improvements when using natural gas as a fuel source instead of traditional gasoline. There are several fuel alternatives such as electricity, which showed potential for future long-term transportation. However, the move from current situation where gasoline vehicle is dominating shows high cost compared to compressed natural gas vehicle. This paper presents modeling and simulation methodology to optimize performance of transportation based on quantitative study of the risk-based performance of regional transportation. Emission estimation method is demonstrated and used to optimize transportation strategies based on life cycle costing. Different fuel supply scenarios are synthesized and evaluated, which showed strategic use of natural gas as a fuel supply.

  13. Determination of rock fracture parameters from crack models for failure in compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, J.M.; Cook, N.G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Micromechanical models for axial splitting and for shear faulting are used to investigate parameters associated with rock fracture under compressive stresses. The fracture energies to create splitting fractures and shear faults are calculated using laboratory triaxial data. These energies are compared with the fracture energies for the propagation of microcracks that coalesce to form the larger scale fractures. It is found that for Westerly granite, the energies to create splitting fractures and shear faults are about three orders of magnitude greater than the energy needed to drive the tensile microcracks, due to the large amount of subsidiary crack surface area created in forming the larger scale fractures. A similar scale effect can be expected when extrapolating the laboratory results to field scale problems

  14. A robust and accurate approach to computing compressible multiphase flow: Stratified flow model and AUSM+-up scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach to compute compressible multifluid equations. Firstly, a single-pressure compressible multifluid model based on the stratified flow model is proposed. The stratified flow model, which defines different fluids in separated regions, is shown to be amenable to the finite volume method. We can apply the conservation law to each subregion and obtain a set of balance equations. Secondly, the AUSM + scheme, which is originally designed for the compressible gas flow, is extended to solve compressible liquid flows. By introducing additional dissipation terms into the numerical flux, the new scheme, called AUSM + -up, can be applied to both liquid and gas flows. Thirdly, the contribution to the numerical flux due to interactions between different phases is taken into account and solved by the exact Riemann solver. We will show that the proposed approach yields an accurate and robust method for computing compressible multiphase flows involving discontinuities, such as shock waves and fluid interfaces. Several one-dimensional test problems are used to demonstrate the capability of our method, including the Ransom's water faucet problem and the air-water shock tube problem. Finally, several two dimensional problems will show the capability to capture enormous details and complicated wave patterns in flows having large disparities in the fluid density and velocities, such as interactions between water shock wave and air bubble, between air shock wave and water column(s), and underwater explosion

  15. Comparison of continuous compression with regular ventilations versus 30:2 compressions-ventilations strategy during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfei; Liu, Qingyu; Zheng, Guanghui; Liu, Zhifeng; Jiang, Longyuan; Lin, Qing; Chen, Rui; Tang, Wanchun

    2017-09-01

    A compression-ventilation (C:V) ratio of 30:2 is recommended for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by the current American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. However, continuous chest compression (CCC) is an alternative strategy for CPR that minimizes interruption especially when an advanced airway exists. In this study, we investigated the effects of 30:2 mechanical CPR when compared with CCC in combination with regular ventilation in a porcine model. Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing 39±2 kg were utilized. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 7 min. The animals were then randomly assigned to receive CCC combined with regular ventilation (CCC group) or 30:2 CPR (VC group). Mechanical chest compression was implemented with a miniaturized mechanical chest compressor. At the same time of beginning of precordial compression, the animals were mechanically ventilated at a rate of 10 breaths-per-minute in the CCC group or with a 30:2 C:V ratio in the VC group. Defibrillation was delivered by a single 150 J shock after 5 min of CPR. If failed to resuscitation, CPR was resumed for 2 min before the next shock. The protocol was stopped if successful resuscitation or at a total of 15 min. The resuscitated animals were observed for 72 h. Coronary perfusion pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide and carotid blood flow in the VC group were similar to those achieved in the CCC group during CPR. No significant differences were observed in arterial blood gas parameters between two groups at baseline, VF 6 min, CPR 4 min and 30, 120 and 360 min post-resuscitation. Although extravascular lung water index of both groups significantly increased after resuscitation, no distinct difference was found between CCC and VC groups. All animals were successfully resuscitated and survived for 72 h with favorable neurologic outcomes in both groups. However, obviously more numbers of rib fracture were observed in CCC animals in comparison with VC animals. There was no

  16. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  17. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  18. Development of a simulation model for compression ignition engine running with ignition improved blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshkumar Ponnusamy Moranahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Automobile Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India. The present work describes the thermodynamic and heat transfer models used in a computer program which simulates the diesel fuel and ignition improver blend to predict the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with ignition improver blend using classical two zone approach. One zone consists of pure air called non burning zone and other zone consist of fuel and combustion products called burning zone. First law of thermodynamics and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield cylinder temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. Using the two zone combustion model the combustion parameters and the chemical equilibrium composition were determined. To validate the model an experimental investigation has been conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 12% by volume of 2- ethoxy ethanol blend with diesel fuel. Addition of ignition improver blend to diesel fuel decreases the exhaust smoke and increases the thermal efficiency for the power outputs. It was observed that there is a good agreement between simulated and experimental results and the proposed model requires low computational time for a complete run.

  19. Nonlinear two-fluid hydromagnetic waves in the solar wind: Rotational discontinuity, soliton, and finite-extent Alfven wave train solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyu, L.H.; Kan, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear one-dimensional constant-profile hydromagnetic wave solutions are obtained in finite-temperature two-fluid collisionless plasmas under adiabatic equation of state. The nonlinear wave solutions can be classified according to the wavelength. The long-wavelength solutions are circularly polarized incompressible oblique Alfven wave trains with wavelength greater than hudreds of ion inertial length. The oblique wave train solutions can explain the high degree of alignment between the local average magnetic field and the wave normal direction observed in the solar wind. The short-wavelength solutions include rarefaction fast solitons, compression slow solitons, Alfven solitons and rotational discontinuities, with wavelength of several tens of ion inertial length, provided that the upstream flow speed is less than the fast-mode speed

  20. Fluid Dynamics And Mass Transfer In Two-Fluid Taylor-Couette Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, G.; Graham, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The Taylor-Couette instability of a single liquid phase can be used to enhance mass transfer processes such as filtration and membrane separations. We consider here the possibility of using this instability to enhance interphase transport in a two-fluid systems, with a view toward improved liquid-liquid extractions for biotechnology applications. We investigate the centrifugal instability of a pair of radially stratified immiscible liquids in the annular gap between concentric, corotating cylinders: two-fluid Taylor-Couette flow. Experiments show that a two-layer flow with a well-defined interface and Taylor vortices in each phase can be obtained. The experimental results are in good agreement with predictions of inviscid arguments based on a two-phase extension of Rayleigh's criterion, as well as with detailed linear stability calculations. For a given geometry, the most stable configuration occurs for fluids of roughly (exactly in the inviscid limit) equal dynamic viscosities. A number of preliminary mass transfer experiments have also been performed, in the presence of axial counterflow. The onset of Taylor vortices coincides with a clear decrease in the extent of axial dispersion and an increase in the rate of interphase transport, thus suggesting that this flow geometry may provide an effective means for countercurrent chromatographic separations

  1. ALFVÉN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M.

    2013-01-01

    Alfvén waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfvén waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfvén waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfvén waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  2. Electromechanical-Traffic Model of Compression-Based Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok B.C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric energy harvesting has advantages over other alternative sources due to its large power density, ease of applications, and capability to be fabricated at different scales: macro, micro, and nano. This paper presents an electromechanical-traffic model for roadway compression-based piezoelectric energy harvesting system. A two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF electromechanical model has been developed for the piezoelectric energy harvesting unit to define its performance in power generation under a number of external excitations on road surface. Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT-5H is selected as the piezoelectric material to be used in this paper due to its high Piezoelectric Charge Constant (d and Piezoelectric Voltage Constant (g values. The main source of vibration energy that has been considered in this paper is the moving vehicle on the road. The effect of various frequencies on possible generated power caused by different vibration characteristics of moving vehicle has been studied. A single unit of circle-shape Piezoelectric Cymbal Transducer (PCT with diameter of 32 mm and thickness of 0.3 mm be able to generate about 0.12 mW and 13 mW of electric power under 4 Hz and 20 Hz of excitation, respectively. The estimated power to be generated for multiple arrays of PCT is approximately 150 kW/ km. Thus, the developed electromechanical-traffic model has enormous potential to be used in estimating the macro scale of roadway power generation system.

  3. Modeling of the overal kinetic extraction from Maytenus aquifolia using compressed CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Minozzo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the species Maytenus aquifolia and Maytenus ilicifolia are widely used in popular medicine in the form of teas for stomach and ulcer illness treatment. Despite the great interest in Maytenus aquifolia therapeutic properties and the fact that it is an abundant and native plant growing in Brazil, there is a lack of information in the literature concerning the extraction at high pressures. In this context, this work is focused on the mathematical modelling of the packed-bed extraction of Maytenus aquifolia with compressed CO2. Three mathematical models were used to represent the experimental data. The experiments were performed in a laboratory-scale unit, evaluating the effects of temperature (293 to 323 K, pressure (100 to 250 bar, and extraction time on the yield of the extracts. Results show that the extraction temperature and solvent density exerted a pronounced effect on yield. The mathematical model of Sovová was the most suitable to represent the experimental extraction data of M. aquifolia.

  4. An implicit numerical model for multicomponent compressible two-phase flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidane, Ali; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new implicit approach to model multicomponent compressible two-phase flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. In the implicit discretization of the species transport equation in our formulation we calculate for the first time the derivative of the molar concentration of component i in phase α (cα, i) with respect to the total molar concentration (ci) under the conditions of a constant volume V and temperature T. The species transport equation is discretized by the finite volume (FV) method. The fluxes are calculated based on powerful features of the mixed finite element (MFE) method which provides the pressure at grid-cell interfaces in addition to the pressure at the grid-cell center. The efficiency of the proposed model is demonstrated by comparing our results with three existing implicit compositional models. Our algorithm has low numerical dispersion despite the fact it is based on first-order space discretization. The proposed algorithm is very robust.

  5. Critical behaviour of the randomly stirred dynamical Potts model: novel universality class and effects of compressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, N V; Kapustin, A S

    2012-01-01

    Critical behaviour of the dynamical Potts model, subjected to vivid turbulent mixing, is studied by means of the renormalization group. The advecting velocity field is modelled by Kraichnan’s rapid-change ensemble: Gaussian statistics with a given pair correlator 〈vv〉∝δ(t − t′) k −d−ξ , where k is the wave number, d is the dimension of space and 0 < ξ < 2 is an arbitrary exponent. The system exhibits different types of infrared scaling behaviour, associated with four infrared attractors of the renormalization group equations. In addition to the known asymptotic regimes (equilibrium Potts model and passive scalar field), the existence of a new, strongly non-equilibrium type of critical behaviour (universality class) is established, where the self-interaction of the order parameter and the turbulent mixing are equally important. The corresponding critical dimensions and the regions of stability for all the regimes are calculated in the leading order of the double expansion in ξ and ε = 6 − d. Special attention is paid to the effects of compressibility of the fluid, because they lead to interesting crossover phenomena. (paper)

  6. Modeling and Optimization of Compressive Strength of Hollow Sandcrete Block with Rice Husk Ash Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the report of an investigation into the model development and optimization of the compressive strength of 55/45 to 70/30 cement/Rice Husk Ash (RHA in hollow sandcrete block. The low cost and local availability potential of RHA, a pozzolanic material gasps for exploitation. The study applies the Scheffe\\'s optimization approach to obtain a mathematical model of the form f(xi1 ,xi2 ,xi3 xi4 , where x are proportions of the concrete components, viz: cement, RHA, sand and water. Scheffe\\'s i experimental design techniques are followed to mould various hollow block samples measuring 450mm x 225mm x 150mm and tested for 28 days strength. The task involved experimentation and design, applying the second order polynomial characterization process of the simplex lattice method. The model adequacy is checked using the control factors. Finally, a software is prepared to handle the design computation process to take the desired property of the mix, and generate the optimal mix ratios. Reversibly, any mix ratios can be desired and the attainable strength obtained.

  7. Model for field-induced reorientation strain in magnetic shape memory alloy with tensile and compressive loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yuping; Dui Guansuo

    2008-01-01

    A model based on the micromechanical and the thermodynamic theory is presented for field-induced martensite reorientation in magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) single crystals. The influence of variants morphology and the material property to constitutive behavior is considered. The nonlinear and hysteretic strain and magnetization response of MSMA are investigated for two main loading cases, namely the magnetic field-induced reorientation of variants under constant compressive stress and tensile stress. The predicted results have shown that increasing tensile loading reduces the required field for actuation, while increasing compressive loads result in the required magnetic field growing considerably. It is helpful to design the intelligent composite with MSMA fibers

  8. Stiffness and Poisson ratio in longitudinal compression of fiber yarns in meso-FE modelling of composite reinforcement forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Naouar, N.; Vidal-Salle, E.; Boisse, P.

    2018-05-01

    In meso-scale finite element modeling, the yarns of the reinforcement are considered to be solids made of a continuous material in contact with their neighbors. The present paper consider the mechanical behavior of these yarns that can happen for some loadings of the reinforcement. The yarns present a specific mechanical behavior when under longitudinal compression because they are made up of a large number of fibers, Local buckling of the fibers causes the compressive stiffness of the continuous material representing the yarn to be much weaker than when under tension. In addition, longitudinal compression causes an important transverse expansion. It is shown that the transverse expansion can be depicted by a Poisson ratio that remained roughly constant when the yarn length and the compression strain varied. Buckling of the fibers significantly increases the transverse dimensions of the yarn which leads to a large Poisson ratio (up to 12 for a yarn analyzed in the present study). Meso-scale finite element simulations of reinforcements with binder yarns submitted to longitudinal compression showed that these improvements led to results in good agreement with micro-CT analyses.

  9. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost effective physical

  10. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O.

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost

  11. Multi-scale Modeling of Compressible Single-phase Flow in Porous Media using Molecular Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an efficient coupling between Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Darcy-scale flow in porous media is presented. The cell-centered finite difference method with a non-uniform rectangular mesh were used to discretize the simulation domain and solve the governing equations. To speed up the MC simulations, we implemented a recently developed scheme that quickly generates MC Markov chains out of pre-computed ones, based on the reweighting and reconstruction algorithm. This method astonishingly reduces the required computational time by MC simulations from hours to seconds. In addition, the reweighting and reconstruction scheme, which was originally designed to work with the LJ potential model, is extended to work with a potential model that accounts for the molecular quadrupole moment of fluids with non-spherical molecules such as CO2. The potential model was used to simulate the thermodynamic equilibrium properties for single-phase and two-phase systems using the canonical ensemble and the Gibbs ensemble, respectively. Comparing the simulation results with the experimental data showed that the implemented model has an excellent fit outperforming the standard LJ model. To demonstrate the strength of the proposed coupling in terms of computational time efficiency and numerical accuracy in fluid properties, various numerical experiments covering different compressible single-phase flow scenarios were conducted. The novelty in the introduced scheme is in allowing an efficient coupling of the molecular scale and Darcy scale in reservoir simulators. This leads to an accurate description of the thermodynamic behavior of the simulated reservoir fluids; consequently enhancing the confidence in the flow predictions in porous media.

