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Sample records for compressible two-fluid model

  1. Effect of Compressibility on Hyperbolicity and Choke Flow Criterion of the Two-phase Two-fluid Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suneet Singh; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2008-09-01

    The standard two-phase two-fluid model lacks hyperbolicity which results in oscillations in the numerical solutions. For the incompressible two-phase flows an exact correction term can be derived which when added to the momentum equations makes the model hyperbolic. No such straightforward approach exists for the similar compressible flows. In the current work, the effect of the compressibility on the characteristic equation is analyzed. It is shown that the hyperbolicity of the system depends only on the slip velocity and not on the phasic velocities, independently. Moreover, a slip Mach number is defined and a non-dimensional characteristic equation is derived. It is shown that for the small values of slip Mach number the effect of the compressibility on the hyperbolicity can be ignored. To verify the above analysis, the characteristic equation for the two-phase compressible flows is numerically solved and results compared with the values obtained with the analytical solution for incompressible flows. Numerical solution of the two-phase two-fluid model for the benchmark problem is used to further verify the abovementioned analysis. Furthermore, the eigenvalues of the characteristic equation are obtained as a power series expansion about the point where the slip Mach number is zero. These eigenvalues are used to develop a choking criterion for the compressible two-phase flows.

  2. Two-fluid model of the Skyrmion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralston, J.P.

    1986-04-01

    We consider the field-theory description of the Skyrme model incorporating quantum fluctuations of a condensed phase. This viewpoint clarifies the usefulness of the model for applications at the physical value of F/sub ..pi../, rather than F/sub ..pi../..-->..infinity. By creating covariant field-theory states associated with a translational-dependent condensate, we emphasize the effects of fluctuations and coherence in a calculation of the q/sup 2/ dependence of the baryon electromagnetic form factor F(q/sup 2/). Using the impulse approximation at large q/sup 2/, we find the model predicts F(q/sup 2/)approx.exp(-Vertical Barq/sup 2/Vertical Bar/lambda/sup 2/)/q /sup 2/, where lambdaapprox.1 GeV is a calculable scale. Appending a pion form factor of O(1/q/sup 2/), we interpret this in terms of higher-twist corrections, at moderate values of momentum transfer, to a leading term of O(1/q/sup 4/). The dependence on a regularization scale ..mu../sup 2/ and F/sub ..pi../ /sup 2/ is such that this result applies for a specified range of q/sup 2/, ..mu../sup 2/, and F/sub ..pi../ /sup 2/. However, the detailed results of the calculation are such that the large-F/sub ..pi../ /sup 2/ and large-..mu../sup 2/ limits do not commute.

  3. Geodesic acoustic mode in a reduced two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haijun, REN

    2017-12-01

    A reduced two-fluid model is constructed to investigate the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The ion dynamics is sufficiently considered by including an anisotropic pressure tensor and inhibited heat flux vector, whose evolutions are determined by equations derived from the 16-momentum model. Electrons are supposed to obey the Boltzmann distribution responding to the electrostatic oscillation with near ion acoustic velocity. In the large safety factor limit, the GAM frequency is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/{q}2 when zeroing the anisotropy. For general anisotropy, the reduced two-fluid model generates the frequency agreeing well with the kinetic result with arbitrary electron temperature. The present simplified fluid model will be of great use and interest for young researchers and students devoted to plasma physics.

  4. Variant biconjugate gradient methods for the two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, H.J. (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan, Province of China)); Yang, D.Y.; Chieng, C.C.

    1993-01-01

    The advanced thermal-hydraulic analysis code (ATHANS) for nuclear steam generators was developed based on the THERMIT-UTSG computer code which is an analytical, U-tube steam generator model. The two-fluid, three-dimensional model is employed to describe two-phase flow and heat transfer dynamics for the coolant in the shell side. The numerical method used in THERMIT-UTSG is the same as in TRAC (Ref. 3) and THERMIT (Ref. 4), which is a modified version of the implicit continuous Eulerian method. Six equations for the mass, momentum, and energy of each phase of the fluid are discretized in finite difference forms. The finite difference equations for the mass and energy of each phase for each mesh cell are solved with unknowns pressure p, void fraction [alpha], liquid temperature T[sub l], and vapor temperature T[sub v], by the Newton method.

  5. Two-fluid model stability, simulation and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bertodano, Martín López de; Clausse, Alejandro; Ransom, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the linear and nonlinear two-phase stability of the one-dimensional Two-Fluid Model (TFM) material waves and the numerical methods used to solve it. The TFM fluid dynamic stability is a problem that remains open since its inception more than forty years ago. The difficulty is formidable because it involves the combined challenges of two-phase topological structure and turbulence, both nonlinear phenomena. The one dimensional approach permits the separation of the former from the latter. The authors first analyze the kinematic and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with the simplified one-dimensional Fixed-Flux Model (FFM). They then analyze the density wave instability with the well-known Drift-Flux Model. They demonstrate that the Fixed-Flux and Drift-Flux assumptions are two complementary TFM simplifications that address two-phase local and global linear instabilities separately. Furthermore, they demonstrate with a well-posed FFM and a DFM two cases of nonlinear two-phase behavior that are ...

  6. Vortex Dynamics in the Two-Fluid Model

    OpenAIRE

    Thouless, D. J.; Geller, M. R.; Vinen, W. F.; Fortin, J. -Y.; Rhee, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    We have used two-fluid dynamics to study the discrepancy between the work of Thouless, Ao and Niu (TAN) and that of Iordanskii. In TAN no transverse force on a vortex due to normal fluid flow was found, whereas the earlier work found a transverse force proportional to normal fluid velocity u and normal fluid density. We have linearized the time-independent two-fluid equations about the exact solution for a vortex, and find three solutions which are important in the region far from the vortex....

  7. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  8. MODIFIED CHOKE FLOW CRITERION FOR THE TWO-PHASE TWO-FLUID MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suneet Singh; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2009-05-01

    A choked condition exists when mass flow rate becomes independent of the downstream conditions. In other words, no information can propagate in the upstream direction under this condition. The real part of the solution of the characteristic equation for the model represents velocity of the signal propagation and the imaginary part is the growth (or decay) rate of that signal. Therefore, if the real part of these eigenvalues is positive then no signal propagates in the upstream direction (choosing downstream direction to be the positive direction) resulting in the choke flow. In order to develop the choke criterion, a non-dimensional form of the characteristic equation is derived for the standard two-phase two-fluid model. The equation is in the terms of a slip Mach number Ms. It can be shown that the slip Mach number is small for many applications including nuclear reactor safety simulations. The eigenvalues of the characteristic equation are obtained as a power series expansion about the point Ms = 0. These eigenvalues are used to develop a choking criterion for the compressible two-phase flows.

  9. Two-fluid model for reacting turbulent two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S. H.; Abou-Ellail, M. M. M.

    1994-05-01

    A reacting two-fluid model, based on the solution of separate transport equations for reacting gas-liquid two-phase flow, is presented. New time-mean transport equations for two-phase mixture fraction bar-f and its variance g are derived. The new two-fluid transport equations for bar-f and g are useful for two-phase reacting flows in which phases strongly interact. They are applicable to both submerged and nonsubmerged combustion. A pdf approach to the reaction process is adopted. The mixture fraction pdf assumes the shape of a beta function while the instantaneous thermochemical properties are computed from an equilibrium model. The proposed two-fluid model is verified by predicting turbulent flow structures of an n-pentane spray flame and a nonreacting bubbly jet flow for which experimental data exist. Good agreement is found between the predictions and the corresponding experimental data.

  10. Higher Dimensional Plane Symmetric Cosmological Models with Two-Fluid Source in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, V. G.; Umarkar, V. M.; Pund, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    We consider anisotropic, homogeneous two-fluid plane symmetric cosmological models in higher dimensions. Here one fluid represents the matter content of the universe and another fluid is chosen to model the CMB (cosmic microwave background) radiation. The radiation and matter content of the universe are in interactive phase. Also we have discussed the behaviour of fluid parameters and kinematical parameters.

  11. A two-fluid model for turbulent diffusion flames at moderate Damkoehler numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutheil, E. (Institut fuer Chemische Technologie, Darmstadt (West Germany))

    1990-04-19

    Since most practical combustors involve turbulent, nonpremixed flames, research has focused on developing a fundamental understanding of such flames. In the present paper, the oxidation of carbon monoxide by air in a turbulent flow is investigated. The turbulent reacting flow is described adopting Spalding's intermittency model, the two-fluid model, which was developed to improve the modeling of exchange processes within the turbulent mixing layer of the two gas streams.

  12. Influence of the city geometric features on the two fluid model parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Ayadh, Mohammed Thabet

    1986-01-01

    The traffic flow in an urban street network is a complicated system which involves many variables. Some of these variables relate to the networkâ s geometric features; some of these variables reflect the characteristics of the vehicles, drivers and pedestrians using the network. The Two Fluid Model was introduced to help evaluate the quality of traffic service in urban street networks. The model parameters, Tm and n, are used as a scale to compare traffic quality...

  13. A two-fluid model for vertical flow applied to CO2 injection wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linga, Gaute; Lund, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    the well, including tubing, packer fluid, casing, cement or drilling mud, and rock formation. This enables prediction of the temperature in the well fluid and in each layer of the well. The model is applied to sudden shut-in and blowout cases of a CO2 injection well, where we employ the highly accurate...... to thermal stresses and subsequent loss of well integrity, and it is therefore crucial to employ models that can predict this accurately. In this work, we present a model for vertical well flow that includes both two-phase flow and heat conduction. The flow is described by a two-fluid model, where mass...

  14. A PISO-like algorithm to simulate superfluid helium flow with the two-fluid model

    CERN Document Server

    Soulaine, Cyprien; Allain, Hervé; Baudouy, Bertrand; Van Weelderen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a segregated algorithm to solve numerically the superfluid helium (He II) equations using the two-fluid model. In order to validate the resulting code and illustrate its potential, different simulations have been performed. First, the flow through a capillary filled with He II with a heated area on one side is simulated and results are compared to analytical solutions in both Landau and Gorter–Mellink flow regimes. Then, transient heat transfer of a forced flow of He II is investigated. Finally, some two-dimensional simulations in a porous medium model are carried out.

  15. Two-Fluid Model for 1D Gas-Liquid Slug Flows: Realizable Mean Slug Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gourma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A two-fluid model is used to predict hydrodynamic characteristics of gas water two phase slug flows in horizontal pipes. Mathematical models are averaged based forms of balance laws with algebraic source terms. Predictions of transient solutions of such systems rely on accurate evaluations of speeds and scales of discontinuities generated by the flow conditions. Slug flows are characterized through slug frequencies, slug lengths and slug translational velocities. These are the fundamental quantities that one has to estimate in order to assess the validity of the model and the numerical method in use. A two fluid 1D model for slug flows along with an AUSMDV* numerical scheme is able to predict correct translational speeds, lengths scales and frequencies of slugs. An adaptive mesh refinement AMR procedure based on Kelvin-Helmholtz stability condition as an indicator for refinement is used to speed up simulations. The marginal Kelvin-Helmholtz stability condition is also introduced to estimate slug body length.

  16. A hierarchy of simple hyperbolic two-fluid models for bubbly flows

    CERN Document Server

    Drui, Florence; Kokh, Samuel; Massot, Marc

    2016-01-01

    With the objective of modeling both separate and disperse two-phase flows, we use in this paper a methodology for deriving two-fluid models that do not assume any flow topology. This methodology is based on a variational principle and on entropy dissipation requirement. Some of the models that are such derived and studied are already known in the contexts of the description of separate-or disperse-phase flows. However, we here propose an arrangement of these models into a hierarchy based on their links through relaxation parameters. Moreover, the models are shown to be compatible with the description of a monodisperse bubbly flow and, within this frame, the relaxation parameters can be identified. This identification is finally verified and discussed through comparisons with experimental measures of sound dispersion and with dispersion relations of a reference model for bubbly media.

  17. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas–solids transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeleke, Najeem, E-mail: najm@psu.edu; Adewumi, Michael, E-mail: m2a@psu.edu; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-15

    Two-phase gas–solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas–solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe–Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  18. A stochastic catastrophe model using two-fluid model parameters to investigate traffic safety on urban arterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Peter Y; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2011-05-01

    During the last few decades, the two-fluid model and its two parameters have been widely used in transportation engineering to represent the quality of operational traffic service on urban arterials. Catastrophe models have also often been used to describe traffic flow on freeway sections. This paper demonstrates the possibility of developing a pro-active network screening tool that estimates the crash rate using a stochastic cusp catastrophe model with the two-fluid model's parameters as inputs. The paper investigates the analogy in logic behind the two-fluid model and the catastrophe model using straightforward graphical illustrations. The paper then demonstrates the application of two-fluid model parameters to a stochastic catastrophe model designed to estimate the level of safety on urban arterials. Current road safety management, including network safety screening, is post-active rather than pro-active in the sense that an existing hotspot must be identified before a safety improvement program can be implemented. This paper suggests that a stochastic catastrophe model can help us to become more pro-active by helping us to identify urban arterials that currently show an acceptable level of safety, but which are vulnerable to turning into crash hotspots. We would then be able to implement remedial actions before hotspots develop. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A polydisperse two-fluid model for surf zone bubble simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.

    2011-05-01

    Wave breaking in the surf zone entrains large volumes of air bubbles into the water column, forming a two-phase bubbly flow field. Numerical study of bubbly flow is largely restricted by the lack of robust and comprehensive bubble entrainment models. In this paper, we propose a new model that connects bubble entrainment with turbulent dissipation rate at the air-water interface. The entrainment model as well as a polydisperse two-fluid model are incorporated into a 3-D volume of fluid code TRUCHAS. The bubbly flow model is first tested against laboratory experimental data for an oscillatory bubble plume. The calculated time-averaged liquid velocities and their fluctuations agree well with measurements, indicating that the model correctly reproduces dynamic interactions between the liquid phase and the continuum representation of the gas phase. Then, it is employed to study the bubbly flow under a laboratory surf zone breaking wave. Through the comparisons with experimental data, it is demonstrated that the model describes bubble entrainment and void fraction evolution reasonably well. The exponential decay of void fraction observed in the laboratory experiments is captured by the model. The kinematics of bubble plume as well as the vertical evolution of bubble size spectrum at any depth are investigated. Studies of bubble effects on liquid phase turbulence show that the presence of bubbles could suppress a large amount of turbulence under breaking waves.

  20. Prediction of subcooled flow boiling characteristics using two-fluid Eulerian CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B., E-mail: gbribeiro@ieav.cta.br; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CFD multiphase model is used to predict subcooled flow boiling characteristics. • Better agreement is achieved for higher saturation pressures. • Onset of nucleate boiling and saturated boiling are well predicted. • CFD multiphase model tends to underestimate the void fraction. • Factors were adjusted in order to improve the void fraction results. - Abstract: The present study concerns a detailed analysis of flow boiling phenomena under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. Two different uniform heat fluxes and three saturation pressures were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m{sup 2} s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of the CFD technique for estimation of the wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Changes in factors applied in the modeling of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and bubble departure frequency were suggested, allowing a better prediction of the void fraction along the heated channel. The commercial CFD solver FLUENT 14.5 was used for the model implementation.

  1. Two-fluid model of the pulsar magnetosphere represented as an axisymmetric force-free dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    Based on the exact dipolar solution of the pulsar equation the self-consistent two-fluid model of the pulsar magnetosphere is developed. We concentrate on the low-mass limit of the model, taking into account the radiation damping. As a result, we obtain the particle distributions sustaining the dipolar force-free configuration of the pulsar magnetosphere in case of a slight velocity shear of the electron and positron components. Over most part of the force-free region, the particles follow the poloidal magnetic field lines, with the azimuthal velocities being small. Close to the Y-point, however, the particle motion is chiefly azimuthal and the Lorentz-factor grows unrestrictedly. This may result in the very-high-energy emission from the vicinity of the Y-point and may also imply the magnetocentrifugal formation of a jet. As for the first-order quantities, the longitudinal accelerating electric field is found to change the sign, hinting at coexistence of the polar and outer gaps. Besides that, the components of the plasma conductivity tensor are derived and the low-mass analogue of the pulsar equation is formulated as well.

  2. Modeling of an atomizer for two fluids; Modelacion de un atomizador de dos fluidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapia Ramirez, Zoili [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-09-01

    The work reported in this article presents the results of the effort to improve the basic understanding of the flow structure that is formed in a two fluid sprayer before and after the interaction between the sprayed fluid and the spraying fluid. The images in the interior of the mixing chamber of the atomizer are shown, which were taken with a high velocity video camera. Also the results of the numerical simulation of the internal flow obtained by means of a package of commercial modeling are shown. [Espanol] El trabajo reportado en este articulo presenta los resultados del esfuerzo por mejorar el entendimiento basico de la estructura del flujo que se forma en un atomizador de dos fluidos antes y despues de la interaccion entre el fluido atomizado y el fluido atomizante. Se muestran imagenes del flujo en el interior de la camara de mezclado del atomizador, las cuales fueron tomadas con una camara de video de alta velocidad. Tambien se incluyen los resultados de la simulacion numerica del flujo interno obtenidas por medio de un paquete de modelacion comercial.

  3. Basic Pilot Code Development for Two-Fluid, Three-Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Bae, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Chung, B. D.; Hwang, M.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, D. H

    2006-03-15

    A basic pilot code for one-dimensional, transient, two-fluid, three-field model has been developed. Using 9 conceptual problems, the basic pilot code has been verified. The results of the verification are summarized below: - It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, bubbly flow, slug/churn turbulent flow, annular-mist flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. A mist flow was not simulated, but it seems that the basic pilot code can simulate mist flow conditions. - The pilot code was programmed so that the source terms of the governing equations and numerical solution schemes can be easily tested. - The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. - It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. - It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. - During the simulation of a two-phase flow, the calculation reaches a quasisteady state with small-amplitude oscillations. The oscillations seem to be induced by some numerical causes. The research items for the improvement of the basic pilot code are listed in the last section of this report.

  4. Vorticity transport in shock driven plasma flows: A comparison of MHD and two-fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Daryl; Wheatley, Vincent; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in a plasma, through the application of a seed magnetic field, has been studied in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodymanics. These studies have shown that suppression is achieved through the transport of vorticity by magnetohydrodynamic waves away from a perturbed fluid-fluid interface where it was baroclinically generated by shock impact. The implementation of a more physically accurate, fully electromagnetic, two-fluid plasma representation allows a more realistic investigation of vorticity transport in shock driven plasma flows. Results comparing ideal one-dimensional two-fluid and magnetohydrodymanic flows are presented. Substantial increases in the complexity of the flow field and vorticity transport dynamics are observed with important ramifications for the stabilization of shock driven interfaces. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  5. Well-posedness and convergence of cfd two-fluid model for bubbly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidheeswaran, Avinash

    The current research is focused on developing a well-posed multidimensional CFD two-fluid model (TFM) for bubbly flows. Two-phase flows exhibit a wide range of local flow instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, plume and jet instabilities. They arise due to the density difference and/or the relative velocity between the two phases. A physically correct TFM is essential to model these instabilities. However, this is not the case with the TFMs in numerical codes, which can be shown to have complex eigenvalues due to incompleteness and hence are ill-posed as initial value problems. A common approach to regularize an incomplete TFM is to add artificial physics or numerically by using a coarse grid or first order methods. However, it eliminates the local physical instabilities along with the undesired high frequency oscillations resulting from the ill-posedness. Thus, the TFM loses the capability to predict the inherent local dynamics of the two-phase flow. The alternative approach followed in the current study is to introduce appropriate physical mechanisms that make the TFM well-posed. First a well-posed 1-D TFM for vertical bubbly flows is analyzed with characteristics, and dispersion analysis. When an incomplete TFM is used, it results in high frequency oscillations in the solution. It is demonstrated through the travelling void wave problem that, by adding the missing short wavelength physics to the numerical TFM, this can be removed by making the model well-posed. To extend the limit of well-posedness beyond the well-known TFM of Pauchon and Banerjee [1], the mechanism of collision is considered, and it is shown by characteristics analysis that the TFM then becomes well-posed for all void fractions of practical interest. The aforementioned ideas are then extended to CFD TFM. The travelling void wave problem is again used to demonstrate that by adding appropriate physics, the problem of ill-posedness is resolved. Furthermore, issues pertaining to

  6. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazarez-Candia, O., E-mail: ocazarez@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, Depto. de Metal-Mecanica, Calzada Tecnologico, No. 27, Zacatepec, Morelos 62780 (Mexico); Benitez-Centeno, O.C. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Depto. de Mecanica, Interior Internado Palmira s/n, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62490 (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, G. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av San Rafael Atlixco No 186, Col. Vicentina 55-534, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  7. Interpolated pressure laws in two-fluid simulations and hyperbolicity

    OpenAIRE

    Helluy, Philippe; Jung, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We consider a two-fluid compressible flow. Each fluid obeys a stiffened gas pressure law. The continuous model is well defined without considering mixture regions. However, for numerical applications it is often necessary to consider artificial mixtures, because the two-fluid interface is diffused by the numerical scheme. We show that classic pressure law interpolations lead to a non-convex hyperbolicity domain and failure of well-known numerical schemes. We propose a physically relevant pres...

  8. Verification of a Higher-Order Finite Difference Scheme for the One-Dimensional Two-Fluid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Fullmer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The one-dimensional two-fluid model is widely acknowledged as the most detailed and accurate macroscopic formulation model of the thermo-fluid dynamics in nuclear reactor safety analysis. Currently the prevailing one-dimensional thermal hydraulics codes are only first-order accurate. The benefit of first-order schemes is numerical viscosity, which serves as a regularization mechanism for many otherwise ill-posed two-fluid models. However, excessive diffusion in regions of large gradients leads to poor resolution of phenomena related to void wave propagation. In this work, a higher-order shock capturing method is applied to the basic equations for incompressible and isothermal flow of the one-dimensional two-fluid model. The higher-order accuracy is gained by a strong stability preserving multi-step scheme for the time discretization and a minmod flux limiter scheme for the convection terms. Additionally the use of a staggered grid allows for several second-order centered terms, when available. The continuity equations are first tested by manipulating the two-fluid model into a pair of linear wave equations and tested for smooth and discontinuous initial data. The two-fluid model is benchmarked with the water faucet problem. With the higher-order method, the ill-posed nature of the governing equations presents severe challenges due to a growing void fraction jump in the solution. Therefore the initial and boundary conditions of the problem are modified in order to eliminate a large counter-current flow pattern that develops. With the modified water faucet problem the numerical models behave well and allow a convergence study. Using the L1 norm of the liquid fraction, it is verified that the first and higher-order numerical schemes converge to the quasi-analytical solution at a rate of O(1/2 and O(2/3, respectively. It is also shown that the growing void jump is a contact discontinuity, i.e. it is a linearly degenerate wave. The sub

  9. Two Fluid Model: Application of Kappa-Maxwelian Distribution for Electrons and Bi-Maxwellian Distribution for Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Somayeh; Safari, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    This study presents two wind model with kappa-Maxwellian function for electrons and bi-Maxwellian distribution function for protons. A set of collesionless MHD equations derived applying zeroth to fourth order moments of Volaso equation and electromagnetic Maxwell equations for plasma. The resultant equations for electron temperatures (parallel and perpendicular relative to magnetic field line) and proton temperatures differ due to the different nature of distribution functions for electrons and protons. Also, we see that, the equations for electron heat flows and proton heat flows are different. This formalism of two fluid model is a useful tool for investigation of solar wind.

  10. Dynamic simulation of wavy-stratified two-phase flow with the one-dimensional two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullmer, William D.

    The one-dimensional two-fluid model is the basis for the description of the transport of mass, momentum and energy in the thermal-hydraulic codes used for nuclear reactor safety analysis. Unlike other physical transport models, the one-dimensional two-fluid model suffers from the possibility of being ill-posed as an initial-boundary value problem depending on the flow conditions and the relevant physical closure laws. Typically, the ill-posedness is dealt with through either excessive numerical damping or the addition of unphysical closure laws designed for the sole purpose of hyperbolization. Unfortunately both methods eliminate the instability along with the problem of ill-posedness causing the model to undoubtedly lose some of its inherent dynamic capability. In this work, a one-dimensional two-fluid model for horizontal or slightly inclined stratified flow is developed. Higher order physical models that are often neglected, such as surface tension and axial viscous stress, are retained for their short-wavelength stability properties. Characteristic, dispersion and nonlinear analyses are performed to demonstrate that the resulting model is linearly well-posed and nonlinearly well-behaved. While it has been known that higher-order differential terms are able to regularize the short-wavelength problem of ill-posedness without removing the long-wavelength instability, the literature is relatively silent on the consequences of using a model under linearly unstable conditions. Using carefully selected conditions in an idealized infinite domain, it is demonstrated for the first time that the one-dimensional two-fluid model exhibits chaotic behavior in addition to limit cycles and asymptotic stability. The chaotic behavior is a consequence of the long-wavelength linear instability (energy source) the nonlinearity (energy transfer) and the short-wavelength dissipation (energy sink). Since the model is chaotic, solutions exhibit a sensitive dependence on initial

  11. Experimental Validation of Methanol Crossover in a Three-dimensional, Two-Fluid Model of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional, steady-state, two-fluid, multi-component and non-isothermal DMFC model has been developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.). It accounts for the presence of micro porous layers, non-equilibrium phase change, and methanol and water uptake in the i......A fully coupled three-dimensional, steady-state, two-fluid, multi-component and non-isothermal DMFC model has been developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.). It accounts for the presence of micro porous layers, non-equilibrium phase change, and methanol and water uptake...... in the ionomer phase of the catalytic layer, and detailed membrane transport of methanol and water. In order to verify the models ability to predict methanol crossover, simulation results are compared with experimental measurements under different current densities along with air and methanol stoichiometries....... Methanol crossover is indirectly measured based on the combined anode and cathode exhaust CO2 mole fraction and by accounting for the CO2 production at the anode as a function of current density. This approach is simple and assumes that all crossed over methanol is oxidized. Moreover, it takes CO2...

  12. Large-amplitude internal solitary waves in a two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenne, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    We compute solitary wave solutions of a Hamiltonian model for large-amplitude long internal waves in a two-layer stratification. Computations are performed for values of the density and depth ratios close to oceanic conditions, and comparisons are made with solutions of both weakly and fully nonlinear models. It is shown that characteristic features of highly nonlinear solitary waves such as broadening are reproduced well by the present model. To cite this article: Ph. Guyenne, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  13. Water Balance Simulations of a PEM Fuel Cell Using a Two-Fluid Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, Madeleine; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2010-01-01

    A previously published computational multi-phase model of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell has been extended in order to account for the anode side and the electrolyte membrane. The model has been applied to study the water balance of a fuel cell during operation under various humidificat...... net water transport coefficient. Thus we can reduce flooding at the cathode and may obtain improved cell performance due to a better humidified membrane. The results also suggest that membrane dehydration may occur at either anode or cathode depending on the net water transport....

  14. A New Two-fluid Radiation-hydrodynamical Model for X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brent F.; Wolfram, Kenneth D.; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-02-01

    Previous research centered on the hydrodynamics in X-ray pulsar accretion columns has largely focused on the single-fluid model, in which the super-Eddington luminosity inside the column decelerates the flow to rest at the stellar surface. This type of model has been relatively successful in describing the overall properties of the accretion flows, but it does not account for the possible dynamical effect of the gas pressure. On the other hand, the most successful radiative transport models for pulsars generally do not include a rigorous treatment of the dynamical structure of the column, instead assuming an ad hoc velocity profile. In this paper, we explore the structure of X-ray pulsar accretion columns using a new, self-consistent, “two-fluid” model, which incorporates the dynamical effect of the gas and radiation pressures, the dipole variation of the magnetic field, the thermodynamic effect of all of the relevant coupling and cooling processes, and a rigorous set of physical boundary conditions. The model has six free parameters, which we vary in order to approximately fit the phase-averaged spectra in Her X-1, Cen X-3, and LMC X-4. In this paper, we focus on the dynamical results, which shed new light on the surface magnetic field strength, the inclination of the magnetic field axis relative to the rotation axis, the relative importance of gas and radiation pressures, and the radial variation of the ion, electron, and inverse-Compton temperatures. The results obtained for the X-ray spectra are presented in a separate paper.

  15. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data, Ulysses observations and a two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Using the empirical constraints provided by observations in the inner corona and in interplanetary space. we derive the flow properties of the solar wind using a two fluid model. Density and scale height temperatures are derived from White Light coronagraph observations on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa, from 1.16 to 5.5 R, in the two polar coronal holes on 11-12 Apr. 1993. Interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux are taken from the Ulysses south polar passage. By comparing the results of the model computations that fit the empirical constraints in the two coronal hole regions, we show how the effects of the line of sight influence the empirical inferences and subsequently the corresponding numerical results.

  16. Extinction properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The extinction spectra of a single-walled carbon nanotube are investigated, within the framework of the vector wave function method in conjunction with the hydrodynamic model. Both polarizations of the incident plane wave (TE and TM with respect to the x-z plane) are treated. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a two-dimensional electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account the different nature of the σ and π electrons. Numerical results show that strong interaction between the fluids gives rise to the splitting of the extinction spectra into two peaks in quantitative agreement with the π and σ + π plasmon energies.

  17. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi [Department of Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  18. Implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting in permeable microvessels: Comparison of two-fluid statistical transport model with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ChiBin, Zhang; XiaoHui, Lin, E-mail: lxh60@seu.edu.cn; ZhaoMin, Wang; ChangBao, Wang

    2017-03-15

    In experiments and theoretical analyses, this study examines the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) in microvessels. It also proposes a three-dimensional statistical transport model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels, which describes blood flow by the two-fluid (Casson and Newtonian) model. The model accounts for the permeable effect of the microvessel wall and the coupling effect between the blood flow and tissue fluid flow. The MDCPs move randomly through the microvessel, and their transport state is described by the Boltzmann equation. The regulated changes and factors affecting the CE of the MDCPs in the assisted magnetic targeting were obtained by solving the theoretical model and by experimental testing. The CE was negatively correlated with the blood flow velocity, and positively correlated with the external magnetic field intensity and microvessel permeability. The predicted CEs of the MDCPs were consistent with the experimental results. Additionally, under the same external magnetic field, the predicted CE was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model than in the model ignoring the permeability effect of the microvessel wall. - Highlights: • A model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels was established. • An experimental device was established, the CE of MDCPs was measured. • The predicted CE of MDCPs was 5–8% higher in the IA-MDT model.

  19. A self-standing two-fluid CFD model for vertical upward two-phase annular flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y., E-mail: yang_liu@mail.dlut.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning Province (China); Li, W.Z.; Quan, S.L. [Key Laboratory of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning Province (China)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: A mathematic model for two-phase annular flow is established in this paper. Pressure loss and wall shear stress increase with inlet gas and liquid flow velocities. Droplet mass fraction distribution exhibits a concave profile radially. - Abstract: In this paper, a new two-fluid CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model is proposed to simulate the vertical upward two-phase annular flow. This model solves the basic mass and momentum equations for the gas core region flow and the liquid film flow, where the basic governing equations are accounted for by the commercial CFD package Fluent6.3.26. The liquid droplet flow and the interfacial inter-phase effects are accounted for by the programmable interface of Fluent, UDF (user defined function). Unlike previous models, the present model includes the effect of liquid roll waves directly determined from the CFD code. It is able to provide more detailed and, the most important, self-standing information for both the gas core flow and the film flow as well as the inner tube wall situations.

  20. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data and a two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The flow properties of the solar wind from 1 R(sub s) to 1 AU were obtained using a two fluid model constrained by density and scale height temperatures derived from white light observations, as well as knowledge of the electron temperature in coronal holes. The observations were obtained with the white light coronographs on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa (Hawaii), in a north polar coronal hole from 1.16 to 5.5 R(sub s) on 11 Apr. 1993. By specifying the density, temperature, Alfven wave velocity amplitude and heating function at the coronal base, it was found that the model parameters fit well the constraints of the empirical density profiles and temperatures. The optimal range of the input parameters was found to yield a higher proton temperature than electron temperature in the inner corona. The results indicate that no preferential heating of the protons at larger distances is needed to produce higher proton than electron temperatures at 1 AU, as observed in the high speed solar wind.

  1. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  2. Development of Non-staggered, semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme for a two-fluid, three-field model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Yoon, H. Y.; Bae, S. W

    2007-11-15

    A pilot code for one-dimensional, transient, two-fluid, three-field model has been developed. In this code, the semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme has been adapted to a 'non-staggered' grid. Using several conceptual problems, the numerical scheme has been verified. The results of the verifications are summarized below: - It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, two-phase mixture flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. A mist flow was not simulated, but it seems that the basic pilot code can simulate mist flow conditions. - The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. - It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. - It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. The non-staggered, semi-implicit ICE numerical scheme, which has been developed in this study, will be a starting point of a new code development that adopts an unstructured finite volume method.

  3. Conceptual OOP design of Pilot Code for Two-Fluid, Three-field Model with C++ 6.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B. D.; Lee, Y. J

    2006-09-15

    To establish the concept of the objective oriented program (OOP) design for reactor safety analysis code, the preliminary OOP design for PILOT code, which based on one dimensional two fluid three filed model, has been attempted with C++ language feature. Microsoft C++ language has been used since it is available as groupware utilization in KAERI. The language has can be merged with Compac Visual Fortran 6.6 in Visual Studio platform. In the development platform, C++ has been used as main language and Fortran has been used as mixed language in connection with C++ main drive program. The mixed language environment is a specific feature provided in visual studio. Existing Fortran source was utilized for input routine of reading steam table from generated file and routine of steam property calculation. The calling convention and passing argument from C++ driver was corrected. The mathematical routine, such as inverse matrix conversion and tridiagonal matrix solver, has been used as PILOT Fortran routines. Simple volume and junction utilized in PILOT code can be treated as objects, since they are the basic construction elements of code system. Other routines for overall solution scheme have been realized as procedure C functions. The conceptual design which consists of hydraulic loop, component, volume, and junction class has been described in the appendix in order to give the essential OOP structure of system safety analysis code. The attempt shows that many part of system analysis code can be expressed as objects, although the overall structure should be maintained as procedure functions. The encapsulation of data and functions within an object can provide many beneficial aspects in programming of system code.

  4. Two-fluid and magnetohydrodynamic modelling of magnetic reconnection in the MAST spherical tokamak and the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Browning, P K; Evans, M; Lucini, F Arese; Lukin, V S; McClements, K G; Stanier, A

    2015-01-01

    Twisted magnetic flux ropes are ubiquitous in space and laboratory plasmas, and the merging of such flux ropes through magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism for restructuring magnetic fields and releasing free magnetic energy. The merging-compression scenario is one possible start up scheme for spherical tokamaks, which has been used on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak MAST. Two current-carrying plasma rings, or flux ropes, approach each other through the mutual attraction of their like currents, and merge, through magnetic reconnection, into a single plasma torus, with substantial plasma heating. 2D resistive MHD and Hall MHD simulations of this process are reported, and new results for the temperature distribution of ions and electrons are presented. A model of the based on relaxation theory is also described, which is now extended to tight aspect ratio geometry. This model allows prediction of the final merged state and the heating. The implications of the relaxation model for heating of the solar ...

  5. Three-dimensional fluidized beds with rough spheres : Validation of a Two Fluid Model by Magnetic Particle Tracking and discrete particle simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, L.; Padding, J.T.; Buist, K. A.; Kuipers, J.

    2017-01-01

    Two fluid model simulations based on our recently introduced kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF) for rough spheres and rough walls, are validated for the first time for full three-dimensional (3D) bubbling fluidized beds. The validation is performed by comparing with experimental data from

  6. Compressibility effects in turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubesin, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical turbulence modeling is discussed with attention given to fluid property variations caused by compressibility in an adiabatic flow. The models are considered in terms of integral quantities expressed by ordinary differential equations and by those formulated as partial differential equations. Compressibility corrections for both integral and partial differential methods are reviewed. Eddy-viscosity models are explored for their capability to characterize the mass-weighted Reynolds stress, which can be accounted for with primitive and/or mass-weighted variables. Compressible flow simulations are currently constrained to low Re and zero mean dilation. The effects of compressibility are defined in wave number space by resolving the Fourier transforms of the velocity vectors into components which are perpendicular and parallel to the wave number vector. Statistical correlations then permit obtaining a value for each contribution.

  7. Analysis of the two-fluid model and the drift-flux model for numerical calculation of two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munkejord, Svend Tollak

    2006-05-11

    This thesis analyses models for two-phase flows and methods for the numerical resolution of these models. It is therefore one contribution to the development of reliable design tools for multiphase applications. Such tools are needed and expected by engineers in a range of fields, including in the oil and gas industry. The approximate Riemann solver of Roe has been studied. Roe schemes for three different two-phase flow models have been implemented in the framework of a standard numerical algorithm for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws. The schemes have been analysed by calculation of benchmark tests from the literature, and by comparison with each other. A Roe scheme for the four-equation one-pressure two-fluid model has been implemented, and a second-order extension based on wave decomposition and flux-difference splitting was shown to work well and to give improved results compared to the first-order scheme. The convergence properties of the scheme were tested on smooth and discontinuous solutions. A Roe scheme has been proposed for a five-equation two-pressure two-fluid model with pressure relaxation. The use of analogous numerical methods for the five-equation and four-equation models allowed for a direct comparison of a method with and without pressure relaxation. Numerical experiments demonstrated that the two approaches converged to the same results, but that the five-equation pressure-relaxation method was significantly more dissipative, particularly for contact discontinuities. Furthermore, even though the five-equation model with instantaneous pressure relaxation has real eigenvalues, the calculations showed that it produced oscillations for cases where the four-equation model had complex eigenvalues. A Roe scheme has been constructed for the drift-flux model with general closure laws. For the case of the Zuber-Findlay slip law describing bubbly flows, the Roe matrix is completely analytical. Hence the present Roe scheme is more efficient than

  8. Experiment-Model Comparisons of Turbulence, Transport, and Flows in a Magnetized Linear Plasma Using a Global Two-Fluid Braginskii Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, M.; Fisher, D. M.; Kelly, R. F.; Hatch, M. W.; Rogers, B. N.

    2017-10-01

    Ongoing experiments and numerical modeling of the dynamics of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the presence of flow shear are being conducted in helicon plasmas in the linear HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) device. Modeling is being done using GBS, a 3D, global two-fluid Braginskii code that solves self-consistently for plasma equilibrium as well as fluctuations. Past experimental measurements of flows have been difficult to reconcile with simple expectations, such as azimuthal flows being dominated by Er x Bz rotation. Therefore, recent measurements have focused on understanding plasma flows, and the role of neutral dynamics. In the model, a set of two-fluid drift-reduced Braginskii equations are evolved using the Global Braginskii Solver Code (GBS). For low-field helicon-sourced Ar plasmas a non-negligible cross-field thermal collisional term must be added to shift the electric potential in the ion momentum and vorticity equations as the ions are unmagnetized. Significant radially and axially dependent neutral profiles are also included in the simulations to try and match those observed in HelCat. Ongoing simulations show a mode dependence on the axial magnetic field along with strong axial variations that suggest drift waves may be important in the low-field case. Supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Award 1500423.

  9. Thermal Hydraulic Modeling of Once-Through Steam Generator by Two-Fluid U-Tube Steam Generator Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zeighami

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The THERMIT U-tube steam generator (THERMIT-UTSG code was used for evaluation for the parametric study of a scaled once-through pressurized water reactor steam generator (OTSG made by Babcock & Wilcox. The results of the code were compared to the experimental data of the 19-tube OTSG and a simple heat transfer code that was developed by Osakabe. The main calculated thermodynamic parameters were primary-secondary fluid temperatures, tube wall internal and external temperatures that were subjected to primary and the secondary fluid, and the secondary fluid vapor quality. The assessed code can be used for modeling the OTSGs with some modification. The results of THERMIT-UTSG were in agreement with the experimental results and the prediction of Osakabe’s numerical model.

  10. A two-fluid two-phase model for thermal-hydraulic analysis of a U-tube steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Huanjen; Chieng, Chingchang; Pei, Baushei (National Tsinghua Univ, Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China)); Wang, Songfeng (Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Lungtan (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-02-01

    The Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code for Nuclear Steam Generators (ATHANS) was developed on the basis of the THERMIT-UTSG computer code for U-tube steam generators. The main features of the ATHANS model are as follows: (a) the equations are solved in cylindrical coordinates, (b) the number and the arrangement of the control volumes inside the steam generator can be chosen by the user, (c) the virtual mass effect is incorporated, and (d) the conjugate gradient squared method is employed to accelerate and improve the numerical convergence. The performance of the model is successfully validated by comparison with the test data from a Westinghouse model F steam generator at the Maanshan nuclear power plant. Better agreement with the test data can be obtained by a finer grid system using a cylindrical coordinate system and the virtual mass effect. With these advanced features, ATHANS provides the basic framework for further studies on the problems of steam generators, such as analyses of secondary-side corrosion and tube ruptures.

  11. One-dimensional two-fluid model for wavy flow beyond the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability: Limit cycles and chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Bertodano, Martín, E-mail: bertodan@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Fullmer, William D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, U. of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2016-12-15

    A 1D TFM numerical simulation of near horizontal stratified two-phase flow is performed where the TFM, including surface tension and viscous stresses, is simplified to a two-equation model using the fixed-flux approximation. As the angle of inclination of the channel increases so does the driving body force, so the flow becomes KH unstable, and waves grow and develop nonlinearities. It is shown that these waves grow until they reach a limit cycle due to viscous dissipation at wave fronts. Upon further inclination of the channel, chaos is observed. The appearance of chaos in a 1D TFM implies a nonlinear process that transfers energy intermittently from long wavelengths where energy is produced to short wavelengths where energy is dissipated by viscosity, so that an averaged energy equilibrium in frequency space is attained. This is comparable to the well-known turbulent stability mechanism of the multi-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations, i.e., chaos implies Lyapunov stability, but in this case it is strictly a two-phase phenomenon.

  12. Unsteady compressible two-fluid flow model for interface capturing. On the dynamics of a shock-bubble interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Kreeft (Jasper)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractMulti-fluid flows are found in many applications in engineering and physics. Examples of these flows from engineering are water-air flows in ship hydrodynamics, exhaust-air flows behind rockets, gas-petrolea flows in upstream pipes of oil rigs, air-fuel bubble interaction flows in

  13. Water holdup estimation from pressure drop measurements in oil-water two-phase flows by means of the two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, L. P. M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Sotgia, G.; Babakhani Dehkordi, P.; Lucchini, A.

    2017-11-01

    The Two-Fluid Model (TFM) has been applied to determine water holdup from pressure drop measurements for core-annular flows in horizontal pipes. The fluids are Milpar 220 oil (ρo=890 kg/m3, μo=0.832 Pa·s at 20 °C) and tap water (μw=1.026×10-3 Pa·s at 20 °C). The investigated volume flow rates range from 2 to 6 m3/h, for water, and from 1 to 3.5 m3/h, for oil, respectively. The results are in very good agreement with available experimental data from the literature and a simple correlation between water holdup and water input fraction has been benchmarked to the overall data set. Eventually, the TFM endowed with the holdup correlation has been adopted to predict the pressure drop with quite satisfactory results: 98% of data fall within a percentage error of ±10%, 99% of the data fall within ±15%, and all the data are predicted within ±20%. On the other hand, the mean absolute relative error for the pressure drop reduction factor is 5.5%.

  14. Edge turbulence and divertor heat flux width simulations of Alcator C-Mod discharges using an electromagnetic two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Xia, T. Y.; Porkolab, M.; Edlund, E.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J.; Hughes, J. W.; Mao, S. F.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, Y. X.

    2017-11-01

    The BOUT++ code has been exploited in order to improve the understanding of the role of turbulent modes in controlling edge transport and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width. For the C-Mod enhanced D_α (EDA) H-mode discharges, BOUT++ six-field two-fluid nonlinear simulations show a reasonable agreement of upstream turbulence and divertor target heat flux behavior: (a) the simulated quasi-coherent modes show consistent characteristics of the frequency versus poloidal wave number spectra of the electromagnetic fluctuations when compared with experimental measurements: frequencies are around 60-120 kHz (experiment: about 70-110 kHz), k_θ are around 2.0 cm-1 which is similar to the phase contrast imaging data; (b) linear spectrum analysis is consistent with the nonlinear phase relationship calculation which indicates the dominance of resistive-ballooning modes and drift-Alfven wave instabilities; (c) the SOL heat flux width λq versus current I p scaling is reproduced by turbulent transport: the simulations yield similar λq to experimental measurements within a factor of 2. However the magnitudes of divertor heat fluxes can be varied, depending on the physics models, sources and sinks, sheath boundary conditions, or flux limiting coefficient; (d) Simple estimate by the ‘2-point model’ for λq is consistent with simulation. Moreover, blobby turbulent spreading is confirmed for these relatively high B p shots.

  15. Numerical analysis of ion temperature effects to the plasma wall transition using a one-dimensional two-fluid model. I. Finite Debye to ionization length ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyergyek, T; Kovačič, J

    2017-06-01

    A one-dimensional, two-fluid, steady state model is used for the analysis of ion temperature effects to the plasma-wall transition. In this paper, the model is solved for a finite ratio ε between the Debye and the ionization length, while in Part II [T. Gyergyek and J. Kovačič, Phys Plasmas 24, 063506 (2017)], the solutions for [Formula: see text] are presented. Ion temperature is treated as a given, independent parameter and it is included in the model as a boundary condition. It is shown that when the ion temperature larger than zero is selected, the ion flow velocity and the electric field at the boundary must be consistent with the selected ion temperature. A numerical procedure, how to determine such "consistent boundary conditions," is proposed, and a simple relation between the ion temperature and ion velocity at the boundary of the system is found. The effects of the ion temperature to the pre-sheath length, potential, ion temperature, and ion density drops in the pre-sheath and in the sheath are investigated. It is concluded that larger ion temperature results in a better shielding of the plasma from the wall. An attempt is made to include the ion heat flux q i into the model in its simplest form [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is a constant heat conduction coefficient. It is shown that inclusion of such a term into the energy transfer equation introduces an additional ion heating mechanism into the system and the ion flow then becomes isothermal instead of adiabatic even in the sheath.

  16. Numerical analysis of ion temperature effects to the plasma wall transition using a one-dimensional two-fluid model. II. Asymptotic two-scale limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2017-06-01

    A one-dimensional, steady state, two fluid model, presented in Part I [T. Gyergyek and J. Kovačič, Phys. Plasmas 24, 063505 (2017)] is extended to the asymptotic two-scale limit. Separate solutions in the pre-sheath and in the sheath region are presented. Ion temperature is treated as an independent parameter, which is included in the model as a boundary condition. For the pre-sheath solutions, it is shown that when the ion temperature is increased, the ion flow velocity at the boundary of the system must also be increased. A simple relationship between ion temperature and ion flow velocity at the boundary is found. This relationship is the same as the corresponding relationship found in Part I. If ion temperature is increased, both the potential drop and the density drop in the pre-sheath decrease. The same is true for the pre-sheath length. As for the solutions in the sheath scale, it is shown that the ion velocity, electron velocity, and electric field at the sheath edge must all be above a certain minimum value in order to obtain physically acceptable monotonic solutions. It is proposed to select the ion velocity at the sheath edge equal to the ion sound velocity. If, at the same time, the zero electron flow velocity at the sheath edge is selected, the electric field at the sheath edge must be larger than roughly 3 × 10-6, in order to obtain monotonic solutions of the model. The selection of the electron velocity at the sheath edge is elaborated extensively. It is concluded that increased ion temperature improves the shielding of the plasma from the electrode.

  17. An interfacial shear term evaluation study for adiabatic dispersed air–water two-phase flow with the two-fluid model using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Schlegel, J.P. [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Buchanan, J.R.; Hogan, K.J. [Bettis Laboratory, Naval Nuclear Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA (United States); Guilbert, P.W. [ANSYS UK Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Closure form of the interfacial shear term in three-dimensional form is investigated. • Assessment against adiabatic upward bubbly air–water flow data using CFD. • Effect of addition of the interfacial shear term on the phase distribution. - Abstract: In commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as ANSYS CFX and Fluent, the interfacial shear term is missing in the field momentum equations. The derivation of the two-fluid model (Ishii and Hibiki, 2011) indicates the presence of this term as a momentum source in the right hand side of the field momentum equation. The inclusion of this term is considered important for proper modeling of the interfacial momentum coupling between phases. For separated flows, such as annular flow, the importance of the shear term is understood in the one-dimensional (1-D) form as the major mechanism by which the wall shear is transferred to the gas phase (Ishii and Mishima, 1984). For gas dispersed two-phase flow CFD simulations, it is important to assess the significance of this term in the prediction of phase distributions. In the first part of this work, the closure of this term in three-dimensional (3-D) form in a CFD code is investigated. For dispersed gas–liquid flow, such as bubbly or churn-turbulent flow, bubbles are dispersed in the shear layer of the continuous phase. The continuous phase shear stress is mainly due to the presence of the wall and the modeling of turbulence through the Boussinesq hypothesis. In a 3-D simulation, the continuous phase shear stress can be calculated from the continuous fluid velocity gradient, so that the interfacial shear term can be closed using the local values of the volume fraction and the total stress of liquid phase. This form also assures that the term acts as an action-reaction force for multiple phases. In the second part of this work, the effect of this term on the volume fraction distribution is investigated. For testing the model two

  18. A Comparison of the Computation Times of Thermal Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium Models of Droplet Field in a Two-Fluid Three-Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Cho, Heong Kyu; Kim, Jong Tae; Yoon, Han Young; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2007-12-15

    A computational model for transient, 3 dimensional 2 phase flows was developed by using 'unstructured-FVM-based, non-staggered, semi-implicit numerical scheme' considering the thermally non-equilibrium droplets. The assumption of the thermally equilibrium between liquid and droplets of previous studies was not used any more, and three energy conservation equations for vapor, liquid, liquid droplets were set up. Thus, 9 conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy were established to simulate 2 phase flows. In this report, the governing equations and a semi-implicit numerical sheme for a transient 1 dimensional 2 phase flows was described considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets. The comparison with the previous model considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets was also reported.

  19. Linear and nonlinear analysis of an unstable, but well-posed, one-dimensional two-fluid model for two-phase flow based on the inviscid Kelvin–Helmholtz instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullmer, William D.; Ransom, Victor H.; Lopez de Bertodano, Martin A., E-mail: bertodan@purdue.edu

    2014-03-15

    For nuclear reactor safety analysis, the one-dimensional two-fluid model equations are solved numerically with the first order upwind method because of its robust stability. In the present two-fluid model for horizontal stratified flow, surface tension is included because it makes the model well-posed. However, this is not done in industrial applications and numerical viscosity provides linear stabilization even when the model is ill-posed. It is now shown that numerical viscosity also provides nonlinear stabilization; meaning that the wave growth is bounded when the flow is unstable (e.g., in case of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability). The formation of kinematic shocks in the presence of numerical viscosity provides the dissipation mechanism needed to stop the wave growth. However, numerical viscosity varies with the mesh size, which means that even though the unstable model is well-posed and meets von Neumann and nonlinear stabilization requirements, the solution does not converge for some short wavelengths greater than 2Δx. Furthermore, when the mesh size is large, significant artificial viscosity is added to the continuity and momentum equations and the model may become over-stabilized. A more scientific approach is proposed: to add a physical dissipation mechanism instead of numerical viscosity, i.e., Reynolds stresses. This approach has two advantages: first, the one-dimensional two-fluid model converges under severe dynamic conditions, such as the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability, and second, a higher order numerical method may be used instead of the first order upwind scheme without experiencing numerical excursions.

  20. Error Resilient Video Compression Using Behavior Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacco R. Taal

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless and Internet video applications are inherently subjected to bit errors and packet errors, respectively. This is especially so if constraints on the end-to-end compression and transmission latencies are imposed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods to optimize the video compression parameters and the rate allocation of these applications that take into account residual channel bit errors. In this paper, we study the behavior of a predictive (interframe video encoder and model the encoders behavior using only the statistics of the original input data and of the underlying channel prone to bit errors. The resulting data-driven behavior models are then used to carry out group-of-pictures partitioning and to control the rate of the video encoder in such a way that the overall quality of the decoded video with compression and channel errors is optimized.

  1. Artificial Neural Network Model for Predicting Compressive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim T. Yousif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Compressive strength of concrete is a commonly used criterion in evaluating concrete. Although testing of the compressive strength of concrete specimens is done routinely, it is performed on the 28th day after concrete placement. Therefore, strength estimation of concrete at early time is highly desirable. This study presents the effort in applying neural network-based system identification techniques to predict the compressive strength of concrete based on concrete mix proportions, maximum aggregate size (MAS, and slump of fresh concrete. Back-propagation neural networks model is successively developed, trained, and tested using actual data sets of concrete mix proportions gathered from literature.    The test of the model by un-used data within the range of input parameters shows that the maximum absolute error for model is about 20% and 88% of the output results has absolute errors less than 10%. The parametric study shows that water/cement ratio (w/c is the most significant factor  affecting the output of the model.     The results showed that neural networks has strong potential as a feasible tool for predicting compressive strength of concrete.

  2. Study Of Compressibility Corrections To Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    Effects on shear layers in simulated confined and unconfined flows studied. Report presents comparative study of some terms that correct for effects of compressibility in standard k-epsilon mathematical model of turbulence where k denotes turbulence kinetic energy and epsilon denotes rate of dissipation of turbulence kenetic energy. Involved simulation of flows by numerical solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. Gmz: a Gml Compression Model for Webgis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, A.; Rajan, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    Geography markup language (GML) is an XML specification for expressing geographical features. Defined by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), it is widely used for storage and transmission of maps over the Internet. XML schemas provide the convenience to define custom features profiles in GML for specific needs as seen in widely popular cityGML, simple features profile, coverage, etc. Simple features profile (SFP) is a simpler subset of GML profile with support for point, line and polygon geometries. SFP has been constructed to make sure it covers most commonly used GML geometries. Web Feature Service (WFS) serves query results in SFP by default. But it falls short of being an ideal choice due to its high verbosity and size-heavy nature, which provides immense scope for compression. GMZ is a lossless compression model developed to work for SFP compliant GML files. Our experiments indicate GMZ achieves reasonably good compression ratios and can be useful in WebGIS based applications.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic motion of a two-fluid plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, J. W.

    2017-08-01

    The two-fluid Maxwell system couples frictionless electrons and ion fluids via Maxwell's equations. When the frequencies of light waves, Langmuir waves, and single-particle cyclotron motion are scaled to be asymptotically large, the two-fluid Maxwell system becomes a fast-slow dynamical system. This fast-slow system admits a formally exact single-fluid closure that may be computed systematically with any desired order of accuracy through the use of a functional partial differential equation. In the leading order approximation, the closure reproduces magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Higher order truncations of the closure give an infinite hierarchy of extended MHD models that allow for arbitrary mass ratio, as well as perturbative deviations from charge neutrality. The closure is interpreted geometrically as an invariant slow manifold in the infinite-dimensional two-fluid phase space, on which two-fluid motions are free of high-frequency oscillations. This perspective shows that the full closure inherits a Hamiltonian structure from the two-fluid theory. By employing infinite-dimensional Lie transforms, the Poisson bracket for the all-order closure may be obtained in the closed form. Thus, conservative truncations of the single-fluid closure may be obtained by simply truncating the single-fluid Hamiltonian. Moreover, the closed-form expression for the all-order bracket gives explicit expressions for a number of the full closure's conservation laws. Notably, the full closure, as well as any of its Hamiltonian truncations, admits a pair of independent circulation invariants.

  5. Development of hyperbolic solution method for two fluids equation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Jae; Chang, Won Pyo

    1997-07-01

    Using the concept of surface tension thickness, the mathematical ill-posedness of the two fluids equation system can now be removed by splitting the pressure discontinuity of the two fluids interface. The bulk modulus L1 and L2 derived from the concept of surface tension thickness makes two fluids equation system hyperbolic type. The hyperbolic equation system has five complete sets of eigenvectors, each of which having real eigenvalues. Three sets of them represents the propagation speeds of the physical properties for individual flow regimes such as the dispersed, the slug, and the separated flows. The propagation characteristics of these eigenvalues have good agreements with both the experimental data and other theoretical results in two-phase mixture. The feature of the hyperbolic model allows to apply advanced numerical upwind technique such as Flux vector splitting (FVS) method. The numerical test show that the characteristics of equation system clearly classify all flow regimes. (author). 25 refs., 3 tabs., 20 figs.

  6. Validation of a two-fluid model used for the simulation of dense fluidized beds; Validation d`un modele a deux fluides applique a la simulation des lits fluidises denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelle, A.

    1997-02-17

    A two-fluid model applied to the simulation of gas-solid dense fluidized beds is validated on micro scale and on macro scale. Phase coupling is carried out in the momentum and energy transport equation of both phases. The modeling is built on the kinetic theory of granular media in which the gas action has been taken into account in order to get correct expressions of transport coefficients. A description of hydrodynamic interactions between particles in high Stokes number flow is also incorporated in the model. The micro scale validation uses Lagrangian numerical simulations viewed as numerical experiments. The first validation case refers to a gas particle simple shear flow. It allows to validate the competition between two dissipation mechanisms: drag and particle collisions. The second validation case is concerted with sedimenting particles in high Stokes number flow. It allows to validate our approach of hydrodynamic interactions. This last case had led us to develop an original Lagrangian simulation with a two-way coupling between the fluid and the particles. The macro scale validation uses the results of Eulerian simulations of dense fluidized bed. Bed height, particles circulation and spontaneous created bubbles characteristics are studied and compared to experimental measurement, both looking at physical and numerical parameters. (author) 159 refs.

  7. Geometrical modeling of fibrous materials under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Benoit; Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2007-10-01

    Many fibrous materials such as nonwovens are consolidated via compaction rolls in a so-called calendering process. Hot rolls compress the fiber assembly and cause fiber-to-fiber bonding resulting in a strong yet porous structure. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for generating three dimensional virtual fiberwebs and simulating the geometrical changes that happen to the structure during the calendering process. Fibers are assumed to be continuous filaments with square cross sections lying randomly in the x or y direction. The fibers are assumed to be flexible to allow bending over one another during the compression process. Lateral displacement is not allowed during the compaction process. The algorithm also does not allow the fibers to interpenetrate or elongate and so the mass of the fibers is conserved. Bending of the fibers is modeled either by considering a constant "slope of bending" or constant "span of bending." The influence of the bending parameters on the propagation of compression through the material's thickness is discussed. In agreement with our experimental observations, it was found that the average solid volume fraction profile across the thickness becomes U shaped after the calendering. The application of these virtual structures in studying transport phenomena in fibrous materials is also demonstrated.

  8. A new model of marine sediment compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kylara; Wood, Warren

    2017-11-01

    Marine sediments cover two-thirds of the earth, and porosity (or void ratio) is a major controlling parameter in virtually every model of seafloor properties, including strength, sound speed, hydrology, thermal conductivity, and electrical resistivity. Our new model of void ratio (e) is based on the proportional void ratio, [ep = (e -er) / (e0 -er)], where e0 is the depositional maximum at the sea floor, and er is the minimum residual void ratio at depth. We assume the values of e0 and er are inherent characteristics of the sediment type. Our model further defines the compression index Cc to be the square root of the proportional void ratio (Cc (e) =(ep) 1 / 2). This new formulation establishes a direct relation between void ratio and effective stress: e =(e0 -er) - 1[log10 ⁡ (σ0 / σ) + 2 (e0 -er) ] 2 / 4 +er and exhibits several advantages over previous models that we demonstrate with compression test data from the Gulf of Mexico and Nankai Trough.

  9. Modelling and numerical simulation of two-phase flows using the two-fluid two-pressure approach; Modelisation et simulation numerique des ecoulements diphasiques par une approche bifluide a deux pressions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemaud, V

    2007-03-15

    This thesis is devoted to the modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor flows. In order to describe these phase transition flows, a two-fluid two-pressure approach is considered. This description of the liquid-vapor mixing is associated to the seven-equation model introduced by Baer and Nunziato. This work investigates the properties of this model in order to simulate the phase transition flows occurring in nuclear engineering. First, a theoretical thermodynamic framework is constructed to describe the liquid-vapor mixing. Provided with this framework, various modelling choices are suggested for the interaction terms between the phases. These closure laws comply with an entropy inequality. The mathematical properties of this model are thereafter examined. The convective part is associated to a nonconservative hyperbolic system. First, we focus on the definition of its weak solutions. Several flow regimes for the two-phase mixing derive from this analysis. Such regimes for the two-phase flows are analogous to the torrential and fluvial regimes for the shallow-water equations. Furthermore, we establish the linear and nonlinear stabilities of the liquid-vapor equilibrium. Finally, the implementation of a turbulence model and the introduction of a reconstruction process for the interfacial area are investigated in order to refine the description of the interfacial transfers. Using a fractional step approach, a Finite Volume method is at last constructed to simulate this model. First, various nonconservative adaptations of standard Riemann solvers are developed to approach the convective part. Unlike the classic nonconservative framework, these schemes converge towards the same solution. Furthermore, a new relaxation scheme is proposed to approach the interfacial transfers. Provided with these schemes, the whole numerical method preserves the liquid-vapor equilibria. Using this numerical method, a careful comparison between the one- and two-pressure two-fluid

  10. Breaking of rod-shaped model material during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kulaviak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The breakage of a model anisometric dry granular material caused by uniaxial compression was studied. The bed of uniform rod-like pasta particles (8 mm long, aspect ratio 1:8 was compressed (Gamlen Tablet Press and their size distribution was measured after each run (Dynamic Image Analysing. The compression dynamics was recorded and the effect of several parameters was tested (rate of compression, volume of granular bed, pressure magnitude and mode of application. Besides the experiments, numerical modelling of the compressed breakable material was performed as well, employing the DEM approach (Discrete Element Method. The comparison between the data and the model looks promising.

  11. Breaking of rod-shaped model material during compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Kulaviak; Vera, Penkavova; Marek, Ruzicka; Miroslav, Puncochar; Petr, Zamostny; Zdenek, Grof; Frantisek, Stepanek; Marek, Schongut; Jaromir, Havlica

    2017-06-01

    The breakage of a model anisometric dry granular material caused by uniaxial compression was studied. The bed of uniform rod-like pasta particles (8 mm long, aspect ratio 1:8) was compressed (Gamlen Tablet Press) and their size distribution was measured after each run (Dynamic Image Analysing). The compression dynamics was recorded and the effect of several parameters was tested (rate of compression, volume of granular bed, pressure magnitude and mode of application). Besides the experiments, numerical modelling of the compressed breakable material was performed as well, employing the DEM approach (Discrete Element Method). The comparison between the data and the model looks promising.

  12. Integer Set Compression and Statistical Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, N. Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Compression of integer sets and sequences has been extensively studied for settings where elements follow a uniform probability distribution. In addition, methods exist that exploit clustering of elements in order to achieve higher compression performance. In this work, we address the case where......, and discuss general properties and possibilities for this class of compression problem....

  13. System of closing relations of a two-fluid model for the HYDRA-IBRAE/LM/V1 code for calculation of sodium boiling in channels of power equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, E. V.; Butov, A. A.; Dugarov, G. A.; Kudasov, I. G.; Lezhnin, S. I.; Mosunova, N. A.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2017-07-01

    The system of equations from a two-fluid model is widely used in modeling thermohydraulic processes during accidents in nuclear reactors. The model includes conservation equations governing the balance of mass, momentum, and energy in each phase of the coolant. The features of heat and mass transfer, as well as of mechanical interaction between phases or with the channel wall, are described by a system of closing relations. Properly verified foreign and Russian codes with a comprehensive system of closing relations are available to predict processes in water coolant. As to the sodium coolant, only a few open publications on this subject are known. A complete system of closing relations used in the HYDRA-IBRAE/LM/V1 thermohydraulic code for calculation of sodium boiling in channels of power equipment is presented. The selection of these relations is corroborated on the basis of results of analysis of available publications with an account taken of the processes occurring in liquid sodium. A comparison with approaches outlined in foreign publications is presented. Particular attention has been given to the calculation of the sodium two-phase flow boiling. The flow regime map and a procedure for the calculation of interfacial friction and heat transfer in a sodium flow with account taken of high conductivity of sodium are described in sufficient detail. Correlations are presented for calculation of heat transfer for a single-phase sodium flow, sodium flow boiling, and sodium flow boiling crisis. A method is proposed for prediction of flow boiling crisis initiation.

  14. Economic Modeling of Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Bo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the variable nature of wind resources, the increasing penetration level of wind power will have a significant impact on the operation and planning of the electric power system. Energy storage systems are considered an effective way to compensate for the variability of wind generation. This paper presents a detailed production cost simulation model to evaluate the economic value of compressed air energy storage (CAES in systems with large-scale wind power generation. The co-optimization of energy and ancillary services markets is implemented in order to analyze the impacts of CAES, not only on energy supply, but also on system operating reserves. Both hourly and 5-minute simulations are considered to capture the economic performance of CAES in the day-ahead (DA and real-time (RT markets. The generalized network flow formulation is used to model the characteristics of CAES in detail. The proposed model is applied on a modified IEEE 24-bus reliability test system. The numerical example shows that besides the economic benefits gained through energy arbitrage in the DA market, CAES can also generate significant profits by providing reserves, compensating for wind forecast errors and intra-hour fluctuation, and participating in the RT market.

  15. Error Resilient Video Compression Using Behavior Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, J.R.; Chen, Z.; He, Y.; Lagendijk, R.I.L.

    2004-01-01

    Wireless and Internet video applications are inherently subjected to bit errors and packet errors, respectively. This is especially so if constraints on the end-to-end compression and transmission latencies are imposed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods to optimize the video compression

  16. Two-fluid turbulence including electron inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrés, Nahuel, E-mail: nandres@iafe.uba.ar; Gómez, Daniel [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CC. 67, suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, Carlos; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    We present a full two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure, and electron inertia. According to this description, each plasma species introduces a new spatial scale: the ion inertial length λ{sub i} and the electron inertial length λ{sub e}, which are not present in the traditional MHD description. In the present paper, we seek for possible changes in the energy power spectrum in fully developed turbulent regimes, using numerical simulations of the two-fluid equations in two-and-a-half dimensions. We have been able to reproduce different scaling laws in different spectral ranges, as it has been observed in the solar wind for the magnetic energy spectrum. At the smallest wavenumbers where plain MHD is valid, we obtain an inertial range following a Kolmogorov k{sup −5∕3} law. For intermediate wavenumbers such that λ{sub i}{sup −1}≪k≪λ{sub e}{sup −1}, the spectrum is modified to a k{sup −7∕3} power-law, as has also been obtained for Hall-MHD neglecting electron inertia terms. When electron inertia is retained, a new spectral region given by k>λ{sub e}{sup −1} arises. The power spectrum for magnetic energy in this region is given by a k{sup −11∕3} power law. Finally, when the terms of electron inertia are retained, we study the self-consistent electric field. Our results are discussed and compared with those obtained in the solar wind observations and previous simulations.

  17. Mathematical Model for the Optimization of Compressive Strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These mathematical models are adopted for optimization of strength of sandcrete block in compression. With the model, any desired strength of sandcrete block, given any mix proportions, is easily evaluated. Basic Language is used in the development of the computer program. The maximum compressive strength ...

  18. Comparison of Single and Two-Fluid Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Antoine

    The results of the "0D" analyses gathered in Tables 5.1 and 6.1 and discussed in Sects. 5.3 and 6.2 provide the basis for comparing Dam's ?-ɛ and Awe's two-fluid models as outlined in Table 7.1. No further comments will be given on this comparison except for one specific point that is crucial to modeling: the energy dissipation circuits. The representation of these circuits in Table 7.1 is rearranged and simplified from Figs. 5.1 and 6.4.

  19. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, Marc, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matemàtiques i Informàtica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given.

  20. Two-Fluid Theory for Spin Superfluidity in Magnetic Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flebus, B; Bender, S A; Tserkovnyak, Y; Duine, R A

    2016-03-18

    We investigate coupled spin and heat transport in easy-plane magnetic insulators. These materials display a continuous phase transition between normal and condensate states that is controlled by an external magnetic field. Using hydrodynamic equations supplemented by Gross-Pitaevski phenomenology and magnetoelectric circuit theory, we derive a two-fluid model to describe the dynamics of thermal and condensed magnons, and the appropriate boundary conditions in a hybrid normal-metal-magnetic-insulator-normal-metal heterostructure. We discuss how the emergent spin superfluidity can be experimentally probed via a spin Seebeck effect measurement.

  1. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELLING OF THE COMPRESSIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Having developed and validated a code based on the Discrete Element Method principle with physical experiments the code was used to study and predict the behaviour (parametric changes) during compression of four bulk systems of particulates with the properties of canola seed, palm kernel and soyabean. The porosity ...

  2. mathematical model for the optimization of compressive strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    - tions to obtain mathematical model of the compressive strength of sandcrete block of alluvial deposit for various mix proportions as multivariate functions with the proportions of sandcrete ingredients serving as variables. These mathematical.

  3. SVM Intrusion Detection Model Based on Compressed Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanxiong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrusion detection needs to deal with a large amount of data; particularly, the technology of network intrusion detection has to detect all of network data. Massive data processing is the bottleneck of network software and hardware equipment in intrusion detection. If we can reduce the data dimension in the stage of data sampling and directly obtain the feature information of network data, efficiency of detection can be improved greatly. In the paper, we present a SVM intrusion detection model based on compressive sampling. We use compressed sampling method in the compressed sensing theory to implement feature compression for network data flow so that we can gain refined sparse representation. After that SVM is used to classify the compression results. This method can realize detection of network anomaly behavior quickly without reducing the classification accuracy.

  4. Potential Flow Model for Compressible Stratified Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydquist, Grant; Reckinger, Scott; Owkes, Mark; Wieland, Scott

    2017-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is an instability that occurs when a heavy fluid lies on top of a lighter fluid in a gravitational field, or a gravity-like acceleration. It occurs in many fluid flows of a highly compressive nature. In this study potential flow analysis (PFA) is used to model the early stages of RTI growth for compressible fluids. In the localized region near the bubble tip, the effects of vorticity are negligible, so PFA is applicable, as opposed to later stages where the induced velocity due to vortices generated from the growth of the instability dominate the flow. The incompressible PFA is extended for compressibility effects by applying the growth rate and the associated perturbation spatial decay from compressible linear stability theory. The PFA model predicts theoretical values for a bubble terminal velocity for single-mode compressible RTI, dependent upon the Atwood (A) and Mach (M) numbers, which is a parameter that measures both the strength of the stratification and intrinsic compressibility. The theoretical bubble terminal velocities are compared against numerical simulations. The PFA model correctly predicts the M dependence at high A, but the model must be further extended to include additional physics to capture the behavior at low A. Undergraduate Scholars Program - Montana State University.

  5. Primordial black hole evolution in two-fluid cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, E. M.; Vieyro, F. L.; Romero, G. E.

    2018-02-01

    Several processes in the early Universe might lead to the formation of primordial black holes with different masses. These black holes would interact with the cosmic plasma through accretion and emission processes. Such interactions might have affected the dynamics of the Universe and generated a considerable amount of entropy. In this paper, we investigate the effects of the presence of primordial black holes on the evolution of the early Universe. We adopt a two-fluid cosmological model with radiation and a primordial black hole gas. The latter is modelled with different initial mass functions taking into account the available constraints over the initial primordial black hole abundances. We find that certain populations with narrow initial mass functions are capable to produce significant changes in the scalefactor and the entropy.

  6. Unsupervised ship trajectory modeling and prediction using compression and clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, G.; van Someren, M.; van Erp, M.; Stehouwer, H.; van Zaanen, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we show how to build a model of ship trajectories in a certain maritime region and use this model to predict future ship movements. The presented method is unsupervised and based on existing compression (line-simplification) and clustering techniques. We evaluate the model with a

  7. Models for predicting compressive strength and water absorption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work presents a mathematical model for predicting the compressive strength and water absorption of laterite-quarry dust cement block using augmented Scheffe's simplex lattice design. The statistical models developed can predict the mix proportion that will yield the desired property. The models were tested for lack of ...

  8. Central upwind scheme for a compressible two-phase flow model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshoor Ahmed

    Full Text Available In this article, a compressible two-phase reduced five-equation flow model is numerically investigated. The model is non-conservative and the governing equations consist of two equations describing the conservation of mass, one for overall momentum and one for total energy. The fifth equation is the energy equation for one of the two phases and it includes source term on the right-hand side which represents the energy exchange between two fluids in the form of mechanical and thermodynamical work. For the numerical approximation of the model a high resolution central upwind scheme is implemented. This is a non-oscillatory upwind biased finite volume scheme which does not require a Riemann solver at each time step. Few numerical case studies of two-phase flows are presented. For validation and comparison, the same model is also solved by using kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS and staggered central schemes. It was found that central upwind scheme produces comparable results to the KFVS scheme.

  9. Compression and model reduction: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LoFaro, T. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Kopell, N. [Boston Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We discuss a method by which the dynamics of a network of coupled neurons can be captured in a one-dimensional map. The network used as an example of this technique consists of a pair of neurons, one of which is an endogenous burster and the other excitable, but not bursting in the absence of phasic input. The reduction is accomplished by decomposing the flow into fast and slow subsystems, each operating on a distinct time scale. A {open_quotes}map of knees{close_quotes} is constructed using singular perturbation techniques. A concise expression for this map is developed by introducing time coordinates to each stable branch of the slow manifold. The compression associated with the fast subsystem is used to determine the qualitative properties of the map.

  10. Dark energy interacting with two fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Basicas y Matematicas, Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: slepe@ucv.cl; Pena, Francisco [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de La Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D Temuco (Chile)], E-mail: fcampos@ufro.cl

    2008-05-29

    A cosmological model of dark energy interacting with dark matter and another general component of the universe is investigated. We found general constraints on these models imposing an accelerated expansion. The same is also studied in the case for holographic dark energy.

  11. Soil Compressibility Models for a Wide Stress Range

    KAUST Repository

    Chong, Song-Hun

    2016-03-03

    Soil compressibility models with physically correct asymptotic void ratios are required to analyze situations that involve a wide stress range. Previously suggested models and other functions are adapted to satisfy asymptotic void ratios at low and high stress levels; all updated models involve four parameters. Compiled consolidation data for remolded and natural clays are used to test the models and to develop correlations between model parameters and index properties. Models can adequately fit soil compression data for a wide range of stresses and soil types; in particular, models that involve the power of the stress σ\\'β display higher flexibility to capture the brittle response of some natural soils. The use of a single continuous function avoids numerical discontinuities or the need for ad hoc procedures to determine the yield stress. The tangent stiffness-readily computed for all models-should not be mistaken for the small-strain constant-fabric stiffness. © 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  12. Tokamak two-fluid ignition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2017-08-01

    This work focuses on modeling the properties needed by a plasma to reach ignition, where ignition is the condition in which fusion power is produced at the steady state without any external input power. We extend the classic work by Lawson giving the ptotτE (product between density, temperature, and energy confinement time) needed for ignition [J. D. Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, Sect. B 70, 6 (1957)] by improving the original zero-dimensional, single fluid model. The effect of multi-fluid physics is included, by distinguishing ions, electrons, and α particles. The effects of one-dimensional density and temperature profiles are also considered. It is found that the multi-fluid model predicts a larger Lawson product required for ignition than the single-fluid one. A detailed analysis of the energy confinement times for each species and energy equilibration times between species shows that the electron energy confinement time is the parameter more strongly affecting the Lawson product needed for ignition. It is also found that peaked profiles (of either temperature or density) require a smaller Lawson product for ignition than flat profiles.

  13. Compressibility enhancement in an almost staggered interacting Harper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bat-el; Berkovits, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the compressibility in the almost staggered fermionic Harper model with repulsive interactions in the vicinity of half-filling. It has been shown by Kraus et al. [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161106(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161106 that for spinless electrons and nearest neighbors electron-electron interactions the compressibility in the central band is enhanced by repulsive interactions. Here we would like to investigate the sensitivity of this conclusion to the spin degree of freedom and longer range interactions. We use the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation, as well as the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculation to evaluate the compressibility. In the almost staggered Harper model, the central energy band is essentially flat and separated from the other bands by a large gap and therefore, the HF approximation is rather accurate. In both cases the compressibility of the system is enhanced compared to the noninteracting case, although the enhancement is weaker due to the inclusion of Hubbard and longer ranged interactions. We also show that the entanglement entropy is suppressed when the compressibility of the system is enhanced.

  14. Compressive strength models of repaired concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apandi, Nazirah Mohd; Ma, Chau-Khun; Awang, Abdullah Zawawi; Omar, Wahid

    2017-11-01

    Application of confinement as repairing technique can improve the strength and ductility of concrete significantly. This paper compares the existing models of repaired concrete, and describes the differences between these models. Over recent years, a great number of studies have been done to develop the models to define the stress-strain behaviour of repaired structures. The considered variables are the cross-sectional area, types of confinement, types of materials used and type of the strength models. Subsequently, the limitations were discussed and significant conclusions on the strength and weakness of each existing models were highlighted. This paper presented the state of the art design strength models available for repaired concrete structures and indicated a direction for future development.

  15. Free-surface modelling technology for compressible and violent flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development of novel modelling technology for compressible and violent free-surface flows, where the new technology aims to extend the capabilities of existing FSM formulations. For the purpose of this study the volume-of-fluid...

  16. Control of Stirling engine. Simplified, compressible model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, P. I.; Sokołowski, J.; Żochowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    A one-dimensional free boundary problem on a motion of a heavy piston in a tube filled with viscous gas is considered. The system of governing equations and boundary conditions is derived. The obtained system of differential equations can be regarded as a mathematical model of an exterior combustion engine. The existence of a weak solution to this model is proved. The problem of maximization of the total work of the engine is considered.

  17. Model-based fitting of compression settings using narrowband stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalewski, Borys; Fereczkowski, Michal; MacDonald, Ewen

    Most state-of-the-art hearing aids apply multi-channel dynamic-range compression (DRC). Studies using speech intelligibility as an outcome measure have shown mixed results in terms of the benefits of compression over linear amplification (e.g. Davies-Venn et al. 2009; Goedegebure et al. 2001, 2002...... present a compression design that has been optimized, within the framework of a computational model, for improving the performance of (aided) hearing impaired listeners in temporal and spectral resolution-related tasks...... the individual hearing-impaired listeners rely on. Therefore, it is difficult to disentangle them when speech recognition is used as an outcome measure. Edwards (2002) suggested using a set of relatively simple outcome measures, based on narrowband signals, for the evaluation of hearing-aid signal processing. We...

  18. Incorporating territory compression into population models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridley, J; Komdeur, J; Sutherland, WJ; Sutherland, William J.

    The ideal despotic distribution, whereby the lifetime reproductive success a territory's owner achieves is unaffected by population density, is a mainstay of behaviour-based population models. We show that the population dynamics of an island population of Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus

  19. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELLING OF THE COMPRESSIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The porosity predicted with the new code were compared with the original code without modifications; the new code which incorporated real system models for agricultural particulate gave lower porosity. Simulation results of other parameters showed variation in the bulk behaviour closer to what operate in the real system ...

  20. Adaptive modeling of compression hearing aids: Convergence and tracking issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Vijay; Jamieson, Donald

    2003-10-01

    Typical measurements of electroacoustic performance of hearing aids include frequency response, compression ratio, threshold and time constants, equivalent input noise, and total harmonic distortion. These measurements employ artificial test signals and do not relate well to perceptual indices of hearing aid performance. Speech-based electroacoustic measures provide means to quantify the real world performance of hearing aids and have been shown to correlate better with perceptual data. This paper investigates the application of system identification paradigm for deriving the speech-based measures, where the hearing aid is modeled as a linear time-varying system and its response to speech stimuli is predicted using a linear adaptive filter. The performance of three adaptive filtering algorithms, viz. the Least Mean Square (LMS), Normalized LMS, and the Affine Projection Algorithm (APA) was investigated using simulated and real digital hearing aids. In particular, the convergence and tracking behavior of these algorithms in modeling compression hearing aids was thoroughly investigated for a range of compression ratio and threshold parameters, and attack and release time constants. Our results show that the NLMS and APA algorithms are capable of modeling digital hearing aids under a variety of compression conditions, and are suitable for deriving speech-based metrics of hearing aid performance.

  1. Physical and numerical modelling of low mach number compressible flows; Modelisation des ecoulements compressibles a faible nombre de mach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paillerre, H. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT/SYSCO), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Clerc, S. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT/SERMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dabbene, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT/SEMT), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cueto, O. [CEA Grenoble, Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique (DTP/SMTH), 38 (France)

    1999-07-01

    This article reviews various physical models that may be used to describe compressible flow at low Mach numbers, as well as the numerical methods developed at DRN to discretize the different systems of equations. A selection of thermal-hydraulic applications illustrate the need to take into account compressibility and multidimensional effects as well as variable flow properties. (authors)

  2. Sensing and compressing 3-D models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumm, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent System Sensors and Controls Dept.

    1998-02-01

    The goal of this research project was to create a passive and robust computer vision system for producing 3-D computer models of arbitrary scenes. Although the authors were unsuccessful in achieving the overall goal, several components of this research have shown significant potential. Of particular interest is the application of parametric eigenspace methods for planar pose measurement of partially occluded objects in gray-level images. The techniques presented provide a simple, accurate, and robust solution to the planar pose measurement problem. In addition, the representational efficiency of eigenspace methods used with gray-level features were successfully extended to binary features, which are less sensitive to illumination changes. The results of this research are presented in two papers that were written during the course of this project. The papers are included in sections 2 and 3. The first section of this report summarizes the 3-D modeling efforts.

  3. Modeling Compressibility Effects in High-Speed Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Man has strived to make objects fly faster, first from subsonic to supersonic and then to hypersonic speeds. Spacecraft and high-speed missiles routinely fly at hypersonic Mach numbers, M greater than 5. In defense applications, aircraft reach hypersonic speeds at high altitude and so may civilian aircraft in the future. Hypersonic flight, while presenting opportunities, has formidable challenges that have spurred vigorous research and development, mainly by NASA and the Air Force in the USA. Although NASP, the premier hypersonic concept of the eighties and early nineties, did not lead to flight demonstration, much basic research and technology development was possible. There is renewed interest in supersonic and hypersonic flight with the HyTech program of the Air Force and the Hyper-X program at NASA being examples of current thrusts in the field. At high-subsonic to supersonic speeds, fluid compressibility becomes increasingly important in the turbulent boundary layers and shear layers associated with the flow around aerospace vehicles. Changes in thermodynamic variables: density, temperature and pressure, interact strongly with the underlying vortical, turbulent flow. The ensuing changes to the flow may be qualitative such as shocks which have no incompressible counterpart, or quantitative such as the reduction of skin friction with Mach number, large heat transfer rates due to viscous heating, and the dramatic reduction of fuel/oxidant mixing at high convective Mach number. The peculiarities of compressible turbulence, so-called compressibility effects, have been reviewed by Fernholz and Finley. Predictions of aerodynamic performance in high-speed applications require accurate computational modeling of these "compressibility effects" on turbulence. During the course of the project we have made fundamental advances in modeling the pressure-strain correlation and developed a code to evaluate alternate turbulence models in the compressible shear layer.

  4. Forecast Jointed Rock Mass Compressive Strength Using a Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protosenya Anatoliy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of forecasting the strength of the jointed rock mass by numerical modeling of finite element method in ABAQUS was described. The paper presents advantages of this method to solve the problem of determining the mechanical characteristics of jointed rock mass and the basic steps of creating a numerical geomechanical model of jointed rock mass and numerical experiment. Numerical simulation was carried out with jointed rock mass in order to obtain the ratio of strain and stress while loading the numerical model, determining parameters of quantitative assessment of the impact of the discontinuities orientation on the value of the compressive strength, compressive strength anisotropy. The results of the numerical experiment are compared with the data of experimental studies investigations. Innovative materials and structures are analyzed in this paper. The results that were obtained by calculation show qualitative agreement with the results of laboratory experiments of jointed rock mass.

  5. Statistical hydrodynamic models for mixing instability flows in turbulent regime: theoretical 0D evaluation criteria and comparison of one and two-fluid approaches; Modeles hydrodynamiques statistiques pour les ecoulements d'instabilites de melange en regime developpe: criteres theoriques d'evaluation ''0D'' et comparaison des approches mono et bifluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor, A

    2001-07-01

    Theoretical criteria are defined to perform quick analytical evaluations of statistical hydro models for turbulent mixing flows induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. They are based on a global energy balance analysis of the mixing zone ('0D' projection) in the limit of zero Atwood number, for incompressible fluids, and in self-similar regime. It is then shown that single-fluid descriptions must be replaced by two-fluid descriptions, particularly for the Rayleigh-Taylor case with variable acceleration. The interaction between a shock and heterogeneities is also considered. Various approaches for the development of new models are finally given. (author)

  6. A compressed sensing model of crowding in peripheral vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, Jens; Dorr, Michael; Barth, Erhardt

    2012-03-01

    We here model peripheral vision in a compressed sensing framework as a strategy of optimally guessing what stimulus corresponds to a sparsely encoded peripheral representation, and find that typical letter-crowding effects naturally arise from this strategy. The model is simple as it consists of only two convergence stages. We apply the model to the problem of crowding effects in reading. First, we show a few instructive examples of letter images that were reconstructed from encodings with different convergence rates. Then, we present an initial analysis of how the choice of model parameters affects the distortion of isolated and flanked letters.

  7. Assessment of chemistry models for compressible reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Recent technological advances in propulsion and power devices and renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles have increased the need for detailed understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible reacting flows. In numerical simulations of such flows, accurate modeling of the fuel chemistry is a critical component of capturing the relevant physics. Various chemical models are currently being used in reacting flow simulations. However, the differences between these models and their impacts on the fluid dynamics in the context of compressible flows are not well understood. In the present work, a numerical code is developed to solve the fully coupled compressible conservation equations for reacting flows. The finite volume code is based on the theoretical and numerical framework developed by Oefelein (Prog. Aero. Sci. 42 (2006) 2-37) and employs an all-Mach-number formulation with dual time-stepping and preconditioning. The numerical approach is tested on turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz numbers. Different chemical models of varying complexity and computational cost are used and their effects are compared.

  8. Dynamic modeling of hydrostatic guideway considering compressibility and inertia effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yikang; Mao, Kuanmin; Zhu, Yaming; Wang, Fengyun; Mao, Xiaobo; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Hydrostatic guideways are used as an alternative to contact bearings due to high stiffness and high damping in heavy machine tools. To improve the dynamic characteristic of bearing structure, the dynamic modeling of the hydrostatic guidway should be accurately known. This paper presents a "mass-spring-Maxwell" model considering the effects of inertia, squeeze, compressibility and static bearing. To determine the dynamic model coefficients, numerical simulation of different cases between displacement and dynamic force of oil film are performed with fluent code. Simulation results show that hydrostatic guidway can be taken as a linear system when it is subjected to a small oscillation amplitude. Based on a dynamic model and numerical simulation, every dynamic model's parameters are calculated by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Identification results show that "mass-spring-damper" model is the most appropriate dynamic model of the hydrostatic guidway. This paper provides a reference and preparation for the analysis of the dynamic model of the similar hydrostatic bearings.

  9. A two-fluid study of oblique tearing modes in a force-free current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Cihan; Daughton, William; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic simulations have demonstrated that three-dimensional reconnection in collisionless regimes proceeds through the formation and interaction of magnetic flux ropes, which are generated due to the growth of tearing instabilities at multiple resonance surfaces. Since kinetic simulations are intrinsically expensive, it is desirable to explore the feasibility of reduced two-fluid models to capture this complex evolution, particularly, in the strong guide field regime, where two-fluid models are better justified. With this goal in mind, this paper compares the evolution of the collisionless tearing instability in a force-free current sheet with a two-fluid model and fully kinetic simulations. Our results indicate that the most unstable modes are oblique for guide fields larger than the reconnecting field, in agreement with the kinetic results. The standard two-fluid tearing theory is extended to address the tearing instability at oblique angles. The resulting theory yields a flat oblique spectrum and underestimates the growth of oblique modes in a similar manner to kinetic theory relative to kinetic simulations.

  10. Tableting Properties and Compression Models of Labisia pumila Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etti, C J; Yusof, Y A; Chin, N L; Mohd Tahir, S

    2017-03-04

    The tableting properties of Labisia pumila herbal powder, which is well known for its therapeutic benefits was investigated. The herbal powder was compressed into tablets using a stainless steel cylindrical uniaxial die of 13-mm- diameter with compaction pressures ranging from 7 to 25 MPa. Two feed weights, 0.5 and 1.0 g were used to form tablets. Some empirical models were used to describe the compressibility behavior of Labisia pumila tablets. The strength and density of tablets increased with increase in compaction pressure and resulted in reduction in porosity of the tablets. Smaller feeds, higher forces and increase in compaction pressure, contributed to more coherent tablets. These findings can be used to enhance the approach and understanding of tableting properties of Labisia pumila herbal powder tablets.