  12. Modeling rainfall infiltration on hillslopes using Flux-concentration relation and time compression approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Li; Yu, Zhongbo

    2018-02-01

    Rainfall infiltration on hillslopes is an important issue in hydrology, which is related to many environmental problems, such as flood, soil erosion, and nutrient and contaminant transport. This study aimed to improve the quantification of infiltration on hillslopes under both steady and unsteady rainfalls. Starting from Darcy's law, an analytical integral infiltrability equation was derived for hillslope infiltration by use of the flux-concentration relation. Based on this equation, a simple scaling relation linking the infiltration times on hillslopes and horizontal planes was obtained which is applicable for both small and large times and can be used to simplify the solution procedure of hillslope infiltration. The infiltrability equation also improved the estimation of ponding time for infiltration under rainfall conditions. For infiltration after ponding, the time compression approximation (TCA) was applied together with the infiltrability equation. To improve the computational efficiency, the analytical integral infiltrability equation was approximated with a two-term power-like function by nonlinear regression. Procedures of applying this approach to both steady and unsteady rainfall conditions were proposed. To evaluate the performance of the new approach, it was compared with the Green-Ampt model for sloping surfaces by Chen and Young (2006) and Richards' equation. The proposed model outperformed the sloping Green-Ampt, and both ponding time and infiltration predictions agreed well with the solutions of Richards' equation for various soil textures, slope angles, initial water contents, and rainfall intensities for both steady and unsteady rainfalls.

  13. Deformation Characteristic and Constitutive Modeling of 2707 Hyper Duplex Stainless Steel under Hot Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huabing Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of 2707 hyper duplex stainless steel (HDSS were investigated through hot compression tests in the temperature range of 900–1250 °C and strain rate range of 0.01–10 s−1. The results showed that the flow behavior strongly depended on strain rate and temperature, and flow stress increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. At lower temperatures, many precipitates appeared in ferrite and distributed along the deformation direction, which could restrain processing of discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DRX because of pinning grain boundaries. When the temperature increased to 1150 °C, the leading softening behaviors were dynamic recovery (DRV in ferrite and discontinuous DRX in austenite. When the temperature reached 1250 °C, softening behavior was mainly DRV in ferrite. The increase of strain rate was conducive to the occurrence of discontinuous DRX in austenite. A constitutive equation at peak strain was established and the results indicated that 2707 HDSS had a higher Q value (569.279 kJ·mol−1 than other traditional duplex stainless steels due to higher content of Cr, Mo, Ni, and N. Constitutive modeling considering strain was developed to model the hot deformation behavior of 2707 HDSS more accurately, and the correlation coefficient and average absolute relative error were 0.992 and 5.22%, respectively.

  14. Control of Warm Compression Stations Using Model Predictive Control: Simulation and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, F.; Alamir, M.; Bonnay, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with multivariable constrained model predictive control for Warm Compression Stations (WCS). WCSs are subject to numerous constraints (limits on pressures, actuators) that need to be satisfied using appropriate algorithms. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to achieve precise control of pressures in normal operation or to avoid reaching stopping criteria (such as excessive pressures) under high disturbances (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors, expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details the simulator used to validate this new control scheme and the associated simulation results on the SBTs WCS. This work is partially supported through the French National Research Agency (ANR), task agreement ANR-13-SEED-0005.

  15. The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) including a critical cavity size ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquier, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) has been developed to predict the packing density of mixtures constituted by bidisperse spherical particles. The four parameters are: the wall effect and the loosening effect coefficients, the compaction index and a critical cavity size ratio. The two geometrical interactions have been studied theoretically on the basis of a spherical cell centered on a secondary class bead. For the loosening effect, a critical cavity size ratio, below which a fine particle can be inserted into a small cavity created by touching coarser particles, is introduced. This is the only parameter which requires adaptation to extend the model to other types of particles. The 4-parameter CPM demonstrates its efficiency on frictionless glass beads (300 values), spherical particles numerically simulated (20 values), round natural particles (125 values) and crushed particles (335 values) with correlation coefficients equal to respectively 99.0%, 98.7%, 97.8%, 96.4% and mean deviations equal to respectively 0.007, 0.006, 0.007, 0.010.

  16. Matrix Metalloproteinases Are Differentially Regulated and Responsive to Compression Therapy in a Red Duroc Model of Hypertrophic Scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Taryn E; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Prindeze, Nicholas J; Moffatt, Lauren T; Carney, Bonnie C; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Proteins of the matrix metalloproteinases family play a vital role in extracellular matrix maintenance and basic physiological processes in tissue homeostasis. The function and activities of matrix metalloproteinases in response to compression therapies have yet to be defined. Here, a swine model of hypertrophic scar was used to profile the transcription of all known 26 matrix metalloproteinases in scars treated with a precise compression dose. Methods: Full-thickness excisional wounds were created. Wounds underwent healing and scar formation. A subset of scars underwent 2 weeks of compression therapy. Biopsy specimens were preserved, and microarrays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were performed to characterize the transcription and expression of various matrix metalloproteinase family members. Results: Microarray results showed that 13 of the known 26 matrix metalloproteinases were differentially transcribed in wounds relative to the preinjury skin. The predominant upregulation of these matrix metalloproteinases during early wound-healing stages declined gradually in later stages of wound healing. The use of compression therapy reduced this decline in 10 of the 13 differentially regulated matrix metalloproteinases. Further investigation of MMP7 using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction confirmed the effect of compression on transcript levels. Assessment of MMP7 at the protein level using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry was concordant. Conclusions: In a swine model of hypertrophic scar, the application of compression to hypertrophic scar attenuated a trend of decreasing levels of matrix metalloproteinases during the process of hypertrophic wound healing, including MMP7, whose enzyme regulation was confirmed at the protein level.

  17. Some numerical methods for two-fluid two-phase flows in oil pipes; Quelques methodes numeriques pour les ecoulements diphasiques bi-fluide en conduites petrolieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masella, J.M.

    1997-05-29

    This thesis is devoted to the numerical simulation of some two-fluid models describing gas-liquid two-phase flow in pipes. The numerical models developed here can be more generally used in the modelling of a wide class of physical models which can be put under an hyperbolic form. We introduce first two isothermal two-fluid models, composed of a mass balance equation and a momentum equation written in each phase, describing respectively a stratified two-phase flow and a dispersed two-phase flow. These models are hyperbolic under some physical assumptions and can be written under a nonconservative vectorial system. We define and analyse a new numerical finite volume scheme (v{integral}Roe) founded on a linearized Riemann solver. This scheme does not need any analytical calculation and gives good results in the tracking of shocks. We compare this new scheme with the classical Roe scheme. Then we propose and study some numerical models, with and without flux splitting method, which are adapted to the discretization of the two-fluid models. This numerical models are given by a finite volume integration of the equations, and lean on the v{integral} scheme. In order to reducing cpu time, due to the low Mach number of two-phase flows, acoustic waves are implicit. Afterwards we proposed a discretization of boundary conditions, which allows the generation of transient flows in pipe. Some numerical academic and more physical tests show the good behaviour of the numerical methods. (author) 77 refs.

  18. A DTM MULTI-RESOLUTION COMPRESSED MODEL FOR EFFICIENT DATA STORAGE AND NETWORK TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Biagi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the technological evolution of terrestrial, aerial and satellite surveying, has considerably increased the measurement accuracy and, consequently, the quality of the derived information. At the same time, the smaller and smaller limitations on data storage devices, in terms of capacity and cost, has allowed the storage and the elaboration of a bigger number of instrumental observations. A significant example is the terrain height surveyed by LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging technology where several height measurements for each square meter of land can be obtained. The availability of such a large quantity of observations is an essential requisite for an in-depth knowledge of the phenomena under study. But, at the same time, the most common Geographical Information Systems (GISs show latency in visualizing and analyzing these kind of data. This problem becomes more evident in case of Internet GIS. These systems are based on the very frequent flow of geographical information over the internet and, for this reason, the band-width of the network and the size of the data to be transmitted are two fundamental factors to be considered in order to guarantee the actual usability of these technologies. In this paper we focus our attention on digital terrain models (DTM's and we briefly analyse the problems about the definition of the minimal necessary information to store and transmit DTM's over network, with a fixed tolerance, starting from a huge number of observations. Then we propose an innovative compression approach for sparse observations by means of multi-resolution spline functions approximation. The method is able to provide metrical accuracy at least comparable to that provided by the most common deterministic interpolation algorithms (inverse distance weighting, local polynomial, radial basis functions. At the same time it dramatically reduces the number of information required for storing or for transmitting and rebuilding a

  19. Dynamic restoration mechanism and physically based constitutive model of 2050 Al–Li alloy during hot compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ruihua; Liu, Qing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Jinfeng, E-mail: lijinfeng@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xiang, Sheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Yonglai; Zhang, Xuhu [Aerospace Research Institute of Materials and Processing Technology, Beijing 100076 (China)

    2015-11-25

    Dynamic restoration mechanism of 2050 Al–Li alloy and its constitutive model were investigated by means of hot compression simulation in the deformation temperature ranging from 340 to 500 °C and at strain rates of 0.001–10 s{sup −1}. The microstructures of the compressed samples were observed using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. On the base of dislocation density theory and Avrami kinetics, a physically based constitutive model was established. The results show that dynamic recovery (DRV) and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) are co-responsible for the dynamic restoration during the hot compression process under all compression conditions. The dynamic precipitation (DPN) of T1 and σ phases was observed after the deformation at 340 °C. This is the first experimental evidence for the DPN of σ phase in Al–Cu–Li alloys. The particle stimulated nucleation of DRX (PSN-DRX) due to the large Al–Cu–Mn particle was also observed. The error analysis suggests that the established constitutive model can adequately describe the flow stress dependence on strain rate, temperature and strain during the hot deformation process. - Highlights: • The experimental evidence for the DPN of σ phase in Al–Cu–Li alloys was found. • The PSN-DRX due to the large Al–Cu–Mn particle was observed. • A novel method was proposed to calculated the stress multiplier α.

  20. Chest Compressions during Sustained Inflations Improve Recovery When Compared to a 3:1 Compression:Ventilation Ratio during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Neonatal Porcine Model of Asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S; Görens, Immanuel; Cheung, Po-Yin; Lee, Tze-Fun; Lu, Min; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2017-01-01

    Recently, sustained inflations (SI) during chest compression (CC) (CC+SI) have been suggested as an alternative to the current approach during neonatal resuscitation. No previous study compared CC+SI using CC rates of 90/min to the current 3:1 compression:ventilation ratio (C:V). To determine whether CC+SI versus a 3:1 C:V reduces the time to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and improves hemodynamic recovery in newborn piglets with asphyxia-induced bradycardia. Term newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated when the heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Piglets were randomized into 3 groups: CC during SI at a rate of 90 CC/min (SI+CC 90, n = 8), a 3:1 C:V using 90 CC and 30 inflations (3:1, n = 8), or a sham group (n = 6). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation, and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment. CC+SI significantly reduced the median (IQR) time of ROSC, i.e., 34 s (28-156 s) versus 210 s (72-300 s) in the 3:1 group (p = 0.048). CC+SI also significantly reduced the requirement for 100% oxygen, improved respiratory parameters, and resulted in a similar hemodynamic recovery. CC+SI during CPR significantly improved ROSC in a porcine model of neonatal resuscitation. This is of considerable clinical relevance because improved respiratory and hemodynamic parameters potentially minimize morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Experimental study of two-fluid effect during magnetic reconnection in the UTST merging experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Kotaro; Takemura, Koichiro; Cao, Qinghong; Watanabe, Takenori G.; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Kamio, Shuji; Yamada, Takuma

    2013-01-01

    Radial profile of floating potential inside the current sheet was measured for the purpose of investigating the two-fluid (Hall) effect during magnetic reconnection in the UTST merging experiment. During magnetic reconnection, the floating potential drop was formed spontaneously inside the current sheet, forming a steep electric potential gradient on its both downstream areas. Magnetic probe array measurement indicates that this potential drop appears spontaneously when the reconnection rate rapidly increase due to change in current sheet structure. The IDS probe measurement observed outflow almost equal to poloidal Alfvén speed in radial direction from the X-point, where steep gradient of floating potential is formed. This fact suggests that ion acceleration/heating is caused by the steep potential gradient formed in the downstream by magnetized electrons. (author)

  2. A Study of Two Fluids Mixing in a Helical-Type Micromixer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y H; Chang, M; Lin, K H

    2006-01-01

    The mixing behavior of two fluids in a passive micromixer with Y-type inlet and helical fluid channel, along with herringbone grooves etched on the base of the fluid channel, was studied with computer simulation technique and experiments. The mixing of pure water and acetone solution under different Reynolds numbers and acetone concentrations were investigated. An image inspection method using the variance in contrast of the image gray level as the measurement parameter was adopted to calculate the mixing efficiency distribution. Inspection results show that the mixing efficiency is decreased with the increase of the concentration of the acetone solution, but the mean mixing efficiency around the outlet can reach to a value of 90% even the Reynolds numbers of the fluids were as low as Re = 1, and the best efficiency for the case of Re = 10 is over 98%. The results show that the proposed micromixer is possible applied to the field of biomedical diagnosis

  3. Effect of flow conditions on spray cone angle of a two-fluid atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaee, Maziar; Banitabaei, Sayed Abdolhossein; Ashjaee, Mehdi; Esfahanian, Vahid [Tehran University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    A visual study is conducted to determine the effects of operating conditions on the spray cone angle of a two-fluid atomizer. The liquid (water) jets exit from peripheral inclined orifices and are introduced into a high-speed gas (air) stream in the gravitational direction. Using a high-speed imaging system, the spray cone angle is determined for Reynolds numbers ranging from 4x10{sup 4} to 9x10{sup 4} and different Weber numbers up to 140. The droplet sizes (Sauter mean diameter) and their distributions are determined using a Malvern Mastersizer X. The results show that the spray cone angle depends on the operating conditions, especially in lower values of Reynolds and Weber numbers. An empirical correlation is also obtained to predict the spray cone angle in terms of these two parameters.

  4. Relativistic effects on large amplitude nonlinear Langmuir waves in a two-fluid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejoh, Yasunori

    1994-07-01

    Large amplitude relativistic nonlinear Langmuir waves are analyzed by the pseudo-potential method. The existence conditions for nonlinear Langmuir waves are confirmed by considering relativistic high-speed electrons in a two-fluid plasma. The significant feature of this investigation is that the propagation of nonlinear Langmuir waves depends on the ratio of the electron streaming velocity to the velocity of light, the normalized potential and the ion mass to electron mass ratio. The constant energy is determined by the specific range of the relativistic effect. In the non-relativistic limit, large amplitude relativistic Langmuir waves do not exist. The present investigation predicts new findings of large amplitude nonlinear Langmuir waves in space plasma phenomena in which relativistic electrons are important. (author)

  5. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the RELAPS/MOD3.2 two-fluid thermal-hydraulic code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu-Bujor, M.

    2000-10-01

    This work presents the implementation of the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure (ASAP) for the non-equilibrium, non-homogeneous two-fluid model, including boron concentration and non-condensable gases, of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. The end-product of this implementation is the Adjoint Sensitivity Model (ASM-REL/TF), which is derived for both the differential and discretized equations underlying the two-fluid model with non-condensable(s). The consistency requirements between these two representations are also highlighted. The validation of the ASM-REL/TF has been carried out by using sample problems involving: (i) liquid-phase only, (ii) gas-phase only, and (iii) two-phase mixture (of water and steam). Thus the 'Two-Loops with Pumps' sample problem supplied with RELAP5/MOD3.2 has been used to verify the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF when only the liquid-phase is present. Furthermore, the 'Edwards Pipe' sample problem, also supplied with RELAP5/MOD3.2, has been used to verify the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF when both (i.e., liquid and gas) phases are present. In addition, the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF have been verified when only the gas-phase is present by using modified 'Two-Loops with Pumps' and the 'Edwards Pipe' sample problems in which the liquid and two-phase fluids, respectively, were replaced by pure steam. The results obtained for these sample problems depict typical sensitivities of junction velocities and volume-averaged pressures to perturbations in initial conditions, and indicate that the numerical solution of the ASM-REL/TF is as robust, stable, and accurate as the original RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations. In addition, the solution of the ASM-REL/TF has been used to calculate sample sensitivities of volume-averaged pressures to variations in the pump head. (orig.) [de

  6. Integrable, oblique travelling waves in quasi-charge-neutral two-fluid plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Webb

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A Hamiltonian description of oblique travelling waves in a two-fluid, charge-neutral, electron-proton plasma reveals that the transverse momentum equations for the electron and proton fluids are exactly integrable in cases where the total transverse momentum flux integrals, Py(d and Pz(d, are both zero in the de Hoffman Teller (dHT frame. In this frame, the transverse electric fields are zero, which simplifies the transverse momentum equations for the two fluids. The integrable travelling waves for the case Py(d=Pz(d=0, are investigated based on the Hamiltonian trajectories in phase space, and also on the longitudinal structure equation for the common longitudinal fluid velocity component ux of the electron and proton fluids. Numerical examples of a variety of travelling waves in a cold plasma, including oscillitons, are used to illustrate the physics. The transverse, electron and proton velocity components ujy and ujz (j=e, p of the waves exhibit complex, rosette type patterns over several periods for ux. The role of separatrices in the phase space, the rotational integral and the longitudinal structure equation on the different wave forms are discussed.