  11. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  12. Compressing climate model simulations: reducing storage burden while preserving information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit; Baker, Allison; Xu, Haiying; Clyne, John; Li, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Climate models, which are run at high spatial and temporal resolutions, generate massive quantities of data. As our computing capabilities continue to increase, storing all of the generated data is becoming a bottleneck, which negatively affects scientific progress. It is thus important to develop methods for representing the full datasets by smaller compressed versions, which still preserve all the critical information and, as an added benefit, allow for faster read and write operations during analysis work. Traditional lossy compression algorithms, as for example used for image files, are not necessarily ideally suited for climate data. While visual appearance is relevant, climate data has additional critical features such as the preservation of extreme values and spatial and temporal gradients. Developing alternative metrics to quantify information loss in a manner that is meaningful to climate scientists is an ongoing process still in its early stages. We will provide an overview of current efforts to develop such metrics to assess existing algorithms and to guide the development of tailored compression algorithms to address this pressing challenge.

  13. Estimating Compressive Strength of High Performance Concrete with Gaussian Process Regression Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nhat-Duc Hoang; Anh-Duc Pham; Quoc-Lam Nguyen; Quang-Nhat Pham

    2016-01-01

    ...) for modeling compressive strength of high-performance concrete (HPC). This machine learning approach is utilized to establish the nonlinear functional mapping between the compressive strength and HPC ingredients...

  14. Modelling compression sensing in ionic polymer metal composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpini, Valentina; Bardella, Lorenzo; Rodella, Andrea; Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-03-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) consist of an ionomeric membrane, including mobile counterions, sandwiched between two thin noble metal electrodes. IPMCs find application as sensors and actuators, where an imposed mechanical loading generates a voltage across the electrodes, and, vice versa, an imposed electric field causes deformation. Here, we present a predictive modelling approach to elucidate the dynamic sensing response of IPMCs subject to a time-varying through-the-thickness compression (‘compression sensing’). The model relies on the continuum theory recently developed by Porfiri and co-workers, which couples finite deformations to the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) system governing the IPMC electrochemistry. For the ‘compression sensing’ problem we establish a perturbative closed-form solution along with a finite element (FE) solution. The systematic comparison between these two solutions is a central contribution of this study, offering insight on accuracy and mathematical complexity. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is employed to find the analytical solution. To this end, we uncouple the force balance from the modified PNP system and separately linearise the PNP equations in the ionomer bulk and in the boundary layers at the ionomer-electrode interfaces. Comparison with FE results for the fully coupled nonlinear system demonstrates the accuracy of the analytical solution to describe IPMC sensing for moderate deformation levels. We finally demonstrate the potential of the modelling scheme to accurately reproduce experimental results from the literature. The proposed model is expected to aid in the design of IPMC sensors, contribute to an improved understanding of IPMC electrochemomechanical response, and offer insight into the role of nonlinear phenomena across mechanics and electrochemistry.

  15. Modeling the mechanical and compression properties of polyamide/elastane knitted fabrics used in compression sportswear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maqsood, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    A compression sportswear fabric should have excellent stretch and recovery properties in order to improve the performance of the sportsman. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of elastane linear density and loop length on the stretch, recovery, and compression properties of the

  16. The effect of inhomogeneous compression on water transport in the cathode of a PEM fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multi-component, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.), is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on transport phenomenon of a PEM Fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas diffusion l...

  17. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    An approach to modelling unsteady compressible flow that is primarily one dimensional is presented. The approach was developed for creating distributed models of machines with reciprocating pistons but it is not limited to this application. The approach is based on the integral form of the unsteady...... conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum applied to a staggered mesh consisting of two overlapping strings of control volumes. Loss mechanisms can be included directly in the governing equations of models by including them as terms in the conservation laws. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures...

  18. Prediction of gas compressibility factor using intelligent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mohamadi-Baghmolaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gas compressibility factor, also known as Z-factor, plays the determinative role for obtaining thermodynamic properties of gas reservoir. Typically, empirical correlations have been applied to determine this important property. However, weak performance and some limitations of these correlations have persuaded the researchers to use intelligent models instead. In this work, prediction of Z-factor is aimed using different popular intelligent models in order to find the accurate one. The developed intelligent models are including Artificial Neural Network (ANN, Fuzzy Interface System (FIS and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy System (ANFIS. Also optimization of equation of state (EOS by Genetic Algorithm (GA is done as well. The validity of developed intelligent models was tested using 1038 series of published data points in literature. It was observed that the accuracy of intelligent predicting models for Z-factor is significantly better than conventional empirical models. Also, results showed the improvement of optimized EOS predictions when coupled with GA optimization. Moreover, of the three intelligent models, ANN model outperforms other models considering all data and 263 field data points of an Iranian offshore gas condensate with R2 of 0.9999, while the R2 for best empirical correlation was about 0.8334.

  19. Confined compressive strength model of rock for drilling optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangchao Shi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The confined compressive strength (CCS plays a vital role in drilling optimization. On the basis of Jizba's experimental results, a new CCS model considering the effects of the porosity and nonlinear characteristics with increasing confining pressure has been developed. Because the confining pressure plays a fundamental role in determining the CCS of bottom-hole rock and because the theory of Terzaghi's effective stress principle is founded upon soil mechanics, which is not suitable for calculating the confining pressure in rock mechanics, the double effective stress theory, which treats the porosity as a weighting factor of the formation pore pressure, is adopted in this study. The new CCS model combined with the mechanical specific energy equation is employed to optimize the drilling parameters in two practical wells located in Sichuan basin, China, and the calculated results show that they can be used to identify the inefficient drilling situations of underbalanced drilling (UBD and overbalanced drilling (OBD.

  20. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenghai; Hsu, Andrew T

    2003-07-01

    A three-dimensional compressible lattice Boltzmann model is formulated on a cubic lattice. A very large particle-velocity set is incorporated in order to enable a greater variation in the mean velocity. Meanwhile, the support set of the equilibrium distribution has only six directions. Therefore, this model can efficiently handle flows over a wide range of Mach numbers and capture shock waves. Due to the simple form of the equilibrium distribution, the fourth-order velocity tensors are not involved in the formulation. Unlike the standard lattice Boltzmann model, no special treatment is required for the homogeneity of fourth-order velocity tensors on square lattices. The Navier-Stokes equations were recovered, using the Chapman-Enskog method from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) lattice Boltzmann equation. The second-order discretization error of the fluctuation velocity in the macroscopic conservation equation was eliminated by means of a modified collision invariant. The model is suitable for both viscous and inviscid compressible flows with or without shocks. Since the present scheme deals only with the equilibrium distribution that depends only on fluid density, velocity, and internal energy, boundary conditions on curved wall are easily implemented by an extrapolation of macroscopic variables. To verify the scheme for inviscid flows, we have successfully simulated a three-dimensional shock-wave propagation in a box and a normal shock of Mach number 10 over a wedge. As an application to viscous flows, we have simulated a flat plate boundary layer flow, flow over a cylinder, and a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil cascade.

  1. Axi-symmetric simulation of a two phase vertical thermosyphon using Eulerian two-fluid methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafeel, Khurram; Turan, Ali

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulation of steady state operation of a vertical two phase closed thermosyphon is performed using the two-fluid methodology within Eulerian multiphase domain. A full scale axi-symmetric model is developed for computational fluid dynamics simulation of thermosyphon using ANSYS/FLUENT 13.0. The effects of evaporation, condensation and interfacial heat and mass transfer are taken into account within the whole domain. Cooling water jacket is also modelled along with the wall of thermosyphon to simulate the effect of conjugate heat transfer between the wall and fluid phase. The results obtained are presented and compared with available experimental investigations for a similar thermosyphon. It is established that two-fluid methodology can be used effectively for the purpose of simulation of two phase system like a typical thermosyphon.

  2. Compressible cell gas models for asymmetric fluid criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Orkoulas, Gerassimos

    2017-03-01

    We thoroughly describe a class of models recently presented by Fisher and coworkers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 040601 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.040601. The crucial feature of such models, termed compressible cell gases (CCGs), is that the individual cell volumes of a lattice gas are allowed to fluctuate. They are studied via the seldom-used (μ , p , T ) ensemble, which leads to their exact mapping onto the Ising model. Remarkably, CCGs obey complete scaling, a formulation for the thermodynamic behavior of fluids near the gas-liquid critical point that accommodates features inherent to the asymmetric nature of this phase transition like the Yang-Yang (YY) and singular coexistence-curve diameter anomalies. The CCG0 models generated when volumes vary freely reveal local free volume fluctuations as the origin of these phenomena. Local energy-volume coupling is found to be another relevant microscopic factor. Furthermore, the CCG class is greatly extended by using the decoration transformation, with an interesting example being the Sastry-Debenedetti-Sciortino-Stanley model for hydrogen bonding in low-temperature water. The magnitude of anomalies is characterized by a single parameter, the YY ratio, which for the models so far considered here ranges from -∞ to 1/2 .

  3. Models of failure in compression of layered materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    1999-01-01

    Compressive failure of fibre reinforced or layered materials by fibre kinking, matrix splitting and fibre/matrix debonding is analysed, The main focus is on brittle matrix composites, however, the analysis of effects due to debonding is carried out in a general framework allowing for arbitrary time......-independent plasticity of the layers. Fibre kinking and matrix splitting are regarded as competing failure modes with the conditions governing the active mode depending on the biaxial stress state in the composite and a combination of micro mechanical parameters. Two criteria for matrix splitting, and two models...... for the evolution of micro cracks in the matrix have been discussed. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Mesoscale Modeling of LX-17 Under Isentropic Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, H K; Willey, T M; Friedman, G; Fried, L E; Vandersall, K S; Baer, M R

    2010-03-06

    Mesoscale simulations of LX-17 incorporating different equilibrium mixture models were used to investigate the unreacted equation-of-state (UEOS) of TATB. Candidate TATB UEOS were calculated using the equilibrium mixture models and benchmarked with mesoscale simulations of isentropic compression experiments (ICE). X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) data provided the basis for initializing the simulations with realistic microstructural details. Three equilibrium mixture models were used in this study. The single constituent with conservation equations (SCCE) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The single constituent equation-of-state (SCEOS) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the equation-of-state of the constituents. The kinetic energy averaging (KEA) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted particle velocity mixture rule and the conservation equations. The SCEOS model yielded the stiffest TATB EOS (0.121{micro} + 0.4958{micro}{sup 2} + 2.0473{micro}{sup 3}) and, when incorporated in mesoscale simulations of the ICE, demonstrated the best agreement with VISAR velocity data for both specimen thicknesses. The SCCE model yielded a relatively more compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2} + 4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) and the KEA model yielded the most compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2}+4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) of all the equilibrium mixture models. Mesoscale simulations with the lower density TATB adiabatic EOS data demonstrated the least agreement with VISAR velocity data.

  5. Exact scaling laws for helical three-dimensional two-fluid turbulent plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, Nahuel; Sahraoui, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    We derive exact scaling laws for a three-dimensional incompressible helical two-fluid plasma, without the assumption of isotropy. For each ideal invariant of the two-fluid model, i.e. the total energy, the electron helicity and the proton helicity, we derive simple scaling laws in terms of two-point increments correlation functions expressed in terms of the velocity field of each species and the magnetic field. These variables are appropriate for comparison with \\textit{in-situ} measurements in the solar wind at different spatial ranges and data from numerical simulations. Finally, with the exact scaling laws and dimensional analysis we predict the magnetic energy and electron helicity spectra for different ranges of scales.

  6. Two-fluid wetting behavior of a hydrophobic silicon nanowire array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongkwan; Chung, Yunsie; Tian, Ye; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2014-11-11

    The two-fluid wetting behavior of surfaces textured by an array of silicon nanowires is investigated systematically. The Si nanowire array is produced by a combination of colloidal patterning and metal-catalyzed etching, with control over its roughness depending upon the wire length. The nanowires are made hydrophobic and oleophobic by treatment with hydrocarbon and fluorinated self-assembled monolayers, respectively. Static, advancing, and receding contact angles are measured with water, hexadecane, and perfluorotripentylamine in both single-fluid (droplet on solid in an air environment) and two-fluid (droplet on solid in a liquid environment) configurations. The single-fluid measurements show wetting behavior similar to that expected by the Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models, where the wetting or non-wetting behaviors are amplified with increasing roughness. The two-fluid systems on the rough surface exhibit more complex configurations because either the droplet or the environment fluid can penetrate the asperities depending upon the wettability of each fluid. It is observed that, when the Young contact angles are significantly increased or reduced from single-liquid to two-liquid systems, the effect of roughness is relatively minimal. However, when the Young contact angles are similar, roughness has almost identical influence on apparent contact angles in single- and two-liquid systems. The Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models are modified to describe various two-fluid wetting states. In cases where metastable behavior is observed for the droplet, advancing and receding measurements are performed to suggest the equilibrium state of the droplet.

  7. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, M., E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  8. Bayesian model calibration of ramp compression experiments on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Hund, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Bayesian model calibration (BMC) is a statistical framework to estimate inputs for a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to dynamic experiments which must be coupled with numerical simulations to interpret the results. Often, dynamic experiments are diagnosed using velocimetry and this output can be modeled using a hydrocode. Several calibration issues unique to this type of scenario including the functional nature of the output, uncertainty of nuisance parameters within the simulation, and model discrepancy identifiability are addressed, and a novel BMC process is proposed. As a proof of concept, we examine experiments conducted on Sandia National Laboratories' Z-machine which ramp compressed tantalum to peak stresses of 250 GPa. The proposed BMC framework is used to calibrate the cold curve of Ta (with uncertainty), and we conclude that the procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. A refined understanding of compressibility effects on the stability of drift ballooning modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, T.; Park, G. Y.; Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Singh, R.

    2017-07-01

    A study is conducted on the impact of plasma compressibility on the stability of drift ballooning modes. The two-fluid and four-field model developed by Hazeltine et al. [Phys. Fluids 28, 2466 (1985)] is employed in this study. Results of linear numerical simulations show that finite compressibility destabilizes ballooning modes which are otherwise stable due to the ion diamagnetic drift effect. A systematic study reveals that the parallel compressibility originating from the two-fluid effect, rather than the drift-acoustic wave coupling suggested by Hastie et al. [Phys. Plasmas 10, 4405 (2003)], plays the most important role in destabilizing the ballooning modes. An analytic evaluation of the dispersion relation underpins the strong sensitivity of this parallel compressibility term in the ballooning mode stability. The potential impact of this new understanding on the physics of small edge localized modes is discussed.

  10. A Computational model for compressed sensing RNAi cellular screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Hua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi becomes an increasingly important and effective genetic tool to study the function of target genes by suppressing specific genes of interest. This system approach helps identify signaling pathways and cellular phase types by tracking intensity and/or morphological changes of cells. The traditional RNAi screening scheme, in which one siRNA is designed to knockdown one specific mRNA target, needs a large library of siRNAs and turns out to be time-consuming and expensive. Results In this paper, we propose a conceptual model, called compressed sensing RNAi (csRNAi, which employs a unique combination of group of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to knockdown a much larger size of genes. This strategy is based on the fact that one gene can be partially bound with several small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and conversely, one siRNA can bind to a few genes with distinct binding affinity. This model constructs a multi-to-multi correspondence between siRNAs and their targets, with siRNAs much fewer than mRNA targets, compared with the conventional scheme. Mathematically this problem involves an underdetermined system of equations (linear or nonlinear, which is ill-posed in general. However, the recently developed compressed sensing (CS theory can solve this problem. We present a mathematical model to describe the csRNAi system based on both CS theory and biological concerns. To build this model, we first search nucleotide motifs in a target gene set. Then we propose a machine learning based method to find the effective siRNAs with novel features, such as image features and speech features to describe an siRNA sequence. Numerical simulations show that we can reduce the siRNA library to one third of that in the conventional scheme. In addition, the features to describe siRNAs outperform the existing ones substantially. Conclusions This csRNAi system is very promising in saving both time and cost for large-scale RNAi

  11. Model for the compression failure of an irradiated tropical wood-polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, F. Y. C.; Chia, L. H. L.; Teoh, S. H.

    Using a gamma irradiation method, some tropical wood-polymer composites were produced which exhibited a significant improvement in uniaxial compressive strength. Although compression failure models have been established for normal uniaxial fiber reinforced composites, for both direct compression failure and by microbuckling compression failure, the unique structure of wood-polymer composite does not allow these same models to adequately describe its compression failure. Experimental results indicated that the failure criterion in a uniaxial compression test for the wood-polymer composite was based on the buckling failure of the wood fiber and impregnated polymer along a shear band. Using this buckling failure criterion, a model was proposed that took into account the stiffening effect of the impregnated polymer on the wood cell wall.

  12. Objective models of compressed breast shapes undergoing mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Steve Si Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University and Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Patel, Bhavika [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Departments of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To develop models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography based on objective analysis, that are capable of accurately representing breast shapes in acquired clinical images and generating new, clinically realistic shapes. Methods: An automated edge detection algorithm was used to catalogue the breast shapes of clinically acquired cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) view mammograms from a large database of digital mammography images. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on these shapes to reduce the information contained within the shapes to a small number of linearly independent variables. The breast shape models, one of each view, were developed from the identified principal components, and their ability to reproduce the shape of breasts from an independent set of mammograms not used in the PCA, was assessed both visually and quantitatively by calculating the average distance error (ADE). Results: The PCA breast shape models of the CC and MLO mammographic views based on six principal components, in which 99.2% and 98.0%, respectively, of the total variance of the dataset is contained, were found to be able to reproduce breast shapes with strong fidelity (CC view mean ADE = 0.90 mm, MLO view mean ADE = 1.43 mm) and to generate new clinically realistic shapes. The PCA models based on fewer principal components were also successful, but to a lesser degree, as the two-component model exhibited a mean ADE = 2.99 mm for the CC view, and a mean ADE = 4.63 mm for the MLO view. The four-component models exhibited a mean ADE = 1.47 mm for the CC view and a mean ADE = 2.14 mm for the MLO view. Paired t-tests of the ADE values of each image between models showed that these differences were statistically significant (max p-value = 0.0247). Visual examination of modeled breast shapes confirmed these results. Histograms of the PCA parameters associated with the six principal components were fitted with Gaussian distributions. The six

  13. Advanced Fluid Reduced Order Models for Compressible Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezaur, Irina Kalashnikova [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fike, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Barone, Matthew F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maddix, Danielle [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mussoni, Erin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Balajewicz, Maciej [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes fiscal year (FY) 2017 progress towards developing and implementing within the SPARC in-house finite volume flow solver advanced fluid reduced order models (ROMs) for compressible captive-carriage flow problems of interest to Sandia National Laboratories for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons components. The proposed projection-based model order reduction (MOR) approach, known as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Least- Squares Petrov-Galerkin (LSPG) method, can substantially reduce the CPU-time requirement for these simulations, thereby enabling advanced analyses such as uncertainty quantification and de- sign optimization. Following a description of the project objectives and FY17 targets, we overview briefly the POD/LSPG approach to model reduction implemented within SPARC . We then study the viability of these ROMs for long-time predictive simulations in the context of a two-dimensional viscous laminar cavity problem, and describe some FY17 enhancements to the proposed model reduction methodology that led to ROMs with improved predictive capabilities. Also described in this report are some FY17 efforts pursued in parallel to the primary objective of determining whether the ROMs in SPARC are viable for the targeted application. These include the implemen- tation and verification of some higher-order finite volume discretization methods within SPARC (towards using the code to study the viability of ROMs on three-dimensional cavity problems) and a novel structure-preserving constrained POD/LSPG formulation that can improve the accuracy of projection-based reduced order models. We conclude the report by summarizing the key takeaways from our FY17 findings, and providing some perspectives for future work.

  14. FEM modelling of soil behaviour under compressive loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungureanu, N.; Vlăduţ, V.; Biriş, S. Şt

    2017-01-01

    Artificial compaction is one of the most dangerous forms of degradation of agricultural soil. Recognized as a phenomenon with multiple negative effects in terms of environment and agricultural production, soil compaction is strongly influenced by the size of external load, soil moisture, size and shape of footprint area, soil type and number of passes. Knowledge of soil behavior under compressive loads is important in order to prevent or minimize soil compaction. In this paper were developed, by means of the Finite Element Method, various models of soil behavior during the artificial compaction produced by the wheel of an agricultural trailer. Simulations were performed on two types of soil (cohesive and non-cohesive) with known characteristics. By applying two loads (4.5 kN and 21 kN) in footprints of different sizes, were obtained the models of the distributions of stresses occuring in the two types of soil. Simulation results showed that soil stresses increase with increasing wheel load and vary with soil type.

  15. Development of performance models for thick composites in compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, H.W.; Grimsby, H.J.; Starbuck, J.M.; Welch, D.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report details initial activities and results from an investigation into the failure of thick-section composite cylinders loaded in compression. The efforts are aimed at the development of models for predicting cylinder performance based on composite material strengths derived from ring and cylinder tests of unidirectional materials. Initial results indicate that existing failure theories are applicable provided that material strength allowables are based on representative tests, and that appropriate solutions for cylinder stresses are used. Both the failure criteria and stress solution must allow for the three-dimensional stress state and for the discrete layer construction. Predictions for an initial test cylinder, which achieved a record pressure in hydrotest, are consistent with the observed performance. Performance model results obtained for a range of laminate constructions indicate this design to be optimum. Improvements in test fixturing also contributed to the record performance for this first cylinder. This work is sponsored by the Director as a three-year project funded from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory seed-money program.

  16. Numerical modeling of a compressible multiphase flow through a nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielska, Urszula; Rabinovitch, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2012-11-01

    New thermodynamic cycles developed for more efficient low temperature resource utilization can increase the net power production from geothermal resources and sensible waste heat recovery by 20-40%, compared to the traditional organic Rankine cycle. These improved systems consist of a pump, a liquid heat exchanger, a two-phase turbine, and a condenser. The two-phase turbine is used to extract energy from a high speed multiphase fluid and consists of a nozzle and an axial impulse rotor. In order to model and optimize the fluid flow through this part of the system an analysis of two-phase flow through a specially designed convergent-divergent nozzle has to be conducted. To characterize the flow behavior, a quasi-one-dimensional steady-state model of the multiphase fluid flow through a nozzle has been constructed. A numerical code capturing dense compressible multiphase flow under subsonic and supersonic conditions and the coupling between both liquid and gas phases has been developed. The output of the code delivers data vital for the performance optimization of the two-phase nozzle.

  17. Statistical modelling of compression and fatigue damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    A statistical computational model of strength and damage of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites under compressive and cyclic compressive loading is presented in this paper. The model is developed on the basis of the Budiansky–Fleck fiber kinking condition, continuum damage mechanics...

  18. High strain-rate compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of selected polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10−3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five parameters for the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are determined by fitting to the experimental compressive stress-strain data using a least-squares fit. The compressive stress-strain curves at three different strain rates derived from the modified Ramberg-Osgood models are compared with the experimental results. It is shown that the compressive stress-strain behavior during loading process can be successfully predicted by the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation.

  19. High strain-rate compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of selected polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, K.; Yokoyama, T.

    2012-08-01

    The present paper deals with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10-3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five parameters for the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are determined by fitting to the experimental compressive stress-strain data using a least-squares fit. The compressive stress-strain curves at three different strain rates derived from the modified Ramberg-Osgood models are compared with the experimental results. It is shown that the compressive stress-strain behavior during loading process can be successfully predicted by the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation.

  20. High strain-rate compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of selected polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama T; Nakai K

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10−3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five paramete...

  1. Implicit two-fluid simulation of electron transport in a plasma erosion opening switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.J.; Wallace, J.M.; Lee, K.

    1986-01-01

    The two-dimensional implicit code ANTHEM is used to model electron transport in Plasma Opening Switches. We look at low density (approx.4 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup -3/) switches at initial plasma temperatures as low as 5 eV. Two-fluid modeling (ions and electrons with inertia) and implicit determination of the fields is employed to allow time steps well in excess of the inverse plasma period, and cell sizes much larger than a Debye length - with the avoidance of the finite grid anomalous plasma heating characteristic of particle codes. Features indicative of both erosion and E > B plasma drift are manifest in the simulations.

  2. A weakly compressible formulation for modelling liquid-gas sloshing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available , the implementation of a weakly compressible formulation which accounts for variations in the gas density is presented. With the aim of ensuring a computational efficient implementation of the proposed formulation, an implicit iterative GMRES solver with LU...

  3. Comparison of postbuckling model and finite element model with compression strength of corrugated boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Urbanik; Edmond P. Saliklis

    2002-01-01

    Conventional compression strength formulas for corrugated fiberboard boxes are limited to geometry and material that produce an elastic postbuckling failure. Inelastic postbuckling can occur in squatty boxes and trays, but a mechanistic rationale for unifying observed strength data is lacking. This study employs a finite element model, instead of actual experiments, to...

  4. Competing disturbance amplification mechanisms in two-fluid boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sandeep; Page, Jacob; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    The linear stability of boundary layers above a thin wall film of lower viscosity is analyzed. Appropriate choice of the film thickness and viscosity excludes the possibility of interfacial instabilities. Transient amplification of disturbances is therefore the relevant destabilizing influence, and can take place via three different mechanisms in the two-fluid configuration. Each is examined in detail by solving an initial value problem whose initial condition comprises a pair of appropriately chosen eigenmodes from the discrete, continuous and interface modes. Two regimes are driven by the lift-up mechanism: (i) The response to a streamwise vortex and (ii) the normal vorticity generated by a stable Tollmien-Schlichting wave. Both are damped due to the film. The third regime is associated with the wall-normal vorticity that is generated by the interface displacement. It can lead to appreciable streamwise velocity disturbances in the near-wall region at relatively low viscosity ratios. The results demonstrate that a wall film can stabilize the early linear stages of boundary-layer transition, and explain the observations from the recent nonlinear direct numerical simulations of this configuration by Jung & Zaki (J. Fluid Mech., vol 772, 2015, 330-360).

  5. Two-fluid plasma Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Vincent; Bond, Daryl; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a shock accelerated perturbed density interface is computationally investigated in the context of ideal two-fluid plasmas. This is accomplished by numerically solving separate sets of conservation equations for the ions and electrons, coupled to the full Maxwell's equations. We focus on cases without an imposed magnetic field and with Debye lengths ranging from a thousandth to a tenth of the interface perturbation wavelength. For all cases investigated, the behavior of the flow is substantially different from that predicted by the Euler or ideal magnetohydrodynamics equations. Electric fields generated by charge separation cause interface oscillations, particularly in the electrons, that drive a secondary high-wavenumber instability. Consequently, the density interface is substantially more unstable than predicted by the Euler equations for all cases investigated. Self-generated magnetic fields are predicted within our simulations, but their orientation is such that they do not dampen the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  6. A comparison of conventional compression plates and locking compression plates using cantilever bending in an ilial fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, C W; Gibson, T W G; Runciman, R J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the stiffness, yield load, ultimate load at failure, displacement at failure, and mode of failure in cantilever bending of locking compression plates (LCP) and dynamic compression plates (DCP) in an acute failure ilial fracture model. Our hypothesis was that the LCP would be superior to the DCP for all of these biomechanical properties. Ten pelves were harvested from healthy dogs euthanatized for reasons unrelated to this study and divided into two groups. A transverse osteotomy was performed and stabilized with either a 6-hole DCP applied in compression or a 6-hole LCP. Pelves were tested in cantilever bending at 20 mm/min to failure and construct stiffness, yield load, ultimate load at failure, displacement at failure, and mode of failure were compared. The mean stiffness of DCP constructs (193 N/mm [95% CI 121 - 264]) and of LCP constructs (224 N/mm [95% CI 152 - 295]) was not significantly different. Mean yield load of DCP constructs (900 N [95% CI 649 -1151]) and of LCP constructs (984 N [95% CI 733 -1235]) was not significantly different. No significant differences were found between the DCP and LCP constructs with respect to mode of failure, displacement at failure, or ultimate load at failure. Our study did not demonstrate any differences between DCP and LCP construct performance in acute failure testing in vitro.

  7. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  8. High Strain-Rate Compressive Properties and Constitutive Modeling of Selected Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takashi

    The present paper is concerned with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10-3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves within a strain range of nearly 0.08 for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five parameters for the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are determined by fitting to the experimental compressive stress-strain data using a least-squares fit. It is shown that the compressive stress-strain behavior at different strain rates up to the maximum stress can successfully be predicted by the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. The limitations of the modified Ramberg-Osgood models are discussed.

  9. A configurable statistical lossless compression core based on variable order modelling and arithmetic coding

    OpenAIRE

    Nunez-Yanez, Jose L; Chouliaras, Vassilios A.

    2005-01-01

    First to introduce the concepts of Variable order Markov Modelling into a hardware core. The combination of this powerful statistical modelling technique and arithmetic coding delivers excellent compression ratios superior to classical dictionary-based compression techniques such as ZIP or ARJ. Statistical algorithms are recognized as optimal but software implementations run at orders of magnitude slower than dictionary-based techniques. The innovative hardware architecture obtained in this w...

  10. Using a visual discrimination model for the detection of compression artifacts in virtual pathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey P; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Yan, Michelle; Roehrig, Hans; Graham, Anna R; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2011-02-01

    A major issue in telepathology is the extremely large and growing size of digitized "virtual" slides, which can require several gigabytes of storage and cause significant delays in data transmission for remote image interpretation and interactive visualization by pathologists. Compression can reduce this massive amount of virtual slide data, but reversible (lossless) methods limit data reduction to less than 50%, while lossy compression can degrade image quality and diagnostic accuracy. "Visually lossless" compression offers the potential for using higher compression levels without noticeable artifacts, but requires a rate-control strategy that adapts to image content and loss visibility. We investigated the utility of a visual discrimination model (VDM) and other distortion metrics for predicting JPEG 2000 bit rates corresponding to visually lossless compression of virtual slides for breast biopsy specimens. Threshold bit rates were determined experimentally with human observers for a variety of tissue regions cropped from virtual slides. For test images compressed to their visually lossless thresholds, just-noticeable difference (JND) metrics computed by the VDM were nearly constant at the 95th percentile level or higher, and were significantly less variable than peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM) metrics. Our results suggest that VDM metrics could be used to guide the compression of virtual slides to achieve visually lossless compression while providing 5-12 times the data reduction of reversible methods.

  11. Observational diagnostics for two-fluid turbulence in molecular clouds as suggested by simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chad D.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, Alex

    2014-04-01

    We present high-resolution simulations of two-fluid (ion-neutral) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with resolutions as large as 5123. All of the simulations are supersonic. We explore simulations that range from mildly sub-Alfvénic to super-Alfvénic. Such turbulence is thought to influence star formation processes in molecular clouds because typical cores form on length scales that are comparable to the dissipation scales of this turbulence in the ions. The simulations are motivated by the fact that recent studies of isophotologue lines in molecular clouds have found significant differences in the linewidth-size relationship for neutral and ion species. Our first goal in this paper is to explain those observations using simulations and analytic theory. Our second goal in this paper is to present a new set of density-based diagnostics by drawing on similar diagnostics that have been obtained by studying single-fluid turbulence. We further show that our two-fluid simulations play a vital role in reconciling alternative models of star formation. The velocity-dependent diagnostics display a very interesting complementarity with the density-dependent diagnostics. We find that the linewidth-size relationship should show a prominent difference between ions and neutrals when the line of sight is orthogonal to the mean field. We also find that the density probability distribution functions and their derived diagnostics should show prominent differences between the ions and neutrals when the line of sight is parallel to the mean field.

  12. An equivalent-time-lines model for municipal solid waste based on its compression characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wu; Bian, Xuecheng; Xu, Wenjie; Chen, Yunmin

    2017-10-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) demonstrates a noticeable time-dependent stress-strain behavior, which contributes greatly to the settlement of landfills and therefore influences both the storage capacity of landfills and the integrity of internal structures. The long-term compression tests for MSW under different biodegradation conditions were analyzed. It showed that the primary compression can affect the secondary compression due to the biodegradation and mechanical creep. Based on the time-lines model for clays and the compression characteristics of MSW, relationships between MSW's viscous strain rate and equivalent time were established, and then the viscous strain functions of MSW under different biodegradation conditions were deduced, and an equivalent-time-lines model for MSW settlement for two biodegradation conditions was developed, including the Type I model for the enhanced biodegradation condition and the Type II model for the normal biodegradation condition. The simulated compression results of laboratory and field compression tests under different biodegradation conditions were consistent with the measured data, which showed the reliability of both types of the equivalent-time-lines model for MSW. In addition, investigations of the long-term settlement of landfills from the literature indicated that the Type I model is suitable for predicting settlement in MSW landfills with a distinct biodegradation progress of MSW, a high content of organics in MSW, a short fill age or under an enhanced biodegradation environment; while the Type II model is good at predicting settlement in MSW landfills with a distinct progress of mechanical creep compression, a low content of organics in MSW, a long fill age or under a normal biodegradation condition. Furthermore, relationships between model parameters and the fill age of landfills were summarized. Finally, the similarities and differences between the equivalent-time-lines model for MSW and the stress

  13. Adhesive–cohesive model for protein compressibility: An alternative perspective on stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadarlat, Voichita M.; Post, Carol Beth

    2003-01-01

    As a dynamic property of folded proteins, protein compressibility provides important information about the forces that govern structural stability. We relate intrinsic compressibility to stability by using molecular dynamics to identify a molecular basis for the variation in compressibility among globular proteins. We find that excess surface charge accounts for this variation not only for the proteins simulated by molecular dynamics but also for a larger set of globular proteins. This dependence on charge distribution forms the basis for an adhesive–cohesive model of protein compressibility in which attractive forces from solvent compete with tertiary interactions that favor folding. Further, a newly recognized correlation between compressibility and the heat capacity of unfolding infers a link between compressibility and the enthalpy of unfolding. This linkage, together with the adhesive–cohesive model for compressibility, leads to the conclusion that folded proteins can gain enthalpic stability from a uniform distribution of charged atoms, as opposed to partitioning charge to the protein surface. Whether buried charged groups can be energetically stabilizing is a fundamental, yet controversial, question regarding protein structure. The analysis reported here implies that one mechanism to gain enthalpic stability involves positioning charge inside the protein in an optimal structural arrangement. PMID:14638940

  14. Interaction of solitary waves in longitudinal magnetic field in two-fluid MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrikov, M. B.; Savelyev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of solitary waves in a model of two-fluid MHD is studied analytically and numerically in the most general case of waves in cold plasma in longitudinal magnetic field. The distinctive feature of this work is the use of “exact” equations rather than an approximate approach (a model equation). Numerical analysis of the solutions of this system of eight partial differential equations shows that the the interaction of solitary waves found in this case is the same (with great accuracy) as that of solitons, i.e., solitary waves that are solutions of various model equations. The solitary waves considered here transport plasmoids with velocities of the order of the Alfven velocity. The main finite-difference method used here for solving the said equations is a natural generalization of the classical two-step Lax-Wendorff scheme.

  15. Sparse Model Uncertainties in Compressed Sensing with Application to Convolutions and Sporadic Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Peter; Walk, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The success of the compressed sensing paradigm has shown that a substantial reduction in sampling and storage complexity can be achieved in certain linear and non-adaptive estimation problems. It is therefore an advisable strategy for noncoherent information retrieval in, for example, sporadic blind and semi-blind communication and sampling problems. But, the conventional model is not practical here since the compressible signals have to be estimated from samples taken solely on the output of...

  16. Viscoelastic properties of passive skeletal muscle in compression: stress-relaxation behaviour and constitutive modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loocke, M; Lyons, C G; Simms, C K

    2008-01-01

    The compressive properties of skeletal muscle are important in impact biomechanics, rehabilitation engineering and surgical simulation. However, the mechanical behaviour of muscle tissue in compression remains poorly characterised. In this paper, the time-dependent properties of passive skeletal muscle were investigated using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Uniaxial ramp and hold compression tests were performed in vitro on fresh porcine skeletal muscle at various rates and orientations of the tissue fibres. Results show that above a very small compression rate, the viscoelastic component plays a significant role in muscle mechanical properties; it represents approximately 50% of the total stress reached at a compression rate of 0.5% s(-1). A stiffening effect with compression rate is observed especially in directions closer to the muscle fibres. Skeletal muscle viscoelastic behaviour is thus dependent on compression rate and fibre orientation. A model is proposed to represent the observed experimental behaviour, which is based on the quasi-linear viscoelasticity framework. A previously developed strain-dependent Young's Moduli formulation was extended with Prony series to account for the tissue viscoelastic properties. Parameters of the model were obtained by fitting to stress-relaxation data obtained in the muscle fibre, cross-fibre and 45 degrees directions. The model then successfully predicted stress-relaxation behaviour at 60 degrees from the fibre direction (errors fitting to data obtained at compression rates of 0.5% s(-1), 1%s(-1) and 10% s(-1) was performed and the model provided a good fit to the data as well as good predictions of muscle behaviour at rates of 0.05% s(-1) and 5% s(-1) (errors <25%).

  17. Dorsal root ganglion compression as an animal model of sciatica and low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiao-Yu; Yang, Jing; LI, HUI-MING; Hu, San-Jue; Xing, Jun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    As sciatica and low back pain are among the most common medical complaints, many studies have duplicated these conditions in animals. Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) is one of these models. The surgery is simple: after exposing the L4/L5 intervertebral foramina, stainless steel rods are implanted unilaterally, one rod for each vertebra, to chronically compress the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Then, CCD can be used to simulate the clinical conditions caused by steno...

  18. The compressed breast during mammography and breast tomosynthesis: in vivo shape characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Alejandro; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-09-01

    To characterize and develop a patient-based 3D model of the compressed breast undergoing mammography and breast tomosynthesis. During this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 50 women were recruited to undergo 3D breast surface imaging with structured light (SL) during breast compression, along with simultaneous acquisition of a tomosynthesis image. A pair of SL systems were used to acquire 3D surface images by projecting 24 different patterns onto the compressed breast and capturing their reflection off the breast surface in approximately 12-16 s. The 3D surface was characterized and modeled via principal component analysis. The resulting surface model was combined with a previously developed 2D model of projected compressed breast shapes to generate a full 3D model. Data from ten patients were discarded due to technical problems during image acquisition. The maximum breast thickness (found at the chest-wall) had an average value of 56 mm, and decreased 13% towards the nipple (breast tilt angle of 5.2°). The portion of the breast not in contact with the compression paddle or the support table extended on average 17 mm, 18% of the chest-wall to nipple distance. The outermost point along the breast surface lies below the midline of the total thickness. A complete 3D model of compressed breast shapes was created and implemented as a software application available for download, capable of generating new random realistic 3D shapes of breasts undergoing compression. Accurate characterization and modeling of the breast curvature and shape was achieved and will be used for various image processing and clinical tasks.

  19. Investigation of turbulence models with compressibility corrections for hypersonic boundary flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pressure work, pressure-dilatation, and dilatation-dissipation (Sarkar, Zeman, and Wilcox models to hypersonic boundary flows are investigated. The flat plate boundary layer flows of Mach number 5–11 and shock wave/boundary layer interactions of compression corners are simulated numerically. For the flat plate boundary layer flows, original turbulence models overestimate the heat flux with Mach number high up to 10, and compressibility corrections applied to turbulence models lead to a decrease in friction coefficients and heating rates. The pressure work and pressure-dilatation models yield the better results. Among the three dilatation-dissipation models, Sarkar and Wilcox corrections present larger deviations from the experiment measurement, while Zeman correction can achieve acceptable results. For hypersonic compression corner flows, due to the evident increase of turbulence Mach number in separation zone, compressibility corrections make the separation areas larger, thus cannot improve the accuracy of calculated results. It is unreasonable that compressibility corrections take effect in separation zone. Density-corrected model by Catris and Aupoix is suitable for shock wave/boundary layer interaction flows which can improve the simulation accuracy of the peak heating and have a little influence on separation zone.

  20. Compression-based aggregation model for medical web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammary, Dhiah; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Many organizations such as hospitals have adopted Cloud Web services in applying their network services to avoid investing heavily computing infrastructure. SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) is the basic communication protocol of Cloud Web services that is XML based protocol. Generally,Web services often suffer congestions and bottlenecks as a result of the high network traffic that is caused by the large XML overhead size. At the same time, the massive load on Cloud Web services in terms of the large demand of client requests has resulted in the same problem. In this paper, two XML-aware aggregation techniques that are based on exploiting the compression concepts are proposed in order to aggregate the medical Web messages and achieve higher message size reduction.

  1. Modified Liu-Carter Compression Model for Natural Clays with Various Initial Water Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial water content has a significant effect on the compression behaviour of reconstituted clays. This effect has to be considered in the Liu-Carter model to ensure the addition voids ratio only related to soil structure. A modified Liu-Carter compression model is proposed by introducing the empirical equations for reconstituted clays at different initial water contents into the Liu-Carter model. The proposed model is verified against the experimental results from the literature. The simulations by the proposed method are also compared with that by old method where the influence of initial water content is not considered. The results show that the predicted virgin compression curves of natural clays are similar, but the values of b and Δey may be very different.

  2. Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach to Two-Fluid Open Many-Fermion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotureau, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Michel, N. [Kyoto University, Japan; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Dukelsky, J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid, Spain

    2009-01-01

    We have extended the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) approach to two-fluid open many-fermion systems governed by complex-symmetric Hamiltonians. The applications are carried out for three- and four-nucleon (proton-neutron) systems within the Gamow Shell Model (GSM) in the complex-energy plane. We study necessary and sufficient conditions for the GSM+DMRG method to yield the correct ground state eigenvalue and discuss different truncation schemes within DMRG. The proposed approach will enable configuration interaction studies of weakly bound and unbound strongly interacting complex systems which, because of a prohibitively large size of Fock space, cannot be treated by means of the direct diagonalization.

  3. Assessment of the impact of modeling axial compression on PET image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, Martin A; Reader, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    To comprehensively evaluate both the acceleration and image-quality impacts of axial compression and its degree of modeling in fully 3D PET image reconstruction. Despite being used since the very dawn of 3D PET reconstruction, there are still no extensive studies on the impact of axial compression and its degree of modeling during reconstruction on the end-point reconstructed image quality. In this work, an evaluation of the impact of axial compression on the image quality is performed by extensively simulating data with span values from 1 to 121. In addition, two methods for modeling the axial compression in the reconstruction were evaluated. The first method models the axial compression in the system matrix, while the second method uses an unmatched projector/backprojector, where the axial compression is modeled only in the forward projector. The different system matrices were analyzed by computing their singular values and the point response functions for small subregions of the FOV. The two methods were evaluated with simulated and real data for the Biograph mMR scanner. For the simulated data, the axial compression with span values lower than 7 did not show a decrease in the contrast of the reconstructed images. For span 11, the standard sinogram size of the mMR scanner, losses of contrast in the range of 5-10 percentage points were observed when measured for a hot lesion. For higher span values, the spatial resolution was degraded considerably. However, impressively, for all span values of 21 and lower, modeling the axial compression in the system matrix compensated for the spatial resolution degradation and obtained similar contrast values as the span 1 reconstructions. Such approaches have the same processing times as span 1 reconstructions, but they permit significant reduction in storage requirements for the fully 3D sinograms. For higher span values, the system has a large condition number and it is therefore difficult to recover accurately the higher

  4. Control of Tension-Compression Asymmetry in Ogden Hyperelasticity with Application to Soft Tissue Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Moerman, Kevin M; Nagel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses tension-compression asymmetry properties of Ogden hyperelastic formulations. It is shown that if all negative or all positive Ogden coefficients are used, tension-compression asymmetry occurs the degree of which cannot be separately controlled from the degree of non-linearity. A simple hybrid form is therefore proposed providing separate control over the tension-compression asymmetry. It is demonstrated how this form relates to a newly introduced generalised strain tensor class which encompasses both the tension-compression asymmetric Seth-Hill strain class and the tension-compression symmetric Ba\\v{z}ant strain class. If the control parameter is set to q=0.5 a tension-compression symmetric form involving Ba\\v{z}ant strains is obtained with the property {\\Psi}({\\lambda}_1,{\\lambda}_2,{\\lambda}_3 )={\\Psi}(1/{\\lambda}_1 ,1/{\\lambda}_2 ,1/{\\lambda}_3 ). The symmetric form may be desirable for the definition of ground matrix contributions in soft tissue modelling allowing all deviation from t...

  5. Closed-form solution of the Ogden-Hill's compressible hyperelastic model for ramp loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezvai, Szabolcs; Kossa, Attila

    2017-05-01

    This article deals with the visco-hyperelastic modelling approach for compressible polymer foam materials. Polymer foams can exhibit large elastic strains and displacements in case of volumetric compression. In addition, they often show significant rate-dependent properties. This material behaviour can be accurately modelled using the visco-hyperelastic approach, in which the large strain viscoelastic description is combined with the rate-independent hyperelastic material model. In case of polymer foams, the most widely used compressible hyperelastic material model, the so-called Ogden-Hill's model, was applied, which is implemented in the commercial finite element (FE) software Abaqus. The visco-hyperelastic model is defined in hereditary integral form, therefore, obtaining a closed-form solution for the stress is not a trivial task. However, the parameter-fitting procedure could be much faster and accurate if closed-form solution exists. In this contribution, exact stress solutions are derived in case of uniaxial, biaxial and volumetric compression loading cases using ramp-loading history. The analytical stress solutions are compared with the stress results in Abaqus using FE analysis. In order to highlight the benefits of the analytical closed-form solution during the parameter-fitting process experimental work has been carried out on a particular open-cell memory foam material. The results of the material identification process shows significant accuracy improvement in the fitting procedure by applying the derived analytical solutions compared to the so-called separated approach applied in the engineering practice.