  7. Application of discontinuous Galerkin method for solving a compressible five-equation two-phase flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M. Rehan; Ali, Ishtiaq; Qamar, Shamsul

    2018-03-01

    In this article, a reduced five-equation two-phase flow model is numerically investigated. The formulation of the model is based on the conservation and energy exchange laws. The model is non-conservative and the governing equations contain two equations for the mass conservation, one for the over all momentum and one for the total energy. The fifth equation is the energy equation for one of the two phases that includes a source term on the right hand side for incorporating energy exchange between the two fluids in the form of mechanical and thermodynamical works. A Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is applied to solve the model equations. The main attractive features of the proposed method include its formal higher order accuracy, its nonlinear stability, its ability to handle complicated geometries, and its ability to capture sharp discontinuities or strong gradients in the solutions without producing spurious oscillations. The proposed method is robust and well suited for large-scale time-dependent computational problems. Several case studies of two-phase flows are presented. For validation and comparison of the results, the same model equations are also solved by using a staggered central scheme. It was found that discontinuous Galerkin scheme produces better results as compared to the staggered central scheme.

  8. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  9. Normal and Fibrotic Rat Livers Demonstrate Shear Strain Softening and Compression Stiffening: A Model for Soft Tissue Mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Perepelyuk

    Full Text Available Tissues including liver stiffen and acquire more extracellular matrix with fibrosis. The relationship between matrix content and stiffness, however, is non-linear, and stiffness is only one component of tissue mechanics. The mechanical response of tissues such as liver to physiological stresses is not well described, and models of tissue mechanics are limited. To better understand the mechanics of the normal and fibrotic rat liver, we carried out a series of studies using parallel plate rheometry, measuring the response to compressive, extensional, and shear strains. We found that the shear storage and loss moduli G' and G" and the apparent Young's moduli measured by uniaxial strain orthogonal to the shear direction increased markedly with both progressive fibrosis and increasing compression, that livers shear strain softened, and that significant increases in shear modulus with compressional stress occurred within a range consistent with increased sinusoidal pressures in liver disease. Proteoglycan content and integrin-matrix interactions were significant determinants of liver mechanics, particularly in compression. We propose a new non-linear constitutive model of the liver. A key feature of this model is that, while it assumes overall liver incompressibility, it takes into account water flow and solid phase compressibility. In sum, we report a detailed study of non-linear liver mechanics under physiological strains in the normal state, early fibrosis, and late fibrosis. We propose a constitutive model that captures compression stiffening, tension softening, and shear softening, and can be understood in terms of the cellular and matrix components of the liver.

  10. Compression stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call your health insurance or prescription plan: Find out if they pay for compression stockings. Ask if your durable medical equipment benefit pays for compression stockings. Get a prescription from your doctor. Find a medical equipment store where they can ...

  11. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  12. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  13. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  14. Vertical discretizations for compressible Euler equation atmospheric models giving optimal representation of normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuburn, J.; Woollings, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate representation of different kinds of wave motion is essential for numerical models of the atmosphere, but is sensitive to details of the discretization. In this paper, numerical dispersion relations are computed for different vertical discretizations of the compressible Euler equations and compared with the analytical dispersion relation. A height coordinate, an isentropic coordinate, and a terrain-following mass-based coordinate are considered, and, for each of these, different choices of prognostic variables and grid staggerings are considered. The discretizations are categorized according to whether their dispersion relations are optimal, are near optimal, have a single zero-frequency computational mode, or are problematic in other ways. Some general understanding of the factors that affect the numerical dispersion properties is obtained: heuristic arguments concerning the normal mode structures, and the amount of averaging and coarse differencing in the finite difference scheme, are shown to be useful guides to which configurations will be optimal; the number of degrees of freedom in the discretization is shown to be an accurate guide to the existence of computational modes; there is only minor sensitivity to whether the equations for thermodynamic variables are discretized in advective form or flux form; and an accurate representation of acoustic modes is found to be a prerequisite for accurate representation of inertia-gravity modes, which, in turn, is found to be a prerequisite for accurate representation of Rossby modes

  15. On the modelling of compressible inviscid flow problems using AUSM schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During last decades, upwind schemes have become a popular method in the field of computational fluid dynamics. Although they are only first order accurate, AUSM (Advection Upstream Splitting Method schemes proved to be well suited for modelling of compressible flows due to their robustness and ability of capturing shock discontinuities. In this paper, we review the composition of the AUSM flux-vector splitting scheme and its improved version noted AUSM+, proposed by Liou, for the solution of the Euler equations. Mach number splitting functions operating with values from adjacent cells are used to determine numerical convective fluxes and pressure splitting is used for the evaluation of numerical pressure fluxes. Both versions of the AUSM scheme are applied for solving some test problems such as one-dimensional shock tube problem and three dimensional GAMM channel. Features of the schemes are discussed in comparison with some explicit central schemes of the first order accuracy (Lax-Friedrichs and of the second order accuracy (MacCormack.

  16. In Situ Imaging during Compression of Plastic Bonded Explosives for Damage Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia W. Manner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of plastic bonded explosives (PBXs is known to influence behavior during mechanical deformation, but characterizing the microstructure can be challenging. For example, the explosive crystals and binder in formulations such as PBX 9501 do not have sufficient X-ray contrast to obtain three-dimensional data by in situ, absorption contrast imaging. To address this difficulty, we have formulated a series of PBXs using octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX crystals and low-density binder systems. The binders were hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB or glycidyl azide polymer (GAP cured with a commercial blend of acrylic monomers/oligomers. The binder density is approximately half of the HMX, allowing for excellent contrast using in situ X-ray computed tomography (CT imaging. The samples were imaged during unaxial compression using micro-scale CT in an interrupted in situ modality. The rigidity of the binder was observed to significantly influence fracture, crystal-binder delamination, and flow. Additionally, 2D slices from the segmented 3D images were meshed for finite element simulation of the mesoscale response. At low stiffness, the binder and crystal do not delaminate and the crystals move with the material flow; at high stiffness, marked delamination is noted between the crystals and the binder, leading to very different mechanical properties. Initial model results exhibit qualitatively similar delamination.

  17. Resolution and Energy Dissipation Characteristics of Implicit LES and Explicit Filtering Models for Compressible Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romit Maulik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Solving two-dimensional compressible turbulence problems up to a resolution of 16, 384^2, this paper investigates the characteristics of two promising computational approaches: (i an implicit or numerical large eddy simulation (ILES framework using an upwind-biased fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO reconstruction algorithm equipped with several Riemann solvers, and (ii a central sixth-order reconstruction framework combined with various linear and nonlinear explicit low-pass spatial filtering processes. Our primary aim is to quantify the dissipative behavior, resolution characteristics, shock capturing ability and computational expenditure for each approach utilizing a systematic analysis with respect to its modeling parameters or parameterizations. The relative advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are addressed for solving a stratified Kelvin-Helmholtz instability shear layer problem as well as a canonical Riemann problem with the interaction of four shocks. The comparisons are both qualitative and quantitative, using visualizations of the spatial structure of the flow and energy spectra, respectively. We observe that the central scheme, with relaxation filtering, offers a competitive approach to ILES and is much more computationally efficient than WENO-based schemes.

  18. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend. A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5 and 10% ethanol (E10 (in vol. under full load condition at variable engine speed ranging from 1000 to 2750 rpm with 250 rpm increment. The model was then validated with other researcher’s experimental result. Model consists of intake and exhaust systems, cylinder, head, valves and port geometries. Performance tests were conducted for volumetric efficiency, brake engine torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure, brake specific fuel consumption, and brake thermal efficiency, while exhaust emissions were analyzed for carbon monoxide (CO and unburned hydrocarbons (HC. The results showed that blending diesel with ethanol increases the volumetric efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while it decreases brake engine torque, brake power and brake mean effective pressure. In term of emission characteristics, the CO emissions concentrations in the engine exhaust decrease significantly with ethanol as additive. But for HC emission, its concentration increase when apply in high engine speed. In conclusion, using Ethanol as fuel additive blend with Diesel operating in HCCI shows a good result in term of performance and emission in low speed but not recommended to use in high speed engine. Ethanol-diesel blends need to researched more to make it commercially useable.

  19. Coupled Downscaled Climate Models and Ecophysiological Metrics Forecast Habitat Compression for an Endangered Estuarine Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R Brown

    Full Text Available Climate change is driving rapid changes in environmental conditions and affecting population and species' persistence across spatial and temporal scales. Integrating climate change assessments into biological resource management, such as conserving endangered species, is a substantial challenge, partly due to a mismatch between global climate forecasts and local or regional conservation planning. Here, we demonstrate how outputs of global climate change models can be downscaled to the watershed scale, and then coupled with ecophysiological metrics to assess climate change effects on organisms of conservation concern. We employed models to estimate future water temperatures (2010-2099 under several climate change scenarios within the large heterogeneous San Francisco Estuary. We then assessed the warming effects on the endangered, endemic Delta Smelt, Hypomesus transpacificus, by integrating localized projected water temperatures with thermal sensitivity metrics (tolerance, spawning and maturation windows, and sublethal stress thresholds across life stages. Lethal temperatures occurred under several scenarios, but sublethal effects resulting from chronic stressful temperatures were more common across the estuary (median >60 days above threshold for >50% locations by the end of the century. Behavioral avoidance of such stressful temperatures would make a large portion of the potential range of Delta Smelt unavailable during the summer and fall. Since Delta Smelt are not likely to migrate to other estuaries, these changes are likely to result in substantial habitat compression. Additionally, the Delta Smelt maturation window was shortened by 18-85 days, revealing cumulative effects of stressful summer and fall temperatures with early initiation of spring spawning that may negatively impact fitness. Our findings highlight the value of integrating sublethal thresholds, life history, and in situ thermal heterogeneity into global change impact

  20. Coupled downscaled climate models and ecophysiological metrics forecast habitat compression for an endangered estuarine fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Larry R.; Komoroske, Lisa M; Wagner, R Wayne; Morgan-King, Tara; May, Jason T.; Connon, Richard E; Fangue, Nann A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is driving rapid changes in environmental conditions and affecting population and species’ persistence across spatial and temporal scales. Integrating climate change assessments into biological resource management, such as conserving endangered species, is a substantial challenge, partly due to a mismatch between global climate forecasts and local or regional conservation planning. Here, we demonstrate how outputs of global climate change models can be downscaled to the watershed scale, and then coupled with ecophysiological metrics to assess climate change effects on organisms of conservation concern. We employed models to estimate future water temperatures (2010–2099) under several climate change scenarios within the large heterogeneous San Francisco Estuary. We then assessed the warming effects on the endangered, endemic Delta Smelt, Hypomesus transpacificus, by integrating localized projected water temperatures with thermal sensitivity metrics (tolerance, spawning and maturation windows, and sublethal stress thresholds) across life stages. Lethal temperatures occurred under several scenarios, but sublethal effects resulting from chronic stressful temperatures were more common across the estuary (median >60 days above threshold for >50% locations by the end of the century). Behavioral avoidance of such stressful temperatures would make a large portion of the potential range of Delta Smelt unavailable during the summer and fall. Since Delta Smelt are not likely to migrate to other estuaries, these changes are likely to result in substantial habitat compression. Additionally, the Delta Smelt maturation window was shortened by 18–85 days, revealing cumulative effects of stressful summer and fall temperatures with early initiation of spring spawning that may negatively impact fitness. Our findings highlight the value of integrating sublethal thresholds, life history, and in situ thermal heterogeneity into global change impact assessments. As

  1. Modelling and analysis of a novel compressed air energy storage system for trigeneration based on electrical energy peak load shifting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Song; He, Wei; Zhang, Aifeng; Li, Guiqiang; Luo, Bingqing; Liu, Xianghua

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new CAES system for trigeneration based on electrical peak load shifting is proposed. • The theoretical models and the thermodynamics process are established and analyzed. • The relevant parameters influencing its performance have been discussed and optimized. • A novel energy and economic evaluation methods is proposed to evaluate the performance of the system. - Abstract: The compressed air energy storage (CAES) has made great contribution to both electricity and renewable energy. In the pursuit of reduced energy consumption and relieving power utility pressure effectively, a novel trigeneration system based on CAES for cooling, heating and electricity generation by electrical energy peak load shifting is proposed in this paper. The cooling power is generated by the direct expansion of compressed air, and the heating power is recovered in the process of compression and storage. Based on the working principle of the typical CAES, the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic system models are established and the characteristics of the system are analyzed. A novel method used to evaluate energy and economic performance is proposed. A case study is conducted, and the economic-social and technical feasibility of the proposed system are discussed. The results show that the trigeneration system works efficiently at relatively low pressure, and the efficiency is expected to reach about 76.3% when air is compressed and released by 15 bar. The annual monetary cost saving annually is about 53.9%. Moreover, general considerations about the proposed system are also presented.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of the Effect of Axial and Transverse Compression on the Residual Tensile Properties of Ballistic Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib C. Chowdhury

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic impact induces multiaxial loading on Kevlar® and polyethylene fibers used in protective armor systems. The influence of multiaxial loading on fiber failure is not well understood. Experiments show reduction in the tensile strength of these fibers after axial and transverse compression. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD simulations to explain and develop a fundamental understanding of this experimental observation since the property reduction mechanism evolves from the atomistic level. An all-atom MD method is used where bonded and non-bonded atomic interactions are described through a state-of-the-art reactive force field. Monotonic tension simulations in three principal directions of the models are conducted to determine the anisotropic elastic and strength properties. Then the models are subjected to multi-axial loads—axial compression, followed by axial tension and transverse compression, followed by axial tension. MD simulation results indicate that pre-compression distorts the crystal structure, inducing preloading of the covalent bonds and resulting in lower tensile properties.

  3. Orientational dynamics of superfluid 3He: A ''Two-fluid'' model . II. orbital dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, A.J.; Takagi, S.

    1978-01-01

    We present a phenomenological theory of the homogeneous orbital dynamics of the class of ''separable'' anisotropic superfluid phases which includes the ABM state generally identified with 3 He-A. The theory is developed by analogy with the spin dynamics described in the first paper of this series; the basic variables are the orientation of the Cooper-pair wavefunction (in the ABM phase, the l-vector) and a quantity K which we visualize as the ''pseudo-angular momentum'' of the Cooper pairs but which must be distinguished, in general, from the total orbital angular momentum of the system. In the ABM case l is the analog of d in the spin dynamics and K of the ''superfluid spin'' S/sub p/. Important points of difference from the spin case which are taken into account include the fact that a rotation of l without a simultaneous rotation of the normal-component distribution strongly increases the energy of the system (''normal locking''), and that the equilibrium value of K is zero even for finite total angular momentum. The theory does not claim to handle correctly effects associated with any intrinsic angular momentum arising from particle-hole asymmetry, but it is shown that the magnitude of this quantity can be estimated directly from experimental data and is extremely small; also, the Landau damping does not emerge automatically from the theory, but can be put in in an ad hoc way. With these provisos the theory should be valid for all frequencies ωvery-much-less-thanΔ (T)/h irrespective of the value of ωtau. (Δ=gap parameter, tau=quasi-particle relaxation time.) It disagrees with all existing phenomenological theories of comparable generality, although the disagreement with that of Volovik and Mineev is confined to the ''gapless'' region very close to T/sub c/.The phenomenological equations of motion, which are similar in general form to those of the spin dynamics with damping, involve an ''orbital susceptibility of the Cooper pairs'' chi/sub orb/

  4. Reproductive solution for grade-two fluid model in two dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Friz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We treat the existence of reproductive solution (weak periodic solution of a second-grade fluid system in two dimensions, by using the Galerkin approximation method and compactness arguments.

  5. Development and Verification of a Pilot Code based on Two-fluid Three-field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Bae, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Chung, B. D.; Jeong, J. J.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, D. H

    2006-09-15

    In this study, a semi-implicit pilot code is developed for a one-dimensional channel flow as three-fields. The three fields are comprised of a gas, continuous liquid and entrained liquid fields. All the three fields are allowed to have their own velocities. The temperatures of the continuous liquid and the entrained liquid are, however, assumed to be equilibrium. The interphase phenomena include heat and mass transfer, as well as momentum transfer. The fluid/structure interaction, generally, include both heat and momentum transfer. Assuming adiabatic system, only momentum transfer is considered in this study, leaving the wall heat transfer for the future study. Using 10 conceptual problems, the basic pilot code has been verified. The results of the verification are summarized below: It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, bubbly flow, slug/churn turbulent flow, annular-mist flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. The pilot code was programmed so that the source terms of the governing equations and numerical solution schemes can be easily tested. The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. Complete phase depletion which might occur during a phase change was found to adversely affect the code stability. A further study would be required to enhance code capability in this regard.

  6. Analysis of different responses of ion and electron in six-field two-fluid ELM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chenhao; Xu, Xueqiao

    2013-10-01

    We report simulation results of a Landau-Fluid (GLF) extension of the BOUT++ six-field two-fluid Braginskii model which contributes to increasing the physics understanding of ELMs. Landau-Fluid closure can fill the gap for parallel dynamics between hot, collisionless pedestal region and cold, collisional SOL region in H-mode plasmas. Our goal is extending the classical parallel heat flux with Landau-Fluid closures and making comparisons with other closure models. Our simulations show that for weakly collisional pedestal plasmas, the calculated growth rate with Landau-Fluid closure introduces more effective damping on the peeling-ballooning modes than that with the classical thermal diffusivity. Further nonlinear simulation shows that ELM size with Landau-Fluid Closure is smaller than that with classical thermal diffusivity. We find an ELM crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature perturbation on the Alfven time scale and slow turbulence spreading. Turbulence transport phase is a slow encroachment of electron temperature perturbation due to the ELM event into pedestal region which is due to a positive phase shift around π / 2 between electron temperature and potential on pedestal region while ion temperature is in-phase with potential. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and also supported by the China Scholarship Committee under contract N0.2011601099.

  7. Modeling of heat release and emissions from droplet combustion of multi component fuels in compression ignition engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsson, Anders

    emissions from the compression ignition engines (CI engines or diesel engines) are continuously increased. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. The complex combustion process of a compression ignition engine may be divided...... it is well suited for optical line of sight diagnostics in both pre and post combustion regions. The work also includes some preliminary studies of radiant emissions from helium stabilized ethylene/air and methane/oxygen flames. It is demonstrated that nano particles below the sooting threshold actually...... of ethylene/air flames well known from the experimental work, was used for the model validation. Two cases were helium stabilized flames with φ = 1 and 2.14. The third case was an unstable flame with φ = 2.14. The unstable case was used to test whether a transient model would be able to predict the frequency...

  8. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A total of 8 numbers of cylinder specimens are cast and tested in 1000 kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM and also modeled in ANSYS. The enhancement of compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of SFRC specimen is achieved up to 17% and 146%, respectively, compared to respective plain concrete specimen. Results gathered from finite element analyses are validated with the experimental test results by identifying as well as optimizing the controlling parameters to make FE models. Modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, density, and shear transfer coefficients for open and closed cracks are found to be the main governing parameters for successful model of plain concrete and SFRC in FE platform. After proper evaluation and logical optimization of these parameters by extensive analyses, finite element (FE models showed a good correlation with the experimental results.

  9. Investigation of the physical and numerical foundations of two-fluid representation of sodium boiling with applications to LMFBR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1983-03-01

    This work involves the development of physical models for the constitutive relations of a two-fluid, three-dimensional sodium boiling code, THERMIT-6S. The code is equipped with a fluid conduction model, a fuel pin model, and a subassembly wall model suitable for stimulating LMFBR transient events. Mathematically rigorous derivations of time-volume averaged conservation equations are used to establish the differential equations of THERMIT-6S. These equations are then discretized in a manner identical to the original THERMIT code. A virtual mass term is incorporated in THERMIT-6S to solve the ill-posed problem. Based on a simplified flow regime, namely cocurrent annular flow, constitutive relations for two-phase flow of sodium are derived. The wall heat transfer coefficient is based on momentum-heat transfer analogy and a logarithmic law for liquid film velocity distribution. A broad literature review is given for two-phase friction factors. It is concluded that entrainment can account for some of the discrepancies in the literature. Mass and energy exchanges are modelled by generalization of the turbulent flux concept. Interfacial drag coefficients are derived for annular flows with entrainment. Code assessment is performed by simulating three experiments for low flow-high power accidents and one experiment for low flow/low power accidents in the LMFBR. While the numerical results for pre-dryout are in good agreement with the data, those for post-dryout reveal the need for improvement of the physical models. The benefits of two-dimensional non-equilibrium representation of sodium boiling are studied

  10. Strain and rate-dependent neuronal injury in a 3D in vitro compression model of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Scimone, Mark T.; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Franck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In the United States over 1.7 million cases of traumatic brain injury are reported yearly, but predictive correlation of cellular injury to impact tissue strain is still lacking, particularly for neuronal injury resulting from compression. Given the prevalence of compressive deformations in most blunt head trauma, this information is critically important for the development of future mitigation and diagnosis strategies. Using a 3D in vitro neuronal compression model, we investigated the role of impact strain and strain rate on neuronal lifetime, viability, and pathomorphology. We find that strain magnitude and rate have profound, yet distinctively different effects on the injury pathology. While strain magnitude affects the time of neuronal death, strain rate influences the pathomorphology and extent of population injury. Cellular injury is not initiated through localized deformation of the cytoskeleton but rather driven by excess strain on the entire cell. Furthermore we find that, mechanoporation, one of the key pathological trigger mechanisms in stretch and shear neuronal injuries, was not observed under compression. PMID:27480807

  11. Introduction to diffuse interfaces and transformation fronts modelling in compressible media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurel Richard

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Computation of interfaces separating compressible materials is related to mixture cells appearance. These mixture cells are consequences of fluid motion and artificial smearing of discontinuities. The correct computation of the entire flow field requires perfect fulfillment of the interface conditions. In the simplest situation of contact interfaces with perfect fluids, these conditions correspond to equal normal velocities and equal pressures. To compute compressible flows with interfaces two main classes of approaches are available. In the first one, the interface is considered as a sharp discontinuity. Lagrangian, Front Tracking and Level Set methods belong to this class. The second option consists in the building of a flow model valid everywhere, in pure materials and mixture cells, solved routinely with a unique Eulerian algorithm [37]. In this frame, the interface is considered as a numerically diffused zone, captured by the algorithm. There are some advantages with this approach, as the corresponding flow model is not only valid in artificial mixture cells, but it also describes accurately true multiphase mixtures of materials. The [37] approach has been simplified by [22] with the help of asymptotic analysis, resulting in a single velocity, single pressure but multi-temperature flow model. This reduced model presents however difficulties for its numerical resolution as one of the equations is non-conservative. In the presence of shocks, jump conditions have been provided by [42], determined in the weak shock limit. When compared against experiments for both weak and strong shocks, excellent agreement was observed. These relations have been accepted as closure shock relations for the [22] model and allowed the study of detonation waves in heterogeneous energetic materials. Generalized Chapman-Jouguet conditions were obtained as well as heterogenous explosives (non-ideal detonation wave structures [36]. Oppositely to the previous example

  12. Supplementary Material for: Compressing an Ensemble With Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges when working with modern climate model ensembles is the increasingly larger size of the data produced, and the consequent difficulty in storing large amounts of spatio-temporally resolved information. Many compression algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific datasets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a different, statistics-based approach that explicitly accounts for the space-time dependence of the data for annual global three-dimensional temperature fields in an initial condition ensemble. The set of estimated parameters is small (compared to the data size) and can be regarded as a summary of the essential structure of the ensemble output; therefore, it can be used to instantaneously reproduce the temperature fields in an ensemble with a substantial saving in storage and time. The statistical model exploits the gridded geometry of the data and parallelization across processors. It is therefore computationally convenient and allows to fit a nontrivial model to a dataset of 1 billion data points with a covariance matrix comprising of 1018 entries. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

  13. Study of instantaneous unsteady heat transfer in a rapid compression-expansion machine using zero dimensional k- ε turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhshan, Y.; Karim, G. A.; Mansouri, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    In this investigation, the instantaneous unsteady heat transfer within a pneumatically driven rapid compression-expansion machine that offers simple, well-controlled and known boundary conditions was studied. Values of the instantaneous apparent overall heat flux from the cylinder gas to the wall surfaces were calculated using a thermodynamics analysis of the experimentally measured pressure and volume temporal development. Corresponding heat flux values were also calculated through the application of a zero-dimensional k- ε turbulence model the characteristic velocity is a contribution of turbulence kinetic energy, mean kinetic energy of charged air into cylinder and piston motion for the calculation of Reynolds, Nusselt and Prandtl numbers. Comparison of the zero-dimensional k- ε turbulence model prediction with experimental data shows good agreement for all compression ratios

  14. 3:1 compression to ventilation ratio versus continuous chest compression with asynchronous ventilation in a porcine model of neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmölzer, Georg M; O'Reilly, Megan; Labossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Nicoll, Jessica; Bigam, David L; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the resuscitation guidelines of children and adults, guidelines on neonatal resuscitation recommend synchronized 90 chest compressions with 30 manual inflations (3:1) per minute in newborn infants. The study aimed to determine if chest compression with asynchronous ventilation improves the recovery of bradycardic asphyxiated newborn piglets compared to 3:1 Compression:Ventilation cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Term newborn piglets (n=8/group) were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented and exposed to 45-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Piglets were randomized to receive resuscitation with either 3:1 compressions to ventilations (3:1C:V CPR group) or chest compressions with asynchronous ventilations (CCaV) or sham. Continuous respiratory parameters (Respironics NM3(®)), cardiac output, mean systemic and pulmonary artery pressures, and regional blood flows were measured. Piglets in 3:1C:V CPR and CCaV CPR groups had similar time to return of spontaneous circulation, survival rates, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters during CPR. The systemic and regional hemodynamic recovery in the subsequent 4h was similar in both groups and significantly lower compared to sham-operated piglets. Newborn piglets resuscitated by CCaV had similar return of spontaneous circulation, survival, and hemodynamic recovery compared to those piglets resuscitated by 3:1 Compression:Ventilation ratio. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Computer model of copper resistivity will improve the efficiency of field-compression devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    By detonating a ring of high explosive around an existing magnetic field, we can, under certain conditions, compress the field and multiply its strength tremendously. In this way, we can duplicate for a fraction of a second the extreme pressures that normally exist only in the interior of stars and planets. Under such pressures, materials may exhibit behavior that will confirm or alter current notions about the fundamental structure of matter and the ongoing processes in planetary interiors. However, we cannot design an efficient field-compression device unless we can calculate the electrical resistivity of certain basic metal components, which interact with the field. To aid in the design effort, we have developed a computer code that calculates the resistivity of copper and other metals over the wide range of temperatures and pressures found in a field-compression device

  16. Inviscid linear stability analysis of two fluid columns of different densities subject to gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathama, Aditya; Pantano, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the inviscid linear stability of vertical interface between two fluid columns of different densities under the influence of gravity. In this flow arrangement, the two free streams are continuously accelerating, in contrast to the canonical Kelvin-Helmholtz or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities whose base flows are stationary (or weakly time dependent). In these classical cases, the temporal evolution of the interface can be expressed as Fourier or Laplace solutions in time. This is not possible in our case; instead, we employ the initial value problem method to solve the equations analytically. The results, expressed in terms of the well-known parabolic cylinder function, indicate that the instability grows as the exponential of a quadratic function of time. The analysis shows that in this accelerating Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration, the interface is unconditionally unstable at all wave modes, despite the presence of surface tension. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0002382) and the California Institute of Technology.

  17. Reduction of momentum transfer rates by parallel electric fields: A two-fluid demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamere, P.A.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.; Otto, A.

    2002-01-01

    Momentum transfer between an ionized gas cloud moving relative to an ambient magnetized plasma is a general problem in space plasma physics. Obvious examples include the Io-Jupiter interaction, comets, and coronal mass ejections. Active plasma experiments have demonstrated that momentum transfer rates associated with Alfven wave propagation are poorly understood. Barium injection experiments from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) have shown that dense ionized clouds are capable of ExB drifting over large distances perpendicular to the magnetic field. The CRRES 'skidding' distances were much larger than predicted by magnetohydrodynamic theory and it has been proposed that parallel electric fields were a key component in the skidding phenomenon. A two-fluid code was used to demonstrate the role of parallel electric fields in reducing momentum transfer between two distinct plasma populations. In this study, a dense plasma was initialized moving relative to an ambient plasma and perpendicular to B. Parallel electric fields were introduced via a friction term in the electron momentum equation and the collision frequency was scaled in proportion to the field-aligned current density. The simulation results showed that parallel electric fields decreased the decelerating magnetic tension force on the plasma cloud through a magnetic diffusion/reconnection process

  18. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage in lined rock caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Hyung-Mok; Ryu, Dong-Woo; Synn, Joong-Ho; Song, Won-Kyong

    2012-06-01

    We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be

  19. Basic life support with four different compression/ventilation ratios in a pig model: the need for ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kill, Clemens; Torossian, Alexander; Freisburger, Christian; Dworok, Sebastian; Massmann, Martin; Nohl, Thorsten; Henning, Ronald; Wallot, Pascal; Gockel, Andreas; Steinfeldt, Thorsten; Graf, Jürgen; Eberhart, Leopold; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2009-09-01

    During cardiac arrest the paramount goal of basic life support (BLS) is the oxygenation of vital organs. Current recommendations are to combine chest compressions with ventilation in a fixed ratio of 30:2; however the optimum compression/ventilation ratio is still debatable. In our study we compared four different compression/ventilation ratios and documented their effects on the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), gas exchange, cerebral tissue oxygenation and haemodynamics in a pig model. Study was performed on 32 pigs under general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Arterial and central venous lines were inserted. For continuous cerebral tissue oxygenation a Licox PtiO(2) probe was implanted. After 3 min of cardiac arrest (ventricular fibrillation) animals were randomized to a compression/ventilation-ratio 30:2, 100:5, 100:2 or compressions-only. Subsequently 10 min BLS, Advanced Life Support (ALS) was performed (100%O(2), 3 defibrillations, 1mg adrenaline i.v.). Data were analyzed with 2-factorial ANOVA. ROSC was achieved in 4/8 (30:2), 5/8 (100:5), 2/8 (100:2) and 0/8 (compr-only) pigs. During BLS, PaCO(2) increased to 55 mm Hg (30:2), 68 mm Hg (100:5; p=0.0001), 66 mm Hg (100:2; p=0.002) and 72 mm Hg (compr-only; p<0.0001). PaO(2) decreased to 58 mmg (30:2), 40 mm Hg (100:5; p=0.15), 43 mm Hg (100:2; p=0.04) and 26 mm Hg (compr-only; p<0.0001). PtiO(2) baseline values were 12.7, 12.0, 11.1 and 10.0 mm Hg and decreased to 8.1 mm Hg (30:2), 4.1 mm Hg (100:5; p=0.08), 4.3 mm Hg (100:2; p=0.04), and 4.5 mm Hg (compr-only; p=0.69). During BLS, a compression/ventilation-ratio of 100:5 seems to be equivalent to 30:2, while ratios of 100:2 or compressions-only detoriate peripheral arterial oxygenation and reduce the chance for ROSC.