  6. Modelling compressible dense and dilute two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurel, Richard; Chinnayya, Ashwin; Carmouze, Quentin

    2017-06-01

    Many two-phase flow situations, from engineering science to astrophysics, deal with transition from dense (high concentration of the condensed phase) to dilute concentration (low concentration of the same phase), covering the entire range of volume fractions. Some models are now well accepted at the two limits, but none are able to cover accurately the entire range, in particular regarding waves propagation. In the present work, an alternative to the Baer and Nunziato (BN) model [Baer, M. R. and Nunziato, J. W., "A two-phase mixture theory for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in reactive granular materials," Int. J. Multiphase Flow 12(6), 861 (1986)], initially designed for dense flows, is built. The corresponding model is hyperbolic and thermodynamically consistent. Contrarily to the BN model that involves 6 wave speeds, the new formulation involves 4 waves only, in agreement with the Marble model [Marble, F. E., "Dynamics of a gas containing small solid particles," Combustion and Propulsion (5th AGARD Colloquium) (Pergamon Press, 1963), Vol. 175] based on pressureless Euler equations for the dispersed phase, a well-accepted model for low particle volume concentrations. In the new model, the presence of pressure in the momentum equation of the particles and consideration of volume fractions in the two phases render the model valid for large particle concentrations. A symmetric version of the new model is derived as well for liquids containing gas bubbles. This model version involves 4 characteristic wave speeds as well, but with different velocities. Last, the two sub-models with 4 waves are combined in a unique formulation, valid for the full range of volume fractions. It involves the same 6 wave speeds as the BN model, but at a given point of space, 4 waves only emerge, depending on the local volume fractions. The non-linear pressure waves propagate only in the phase with dominant volume fraction. The new model is tested numerically on various

  7. Two equation modelling and the pseudo compressibility technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the Center for Modelling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT) is to further the understanding of turbulence theory for engineering applications. One important foundation is the establishment of a data base encompassing the multitude of existing models as well as newly proposed ideas. The research effort described is a precursor to an extended survey of two equation turbulence models in the presence of a separated shear layer. Recently, several authors have examined the performance of two equation models in the context of the backward facing step flow. Conflicting results, however, demand that further attention is necessary to properly understand the behavior and limitations of this popular technique, especially the low Reynolds number formulations. The objective is to validate an incompressible Navier Stokes code for use as a numerical test-bed. In turn, this code will be used for analyzing the performance of several two equation models.

  8. A discrete fibre dispersion method for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of fibrous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewei; Ogden, Ray W; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2018-01-01

    Recently, micro-sphere-based methods derived from the angular integration approach have been used for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of soft biological tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that many of the widely used numerical integration schemes over the unit sphere are inaccurate for large deformation problems even without excluding fibres under compression. Thus, in this study, we propose a discrete fibre dispersion model based on a systematic method for discretizing a unit hemisphere into a finite number of elementary areas, such as spherical triangles. Over each elementary area, we define a representative fibre direction and a discrete fibre density. Then, the strain energy of all the fibres distributed over each elementary area is approximated based on the deformation of the representative fibre direction weighted by the corresponding discrete fibre density. A summation of fibre contributions over all elementary areas then yields the resultant fibre strain energy. This treatment allows us to exclude fibres under compression in a discrete manner by evaluating the tension-compression status of the representative fibre directions only. We have implemented this model in a finite-element programme and illustrate it with three representative examples, including simple tension and simple shear of a unit cube, and non-homogeneous uniaxial extension of a rectangular strip. The results of all three examples are consistent and accurate compared with the previously developed continuous fibre dispersion model, and that is achieved with a substantial reduction of computational cost. © 2018 The Author(s).

  9. On the combined gradient-stochastic plasticity model: Application to Mo-micropillar compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantinidis, A. A., E-mail: akonsta@civil.auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Zhang, X., E-mail: zhangxu26@126.com [Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (Greece); Aifantis, E. C., E-mail: mom@mom.gen.auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-17

    A formulation for addressing heterogeneous material deformation is proposed. It is based on the use of a stochasticity-enhanced gradient plasticity model implemented through a cellular automaton. The specific application is on Mo-micropillar compression, for which the irregularities of the strain bursts observed have been experimentally measured and theoretically interpreted through Tsallis' q-statistics.

  10. Impact of particle density and initial volume on mathematical compression models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2000-01-01

    In the calculation of the coefficients of compression models for powders either the initial volume or the particle density is introduced as a normalising factor. The influence of these normalising factors is, however, widely different on coefficients derived from the Kawakita, Walker and Heckel e...

  11. The Effect of Transition Modeling on the Prediction of Compressible Deep Dynamic Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, W.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Platzer, M. F.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The importance of transition modeling in the computation of compressible, unsteady separated flows is discussed. The study showed that it is critical to predict the experimentally attained transition point properly in order to obtain good agreement with data it the same Mach number and Reynolds number.

  12. Improvements of an objective model of compressed breasts undergoing mammography: Generation and characterization of breast shapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Ruiz, A.; Feng, S.S.J.; Zelst, J.C.M. van; Vreemann, S.; Mann, J.R.; D'Orsi, C.J.; Sechopoulos, I.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a set of accurate 2D models of compressed breasts undergoing mammography or breast tomosynthesis, based on objective analysis, to accurately characterize mammograms with few linearly independent parameters, and to generate novel clinically realistic paired cranio-caudal (CC) and

  13. Petrophysical studies of north American carbonate rock samples and evaluation of pore-volume compressibility models

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gilberto Peixoto; Franco, Daniel R.; Stael, Giovanni C.; da Costa de Oliveira Lima, Maira; Sant'Anna Martins, Ricardo; de Moraes França, Olívia; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. V.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate two pore volume compressibility models that are currently discussed in the literature (Horne, 1990; Jalalh, 2006b). Five groups of carbonate rock samples from the three following sedimentary basins in North America that are known for their association with hydrocarbon deposits were selected for this study: (i) the Guelph Formation of the Michigan Basin (Middle Silurian); (ii) the Edwards Formation of the Central Texas Platform (Middle Cretaceous); and (iii) the Burlington-Keokuk Formation of the Mississippian System (Lower Mississippian). In addition to the evaluation of the compressibility model, a petrophysical evaluation of these rock samples was conducted. Additional characterizations, such as grain density, the effective porosity, absolute grain permeability, thin section petrography, MICP and NMR, were performed to complement constant pore-pressure compressibility tests. Although both models presented an overall good representation of the compressibility behavior of the studied carbonate rocks, even when considering their broad porosity range (~ 2-38%), the model proposed by Jalalh (2006b) performed better with a confidence level of 95% and a prediction interval of 68%.

  14. Modelling particulate self-healing materials and application to uni-axial compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbst, O.; Herbst, Olaf; Luding, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Using an advanced history dependent contact model for DEM simulations, including elasto-plasticity, viscosity, adhesion, and friction, pressure-sintered tablets are formed from primary particles. These tablets are subjected to unconfined uni-axial compression until and beyond failure. For fast and

  15. Modeling particulate self-healing materials and application to uni-axial compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbst, O.; Luding, S.

    2008-01-01

    Using an advanced history dependent contact model for DEM simulations, including elasto-plasticity, viscosity, adhesion, and friction, pressure-sintered tablets are formed from primary particles. These tablets are subjected to unconfined uni-axial compression until and beyond failure. For fast and

  16. A tentative model for estimating the compressibility of rock-salt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... compressibility of these alloys in terms of the elastic data of end-members alone. The calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental ones. The present model makes use of an early suggestion that interconnects Gibbs energy for the formation and/or migration of defects in solids with bulk properties.

  17. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of

  18. Modeling two-stage bunch compression with wakefields: Macroscopic properties and microbunching instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In a two-stage compression and acceleration system, where each stage compresses a chirped bunch in a magnetic chicane, wakefields affect high-current bunches. The longitudinal wakes affect the macroscopic energy and current profiles of the compressed bunch and cause microbunching at short wavelengths. For macroscopic wavelengths, impedance formulas and tracking simulations show that the wakefields can be dominated by the resistive impedance of coherent edge radiation. For this case, we calculate the minimum initial bunch length that can be compressed without producing an upright tail in phase space and associated current spike. Formulas are also obtained for the jitter in the bunch arrival time downstream of the compressors that results from the bunch-to-bunch variation of current, energy, and chirp. Microbunching may occur at short wavelengths where the longitudinal space-charge wakes dominate or at longer wavelengths dominated by edge radiation. We model this range of wavelengths with frequency-dependent impedance before and after each stage of compression. The growth of current and energy modulations is described by analytic gain formulas that agree with simulations.

  19. 3D two-fluid simulations of turbulence in LAPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.

    The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) is modeled using a modified version of the 3D Global Braginskii Solver code (GBS) for a nominal Helium plasma. The unbiased low-flow regime is explored in simulations where there is an intrinsic E x B rotation of the plasma. In the simulations this rotation is caused primarily by sheath effects with the Reynolds stress and J x B torque due to a cross-field Pederson conductivity having little effect. Explicit biasing simulations are also explored for the first time where the intrinsic rotation of the plasma is modified through boundary conditions that mimic the biasable limiter used in LAPD. Comparisons to experimental measurements in the unbiased case show strong qualitative agreement with the data, particularly the radial dependence of the density fluctuations, cross-correlation lengths, radial flux dependence outside of the cathode edge, and camera imagery. Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) turbulence at relatively large scales is the dominant driver of cross-field transport in these simulations with smaller-scale drift waves and sheath modes playing a secondary role. Plasma holes and blobs arising from KH vortices are consistent with the scale sizes and overall appearance of those in LAPD camera images. The addition of ion-neutral collisions in the unbiased simulations at previously theorized values reduces the radial particle flux due to a modest stabilizing contribution of the collisions on the KH-modes driving the turbulent transport. In the biased runs the ion-neutral collisions have a much smaller effect due to the modification of the potential from sheath terms. In biasing the plasma to increase the intrinsic rotation, simulations show the emergence of a nonlinearly saturated coherent mode of order m = 6. In addition, the plasma inside of the cathode edge becomes quiescent due to the strong influence of the wall bias in setting up the equilibrium plasma potential. Biasing in the direction opposite to the intrinsic flow reduces the

  20. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  1. Compressibility effects for the AGARD-B model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tuling, S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available with near wall treatment and the Spalart-Allmaras and - SST turbulence models, and validated experimentally in a 5' × 5' transonic facility. Other aspects not previously identified or studied are firstly a recovery shock between the primary and secondary...

  2. Acute forces required for fatal compression asphyxia: A biomechanical model and historical comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Mark W; Still, G Keith; Neuman, Tom S; Graham, Michael A; Griffin, Lanny V

    2017-04-01

    Background Fatalities from acute compression have been reported with soft-drink vending machine tipping, motor vehicle accidents, and trench cave-ins. A major mechanism of such deaths is flail chest but the amount of force required is unclear. Between the range of a safe static chest compression force of 1000 N (102 kg with earth gravity) and a lethal dynamic force of 10-20 kN (falling 450 kg vending machines), there are limited quantitative human data on the force required to cause flail chest, which is a major correlate of acute fatal compression asphyxia. Methods We modeled flail chest as bilateral fractures of six adjacent ribs. The static and dynamic forces required to cause such a ribcage failure were estimated using a biomechanical model of the thorax. The results were then compared with published historical records of judicial "pressing," vending machine fatalities, and automobile safety cadaver testing. Results and conclusion The modeling results suggest that an adult male requires 2550 ± 250 N of chest-applied distributed static force (260 ± 26 kg with earth gravity) or 4050 ± 320 N of dynamic force to cause flail chest from short-term chest compression.

  3. Stability limits in rotation and β with energetic ion, two fluid, and resistive wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D. P.; Cole, A. J.; Finn, J. M.; Halfmoon, M. R.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2017-10-01

    The non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of a tokamak configuration that is driven unstable to the m / n = 2 / 1 mode by increasing pressure is studied in a reduced model that includes many of the key physics components driving the instability: two fluid responses in various regimes at the resonant surface, a drift-kinetic slowing down distribution of trapped energetic ions, variations in the magnetic shear, plasma rotation and a resistive wall. The changes in stability are examined as the rotation varies across the Hall, Semi-Collisional and Inertial regimes, and compared with recent experiments on DIII-D for rotational limits. The energetic ion contribution to the perturbed pressure is included in the model, where energetic ions damp and stabilize the mode when orbiting in significant positive shear, and drive the mode unstable in reversed shear regions. The effect of rotation is included in the drift-kinetic ion model, where it modifies this effect. The equilibria are stable for low β and the marginal stability values in β and rotation are computed. The impact of the rotation in both the plasma layer responses, and the energetic ion response, must be taken into account to interpret the experimental results. Supported by US DOE Grants DE-SC0014005 and DE-SC0014119.

  4. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  5. Compression-based Modelling of Musical Similarity Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Marcus; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Similarity is an important concept in music cognition research since the similarity between (parts of) musical pieces determines perception of stylistic categories and structural relationships between parts of musical works. The purpose of the present research is to develop and test models of musical similarity perception inspired by a transformational approach which conceives of similarity between two perceptual objects in terms of the complexity of the cognitive operations required to trans...

  6. Numerical Modeling of Compressible Flow and Its Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Streamwise coordinate  Numerical parameter 0 Reference boundary layer thickness r Relative permittivity  Standard deviation R Separation...10) where 0 is the permittivity of free space. The electric field was found from E = −∇φ. C. Closure Models In the equation set (1)–(3), closure...103302. 27Uddi, M., Jiang, N., Adamovich, I. V., and Lempert, W. R., “Nitric Oxide Density Measurements in Air and Air/ Fuel Nanosecond Pulse Discharges

  7. Progress in turbulence modeling for complex flow fields including effects of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two second-order-closure turbulence models were devised that are suitable for predicting properties of complex turbulent flow fields in both incompressible and compressible fluids. One model is of the "two-equation" variety in which closure is accomplished by introducing an eddy viscosity which depends on both a turbulent mixing energy and a dissipation rate per unit energy, that is, a specific dissipation rate. The other model is a "Reynolds stress equation" (RSE) formulation in which all components of the Reynolds stress tensor and turbulent heat-flux vector are computed directly and are scaled by the specific dissipation rate. Computations based on these models are compared with measurements for the following flow fields: (a) low speed, high Reynolds number channel flows with plane strain or uniform shear; (b) equilibrium turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients or effects of compressibility; and (c) flow over a convex surface with and without a pressure gradient.

  8. Finite element implementation of a new model of slight compressibility for transversely isotropic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrat, B; Murphy, J G; MacManus, D B; Gilchrist, M D

    2016-01-01

    Modelling transversely isotropic materials in finite strain problems is a complex task in biomechanics, and is usually addressed by using finite element (FE) simulations. The standard method developed to account for the quasi-incompressible nature of soft tissues is to decompose the strain energy function (SEF) into volumetric and deviatoric parts. However, this decomposition is only valid for fully incompressible materials, and its use for slightly compressible materials yields an unphysical response during the simulation of hydrostatic tension/compression of a transversely isotropic material. This paper presents the FE implementation as subroutines of a new volumetric model solving this deficiency in two FE codes: Abaqus and FEBio. This model also has the specificity of restoring the compatibility with small strain theory. The stress and elasticity tensors are first derived for a general SEF. This is followed by a successful convergence check using a particular SEF and a suite of single-element tests showing that this new model does not only correct the hydrostatic deficiency but may also affect stresses during shear tests (Poynting effect) and lateral stretches during uniaxial tests (Poisson's effect). These FE subroutines have numerous applications including the modelling of tendons, ligaments, heart tissue, etc. The biomechanics community should be aware of specificities of the standard model, and the new model should be used when accurate FE results are desired in the case of compressible materials.

  9. Balanced sparse model for tight frames in compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunsong; Cai, Jian-Feng; Zhan, Zhifang; Guo, Di; Ye, Jing; Chen, Zhong; Qu, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Compressed sensing has shown to be promising to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging. In this new technology, magnetic resonance images are usually reconstructed by enforcing its sparsity in sparse image reconstruction models, including both synthesis and analysis models. The synthesis model assumes that an image is a sparse combination of atom signals while the analysis model assumes that an image is sparse after the application of an analysis operator. Balanced model is a new sparse model that bridges analysis and synthesis models by introducing a penalty term on the distance of frame coefficients to the range of the analysis operator. In this paper, we study the performance of the balanced model in tight frame based compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging and propose a new efficient numerical algorithm to solve the optimization problem. By tuning the balancing parameter, the new model achieves solutions of three models. It is found that the balanced model has a comparable performance with the analysis model. Besides, both of them achieve better results than the synthesis model no matter what value the balancing parameter is. Experiment shows that our proposed numerical algorithm constrained split augmented Lagrangian shrinkage algorithm for balanced model (C-SALSA-B) converges faster than previously proposed algorithms accelerated proximal algorithm (APG) and alternating directional method of multipliers for balanced model (ADMM-B).

  10. Balanced sparse model for tight frames in compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsong Liu

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing has shown to be promising to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging. In this new technology, magnetic resonance images are usually reconstructed by enforcing its sparsity in sparse image reconstruction models, including both synthesis and analysis models. The synthesis model assumes that an image is a sparse combination of atom signals while the analysis model assumes that an image is sparse after the application of an analysis operator. Balanced model is a new sparse model that bridges analysis and synthesis models by introducing a penalty term on the distance of frame coefficients to the range of the analysis operator. In this paper, we study the performance of the balanced model in tight frame based compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging and propose a new efficient numerical algorithm to solve the optimization problem. By tuning the balancing parameter, the new model achieves solutions of three models. It is found that the balanced model has a comparable performance with the analysis model. Besides, both of them achieve better results than the synthesis model no matter what value the balancing parameter is. Experiment shows that our proposed numerical algorithm constrained split augmented Lagrangian shrinkage algorithm for balanced model (C-SALSA-B converges faster than previously proposed algorithms accelerated proximal algorithm (APG and alternating directional method of multipliers for balanced model (ADMM-B.

  11. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3.5 Locking Compression Plate Fixation to 3.5 Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate Fixation in a Canine Cadaveric Distal Humeral Metaphyseal Gap Model

    OpenAIRE

    Filipowicz, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Objective- To compare the biomechanical properties of 3.5 locking compression plate (LCP) fixation to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation in a canine cadaveric, distal humeral metaphyseal gap model in static axial compression and cyclic axial compression and torsion. Study Design- Biomechanical in vitro study. Sample Population- 30 paired humeri from adult, medium to large breed dogs. Methods- Testing was performed monotonically to failure in axial compres...

  12. Exploring Vacuum Energy in a Two-Fluid Bianchi Type I Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kohli, Ikjyot Singh

    2014-01-01

    We use a dynamical systems approach based on the method of orthonormal frames to study the dynamics of a two-fluid, non-tilted Bianchi Type I cosmological model. In our model, one of the fluids is a fluid with bulk viscosity, while the other fluid assumes the role of a cosmological constant and represents nonnegative vacuum energy. We begin by completing a detailed fixed-point analysis of the system which gives information about the local sinks, sources and saddles. We then proceed to analyze the global features of the dynamical system by using topological methods such as finding Lyapunov and Chetaev functions, and finding the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-limit sets using the LaSalle invariance principle. The fixed points found were a flat Friedmann-LeMa\\^{\\i}tre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe with no vacuum energy, a de Sitter universe, a flat FLRW universe with both vacuum and non-vacuum energy, and a Kasner quarter-circle universe. We also show in this paper that the vacuum energy we observe in our present-day...

  13. Modeling and experimental validation of trabecular bone damage, softening and densification under large compressive strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hadi S; Pahr, Dieter H; Zysset, Philippe K

    2012-11-01

    Vertebral fractures represent a major health problem and involve the progressive collapse of trabecular bone over large compressive strains. This collapse is driven by local failure and interaction of the trabecular rod and plate elements, which translates into stress softening and densification at the material level. Current constitutive models for trabecular bone are essentially limited to infinitesimal strains. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to extend our current phenomenological model of trabecular bone (Garcia et al., 2009) for the simulation of large compressive strains by including post-yield softening and densification. A constitutive model of trabecular bone based on both volume fraction and trabecular orientation was formulated in a proper theoretical framework, implemented in commercial FE software and validated with human vertebral sections subjected to large compressive strains. As it is for infinitesimal strains, the evolution of plastic strains and damage is described by local internal variables. An isotropic softening rule was controlled by the cumulated plastic strain and a non-linear elastic spring was added to account for densification of the porous material in moderate-to-large compressive strains beyond a given threshold. To avoid convergence problems occurring as a result of softening, a consistent visco-plastic regularization approach was adopted. The experimental results for 37 vertebral sections from previous work (Dall'Ara et al., 2010) were used to validate the constitutive model for compressive loading up to 45% of the average axial deformation. This validation study showed that the model provides both qualitative predictions of damage localization on the cortex and quantitative predictions of dissipated energy (ρ(C)=0.912) of vertebral body behavior under large compressive strains. Since the evolution of the internal variables was considered in local manner, a mesh sensitivity analysis of the finite element model was conducted

  14. The effect of compression on tuning estimates in a simple nonlinear auditory filter model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Marton; MacDonald, Ewen; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    consists of a compressor between two bandpass filters. The BPNL forms the basis of the dual-resonance nonlinear (DRNL) filter that has been used in a number of modeling studies. The location of the nonlinear element and its effect on estimated tuning in the two measurement paradigms was investigated......, there is evidence that human frequency-selectivity estimates depend on whether an iso-input or an iso-response measurement paradigm is used (Eustaquio-Martin et al., 2011). This study presents simulated tuning estimates using a simple compressive auditory filter model, the bandpass nonlinearity (BPNL), which....... The results show that compression leads to (i) a narrower tuning estimate in the iso-response paradigm when a compressor precedes a filter, and (ii) a wider tuning estimate in the iso-input paradigm when a compressor follows a filter. The results imply that if the DRNL presents a valid cochlear model...

  15. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  16. A novel rodent model of spinal metastasis and spinal cord compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zibly Zion

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal cord metastatic lesions affect a high number of cancer patients usually resulting in spinal cord compression syndrome. A major obstacle in the research of spinal metastatic disease is the lack of a simple reproducible animal model that mimics the natural course of the disease. In this study, we present a highly reproducible rodent model that can be used for different types of cancers while mimicking the natural course of human metastatic spinal cord compression syndrome. Results All sixteen Fisher 344 rats survived the dorsal approach intraosseous implantation of CRL-1666 adenocarcinoma cells and both rats survived the sham control surgery. By Day 13 functional analysis via the modified Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale showed significant decrease in motor function; median functional score was 3 for the tumor group (p = 0.0011. Median time to paresis was 8.7 days post-operatively. MR imaging illustrated repeated and consistent tumor formation, furthermore, onset of neurological sequale was the result of tumor formation and cord compression as confirmed by histological examination. Conclusions Analysis of these findings demonstrates a repeatable and consistent tumor growth model for cancer spinal metastases in rats. This novel rat model requires a less intricate surgical procedure, and as a result minimizes procedure time while subsequently increasing consistency. Therefore, this model allows for the preclinical evaluation of therapeutics for spinal metastases that more closely replicates physiological findings.

  17. On mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of transient compressible flow across open boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rian, Kjell Erik

    2003-07-01

    In numerical simulations of turbulent reacting compressible flows, artificial boundaries are needed to obtain a finite computational domain when an unbounded physical domain is given. Artificial boundaries which fluids are free to cross are called open boundaries. When calculating such flows, non-physical reflections at the open boundaries may occur. These reflections can pollute the solution severely, leading to inaccurate results, and the generation of spurious fluctuations may even cause the numerical simulation to diverge. Thus, a proper treatment of the open boundaries in numerical simulations of turbulent reacting compressible flows is required to obtain a reliable solution for realistic conditions. A local quasi-one-dimensional characteristic-based open-boundary treatment for the Favre-averaged governing equations for time-dependent three-dimensional multi-component turbulent reacting compressible flow is presented. A k-{epsilon} model for turbulent compressible flow and Magnussen's EDC model for turbulent combustion is included in the analysis. The notion of physical boundary conditions is incorporated in the method, and the conservation equations themselves are applied on the boundaries to complement the set of physical boundary conditions. A two-dimensional finite-difference-based computational fluid dynamics code featuring high-order accurate numerical schemes was developed for the numerical simulations. Transient numerical simulations of the well-known, one-dimensional shock-tube problem, a two-dimensional pressure-tower problem in a decaying turbulence field, and a two-dimensional turbulent reacting compressible flow problem have been performed. Flow- and combustion-generated pressure waves seem to be well treated by the non-reflecting subsonic open-boundary conditions. Limitations of the present open-boundary treatment are demonstrated and discussed. The simple and solid physical basis of the method makes it both favourable and relatively easy to

  18. Evaluation and mathematical modeling of asymmetric tensile and compressive creep in aluminum alloy ZL109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qing [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Weizheng, E-mail: zhangwz@bit.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Youyi [School of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11790, US (United States)

    2015-03-25

    This study investigates the effects of tension/compression asymmetry during creep deformation under different conditions. The asymmetry is found to be dependent on stress and temperature. At high temperatures (350 °C, 70 MPa) or high levels of stress (250 °C, 130 MPa), the ratio between the tensile and compressive creep rates can be as large as 10. This ratio is smaller at lower temperatures (200 °C, 90 MPa) and lower levels of stress (300 °C, 30 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) visualization of different microdefects indicates that the size and volume of microcavities are dependent on the level of stress applied. Similarly, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to visualize dislocations and twinning. The differences in microcavity size and volume in tensile and compressive creep appear to be larger under higher temperature and stress, but no difference in dislocation is observed and no twinning crystals are found. Cavity nucleation appears to be the cause of the asymmetry in creep behavior, which is determined by temperature and stress. A new mathematical model for creep is constructed and validated considering the different asymmetric mechanisms of tensile and compressive creep.

  19. Dispersion Relations and Polarizations of Low-frequency Waves in Two-fluid Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in magnetized plasmas based on two-fluid model are obtained. The properties of waves propagating at different angles (to the ambient magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}_{0}$) and \\beta (the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressures) values are investigated. It is shown that two linearly polarized waves, namely the fast and Alfv\\'{e}n modes in the low-\\beta $\\left( \\beta \\ll 1\\right)$ plasmas, the fast and slow modes in the \\beta \\sim 1 plasmas, and the Alfv\\'{e}n and slow modes in the high-\\beta $\\left( \\beta \\gg 1\\right)$ plasmas, become circularly polarized at the near-parallel (to $\\mathbf{B}_{0}$) propagation. The negative magnetic-helicity of the Alfv\\'{e}n mode occurs only at small or moderate angles in the low-\\beta plasmas, and the ion cross-helicity of the slow mode is nearly the same as that of the Alfv\\'{e}n mode in the high-\\beta plasmas. It also shown the electric polarization $\\delta E_{z}/\\delta E_{y}$ decreases...

  20. Physical and numerical modeling of multidimensional liquid-vapor flows advanced two-fluid models, application to upwind finite volume methods; Modelisation physique et numerique d'ecoulements eau-vapeur multidimensionnels modeles bifluides avances, application de methodes de volumes finis decentres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seignole, V

    2005-07-01

    This report presents the work of thesis realized under the direction of Jean-Michel Ghidaglia (thesis director, ENS-Cachan) and of Anela Kumbaro (tutor, CEA) within the framework of the modeling of two-phase flows with OAP code. The report consists of two parts of unequal size: the first part concentrates on aspects related exclusively to two-phase flows, while the second one is devoted to the study of a numerical problem inherent to the resolution of two-phase flow systems, but whose action has a broader framework. (author)

  1. Modeling and computation of boundary-layer flows laminar, turbulent and transitional boundary layers in incompressible and compressible flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of our book extends the modeling and calculation of boundary-layer flows to include compressible flows. The subjects cover laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers for two- and three-dimensional incompressible and compressible flows. The viscous-inviscid coupling between the boundary layer and the inviscid flow is also addressed. The book has a large number of homework problems.

  2. Compressing an Ensemble with Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2015-04-02

    One of the main challenges when working with modern climate model ensembles is the increasingly larger size of the data produced, and the consequent difficulty in storing large amounts of spatio-temporally resolved information. Many compression algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific data sets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a different, statistics-based approach that explicitly accounts for the space-time dependence of the data for annual global three-dimensional temperature fields in an initial condition ensemble. The set of estimated parameters is small (compared to the data size) and can be regarded as a summary of the essential structure of the ensemble output; therefore, it can be used to instantaneously reproduce the temperature fields in an ensemble with a substantial saving in storage and time. The statistical model exploits the gridded geometry of the data and parallelization across processors. It is therefore computationally convenient and allows to fit a non-trivial model to a data set of one billion data points with a covariance matrix comprising of 10^18 entries.

  3. Thermodynamic Modelling of an Ejector with Compressible Flow by a One-Dimensional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Chacoux

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is the dimensioning of the cylindrical mixing chamber of a compressible fluid ejector used in particular in sugar refineries for degraded vapor re‑compression at the calandria exit, during the evaporation phase. The method used, known as the “integral” or “thermodynamic model”, is based on the model of the one‑dimensional isentropic flow of perfect gases with the addition of a model of losses. Characteristic curves and envelope curves are plotted. The latter are an interesting tool from which the characteristic dimensions of the ejector can be rapidly obtained for preliminary dimensioning (for an initial contact with a customer for example. These ejectors, which were specifically designed for the process rather than selected from a catalog of standard devices, will promote energy saving.

  4. Extra compressibility terms for Favre-averaged two-equation models of inhomogeneous turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubesin, Morris W.

    1990-01-01

    Forms of extra-compressibility terms that result from use of Favre averaging of the turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation are derived. These forms introduce three new modeling constants, a polytropic coefficient that defines the interrelationships of the pressure, density, and enthalpy fluctuations and two constants in the dissipation equation that account for the non-zero pressure-dilitation and mean pressure gradients.

  5. Modeling of Compressive Strength for Self-Consolidating High-Strength Concrete Incorporating Palm Oil Fuel Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiuddin, Md.; Raman, Sudharshan N.; Abdus Salam, Md.; Jumaat, Mohd. Zamin

    2016-01-01

    Modeling is a very useful method for the performance prediction of concrete. Most of the models available in literature are related to the compressive strength because it is a major mechanical property used in concrete design. Many attempts were taken to develop suitable mathematical models for the prediction of compressive strength of different concretes, but not for self-consolidating high-strength concrete (SCHSC) containing palm oil fuel ash (POFA). The present study has used artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict the compressive strength of SCHSC incorporating POFA. The ANN model has been developed and validated in this research using the mix proportioning and experimental strength data of 20 different SCHSC mixes. Seventy percent (70%) of the data were used to carry out the training of the ANN model. The remaining 30% of the data were used for testing the model. The training of the ANN model was stopped when the root mean square error (RMSE) and the percentage of good patterns was 0.001 and ≈100%, respectively. The predicted compressive strength values obtained from the trained ANN model were much closer to the experimental values of compressive strength. The coefficient of determination (R2) for the relationship between the predicted and experimental compressive strengths was 0.9486, which shows the higher degree of accuracy of the network pattern. Furthermore, the predicted compressive strength was found very close to the experimental compressive strength during the testing process of the ANN model. The absolute and percentage relative errors in the testing process were significantly low with a mean value of 1.74 MPa and 3.13%, respectively, which indicated that the compressive strength of SCHSC including POFA can be efficiently predicted by the ANN. PMID:28773520

  6. Modeling of Compressive Strength for Self-Consolidating High-Strength Concrete Incorporating Palm Oil Fuel Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Safiuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling is a very useful method for the performance prediction of concrete. Most of the models available in literature are related to the compressive strength because it is a major mechanical property used in concrete design. Many attempts were taken to develop suitable mathematical models for the prediction of compressive strength of different concretes, but not for self-consolidating high-strength concrete (SCHSC containing palm oil fuel ash (POFA. The present study has used artificial neural networks (ANN to predict the compressive strength of SCHSC incorporating POFA. The ANN model has been developed and validated in this research using the mix proportioning and experimental strength data of 20 different SCHSC mixes. Seventy percent (70% of the data were used to carry out the training of the ANN model. The remaining 30% of the data were used for testing the model. The training of the ANN model was stopped when the root mean square error (RMSE and the percentage of good patterns was 0.001 and ≈100%, respectively. The predicted compressive strength values obtained from the trained ANN model were much closer to the experimental values of compressive strength. The coefficient of determination (R2 for the relationship between the predicted and experimental compressive strengths was 0.9486, which shows the higher degree of accuracy of the network pattern. Furthermore, the predicted compressive strength was found very close to the experimental compressive strength during the testing process of the ANN model. The absolute and percentage relative errors in the testing process were significantly low with a mean value of 1.74 MPa and 3.13%, respectively, which indicated that the compressive strength of SCHSC including POFA can be efficiently predicted by the ANN.

  7. A progressive compression model of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice: function assessment and pathological changes in spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Dong; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Shu-Xian; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Zhi-Zhong

    2017-08-01

    Non-traumatic injury accounts for approximately half of clinical spinal cord injury, including chronic spinal cord compression. However, previous rodent spinal cord compression models are mainly designed for rats, few are available for mice. Our aim is to develop a thoracic progressive compression mice model of spinal cord injury. In this study, adult wild-type C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: in the surgery group, a screw was inserted at T9 lamina to compress the spinal cord, and the compression was increased by turning it further into the canal (0.2 mm) post-surgery every 2 weeks up to 8 weeks. In the control group, a hole was drilled into the lamina without inserting a screw. The results showed that Basso Mouse Scale scores were lower and gait worsened. In addition, the degree of hindlimb dysfunction in mice was consistent with the degree of spinal cord compression. The number of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord was reduced in all groups of mice, whereas astrocytes and microglia were gradually activated and proliferated. In conclusion, this progressive compression of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice is a preferable model for chronic progressive spinal cord compression injury.

  8. A novel phenomenological model for dynamic behavior of magnetorheological elastomers in tension-compression mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatandoost, Hossein; Norouzi, Mahmood; Masoud Sajjadi Alehashem, Seyed; Smoukov, Stoyan K.

    2017-06-01

    Tension-compression operation in MR elastomers (MREs) offers both the most compact design and superior stiffness in many vertical load-bearing applications, such as MRE bearing isolators in bridges and buildings, suspension systems and engine mounts in cars, and vibration control equipment. It suffers, however, from lack of good computational models to predict device performance, and as a result shear-mode MREs are widely used in the industry, despite their low stiffness and load-bearing capacity. We start with a comprehensive review of modeling of MREs and their dynamic characteristics, showing previous studies have mostly focused on dynamic behavior of MREs in shear mode, though the MRE strength and MR effect are greatly decreased at high strain amplitudes, due to increasing distance between the magnetic particles. Moreover, the characteristic parameters of the current models assume either frequency, or strain, or magnetic field are constant; hence, new model parameters must be recalculated for new loading conditions. This is an experimentally time consuming and computationally expensive task, and no models capture the full dynamic behavior of the MREs at all loading conditions. In this study, we present an experimental setup to test MREs in a coupled tension-compression mode, as well as a novel phenomenological model which fully predicts the stress-strain material behavior as a function of magnetic flux density, loading frequency and strain. We use a training set of experiments to find the experimentally derived model parameters, from which can predict by interpolation the MRE behavior in a relatively large continuous range of frequency, strain and magnetic field. We also challenge the model to make extrapolating predictions and compare to additional experiments outside the training experimental data set with good agreement. Further development of this model would allow design and control of engineering structures equipped with tension-compression MREs and all

  9. Electromechanical modeling and experimental analysis of a compression-based piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, wireless sensor networks have been widely used in the field of structure health monitoring of civil, mechanical, and aerospace systems. Currently, most wireless sensor networks are battery-powered and it is costly and unsustainable for maintenance because of the requirement for frequent battery replacements. As an attempt to address such issue, this article theoretically and experimentally studies a compression-based piezoelectric energy harvester using a multilayer stack configuration, which is suitable for civil infrastructure system applications where large compressive loads occur, such as heavily vehicular loading acting on pavements. In this article, we firstly present analytical and numerical modeling of the piezoelectric multilayer stack under axial compressive loading, which is based on the linear theory of piezoelectricity. A two-degree-of-freedom electromechanical model, considering both the mechanical and electrical aspects of the proposed harvester, was developed to characterize the harvested electrical power under the external electrical load. Exact closed-form expressions of the electromechanical models have been derived to analyze the mechanical and electrical properties of the proposed harvester. The theoretical analyses are validated through several experiments for a test prototype under harmonic excitations. The test results exhibit very good agreement with the analytical analyses and numerical simulations for a range of resistive loads and input excitation levels.

  10. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  11. Modeling of the Tension and Compression Behavior of Sintered 316L Using Micro Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroszko Michał

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the method of numerical modeling of the tension and compression behavior of sintered 316L. In order to take into account the shape of the mesostructures of materials in the numerical modeling, X-ray microtomography was used. Based on the micro-CT images, three-dimensional geometrical models mapped shapes of the porosity were generated. To the numerical calculations was used finite element method. Based on the received stress and strain fields was described the mechanism of deformation of the materials until fracture. The influence of material discontinuities at the mesoscopic scale on macromechanical properties of the porous materials was investigated.

  12. Computer modeling of the vapor compression cycle with constant flow area expansion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, P.; Didion, D.

    1983-05-01

    An analysis of the vapor compression cycle and the main components of an air source heat pump during steady state operator was performed with emphasis on fundamental phenomena taking place between key locations in the refrigerant system. The basis of the general heat pump model formulation is the logic which links the analytical models of heat pump components together in a format requiring an iterative solution of refrigerant pressure, enthalpy and mass balances. The modeling effort emphasis was on the local thermodynamic phenomena which were described by fundamental heat transfer equations and equation of state relationships among material properties.

  13. Utilization of Response Surface Methodology for Modeling and Optimization of Tablet Compression Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vijay Kumar Garlapati; Lakshmishri Roy

    2017-01-01

    ... time and Dissolution time. Among all the table compression parameters, feeder speed, precompression, main compression forces and Turret speed have a substantial effect on tablet properties. Aim...

  14. Rheological-dynamical continuum damage model for concrete under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical model for the prediction of concrete response under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification is presented in this paper. The proposed approach, referred to as the rheological-dynamical continuum damage model, combines rheological-dynamical analogy and damage mechanics. Within the framework of this approach the key continuum parameters such as the creep coefficient, Poisson’s ratio and damage variable are functionally related. The critical values of the creep coefficient and damage variable under peak stress are used to describe the failure mode of the concrete cylinder. The ultimate strain is determined in the post-peak regime only, using the secant stress-strain relation from damage mechanics. The post-peak branch is used for the energy analysis. Experimental data for five concrete compositions were obtained during the examination presented herein. The principal difference between compressive failure and tensile fracture is that there is a residual stress in the specimens, which is a consequence of uniformly accelerated motion of load during the examination of compressive strength. The critical interpenetration displacements and crushing energy are obtained theoretically based on the concept of global failure analysis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 174027: Computational Mechanics in Structural Engineering i br. TR 36017: Utilization of by-products and recycled waste materials in concrete composites for sustainable construction development in Serbia: Investigation and environmental assessment of possible applications

  15. Two-fluid sub-grid-scale viscosity in nonlinear simulation of ballooning modes in a heliotron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, H.; Hamba, F.; Ito, A.

    2017-07-01

    A large eddy simulation (LES) approach is introduced to enable the study of the nonlinear growth of ballooning modes in a heliotron-type device, by solving fully 3D two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations numerically over a wide range of parameter space, keeping computational costs as low as possible. A model to substitute the influence of scales smaller than the grid size, at sub-grid scale (SGS), and at the scales larger than it—grid scale (GS)—has been developed for LES. The LESs of two-fluid MHD equations with SGS models have successfully reproduced the growth of the ballooning modes in the GS and nonlinear saturation. The numerical results show the importance of SGS effects on the GS components, or the effects of turbulent fluctuation at small scales in low-wavenumber unstable modes, over the course of the nonlinear saturation process. The results also show the usefulness of the LES approach in studying instability in a heliotron device. It is shown through a parameter survey over many SGS model coefficients that turbulent small-scale components in experiments can contribute to keeping the plasma core pressure from totally collapsing.

  16. Compressibility Considerations for kappa-omega Turbulence Models in Hypersonic Boundary Layer Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of kappa-omega models to predict compressible turbulent skin friction in hypersonic boundary layers is investigated. Although uncorrected two-equation models can agree well with correlations for hot-wall cases, they tend to perform progressively worse - particularly for cold walls - as the Mach number is increased in the hypersonic regime. Simple algebraic models such as Baldwin-Lomax perform better compared to experiments and correlations in these circumstances. Many of the compressibility corrections described in the literature are summarized here. These include corrections that have only a small influence for kappa-omega models, or that apply only in specific circumstances. The most widely-used general corrections were designed for use with jet or mixing-layer free shear flows. A less well-known dilatation-dissipation correction intended for boundary layer flows is also tested, and is shown to agree reasonably well with the Baldwin-Lomax model at cold-wall conditions. It exhibits a less dramatic influence than the free shear type of correction. There is clearly a need for improved understanding and better overall physical modeling for turbulence models applied to hypersonic boundary layer flows.

  17. Computational modeling of joint U.S.-Russian experiments relevant to magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) experiments, in which a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions, present some challenging computational modeling problems. Recently, joint experiments relevant to MTF (Russian acronym MAGO, for Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) have been performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). Modeling of target plasmas must accurately predict plasma densities, temperatures, fields, and lifetime; dense plasma interactions with wall materials must be characterized. Modeling of magnetically driven imploding solid liners, for compression of target plasmas, must address issues such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in the presence of material strength, and glide plane-liner interactions. Proposed experiments involving liner-on-plasma compressions to fusion conditions will require integrated target plasma and liner calculations. Detailed comparison of the modeling results with experiment will be presented.

  18. Control volume based modelling in one space dimension of oscillating, compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach for modelling unsteady, primarily one-dimensional, compressible flow. The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are applied to a staggered mesh of control volumes and loss mechanisms are included directly as extra terms. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects are calculated using empirical correlations. Transformations of the conservation equations into new variables, artificial dissipation for dissipating acoustic phenomena, and an asymmetric interpolation method for minimising numerical diffusion and non physical temperature oscillations...... are presented. The capabilities of the approach are illustrated with an example solution and an experimental validation of a Stirling engine model....

  19. Models of Long-Term Brittle Fracture of Rods in Tension and Compression Under Creep Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobzar', Yu. M.

    2017-10-01

    Fracture models based on the increasing density of material and the decreasing bearing mass of material in tension and compression, respectively, are proposed. The creep strain rates modeled using the most widespread version of the flow theory. An analytical approach allows obtaining an equation identical in all cases and relating Poisson's ratio, time function, and rheological parameter. An algorithm for determining two last parameters based on creep testing is proposed. The expected time-to-fracture values of heat-resistant alloys are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Model-based compressed sensing of fiber Bragg grating arrays in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werzinger, Stefan; Gottinger, Michael; Gussner, Sandra; Bergdolt, Sven; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    We propose a model-based compressed sensing (MBCS) of FBG arrays (FBGA), interrogated with wavelength scanning incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry. This method measures the frequency response of a FBGA with an electrical vector network analyzer combined with a tunable laser. Instead of the usual inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT), we apply a direct estimation of the grating reflectivities with a simple frequency domain model. A reconstruction of 10 gratings spaced by 20 cm is demonstrated. MBCS allows to reduce the number of measurement frequencies from 120 to 8, compared to an IDFT, while using a bandwidth of just 500 MHz.

  1. A model and numerical method for compressible flows with capillary effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidmayer, Kevin, E-mail: kevin.schmidmayer@univ-amu.fr; Petitpas, Fabien, E-mail: fabien.petitpas@univ-amu.fr; Daniel, Eric, E-mail: eric.daniel@univ-amu.fr; Favrie, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.favrie@univ-amu.fr; Gavrilyuk, Sergey, E-mail: sergey.gavrilyuk@univ-amu.fr

    2017-04-01

    A new model for interface problems with capillary effects in compressible fluids is presented together with a specific numerical method to treat capillary flows and pressure waves propagation. This new multiphase model is in agreement with physical principles of conservation and respects the second law of thermodynamics. A new numerical method is also proposed where the global system of equations is split into several submodels. Each submodel is hyperbolic or weakly hyperbolic and can be solved with an adequate numerical method. This method is tested and validated thanks to comparisons with analytical solutions (Laplace law) and with experimental results on droplet breakup induced by a shock wave.