  20. End-Tidal CO2-Guided Chest Compression Delivery Improves Survival in a Neonatal Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Justin T; Hamrick, Jennifer L; Bhalala, Utpal; Armstrong, Jillian S; Lee, Jeong-Hoo; Kulikowicz, Ewa; Lee, Jennifer K; Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Koehler, Raymond C; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Shaffner, Donald H

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether end-tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery improves survival over standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation after prolonged asphyxial arrest. Preclinical randomized controlled study. University animal research laboratory. 1-2-week-old swine. After undergoing a 20-minute asphyxial arrest, animals received either standard or end-tidal CO2-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In the standard group, chest compression delivery was optimized by video and verbal feedback to maintain the rate, depth, and release within published guidelines. In the end-tidal CO2-guided group, chest compression rate and depth were adjusted to obtain a maximal end-tidal CO2 level without other feedback. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation included 10 minutes of basic life support followed by advanced life support for 10 minutes or until return of spontaneous circulation. Mean end-tidal CO2 at 10 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 34 ± 8 torr in the end-tidal CO2 group (n = 14) and 19 ± 9 torr in the standard group (n = 14; p = 0.0001). The return of spontaneous circulation rate was 7 of 14 (50%) in the end-tidal CO2 group and 2 of 14 (14%) in the standard group (p = 0.04). The chest compression rate averaged 143 ± 10/min in the end-tidal CO2 group and 102 ± 2/min in the standard group (p tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery. The response of the relaxation arterial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure to the initial epinephrine administration was greater in the end-tidal CO2 group than in the standard group (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). The prevalence of resuscitation-related injuries was similar between groups. End-tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery is an effective resuscitation method that improves early survival after prolonged asphyxial arrest in this neonatal piglet model. Optimizing end-tidal CO2 levels during cardiopulmonary resuscitation required that chest compression delivery rate exceed current guidelines

  1. An Efficient Data Compression Model Based on Spatial Clustering and Principal Component Analysis in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihang Yin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs have been widely used to monitor the environment, and sensors in WSNs are usually power constrained. Because inner-node communication consumes most of the power, efficient data compression schemes are needed to reduce the data transmission to prolong the lifetime of WSNs. In this paper, we propose an efficient data compression model to aggregate data, which is based on spatial clustering and principal component analysis (PCA. First, sensors with a strong temporal-spatial correlation are grouped into one cluster for further processing with a novel similarity measure metric. Next, sensor data in one cluster are aggregated in the cluster head sensor node, and an efficient adaptive strategy is proposed for the selection of the cluster head to conserve energy. Finally, the proposed model applies principal component analysis with an error bound guarantee to compress the data and retain the definite variance at the same time. Computer simulations show that the proposed model can greatly reduce communication and obtain a lower mean square error than other PCA-based algorithms.

  2. RELAP-7 Progress Report: A Mathematical Model for 1-D Compressible, Single-Phase Flow Through a Branching Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-08-14

    In the literature, the abundance of pipe network junction models, as well as inclusion of dissipative losses between connected pipes with loss coefficients, has been treated using the incompressible flow assumption of constant density. This approach is fundamentally, physically wrong for compressible flow with density change. This report introduces a mathematical modeling approach for general junctions in piping network systems for which the transient flows are compressible and single-phase. The junction could be as simple as a 1-pipe input and 1-pipe output with differing pipe cross-sectional areas for which a dissipative loss is necessary, or it could include an active component, between an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe, such as a pump or turbine. In this report, discussion will be limited to the former. A more general branching junction connecting an arbitrary number of pipes with transient, 1-D compressible single-phase flows is also presented. These models will be developed in a manner consistent with the use of a general equation of state like, for example, the recent Spline-Based Table Look-up method [1] for incorporating the IAPWS-95 formulation [2] to give accurate and efficient calculations for properties for water and steam with RELAP-7 [3].

  3. An Efficient Data Compression Model Based on Spatial Clustering and Principal Component Analysis in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yihang; Liu, Fengzheng; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Quanzhong

    2015-08-07

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have been widely used to monitor the environment, and sensors in WSNs are usually power constrained. Because inner-node communication consumes most of the power, efficient data compression schemes are needed to reduce the data transmission to prolong the lifetime of WSNs. In this paper, we propose an efficient data compression model to aggregate data, which is based on spatial clustering and principal component analysis (PCA). First, sensors with a strong temporal-spatial correlation are grouped into one cluster for further processing with a novel similarity measure metric. Next, sensor data in one cluster are aggregated in the cluster head sensor node, and an efficient adaptive strategy is proposed for the selection of the cluster head to conserve energy. Finally, the proposed model applies principal component analysis with an error bound guarantee to compress the data and retain the definite variance at the same time. Computer simulations show that the proposed model can greatly reduce communication and obtain a lower mean square error than other PCA-based algorithms.

  4. Two-fluid (plasma-neutral) Extended-MHD simulations of spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experiment with PSI-Tet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    A self-consistent, two-fluid (plasma-neutral) dynamic neutral model has been implemented into the 3-D, Extended-MHD code PSI-Tet. A monatomic, hydrogenic neutral fluid reacts with a plasma fluid through elastic scattering collisions and three inelastic collision reactions: electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge-exchange. Density, momentum, and energy are evolved for both the plasma and neutral species. The implemented plasma-neutral model in PSI-Tet is being used to simulate decaying spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experimental geometry, which is being compare to two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements (TALIF) made on the HIT-SI3 experiment. TALIF is used to measure the absolute density and temperature of monatomic deuterium atoms. Neutral densities on the order of 1015 m-3 and neutral temperatures between 0.6-1.7 eV were measured towards the end of decay of spheromak configurations with initial toroidal currents between 10-12 kA. Validation results between TALIF measurements and PSI-Tet simulations with the implemented dynamic neutral model will be presented. Additionally, preliminary dynamic neutral simulations of the HIT-SI/HIT-SI3 spheromak plasmas sustained with inductive helicity injection will be presented. Lastly, potential benefits of an expansion of the two-fluid model into a multi-fluid model that includes multiple neutral species and tracking of charge states will be discussed.

  5. Model-supported characterization of a PEM water electrolysis cell for the effect of compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frensch, Steffen Henrik; Olesen, Anders Christian; Simon Araya, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the cell compression of a PEM water electrolysis cell. A small single cell is therefore electrochemically analyzed by means of polarization behavior and impedance spectroscopy throughout a range of currents (0.01 A cm−2 to 2.0 A cm−2) at two temperatures (60...

  6. A semi-analytical modelling of multistage bunch compression with collective effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorodnov, Igor; Dohlus, Martin

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we introduce an analytical solution (up to the third order) for a multistage bunch compression and acceleration system without collective effects. The solution for the system with collective effects is found by an iterative procedure based on this analytical result. The developed formalism is applied to the FLASH facility at DESY. Analytical estimations of RF tolerances are given. (orig.)

  7. A semi-analytical modelling of multistage bunch compression with collective effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorodnov, Igor; Dohlus, Martin

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we introduce an analytical solution (up to the third order) for a multistage bunch compression and acceleration system without collective effects. The solution for the system with collective effects is found by an iterative procedure based on this analytical result. The developed formalism is applied to the FLASH facility at DESY. Analytical estimations of RF tolerances are given. (orig.)

  8. A new parametric model to assess delay and compression of mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, J.A.A.; Janssen, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background A decrease in mortality across all ages causes a shift of the age pattern of mortality, or mortality delay, while differences in the rate of decrease across ages cause a change in the shape of the age-at-death distribution, mortality compression or expansion. Evidence exists for both

  9. A new parametric model to assess delay and compression of mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Joop; Janssen, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in mortality across all ages causes a shift of the age pattern of mortality, or mortality delay, while differences in the rate of decrease across ages cause a change in the shape of the age-at-death distribution, mortality compression or expansion. Evidence exists for both

  10. Deformation behaviors of three-dimensional graphene honeycombs under out-of-plane compression: Atomistic simulations and predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanchao; Chen, Cheng; Hu, Dianyin; Song, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Combining atomistic simulations and continuum modeling, a comprehensive study of the out-of-plane compressive deformation behaviors of equilateral three-dimensional (3D) graphene honeycombs was performed. It was demonstrated that under out-of-plane compression, the honeycomb exhibits two critical deformation events, i.e., elastic mechanical instability (including elastic buckling and structural transformation) and inelastic structural collapse. The above events were shown to be strongly dependent on the honeycomb cell size and affected by the local atomic bonding at the cell junction. By treating the 3D graphene honeycomb as a continuum cellular solid, and accounting for the structural heterogeneity and constraint at the junction, a set of analytical models were developed to accurately predict the threshold stresses corresponding to the onset of those deformation events. The present study elucidates key structure-property relationships of 3D graphene honeycombs under out-of-plane compression, and provides a comprehensive theoretical framework to predictively analyze their deformation responses, and more generally, offers critical new knowledge for the rational bottom-up design of 3D networks of two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  11. Hot Deformation Behavior and a Two-Stage Constitutive Model of 20Mn5 Solid Steel Ingot during Hot Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available 20Mn5 steel is widely used in the manufacture of heavy hydro-generator shaft forging due to its strength, toughness, and wear resistance. However, the hot deformation and recrystallization behaviors of 20Mn5 steel compressed under a high temperature were not studied. For this article, hot compression experiments under temperatures of 850–1200 °C and strain rates of 0.01 s−1–1 s−1 were conducted using a Gleeble-1500D thermo-mechanical simulator. Flow stress-strain curves and microstructure after hot compression were obtained. Effects of temperature and strain rate on microstructure are analyzed. Based on the classical stress-dislocation relationship and the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization, a two-stage constitutive model is developed to predict the flow stress of 20Mn5 steel. Comparisons between experimental flow stress and predicted flow stress show that the predicted flow stress values are in good agreement with the experimental flow stress values, which indicates that the proposed constitutive model is reliable and can be used for numerical simulation of hot forging of 20Mn5 solid steel ingot.

  12. Thermodynamics of a Compressible Maier-Saupe Model Based on the Self-Consistent Field Theory of Wormlike Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical formalism for describing systems of semiflexible polymers, which can have density variations due to finite compressibility and exhibit an isotropic-nematic transition. The molecular architecture of the semiflexible polymers is described by a continuum wormlike-chain model. The non-bonded interactions are described through a functional of two collective variables, the local density and local segmental orientation tensor. In particular, the functional depends quadratically on local density-variations and includes a Maier–Saupe-type term to deal with the orientational ordering. The specified density-dependence stems from a free energy expansion, where the free energy of an isotropic and homogeneous homopolymer melt at some fixed density serves as a reference state. Using this framework, a self-consistent field theory is developed, which produces a Helmholtz free energy that can be used for the calculation of the thermodynamics of the system. The thermodynamic properties are analysed as functions of the compressibility of the model, for values of the compressibility realizable in mesoscopic simulations with soft interactions and in actual polymeric materials.

  13. Bee Venom Acupuncture Reduces Interleukin-6, Increases Interleukin-10, and Induces Locomotor Recovery in a Model of Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento de Souza, Raquel; Silva, Fernanda Kohn; Alves de Medeiros, Magda

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) initiate a series of molecular and cellular events in which inflammatory responses can lead to major neurological dysfunctions. The present study aims to investigate whether bee venom (BV) acupuncture applied at acupoints ST36 (Zusanli) and GV3 (Yaoyangquan) could minimize locomotor deficits and the magnitude of neural tissue losses, and change the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after an SCI by compression. Wistar rats were subjected to an SCI model by compression in which a 2-French Fogarty embolectomy catheter was inflated in the extradural space. The effects of BV acupuncture, in which 20 μL of BV diluted in saline (0.08 mg/kg) was injected at acupoints GV3 and ST36 [BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI] was compared with BV injected at nonacupoints [BV(NP)-SCI] and with no treatment [group subjected only to SCI (CTL-SCI)]. The BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI group showed a significant improvement in the locomotor performance and a decrease of lesion size compared with the controls. BV acupuncture at the ST36 + GV3 increased the expression of interleukin-10 (anti-inflammatory) at 6 hours and reduced the expression of interleukin-6 (proinflammatory) at 24 hours after SCI compared with the controls. Our results suggest that BV acupuncture can reduce neuroinflammation and induce recovery in the SCI compression model. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Microstructure Evolution and Flow Stress Model of a 20Mn5 Hollow Steel Ingot during Hot Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Ma, Qing-Xian; Luo, Jian-Bin

    2018-03-21

    20Mn5 steel is widely used in the manufacture of heavy hydro-generator shaft due to its good performance of strength, toughness and wear resistance. However, the hot deformation and recrystallization behaviors of 20Mn5 steel compressed under high temperature were not studied. In this study, the hot compression experiments under temperatures of 850-1200 °C and strain rates of 0.01/s-1/s are conducted using Gleeble thermal and mechanical simulation machine. And the flow stress curves and microstructure after hot compression are obtained. Effects of temperature and strain rate on microstructure are analyzed. Based on the classical stress-dislocation relation and the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization, a two-stage constitutive model is developed to predict the flow stress of 20Mn5 steel. Comparisons between experimental flow stress and predicted flow stress show that the predicted flow stress values are in good agreement with the experimental flow stress values, which indicates that the proposed constitutive model is reliable and can be used for numerical simulation of hot forging of 20Mn5 hollow steel ingot.

  15. Parameters Determination of Yoshida Uemori Model Through Optimization Process of Cyclic Tension-Compression Test and V-Bending Springback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Toros

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, the studies on the enhancement of the prediction capability of the sheet metal forming simulations have increased remarkably. Among the used models in the finite element simulations, the yield criteria and hardening models have a great importance for the prediction of the formability and springback. The required model parameters are determined by using the several test results, i.e. tensile, compression, biaxial stretching tests (bulge test and cyclic tests (tension-compression. In this study, the Yoshida-Uemori (combined isotropic and kinematic hardening model is used to determine the performance of the springback prediction. The model parameters are determined by the optimization processes of the cyclic test by finite element simulations. However, in the study besides the cyclic tests, the model parameters are also evaluated by the optimization process of both cyclic and V-die bending simulations. The springback angle predictions with the model parameters obtained by the optimization of both cyclic and V-die bending simulations are found to mimic the experimental results in a better way than those obtained from only cyclic tests. However, the cyclic simulation results are found to be close enough to the experimental results.

  16. Cascade and intermittency model for turbulent compressible self-gravitating matter and self-binding phase-space density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    A simple physical model which describes the dynamics of turbulence and the spectrum of density fluctuations in compressible, self-gravitating matter and self-binding, phase-space density fluctuations is presented. The two systems are analogous to each other in that each tends to self-organize into hierarchical structures via the mechanism of Jeans collapse. The model, the essential physical ingredient of which is a cascade constrained by the physical requirement of quasivirialization, is shown to exhibit interesting geometric properties such as intrinsic intermittency and anisotropy

  17. Fast and robust wavelet-based dynamic range compression and contrast enhancement model with color restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unaldi, Numan; Asari, Vijayan K.; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2009-05-01

    Recently we proposed a wavelet-based dynamic range compression algorithm to improve the visual quality of digital images captured from high dynamic range scenes with non-uniform lighting conditions. The fast image enhancement algorithm that provides dynamic range compression, while preserving the local contrast and tonal rendition, is also a good candidate for real time video processing applications. Although the colors of the enhanced images produced by the proposed algorithm are consistent with the colors of the original image, the proposed algorithm fails to produce color constant results for some "pathological" scenes that have very strong spectral characteristics in a single band. The linear color restoration process is the main reason for this drawback. Hence, a different approach is required for the final color restoration process. In this paper the latest version of the proposed algorithm, which deals with this issue is presented. The results obtained by applying the algorithm to numerous natural images show strong robustness and high image quality.

  18. CFD modeling of two-stage ignition in a rapid compression machine: Assessment of zero-dimensional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Gaurav [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Raju, Mandhapati P. [General Motor R and D Tech Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In modeling rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments, zero-dimensional approach is commonly used along with an associated heat loss model. The adequacy of such approach has not been validated for hydrocarbon fuels. The existence of multi-dimensional effects inside an RCM due to the boundary layer, roll-up vortex, non-uniform heat release, and piston crevice could result in deviation from the zero-dimensional assumption, particularly for hydrocarbons exhibiting two-stage ignition and strong thermokinetic interactions. The objective of this investigation is to assess the adequacy of zero-dimensional approach in modeling RCM experiments under conditions of two-stage ignition and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) response. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are conducted for n-heptane ignition in an RCM and the validity of zero-dimensional approach is assessed through comparisons over the entire NTC region. Results show that the zero-dimensional model based on the approach of 'adiabatic volume expansion' performs very well in adequately predicting the first-stage ignition delays, although quantitative discrepancy for the prediction of the total ignition delays and pressure rise in the first-stage ignition is noted even when the roll-up vortex is suppressed and a well-defined homogeneous core is retained within an RCM. Furthermore, the discrepancy is pressure dependent and decreases as compressed pressure is increased. Also, as ignition response becomes single-stage at higher compressed temperatures, discrepancy from the zero-dimensional simulations reduces. Despite of some quantitative discrepancy, the zero-dimensional modeling approach is deemed satisfactory from the viewpoint of the ignition delay simulation. (author)

  19. An effective simplified model of composite compression struts for partially-restrained steel frame with reinforced concrete infill walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guohua; Chuang-Sheng, Walter Yang; Gu, Qiang; DesRoches, Reginald

    2018-04-01

    To resolve the issue regarding inaccurate prediction of the hysteretic behavior by micro-based numerical analysis for partially-restrained (PR) steel frames with solid reinforced concrete (RC) infill walls, an innovative simplified model of composite compression struts is proposed on the basis of experimental observation on the cracking distribution, load transferring mechanism, and failure modes of RC infill walls filled in PR steel frame. The proposed composite compression struts model for the solid RC infill walls is composed of α inclined struts and main diagonal struts. The α inclined struts are used to reflect the part of the lateral force resisted by shear connectors along the frame-wall interface, while the main diagonal struts are introduced to take into account the rest of the lateral force transferred along the diagonal direction due to the complicated interaction between the steel frame and RC infill walls. This study derives appropriate formulas for the effective widths of the α inclined strut and main diagonal strut, respectively. An example of PR steel frame with RC infill walls simulating simulated by the composite inclined compression struts model is illustrated. The maximum lateral strength and the hysteresis curve shape obtained from the proposed composite strut model are in good agreement with those from the test results, and the backbone curve of a PR steel frame with RC infill walls can be predicted precisely when the inter-story drift is within 1%. This simplified model can also predict the structural stiffness and the equivalent viscous damping ratio well when the inter-story drift ratio exceeds 0.5%.

  20. Compressible convection in a rotating spherical shell. II. A linear anelastic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Gilman, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    We study the onset of convection for a compressible fluid in a rotating spherical shell via linear anelastic fluid equations for a depth of 40% of the radius, constant kinematic viscosity and thermometric diffusivity, Taylor numbers up to 10 5 , and density stratifications up to seven e-folds across the zone. The perturbations are expanded in spherical harmonics, and the radially dependent equations are solved with a Newton-Raphson relaxation method

  1. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Feng; Yan, Lan; Xu, Xipeng

    2017-12-26

    The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM) model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE) simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  2. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  3. Mask leak increases and minute ventilation decreases when chest compressions are added to bag ventilation in a neonatal manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Mark B; Shah, Dharmesh; Hinder, Murray; Klimek, Jan; Marceau, James; Wright, Audrey

    2014-05-01

    To determine changes in respiratory mechanics when chest compressions are added to mask ventilation, as recommended by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) guidelines for newborn infants. Using a Laerdal Advanced Life Support leak-free baby manikin and a 240-mL self-inflating bag, 58 neonatal staff members were randomly paired to provide mask ventilation, followed by mask ventilation with chest compressions with a 1:3 ratio, for two minutes each. A Florian respiratory function monitor was used to measure respiratory mechanics, including mask leak. The addition of chest compressions to mask ventilation led to a significant reduction in inflation rate, from 63.9 to 32.9 breaths per minute (p mask leak of 6.8% (p mask ventilation, in accordance with the ILCOR guidelines, in a manikin model is associated with a significant reduction in delivered ventilation and increase in mask leak. If similar findings occur in human infants needing an escalation in resuscitation, there is a potential risk of either delay in recovery or inadequate response to resuscitation. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Two-fluid spray atomisation and pneumatic nozzles for fluid bed coating/agglomeration purposes: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, Poul; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    understood. This paper provides a systematic and up-to-date review of two-fluid nozzle designs and principles together with a presentation of nozzle fundamentals introducing basic nozzle theory and thermodynamics. Correlations for the prediction of mean droplet diameters are reviewed, compared...

  5. Two-fluid limits on stellarator performance: Explanation of three stellarator puzzles and comparison to axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, L.E.; Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Fu, G.Y.; Breslau, J.A.; Chen, J.

    2005-01-01

    The basic two-fluid processes, those related to the nonlinearly self-consistent diamagnetic drifts of the electrons and ions, are shown to have fundamentally different effects on the steady state and beta limits of stellarator configurations, compared to MHD predictions. Nonlinear numerical simulation shows that the ideal MHD ballooning modes and the resistive MHD ballooning and interchange modes at relatively high mode numbers, that set the most severe theoretical limits on beta in stellarators with fixed boundary, are easily stabilized by two-fluid effects at realistic parameters, including finite Larmor radius effects related to the ion diamagnetic drift. Magnetic reconnection at low-order rational magnetic surfaces, on the other hand, is enhanced through the parallel component of the two-fluid electron pressure gradient in Ohm's law. The accelerated reconnection rates may impose the true intrinsic limit on beta in stellarators, as a 'soft' or confinement mediated limit in β e , due to steady confinement degradation in the presence of large magnetic islands. Study of the corresponding axisymmetric configurations shows that the helical component of the stellarator configuration provides an important amplifying factor for these effects. The two-fluid results may explain several previously puzzling experimental observations on stellarator behavior. (author)

  6. Compressive rib fracture: peri-mortem and post-mortem trauma patterns in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules A; Weller, Sarah; Swain, Michael V; Neil Waddell, J; Das, Raj

    2013-07-01

    Despite numerous studies on high impact fractures of ribs, little is known about compressive rib injuries. We studied rib fractures from a biomechanical and morphological perspective using 15, 5th ribs of domestic pigs Sus scrofa, divided into two groups, desiccated (representing post-mortem trauma) and fresh ribs with intact periosteum (representing peri-mortem trauma). Ribs were axially compressed and subjected to four-point bending in an Instron 3339 fitted with custom jigs. Morphoscopic analysis of resultant fractures consisted of standard optical methods, micro-CT (μCT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). During axial compression, fresh ribs had slightly higher strength because of energy absorption capabilities of their soft and fluidic components. In flexure tests, dry ribs showed typical elastic-brittle behaviour with long linear load-extension curves, followed by relatively short non-linear elastic (hyperelastic) behaviour and brittle fracture. Fresh ribs showed initial linear-elastic behaviour, followed by strain softening, visco-plastic responses. During the course of loading, dry bone showed minimal observable damage prior to the onset of unstable fracture. In contrast, fresh bone showed buckling-like damage features on the compressive surface and cracking parallel to the axis of the bone. Morphologically, all dry ribs fractured precipitously, whereas all but one of the fresh ribs showed incomplete fracture. The mode of fracture, however, was remarkably similar for both groups, with butterfly fractures predominating (7/15, 46.6% dry and wet). Our study highlights the fact that under controlled loading, despite seemingly similar butterfly fracture morphology, fresh ribs (representing perimortem trauma) show a non-catastrophic response. While extensive strain softening observed for the fresh bone does show some additional micro-cracking damage, it appears that the periosteum may play a key role in imparting the observed pseudo-ductility to the ribs

  7. Experimental Study and Modelling of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) and Polycarbonate Compressive Behavior from Low to High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Qoubaa, Z.; Colard, L.; Matadi Boumbimba, R.; Rusinek, A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper concerns an experimental investigation of Polycarbonate and Poly (methyl methacrylate) compressive behavior from low to high strain rates. Experiments were conducted from 0.001/s to ≈ 5000/s for PC and from 0.001/s to ≈ 2000/s for PMMA. The true strain-stress behavior is established and analyzed at various stain rates. Both PC and PMMA mechanical behavior appears as known, to be strain rate and temperature dependent. The DSGZ model is selected for modelling the strain-stress curves while the yield stress is reproduced using the cooperative model and a modified Eyring equation based on Eyring first process theory. All the three models predictions are in agreement with experiments performed on PC and PMMA.

  8. A Novel A Posteriori Investigation of Scalar Flux Models for Passive Scalar Dispersion in Compressible Boundary Layer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, Kalen; Raman, Venkat

    2011-11-01

    A novel direct numerical simulation (DNS) based a posteriori technique has been developed to investigate scalar transport modeling error. The methodology is used to test Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulent scalar flux models for compressible boundary layer flows. Time-averaged DNS velocity and turbulence fields provide the information necessary to evolve the time-averaged scalar transport equation without requiring the use of turbulence modeling. With this technique, passive dispersion of a scalar from a boundary layer surface in a supersonic flow is studied with scalar flux modeling error isolated from any flowfield modeling errors. Several different scalar flux models are used. It is seen that the simple gradient diffusion model overpredicts scalar dispersion, while anisotropic scalar flux models underpredict dispersion. Further, the use of more complex models does not necessarily guarantee an increase in predictive accuracy, indicating that key physics is missing from existing models. Using comparisons of both a priori and a posteriori scalar flux evaluations with DNS data, the main modeling shortcomings are identified. Results will be presented for different boundary layer conditions.

  9. Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Mechanical Properties of Intermittently Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression with Different Loading Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Dong, Lu; Xu, Nuwen; Feng, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intermittently jointed rocks, widely existing in many mining and civil engineering structures, are quite susceptible to cyclic loading. Understanding the fatigue mechanism of jointed rocks is vital to the rational design and the long-term stability analysis of rock structures. In this study, the fatigue mechanical properties of synthetic jointed rock models under different cyclic conditions are systematically investigated in the laboratory, including four loading frequencies, four maximum stresses, and four amplitudes. Our experimental results reveal the influence of the three cyclic loading parameters on the mechanical properties of jointed rock models, regarding the fatigue deformation characteristics, the fatigue energy and damage evolution, and the fatigue failure and progressive failure behavior. Under lower loading frequency or higher maximum stress and amplitude, the jointed specimen is characterized by higher fatigue deformation moduli and higher dissipated hysteresis energy, resulting in higher cumulative damage and lower fatigue life. However, the fatigue failure modes of jointed specimens are independent of cyclic loading parameters; all tested jointed specimens exhibit a prominent tensile splitting failure mode. Three different crack coalescence patterns are classified between two adjacent joints. Furthermore, different from the progressive failure under static monotonic loading, the jointed rock specimens under cyclic compression fail more abruptly without evident preceding signs. The tensile cracks on the front surface of jointed specimens always initiate from the joint tips and then propagate at a certain angle with the joints toward the direction of maximum compression.

  10. High-order Two-Fluid Plasma Solver for Direct Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Flows with Realistic Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaorui; Livescu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The two-fluid plasma equations with full transport terms, including temperature and magnetic field dependent ion and electron viscous stresses and heat fluxes, frictional drag force, and ohmic heating term have been solved by using the sixth-order non-dissipative compact scheme for plasma flows in several different regimes. In order to be able to fully resolve all the dynamically relevant time and length scales while maintaining computational feasibility, the assumptions of infinite speed of light and negligible electron inertia have been made. The accuracy and robustness of this two-fluid plasma solver in handling plasma flows have been tested against a series of canonical problems, such as Alfven-Whistler dispersion relation, electromagnetic plasma shock, magnetic reconnection, etc. For all test cases, grid convergence tests have been conducted to achieve fully resolved results. The roles of heat flux, viscosity, resistivity, Hall and Biermann battery effects, are investigated for the canonical flows studied.

  11. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  12. A comparison between rib fracture patterns in peri- and post-mortem compressive injury in a piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Amanda L; Swain, Michael V; Neil Waddell, J; Das, Raj; Athens, Josie; Kieser, Jules A

    2014-05-01

    Forensic biomechanics is increasingly being used to explain how observed injuries occur. We studied infant rib fractures from a biomechanical and morphological perspective using a porcine model. We used 24, 6th ribs of one day old domestic pigs Sus scrofa, divided into three groups, desiccated (representing post-mortem trauma), fresh ribs with intact periosteum (representing peri-mortem trauma) and those stored at -20°C. Two experiments were designed to study their biomechanical behaviour fracture morphology: ribs were axially compressed and subjected to four-point bending in an Instron 3339 fitted with custom jigs. Morphoscopic analysis of resultant fractures consisted of standard optical methods, micro-CT (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). During axial compression fresh ribs did not fracture because of energy absorption capabilities of their soft and fluidic components. In flexure tests, dry ribs showed typical elastic-brittle behaviour with long linear load-extension curves, followed by short non-linear elastic (hyperelastic) behaviour and brittle fracture. Fresh ribs showed initial linear-elastic behaviour, followed by strain softening and visco-plastic responses. During the course of loading, dry bone showed minimal observable damage prior to the onset of unstable fracture. Frozen then thawed bone showed similar patterns to fresh bone. Morphologically, fresh ribs showed extensive periosteal damage to the tensile surface with areas of collagen fibre pull-out along the tensile surface. While all dry ribs fractured precipitously, with associated fibre pull-out, the latter feature was absent in thawed ribs. Our study highlights the fact that under controlled loading, fresh piglet ribs (representing perimortem trauma) did not fracture through bone, but was associated with periosteal tearing. These results suggest firstly, that complete lateral rib fracture in infants may in fact not result from pure compression as has been previously assumed; and

  13. Comparative study of the two-fluid momentum equations for multi-dimensional bubbly flows: Modification of Reynolds stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Ik Kyu; Yoon, Han Young [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Byoung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Two-fluid equations are widely used to obtain averaged behaviors of two-phase flows. This study addresses a problem that may arise when the two-fluid equations are used for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. If steady drag is the only accounted force for the interfacial momentum transfer, the disperse-phase velocity would be the same as the continuous-phase velocity when the flow is fully developed without gravity. However, existing momentum equations may show unphysical results in estimating the relative velocity of the disperse phase against the continuous-phase. First, we examine two types of existing momentum equations. One is the standard two-fluid momentum equation in which the disperse-phase is treated as a continuum. The other is the averaged momentum equation derived from a solid/ fluid particle motion. We show that the existing equations are not proper for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. To resolve the problem mentioned above, we modify the form of the Reynolds stress terms in the averaged momentum equation based on the solid/fluid particle motion. The proposed equation shows physically correct results for both multi-dimensional laminar and turbulent flows.