  2. Correlating locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views using an analytical hemispherical compression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Guido; Tanner, Christine; Snoeren, Peter; Samulski, Maurice; Leifland, Karin; Wallis, Matthew G.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-08-01

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast examinations usually consist of two views per breast. In order to combine information from both views, corresponding regions in the views need to be matched. In 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), this may be a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists, because many slices have to be inspected individually. For multiview computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, matching corresponding regions is an essential step that needs to be automated. In this study, we developed an automatic method to quickly estimate corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views by applying a spatial transformation. First we match a model of a compressed breast to the tomosynthesis view containing a point of interest. Then we estimate the location of the corresponding point in the ipsilateral view by assuming that this model was decompressed, rotated and compressed again. In this study, we use a relatively simple, elastically deformable sphere model to obtain an analytical solution for the transformation in a given DBT case. We investigate three different methods to match the compression model to the data by using automatic segmentation of the pectoral muscle, breast tissue and nipple. For validation, we annotated 208 landmarks in both views of a total of 146 imaged breasts of 109 different patients and applied our method to each location. The best results are obtained by using the centre of gravity of the breast to define the central axis of the model, around which the breast is assumed to rotate between views. Results show a median 3D distance between the actual location and the estimated location of 14.6 mm, a good starting point for a registration method or a feature-based local search method to link suspicious regions in a multiview CAD system. Approximately half of the estimated locations are at most one slice away from the actual location, which makes the method useful as a mammographic workstation tool for

  3. Fast and Stable Signal Deconvolution via Compressible State-Space Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemipour, Abbas; Liu, Ji; Solarana, Krystyna; Nagode, Daniel A; Kanold, Patrick O; Wu, Min; Babadi, Behtash

    2018-01-01

    Common biological measurements are in the form of noisy convolutions of signals of interest with possibly unknown and transient blurring kernels. Examples include EEG and calcium imaging data. Thus, signal deconvolution of these measurements is crucial in understanding the underlying biological processes. The objective of this paper is to develop fast and stable solutions for signal deconvolution from noisy, blurred, and undersampled data, where the signals are in the form of discrete events distributed in time and space. We introduce compressible state-space models as a framework to model and estimate such discrete events. These state-space models admit abrupt changes in the states and have a convergent transition matrix, and are coupled with compressive linear measurements. We consider a dynamic compressive sensing optimization problem and develop a fast solution, using two nested expectation maximization algorithms, to jointly estimate the states as well as their transition matrices. Under suitable sparsity assumptions on the dynamics, we prove optimal stability guarantees for the recovery of the states and present a method for the identification of the underlying discrete events with precise confidence bounds. We present simulation studies as well as application to calcium deconvolution and sleep spindle detection, which verify our theoretical results and show significant improvement over existing techniques. Our results show that by explicitly modeling the dynamics of the underlying signals, it is possible to construct signal deconvolution solutions that are scalable, statistically robust, and achieve high temporal resolution. Our proposed methodology provides a framework for modeling and deconvolution of noisy, blurred, and undersampled measurements in a fast and stable fashion, with potential application to a wide range of biological data.

  4. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  5. Correlating locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views using an analytical hemispherical compression model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Schie, Guido; Snoeren, Peter; Samulski, Maurice; Karssemeijer, Nico [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Tanner, Christine [Computer Vision Laboratory, ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Leifland, Karin [Unilabs Mammography, Capio S:t Goerans Hospital, SE-112 81 Stockholm (Sweden); Wallis, Matthew G, E-mail: g.schie@rad.umcn.nl [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-07

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast examinations usually consist of two views per breast. In order to combine information from both views, corresponding regions in the views need to be matched. In 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), this may be a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists, because many slices have to be inspected individually. For multiview computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, matching corresponding regions is an essential step that needs to be automated. In this study, we developed an automatic method to quickly estimate corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views by applying a spatial transformation. First we match a model of a compressed breast to the tomosynthesis view containing a point of interest. Then we estimate the location of the corresponding point in the ipsilateral view by assuming that this model was decompressed, rotated and compressed again. In this study, we use a relatively simple, elastically deformable sphere model to obtain an analytical solution for the transformation in a given DBT case. We investigate three different methods to match the compression model to the data by using automatic segmentation of the pectoral muscle, breast tissue and nipple. For validation, we annotated 208 landmarks in both views of a total of 146 imaged breasts of 109 different patients and applied our method to each location. The best results are obtained by using the centre of gravity of the breast to define the central axis of the model, around which the breast is assumed to rotate between views. Results show a median 3D distance between the actual location and the estimated location of 14.6 mm, a good starting point for a registration method or a feature-based local search method to link suspicious regions in a multiview CAD system. Approximately half of the estimated locations are at most one slice away from the actual location, which makes the method useful as a mammographic workstation tool for

  6. Compression-recovery model of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator guided by X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Rajput, Krishn Gopal

    2017-10-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators play a key role in enhancing the cycle life of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries by maintaining the elastic characteristics under a defined level of compression force with the plates of the electrodes. Inevitably, there are inherent challenges to maintain the required level of compression characteristics of AGM separators during the charge and discharge of the battery. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) analytical model for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators by formulating a direct relationship with the constituent fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators has successfully included the fiber slippage criterion and internal friction losses. The presented work uses, for the first time, 3D data of fiber orientation from X-ray micro-computed tomography, for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of compression-recovery behavior of AGM samples with defined fiber orientation characteristics. In general, the theory agreed reasonably well with the experimental results of AGM samples in both dry and wet states. Through theoretical modeling, fiber volume fraction was established as one of the key structural parameters that modulates the compression hysteresis of an AGM separator.

  7. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods. PMID:28772472

  8. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-26

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel-space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  9. Sub-grid combustion modeling for compressible two-phase reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vaidyanathan

    2003-06-01

    A generic formulation for modeling the turbulent combustion in compressible, high Reynolds number, two-phase; reacting flows has been developed and validated. A sub-grid mixing/combustion model called Linear Eddy Mixing (LEM) model has been extended to compressible flows and used inside the framework of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in this LES-LEM approach. The LES-LEM approach is based on the proposition that the basic mechanistic distinction between the convective and the molecular effects should be preserved for accurate prediction of complex flow-fields such as those encountered in many combustion systems. Liquid droplets (represented by computational parcels) are tracked using the Lagrangian approach wherein the Newton's equation of motion for the discrete particles are integrated explicitly in the Eulerian gas field. The gas phase LES velocity fields are used to estimate the instantaneous gas velocity at the droplet location. Drag effects due to the droplets on the gas phase and the heat transfer between the gas and the liquid phase are explicitly included. Thus, full coupling is achieved between the two phases in the simulation. Validation of the compressible LES-LEM approach is conducted by simulating the flow-field in an operational General Electric Aircraft Engines combustor (LM6000). The results predicted using the proposed approach compares well with the experiments and a conventional (G-equation) thin-flame model. Particle tracking algorithms used in the present study are validated by simulating droplet laden temporal mixing layers. Quantitative and qualitative comparison with the results of spectral DNS exhibits good agreement. Simulations using the current LES-LEM for freely propagating partially premixed flame in a droplet-laden isotropic turbulent field correctly captures the flame structure in the partially premixed flames. Due to the strong spatial variation of equivalence ratio a broad flame similar to a premixed flame is realized. The current

  10. A Nonlinear Elastic Model for Triaxial Compressive Properties of Artificial Methane-Hydrate-Bearing Sediment Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Yamaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A constitutive model for marine sediments containing natural gas hydrate is essential for the simulation of the geomechanical response to gas extraction from a gas-hydrate reservoir. In this study, the triaxial compressive properties of artificial methane-hydrate-bearing sediment samples reported in an earlier work were analyzed to examine the applicability of a nonlinear elastic constitutive model based on the Duncan-Chang model. The presented model considered the dependences of the mechanical properties on methane hydrate saturation and effective confining pressure. Some parameters were decided depending on the type of sand forming a specimen. The behaviors of lateral strain versus axial strain were also formulated as a function of effective confining pressure. The constitutive model presented in this study will provide a basis for an elastic analysis of the geomechanical behaviors of the gas-hydrate reservoir in the future study, although it is currently available to a limited extent.

  11. Integration of phase change materials in compressed hydrogen gas systems: Modelling and parametric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of saving the monetary...... temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank, but its influence on the hydrogen peak temperature that occurs at the end of refueling is modest. The heat transfer from the gas...

  12. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  13. Analysis of discrete-to-discrete imaging models for iterative tomographic image reconstruction and compressive sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, Jakob H; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Discrete-to-discrete imaging models for computed tomography (CT) are becoming increasingly ubiquitous as the interest in iterative image reconstruction algorithms has heightened. Despite this trend, all the intuition for algorithm and system design derives from analysis of continuous-to-continuous models such as the X-ray and Radon transform. While the similarity between these models justifies some crossover, questions such as what are sufficient sampling conditions can be quite different for the two models. This sampling issue is addressed extensively in the first half of the article using singular value decomposition analysis for determining sufficient number of views and detector bins. The question of full sampling for CT is particularly relevant to current attempts to adapt compressive sensing (CS) motivated methods to application in CT image reconstruction. The second half goes in depth on this subject and discusses the link between object sparsity and sufficient sampling for accurate reconstruction. Par...

  14. Derivation of models of compressible miscible displacement in partially fractured reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Choquet

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We derive rigorously homogenized models for the displacement of one compressible miscible fluid by another in fractured porous media. We denote by $epsilon$ the characteristic size of the heterogeneity in the medium. A parameter $alpha in [0,1]$ characterizes the cracking degree of the rock. We carefully define an adapted microscopic model which is scaled by appropriate powers of $epsilon$. We then study its limit as $epsilon o 0$. Assuming a totally fractured or a partially fractured medium, we obtain two effective macroscopic limit models. The first one is a double porosity model. The second one is of single porosity type but it still contains some effects due to the partial storage in the matrix part. The convergence is shown using two-scale convergence techniques.

  15. Modeling compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete by Artificial Neural Network, Model Tree and Non-linear Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neela Deshpande

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past Artificial Neural Networks (ANN have emerged out as a promising technique for predicting compressive strength of concrete. In the present study back propagation was used to predict the 28 day compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC along with two other data driven techniques namely Model Tree (MT and Non-linear Regression (NLR. Recycled aggregate is the current need of the hour owing to its environmental friendly aspect of re-use of the construction waste. The study observed that, prediction of 28 day compressive strength of RAC was done better by ANN than NLR and MT. The input parameters were cubic meter proportions of Cement, Natural fine aggregate, Natural coarse Aggregates, recycled aggregates, Admixture and Water (also called as raw data. The study also concluded that ANN performs better when non-dimensional parameters like Sand–Aggregate ratio, Water–total materials ratio, Aggregate–Cement ratio, Water–Cement ratio and Replacement ratio of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates, were used as additional input parameters. Study of each network developed using raw data and each non dimensional parameter facilitated in studying the impact of each parameter on the performance of the models developed using ANN, MT and NLR as well as performance of the ANN models developed with limited number of inputs. The results indicate that ANN learn from the examples and grasp the fundamental domain rules governing strength of concrete.

  16. Three-dimensional coupled double-distribution-function lattice Boltzmann models for compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ruo-Fan; You, Yan-Cheng; Zhu, Cheng-Xiang; Chen, Rong-Qian; Zhu, Jian-Feng

    2017-12-01

    Two three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann models in the framework of coupled double-distribution-function approach for compressible flows, in which specific-heat ratio and Prandtl number can be adjustable, are developed in this paper. The main differences between the two models are discrete equilibrium density and total energy distribution function. One is the D3Q25 model obtained from spherical function, and the other is the D3Q27 standard lattice model obtained from Hermite expansions of the corresponding continuous equilibrium distribution functions. The two models are tested by numerical simulations of some typical compressible flows, and their numerical stability and precision are also analysed. The results indicate that the two models are capable for supersonic flows, while the one from Hermite expansions is not suitable for compressible flows with shock waves.

  17. Rapid maxillary anterior teeth retraction en masse by bone compression: a canine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chufeng Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study sought to establish an animal model to study the feasibility and safety of rapid retraction of maxillary anterior teeth en masse aided by alveolar surgery in order to reduce orthodontic treatment time. METHOD: Extraction of the maxillary canine and alveolar surgery were performed on twelve adult beagle dogs. After that, the custom-made tooth-borne distraction devices were placed on beagles' teeth. Nine of the dogs were applied compression at 0.5 mm/d for 12 days continuously. The other three received no force as the control group. The animals were killed in 1, 14, and 28 days after the end of the application of compression. RESULTS: The tissue responses were assessed by craniometric measurement as well as histological examination. Gross alterations were evident in the experimental group, characterized by anterior teeth crossbite. The average total movements of incisors within 12 days were 4.63±0.10 mm and the average anchorage losses were 1.25±0.12 mm. Considerable root resorption extending into the dentine could be observed 1 and 14 days after the compression. But after consolidation of 28 days, there were regenerated cementum on the dentine. There was no apparent change in the control group. No obvious tooth loosening, gingival necrosis, pulp degeneration, or other adverse complications appeared in any of the dogs. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first experimental study for testing the technique of rapid anterior teeth retraction en masse aided by modified alveolar surgery. Despite a preliminary animal model study, the current findings pave the way for the potential clinical application that can accelerate orthodontic tooth movement without many adverse complications. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: It may become a novel method to shorten the clinical orthodontic treatment time in the future.

  18. A viscous compressible model of soap film flow and its equivalence with the Navier-Stokes equations

    OpenAIRE

    Fast, Petri

    2005-01-01

    We present a quasi-two dimensional model of flowing soap films that bears striking similarity to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The variation in soap film thickness that is commonly used for flow visualization in experiments is analogous to density variations in the Navier-Stokes equations. When the soap film flow velocity is comparable to the Marangoni elastic wave velocity we recover the compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the soap film behaves like a two-dimensional isother...

  19. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability of a thermal interface in a two-fluid plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Bond, D.

    2017-11-03

    We computationally investigate the Richtmyer–Meshkov instability of a density interface with a single-mode perturbation in a two-fluid, ion–electron plasma with no initial magnetic field. Self-generated magnetic fields arise subsequently. We study the case where the density jump across the initial interface is due to a thermal discontinuity, and select plasma parameters for which two-fluid plasma effects are expected to be significant in order to elucidate how they alter the instability. The instability is driven via a Riemann problem generated precursor electron shock that impacts the density interface ahead of the ion shock. The resultant charge separation and motion generates electromagnetic fields that cause the electron shock to degenerate and periodically accelerate the electron and ion interfaces, driving Rayleigh–Taylor instability. This generates small-scale structures and substantially increases interfacial growth over the hydrodynamic case.

  20. Evaluation of Industry Standard Turbulence Models on an Axisymmetric Supersonic Compression Corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations of a shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) created by a Mach 2.85 flow over an axisymmetric 30-degree compression corner were carried out. The objectives were to evaluate four turbulence models commonly used in industry, for SWBLIs, and to evaluate the suitability of this test case for use in further turbulence model benchmarking. The Spalart-Allmaras model, Menter's Baseline and Shear Stress Transport models, and a low-Reynolds number k- model were evaluated. Results indicate that the models do not accurately predict the separation location; with the SST model predicting the separation onset too early and the other models predicting the onset too late. Overall the Spalart-Allmaras model did the best job in matching the experimental data. However there is significant room for improvement, most notably in the prediction of the turbulent shear stress. Density data showed that the simulations did not accurately predict the thermal boundary layer upstream of the SWBLI. The effect of turbulent Prandtl number and wall temperature were studied in an attempt to improve this prediction and understand their effects on the interaction. The data showed that both parameters can significantly affect the separation size and location, but did not improve the agreement with the experiment. This case proved challenging to compute and should provide a good test for future turbulence modeling work.

  1. A Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Model of Jointed Hard Rock for Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy resources such as wind and solar are intermittent, which causes instability when being connected to utility grid of electricity. Compressed air energy storage (CAES provides an economic and technical viable solution to this problem by utilizing subsurface rock cavern to store the electricity generated by renewable energy in the form of compressed air. Though CAES has been used for over three decades, it is only restricted to salt rock or aquifers for air tightness reason. In this paper, the technical feasibility of utilizing hard rock for CAES is investigated by using a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM modelling of nonisothermal gas flow. Governing equations are derived from the rules of energy balance, mass balance, and static equilibrium. Cyclic volumetric mass source and heat source models are applied to simulate the gas injection and production. Evaluation is carried out for intact rock and rock with discrete crack, respectively. In both cases, the heat and pressure losses using air mass control and supplementary air injection are compared.

  2. Effect of aggregates on the magnetization property of ferrofluids: A model of gaslike compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li, Yan Huang, Xiaodong Liu, Yueqing Lin, Lang Bai and Qiang Li

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of field-induced aggregation of particles on the magnetization property of ferrofluids is investigated. From the viewpoint of energy, magnetizability of ferrofluids is more complicated than predicted by Langevin theory because the aggregation, i.e., the transition of ferrofluid microstructure, would consume the energy of the applied magnetic field. For calculating the effect of aggregates on the magnetization of ferrofluids, a model of gaslike compression (MGC is proposed to simulate the evolution of the aggregate structure. In this model, the field-induced colloidal particles aggregating in ferrofluids is equivalent to the "gas of the particles" being compressed by the applied magnetic field. The entropy change of the ferrofluid microstructure is proportional to the particle volume fraction in field-induced aggregates phivH. On the basis of the known behavior of ferrofluid magnetization and the aggregate structure determined from the present experiments, phivH is obtained and found to depend on the aggregating characteristic parameter of ferrofluid particles γ in addition to the particle volume fraction in ferrofluids phiv and the strength of applied magnetic field H. The effect of the nonmagnetic surface layer of ferrofluid particles is also studied. The theory of MGC conforms to our experimental results better than Langevin theory.

  3. Effect of a seed magnetic field on two-fluid plasma Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Daryl; Wheatley, Vincent; Samtaney, Ravi; Pullin, Dale

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of a uniform seed magnetic field on the plasma Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) using two-fluid simulations. These couple sets of conservation equations for the ions and electrons to the full Maxwell's equations. We consider cases where the seed magnetic field is normal to the interface and where the reference Debye length and Larmor radius range from a tenth to a thousandth of the interface perturbation wavelength. In ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), it has been shown that in the presence of such a seed magnetic field, the growth of the RMI is suppressed by the transport of vorticity from the interface by MHD shocks. Our two-fluid plasma simulations reveal that while the RMI is suppressed in the presence of the seed field, the suppression mechanism varies depending on the plasma length-scales. Two-fluid plasma RMI simulations also reveal a secondary, high-wavenumber, electron-driven interface instability. This is not suppressed by the presence of the seed field. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  4. Influence of Chest Compressions on Circulation during the Peri-Cardiac Arrest Period in Porcine Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    Full Text Available Starting chest compressions immediately after a defibrillation shock might be harmful, if the victim already had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and yet was still being subjected to external compressions at the same time. The objective of this study was to study the influence of chest compressions on circulation during the peri-cardiac arrest period.Prospective, randomized controlled study.Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China.Healthy 3-month-old male domestic pigs.44 pigs (28±2 kg were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (non-arrested with compressions (n = 12; Group II (arrested with compressions only (n = 12; Group III (ROSC after compressions and defibrillation (n = 20. In Groups I and II, compressions were performed to a depth of 5cm (Ia and IIa, n = 6 or a depth of 3cm (Ib and IIb, n = 6 respectively, while in Group III, the animals which had just achieved ROSC (n = 18 were compressed to a depth of 5cm (IIIa, n = 6, a depth of 3cm (IIIb, n = 6, or had no compressions (IIIc, n = 6. Hemodynamic parameters were collected and analyzed.Hemodynamics were statistically different between Groups Ia and Ib when different depths of compressions were performed (p < 0.05. In Group II, compressions were beneficial and hemodynamics correlated with the depth of compressions (p < 0.05. In Group III, compressions that continued after ROSC produced a reduction in arterial pressure (p < 0.05.Chest compressions might be detrimental to hemodynamics in the early post-ROSC stage. The deeper the compressions were, the better the effect on hemodynamics during cardiac arrest, but the worse the effect on hemodynamics after ROSC.

  5. Finite-element modeling of compression and gravity on a population of breast phantoms for multimodality imaging simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y; Samei, E; Segars, W P

    2016-05-01

    The authors are developing a series of computational breast phantoms based on breast CT data for imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a program that will allow a user to alter the phantoms to simulate the effect of gravity and compression of the breast (craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique) making the phantoms applicable to multimodality imaging. This application utilizes a template finite-element (FE) breast model that can be applied to their presegmented voxelized breast phantoms. The FE model is automatically fit to the geometry of a given breast phantom, and the material properties of each element are set based on the segmented voxels contained within the element. The loading and boundary conditions, which include gravity, are then assigned based on a user-defined position and compression. The effect of applying these loads to the breast is computed using a multistage contact analysis in FEBio, a freely available and well-validated FE software package specifically designed for biomedical applications. The resulting deformation of the breast is then applied to a boundary mesh representation of the phantom that can be used for simulating medical images. An efficient script performs the above actions seamlessly. The user only needs to specify which voxelized breast phantom to use, the compressed thickness, and orientation of the breast. The authors utilized their FE application to simulate compressed states of the breast indicative of mammography and tomosynthesis. Gravity and compression were simulated on example phantoms and used to generate mammograms in the craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique views. The simulated mammograms show a high degree of realism illustrating the utility of the FE method in simulating imaging data of repositioned and compressed breasts. The breast phantoms and the compression software can become a useful resource to the breast imaging research community. These phantoms can then be used to evaluate and compare imaging

  6. Mathematical model relating uniaxial compressive behavior of manufactured sand mortar to MIP-derived pore structure parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenghong; Bu, Jingwu

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial compression response of manufactured sand mortars proportioned using different water-cement ratio and sand-cement ratio is examined. Pore structure parameters such as porosity, threshold diameter, mean diameter, and total amounts of macropores, as well as shape and size of micropores are quantified by using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) technique. Test results indicate that strains at peak stress and compressive strength decreased with the increasing sand-cement ratio due to insufficient binders to wrap up entire sand. A compression stress-strain model of normal concrete extending to predict the stress-strain relationships of manufactured sand mortar is verified and agreed well with experimental data. Furthermore, the stress-strain model constant is found to be influenced by threshold diameter, mean diameter, shape, and size of micropores. A mathematical model relating stress-strain model constants to the relevant pore structure parameters of manufactured sand mortar is developed.

  7. On Active Surge Control of Compression Systems via Characteristic Linearization and Model Nonlinearity Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes S.M. Simamora

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple approach of active surge control of compression systems is presented. Specifically, nonlinear components of the pressure ratio and rotating speed states of the Moore-Greitzer model are transferred into the input vectors. Subsequently, the compressor characteristic is linearized into two modes, which describe the stable region and the unstable region respectively. As a result, the system’s state and input matrices both appear linear, to which linear realization and analysis are applicable. A linear quadratic regulator plus integrator is then chosen as closed-loop controller. By simulation it was shown that the modified model and characteristics can describe surge behavior, while the closed-loop controller can stabilize the system in the unstable operating region. The last-mentioned was achieved when massflow was 5.38 per cent less than the surge point.

  8. Modeling and Experimental Investigation of Methylcyclohexane Ignition in a Rapid Compression Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Naik, C V; Mhaold?in, T N; Curran, H J; Orme, J P; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

    2005-10-13

    A new mechanism for the oxidation of methylcyclohexane has been developed. The mechanism combined a newly-developed low temperature mechanism with a previously developed high temperature mechanism. Predictions from the chemical kinetic model have been compared to experimentally measured ignition delay times from a rapid compression machine. Predicted ignition delay times using the initial estimates of the methylcyclohexyl peroxy radical isomerization rate constants were much longer than those measured at low temperatures. The initial estimates of isomerization rate constants were modified based on the experimental findings of Gulati and Walker that indicate a much slower rate of isomerization. Predictions using the modified rate constants for isomerizations yielded faster ignition at lower temperatures that greatly improved the agreement between model predictions and the experimental data. These findings point to much slower isomerization rates for methylcyclohexyl peroxy radicals than previously expected.

  9. Modeling and control of tissue compression and temperature for automation in robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Utkarsh; Li, Baichun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used widely due to its various benefits that includes reduced patient trauma and increased dexterity and ergonomics for the operating surgeon. Making the whole or part of the surgical procedure autonomous increases patient safety and will enable the robotic surgery platform to be used in telesurgery. In this work, an Electrosurgery procedure that involves tissue compression and application of heat such as the coaptic vessel closure has been automated. A MIMO nonlinear model characterizing the tissue stiffness and conductance under compression was feedback linearized and tuned PID controllers were used to control the system to achieve both the displacement and temperature constraints. A reference input for both the constraints were chosen as a ramp and hold trajectory which reflect the real constraints that exist in an actual surgical procedure. Our simulations showed that the controllers successfully tracked the reference trajectories with minimal deviation and in finite time horizon. The MIMO system with controllers developed in this work can be used to drive a surgical robot autonomously and perform electrosurgical procedures such as coaptic vessel closures.

  10. ASAM v2.7: a compressible atmospheric model with a Cartesian cut cell approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jähn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the fully compressible, three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model called All Scale Atmospheric Model (ASAM is presented. A cut cell approach is used to include obstacles and orography into the Cartesian grid. Discretization is realized by a mixture of finite differences and finite volumes and a state limiting is applied. Necessary shifting and interpolation techniques are outlined. The method can be generalized to any other orthogonal grids, e.g., a lat–long grid. A linear implicit Rosenbrock time integration scheme ensures numerical stability in the presence of fast sound waves and around small cells. Analyses of five two-dimensional benchmark test cases from the literature are carried out to show that the described method produces meaningful results with respect to conservation properties and model accuracy. The test cases are partly modified in a way that the flow field or scalars interact with cut cells. To make the model applicable for atmospheric problems, physical parameterizations like a Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model, a two-moment bulk microphysics scheme, and precipitation and surface fluxes using a sophisticated multi-layer soil model are implemented and described. Results of an idealized three-dimensional simulation are shown, where the flow field around an idealized mountain with subsequent gravity wave generation, latent heat release, orographic clouds and precipitation are modeled.

  11. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  12. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Rahim Hematiyan, Mohammad; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.

  13. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas....... Furthermore, the presence of irreducible liquid water is taken into account. In order to account for compression, porous media morphology variations are specified based on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) through-plane strain and intrusion which are stated as a function of compression. These morphology...... diffusion layer, microporous layer, and catalyst layer, excluding the membrane and anode. In the porous media liquid water transport is described by the capillary pressure gradient, momentum loss via the Darcy-Forchheimer equation, and mass transfer between phases by a nonequilibrium phase change model...

  14. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  15. Effects of Panax ginseng-containing herbal plasters on compressed intervertebral discs in an in vivo rat tail model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Daniel H K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tienchi (Panax notoginseng has been used in conservative treatments for back pain as a major ingredient of many herbal medicines. This study aims to investigate the effects of a herbal medicine containing tienchi on compressed intervertebral discs in rats. Methods Using an in vivo rat tail model, intervertebral disc compression was simulated in the caudal 8–9 discs of 25 rats by continuous static compression (11 N for 2 weeks. An herbal medicine plaster (in which the major ingredient was tienchi was externally applied to the compressed disc (n=9 for three weeks, and held in place by an adhesive bandage, in animals in the Chinese Medicine (CM group. The effect of the bandage was evaluated in a separate placebo group (n=9, while no intervention with unrestricted motion was provided to rats in an additional control group (n=7. Disc structural properties were quantified by in vivo disc height measurement and in vitro morphological analysis. Results Disc height decreased after the application of compression (P P = 0.006 and placebo (P = 0.003 groups, but was maintained in the CM group (P = 0.494. No obvious differences in disc morphology were observed among the three groups (P = 0.896. Conclusion The tienchi-containing herbal plaster had no significant effect on the morphology of compressed discs, but maintained disc height in rats.

  16. Revisiting Turbulence Model Validation for High-Mach Number Axisymmetric Compression Corner Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Huang, George P.

    2015-01-01

    Two axisymmetric shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) cases are used to benchmark one- and two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models. This validation exercise was executed in the philosophy of the NASA Turbulence Modeling Resource and the AIAA Turbulence Model Benchmarking Working Group. Both SWBLI cases are from the experiments of Kussoy and Horstman for axisymmetric compression corner geometries with SWBLI inducing flares of 20 and 30 degrees, respectively. The freestream Mach number was approximately 7. The RANS closures examined are the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model and the Menter family of kappa - omega two equation models including the Baseline and Shear Stress Transport formulations. The Wind-US and CFL3D RANS solvers are employed to simulate the SWBLI cases. Comparisons of RANS solutions to experimental data are made for a boundary layer survey plane just upstream of the SWBLI region. In the SWBLI region, comparisons of surface pressure and heat transfer are made. The effects of inflow modeling strategy, grid resolution, grid orthogonality, turbulent Prandtl number, and code-to-code variations are also addressed.

  17. Polarization and Compressibility of Oblique Kinetic Alfven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunana, Peter; Goldstein, M. L.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Laveder, D.; Zank, G. P.

    2012-01-01

    Even though solar wind, as a collisionless plasma, is properly described by the kineticMaxwell-Vlasov description, it can be argued that much of our understanding of solar wind observational data comes from an interpretation and numerical modeling which is based on a fluid description of magnetohydrodynamics. In recent years, there has been a significant interest in better understanding the importance of kinetic effects, i.e. the differences between the kinetic and usual fluid descriptions. Here we concentrate on physical properties of oblique kinetic Alfvn waves (KAWs), which are often recognized as one of the key ingredients in the solar wind turbulence cascade. We use three different fluid models with various degrees of complexity and calculate polarization and magnetic compressibility of oblique KAWs (propagation angle q = 88), which we compare to solutions derived from linear kinetic theory. We explore a wide range of possible proton plasma b = [0.1,10.0] and a wide range of length scales krL = [0.001,10.0]. It is shown that the classical isotropic two-fluid model is very compressible in comparison with kinetic theory and that the largest discrepancy occurs at scales larger than the proton gyroscale. We also show that the two-fluid model contains a large error in the polarization of electric field, even at scales krL 1. Furthermore, to understand these discrepancies between the two-fluid model and the kinetic theory, we employ two versions of the Landau fluid model that incorporate linear low-frequency kinetic effects such as Landau damping and finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections into the fluid description. It is shown that Landau damping significantly reduces the magnetic compressibility and that FLR corrections (i.e. nongyrotropic contributions) are required to correctly capture the polarization.We also show that, in addition to Landau damping, FLR corrections are necessary to accurately describe the damping rate of KAWs. We conclude that kinetic effects

  18. Integrated modeling for optimized regional transportation with compressed natural gas fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A. Gabbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transportation represents major energy consumption where fuel is considered as a primary energy source. Recent development in the vehicle technology revealed possible economical improvements when using natural gas as a fuel source instead of traditional gasoline. There are several fuel alternatives such as electricity, which showed potential for future long-term transportation. However, the move from current situation where gasoline vehicle is dominating shows high cost compared to compressed natural gas vehicle. This paper presents modeling and simulation methodology to optimize performance of transportation based on quantitative study of the risk-based performance of regional transportation. Emission estimation method is demonstrated and used to optimize transportation strategies based on life cycle costing. Different fuel supply scenarios are synthesized and evaluated, which showed strategic use of natural gas as a fuel supply.

  19. Integration of phase change materials in compressed hydrogen gas systems: Modelling and parametric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of saving the monetary...... and energy resources spent at the refueling station to cool the gas prior to tank filling. This is done while respecting the technical constraint of keeping the walls below the critical temperature of 85 C to ensure the mechanical stability of the storage system even when the gas is fueled at ambient...... temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank, but its influence on the hydrogen peak temperature that occurs at the end of refueling is modest. The heat transfer from the gas...

  20. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  1. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  2. A comparative study of several compressibility corrections to turbulence models applied to high-speed shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, John R.; Rubesin, Morris W.

    1991-01-01

    Several recently published compressibility corrections to the standard k-epsilon turbulence model are used with the Navier-Stokes equations to compute the mixing region of a large variety of high speed flows. These corrections, specifically developed to address the weakness of higher order turbulence models to accurately predict the spread rate of compressible free shear flows, are applied to two stream flows of the same gas mixing under a large variety of free stream conditions. Results are presented for two types of flows: unconfined streams with either (1) matched total temperatures and static pressures, or (2) matched static temperatures and pressures, and a confined stream.

  3. A non-linear homogeneous model for bone-like materials under compressive load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, M; Voide, R; de Bien, C; Freichels, H; Jérôme, C; Léonard, A; Toye, D; Müller, R; van Lenthe, G H; Ponthot, J P

    2012-02-01

    Finite element (FE) models accurately compute the mechanical response of bone and bone-like materials when the models include their detailed microstructure. In order to simulate non-linear behavior, which currently is only feasible at the expense of extremely high computational costs, coarser models can be used if the local morphology has been linked to the apparent mechanical behavior. The aim of this paper is to implement and validate such a constitutive law. This law is able to capture the non-linear structural behavior of bone-like materials through the use of fabric tensors. It also allows for irreversible strains using an elastoplastic material model incorporating hardening. These features are expressed in a constitutive law based on the anisotropic continuum damage theory coupled with isotropic elastoplasticity in a finite strain framework. This material model was implemented into metafor (LTAS-MNNL, University of Liège, Belgium), a non-linear FE software. The implementation was validated against experimental data of cylindrical samples subjected to compression. Three materials with bone-like microstructure were tested: aluminum foams of variable density (ERG, Oakland, CA, USA), polylactic acid foam (CERM, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium), and cancellous bone tissue of a deer antler (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Jointed Rock Under Compressive Loading Using X-ray Computerized Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinglei; Yang, Shengqi; Ranjith, P. G.; Zhu, Wancheng; Yang, Tianhong

    2016-03-01

    As jointed rocks consist of joints embedded within intact rock blocks, the presence and geometrical fabric of joints have a great influence on the mechanical behavior of rock. With consideration of the actual spatial shape of joints, a numerical model is proposed to investigate the fracture evolution mechanism of jointed rocks. In the proposed model, computerized tomography (CT) scanning is first used to capture the microstructure of a jointed sandstone specimen, which is artificially fabricated by loading the intact sample until the residual strength, and then digital image processing (DIP) techniques are applied to characterize the geometrical fabric of joints from the CT images. A simple vectorization method is used to convert the microstructure based on a cross-sectional image into a layer of 3-D vectorized microstructure and the overall 3-D model of the jointed sandstone including the real spatial shape of the joints is established by stacking the layers in a specific sequence. The 3-D model is then integrated into a well-established code [three-dimensional Rock Failure Process Analysis, (RFPA3D)]. Using the proposed model, a uniaxial compression test of the jointed sandstone is simulated. The results show that the presence of joints can produce tensile stress zones surrounding them, which result in the fracture of jointed rocks under a relatively small external load. In addition, the spatial shape of the joints has a great influence on the fracture process of jointed rocks.

  5. Preclinical mouse models for assessing axial compression of long bones during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Brun, Julia; Bonnet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this laboratory method is to describe two approaches for the investigation of bone responses to mechanical loading in mice in vivo. The first is running exercise, because it is easily translatable clinically, and the second is axial compression of the tibia, because it is precisely controllable. The effects of running exercise, and in general physical activity, on bone tissue have been shown to be both direct through mechanical loading (ground impact and muscle tension) and indirect through metabolic changes. Therefore, running exercise has been considered the most convenient preclinical model for demonstrating the general idea that exercise is good for bone health, either early in age for increasing peak bone mass or later in age by slowing down bone loss. However, numerous combinations of protocols have been reported, which makes it difficult to formulate a simple take-home message. This laboratory method also provides a detailed description of in vivo direct mechanical axial compression of the mouse tibia. The effects of mechanical loading depend on the force (strain), frequency, waveform and duration of application, and they range from bone anabolism with low bone remodeling, inducing lamellar bone accumulation, to bone catabolism with high bone remodeling, leading to microdamage, woven bone formation and bone loss. Direct in vivo loading models are extensively used to study mechanotransduction pathways, and contribute by this way to the development of new bone anabolism treatments. Although it is particularly difficult to assemble an internationally adopted protocol description, which would give reproducible bone responses, here we have attempted to provide a comprehensive guide for best practice in performing running exercise and direct in vivo mechanical loading in the laboratory.

  6. Profile of a low-Mach-number shock in two-fluid plasma theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gedalin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic profiles of low-Mach-number collisionless shocks in space plasmas are studied within the two-fluid plasma theory. Particular attention is given to the upstream magnetic oscillations generated at the ramp. By including weak resistive dissipation in the equations of motion for electrons and protons, the dependence of the upstream wave train features on the ratio of the dispersion length to the dissipative length is established quantitatively. The dependence of the oscillation amplitude and spatial damping scale on the shock normal angle θ is found.

  7. Comparison of continuous compression with regular ventilations versus 30:2 compressions-ventilations strategy during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfei; Liu, Qingyu; Zheng, Guanghui; Liu, Zhifeng; Jiang, Longyuan; Lin, Qing; Chen, Rui; Tang, Wanchun

    2017-09-01

    A compression-ventilation (C:V) ratio of 30:2 is recommended for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by the current American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. However, continuous chest compression (CCC) is an alternative strategy for CPR that minimizes interruption especially when an advanced airway exists. In this study, we investigated the effects of 30:2 mechanical CPR when compared with CCC in combination with regular ventilation in a porcine model. Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing 39±2 kg were utilized. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 7 min. The animals were then randomly assigned to receive CCC combined with regular ventilation (CCC group) or 30:2 CPR (VC group). Mechanical chest compression was implemented with a miniaturized mechanical chest compressor. At the same time of beginning of precordial compression, the animals were mechanically ventilated at a rate of 10 breaths-per-minute in the CCC group or with a 30:2 C:V ratio in the VC group. Defibrillation was delivered by a single 150 J shock after 5 min of CPR. If failed to resuscitation, CPR was resumed for 2 min before the next shock. The protocol was stopped if successful resuscitation or at a total of 15 min. The resuscitated animals were observed for 72 h. Coronary perfusion pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide and carotid blood flow in the VC group were similar to those achieved in the CCC group during CPR. No significant differences were observed in arterial blood gas parameters between two groups at baseline, VF 6 min, CPR 4 min and 30, 120 and 360 min post-resuscitation. Although extravascular lung water index of both groups significantly increased after resuscitation, no distinct difference was found between CCC and VC groups. All animals were successfully resuscitated and survived for 72 h with favorable neurologic outcomes in both groups. However, obviously more numbers of rib fracture were observed in CCC animals in comparison with VC animals. There was no

  8. Distributed parameter model and experimental validation of a compressive-mode energy harvester under harmonic excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.T. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xian (China); Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yang, Z.; Zu, J. [Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Qin, W. Y., E-mail: qinweiyang67@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xian (China)

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents the modeling and parametric analysis of the recently proposed nonlinear compressive-mode energy harvester (HC-PEH) under harmonic excitation. Both theoretical and experimental investigations are performed in this study over a range of excitation frequencies. Specially, a distributed parameter electro-elastic model is analytically developed by means of the energy-based method and the extended Hamilton’s principle. An analytical formulation of bending and stretching forces are derived to gain insight on the source of nonlinearity. Furthermore, the analytical model is validated against with experimental data and a good agreement is achieved. Both numerical simulations and experiment illustrate that the harvester exhibits a hardening nonlinearity and hence a broad frequency bandwidth, multiple coexisting solutions and a large-amplitude voltage response. Using the derived model, a parametric study is carried out to examine the effect of various parameters on the harvester voltage response. It is also shown from parametric analysis that the harvester’s performance can be further improved by selecting the proper length of elastic beams, proof mass and reducing the mechanical damping.

  9. Development of a simulation model for compression ignition engine running with ignition improved blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshkumar Ponnusamy Moranahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Automobile Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India. The present work describes the thermodynamic and heat transfer models used in a computer program which simulates the diesel fuel and ignition improver blend to predict the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with ignition improver blend using classical two zone approach. One zone consists of pure air called non burning zone and other zone consist of fuel and combustion products called burning zone. First law of thermodynamics and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield cylinder temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. Using the two zone combustion model the combustion parameters and the chemical equilibrium composition were determined. To validate the model an experimental investigation has been conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 12% by volume of 2- ethoxy ethanol blend with diesel fuel. Addition of ignition improver blend to diesel fuel decreases the exhaust smoke and increases the thermal efficiency for the power outputs. It was observed that there is a good agreement between simulated and experimental results and the proposed model requires low computational time for a complete run.

  10. Computational Modeling of Supercritical and Transcritical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    certainly possible but they are much more involved. A homogenous two fluid model considers the vapor state and liquid state to be independent species...discontinuities which can be difficult to model .12 Recently, Dahms and Oefelein have proposed a theoretical framework for assessing when a propellant ... model and how it affects the mixing of the propellants . There is also large scale roll up present in the fixed compressibility case that is not

  11. Dispersion relations for low-frequency waves in a warm, underdense, two-fluid plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuwa, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Analytical forms of dispersion relations for three lower-frequency waves in a two-fluid plasma are presented. In underdense plasmas, ωp2≲Ωce 2, that is, low density or strongly magnetized plasmas, where ωp and Ωce are respectively the plasma frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency, the displacement current can become important in higher-frequency (non-magnetohydrodynamic) region. Focusing on only three branches that become magnetohydrodynamic waves in the low-frequency limit, we derive dispersion relations applicable to both underdense and overdense plasmas by the full set of equations of two-fluid plasmas including the displacement current. It is shown that our analytical results well agree with the exact numerical ones in all frequency ranges when the following conditions are satisfied: normal (i.e., not pair) plasma; low plasma β, and not extremely small electron to ion temperature ratio, me/mi≪Te/Ti, while more exact dispersion relations are needed to perform polarization analysis.

  12. Use of a loudness model for hearing aid fitting: II. Hearing aids with multi-channel compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B C; Alcántara, J I; Stone, M A; Glasberg, B R

    1999-06-01

    A model for predicting loudness for people with cochlear hearing loss was applied to the problem of the initial fitting of a multi-channel compression hearing aid. The fitting was based on two constraints: (1) The specific loudness pattern evoked by speech of a moderate level (65 dB SPL) should be reasonably flat (equal loudness per critical band), and the overall loudness should be similar to that evoked in a normal listener by 65-dB speech (about 23 sones for binaural listening); (2) Speech with an overall level of 45 dB SPL should just be audible in all frequency bands from 500 Hz up to about 4 kHz, provided that this does not require compression ratios exceeding about 3. These two constraints were used to determine initial values for the gain, compression ratio and compression threshold in each channel of a multi-channel compression system. This initial fitting was based entirely on audiometric thresholds; it does not require suprathreshold loudness measures. The fitting method was evaluated using an experimental fast-acting four-channel compression system. The initial fitting was followed by an adaptive procedure to 'fine tune' the fitting, and the aids were then used in everyday life. Performance was evaluated by use of questionnaires and by measures of speech intelligibility. Although the fine tuning resulted in modest changes in the fitting parameters for some subjects, on average the frequency response shapes and compression ratios were similar before and after the fine tuning. The fittings led to satisfactory loudness impressions in everyday life and to high speech intelligibility over a wide range of levels. It was concluded that the initial fitting method gives reasonable starting values for the fine tuning.

  13. Copious Volcanism on a Compression-dominated Planet? Insights into Magma Ascent and Mountain Building on Io from Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Patrick J.; Kirchoff, M. R.

    2012-10-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system. However, the largest mountains on Io are not massive shield volcanoes, but rather tabular features with a characteristic tilted-block morphology created by compressional faulting. A global bias towards compression may be produced by a vertical “conveyor belt” of repeated burial and subsidence of volcanic units, but this hypothesis begs the question of how the magma ascends to the surface in apparent violation of the long-standing principle that compression inhibits eruption. Here we explore the twin paradoxes of “copious volcanism on a compression-dominated planet” and “dominance of compression-built mountains on a volcanic planet” via quantitative modeling of the evolution of stresses in and deformation of Io’s lithosphere. Consideration of the pressure balance on a vertical magma conduit (dike) reveals that the vertical stress gradient associated with the conveyor belt stress state (compression decreasing upward) actually provides a driving force for magma ascent. Unfortunately, the components of the conveyor belt stress state (thermal, Poisson, and subsidence stresses) add together to produce horizontal compression in the lower lithosphere. This is inconsistent with vertical conduits, instead favoring horizontal ones (sills). However, the combined flexural (bending) and membrane (stretching) responses to loading produce stress changes beneath and surrounding large loads that can alter the principal stress orientations, re-enabling magma ascent. The particle-based Distinct Element Method (DEM) provides another way to model the response of Io’s lithosphere to the conveyor belt stress state. We model the lithosphere as a gravitationally loaded and bonded assemblage of particles, subject to horizontal displacements that increase with depth. The resulting deformation produces intact triangular blocks with tilted margins that resemble Ionian mountains. This work is sponsored by

  14. Low-Order Modeling for Unsteady Separated Compressible Flows by POD-Galerkin Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguet, R.; Braza, M.; Harran, G.; Dervieux, A.