  14. Hydromagnetic thermosolutal instability of compressible walters' (model B' rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermosolutal instability of compressible Walters' (model B' elastico-viscous rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles (fine dust in the presence of vertical magnetic field in porous medium is considered. By applying normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation has been derived and solved analytically. It is observed that the rotation, magnetic field, suspended particles and viscoelasticity introduce oscillatory modes. For stationary convection the Walters' (model B' fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that the rotation and stable solute gradient has stabilizing effects and suspended particles are found to have destabilizing effect on the system, whereas the medium permeability has stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the system under certain conditions. The magnetic field has destabilizing effect in the absence of rotation, whereas in the presence of rotation, magnetic field has stabilizing or destabilizing effect under certain conditions.

  15. Spatial and temporal expression levels of specific microRNAs in a spinal cord injury mouse model and their relationship to the duration of compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziu, Mateo; Fletcher, Lauren; Savage, Jennifer G; Jimenez, David F; Digicaylioglu, Murat; Bartanusz, Viktor

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs, a class of small nonprotein-coding RNAs, are thought to control gene translation into proteins. The latter are the ultimate effectors of the biochemical cascade occurring in any physiological and pathological process. MicroRNAs have been shown to change their expression levels during injury of spinal cord in contusion rodent models. Compression is the most frequent mode of damage of neural elements in spinal cord injury. The cellular and molecular changes occurring in the spinal cord during prolonged compression are not very well elucidated. Understanding the underlying molecular events that occur during sustained compression is paramount in building new therapeutic strategies. The purpose of our study was to probe the relationship between the expression level changes of different miRNAs and the timing of spinal cord decompression in a mouse model. A compression spinal cord injury mouse model was used for the study. A laminectomy was performed in the thoracic spine of C57BL/6 mice. Then, the thecal sac was compressed to create the injury. Decompression was performed early for one group and it was delayed in the second group. The spinal cord at the epicenter of the injury and one level rostral to it were removed at 3, 6, and 24 hours after trauma, and RNA was extracted. Expression levels of six different microRNAs and the relationship to the duration of compression were analyzed. This work was supported in part by the University Research Council Grants Program at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio (Grant 130267). There are no specific conflicts of interest to be disclosed for this work. Expression levels of microRNAs in the prolonged compression of spinal cord model were significantly different compared with the expression levels in the short duration of compression spinal cord injury model. Furthermore, microRNAs show a different expression pattern in different regions of the injured spinal cord. Our findings demonstrate that

  16. Application of a two-dimensional model for predicting the pressure-flow and compression properties during column packing scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Justin T; Cecchini, Douglas; Chu, Cathy; Liu, Wei-Han; Spann, Andrew

    2007-03-23

    A two-dimensional model was formulated to describe the pressure-flow behavior of compressible stationary phases for protein chromatography at different temperatures and column scales. The model was based on the assumption of elastic deformation of the solid phase and steady-state Darcy flow. Using a single fitted value for the empirical modulus parameters, the model was applied to describe the pressure-flow behavior of several adsorbents packed using both fluid flow and mechanical compression. Simulations were in agreement with experimental data and accurately predicted the pressure-flow and compression behavior of three adsorbents over a range of column scales and operating temperatures. Use of the described theoretical model potentially improves the accuracy of the column scale-up process, allowing the use of limited laboratory scale data to predict column performance in large scale applications.

  17. Modelo de error en imágenes comprimidas con wavelets Error Model in Wavelet-compressed Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Puetamán G.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta la compresión de imágenes a través de la comparación entre el modelo Wavelet y el modelo Fourier, utilizando la minimización de la función de error. El problema que se estudia es específico, consiste en determinar una base {ei} que minimice la función de error entre la imagen original y la recuperada después de la compresión. Es de resaltar que existen muchas aplicaciones, por ejemplo, en medicina o astronomía, en donde no es aceptable ningún deterioro de la imagen porque toda la información contenida, incluso la que se estima como ruido, se considera imprescindible.In this paper we study image compression as a way to compare Wavelet and Fourier models, by minimizing the error function. The particular problem we consider is to determine basis {ei} minimizing the error function between the original image and the recovered one after compression. It is to be noted or remarked that there are many applications in such diverse fields as for example medicine and astronomy, where no image deteriorating is acceptable since even noise is considered essential.

  18. A compressible two-phase model for dispersed particle flows with application from dense to dilute regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Thomas P., E-mail: thomas.p.mcgrath@navy.mil [Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division, 4013 Fowler Rd., Indian Head, Maryland 20640 (United States); St Clair, Jeffrey G. [Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division, 4013 Fowler Rd., Indian Head, Maryland 20640 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 231 MAE-A, P.O. Box 116250, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Balachandar, S. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 231 MAE-A, P.O. Box 116250, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    Multiphase flows are present in many important fields ranging from multiphase explosions to chemical processing. An important subset of multiphase flow applications involves dispersed materials, such as particles, droplets, and bubbles. This work presents an Eulerian–Eulerian model for multiphase flows containing dispersed particles surrounded by a continuous media such as air or water. Following a large body of multiphase literature, the driving force for particle acceleration is modeled as a direct function of both the continuous-phase pressure gradient and the gradient of intergranular stress existing within the particle phase. While the application of these two components of driving force is well accepted in much of the literature, other models exist in which the particle-phase pressure gradient itself drives particle motion. The multiphase model treats all phases as compressible and is derived to ensure adherence to the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. The governing equations are presented and discussed, and a characteristic analysis shows the model to be hyperbolic, with a degeneracy in the case that the intergranular stress, which is modeled as a configuration pressure, is zero. Finally, results from a two sample problems involving shock-induced particle dispersion are presented. The results agree well with experimental measurements, providing initial confidence in the proposed model.

  19. Modelling and design of high compression electron guns for EBIS/T charge breeders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087190; Zschornack, G.; Lettry, J.; Wenander, F.

    In this thesis the optimization of the REXEBIS charge breeder at the ISOLDE facility is presented. REXEBIS in its current state provides a current density of 200A/cm² inside the trapping region at 2 T and will be optimized to the physical limit of its design. To overcome this limit a new electron gun, the HEC² gun, was designed in collaboration with the BNL and is in commission at TestEBIS. This electron gun promises a current density of >10 kA/cm², which decreases the charge breeding time significantly. This thesis presents novel simulation techniques supporting the commissioning phase by explaining the sources of occurring loss current and, in addition, evaluate the currently installed collector for compatibility with the HEC2 gun operating at its design limit. The experience gained from the commission of the HEC² gun and the established numerical techniques lead to the development of a smaller high-compression electron gun for medical purposes, the MEDeGUN. This electron gun should provide a high-quali...

  20. Modeling of material properties of piezoelectric ceramics taking into account damage development under static compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, M; Nishikata, T; Okayasu, M

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out static compression tests in the poling direction for PZT ceramics and evaluated the material properties by measuring the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and electrostatic capacity at regular intervals. Then the variation in the material properties up to fracture was clarified. Also, the development of internal damage was also clarified quantitatively by evaluating a damage variable on the basis of the continuum damage mechanics. The damage variable was calculated from the ratio of the elastic coefficient to its initial value. In the present paper, the development of internal damage was formulated as an evolution equation of the damage variable. In the formulation, a threshold stress leading to the onset of damage was considered. Moreover, the variation in material properties was related to the damage variable and formulated as material functions of the damage variable. The development of internal damage and the variation in material properties were simulated by the equations proposed in the present paper and the validity of the equations was verified by comparing the predictions with experimental results. (paper)

  1. A Mathematical Model for the Non-Stationary Process of Compression Molding of Plates from Granulate of Thermoplastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Vodyakov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mathematical modeling allows assigning optimal parameters for the process of compression molding of plates and calculating the dimensions of the mold without costly and long-term experiments. The options ensure the required precision of pressing. The disadvantages of the known models are the assumptions about the process isothermicity and independence of the thermal-physical coefficients from temperature. The models do not take into account the dependence of the pressure in the cavity of the mold on the excess of the melt; the problem of calculating the dimensions of the mold cavity for given plate dimensions is not posed. The known models do not give a complete description of all stages of the process. The aim of this paper is to develop a perfect mathematical model without limitations for the compression molding of plates from a granulate of highly filled thermoplastic composites. Materials and Methods: The paper proposes a non-stationary mathematical model. The model takes into account the presence of physical states transitions and dependence of the thermophysical characteristics of composites on temperature. The model is based on the known equations of thermal physics and continuum mechanics. Results: Initial and boundary conditions, rheological equations, systems of equations for the material, thermal, and power balance are determined for three stages of the process. The calculation problems are determined too. A program of iterative numerical calculation has been developed because of the resulting system of equations has no analytical solution. A convergence of experimental and theoretical results with the correlation coefficient confirms the adequacy of the developed mathematical model and the calculation program. Discussion and Conclusions: The results of the study allow calculating the dimensions of the mold cavity, the initial granulate required mass, technological losses, the time functions of pressure and temperature

  2. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  3. Investigation of a new mathematical model for compression of pharmaceutical powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2001-01-01

    A new compaction equation, the log-exp model: V=V-w log(P)+V exp(P/P) is presented. The model presumes that two compaction processes: a logarithmic and an exponential decline may be active simultaneously. Using non-linear regression techniques the model gives an excellent fit to a number of model...... substances with wide differences in compaction behaviour. Compared to the Kawakita equation the model covers a broader range of the compaction profile. The new model and the Cooper and Eaton equation fit the data on the same level, but the parameters derived from the log-exp model seems to have more...

  4. Transport properties of LiF under strong compression: modeling using advanced electronic structure methods and classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Jones, Reese; Ward, Donald; Spataru, Catalin; Shulenburger, Luke; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2015-06-01

    Window materials are ubiquitous in shock physics and with high energy density drivers capable of reaching multi-Mbar pressures the use of LiF is increasing. Velocimetry and temperature measurements of a sample through a window are both influenced by the assumed index of refraction and thermal conductivity, respectively. We report on calculations of index of refraction using the many-body theory GW and thermal ionic conductivity using linear response theory and model potentials. The results are expected to increase the accuracy of a broad range of high-pressure shock- and ramp compression experiments. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. The effect of differing support surfaces on the efficacy of chest compressions using a resuscitation manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, M; Tweed, C; Perkins, G D

    2001-11-01

    External chest compression (ECC) efficacy is influenced by factors including the surface supporting the patient. Air-filled support surfaces are deflated for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with little evidence to substantiate this. We investigated the effect that differing support surfaces had on ECC efficacy using a CPR manikin model. Four participants carried out four cycles of ECC with an assistant ventilating. The subjects were blinded to the seven support surfaces and the order was randomised. For each participant/surface combination, ECC variables and the participants' perceptions were measured. Participants produced effective ECC with the manikin on the floor (mean proportion correct, 94.5%; mean depth, 42.5 mm). Compared with the floor: the proportion of correct ECC was less for the overlay inflated (PCPR.

  6. Numerical and theoretical aspects of the modelling of compressible two-phase flow by interface capture methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokh, S.

    2001-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a numerical direct simulation of compressible two-phase flows by using interface capturing methods. These techniques are based on the use of an Eulerian fixed grid to describe flow variables as well as the interface between fluids. The author first recalls conventional interface capturing methods and makes the distinction between those based on discontinuous colour functions and those based on level set functions. The approach is then extended to a five equation model to allow the largest as possible choice of state equations for the fluids. Three variants are developed. A solver inspired by the Roe scheme is developed for one of them. These interface capturing methods are then refined, more particularly for problems of numerical diffusion at the interface. A last part addresses the study of dynamic phase change. Non-conventional thermodynamics tools are used to study the structures of an interface which performs phase transition [fr

  7. A Microstructure-Based Model to Characterize Micromechanical Parameters Controlling Compressive and Tensile Failure in Crystallized Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerani, T.; Zhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    A discrete element model is proposed to examine rock strength and failure. The model is implemented by UDEC which is developed for this purpose. The material is represented as a collection of irregular-sized deformable particles interacting at their cohesive boundaries. The interface between two adjacent particles is viewed as a flexible contact whose stress-displacement law is assumed to control the material fracture and fragmentation process. To reproduce rock anisotropy, an innovative orthotropic cohesive law is developed for contact which allows the interfacial shear and tensile behaviours to be different from each other. The model is applied to a crystallized igneous rock and the individual and interactional effects of the microstructural parameters on the material compressive and tensile failure response are examined. A new methodical calibration process is also established. It is shown that the model successfully reproduces the rock mechanical behaviour quantitatively and qualitatively. Ultimately, the model is used to understand how and under what circumstances micro-tensile and micro-shear cracking mechanisms control the material failure at different loading paths.

  8. Experimental Validation of the Simulation Model of a DOAS Equipped with a Desiccant Wheel and a Vapor Compression Refrigeration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Martínez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS can be designed to supply 100% of the outside air and meet the latent load of the room with dry air. The objectives of this study were to develop a model of a DOAS equipped with a desiccant wheel and a vapor-compression refrigeration system, build a prototype, validate the model with experimental data, and gain knowledge about the system operation. The test facility was designed with the desiccant wheel downstream of the cooling coil to take advantage of the operating principles of cooling coils and desiccants. A model of the DOAS was developed in the TRNSYS environment. The root mean standard error (RMSE was used for model validation by comparing the measured air and refrigerant properties with the corresponding calculated values. The results obtained with the developed model showed that the DOAS was able to maintain an indoor humidity ratio depending on outdoor conditions. Laboratory tests were also used to investigate the effect of changes in the regeneration air temperature and the process airflow rate on the process air humidity ratio at the outlet of the wheel. The results are consistent with the technical literature.

  9. SBKF Modeling and Analysis Plan: Buckling Analysis of Compression-Loaded Orthogrid and Isogrid Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    This document outlines a Modeling and Analysis Plan (MAP) to be followed by the SBKF analysts. It includes instructions on modeling and analysis formulation and execution, model verification and validation, identifying sources of error and uncertainty, and documentation. The goal of this MAP is to provide a standardized procedure that ensures uniformity and quality of the results produced by the project and corresponding documentation.

  10. SeqCompress: an algorithm for biological sequence compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-10-01

    The growth of Next Generation Sequencing technologies presents significant research challenges, specifically to design bioinformatics tools that handle massive amount of data efficiently. Biological sequence data storage cost has become a noticeable proportion of total cost in the generation and analysis. Particularly increase in DNA sequencing rate is significantly outstripping the rate of increase in disk storage capacity, which may go beyond the limit of storage capacity. It is essential to develop algorithms that handle large data sets via better memory management. This article presents a DNA sequence compression algorithm SeqCompress that copes with the space complexity of biological sequences. The algorithm is based on lossless data compression and uses statistical model as well as arithmetic coding to compress DNA sequences. The proposed algorithm is compared with recent specialized compression tools for biological sequences. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm has better compression gain as compared to other existing algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Holographic Dark Energy Interacting with Two Fluids and Validity of Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath, Ujjal

    2010-01-01

    We have considered a cosmological model of holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter and another unknown component of dark energy of the universe. We have assumed two interaction terms $Q$ and $Q'$ in order to include the scenario in which the mutual interaction between the two principal components (i.e., holographic dark energy and dark matter) of the universe leads to some loss in other forms of cosmic constituents. Our model is valid for any sign of $Q$ and $Q'$. If $Q

  12. Validation of a zero-dimensional and 2-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to re-duce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of liquid fuel injected directly into the cylinder acts as the ignition inhibitor of the gaseous fuel. Achieving the optimum combustion process in such an engine requires the application of advanced control algorithms which require mathematical modelling support. In response to the growing demand for new simulation tools, a 0-D model of a dual-fuel engine was proposed and validated. The validation was performed in a broad range of engine operating points, including various speeds and load condition, as well as different natural gas/diesel blend ratios. It was demonstrated that the average model calculation error within the entire cycle did not exceed 6.2%, and was comparable to the measurement results cycle to cycle variations. The maximum model calculation error in a single point of a cycle was 15% for one of the complex (multipoint injection cases. In other cases, it did not exceed 11%.