    A low-dimensional model is developed on the basis of the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations by means of POD-Galerkin methodology in the perspective of physical analysis and computational savings. This approach consists in projecting the complex physical model onto a subspace determined to reach an optimal statistical content conservation. This leads to a drastic reduction of the number of degrees of freedom while preserving the main flow dynamics. The high-order system formulation is modified and an inner product which couples the contributions of both kinematic and thermodynamic state variables is selected. The associated reduced order model is a quadratic polynomial ordinary differential equation system which presents an inherent sensitivity to POD basis truncation for long-term prediction. A calibration process based on the minimisation of the prediction error with respect to reference dynamics is implemented. The predictive capacities of the low-order approach are evaluated by comparison with results issued from the 2D Navier-Stokes simulation of a transonic flow around a NACA0012 airfoil, at zero angle of incidence. This configuration is characterised by a complex unsteadiness caused by a von Kármán instability mode induced by shock/vortex interaction, and a low frequency buffeting mode.

  15. Modeling and Optimization of Compressive Strength of Hollow Sandcrete Block with Rice Husk Ash Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the report of an investigation into the model development and optimization of the compressive strength of 55/45 to 70/30 cement/Rice Husk Ash (RHA in hollow sandcrete block. The low cost and local availability potential of RHA, a pozzolanic material gasps for exploitation. The study applies the Scheffe\\'s optimization approach to obtain a mathematical model of the form f(xi1 ,xi2 ,xi3 xi4 , where x are proportions of the concrete components, viz: cement, RHA, sand and water. Scheffe\\'s i experimental design techniques are followed to mould various hollow block samples measuring 450mm x 225mm x 150mm and tested for 28 days strength. The task involved experimentation and design, applying the second order polynomial characterization process of the simplex lattice method. The model adequacy is checked using the control factors. Finally, a software is prepared to handle the design computation process to take the desired property of the mix, and generate the optimal mix ratios. Reversibly, any mix ratios can be desired and the attainable strength obtained.

  16. Modelling of compression and extension of the continental lithosphere: Towards rehabilitation of the necking-level model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Valentin; Stephenson, Randell; Diament, Michel

    2010-12-01

    We present a dynamic model of continental lithosphere deformation under extension or compression, focusing on the role of an effective mechanical parameter called "necking level" or "necking depth", a widely used concept in basin modelling studies. Though it has generally been assumed that "necking depth" depends strongly upon the rheological structure of the lithosphere (especially the depth distribution of its strong layers), such a dependency has never been demonstrated. Our model, which accommodates small deformations of a thin inhomogeneous plate induced by in-plane as well as by mantle boundary forces (applied to the model sides and base, respectively), shows that "necking depth" is a function of the horizontal position and depends mainly on the relative thicknesses and strengths of the rigid layers in the uppermost crust and below the Moho. Using different yield strength envelopes we demonstrate that the final structure of the lithosphere formed as a result of deformation and its consequent isostatic adjustment can be closely approximated by a model with a flat necking level. In the process of extension and compression of the continental lithosphere all boundaries, including the topographic surface and the Moho, deform. As a result, the total disturbance of the isostatic equilibrium state (specified as a load) is only a part of the topographic weight. Estimates of the correct load can be made using the depth to the necking level inferred from lithosphere structure, composition and thermal state. The final topography of lithospheric interfaces depends on both necking depth and effective flexural rigidity. Any attempt to estimate simultaneously strain distribution, necking depth and effective flexural rigidity, however, represents an ill-posed problem and is not possible without reliance upon strong independent assumptions constraining lithosphere structure.

  17. Endoluminal compression clip : full-thickness resection of the mesenteric bowel wall in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopelman, Yael; Siersema, Peter D.; Nir, Yael; Szold, Amir; Bapaye, Amol; Segol, Ori; Willenz, Ehud P.; Lelcuk, Shlomo; Geller, Alexander; Kopelman, Doron

    2009-01-01

    Background: Performing a full-thickness intestinal wall resection Of a sessile polyp located on the mesenteric side with a compression clip may lead to compression of mesenteric vessels. The application of such a clip may therefore cause a compromised blood supply in the particular bowel segment,

  18. Sparse Polynomial Chaos Surrogate for ACME Land Model via Iterative Bayesian Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, K.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Safta, C.; Debusschere, B.; Najm, H. N.; Thornton, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    For computationally expensive climate models, Monte-Carlo approaches of exploring the input parameter space are often prohibitive due to slow convergence with respect to ensemble size. To alleviate this, we build inexpensive surrogates using uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods employing Polynomial Chaos (PC) expansions that approximate the input-output relationships using as few model evaluations as possible. However, when many uncertain input parameters are present, such UQ studies suffer from the curse of dimensionality. In particular, for 50-100 input parameters non-adaptive PC representations have infeasible numbers of basis terms. To this end, we develop and employ Weighted Iterative Bayesian Compressive Sensing to learn the most important input parameter relationships for efficient, sparse PC surrogate construction with posterior uncertainty quantified due to insufficient data. Besides drastic dimensionality reduction, the uncertain surrogate can efficiently replace the model in computationally intensive studies such as forward uncertainty propagation and variance-based sensitivity analysis, as well as design optimization and parameter estimation using observational data. We applied the surrogate construction and variance-based uncertainty decomposition to Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) Land Model for several output QoIs at nearly 100 FLUXNET sites covering multiple plant functional types and climates, varying 65 input parameters over broad ranges of possible values. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research, Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Matrix-fracture transfer shape factor for modeling flow of a compressible fluid in dual-porosity media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar, E.; Hassanzadeh, H. [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    The matrix-fracture transfer shape factor is one of the important parameters in the modeling of fluid flow in fractured porous media using a dual-porosity concept. The focus of this study is to find the shape factor for the single-phase flow of compressible fluids (gases) in fractured porous media. In this study, a model for the determination of the shape factor for compressible fluids is presented; and, the solution of nonlinear gas diffusivity equation is used to derive the shape factor. The integral method and the method of moments are used to solve the nonlinear governing equation by considering the pressure dependency of the viscosity and isothermal compressibility of the fluid. The approximate semi-analytical model for the shape factor presented in this study is verified using single-porosity, fine-grid, numerical simulations. The dependency of the shape factor on the gas specific gravity, pressure and temperature are also investigated. The theoretical analysis presented improves our understanding of fluid flow in fractured porous media. In addition, the developed matrix-fracture transfer shape factor can be used as an input for modeling flow of compressible fluids in dual-porosity systems, such as naturally fractured gas reservoirs, coal-bed methane reservoirs and fractured tight gas reservoirs.

  20. The model of turbulent mixing zone evolution, which accounts for the deviation from spherical symmetry of laser thermonuclear target compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhin, R.; Rozanov, V.; Doskoch, I.; Zmitrenko, N.; Proncheva, N.

    2008-05-01

    The present report presents an analytical model destined to describe the development of hydrodynamic instabilities and their influence on the neutron yield under laser target compression. A number of specific numerical simulations formed the basis of the analysis. The plane and spherical tasks with certain initial conditions were considered. In a plane case the two pairs of gases typical for the shock tube experiments were studied. The spherical task was the modeling one and involved a small number of harmonics (the calculation parameters corresponded to the regime of laser compression). A notable difference in the calculation parameters of the gases in shock tubes and the laser compressed targets is not an obstacle for the construction of a unified model, since in gas dynamic problems the fundamental properties of gas-dynamic similarity are fulfilled. Basing on the simulations [1] and theory [2], the authors constructed a model of mixing zone development, which takes into account the initial conditions of perturbation. In addition to the earlier studied problems the report presents 2D-simulations of spherical target compression with account for the mixing processes. The simulations were aimed at determination of the degree of the mixing zone influence on the neutron yield.

  1. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scar/span>s are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  2. Some numerical methods for two-fluid two-phase flows in oil pipes; Quelques methodes numeriques pour les ecoulements diphasiques bi-fluide en conduites petrolieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masella, J.M.

    1997-05-29

    This thesis is devoted to the numerical simulation of some two-fluid models describing gas-liquid two-phase flow in pipes. The numerical models developed here can be more generally used in the modelling of a wide class of physical models which can be put under an hyperbolic form. We introduce first two isothermal two-fluid models, composed of a mass balance equation and a momentum equation written in each phase, describing respectively a stratified two-phase flow and a dispersed two-phase flow. These models are hyperbolic under some physical assumptions and can be written under a nonconservative vectorial system. We define and analyse a new numerical finite volume scheme (v{integral}Roe) founded on a linearized Riemann solver. This scheme does not need any analytical calculation and gives good results in the tracking of shocks. We compare this new scheme with the classical Roe scheme. Then we propose and study some numerical models, with and without flux splitting method, which are adapted to the discretization of the two-fluid models. This numerical models are given by a finite volume integration of the equations, and lean on the v{integral} scheme. In order to reducing cpu time, due to the low Mach number of two-phase flows, acoustic waves are implicit. Afterwards we proposed a discretization of boundary conditions, which allows the generation of transient flows in pipe. Some numerical academic and more physical tests show the good behaviour of the numerical methods. (author) 77 refs.

  3. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O.

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost

  4. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  5. Multi-scale Modeling of Compressible Single-phase Flow in Porous Media using Molecular Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an efficient coupling between Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Darcy-scale flow in porous media is presented. The cell-centered finite difference method with a non-uniform rectangular mesh were used to discretize the simulation domain and solve the governing equations. To speed up the MC simulations, we implemented a recently developed scheme that quickly generates MC Markov chains out of pre-computed ones, based on the reweighting and reconstruction algorithm. This method astonishingly reduces the required computational time by MC simulations from hours to seconds. In addition, the reweighting and reconstruction scheme, which was originally designed to work with the LJ potential model, is extended to work with a potential model that accounts for the molecular quadrupole moment of fluids with non-spherical molecules such as CO2. The potential model was used to simulate the thermodynamic equilibrium properties for single-phase and two-phase systems using the canonical ensemble and the Gibbs ensemble, respectively. Comparing the simulation results with the experimental data showed that the implemented model has an excellent fit outperforming the standard LJ model. To demonstrate the strength of the proposed coupling in terms of computational time efficiency and numerical accuracy in fluid properties, various numerical experiments covering different compressible single-phase flow scenarios were conducted. The novelty in the introduced scheme is in allowing an efficient coupling of the molecular scale and Darcy scale in reservoir simulators. This leads to an accurate description of the thermodynamic behavior of the simulated reservoir fluids; consequently enhancing the confidence in the flow predictions in porous media.

  6. Control of Warm Compression Stations Using Model Predictive Control: Simulation and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, F.; Alamir, M.; Bonnay, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with multivariable constrained model predictive control for Warm Compression Stations (WCS). WCSs are subject to numerous constraints (limits on pressures, actuators) that need to be satisfied using appropriate algorithms. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to achieve precise control of pressures in normal operation or to avoid reaching stopping criteria (such as excessive pressures) under high disturbances (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors, expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details the simulator used to validate this new control scheme and the associated simulation results on the SBTs WCS. This work is partially supported through the French National Research Agency (ANR), task agreement ANR-13-SEED-0005.

  7. The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) including a critical cavity size ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquier, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) has been developed to predict the packing density of mixtures constituted by bidisperse spherical particles. The four parameters are: the wall effect and the loosening effect coefficients, the compaction index and a critical cavity size ratio. The two geometrical interactions have been studied theoretically on the basis of a spherical cell centered on a secondary class bead. For the loosening effect, a critical cavity size ratio, below which a fine particle can be inserted into a small cavity created by touching coarser particles, is introduced. This is the only parameter which requires adaptation to extend the model to other types of particles. The 4-parameter CPM demonstrates its efficiency on frictionless glass beads (300 values), spherical particles numerically simulated (20 values), round natural particles (125 values) and crushed particles (335 values) with correlation coefficients equal to respectively 99.0%, 98.7%, 97.8%, 96.4% and mean deviations equal to respectively 0.007, 0.006, 0.007, 0.010.

  8. Modeling rainfall infiltration on hillslopes using Flux-concentration relation and time compression approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Li; Yu, Zhongbo

    2018-02-01

    Rainfall infiltration on hillslopes is an important issue in hydrology, which is related to many environmental problems, such as flood, soil erosion, and nutrient and contaminant transport. This study aimed to improve the quantification of infiltration on hillslopes under both steady and unsteady rainfalls. Starting from Darcy's law, an analytical integral infiltrability equation was derived for hillslope infiltration by use of the flux-concentration relation. Based on this equation, a simple scaling relation linking the infiltration times on hillslopes and horizontal planes was obtained which is applicable for both small and large times and can be used to simplify the solution procedure of hillslope infiltration. The infiltrability equation also improved the estimation of ponding time for infiltration under rainfall conditions. For infiltration after ponding, the time compression approximation (TCA) was applied together with the infiltrability equation. To improve the computational efficiency, the analytical integral infiltrability equation was approximated with a two-term power-like function by nonlinear regression. Procedures of applying this approach to both steady and unsteady rainfall conditions were proposed. To evaluate the performance of the new approach, it was compared with the Green-Ampt model for sloping surfaces by Chen and Young (2006) and Richards' equation. The proposed model outperformed the sloping Green-Ampt, and both ponding time and infiltration predictions agreed well with the solutions of Richards' equation for various soil textures, slope angles, initial water contents, and rainfall intensities for both steady and unsteady rainfalls.

  9. A DTM MULTI-RESOLUTION COMPRESSED MODEL FOR EFFICIENT DATA STORAGE AND NETWORK TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Biagi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the technological evolution of terrestrial, aerial and satellite surveying, has considerably increased the measurement accuracy and, consequently, the quality of the derived information. At the same time, the smaller and smaller limitations on data storage devices, in terms of capacity and cost, has allowed the storage and the elaboration of a bigger number of instrumental observations. A significant example is the terrain height surveyed by LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging technology where several height measurements for each square meter of land can be obtained. The availability of such a large quantity of observations is an essential requisite for an in-depth knowledge of the phenomena under study. But, at the same time, the most common Geographical Information Systems (GISs show latency in visualizing and analyzing these kind of data. This problem becomes more evident in case of Internet GIS. These systems are based on the very frequent flow of geographical information over the internet and, for this reason, the band-width of the network and the size of the data to be transmitted are two fundamental factors to be considered in order to guarantee the actual usability of these technologies. In this paper we focus our attention on digital terrain models (DTM's and we briefly analyse the problems about the definition of the minimal necessary information to store and transmit DTM's over network, with a fixed tolerance, starting from a huge number of observations. Then we propose an innovative compression approach for sparse observations by means of multi-resolution spline functions approximation. The method is able to provide metrical accuracy at least comparable to that provided by the most common deterministic interpolation algorithms (inverse distance weighting, local polynomial, radial basis functions. At the same time it dramatically reduces the number of information required for storing or for transmitting and rebuilding a

  10. Integrable, oblique travelling waves in quasi-charge-neutral two-fluid plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Webb

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A Hamiltonian description of oblique travelling waves in a two-fluid, charge-neutral, electron-proton plasma reveals that the transverse momentum equations for the electron and proton fluids are exactly integrable in cases where the total transverse momentum flux integrals, Py(d and Pz(d, are both zero in the de Hoffman Teller (dHT frame. In this frame, the transverse electric fields are zero, which simplifies the transverse momentum equations for the two fluids. The integrable travelling waves for the case Py(d=Pz(d=0, are investigated based on the Hamiltonian trajectories in phase space, and also on the longitudinal structure equation for the common longitudinal fluid velocity component ux of the electron and proton fluids. Numerical examples of a variety of travelling waves in a cold plasma, including oscillitons, are used to illustrate the physics. The transverse, electron and proton velocity components ujy and ujz (j=e, p of the waves exhibit complex, rosette type patterns over several periods for ux. The role of separatrices in the phase space, the rotational integral and the longitudinal structure equation on the different wave forms are discussed.

  11. A biomechanical comparison of 3.5 locking compression plate fixation to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate fixation in a canine cadaveric distal humeral metaphyseal gap model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipowicz, D; Lanz, O; McLaughlin, R; Elder, S; Werre, S

    2009-01-01

    3.5 locking compression plate (LCP) fixation was compared to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation in a canine cadaveric, distal humeral metaphyseal gap model. Thirty paired humeri from adult, large breed dogs were separated into equal groups based on testing: static compression, cyclic compression, and cyclic torsion. Humeral constructs stabilised with LCP were significantly stiffer than those plated with LC-DCP when loaded in static axial compression (P = 0.0004). When cyclically loaded in axial compression, the LCP constructs were significantly less stiff than the LC-DCP constructs (P = 0.0029). Constructs plated with LCP were significantly less resistant to torsion over 500 cycles than those plated with LC-DCP (Plocking plates may be attributed to the stability afforded by the plate-screw interface of locking plates. The LCP constructs demonstrated less stiffness in dynamic testing in this model, likely due to plate-bone offset secondary to non-anatomic contouring and occasional incomplete seating of the locking screws when using the torque-limiting screw driver. Resolution of these aspects of LCP application may help improve the stiffness of fixation in fractures modeled by the experimental set-up of this investigation.

  12. Non-relativistic limit of the compressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier-P1 approximation model arising in radiation hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Song; Li, Fucai; Xie, Feng

    2015-01-01

    As is well-known that the general radiation hydrodynamics models include two mainly coupled parts: one is macroscopic fluid part, which is governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, another is radiation field part, which is described by the transport equation of photons. Under the two physical approximations: "gray" approximation and P1 approximation, one can derive the so-called Navier-Stokes-Fourier-P1 approximation radiation hydrodynamics model from the general one. In t...

  13. Computational model considering effects of process and experimental verification of compressive strength of the X-cor sandwich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, X. D.; Jun, X.; Tan, Y. G.; Li, Y.; Yuan, Y. H.; Zhang, J. B.

    2008-11-01

    In order to increase the through-thickness compressive strength, pultruded carbon fiber pins are inserted into the ploymethacrylimide core of the sandwich, and then the X-cor sandwich is obtained. During curing process of the X-cor sandwich the forming of the residual stress is described in detail, the analytical results are that carbon fiber Z-pins preserve residually tensile stress in the end. Considering the effects of the residual stress Z-pins are treated as beams upon an elastic foundation, then a sort of compressive strength computational model of the X-cor sandwich is proposed and the compressive strength is computed. The X-cor sandwich samples of different density, diameter and angle of Z-pins are made for compressive strength experiments. Through the contrast between experimental and computational results the computational model is verified. As Z-pin's diameter and density increase the residual stress increase. While as Z-pin's angle increases the residual stress decrease.

  14. Context- and Template-Based Compression for Efficient Management of Data Models in Resource-Constrained Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Jorge Berzosa; Montón, Luis Gardeazabal; Rodriguez, Roberto Cortiñas

    2017-08-01

    The Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) paradigm is based on the deployment of interconnected heterogeneous devices and systems, so interoperability is at the heart of any CPS architecture design. In this sense, the adoption of standard and generic data formats for data representation and communication, e.g., XML or JSON, effectively addresses the interoperability problem among heterogeneous systems. Nevertheless, the verbosity of those standard data formats usually demands system resources that might suppose an overload for the resource-constrained devices that are typically deployed in CPS. In this work we present Context- and Template-based Compression (CTC), a data compression approach targeted to resource-constrained devices, which allows reducing the resources needed to transmit, store and process data models. Additionally, we provide a benchmark evaluation and comparison with current implementations of the Efficient XML Interchange (EXI) processor, which is promoted by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), and it is the most prominent XML compression mechanism nowadays. Interestingly, the results from the evaluation show that CTC outperforms EXI implementations in terms of memory usage and speed, keeping similar compression rates. As a conclusion, CTC is shown to be a good candidate for managing standard data model representation formats in CPS composed of resource-constrained devices.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of the Effect of Axial and Transverse Compression on the Residual Tensile Properties of Ballistic Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib C. Chowdhury

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic impact induces multiaxial loading on Kevlar® and polyethylene fibers used in protective armor systems. The influence of multiaxial loading on fiber failure is not well understood. Experiments show reduction in the tensile strength of these fibers after axial and transverse compression. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD simulations to explain and develop a fundamental understanding of this experimental observation since the property reduction mechanism evolves from the atomistic level. An all-atom MD method is used where bonded and non-bonded atomic interactions are described through a state-of-the-art reactive force field. Monotonic tension simulations in three principal directions of the models are conducted to determine the anisotropic elastic and strength properties. Then the models are subjected to multi-axial loads—axial compression, followed by axial tension and transverse compression, followed by axial tension. MD simulation results indicate that pre-compression distorts the crystal structure, inducing preloading of the covalent bonds and resulting in lower tensile properties.

  16. Development and Verification of a Pilot Code based on Two-fluid Three-field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Bae, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Chung, B. D.; Jeong, J. J.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, D. H

    2006-09-15

    In this study, a semi-implicit pilot code is developed for a one-dimensional channel flow as three-fields. The three fields are comprised of a gas, continuous liquid and entrained liquid fields. All the three fields are allowed to have their own velocities. The temperatures of the continuous liquid and the entrained liquid are, however, assumed to be equilibrium. The interphase phenomena include heat and mass transfer, as well as momentum transfer. The fluid/structure interaction, generally, include both heat and momentum transfer. Assuming adiabatic system, only momentum transfer is considered in this study, leaving the wall heat transfer for the future study. Using 10 conceptual problems, the basic pilot code has been verified. The results of the verification are summarized below: It was confirmed that the basic pilot code can simulate various flow conditions (such as single-phase liquid flow, bubbly flow, slug/churn turbulent flow, annular-mist flow, and single-phase vapor flow) and transitions of the flow conditions. The pilot code was programmed so that the source terms of the governing equations and numerical solution schemes can be easily tested. The mass and energy conservation was confirmed for single-phase liquid and single-phase vapor flows. It was confirmed that the inlet pressure and velocity boundary conditions work properly. It was confirmed that, for single- and two-phase flows, the velocity and temperature of non-existing phase are calculated as intended. Complete phase depletion which might occur during a phase change was found to adversely affect the code stability. A further study would be required to enhance code capability in this regard.

  17. Predicition Of Compressive Strength In Light-Weight Self-Compacting Concrete By ANFIS Analytical Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    B. Vakhshouri; S. Nejadi

    2015-01-01

    ...; published in recent 12 years have been analyzed in this study. The collected information is used to investigate the relationship between compressive strength, elasticity modulus and splitting tensile strength in LWSCC...

  18. Coupled Downscaled Climate Models and Ecophysiological Metrics Forecast Habitat Compression for an Endangered Estuarine Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R Brown

    Full Text Available Climate change is driving rapid changes in environmental conditions and affecting population and species' persistence across spatial and temporal scales. Integrating climate change assessments into biological resource management, such as conserving endangered species, is a substantial challenge, partly due to a mismatch between global climate forecasts and local or regional conservation planning. Here, we demonstrate how outputs of global climate change models can be downscaled to the watershed scale, and then coupled with ecophysiological metrics to assess climate change effects on organisms of conservation concern. We employed models to estimate future water temperatures (2010-2099 under several climate change scenarios within the large heterogeneous San Francisco Estuary. We then assessed the warming effects on the endangered, endemic Delta Smelt, Hypomesus transpacificus, by integrating localized projected water temperatures with thermal sensitivity metrics (tolerance, spawning and maturation windows, and sublethal stress thresholds across life stages. Lethal temperatures occurred under several scenarios, but sublethal effects resulting from chronic stressful temperatures were more common across the estuary (median >60 days above threshold for >50% locations by the end of the century. Behavioral avoidance of such stressful temperatures would make a large portion of the potential range of Delta Smelt unavailable during the summer and fall. Since Delta Smelt are not likely to migrate to other estuaries, these changes are likely to result in substantial habitat compression. Additionally, the Delta Smelt maturation window was shortened by 18-85 days, revealing cumulative effects of stressful summer and fall temperatures with early initiation of spring spawning that may negatively impact fitness. Our findings highlight the value of integrating sublethal thresholds, life history, and in situ thermal heterogeneity into global change impact

  19. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend. A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5 and 10% ethanol (E10 (in vol. under full load condition at variable engine speed ranging from 1000 to 2750 rpm with 250 rpm increment. The model was then validated with other researcher’s experimental result. Model consists of intake and exhaust systems, cylinder, head, valves and port geometries. Performance tests were conducted for volumetric efficiency, brake engine torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure, brake specific fuel consumption, and brake thermal efficiency, while exhaust emissions were analyzed for carbon monoxide (CO and unburned hydrocarbons (HC. The results showed that blending diesel with ethanol increases the volumetric efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while it decreases brake engine torque, brake power and brake mean effective pressure. In term of emission characteristics, the CO emissions concentrations in the engine exhaust decrease significantly with ethanol as additive. But for HC emission, its concentration increase when apply in high engine speed. In conclusion, using Ethanol as fuel additive blend with Diesel operating in HCCI shows a good result in term of performance and emission in low speed but not recommended to use in high speed engine. Ethanol-diesel blends need to researched more to make it commercially useable.

  20. Resolution and Energy Dissipation Characteristics of Implicit LES and Explicit Filtering Models for Compressible Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romit Maulik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Solving two-dimensional compressible turbulence problems up to a resolution of 16, 384^2, this paper investigates the characteristics of two promising computational approaches: (i an implicit or numerical large eddy simulation (ILES framework using an upwind-biased fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO reconstruction algorithm equipped with several Riemann solvers, and (ii a central sixth-order reconstruction framework combined with various linear and nonlinear explicit low-pass spatial filtering processes. Our primary aim is to quantify the dissipative behavior, resolution characteristics, shock capturing ability and computational expenditure for each approach utilizing a systematic analysis with respect to its modeling parameters or parameterizations. The relative advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are addressed for solving a stratified Kelvin-Helmholtz instability shear layer problem as well as a canonical Riemann problem with the interaction of four shocks. The comparisons are both qualitative and quantitative, using visualizations of the spatial structure of the flow and energy spectra, respectively. We observe that the central scheme, with relaxation filtering, offers a competitive approach to ILES and is much more computationally efficient than WENO-based schemes.

  1. Wall modeled large eddy simulation of supersonic flow physics over compression-expansion ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshtasbi Rad, Ebrahim; Mousavi, Seyed Mahmood

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, wall modeled large-eddy simulation (WMLES) in the Fluent software is used to investigate the flow physics of a three-dimensional shock-turbulent boundary layer interaction, as an important phenomenon in aerospace science, on a compression-expansion ramp with the angle of 25°. Fine flow structures are obtained via Laplacian of density that called shadowgraph, in which shock wave structures are visible distinctly. The results are compared with the experimental data of Zheltovodov et al., 1990 [33], in the same condition regarding geometry, boundary conditions, etc. as those used by them. Results show that not only there are a good agreement with experimental trends concerning wall pressure, friction coefficient distribution and mean velocity profiles, but also in comparison with those presented by Grilli et al., 2013 [24]. LES simulation, used in this study, presents more accurate results with fewer computational costs. Afterwards, we investigated the influence of discontinuity in wall temperature, varying stagnation pressure and Reynolds number on physics of flow in order to control the shock behavior. Our simulations shows that, discontinuity in wall temperature, varying free stream stagnation pressure and Reynolds number (the free stream Mach number remained essentially constant) influences the starting point of shock, shock strength, separation length and the collision angle of separated and reattachment shock waves.

  2. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  3. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  4. On the modelling of compressible inviscid flow problems using AUSM schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During last decades, upwind schemes have become a popular method in the field of computational fluid dynamics. Although they are only first order accurate, AUSM (Advection Upstream Splitting Method schemes proved to be well suited for modelling of compressible flows due to their robustness and ability of capturing shock discontinuities. In this paper, we review the composition of the AUSM flux-vector splitting scheme and its improved version noted AUSM+, proposed by Liou, for the solution of the Euler equations. Mach number splitting functions operating with values from adjacent cells are used to determine numerical convective fluxes and pressure splitting is used for the evaluation of numerical pressure fluxes. Both versions of the AUSM scheme are applied for solving some test problems such as one-dimensional shock tube problem and three dimensional GAMM channel. Features of the schemes are discussed in comparison with some explicit central schemes of the first order accuracy (Lax-Friedrichs and of the second order accuracy (MacCormack.

  5. Discrete Boltzmann modeling of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in two-component compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuandong; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Luo, Kai Hong; Li, Yingjun

    2017-11-01

    A discrete Boltzmann model (DBM) is proposed to probe the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in two-component compressible flows. Each species has a flexible specific-heat ratio and is described by one discrete Boltzmann equation (DBE). Independent discrete velocities are adopted for the two DBEs. The collision and force terms in the DBE account for the molecular collision and external force, respectively. Two types of force terms are exploited. In addition to recovering the modified Navier-Stokes equations in the hydrodynamic limit, the DBM has the capability of capturing detailed nonequilibrium effects. Furthermore, we use the DBM to investigate the dynamic process of the RTI. The invariants of tensors for nonequilibrium effects are presented and studied. For low Reynolds numbers, both global nonequilibrium manifestations and the growth rate of the entropy of mixing show three stages (i.e., the reducing, increasing, and then decreasing trends) in the evolution of the RTI. On the other hand, the early reducing tendency is suppressed and even eliminated for high Reynolds numbers. Relevant physical mechanisms are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Model-Based and Nonparametric Approaches to Clustering for Data Compression in Actuarial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hagan, Adrian; Ferrari, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Clustering is used by actuaries in a data compression process to make massive or nested stochastic simulations practical to run. A large data set of assets or liabilities is partitioned into a user-defined number of clusters, each of which is compressed to a single representative policy. The representative policies can then simulate the behavior of the entire portfolio over a large range of stochastic scenarios. Such processes are becoming increasingly important in understanding product behav...

  7. Grade-two fluids on non-smooth domain driven by multiplicative noise: Existence, uniqueness and regularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafimandimby, Paul André

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of a stochastic PDE with multiplicative noise modeling the motion of viscous and inviscid grade-two fluids on a bounded domain O of R2. We aim to identify the minimal conditions on the boundary smoothness of the domain for the well-posedness and time regularity of the solution. In particular, we found out that the existence of a H1 (O) weak martingale solution holds for any bounded Lipschitz domain O. When O is a convex polygon the solution u lives in the Sobolev space W 2 , r (O) for some r > 2 and rot (u - αΔu) is continuous in L2 (O) with respect to the time variable. Moreover, pathwise uniqueness of solution holds. The existence result is new for the stochastic inviscid model and improves previous results for the viscous one. The time continuity result is new, even for the deterministic case when the domain O is a convex polygon.

  8. Modeling the Speech-Reception Threshold for Amplitude-Compressed Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festen, Joost M.; van Dijkhuizen, Janette N.

    For normal-hearing listeners reduction of modulations in speech transmission yields reduced intelligibility. Modulation transfer is even a good predictor for intelligibility in many listening conditions. For hearing-impaired listeners it is often argued that the limited dynamic range of the ear and the associated loudness recruitment needs to be compensated for by a compressive mapping of the level variations within speech (syllabic compression). However, because the results of numerous experiments on syllabic compression are generally negative, it is interesting to see whether the results for hearing-impaired listeners can be accounted for by a reduced transfer of modulations. Intelligibility scores for 16 normal-hearing listeners and 16 hearing-impaired listeners were obtained for speech after syllabic compression with as parameters the number of processing channels and the compression ratio. Simple modulation transfer accounts only partly for the variability in intelligibility scores. A much better result is obtained with a phase-locked transfer of modulations, using only output modulations in quarter octaves that are in-phase with modulations of the input signal. Both for normal-hearing listeners and for hearing-impaired listeners the data of various compression conditions can be equated in terms of the phase-locked modulation transfer.

  9. Modeling of heat release and emissions from droplet combustion of multi component fuels in compression ignition engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsson, Anders

    emissions from the compression ignition engines (CI engines or diesel engines) are continuously increased. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. The complex combustion process of a compression ignition engine may be divided......-mixed flat flame burner at atmospheric pressure. The fundamental mechanisms of this laboratory flame are identical with those of an IC engine. The high control of the laboratory flame and the easy access to it makes it valuable for model validation. Modeling of the pre-mixed flat flame was performed......This PhD dissertation was carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in Department of Mechanical Engineering and supervised by Associate Professor Jesper Schramm. The PhD project was funded by the Technical University of Denmark. Demands on reducing the fuel consumption and harmful...

  10. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A total of 8 numbers of cylinder specimens are cast and tested in 1000 kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM and also modeled in ANSYS. The enhancement of compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of SFRC specimen is achieved up to 17% and 146%, respectively, compared to respective plain concrete specimen. Results gathered from finite element analyses are validated with the experimental test results by identifying as well as optimizing the controlling parameters to make FE models. Modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, density, and shear transfer coefficients for open and closed cracks are found to be the main governing parameters for successful model of plain concrete and SFRC in FE platform. After proper evaluation and logical optimization of these parameters by extensive analyses, finite element (FE models showed a good correlation with the experimental results.

  11. "Tie over ring" sutureless compression based gastrointestinal anastomotic method: experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Shojaeian, Reza; Zabolinejad, Nona; Gharavifard, Mohammad; Sabzevari, Alireza; Joodi, Marjan; Yal, Nazila; Saeedi Sharifabad, Parisa; Hajian, Sara; Nazarzadeh, Reza; Lotfinejad, Nasim

    2014-03-01

    Giving the ever-rising trend of pediatric minimally invasive surgery besides early neonatal surgical interventions, intestinal anastomosis turns out to be a time consuming stage due to several anatomical as well as technical difficulties. A perfect bowel anastomosis method should be easy, rapid, safe and reliable in creation of bowel continuity with minimal tissue damage. In this light, sutureless anastomotic methods have been introduced, using compression based anastomosis with biofragmentable rings or powerful magnets. Accordingly, this experimental animal model study has evaluated the result of an easy, rapid intestinal sutureless anastomotic technique via simple tying over an intraluminal ring, in comparison with conventional handsewn bowel anastomosis. Thirty Wistar-Albino male rats were enrolled and small bowel was transected via a midline laparotomy. A grooved plastic ring was inserted into the ileal lumen and both intestinal cutting ends were fixed over the ring with a simple tie in the first group. On the other hand, enteroenterostomy was performed by the conventional method of handsewn anastomosis in the second group. After 14 days, rats were sacrificed to evaluate for intraperitoneal adhesion and abscess formation in addition to other evidences of anastomotic leakage. Furthermore, the anastomotic site integrity, tensile strength and healing stage were assessed microscopically. The mean operative time and intraoperative bleeding in the tie over ring group were significantly less than those in the handsewn anastomosis group. Anastomotic stricture was more common in the conventional anastomosis group while the anastomotic tensile strength was significantly higher in the tie over ring group. Histopathological healing parameters and final healing score were almost similar in both groups but mean inflammatory cell infiltration in handsewn anastomosis was significantly higher. "Tie over ring" is a simple method of anastomosis that is feasible, fast, safe and

  12. Algebraic Reynolds stress modeling of turbulence subject to rapid homogeneous and non-homogeneous compression or expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, I. A.; Wallin, S.; Brethouwer, G.; Grundestam, O.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (EARSM) by Grigoriev et al. ["A realizable explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model for compressible turbulent flow with significant mean dilatation," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 105112 (2013)] and the related differential Reynolds stress model (DRSM) are used to investigate the influence of homogeneous shear and compression on the evolution of turbulence in the limit of rapid distortion theory (RDT). The DRSM predictions of the turbulence kinetic energy evolution are in reasonable agreement with RDT while the evolution of diagonal components of anisotropy correctly captures the essential features, which is not the case for standard compressible extensions of DRSMs. The EARSM is shown to give a realizable anisotropy tensor and a correct trend of the growth of turbulence kinetic energy K, which saturates at a power law growth versus compression ratio, as well as retaining a normalized strain in the RDT regime. In contrast, an eddy-viscosity model results in a rapid exponential growth of K and excludes both realizability and high magnitude of the strain rate. We illustrate the importance of using a proper algebraic treatment of EARSM in systems with high values of dilatation and vorticity but low shear. A homogeneously compressed and rotating gas cloud with cylindrical symmetry, related to astrophysical flows and swirling supercritical flows, was investigated too. We also outline the extension of DRSM and EARSM to include the effect of non-homogeneous density coupled with "local mean acceleration" which can be important for, e.g., stratified flows or flows with heat release. A fixed-point analysis of direct numerical simulation data of combustion in a wall-jet flow demonstrates that our model gives quantitatively correct predictions of both streamwise and cross-stream components of turbulent density flux as well as their influence on the anisotropies. In summary, we believe that our approach, based on a proper

  13. Supplementary Material for: Compressing an Ensemble With Statistical Models: An Algorithm for Global 3D Spatio-Temporal Temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges when working with modern climate model ensembles is the increasingly larger size of the data produced, and the consequent difficulty in storing large amounts of spatio-temporally resolved information. Many compression algorithms can be used to mitigate this problem, but since they are designed to compress generic scientific datasets, they do not account for the nature of climate model output and they compress only individual simulations. In this work, we propose a different, statistics-based approach that explicitly accounts for the space-time dependence of the data for annual global three-dimensional temperature fields in an initial condition ensemble. The set of estimated parameters is small (compared to the data size) and can be regarded as a summary of the essential structure of the ensemble output; therefore, it can be used to instantaneously reproduce the temperature fields in an ensemble with a substantial saving in storage and time. The statistical model exploits the gridded geometry of the data and parallelization across processors. It is therefore computationally convenient and allows to fit a nontrivial model to a dataset of 1 billion data points with a covariance matrix comprising of 1018 entries. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

  14. Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Compression Plate and Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate Combined with an Intramedullary Rod in a Canine Femoral Fracture-Gap Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matres-Lorenzo, Luis; Diop, Amadou; Maurel, Nathalie; Boucton, Marie-Charlotte; Bernard, Fabrice; Bernardé, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of locking compression plate (LCP) and a limited contact dynamic compression plate combined with an intramedullary rod (LC-DCP-R) in a cadaveric, canine, femoral fracture-gap model. In vitro biomechanical study; nonrandomized, complete block (dog). Paired cadaveric canine femora (n = 10 dogs). Paired femurs with a mid-diaphyseal 20 mm gap were stabilized with either LCP or LC-DCP-R. Nondestructive testing up to 60% of body weight (BW) was followed by a continuous destructive test. Comparative structural properties, 3-dimensional (3D) interfragmentary motion, and plate linear strain were evaluated. Paired comparisons were made between LCP and LC-DCP-R. Stiffness after nondestructive testing was significantly lower for LCP with a mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 61 N/mm (46-76) versus 89 N/mm (67-110) for LC-DCP-R (P = .0072). Ultimate load to failure was significantly lower for LCP with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 270 N (247-286) versus 371.5 (353-385) for LC-DCP-R (P = .002). Axial motion at 60% BW was significantly higher for LCP with a median (IQR) of 1.01 mm (0.71-1.26) versus 0.36 mm (0.20-0.49) for LC-DCP-R (P = .002). Shear motion was significantly higher for LCP with a median (IQR) of 1.18 (0.78-1.58) versus 0.72 mm (0.45-1.00) for LC-DCP-R (P = .018). Strain was significantly higher for mid-LCP surface with a mean (95%CI) at 60% BW of 979 μdef (579-1378) versus 583 μdef (365-801) at mid-LC-DCP-R surface (P = .0153). The elastic limit strain of the plates was not different and was reached at a mean (95%CI) load of 241 N (190-292) for LCP versus 290 N (245-336) for LC-DCP-R (P = .12). The LC-DCP-R showed higher stiffness and resistance to failure, lower interfragmentary motion, and lower plate strain and stress compared to LCP. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. RHEOLOGICAL DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR MODEL OF SUGAR DOUGH IN THE CONDITIONS OF MONOAXIAL COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The knowledge of regularities of deformation behavior of the processed confectionery masses with certain rheological properties allows to calculate parameters of shaping process and to select processing equipment for its carrying out. The article studies the obtaining of the rheological equation of deformation behavior of sugar dough in the conditions of monoaxial compression which is realized in sugar cookies dough pieces formation processes. The results of the pilot studies confirming adequacy of the offered rheological equation are presented. The behavior of an elastic-, viscous- and plastic body in the conditions of quasistatic test for creeping during which the set size is tension, and the measured one is relative deformation is considered. The main rheological properties of sugar dough received experimentally are given. Values of rheological constants are received and it is revealed that at 95% confidential probability, the rheological equation for the general deformation of an elastic-, viscous- and plastic body adequately describes experimental data. The maximum fault thus makes 2,3%. It is established that dough pieces shaping processes from the sugar dough possessing visco- and plastic properties should be realized at an external tension (power impact from the forming body which exceeds a limit of fluidity of the dough formed. The level of external tension, as well as the duration of its influence (that is formation duration should be chosen taking into account the residual deformations in the processed mass which guarantee giving of a certain geometrical form and drawing on a surface of dough pieces. The rheological model of sugar dough allows to predict its deformation behavior in the formation conditions, and to calculate the parameters of sugar dough formation process.

  16. Two-fluid (plasma-neutral) Extended-MHD simulations of spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experiment with PSI-Tet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    A self-consistent, two-fluid (plasma-neutral) dynamic neutral model has been implemented into the 3-D, Extended-MHD code PSI-Tet. A monatomic, hydrogenic neutral fluid reacts with a plasma fluid through elastic scattering collisions and three inelastic collision reactions: electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge-exchange. Density, momentum, and energy are evolved for both the plasma and neutral species. The implemented plasma-neutral model in PSI-Tet is being used to simulate decaying spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experimental geometry, which is being compare to two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements (TALIF) made on the HIT-SI3 experiment. TALIF is used to measure the absolute density and temperature of monatomic deuterium atoms. Neutral densities on the order of 1015 m-3 and neutral temperatures between 0.6-1.7 eV were measured towards the end of decay of spheromak configurations with initial toroidal currents between 10-12 kA. Validation results between TALIF measurements and PSI-Tet simulations with the implemented dynamic neutral model will be presented. Additionally, preliminary dynamic neutral simulations of the HIT-SI/HIT-SI3 spheromak plasmas sustained with inductive helicity injection will be presented. Lastly, potential benefits of an expansion of the two-fluid model into a multi-fluid model that includes multiple neutral species and tracking of charge states will be discussed.

  17. Ab initio models for polycrystalline diamond constructed from cold-compressed disordered graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Li, Jianfu; Huang, Bolong; Wang, Baolin; Wang, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    A general scheme is proposed to construct systematically a family of superhard sp3 carbon phases of cold-compressed graphite by combining hexagonal to cubic diamond (named as X-Carbon). Based on calculations employing density functional theory (DFT), we find that our currently proposed X-carbon can occur by compressing disordered graphite, and the X-carbon is more stable in energy than the previously proposed M, Z, W, bct-C4, P allotropes. Thus, the X-carbon is predicted to be the transition of cold-compressed graphite. The results show that the simulated x-ray diffraction pattern, Vickers hardness and bulk modulus of X-Carbon match well with the experimental data (Mao et al Science 302, 425 (2003)). These new phases are transparent superhard materials with a large hardness and wide electronic band gaps comparable to cubic diamond.

  18. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage in lined rock caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Hyung-Mok; Ryu, Dong-Woo; Synn, Joong-Ho; Song, Won-Kyong

    2012-06-01

    We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be

  19. End-Tidal CO2-Guided Chest Compression Delivery Improves Survival in a Neonatal Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Justin T; Hamrick, Jennifer L; Bhalala, Utpal; Armstrong, Jillian S; Lee, Jeong-Hoo; Kulikowicz, Ewa; Lee, Jennifer K; Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Koehler, Raymond C; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Shaffner, Donald H

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether end-tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery improves survival over standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation after prolonged asphyxial arrest. Preclinical randomized controlled study. University animal research laboratory. 1-2-week-old swine. After undergoing a 20-minute asphyxial arrest, animals received either standard or end-tidal CO2-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In the standard group, chest compression delivery was optimized by video and verbal feedback to maintain the rate, depth, and release within published guidelines. In the end-tidal CO2-guided group, chest compression rate and depth were adjusted to obtain a maximal end-tidal CO2 level without other feedback. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation included 10 minutes of basic life support followed by advanced life support for 10 minutes or until return of spontaneous circulation. Mean end-tidal CO2 at 10 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 34 ± 8 torr in the end-tidal CO2 group (n = 14) and 19 ± 9 torr in the standard group (n = 14; p = 0.0001). The return of spontaneous circulation rate was 7 of 14 (50%) in the end-tidal CO2 group and 2 of 14 (14%) in the standard group (p = 0.04). The chest compression rate averaged 143 ± 10/min in the end-tidal CO2 group and 102 ± 2/min in the standard group (p CO2-guided chest compression delivery. The response of the relaxation arterial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure to the initial epinephrine administration was greater in the end-tidal CO2 group than in the standard group (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). The prevalence of resuscitation-related injuries was similar between groups. End-tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery is an effective resuscitation method that improves early survival after prolonged asphyxial arrest in this neonatal piglet model. Optimizing end-tidal CO2 levels during cardiopulmonary resuscitation required that chest compression delivery rate exceed current guidelines. The

  20. Inviscid linear stability analysis of two fluid columns of different densities subject to gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathama, Aditya; Pantano, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the inviscid linear stability of vertical interface between two fluid columns of different densities under the influence of gravity. In this flow arrangement, the two free streams are continuously accelerating, in contrast to the canonical Kelvin-Helmholtz or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities whose base flows are stationary (or weakly time dependent). In these classical cases, the temporal evolution of the interface can be expressed as Fourier or Laplace solutions in time. This is not possible in our case; instead, we employ the initial value problem method to solve the equations analytically. The results, expressed in terms of the well-known parabolic cylinder function, indicate that the instability grows as the exponential of a quadratic function of time. The analysis shows that in this accelerating Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration, the interface is unconditionally unstable at all wave modes, despite the presence of surface tension. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0002382) and the California Institute of Technology.