  13. Reduced Gasoline Surrogate (Toluene/n-Heptane/iso-Octane) Chemical Kinetic Model for Compression Ignition Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2018-04-03

    Toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) (mixture of toluene, iso-octane and heptane) is a suitable surrogate to represent a wide spectrum of real fuels with varying octane sensitivity. Investigating different surrogates in engine simulations is a prerequisite to identify the best matching mixture. However, running 3D engine simulations using detailed models is currently impossible and reduction of detailed models is essential. This work presents an AramcoMech reduced kinetic model developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for simulating complex TPRF surrogate blends. A semi-decoupling approach was used together with species and reaction lumping to obtain a reduced kinetic model. The model was widely validated against experimental data including shock tube ignition delay times and premixed laminar flame speeds. Finally, the model was utilized to simulate the combustion of a low reactivity gasoline fuel under partially premixed combustion conditions.

  14. Reduced Gasoline Surrogate (Toluene/n-Heptane/iso-Octane) Chemical Kinetic Model for Compression Ignition Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Atef, Nour; Alfazazi, Adamu; Badra, Jihad; Zhang, Yu; Tzanetakis, Tom; Pei, Yuanjiang

    2018-01-01

    Toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) (mixture of toluene, iso-octane and heptane) is a suitable surrogate to represent a wide spectrum of real fuels with varying octane sensitivity. Investigating different surrogates in engine simulations is a prerequisite to identify the best matching mixture. However, running 3D engine simulations using detailed models is currently impossible and reduction of detailed models is essential. This work presents an AramcoMech reduced kinetic model developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for simulating complex TPRF surrogate blends. A semi-decoupling approach was used together with species and reaction lumping to obtain a reduced kinetic model. The model was widely validated against experimental data including shock tube ignition delay times and premixed laminar flame speeds. Finally, the model was utilized to simulate the combustion of a low reactivity gasoline fuel under partially premixed combustion conditions.

  15. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  16. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered

  17. A renormalization group scaling analysis for compressible two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Deng, Y.; Glimm, J.; Li, G.; Zhang, Q.; Sharp, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    Computational solutions to the Rayleigh--Taylor fluid mixing problem, as modeled by the two-fluid two-dimensional Euler equations, are presented. Data from these solutions are analyzed from the point of view of Reynolds averaged equations, using scaling laws derived from a renormalization group analysis. The computations, carried out with the front tracking method on an Intel iPSC/860, are highly resolved and statistical convergence of ensemble averages is achieved. The computations are consistent with the experimentally observed growth rates for nearly incompressible flows. The dynamics of the interior portion of the mixing zone is simplified by the use of scaling variables. The size of the mixing zone suggests fixed-point behavior. The profile of statistical quantities within the mixing zone exhibit self-similarity under fixed-point scaling to a limited degree. The effect of compressibility is also examined. It is found that, for even moderate compressibility, the growth rates fail to satisfy universal scaling, and moreover, increase significantly with increasing compressibility. The growth rates predicted from a renormalization group fixed-point model are in a reasonable agreement with the results of the exact numerical simulations, even for flows outside of the incompressible limit

  18. Isotropic background for interacting two fluid scenario coupled with zero mass scalar field in modified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirde, V.R.; Shekh, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    The modified theories of gravity have engrossed much attention in the last decade, especially f(R) gravity. In this contextual exploration, we investigate interaction between barotropic fluid and dark energy with zero-mass scalar field for the spatially homogeneous and isotropic flat FRW universe. In this universe, the field equations correspond to the particular choice of f(R) = R+bR m . The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by applying volumetric power law and exponential law of expansion. In power and exponential law of expansion, the universe shows both matter dominated and DE era for b ≤ 0 and b ≥ 0 and remain present in dark era respectively, but power law model is fully occupying with real matter for b > 0 and for b < 0 exponential model expands with negative pressure and remain present in matter dominated phase respectively. The physical behavior of the universe has been discussed by using some physical quantities

  19. K-TIF: a two-fluid computer program for downcomer flow dynamics. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsden, A.A.; Harlow, F.H.

    1977-10-01

    The K-TIF computer program has been developed for numerical solution of the time-varying dynamics of steam and water in a pressurized water reactor downcomer. The current status of physical and mathematical modeling is presented in detail. The report also contains a complete description of the numerical solution technique, a full description and listing of the computer program, instructions for its use, with a sample printout for a specific test problem. A series of calculations, performed with no change in the modeling parameters, shows consistent agreement with the experimental trends over a wide range of conditions, which gives confidence to the calculations as a basis for investigating the complicated physics of steam-water flows in the downcomer.

  20. Simplified two-fluid current–voltage relation for superconductor transition-edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tian-Shun; Chen, Jun-Kang; Zhang, Qing-Ya; Li, Tie-Fu; Liu, Jian-She; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Xingxiang

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simplified current–voltage (IV) relation for the analysis and simulation of superconductor transition-edge sensor (TES) circuits. Compared to the conventional approach based on the effective TES resistance, our expression describes the device behavior more thoroughly covering the superconducting, transitional, and normal-state for TES currents in both directions. We show how to use our IV relation to perform small-signal analysis and derive the device's temperature and current sensitivities based on its physical parameters. We further demonstrate that we can use our IV relation to greatly simplify TES device modeling and make SPICE simulation of TES circuits easily accessible. We present some interesting results as examples of valuable simulations enabled by our IV relation. -- Highlights: •We propose an IV relation for superconductor transition-edge sensors (TES). •We derive the dependence of the sensitivity of TES on its physical parameters. •We use our IV relation for SPICE modeling of TES device. •We present simulation results using device model based on our IV relation

  1. Simplified two-fluid current–voltage relation for superconductor transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tian-Shun; Chen, Jun-Kang [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, Anhui Province 230026 (China); Zhang, Qing-Ya; Li, Tie-Fu; Liu, Jian-She [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Wei, E-mail: weichen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhou, Xingxiang, E-mail: xizhou@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, Anhui Province 230026 (China)

    2013-11-21

    We propose a simplified current–voltage (IV) relation for the analysis and simulation of superconductor transition-edge sensor (TES) circuits. Compared to the conventional approach based on the effective TES resistance, our expression describes the device behavior more thoroughly covering the superconducting, transitional, and normal-state for TES currents in both directions. We show how to use our IV relation to perform small-signal analysis and derive the device's temperature and current sensitivities based on its physical parameters. We further demonstrate that we can use our IV relation to greatly simplify TES device modeling and make SPICE simulation of TES circuits easily accessible. We present some interesting results as examples of valuable simulations enabled by our IV relation. -- Highlights: •We propose an IV relation for superconductor transition-edge sensors (TES). •We derive the dependence of the sensitivity of TES on its physical parameters. •We use our IV relation for SPICE modeling of TES device. •We present simulation results using device model based on our IV relation.

  2. Pulse Oximetry: A Non-Invasive, Novel Marker for the Quality of Chest Compressions in Porcine Models of Cardiac Arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    Full Text Available Pulse oximetry, which noninvasively detects the blood flow of peripheral tissue, has achieved widespread clinical use. We have noticed that the better the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, the better the appearance of pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform (POP. We investigated whether the area under the curve (AUC and/or the amplitude (Amp of POP could be used to monitor the quality of CPR.Prospective, randomized controlled study.Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China.Healthy 3-month-old male domestic swine.34 local pigs were enrolled in this study. After 4 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, animals were randomly assigned into two resuscitation groups: a "low quality" group (with a compression depth of 3cm and a "high quality" group (with a depth of 5cm. All treatments between the two groups were identical except for the depth of chest compressions. Hemodynamic parameters [coronary perfusion pressure (CPP, partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2] as well as AUC and Amp of POP were all collected and analyzed.There were statistical differences between the "high quality" group and the "low quality" group in AUC, Amp, CPP and PETCO2 during CPR (P<0.05. AUC, Amp and CPP were positively correlated with PETCO2, respectively (P<0.01. There was no statistical difference between the heart rate calculated according to the POP (FCPR and the frequency of mechanical CPR at the 3rd minute of CPR. The FCPR was lower than the frequency of mechanical CPR at the 6th and the 9th minute of CPR.Both the AUC and Amp of POP correlated well with CPP and PETCO2 in animal models. The frequency of POP closely matched the CPR heart rate. AUC and Amp of POP might be potential noninvasive quality monitoring markers for CPR.

  3. On the stability and compressive nonlinearity of a physiologically based model of the cochlea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nankali, Amir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Grosh, Karl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Hearing relies on a series of coupled electrical, acoustical (fluidic) and mechanical interactions inside the cochlea that enable sound processing. A positive feedback mechanism within the cochlea, called the cochlear amplifier, provides amplitude and frequency selectivity in the mammalian auditory system. The cochlear amplifier and stability are studied using a nonlinear, micromechanical model of the Organ of Corti (OoC) coupled to the electrical potentials in the cochlear ducts. It is observed that the mechano-electrical transduction (MET) sensitivity and somatic motility of the outer hair cell (OHC), control the cochlear stability. Increasing MET sensitivity beyond a critical value, while electromechanical coupling coefficient is within a specific range, causes instability. We show that instability in this model is generated through a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. A reduced order model of the system is approximated and it is shown that the tectorial membrane (TM) transverse mode effect on the dynamics is significant while the radial mode can be simplified from the equations. The cochlear amplifier in this model exhibits good agreement with the experimental data. A comprehensive 3-dimensional model based on the cross sectional model is simulated and the results are compared. It is indicated that the global model qualitatively inherits some characteristics of the local model, but the longitudinal coupling along the cochlea shifts the stability boundary (i.e., Hopf bifurcation point) and enhances stability.

  4. Multi-scale Modeling of Compressible Single-phase Flow in Porous Media using Molecular Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    potential model that accounts for the molecular quadrupole moment of fluids with non-spherical molecules such as CO2. The potential model was used to simulate the thermodynamic equilibrium properties for single-phase and two-phase systems using the canonical

  5. A meso-scale model to study the compressive strength of woven carbon fiber reinforced plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schormans, J.M.J.; Remmers, J.J.C.; Wilson, W.; Deshpande, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling kink-band formation in woven composites using a detailed micro-model is numerically expensive. In order to reduce the computational resources, a method to homogenize fiber-tows is proposed which uses a rules of mixture approach. The method is tested by comparing the stiffness and

  6. Hysteresis model of shape memory alloy wire-based laminated rubber bearing under compression and unidirectional shear loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, F; Alam, M Shahria

    2015-01-01

    Smart lead rubber bearings (LRBs), in which a shape memory alloy (SMA) is used in the form of wires, are a new generation of elastomeric isolators with improved performance in terms of recentering capability and energy dissipation capacity. It is of great interest to implement SMA wire-based lead rubber bearings (SMA-LRBs) in bridges; however, currently there is no appropriate hysteresis model for accurately simulating the behavior of such isolators. A constitutive model for SMA-LRBs is proposed in this study. An LRB is equipped with a double cross configuration of SMA wires (DC-SMAW) and subjected to compression and unidirectional shear loadings. Due to the complexity of the shear behavior of the SMA-LRB, a hysteresis model is developed for the DC-SMAWs and then combined with the bilinear kinematic hardening model, which is assumed for the LRB. Comparing the hysteretic response of decoupled systems with that of the SMA-LRB shows that the high recentering capability of the DC-SMAW model with zero residual deformation could noticeably reduce the residual deformation of the LRB. The developed constitutive model for DC-SMAWs is characterized by three stiffnesses when the shear strain exceeds a starting limit at which the SMA wires are activated due to phase transformation. An important point is that the shear hysteresis of the DC-SMAW model looks different from the flag-shaped hysteresis of the SMA because of the specific arrangement of wires and its effect on the resultant forces transferred from the wires to the rubber bearing. (paper)

  7. Two-fluid and nonlinear effects of tearing and pressure-driven resistive modes in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirnov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Large-scale tearing instabilities have long been considered to underlie transport and dynamo processes in the reversed field pinch (RFP). The vast majority of theoretical and computational RFP work has focused on pressureless, single-fluid MHD in cylindrical plasmas driven solely by a toroidal electric field. We report results of five investigations covering two-fluid dynamos, toroidal nonlinear MHD computation, nonlinear computation of Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD), the effect of shear flow on tearing instability, and the effect of pressure on resistive instability. The key findings are: (1) two-fluid dynamo arising from the Hall term is much larger than the standard MHD dynamo present in a single-fluid treatment, (2) geometric coupling from toroidicity precludes the occurrence of laminar single helicity states, except for nonreversed plasmas, (3) OFCD, a form of AC helicity injection, can sustain the RFP plasma current, although magnetic fluctuations are enhanced, (4) edge shear flow can destabilize the edge resonant m=0 modes, which occur as spikes in experiment, and (5) pressure driven modes are resistive at low beta, only becoming ideal at extremely high beta. (author)

  8. Centrifugal fingering in a curved Hele-Shaw cell: A generalized Euler's elastica shape for the two-fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Jose; Brandao, Rodolfo

    2017-11-01

    We study a family of generalized elastica-like equilibrium shapes that arise at the interface separating two fluids in a curved rotating Hele-Shaw cell. This family of stationary interface solutions consists of shapes that balance the competing capillary and centrifugal forces in such a curved flow environment. We investigate how the emerging interfacial patterns are impacted by changes in the geometric properties of the curved Hele-Shaw cell. A vortex-sheet formalism is used to calculate the two-fluid interface curvature, and a gallery of possible shapes is provided to highlight a number of peculiar morphological features. A linear perturbation theory is employed to show that the most prominent aspects of these complex stationary patterns can be fairly well reproduced by the interplay of just two interfacial modes. The connection of these dominant modes to the geometry of the curved cell, as well as to the fluid dynamic properties of the flow, is discussed. We thank CNPq (Brazilian Research Council) for financial support under Grant No. 304821/2015-2.

  9. Hybrid parallelization of the XTOR-2F code for the simulation of two-fluid MHD instabilities in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Alain; Lütjens, Hinrich

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallel version of the XTOR-2F code [Lütjens and Luciani, J. Comput. Phys. 229 (2010) 8130] solving the two-fluid MHD equations in full tokamak geometry by means of an iterative Newton-Krylov matrix-free method has been developed. The present work shows that the code has been parallelized significantly despite the numerical profile of the problem solved by XTOR-2F, i.e. a discretization with pseudo-spectral representations in all angular directions, the stiffness of the two-fluid stability problem in tokamaks, and the use of a direct LU decomposition to invert the physical pre-conditioner at every Krylov iteration of the solver. The execution time of the parallelized version is an order of magnitude smaller than the sequential one for low resolution cases, with an increasing speedup when the discretization mesh is refined. Moreover, it allows to perform simulations with higher resolutions, previously forbidden because of memory limitations.

  10. Anisotropic Multishell Analytical Modeling of an Intervertebral Disk Subjected to Axial Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Sébastien; Nadeau, Sylvie; Bouzid, Abdel-Hakim

    2016-04-01

    Studies on intervertebral disk (IVD) response to various loads and postures are essential to understand disk's mechanical functions and to suggest preventive and corrective actions in the workplace. The experimental and finite-element (FE) approaches are well-suited for these studies, but validating their findings is difficult, partly due to the lack of alternative methods. Analytical modeling could allow methodological triangulation and help validation of FE models. This paper presents an analytical method based on thin-shell, beam-on-elastic-foundation and composite materials theories to evaluate the stresses in the anulus fibrosus (AF) of an axisymmetric disk composed of multiple thin lamellae. Large deformations of the soft tissues are accounted for using an iterative method and the anisotropic material properties are derived from a published biaxial experiment. The results are compared to those obtained by FE modeling. The results demonstrate the capability of the analytical model to evaluate the stresses at any location of the simplified AF. It also demonstrates that anisotropy reduces stresses in the lamellae. This novel model is a preliminary step in developing valuable analytical models of IVDs, and represents a distinctive groundwork that is able to sustain future refinements. This paper suggests important features that may be included to improve model realism.

  11. Modeling basic creep in concrete at early-age under compressive and tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.hilaire@ens-cachan.fr [ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Benb