  1. Current flow instability and nonlinear structures in dissipative two-fluid plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkarov, O.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Romadanov, I. V.; Chapurin, O.; Umansky, M. V.; Raitses, Y.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2018-01-01

    The current flow in two-fluid plasma is inherently unstable if plasma components (e.g., electrons and ions) are in different collisionality regimes. A typical example is a partially magnetized E ×B plasma discharge supported by the energy released from the dissipation of the current in the direction of the applied electric field (perpendicular to the magnetic field). Ions are not magnetized so they respond to the fluctuations of the electric field ballistically on the inertial time scale. In contrast, the electron current in the direction of the applied electric field is dissipatively supported either by classical collisions or anomalous processes. The instability occurs due to a positive feedback between the electron and ion current coupled by the quasi-neutrality condition. The theory of this instability is further developed taking into account the electron inertia, finite Larmor radius and nonlinear effects. It is shown that this instability results in highly nonlinear quasi-coherent structures resembling breathing mode oscillations in Hall thrusters.

  2. RELAP-7 Progress Report: A Mathematical Model for 1-D Compressible, Single-Phase Flow Through a Branching Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-08-14

    In the literature, the abundance of pipe network junction models, as well as inclusion of dissipative losses between connected pipes with loss coefficients, has been treated using the incompressible flow assumption of constant density. This approach is fundamentally, physically wrong for compressible flow with density change. This report introduces a mathematical modeling approach for general junctions in piping network systems for which the transient flows are compressible and single-phase. The junction could be as simple as a 1-pipe input and 1-pipe output with differing pipe cross-sectional areas for which a dissipative loss is necessary, or it could include an active component, between an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe, such as a pump or turbine. In this report, discussion will be limited to the former. A more general branching junction connecting an arbitrary number of pipes with transient, 1-D compressible single-phase flows is also presented. These models will be developed in a manner consistent with the use of a general equation of state like, for example, the recent Spline-Based Table Look-up method [1] for incorporating the IAPWS-95 formulation [2] to give accurate and efficient calculations for properties for water and steam with RELAP-7 [3].

  3. Improvement of the mathematical model of the diagram of deformation of the compressed composite steel and concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomin Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model of the stress-strain ratio of compressed concrete at elevated temperatures for composite structures described in Eurocode EN 1994-1-2:2005 Eurocode 4 divided in two stages: Stage 1 - represents the ascending branch and is defined by two parameters: compressive strength fc, θ and corresponding deformations εcu,θ, stage II - the descending branch which is accepted for numerical methods. The design practice showed deficiencies in the provisions on models of deformation diagrams given in Eurocode 2. Part 1-2 General provisions. Structural Fire Design. (EN 1992-1-2:2004, (ENV 1992-1-2:1995, which were reflected in the national standards in the process of harmonization. A technique for determining the refined diagrams “σc,θ – εc,θ” was developed for the design of composite reinforced concrete structures in case of fire. Diagram parameter values were adjusted for concretes based on silicate filler at high temperatures, the mathematical stress-strain model of the concrete under compression and high temperatures was specified.

  4. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  5. A new parametric model to assess delay and compression of mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, J.A.A.; Janssen, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background A decrease in mortality across all ages causes a shift of the age pattern of mortality, or mortality delay, while differences in the rate of decrease across ages cause a change in the shape of the age-at-death distribution, mortality compression or expansion. Evidence exists for both

  6. A new parametric model to assess delay and compression of mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Joop; Janssen, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in mortality across all ages causes a shift of the age pattern of mortality, or mortality delay, while differences in the rate of decrease across ages cause a change in the shape of the age-at-death distribution, mortality compression or expansion. Evidence exists for both

  7. Quantifying and modeling the acoustic effects of compression on speech in noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, Koenraad S.; Versfeld, Niek J.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2008-01-01

    In this presentation a method is proposed that is able to separate a speech signal out of a noise signal after processing of the signal through wide-dynamic-range compression (WDRC). This technique reconstructs the speech signal and noise signal sample by sample separately using the gain factor of

  8. An artificial compressibility CBS method for modelling heat transfer and fluid flow in heterogeneous porous materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, AG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the development of an artificial compressibility version of the characteristicbased split (CBS) method proposed by Zienkiewicz and Codina (Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 1995; 20:869–885). The technique is applied...

  9. Compression of head-related transfer function using autoregressive-moving-average models and Legendre polynomials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekarchi, Sayedali; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    -moving-average (ARMA) filters whose coefficients are calculated using Prony's method. Such filters are specified by a few coefficients which can generate the full head-related impulse responses (HRIRs). Next, Legendre polynomials (LPs) are used to compress the ARMA filter coefficients. LPs are derived on the sphere...

  10. MODELING OF DIESEL- COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS BUBBLY FLOW UNDER INFLUENCING OF A MAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASANAIN A. ABDULWAHHAB

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of a single compressed natural gas bubble in diesel flow with effecting magnetic flux is presented in this paper. The three dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations have been used to solve the Diesel and compressed natural gas laminar two phase flow in horizontal pipe. The simulation was carried out using COMSOL Multiphysic software version 4.4, Level-Set method. The interface between the gaseous and liquid phases was described as the zero level set of a smooth function. The results showed that compressed natural gas bubble under magnetic field grow up vertically to have bigger elliptical shape in the Diesel phase, doubling in diameter before it breaks away in two parts of 0.2 and 0.8 tesla. Also, it has been noted that the compressed natural gas bubble velocity is decreasing as the magnetic field is strengthening. The numerical procedure has been validated by comparing the computational results with experimental results reported in the literature where a good agreement was achieved.

  11. A Self-consistent Model of the Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Including Compressible and Incompressible Heating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Munehito; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a novel one-dimensional model that includes both shock and turbulence heating and qualify how these processes contribute to heating the corona and driving the solar wind. Compressible MHD simulations allow us to automatically consider shock formation and dissipation, while turbulent dissipation is modeled via a one-point closure based on Alfvén wave turbulence. Numerical simulations were conducted with different photospheric perpendicular correlation lengths {λ }0, which is a critical parameter of Alfvén wave turbulence, and different root-mean-square photospheric transverse-wave amplitudes δ {v}0. For the various {λ }0, we obtain a low-temperature chromosphere, high-temperature corona, and supersonic solar wind. Our analysis shows that turbulence heating is always dominant when {λ }0≲ 1 {Mm}. This result does not mean that we can ignore the compressibility because the analysis indicates that the compressible waves and their associated density fluctuations enhance the Alfvén wave reflection and therefore the turbulence heating. The density fluctuation and the cross-helicity are strongly affected by {λ }0, while the coronal temperature and mass-loss rate depend weakly on {λ }0.

  12. Thermodynamics of a Compressible Maier-Saupe Model Based on the Self-Consistent Field Theory of Wormlike Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical formalism for describing systems of semiflexible polymers, which can have density variations due to finite compressibility and exhibit an isotropic-nematic transition. The molecular architecture of the semiflexible polymers is described by a continuum wormlike-chain model. The non-bonded interactions are described through a functional of two collective variables, the local density and local segmental orientation tensor. In particular, the functional depends quadratically on local density-variations and includes a Maier–Saupe-type term to deal with the orientational ordering. The specified density-dependence stems from a free energy expansion, where the free energy of an isotropic and homogeneous homopolymer melt at some fixed density serves as a reference state. Using this framework, a self-consistent field theory is developed, which produces a Helmholtz free energy that can be used for the calculation of the thermodynamics of the system. The thermodynamic properties are analysed as functions of the compressibility of the model, for values of the compressibility realizable in mesoscopic simulations with soft interactions and in actual polymeric materials.

  13. Thermodynamics of Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites Revisited: Compressible Self-Consistent Field Theory Modeling of Melt-Intercalated Organoclays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Valeriy; Jog, Prasanna; Weinhold, Jeffrey; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2010-03-01

    We formulate a ``compressible'' version of lattice self-consistent field theory (SCFT) to describe thermodynamic behavior of organically modified clays in polymer melt. The melt consists of the homopolymer matrix and a fraction of end-functionalized ``active'' chains, each chain having a single ``sticker'' end-group with strong affinity to the clay surface. We calculate the phase map for this system as function of the melt composition and the strength of the ``sticker'' adhesion to the clay. It is shown that within the compressible SCFT model, intercalated morphologies are favored in a significantly broader parameter range than was expected based on the incompressible SCFT analysis. We provide a qualitative analysis of this result and discuss implications for the physics of nanocomposites in general.

  14. Double-diffusive two-fluid flow in a slippery channel: A linear stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sukhendu; Usha, R.; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2014-12-01

    The effect of velocity slip at the walls on the linear stability characteristics of two-fluid three-layer channel flow (the equivalent core-annular configuration in case of pipe) is investigated in the presence of double diffusive (DD) phenomenon. The fluids are miscible and consist of two solute species having different rates of diffusion. The fluids are assumed to be of the same density, but varying viscosity, which depends on the concentration of the solute species. It is found that the flow stabilizes when the less viscous fluid is present in the region adjacent to the slippery channel walls in the single-component (SC) system but becomes unstable at low Reynolds numbers in the presence of DD effect. As the mixed region of the fluids moves towards the channel walls, a new unstable mode (DD mode), distinct from the Tollman Schlichting (TS) mode, arises at Reynolds numbers smaller than the critical Reynolds number for the TS mode. We also found that this mode becomes more prominent when the mixed layer overlaps with the critical layer. It is shown that the slip parameter has nonmonotonic effect on the stability characteristics in this system. Through energy budget analysis, the dual role of slip is explained. The effect of slip is influenced by the location of mixed layer, the log-mobility ratio of the faster diffusing scalar, diffusivity, and the ratio of diffusion coefficients of the two species. Increasing the value of the slip parameter delays the first occurrence of the DD-mode. It is possible to achieve stabilization or destabilization by controlling the various physical parameters in the flow system. In the present study, we suggest an effective and realistic way to control three-layer miscible channel flow with viscosity stratification.

  15. Core-annular miscible two-fluid flow in a slippery pipe: A stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Geetanjali; Usha, Ranganathan; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2017-09-01

    This study is motivated by the preliminary direct numerical simulations in double-diffusive (DD) core-annular flows with slip at the wall which displayed elliptical shaped instability patterns as in a rigid pipe case; however, slip at the pipe wall delays the onset of instability for a range of parameters and increases the phase speed. This increased our curiosity to have a thorough understanding of the linear stability characteristics of the miscible DD two-fluid flow in a pipe with slip at the pipe wall. The present study, therefore, addresses the linear stability of viscosity-stratified core-annular Poiseuille flow of miscible fluids with matched density in a slippery pipe in the presence of two scalars diffusing at different rates. The physical mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of instabilities in the DD system are explained through an energy budget analysis. The differences and similarities between core-annular flow in a slippery pipe and in a plane channel with velocity slip at the walls are explored. The stability characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of slip. The diffusivity effect is non-monotonic in a DD system. A striking feature of instability is that only a band of wavenumbers is destabilized in the presence of moderate to large inertial effects. Both the longwave and shortwave are stabilized at small Reynolds numbers. Slip exhibits a dual role of stabilizing or destabilizing the flow. The preliminary direct numerical simulations confirm the predictions of the linear stability analysis. The present study reveals that it may be possible to control the instabilities in core-annular pressure driven pipe flows by imposing a velocity slip at the walls.

  16. A constitutive model for mechanical response characterization of pumpkin peel and flesh tissues under tensile and compressive loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Yarlagadda, Prasad K D V; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-08-01

    Enhancing quality of food products and reducing volume of waste during mechanical operations of food industry requires a comprehensive knowledge of material response under loadings. While research has focused on mechanical response of food material, the volume of waste after harvesting and during processing stages is still considerably high in both developing and developed countries. This research aims to develop and evaluate a constitutive model of mechanical response of tough skinned vegetables under postharvest and processing operations. The model focuses on both tensile and compressive properties of pumpkin flesh and peel tissues where the behaviours of these tissues vary depending on various factors such as rheological response and cellular structure. Both elastic and plastic response of tissue were considered in the modelling process and finite elasticity combined with pseudo elasticity theory was applied to generate the model. The outcomes were then validated using the published results of experimental work on pumpkin flesh and peel under uniaxial tensile and compression. The constitutive coefficients for peel under tensile test was α = 25.66 and β = -18.48 Mpa and for flesh α = -5.29 and β = 5.27 Mpa. under compression the constitutive coefficients were α = 4.74 and β = -1.71 Mpa for peel and α = 0.76 and β = -1.86 Mpa for flesh samples. Constitutive curves predicted the values of force precisely and close to the experimental values. The curves were fit for whole stress versus strain curve as well as a section of curve up to bio yield point. The modelling outputs had presented good agreement with the empirical values and the constructive curves exhibited a very similar pattern to the experimental curves. The presented constitutive model can be applied next to other agricultural materials under loading in future.

  17. Dual-phase steel sheets under cyclic tension-compression to large strains: Experiments and crystal plasticity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Milovan; Korkolis, Yannis P.; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Knezevic, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a physically-based crystal plasticity model for the prediction of cyclic tension-compression deformation of multi-phase materials, specifically dual-phase (DP) steels. The model is elasto-plastic in nature and integrates a hardening law based on statistically stored dislocation density, localized hardening due to geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs), slip-system-level kinematic backstresses, and annihilation of dislocations. The model further features a two level homogenization scheme where the first level is the overall response of a two-phase polycrystalline aggregate and the second level is the homogenized response of the martensite polycrystalline regions. The model is applied to simulate a cyclic tension-compression-tension deformation behavior of DP590 steel sheets. From experiments, we observe that the material exhibits a typical decreasing hardening rate during forward loading, followed by a linear and then a non-linear unloading upon the load reversal, the Bauschinger effect, and changes in hardening rate during strain reversals. To predict these effects, we identify the model parameters using a portion of the measured data and validate and verify them using the remaining data. The developed model is capable of predicting all the particular features of the cyclic deformation of DP590 steel, with great accuracy. From the predictions, we infer and discuss the effects of GNDs, the backstresses, dislocation annihilation, and the two-level homogenization scheme on capturing the cyclic deformation behavior of the material.

  18. Mathematical Modeling for Microstructural Evolution in Multi-pass Hot Compression of Q345E Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dongsheng; Peng, Yaya

    2015-05-01

    The deformation process and inter-pass time of hot working are always accompanied by complicated microstructural evolution. As a kind of low alloy steels with good malleability, Q345E steel is widely used. The specimens of Q345E steel were heated to 1123, 1223, 1323, 1423, and 1523 K and held for 0, 120, 240, 360, and 480 s, respectively, on Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator to develop the austenite grain growth equation of Q345E steel. In addition, the `single-pass hot compression tests,' `double-pass hot compression tests,' and `single-pass hot compression and thermal insulation tests' at temperature from 1123 to 1423 K with the strain rate from 0.01 to 10 s-1 were carried out on Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator to investigate the behavior of dynamic recrystallization (DRX), meta-dynamic recrystallization (MDRX), and static recrystallization (SRX), and to establish the mathematical equations of DRX, MDRX, and SRX, which can predict the volume fraction of recrystallization and grain size after recrystallization. The result of error analysis and a 2D finite element simulation model during hot upsetting verifies that the experimental data agree well with the predicted values calculated by these mathematical equations, which indicates that the established mathematical equations can be applied to accurately predict the microstructural evolution of Q345E steel during hot deformation.

  19. A 3D GPU-accelerated MPI-parallel computational tool for simulating interaction of moving rigid bodies with two-fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    We present a 3D MPI-parallel, GPU-accelerated computational tool that captures the interaction between a moving rigid body and two-fluid flows. Although the immediate application is the study of ocean wave energy converters (WECs), the model was developed at a general level and can be used in other applications. Solving the full Navier-Stokes equations, the model is able to capture non-linear effects, including wave-breaking and fluid-structure interaction, that have significant impact on WEC performance. To transport mass and momentum, we use a consistent scheme that can handle large density ratios (e.g. air/water). We present a novel reconstruction scheme for resolving three-phase (solid-liquid-gas) cells in the volume-of-fluid context, where the fluid interface orientation is estimated via a minimization procedure, while imposing a contact angle. The reconstruction allows for accurate mass and momentum transport in the vicinity of three-phase cells. The fast-fictitious-domain method is used for capturing the interaction between a moving rigid body and two-fluid flow. The pressure Poisson solver is accelerated using GPUs in the MPI framework. We present results of an array of test cases devised to assess the performance and accuracy of the computational tool.

  20. Video compressed sensing using iterative self-similarity modeling and residual reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yookyung; Oh, Han; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) has great potential for use in video data acquisition and storage because it makes it unnecessary to collect an enormous amount of data and to perform the computationally demanding compression process. We propose an effective CS algorithm for video that consists of two iterative stages. In the first stage, frames containing the dominant structure are estimated. These frames are obtained by thresholding the coefficients of similar blocks. In the second stage, refined residual frames are reconstructed from the original measurements and the measurements corresponding to the frames estimated in the first stage. These two stages are iterated until convergence. The proposed algorithm exhibits superior subjective image quality and significantly improves the peak-signal-to-noise ratio and the structural similarity index measure compared to other state-of-the-art CS algorithms.

  1. A new constitutive model for simulation of softening, plateau, and densification phenomena for trabecular bone under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Seung; Lee, Jae-Myung; Youn, BuHyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Shin, Jong Ki; Goh, Tae Sik; Lee, Jung Sub

    2017-01-01

    A new type of constitutive model and its computational implementation procedure for the simulation of a trabecular bone are proposed in the present study. A yield surface-independent Frank-Brockman elasto-viscoplastic model is introduced to express the nonlinear material behavior such as softening beyond yield point, plateau, and densification under compressive loads. In particular, the hardening- and softening-dominant material functions are introduced and adopted in the plastic multiplier to describe each nonlinear material behavior separately. In addition, the elasto-viscoplastic model is transformed into an implicit type discrete model, and is programmed as a user-defined material subroutine in commercial finite element analysis code. In particular, the consistent tangent modulus method is proposed to improve the computational convergence and to save computational time during finite element analysis. Through the developed material library, the nonlinear stress-strain relationship is analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively, and the simulation results are compared with the results of compression test on the trabecular bone to validate the proposed constitutive model, computational method, and material library. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling compressible multiphase flows Quelques résultats concernant la modélisation des écoulements multiphasiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coquel Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We give in this paper a short review of some recent achievements within the framework of multiphase flow modeling. We focus first on a class of compressible two-phase flow models, detailing closure laws and their main properties. Next we briefly summarize some attempts to model two-phase flows in a porous region, and also a class of compressible three-phase flow models. Some of the main difficulties arising in the numerical simulation of solutions of these complex and highly non-linear systems of PDEs are then discussed, and we eventually show some numerical results when tackling two-phase flows with mass transfer. Nous présentons dans cet article quelques résultats récents concernant la modélisation et la simulation numérique des écoulements multiphasiques. Nous nous concentrons tout d’abord sur une classe de modèles diphasiques compressibles, en détaillant les lois de fermeture et les principales propriétés du sytème. Nous résumons ensuite brièvement les propositions de modélisation d’écoulements diphasiques en milieu poreux et d’écoulements triphasiques. Quelques difficultés apparaissant dans la simulation numérique de ces modèles sont présentées, et des résultats récents comportant un transfert de masse entre phases sont finalement décrits.

  3. High-order Two-Fluid Plasma Solver for Direct Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Flows with Realistic Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaorui; Livescu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The two-fluid plasma equations with full transport terms, including temperature and magnetic field dependent ion and electron viscous stresses and heat fluxes, frictional drag force, and ohmic heating term have been solved by using the sixth-order non-dissipative compact scheme for plasma flows in several different regimes. In order to be able to fully resolve all the dynamically relevant time and length scales while maintaining computational feasibility, the assumptions of infinite speed of light and negligible electron inertia have been made. The accuracy and robustness of this two-fluid plasma solver in handling plasma flows have been tested against a series of canonical problems, such as Alfven-Whistler dispersion relation, electromagnetic plasma shock, magnetic reconnection, etc. For all test cases, grid convergence tests have been conducted to achieve fully resolved results. The roles of heat flux, viscosity, resistivity, Hall and Biermann battery effects, are investigated for the canonical flows studied.

  4. Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Mechanical Properties of Intermittently Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression with Different Loading Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Dong, Lu; Xu, Nuwen; Feng, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intermittently jointed rocks, widely existing in many mining and civil engineering structures, are quite susceptible to cyclic loading. Understanding the fatigue mechanism of jointed rocks is vital to the rational design and the long-term stability analysis of rock structures. In this study, the fatigue mechanical properties of synthetic jointed rock models under different cyclic conditions are systematically investigated in the laboratory, including four loading frequencies, four maximum stresses, and four amplitudes. Our experimental results reveal the influence of the three cyclic loading parameters on the mechanical properties of jointed rock models, regarding the fatigue deformation characteristics, the fatigue energy and damage evolution, and the fatigue failure and progressive failure behavior. Under lower loading frequency or higher maximum stress and amplitude, the jointed specimen is characterized by higher fatigue deformation moduli and higher dissipated hysteresis energy, resulting in higher cumulative damage and lower fatigue life. However, the fatigue failure modes of jointed specimens are independent of cyclic loading parameters; all tested jointed specimens exhibit a prominent tensile splitting failure mode. Three different crack coalescence patterns are classified between two adjacent joints. Furthermore, different from the progressive failure under static monotonic loading, the jointed rock specimens under cyclic compression fail more abruptly without evident preceding signs. The tensile cracks on the front surface of jointed specimens always initiate from the joint tips and then propagate at a certain angle with the joints toward the direction of maximum compression.

  5. A prediction model for uniaxial compressive strength of deteriorated pyroclastic rocks due to freeze-thaw cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnce, İsmail; Fener, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Either directly or indirectly, building stone is exposed to diverse atmospheric interactions depending on the seasonal conditions. Due to those interactions, objects of historic and cultural heritage, as well as modern buildings, partially or completely deteriorate. Among processes involved in rock deterioration, the freeze-thaw (F-T) cycle is one of the most important. Even though pyroclastic rocks have been used as building stone worldwide due to their easy workability, they are the building stone most affected by the F-T cycle. A historical region in Central Anatolia, Turkey, Cappadoia encompasses exceptional natural wonders characterized by fairy chimneys and unique historical and cultural heritage. Human-created caves, places of worship and houses have been dug into the pyroclastic rocks, which have in turn been used in architectural construction as building stone. Using 10 pyroclastic rock samples collected from Cappadocia, we determined the rock's index-mechanical properties to develop a statistical model for estimating percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strength a critical parameter of F-T cycle's important value. We used dry density (ρd), ultrasonic velocity (Vp), point load strengths (IS(50)), and slake-durability test indexes (Id4) values of unweathered rocks in our model, which is highly reliable (R2 = 0.84) for predetermination of percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strengths of pyroclastic rocks without requiring any F-T tests.

  6. THERMAL INSTABILITY OF COMPRESSIBLE WALTERS' (MODEL B' FLUID IN THE PRESENCE OF HALL CURRENTS AND SUSPENDED PARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi GUPTA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Hall currents and suspended particles is considered on the hydromagnetic stability of a compressible, electrically conducting Walters' (Model B' elastico-viscous fluid. After linearizing the relevant hydromagnetic equations, the perturbation equations are analyzed in terms of normal modes. A dispersion relation governing the effects of visco-elasticity, magnetic field, Hall currents and suspended particles is derived. It has been found that for stationary convection, the Walters' (Model B' fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid due to the vanishing of the visco-elastic parameter. The compressibility and magnetic field have a stabilizing effect on the system, as such their effect is to postpone the onset of thermal instability whereas Hall currents and suspended particles are found to hasten the onset of thermal instability for permissible range of values of various parameters. Also, the dispersion relation is analyzed numerically and the results shown graphically. The critical Rayleigh numbers and the wavenumbers of the associated disturbances for the onset of instability as stationary convection are obtained and the behavior of various parameters on critical thermal Rayleigh numbers has been depicted graphically. The visco-elasticity, suspended particles and Hall currents (hence magnetic field introduce oscillatory modes in the system which were non-existent in their absence.

  7. Modeling and analysis of porosity and compressive strength of gradient Al2O3-ZrO2 ceramic filter using BP neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BP neural network was used in this study to model the porosity and the compressive strength of a gradient Al2O3-ZrO2 ceramic foam filter prepared by centrifugal slip casting. The influences of the load applied on the epispastic polystyrene template (F, the centrifugal acceleration (v and sintering temperature (T on the porosity (P and compressive strength (σ of the sintered products were studied by using the registered three-layer BP model. The accuracy of the model was verified by comparing the BP model predicted results with the experimental ones. Results show that the model prediction agrees with the experimental data within a reasonable experimental error, indicating that the three-layer BP network based modeling is effective in predicting both the properties and processing parameters in designing the gradient Al2O3-ZrO2 ceramic foam filter. The prediction results show that the porosity percentage increases and compressive strength decreases with an increase in the applied load on epispastic polystyrene template. As for the influence of sintering temperature, the porosity percentage decreases monotonically with an increase in sintering temperature, yet the compressive strength first increases and then decreases slightly in a given temperature range. Furthermore, the porosity percentage changes little but the compressive strength first increases and then decreases when the centrifugal acceleration increases.

  8. A comparison of compressive force generation by plating and intramedullary nailing techniques in a transverse diaphyseal humerus fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkus, Walter V; Goldberg, Steven H; Lorenz, Eric P

    2008-07-01

    The null hypothesis to be tested in this study is that the compression forces generated with a novel compressible intramedullary nail are not different from compression plating techniques. A custom sensor was used to measure the compressive force at a transverse midshaft humeral sawbone osteotomy (OTA 12-A3.2) in four groups. The groups included: standard compression plating using a limited contact dynamic compression plate (LCDC) with eccentric screw placement (ED-LCDC), compression plating using an LCDC plate with an articulated tensioner and eccentric compression screw (AT-LCDC), locked humeral nail compressed using the manufacturer's long stainless steel screwdriver (T2-IMN), and locked humeral nail compressed using a short stainless steel AO screwdriver (SF-IMN). From continuous measurements recorded during osteotomy compression, the maximum force (CMax) and force at 60 seconds after the peak measurement (CMax +60) were analyzed. The mean CMax was 2043 N for SF-IMN, 1109 N for AT-LCDC, 799 N for T2-IMN, and 365 N for ED-LCDC. Mean CMax +60 was 1648 N for SF-IMN, 944 N for AT-LCDC, 650 N for T2-IMN, and 319 N for ED-LCDC. The difference in both CMax and CMax +60 was statistically significant between all groups (p tensioner when used with a short stainless steel screwdriver shaft. Clinical studies are needed to analyze whether this compression could improve the union rate of humeral fractures and nonunions beyond those of standard nails.

  9. Comparative study of the two-fluid momentum equations for multi-dimensional bubbly flows: Modification of Reynolds stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Ik Kyu; Yoon, Han Young [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Byoung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Two-fluid equations are widely used to obtain averaged behaviors of two-phase flows. This study addresses a problem that may arise when the two-fluid equations are used for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. If steady drag is the only accounted force for the interfacial momentum transfer, the disperse-phase velocity would be the same as the continuous-phase velocity when the flow is fully developed without gravity. However, existing momentum equations may show unphysical results in estimating the relative velocity of the disperse phase against the continuous-phase. First, we examine two types of existing momentum equations. One is the standard two-fluid momentum equation in which the disperse-phase is treated as a continuum. The other is the averaged momentum equation derived from a solid/ fluid particle motion. We show that the existing equations are not proper for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. To resolve the problem mentioned above, we modify the form of the Reynolds stress terms in the averaged momentum equation based on the solid/fluid particle motion. The proposed equation shows physically correct results for both multi-dimensional laminar and turbulent flows.

  10. The inviscid, compressible and rotational, 2D isotropic Burgers and pressureless Euler-Coriolis fluids: Solvable models with illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquard, Ph.; Vuffray, M.

    2014-10-01

    The coupling between dilatation and vorticity, two coexisting and fundamental processes in fluid dynamics (Wu et al., 2006, pp. 3, 6) is investigated here, in the simplest cases of inviscid 2D isotropic Burgers and pressureless Euler-Coriolis fluids respectively modeled by single vortices confined in compressible, local, inertial and global, rotating, environments. The field equations are established, inductively, starting from the equations of the characteristics solved with an initial Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity fields namely a vorticity free and a divergence free part (Wu et al., 2006, Sects. 2.3.2, 2.3.3) and, deductively, by means of a canonical Hamiltonian Clebsch like formalism (Clebsch, 1857, 1859), implying two pairs of conjugate variables. Two vector valued fields are constants of the motion: the velocity field in the Burgers case and the momentum field per unit mass in the Euler-Coriolis one. Taking advantage of this property, a class of solutions for the mass densities of the fluids is given by the Jacobian of their sum with respect to the actual coordinates. Implementation of the isotropy hypothesis entails a radial dependence of the velocity potentials and of the stream functions associated to the compressible and to the rotational part of the fluids and results in the cancellation of the dilatation-rotational cross terms in the Jacobian. A simple expression is obtained for all the radially symmetric Jacobians occurring in the theory. Representative examples of regular and singular solutions are shown and the competition between dilatation and vorticity is illustrated. Inspired by thermodynamical, mean field theoretical analogies, a genuine variational formula is proposed which yields unique measure solutions for the radially symmetric fluid densities investigated. We stress that this variational formula, unlike the Hopf-Lax formula, enables us to treat systems which are both compressible and rotational. Moreover in the one

  11. Study of the Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35® properties after compression and proposition of a model to predict tablet stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Claudia; Mazel, Vincent; Dausset, Caroline; Busignies, Virginie; Bornes, Stéphanie; Nivoliez, Adrien; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health are now widely acknowledged, and this has prompted growing interest in research and development in the pharmaceutical field. However, to be viable when they reach their target, the bacteria must be able to survive during the manufacturing process and the biological pathway. Tablet form best meets the requirements for protecting acid labile drugs, but the tableting process could be an additional stress for the bacteria. This study evaluated the initial effect of compression pressure on the Lcr35® strain in a vaginal (Lcr regenerans®) and an intestinal (Lcr restituo®) formulation. A stability study was also performed on the tablets and revealed a beneficial effect of this form. The obtained destruction rates (k) demonstrated that the bacterial stability was greater in tablets than in powders (kpowders>ktablets). A new mathematical model was developed combining compression and temperature parameters to predict the bacterial viability at any pressure and time. Moreover, the genetic profile of Lcr35® (Rep-PCR, microarrays), its resistance to acidity and its ability to inhibit Candidaalbicans growth, after compression, were determined to evaluate the target product profile (TPP) in a Quality by Design (QbD) approach. The Rep-PCR analysis validated the strain identity and the microarrays demonstrated the genetic stability of Lcr35® strain after compaction. Additionally, ability to inhibit the C. albicans growth was maintained and the resistance to gastric conditions of Lcr35® was even improved by tableting. As a dosage form, tablets containing probiotic can guarantee that an adequate amount of bacteria reaches the therapeutic target (intestinal or vaginal) and that the product remains stable until the time of consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inviscid spatial stability of a compressible mixing layer. Part 2: The flame sheet model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, T.L.; Grosch, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    The results of an inviscid spatial calculation for a compressible reacting mixing layer are reported. The limit of infinitive activation energy is taken and the diffusion flame is approximated by a flame sheet. Results are reported for the phase speeds of the neutral waves and maximum growth rates of the unstable waves as a function of the parameters of the problem: the ratio of the temperature of the stationary stream to that of the moving stream, the Mach number of the moving streams, the heat release per unit mass fraction of the reactant, the equivalence ratio of the reaction, and the frequency of the disturbance. These results are compared to the phase speeds and growth rates of the corresponding nonreacting mixing layer. We show that the addition of combustion has important, and complex effects on the flow stability.

  13. Model-supported characterization of a PEM water electrolysis cell for the effect of compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frensch, Steffen Henrik; Olesen, Anders Christian; Simon Araya, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the cell compression of a PEM water electrolysis cell. A small single cell is therefore electrochemically analyzed by means of polarization behavior and impedance spectroscopy throughout a range of currents (0.01 A cm−2 to 2.0 A cm−2) at two temperatures (60....... In this case, no signs of severe mass transport problems due to crushed transport layers are visible in either polarization curves or impedance plots, even at high currents. However, a Tafel plot analysis revealed more than one slope throughout the current range. The change in the Tafel slope is therefore...... discussed and connected to the electrochemical reaction or an ohmic contribution from a non-electrode component....

  14. Thermosolutal Convection in Compressible Walters' (Model B′ Fluid Permeated with Suspended Particles in a Brinkman Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Rana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the thermosolutal convection in compressible Walters' (model B′ elastico-viscous fluid permeated with suspended particles in a porous medium is considered. For the porous medium, the Brinkman model is employed. By applying normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation has been derived and solved analytically. It is observed that the medium permeability, suspended particles, gravity field and viscoelasticity introduce oscillatory modes. For stationary convection, it is observed that the Darcy number and stable solute gradient have stabilizing effects whereas the suspended particles and medium permeability has destabilizing effects on the system. The effects of Darcy number, stable solute gradient, suspended particles and medium permeability has also been shown graphically.

  15. Laser-Driven Ramp Compression to Investigate and Model Dynamic Response of Iron at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourou Amadou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficient laser shock processing of materials requires a good characterization of their dynamic response to pulsed compression, and predictive numerical models to simulate the thermomechanical processes governing this response. Due to the extremely high strain rates involved, the kinetics of these processes should be accounted for. In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of the dynamic behavior of iron under laser driven ramp loading, then we compare the results to the predictions of a constitutive model including viscoplasticity and a thermodynamically consistent description of the bcc to hcp phase transformation expected near 13 GPa. Both processes are shown to affect wave propagation and pressure decay, and the influence of the kinetics of the phase transformation on the velocity records is discussed in details.

  16. ASAMgpu V1.0 – a moist fully compressible atmospheric model using graphics processing units (GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Horn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the three dimensional compressible moist atmospheric model ASAMgpu is presented. The calculations are done using graphics processing units (GPUs. To ensure platform independence OpenGL and GLSL are used, with that the model runs on any hardware supporting fragment shaders. The MPICH2 library enables interprocess communication allowing the usage of more than one GPU through domain decomposition. Time integration is done with an explicit three step Runge-Kutta scheme with a time-splitting algorithm for the acoustic waves. The results for four test cases are shown in this paper. A rising dry heat bubble, a cold bubble induced density flow, a rising moist heat bubble in a saturated environment, and a DYCOMS-II case.

  17. Hydromagnetic thermosolutal instability of compressible walters' (model B' rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermosolutal instability of compressible Walters' (model B' elastico-viscous rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles (fine dust in the presence of vertical magnetic field in porous medium is considered. By applying normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation has been derived and solved analytically. It is observed that the rotation, magnetic field, suspended particles and viscoelasticity introduce oscillatory modes. For stationary convection the Walters' (model B' fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that the rotation and stable solute gradient has stabilizing effects and suspended particles are found to have destabilizing effect on the system, whereas the medium permeability has stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the system under certain conditions. The magnetic field has destabilizing effect in the absence of rotation, whereas in the presence of rotation, magnetic field has stabilizing or destabilizing effect under certain conditions.

  18. A localizing circumferential compression device increases survival after coral snake envenomation to the torso of an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Jason B; Deguzman, Jocelyn M; Brewer, Kori L; Meggs, William J; O'Rourke, Dorcas

    2011-07-01

    Pressure immobilization bandages have been shown to delay onset of systemic toxicity after Eastern coral snake (Micrurus fulvius) envenomation to the distal extremity. To assess the efficacy of a novel compression device in delaying onset of systemic toxicity after truncal envenomations with Eastern coral snake (Micrurus fulvius) venom in a porcine model. With University approval, nine juvenile pigs (11 kg to 22 kg) were sedated, anesthetized, and intubated but not paralyzed to ensure continuous spontaneous respirations in a university animal laboratory. Each animal was injected subcutaneously with 10 mg of M. fulvius venom in a pre-selected area of the trunk. After 1 min, six animals had the application of a novel, localizing circumferential compression (LoCC) device applied to the bite site (treatment group) and three animals had no treatment (control group). The device was composed of a rigid polymer clay form molded into a hollow fusiform shape with an internal dimension of 8 × 5 × 3 cm and an elastic belt wrapped around the animal securing the device in place. Vital signs were recorded at 30-min intervals. End points included a respiratory rate below 3 breaths/min, oxygen saturation coral snake venom. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelo de error en imágenes comprimidas con wavelets Error Model in Wavelet-compressed Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Puetamán G.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta la compresión de imágenes a través de la comparación entre el modelo Wavelet y el modelo Fourier, utilizando la minimización de la función de error. El problema que se estudia es específico, consiste en determinar una base {ei} que minimice la función de error entre la imagen original y la recuperada después de la compresión. Es de resaltar que existen muchas aplicaciones, por ejemplo, en medicina o astronomía, en donde no es aceptable ningún deterioro de la imagen porque toda la información contenida, incluso la que se estima como ruido, se considera imprescindible.In this paper we study image compression as a way to compare Wavelet and Fourier models, by minimizing the error function. The particular problem we consider is to determine basis {ei} minimizing the error function between the original image and the recovered one after compression. It is to be noted or remarked that there are many applications in such diverse fields as for example medicine and astronomy, where no image deteriorating is acceptable since even noise is considered essential.

  20. Semidiscrete Galerkin modelling of compressible viscous flow past a circular cone at incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Andrew James, Jr.

    1989-10-01

    A numerical study of the laminar and compressible boundary layer, about a circular cone in a supersonic free stream, is presented. It is thought that if accurate and efficient numerical schemes can be produced to solve the boundary layer equations, they can be joined to numerical codes that solve the inviscid outer flow. The combination of these numerical codes is competitive with the accurate, but computationally expensive, Navier-Stokes schemes. The primary goal is to develop a finite element method for the calculation of 3-D compressible laminar boundary layer about a yawed cone. The proposed method can, in principle, be extended to apply to the 3-D boundary layer of pointed bodies of arbitrary cross section. The 3-D boundary layer equations governing supersonic free stream flow about a cone are examined. The 3-D partial differential equations are reduced to 2-D integral equations by applying the Howarth, Mangler, Crocco transformations, a linear relation between viscosity, and a Blasius-type of similarity variable. This is equivalent to a Dorodnitsyn-type formulation. The reduced equations are independent of density and curvature effects, and resemble the weak form of the 2-D incompressible boundary layer equations in Cartesian coordinates. In addition the coordinate normal to the wall has been stretched, which reduces the gradients across the layer and provides high resolution near the surface. Utilizing the parabolic nature of the boundary layer equations, a finite element method is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation. The formulation is presented in a Petrov-Galerkin finite element form and discretized across the layer using linear interpolation functions. The finite element discretization yields a system of ordinary differential equations in the circumferential direction. The circumferential derivatives are solved by an implicit and noniterative finite difference marching scheme. Solutions are presented for a 15 deg half angle cone at angles of attack of

  1. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of stress response in a spinal cord clip compression injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aneurysm clip impact-compression model of spinal cord injury (SCI) is a standard injury model in animals that closely mimics the primary mechanism of most human injuries: acute impact and persisting compression. Its histo-pathological and behavioural outcomes are extensively similar to human SCI. To understand the distinct molecular events underlying this injury model we analyzed global mRNA abundance changes during the acute, subacute and chronic stages of a moderate to severe injury to the rat spinal cord. Results Time-series expression analyses resulted in clustering of the majority of deregulated transcripts into eight statistically significant expression profiles. Systematic application of Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment pathway analysis allowed inference of biological processes participating in SCI pathology. Temporal analysis identified events specific to and common between acute, subacute and chronic time-points. Processes common to all phases of injury include blood coagulation, cellular extravasation, leukocyte cell-cell adhesion, the integrin-mediated signaling pathway, cytokine production and secretion, neutrophil chemotaxis, phagocytosis, response to hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, angiogenesis, apoptosis, inflammatory processes and ossification. Importantly, various elements of adaptive and induced innate immune responses span, not only the acute and subacute phases, but also persist throughout the chronic phase of SCI. Induced innate responses, such as Toll-like receptor signaling, are more active during the acute phase but persist throughout the chronic phase. However, adaptive immune response processes such as B and T cell activation, proliferation, and migration, T cell differentiation, B and T cell receptor-mediated signaling, and B cell- and immunoglobulin-mediated immune response become more significant during the chronic phase. Conclusions This analysis showed that, surprisingly, the diverse series of molecular events that

  2. Development and evaluation of natural gum-based extended release matrix tablets of two model drugs of different water solubilities by direct compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori-Kwakye, Kwabena; Mfoafo, Kwadwo Amanor; Kipo, Samuel Lugrie; Kuntworbe, Noble; Boakye-Gyasi, Mariam El

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at developing extended release matrix tablets of poorly water-soluble diclofenac sodium and highly water-soluble metformin hydrochloride by direct compression using cashew gum, xanthan gum and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) as release retardants. The suitability of light grade cashew gum as a direct compression excipient was studied using the SeDeM Diagram Expert System. Thirteen tablet formulations of diclofenac sodium (∼100 mg) and metformin hydrochloride (∼200 mg) were prepared with varying amounts of cashew gum, xanthan gum and HPMC by direct compression. The flow properties of blended powders and the uniformity of weight, crushing strength, friability, swelling index and drug content of compressed tablets were determined. In vitro drug release studies of the matrix tablets were conducted in phosphate buffer (diclofenac: pH 7.4; metformin: pH 6.8) and the kinetics of drug release was determined by fitting the release data to five kinetic models. Cashew gum was found to be suitable for direct compression, having a good compressibility index (ICG) value of 5.173. The diclofenac and metformin matrix tablets produced generally possessed fairly good physical properties. Tablet swelling and drug release in aqueous medium were dependent on the type and amount of release retarding polymer and the solubility of drug used. Extended release of diclofenac (∼24 h) and metformin (∼8-12 h) from the matrix tablets in aqueous medium was achieved using various blends of the polymers. Drug release from diclofenac tablets fitted zero order, first order or Higuchi model while release from metformin tablets followed Higuchi or Hixson-Crowell model. The mechanism of release of the two drugs was mostly through Fickian diffusion and anomalous non-Fickian diffusion. The study has demonstrated the potential of blended hydrophilic polymers in the design and optimization of extended release matrix tablets for soluble and poorly soluble drugs by direct

  3. Modelling and design of high compression electron guns for EBIS/T charge breeders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087190; Zschornack, G.; Lettry, J.; Wenander, F.

    In this thesis the optimization of the REXEBIS charge breeder at the ISOLDE facility is presented. REXEBIS in its current state provides a current density of 200A/cm² inside the trapping region at 2 T and will be optimized to the physical limit of its design. To overcome this limit a new electron gun, the HEC² gun, was designed in collaboration with the BNL and is in commission at TestEBIS. This electron gun promises a current density of >10 kA/cm², which decreases the charge breeding time significantly. This thesis presents novel simulation techniques supporting the commissioning phase by explaining the sources of occurring loss current and, in addition, evaluate the currently installed collector for compatibility with the HEC2 gun operating at its design limit. The experience gained from the commission of the HEC² gun and the established numerical techniques lead to the development of a smaller high-compression electron gun for medical purposes, the MEDeGUN. This electron gun should provide a high-quali...

  4. Detection of copy-move image modification using JPEG compression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozámský, Adam; Šorel, Michal

    2018-02-01

    The so-called copy-move forgery, based on copying an object and pasting in another location of the same image, is a common way to manipulate image content. In this paper, we address the problem of copy-move forgery detection in JPEG images. The main problem with JPEG compression is that the same pixels, after moving to a different position and storing in the JPEG format, have different values. The majority of existing algorithms is based on matching pairs of similar patches, which generates many false matches. In many cases they cannot be eliminated by postprocessing, causing the failure of detection. To overcome this problem, we derive a JPEG-based constraint that any pair of patches must satisfy to be considered a valid candidate and propose an efficient algorithm to verify the constraint. The constraint can be integrated into most existing methods. Experiments show significant improvement of detection, especially for difficult cases, such as small objects, objects covered by textureless areas and repeated patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. VenUS IV (Venous leg Ulcer Study IV) - compression hosiery compared with compression bandaging in the treatment of venous leg ulcers: a randomised controlled trial, mixed-treatment comparison and decision-analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Rebecca L; Gabe, Rhian; Ali, Shehzad; Saramago, Pedro; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Adderley, Una; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky A; Dumville, Jo C; Iglesias, Cynthia P; Kang'ombe, Arthur R; Soares, Marta O; Stubbs, Nikki C; Torgerson, David J

    2014-09-01

    Compression is an effective and recommended treatment for venous leg ulcers. Although the four-layer bandage (4LB) is regarded as the gold standard compression system, it is recognised that the amount of compression delivered might be compromised by poor application technique. Also the bulky nature of the bandages might reduce ankle or leg mobility and make the wearing of shoes difficult. Two-layer compression hosiery systems are now available for the treatment of venous leg ulcers. Two-layer hosiery (HH) may be advantageous, as it has reduced bulk, which might enhance ankle or leg mobility and patient adherence. Some patients can also remove and reapply two-layer hosiery, which may encourage self-management and could reduce costs. However, little robust evidence exists about the effectiveness of two-layer hosiery for ulcer healing and no previous trials have compared two-layer hosiery delivering 'high' compression with the 4LB. Part I To compare the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HH and 4LB in terms of time to complete healing of venous leg ulcers. Part II To synthesise the relative effectiveness evidence (for ulcer healing) of high-compression treatments for venous leg ulcers using a mixed-treatment comparison (MTC). Part III To construct a decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of high-compression treatments for venous leg ulcers. Part I A multicentred, pragmatic, two-arm, parallel, open randomised controlled trial (RCT) with an economic evaluation. Part II MTC using all relevant RCT data - including Venous leg Ulcer Study IV (VenUS IV). Part III A decision-analytic Markov model. Part I Community nurse teams or services, general practitioner practices, leg ulcer clinics, tissue viability clinics or services and wound clinics within England and Northern Ireland. Part I Patients aged ≥ 18 years with a venous leg ulcer, who were willing and able to tolerate high compression. Part I Participants in the

  6. Ocean Acidification Portends Acute Habitat Compression for Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) in a Physiologically-informed Metabolic Rate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Raye, G.; Weng, K.

    2011-12-01

    Ocean acidification affects organisms on a biochemical scale, yet its societal impacts manifest from changes that propagate through entire populations. Successful forecasting of the effects of ocean acidification therefore depends on at least two steps: (1) deducing systemic physiology based on subcellular stresses and (2) scaling individual physiology up to ecosystem processes. Predictions that are based on known biological processes (process-based models) may fare better than purely statistical models in both these steps because the latter are less robust to novel environmental conditions. Here we present a process-based model that uses temperature, pO2, and pCO2 to predict maximal aerobic scope in Atlantic cod. Using this model, we show that (i) experimentally-derived physiological parameters are sufficient to capture the response of cod aerobic scope to temperature and oxygen, and (ii) subcellular pH effects can be used to predict the systemic physiological response of cod to an acidified ocean. We predict that acute pH stress (on a scale of hours) could limit the mobility of Atlantic cod during diel vertical migration across a pCO2 gradient, promoting habitat compression. Finally, we use a global sensitivity analysis to identify opportunities for the improvement of model uncertainty as well as some physiological adaptations that could mitigate climate stresses on cod in the future.

  7. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  8. SBKF Modeling and Analysis Plan: Buckling Analysis of Compression-Loaded Orthogrid and Isogrid Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    This document outlines a Modeling and Analysis Plan (MAP) to be followed by the SBKF analysts. It includes instructions on modeling and analysis formulation and execution, model verification and validation, identifying sources of error and uncertainty, and documentation. The goal of this MAP is to provide a standardized procedure that ensures uniformity and quality of the results produced by the project and corresponding documentation.

  9. Evolution of the reflection and focusing patterns and stress states in two-fluid cylindrical shell systems subjected to an external shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, S.; Dooley, G.; Williston, K.; Gaudet, J.

    2011-12-01

    Several most important features of the hydrodynamic field induced inside a circular cylindrical shell filled with and submerged into different fluids when it is subjected to an external shock wave are considered. This investigation is a follow-up of an earlier study of the two-fluid shell-shock interaction [S. Iakovlev, Interaction between an external shock wave and a cylindrical shell filled with and submerged into different fluids, Journal of Sound and Vibration 322 (2009) 401-437], and it addresses a number of practically important issues not covered in that work. The focus of this study is on the evolution of the respective hydrodynamic patterns in response to the continuous change of the parameters of the fluids, in particular the speed of sound. Along with the analysis of the hydrodynamic patterns it is also demonstrated that when one is concerned with the highest pressure attained inside the shell, the most dangerous combination of the parameters occurs when the ratio of the internal and external acoustic speeds is close to 0.48, with the respective pressure exceeding the maximum incident pressure by more than 110 percent. The effect that the hydrodynamic features discussed have on the stress state of the shell is addressed as well, and it is observed that the maximum tensile stress is significantly affected by the evolution of the considered hydrodynamic features, whereas the maximum compressive stress is not. It is also observed that the maximum tensile stress is very sensitive to the change of the ratio of the acoustic speeds in the internal and external fluids, with as little an increase of the latter as 13 percent resulting in more than doubling of the former in some cases.

  10. Holographic Dark Energy Interacting with Two Fluids and Validity of Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath, Ujjal

    2010-01-01

    We have considered a cosmological model of holographic dark energy interacting with dark matter and another unknown component of dark energy of the universe. We have assumed two interaction terms $Q$ and $Q'$ in order to include the scenario in which the mutual interaction between the two principal components (i.e., holographic dark energy and dark matter) of the universe leads to some loss in other forms of cosmic constituents. Our model is valid for any sign of $Q$ and $Q'$. If $Q

  11. Object class recognition based on compressive sensing with sparse features inspired by hierarchical model in visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pei; Xu, Zhiyong; Yu, Huapeng; Chang, Yongxin; Fu, Chengyu; Shao, Jianxin

    2012-11-01

    According to models of object recognition in cortex, the brain uses a hierarchical approach in which simple, low-level features having high position and scale specificity are pooled and combined into more complex, higher-level features having greater location invariance. At higher levels, spatial structure becomes implicitly encoded into the features themselves, which may overlap, while explicit spatial information is coded more coarsely. In this paper, the importance of sparsity and localized patch features in a hierarchical model inspired by visual cortex is investigated. As in the model of Serre, Wolf, and Poggio, we first apply Gabor filters at all positions and scales; feature complexity and position/scale invariance are then built up by alternating template matching and max pooling operations. In order to improve generalization performance, the sparsity is proposed and data dimension is reduced by means of compressive sensing theory and sparse representation algorithm. Similarly, within computational neuroscience, adding the sparsity on the number of feature inputs and feature selection is critical for learning biologically model from the statistics of natural images. Then, a redundancy dictionary of patch-based features that could distinguish object class from other categories is designed and then object recognition is implemented by the process of iterative optimization. The method is test on the UIUC car database. The success of this approach suggests a proof for the object class recognition in visual cortex.

  12. Validation of a zero-dimensional and 2-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to re-duce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of liquid fuel injected directly into the cylinder acts as the ignition inhibitor of the gaseous fuel. Achieving the optimum combustion process in such an engine requires the application of advanced control algorithms which require mathematical modelling support. In response to the growing demand for new simulation tools, a 0-D model of a dual-fuel engine was proposed and validated. The validation was performed in a broad range of engine operating points, including various speeds and load condition, as well as different natural gas/diesel blend ratios. It was demonstrated that the average model calculation error within the entire cycle did not exceed 6.2%, and was comparable to the measurement results cycle to cycle variations. The maximum model calculation error in a single point of a cycle was 15% for one of the complex (multipoint injection cases. In other cases, it did not exceed 11%.

  13. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR. The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 – 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1. The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa, a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the

  14. Three-dimensional two-fluid code for U-tube steam generator thermal design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.Y.; No, H.C.

    1986-11-01

    A computer code, FAUST (Flow Analysis of U-tube Steam generators), for U-tube steam generator design analysis is developed on the basis of the pressurized water reactor core transient analysis code, THERMIT. The original (x,y,z) coordinates used in THERMIT are transformed into the cylindrical (r,theta,z) coordinates for FAUST, which are better fitted in the geometry of steam generators. To couple the primary side with the secondary side, a one-dimensional tube representative of a computational cell in the heat transfer model is developed with a geometrical mapping between the primary and secondary sides. The special unitary group SU(2) is used to treat the complex geometry of the U-bend region for frictional wall force. A form loss model for tube support plates in two-phase flow is implemented in the code. The steam dome model developed here enables us to consider the different amounts of feedwater distributed into the hot and cold sides of the downcomer.

  15. Investigation of a new mathematical model for compression of pharmaceutical powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2001-01-01

    substances with wide differences in compaction behaviour. Compared to the Kawakita equation the model covers a broader range of the compaction profile. The new model and the Cooper and Eaton equation fit the data on the same level, but the parameters derived from the log-exp model seems to have more...... discriminative power between substances and have a close relation to the apparent plastic or brittle densification mechanism. The log-exp model has potential as a tool in estimation of the strength of agglomerated materials. A proposal for a set-up to an iterative non-linear regression calculation...

  16. Pulse Oximetry: A Non-Invasive, Novel Marker for the Quality of Chest Compressions in Porcine Models of Cardiac Arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    Full Text Available Pulse oximetry, which noninvasively detects the blood flow of peripheral tissue, has achieved widespread clinical use. We have noticed that the better the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, the better the appearance of pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform (POP. We investigated whether the area under the curve (AUC and/or the amplitude (Amp of POP could be used to monitor the quality of CPR.Prospective, randomized controlled study.Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China.Healthy 3-month-old male domestic swine.34 local pigs were enrolled in this study. After 4 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, animals were randomly assigned into two resuscitation groups: a "low quality" group (with a compression depth of 3cm and a "high quality" group (with a depth of 5cm. All treatments between the two groups were identical except for the depth of chest compressions. Hemodynamic parameters [coronary perfusion pressure (CPP, partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2] as well as AUC and Amp of POP were all collected and analyzed.There were statistical differences between the "high quality" group and the "low quality" group in AUC, Amp, CPP and PETCO2 during CPR (P<0.05. AUC, Amp and CPP were positively correlated with PETCO2, respectively (P<0.01. There was no statistical difference between the heart rate calculated according to the POP (FCPR and the frequency of mechanical CPR at the 3rd minute of CPR. The FCPR was lower than the frequency of mechanical CPR at the 6th and the 9th minute of CPR.Both the AUC and Amp of POP correlated well with CPP and PETCO2 in animal models. The frequency of POP closely matched the CPR heart rate. AUC and Amp of POP might be potential noninvasive quality monitoring markers for CPR.

  17. Hysteresis model of shape memory alloy wire-based laminated rubber bearing under compression and unidirectional shear loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, F.; Shahria Alam, M.

    2015-06-01

    Smart lead rubber bearings (LRBs), in which a shape memory alloy (SMA) is used in the form of wires, are a new generation of elastomeric isolators with improved performance in terms of recentering capability and energy dissipation capacity. It is of great interest to implement SMA wire-based lead rubber bearings (SMA-LRBs) in bridges; however, currently there is no appropriate hysteresis model for accurately simulating the behavior of such isolators. A constitutive model for SMA-LRBs is proposed in this study. An LRB is equipped with a double cross configuration of SMA wires (DC-SMAW) and subjected to compression and unidirectional shear loadings. Due to the complexity of the shear behavior of the SMA-LRB, a hysteresis model is developed for the DC-SMAWs and then combined with the bilinear kinematic hardening model, which is assumed for the LRB. Comparing the hysteretic response of decoupled systems with that of the SMA-LRB shows that the high recentering capability of the DC-SMAW model with zero residual deformation could noticeably reduce the residual deformation of the LRB. The developed constitutive model for DC-SMAWs is characterized by three stiffnesses when the shear strain exceeds a starting limit at which the SMA wires are activated due to phase transformation. An important point is that the shear hysteresis of the DC-SMAW model looks different from the flag-shaped hysteresis of the SMA because of the specific arrangement of wires and its effect on the resultant forces transferred from the wires to the rubber bearing.

  18. On the stability and compressive nonlinearity of a physiologically based model of the cochlea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nankali, Amir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Grosh, Karl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Hearing relies on a series of coupled electrical, acoustical (fluidic) and mechanical interactions inside the cochlea that enable sound processing. A positive feedback mechanism within the cochlea, called the cochlear amplifier, provides amplitude and frequency selectivity in the mammalian auditory system. The cochlear amplifier and stability are studied using a nonlinear, micromechanical model of the Organ of Corti (OoC) coupled to the electrical potentials in the cochlear ducts. It is observed that the mechano-electrical transduction (MET) sensitivity and somatic motility of the outer hair cell (OHC), control the cochlear stability. Increasing MET sensitivity beyond a critical value, while electromechanical coupling coefficient is within a specific range, causes instability. We show that instability in this model is generated through a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. A reduced order model of the system is approximated and it is shown that the tectorial membrane (TM) transverse mode effect on the dynamics is significant while the radial mode can be simplified from the equations. The cochlear amplifier in this model exhibits good agreement with the experimental data. A comprehensive 3-dimensional model based on the cross sectional model is simulated and the results are compared. It is indicated that the global model qualitatively inherits some characteristics of the local model, but the longitudinal coupling along the cochlea shifts the stability boundary (i.e., Hopf bifurcation point) and enhances stability.

  19. Evaluation of interface models for 3D-1D coupling of compressible Euler methods for the application on cavitating flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deininger Martina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of complete hydraulic systems (e.g. diesel injectors can, due to high computational costs, currently not be done entirely in three dimensions. Our aim is to substitute the 3D solver by a corresponding 1D method in some parts of the system and develop a solver coupling with suitable interface models. Firstly, we investigate an interface model for non-cavitating flow passing the interface. A flux-coupling with a thin interface approach is considered and the jump in dimensions at the interface is transferred to an additional variable φ, which switches between the 3D and the 1D domain. As shown in two testcases, the error introduced in the vicinity of the interface is quite small. Two numerical flux formulations for the flux over the 3D-1D interface are compared and the Roe-type flux formulation is recommended. Secondly, extending the first method to cavitating flows passing the interface, we divide the density equation in two equations - one for liquid and one for vapor phase of the two-phase fluid - and couple the two equations by source terms depending on the free enthalpy. We propose two interface models for coupling 3D and 1D compressible density-based Euler methods that have potential for considering the entire (non- cavitating hydraulic system behaviour by a 1D method in combination with an embedded detailed 3D simulation at much lower computational costs than the pure 3D simulation.

  20. Comparison between a μFE model and DEM for an assembly of spheres under triaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Sadegh; Shire, Tom; Fonseca, Joana

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a simple case of a Face Centred Cubic (FCC) array of 2,000 spheres under triaxial compression to compare the results obtained using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) and a micro finite element model (μFE). This μFE approach was developed so that the internal structure of the soil can be obtained using x-ray computed tomography and converted into a numerical fabric. The individual grains are represented as continuum deformable bodies and the inter-granular interaction based on the defined contact laws. In order to demonstrate the simple contact constitutive behaviour used in this μFE model, the response for two contacting elastic spheres is compared with theoretical equations. The strength at failure of the packing of 2,000 spheres is seen to yield similar values for DEM, μFE and the analytical solution. When comparing the evolving void ratio, a good agreement between the two numerical models was observed for very small strains but as the strain increases, the values start to diverge, which is believed to be related with the rigidity of the grains used in DEM.

  1. Modeling of feed-forward control using the partial least squares regression method in the tablet compression process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yusuke; Otsuka, Makoto

    2017-05-30

    In the pharmaceutical industry, the implementation of continuous manufacturing has been widely promoted in lieu of the traditional batch manufacturing approach. More specially, in recent years, the innovative concept of feed-forward control has been introduced in relation to process analytical technology. In the present study, we successfully developed a feed-forward control model for the tablet compression process by integrating data obtained from near-infrared (NIR) spectra and the physical properties of granules. In the pharmaceutical industry, batch manufacturing routinely allows for the preparation of granules with the desired properties through the manual control of process parameters. On the other hand, continuous manufacturing demands the automatic determination of these process parameters. Here, we proposed the development of a control model using the partial least squares regression (PLSR) method. The most significant feature of this method is the use of dataset integrating both the NIR spectra and the physical properties of the granules. Using our model, we determined that the properties of products, such as tablet weight and thickness, need to be included as independent variables in the PLSR analysis in order to predict unknown process parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Theoretical Model of Coronary Blood Flow Regulation: Role of Myocardium Compressive Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinzhou; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2015-11-01

    Auto-regulatory reserve of coronary blood flow is nonuniformly distributed across the ventricular wall. MCF are thought to play an important role in determining the transmural distribution of myocardium blood flow. Here, impacts of MCF on coronary flow regulation are analyzed using a theoretical model. Coronary microvessels at various depths in the ventricular wall are represented by parallel segments. Nine vessel regions are connected in series to represent one parallel segment, which includes four vasoactive regions regulated by the wall tension, the shear stress and the metabolic demand. The nonuniform distribution of MCF is modeled and its effects on coronary flow regulation are taken into consideration by using a modified tension model and a vessel collapse model. Flow regulation behaviors in both normal and obstructed coronary circulation are simulated. Model-predicted auto-regulatory curve is shifted to the high pressure region by including the effect of MCF. Model-predicted flow distributions in obstructed coronary circulation show that severe stenosis in coronary artery would first impede myocardial blood flow in subendocardial layer. The model results indicate that MCF plays an important role in coronary flow regulation and also in determining the transmural distribution of myocardium blood flow. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Role of ischemia and deformation in the onset of compression-induced deep tissue injury: MRI-based studies in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stekelenburg, Anke; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Parusel, Henry; Bader, Dan L.; Nicolay, Klaas; Oomens, Cees W.

    2007-01-01

    A rat model was used to distinguish between the different factors that contribute to muscle tissue damage related to deep pressure ulcers that develop after compressive loading. The separate and combined effects of ischemia and deformation were studied. Loading was applied to the hindlimb of rats

  4. Application of Compressible Volume of Fluid Model in Simulating the Impact and Solidification of Hollow Spherical ZrO2 Droplet on a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Hadi; Emami, Mohsen Davazdah; Jazi, Hamidreza Salimi; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-09-01

    Applications of hollow spherical particles in thermal spraying process have been developed in recent years, accompanied by attempts in the form of experimental and numerical studies to better understand the process of impact of a hollow droplet on a surface. During such process, volume and density of the trapped gas inside droplet change. The numerical models should be able to simulate such changes and their consequent effects. The aim of this study is to numerically simulate the impact of a hollow ZrO2 droplet on a flat surface using the volume of fluid technique for compressible flows. An open-source, finite-volume-based CFD code was used to perform the simulations, where appropriate subprograms were added to handle the studied cases. Simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. Results showed that at high impact velocities (U 0 > 100 m/s), the compression of trapped gas inside droplet played a significant role in the impact dynamics. In such velocities, the droplet splashed explosively. Compressibility effects result in a more porous splat, compared to the corresponding incompressible model. Moreover, the compressible model predicted a higher spread factor than the incompressible model, due to planetary structure of the splat.

  5. MODELLING OF PROCESS OF COMPRESSION OF STEAMS OF A RECTIFIED ALCOHOL IN THE SCHEMA OF AN ALCOHOLIC COLUMN WITH A HEAT PUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Korotkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thermodynamic relations and equation of state of Redlich-Kwong, obtaining the approximation of the molar volume dependence on temperature and pressure, ideal gas heat capacity on temperature for the modeling of vapor compression rectified alcohol. Energy analysis scheme alcohol column with a heat pump and its comparison with the standard rectification plant.

  6. Modeling of Compressible Flow with Friction and Heat Transfer Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the verification and validation of a quasi one-dimensional pressure based finite volume algorithm, implemented in Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), for predicting compressible flow with friction, heat transfer and area change. The numerical predictions were compared with two classical solutions of compressible flow, i.e. Fanno and Rayleigh flow. Fanno flow provides an analytical solution of compressible flow in a long slender pipe where incoming subsonic flow can be choked due to friction. On the other hand, Raleigh flow provides analytical solution of frictionless compressible flow with heat transfer where incoming subsonic flow can be choked at the outlet boundary with heat addition to the control volume. Nonuniform grid distribution improves the accuracy of numerical prediction. A benchmark numerical solution of compressible flow in a converging-diverging nozzle with friction and heat transfer has been developed to verify GFSSP's numerical predictions. The numerical predictions compare favorably in all cases.

  7. Compressive properties of commercially available polyurethane foams as mechanical models for osteoporotic human cancellous bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Purvi S D; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Hukins, David W L

    2008-01-01

    ... of the low density PU foams are universally accepted as models for osteoporotic (OP) bone. The aim of this study was to determine whether low density PU foam might be suitable for mimicking human OP cancellous bone...

  8. Rapid maxillary anterior teeth retraction en masse by bone compression: a canine model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Chufeng; Cao, Yang; Liu, Conghua; Zhang, Jincai; Xu, Pingping

    2011-01-01

    The present study sought to establish an animal model to study the feasibility and safety of rapid retraction of maxillary anterior teeth en masse aided by alveolar surgery in order to reduce orthodontic treatment time...

  9. The effect of a two-fluid atmosphere on relativistic stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govender, Gabriel; Brassel, Byron P.; Maharaj, Sunil D. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, Durban (South Africa)

    2015-07-15

    We model the physical behaviour at the surface of a relativistic radiating star in the strong gravity limit. The spacetime in the interior is taken to be spherically symmetrical and shear-free. The heat conduction in the interior of the star is governed by the geodesic motion of fluid particles and a non-vanishing radially directed heat flux. The local atmosphere in the exterior region is a two-component system consisting of standard pressureless (null) radiation and an additional null fluid with non-zero pressure and constant energy density. We analyse the generalised junction condition for the matter and gravitational variables on the stellar surface and generate an exact solution. We investigate the effect of the exterior energy density on the temporal evolution of the radiating fluid pressure, luminosity, gravitational redshift and mass flow at the boundary of the star. The influence of the density on the rate of gravitational collapse is also probed and the strong, dominant and weak energy conditions are also tested. We show that the presence of the additional null fluid has a significant effect on the dynamical evolution of the star. (orig.)

  10. Three-dimensional two-fluid Braginskii simulations of the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Rogers, Barrett N.; Rossi, Giovanni D.; Guice, Daniel S.; Carter, Troy A.

    2015-09-01

    The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) is modeled using the 3D Global Braginskii Solver code. Comparisons to experimental measurements are made in the low-bias regime in which there is an intrinsic E × B rotation of the plasma. In the simulations, this rotation is caused primarily by sheath effects and may be a likely mechanism for the intrinsic rotation seen in LAPD. Simulations show strong qualitative agreement with the data, particularly the radial dependence of the density fluctuations, cross-correlation lengths, radial flux dependence outside of the cathode edge, and camera imagery. Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) turbulence at relatively large scales is the dominant driver of cross-field transport in these simulations with smaller-scale drift waves and sheath modes playing a secondary role. Plasma holes and blobs arising from KH vortices in the simulations are consistent with the scale sizes and overall appearance of those in LAPD camera images. The addition of ion-neutral collisions in the simulations at previously theorized values reduces the radial particle flux by about a factor of two, from values that are somewhat larger than the experimentally measured flux to values that are somewhat lower than the measurements. This reduction is due to a modest stabilizing contribution of the collisions on the KH-modes driving the turbulent transport.

  11. A multiscale model of distributed fracture and permeability in solids in all-round compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Maria Laura; Della Vecchia, Gabriele; Ortiz, Michael; Pandolfi, Anna

    2017-07-01

    We present a microstructural model of permeability in fractured solids, where the fractures are described in terms of recursive families of parallel, equidistant cohesive faults. Faults originate upon the attainment of tensile or shear strength in the undamaged material. Secondary faults may form in a hierarchical organization, creating a complex network of connected fractures that modify the permeability of the solid. The undamaged solid may possess initial porosity and permeability. The particular geometry of the superposed micro-faults lends itself to an explicit analytical quantification of the porosity and permeability of the damaged material. The model is the finite kinematics version of a recently proposed porous material model, applied with success to the simulation of laboratory tests and excavation problems [De Bellis, M. L., Della Vecchia, G., Ortiz, M., Pandolfi, A., 2016. A linearized porous brittle damage material model with distributed frictional-cohesive faults. Engineering Geology 215, 10-24. Cited By 0. 10.1016/j.enggeo.2016.10.010]. The extension adds over and above the linearized kinematics version for problems characterized by large deformations localized in narrow zones, while the remainder of the solid undergoes small deformations, as typically observed in soil and rock mechanics problems. The approach is particularly appealing as a means of modeling a wide scope of engineering problems, ranging from the prevention of water or gas outburst into underground mines, to the prediction of the integrity of reservoirs for CO2 sequestration or hazardous waste storage, to hydraulic fracturing processes.

  12. Model of dynamic compression tests on hydraulic testing machines: Influence of dynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, S.; Gavrus, A.; Guines, D.; Ragneau, E.

    2003-09-01

    The forming process simulation requires models describing the materials behaviour at large strains and at strain rates up to hundreds of s^{-1}. The major difficulty then encountered is that few experimental tests enable to reach these two criteria. For a few years, several studies have been carried out on hydraulic machines provided with a dynamic jack. However, for higher strain rates tests, the load measurement is disturbed by the response of the experimental set-up and oscillations appear. In this article, the experimental test is developed and a finite element model of the set-up is introduced.

  13. Rabbit model of intervertebral disc degeneration by external compression device characterized by X-ray, MRI, histology, and cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ismail

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate experimental animal models, which mimic the degenerative process occurring in human intervertebral disc (IVD breakdown and can be used for new treatment studies such as tissue engineering or disc distraction are lacking. We studied the external compression device that used by Kroeber et al to create intervertebral disc degeneration in rabbit model characterized by X-ray, MRI, Histology, and Cell Viability. Ten NZW rabbit were randomly assigned to one of five groups. Intervertebral disc VL4-L5 are compressed using an external loading device, 1.9 MPa. First group rabbit are loaded for 14 days, second loaded for 28 days, thirth group are loaded for 14 days, and unloaded for 14 days, fourth group loaded for 28 days and unloaded for 28 days. The fifth group, rabbits underwent a sham operation. Additional, rabbits were used as sample for cell viability study. In disc height : sample in group one have biggest decreasing of disc height, that is 23.9 unit. In MRI assessment, the worst grade is grade 3. In histological score, the worst group is group three (58.69, and the best is group 4 (45.69. Group one have the largest dead cell, that are 403.5, and the smallest is group four (124.75. Trypan blue staining showed that group four have better viable cell (91.1 compare than group three (86.4. The study conclude disc degeneration can be created by external axial loading for 14 days in rabbit intervertebral disc. Duration of 28 days unloading gave better result for cells to recover. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:199-207  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Keywords: Rabbit model –intervertebral disc degeneration- external compression device-X-ray, MRI, Histology, and Cell viabilty /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso

  14. Efficient non-linear model reduction via a least-squares Petrov-Galerkin projection and compressive tensor approximations

    KAUST Repository

    Carlberg, Kevin

    2010-10-28

    A Petrov-Galerkin projection method is proposed for reducing the dimension of a discrete non-linear static or dynamic computational model in view of enabling its processing in real time. The right reduced-order basis is chosen to be invariant and is constructed using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition method. The left reduced-order basis is selected to minimize the two-norm of the residual arising at each Newton iteration. Thus, this basis is iteration-dependent, enables capturing of non-linearities, and leads to the globally convergent Gauss-Newton method. To avoid the significant computational cost of assembling the reduced-order operators, the residual and action of the Jacobian on the right reduced-order basis are each approximated by the product of an invariant, large-scale matrix, and an iteration-dependent, smaller one. The invariant matrix is computed using a data compression procedure that meets proposed consistency requirements. The iteration-dependent matrix is computed to enable the least-squares reconstruction of some entries of the approximated quantities. The results obtained for the solution of a turbulent flow problem and several non-linear structural dynamics problems highlight the merit of the proposed consistency requirements. They also demonstrate the potential of this method to significantly reduce the computational cost associated with high-dimensional non-linear models while retaining their accuracy. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Research on constitutive models and hot workability of as-homogenized Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy during isothermal compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Peng, Xiaoyan; Liang, Xiaopeng; Deng, Ying; Xu, Guofu; Yin, Zhimin

    2017-05-01

    Hot compression tests of as-homogenized Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy were performed at the deformation temperature range of 350-450 °C and the strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. The Arrhenius-type constitutive equation and the Avrami-type model were established to predict the flow behaviors of the alloy respectively. The processing map at the true strain of 0.92 was developed to evaluate the workability of the alloy and the related microstructures were investigated. The results show that the Avrami-type model has a higher accuracy to predict flow stress than the Arrhenius-type constitutive equation. The stable deformation occurs under high temperature or low strain rate mainly owing to the dynamic recrystallization. Flow instability is prone to occur under the condition of low temperature and high strain rate due to the initiation and the propagation of micro-cracks. According to the processing map and corresponding microstructure characteristics, the optimum processing parameters are in the temperature range of 380-405 °C and the strain rate range of 0.006-0.035 s-1.

  16. A tentative model for estimating the compressibility of rock-salt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Ab initio detailed calculations of the elastic properties of AgClx Br1−x alloys were recently made using density-functional perturbation theory and by employing the virtual crystal approximation or by means of the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. Here, we suggest a simple theoretical model ...

  17. Formation of systems of incompact bands parallel to the compression axis in the unconsolidated sedimentary rocks: A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamediev, Sh. A.; Ul'Kin, D. A.

    2011-10-01

    Uniaxial compression of poorly lithified rocks leads to the formation of thin incompact layers (or bands, in the two-dimensional case) parallel to the compression axis, which are characterized by increased porosity. The standard model of the formation of such bands, as well as deformation bands of other types, associates them with the narrow zones of localization of plastic deformations. In the case of decompaction, it is assumed that transverse tensile deformations are localized within the band, which cause the band to dilate. Here, the formation of a band of localized deformations is treated as a loss-of-stability phenomenon. Based on observations, we propose a fundamentally different model of incompact bands formation, according to which the microdefects in sediment packing (pores) rather than the deformations are localized in the narrow zones. The localization of pores, which are initially randomly distributed in the medium, occurs as a result of their migration through the geomaterial. The migration and subsequent localization of pores are driven by a common mechanism, namely, a trend of a system to lower its total energy (small variations in total energy are equal to the increment of free energy minus the work of external forces). Migration of a single pore in a granular sedimentary rock is caused by the force f driving the defect. This force was introduced by J. Eshelby (1951; 1970). An important feature of our model is that the formation of an incompact band here does not have a sense of a loss of stability. Quite the contrary, the formation of incompact bands is treated as a gradual process spread over time. In this context, the origination of incompact band systems directly follows from our model itself, without any a priori assumptions postulating the existence of such systems and without any special tuning of the model parameters. Moreover, based on the proposed model, we can predict the incompact bands to always occur in the form of systems rather than

  18. Predicting model on ultimate compressive strength of Al2O3-ZrO2 ceramic foam filter based on BP neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jingyuan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In present study, BP neural network model was proposed for the prediction of ultimate compressive strength of Al2O3-ZrO2 ceramic foam filter prepared by centrifugal slip casting. The inputs of the BP neural network model were the applied load on the epispastic polystyrene template (F, centrifugal acceleration (v and sintering temperature (T, while the only output was the ultimate compressive strength (σ. According to the registered BP model, the effects of F, v, T on σ were analyzed. The predicted results agree with the actual data within reasonable experimental error, indicating that the BP model is practically a very useful tool in property prediction and process parameter design of the Al2O3-ZrO2 ceramic foam filter prepared by centrifugal slip casting.

  19. A finite element-based machine learning approach for modeling the mechanical behavior of the breast tissues under compression in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, F; Rupérez-Moreno, M J; Martínez-Sober, M; Solves-Llorens, J A; Lorente, D; Serrano-López, A J; Martínez-Sanchis, S; Monserrat, C; Martín-Guerrero, J D

    2017-11-01

    This work presents a data-driven method to simulate, in real-time, the biomechanical behavior of the breast tissues in some image-guided interventions such as biopsies or radiotherapy dose delivery as well as to speed up multimodal registration algorithms. Ten real breasts were used for this work. Their deformation due to the displacement of two compression plates was simulated off-line using the finite element (FE) method. Three machine learning models were trained with the data from those simulations. Then, they were used to predict in real-time the deformation of the breast tissues during the compression. The models were a decision tree and two tree-based ensemble methods (extremely randomized trees and random forest). Two different experimental setups were designed to validate and study the performance of these models under different conditions. The mean 3D Euclidean distance between nodes predicted by the models and those extracted from the FE simulations was calculated to assess the performance of the models in the validation set. The experiments proved that extremely randomized trees performed better than the other two models. The mean error committed by the three models in the prediction of the nodal displacements was under 2 mm, a threshold usually set for clinical applications. The time needed for breast compression prediction is sufficiently short to allow its use in real-time (<0.2 s). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Global two-fluid simulations of geodesic acoustic modes in strongly shaped tight aspect ratio tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. R.; Hnat, B.; Thyagaraja, A.; McClements, K. G.; Knight, P. J.; Kirk, A.; MAST Team

    2013-05-01

    Following recent observations suggesting the presence of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in ohmically heated discharges in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [J. R. Robinson et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 105007 (2012)], the behaviour of the GAM is studied numerically using the two fluid, global code CENTORI [P. J. Knight et al. Comput. Phys. Commun. 183, 2346 (2012)]. We examine mode localisation and effects of magnetic geometry, given by aspect ratio, elongation, and safety factor, on the observed frequency of the mode. An excellent agreement between simulations and experimental data is found for simulation plasma parameters matched to those of MAST. Increasing aspect ratio yields good agreement between the GAM frequency found in the simulations and an analytical result obtained for elongated large aspect ratio plasmas.

  1. Global two-fluid simulations of geodesic acoustic modes in strongly shaped tight aspect ratio tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J. R.; Hnat, B. [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Thyagaraja, A. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); McClements, K. G.; Knight, P. J.; Kirk, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: MAST Team

    2013-05-15

    Following recent observations suggesting the presence of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in ohmically heated discharges in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [J. R. Robinson et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 105007 (2012)], the behaviour of the GAM is studied numerically using the two fluid, global code CENTORI [P. J. Knight et al. Comput. Phys. Commun. 183, 2346 (2012)]. We examine mode localisation and effects of magnetic geometry, given by aspect ratio, elongation, and safety factor, on the observed frequency of the mode. An excellent agreement between simulations and experimental data is found for simulation plasma parameters matched to those of MAST. Increasing aspect ratio yields good agreement between the GAM frequency found in the simulations and an analytical result obtained for elongated large aspect ratio plasmas.

  2. Use of a loudness model for hearing aid fitting: III. A general method for deriving initial fittings for hearing aids with multi-channel compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B C; Glasberg, B R; Stone, M A

    1999-08-01

    A model for predicting loudness for people with cochlear hearing loss is applied to the problem of the initial fitting of multi-channel fast-acting compression hearing aids. The fitting is based entirely on the pure tone audiogram, and does not require measures of loudness growth. One constraint is always applied: the specific loudness pattern evoked by speech of a moderate level (65 dB SPL) should be reasonably flat (equal loudness per critical band), and the overall loudness should be similar to that evoked in a normal listener by 65-dB speech. This is achieved using the 'Cambridge' formula. For hearing aids where the compression threshold in each channel can be set to a very low value, an additional constraint is used: speech with an overall level of 45 dB SPL should be audible over its entire dynamic range in all frequency channels from 500 Hz up to about 4 kHz. For hearing aids where the compression thresholds cannot be set to very low values, a different additional constraint is used: the specific loudness pattern evoked by speech of a high level (85 dB SPL, and with the spectral characteristics of shouted speech) should be reasonably flat, and the overall loudness should be similar to that evoked in a normal listener by 85-dB speech. For both cases, compression ratios are limited to values below 3. For each of these two cases, we show how to derive compression ratios and gains, and for the first case, compression thresholds, for each channel. The derivations apply to systems with any number of channels. A computer program implementing the derivations is described. The program also calculates target insertion gains at the centre frequency of each channel for input levels of 50, 65 and 80 dB SPL, and target gains at the eardrum measured relative to the level at the reference microphone of a probe microphone system.

  3. Multi-Scale Impact and Compression-After-Impact Modeling of Reinforced Benzoxazine/Epoxy Composites using Micromechanics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Marc Villa; Barjasteh, Ehsan; Baid, Harsh K.; Godines, Cody; Abdi, Frank; Nikbin, Kamran

    A multi-scale micromechanics approach along with finite element (FE) model predictive tool is developed to analyze low-energy-impact damage footprint and compression-after-impact (CAI) of composite laminates which is also tested and verified with experimental data. Effective fiber and matrix properties were reverse-engineered from lamina properties using an optimization algorithm and used to assess damage at the micro-level during impact and post-impact FE simulations. Progressive failure dynamic analysis (PFDA) was performed for a two step-process simulation. Damage mechanisms at the micro-level were continuously evaluated during the analyses. Contribution of each failure mode was tracked during the simulations and damage and delamination footprint size and shape were predicted to understand when, where and why failure occurred during both impact and CAI events. The composite laminate was manufactured by the vacuum infusion of the aero-grade toughened Benzoxazine system into the fabric preform. Delamination footprint was measured using C-scan data from the impacted panels and compared with the predicated values obtained from proposed multi-scale micromechanics coupled with FE analysis. Furthermore, the residual strength was predicted from the load-displacement curve and compared with the experimental values as well.

  4. Multiobjective Optimization of a Vehicle Vibration Model Using the Improved Compressed-Objective Genetic Algorithm with Convergence Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittipong Boonlong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ride quality and road holding capacity of a vehicle is significantly influenced by its suspension system. In the design process, a number of objective functions related to comfort and road holding capacity are taken into consideration. In this paper, the five-degree-of-freedom system of vehicle vibration model with passive suspension is investigated. This multiobjective optimization problem consists of five objective functions. Based on these five design objectives, this paper formulates four two-objective optimization problems by considering four pairs of design objectives and one five-objective optimization problem. This paper proposes the use of the improved compressed objective genetic algorithm (COGA-II with convergence detection. COGA-II is intentionally designed for dealing with a problem having many optimized objectives. Furthermore, the performance of COGA-II was benchmarked with the multiobjective uniform-diversity genetic algorithm (MUGA utilized in the previous study. From the simulation results, with equal population sizes, COGA-II employing the convergence detection for searching termination uses less numbers of generations for most sets of design objectives than MUGA whose termination condition is defined by the constant maximum number of generations. Moreover, the solutions obtained from COGA-II are obviously superior to those obtained from MUGA regardless of sets of design objective.

  5. Nasopharyngeal oxygen with intermittent nose-close and abdomen-compression: a novel resuscitation technique in a piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Wen-Jue; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Soong, Yen-Hui Matthew

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a simple and novel cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) technique, nasopharyngeal oxygen with intermittent nose-close and abdomen-compression (NPO(2) -NC-AC) in an animal model. Prospective piglet study. In an animal physiology laboratory of a medical university. PIGLETS: Six healthy piglets <14 days old. Spontaneous breathing of the anesthetized piglets (n = 6) was medically ceased until severe bradycardia (<20 beat/min). NPO(2) -NC-AC CPR trial was then initiated by delivering NPO(2) at 1.0-1.5 L/kg/min and intermittently performing the NC-AC maneuver: (1) NC for inspiration, occluded nostrils for 1 sec; and (2) AC for expiration, released nostrils, and compressed the abdomen for 1 sec. NC-AC was repeated at a rate of 30/min for 5 min. This CPR trial was repeated three times in each piglet. Cardiopulmonary variables were monitored, recorded, and compared. A total of 18 CPR trials were performed. All of these acute life-threatening asphyxia events rapidly improved within 1 min of CPR. Cardiopulmonary variables recovered to the baseline levels and oxygenation continually increased. The intratracheal pressure (P(tr) ) values of positive end expiratory pressure and peak inspiratory pressure values were 4.3 ± 0.8 cmH(2) O and 26.2 ± 4.1 cmH(2) O, respectively. Chest wall movement was observed when the P(tr) reached 17.5 ± 3.1 cmH(2) O. All six piglets fully recovered after 63.8 ± 7.2 min of experiment without additional support. NPO(2) -NC-AC is a simple and effective CPR technique for severe acute cardiopulmonary asphyxia in piglets. It may be clinically applicable for supportive or rescue use. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  7. Fast Bayesian Inference of Copy Number Variants using Hidden Markov Models with Wavelet Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wiedenhoeft

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available By integrating Haar wavelets with Hidden Markov Models, we achieve drastically reduced running times for Bayesian inference using Forward-Backward Gibbs sampling. We show that this improves detection of genomic copy number variants (CNV in array CGH experiments compared to the state-of-the-art, including standard Gibbs sampling. The method concentrates computational effort on chromosomal segments which are difficult to call, by dynamically and adaptively recomputing consecutive blocks of observations likely to share a copy number. This makes routine diagnostic use and re-analysis of legacy data collections feasible; to this end, we also propose an effective automatic prior. An open source software implementation of our method is available at http://schlieplab.org/Software/HaMMLET/ (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.46262. This paper was selected for oral presentation at RECOMB 2016, and an abstract is published in the conference proceedings.

  8. An experimental investigation of vortex stability, tip shapes, compressibility, and noise for hovering model rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangler, J. L.; Wohlfeld, R. M.; Miley, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Schlieren methods of flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry for velocity measurements were used to investigate the wakes generated by hovering model propellers and rotors. The research program was directed toward investigating (1) the stability of the tip vortex, (2) the effects produced by various tip shapes on performance and tip vortex characteristics, and (3) the shock formation and noise characteristics associated with various tip shapes. A free-wake analysis was also conducted for comparison with the vortex stability experimental results. Schlieren photographs showing wake asymmetry, interaction, and instability are presented along with a discussion of the effects produced by the number of blades, collective pitch, and tip speed. Two hot-wire anemometer techniques, used to measure the maximum circumferential velocity in the tip vortex, are discussed.

  9. Fast Bayesian Inference of Copy Number Variants using Hidden Markov Models with Wavelet Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenhoeft, John; Brugel, Eric; Schliep, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    By integrating Haar wavelets with Hidden Markov Models, we achieve drastically reduced running times for Bayesian inference using Forward-Backward Gibbs sampling. We show that this improves detection of genomic copy number variants (CNV) in array CGH experiments compared to the state-of-the-art, including standard Gibbs sampling. The method concentrates computational effort on chromosomal segments which are difficult to call, by dynamically and adaptively recomputing consecutive blocks of observations likely to share a copy number. This makes routine diagnostic use and re-analysis of legacy data collections feasible; to this end, we also propose an effective automatic prior. An open source software implementation of our method is available at http://schlieplab.org/Software/HaMMLET/ (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.46262). This paper was selected for oral presentation at RECOMB 2016, and an abstract is published in the conference proceedings.

  10. Modulation of Jupiter's plasma flow, polar currents, and auroral precipitation by solar wind-induced compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere: a simple theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We construct a simple model of the plasma flow, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents, and auroral precipitation in Jupiter's magnetosphere, and examine how they respond to compressions and expansions of the system induced by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. The main simplifying assumption is axi-symmetry, the system being modelled principally to reflect dayside conditions. The model thus describes three magnetospheric regions, namely the middle and outer magnetosphere on closed magnetic field lines bounded by the magnetopause, together with a region of open field lines mapping to the tail. The calculations assume that the system is initially in a state of steady diffusive outflow of iogenic plasma with a particular equatorial magnetopause radius, and that the magnetopause then moves rapidly in or out due to a change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. If the change is sufficiently rapid (~2–3 h or less the plasma angular momentum is conserved during the excursion, allowing the modified plasma angular velocity to be calculated from the radial displacement of the field lines, together with the modified magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents and auroral precipitation. The properties of these transient states are compared with those of the steady states to which they revert over intervals of ~1–2 days. Results are shown for rapid compressions of the system from an initially expanded state typical of a solar wind rarefaction region, illustrating the reduction in total precipitating electron power that occurs for modest compressions, followed by partial recovery in the emergent steady state. For major compressions, however, typical of the onset of a solar wind compression region, a brightened transient state occurs in which super-rotation is induced on closed field lines, resulting in a reversal in sense of the usual magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system. Current system reversal results in accelerated auroral electron

  11. Modulation of Jupiter's plasma flow, polar currents, and auroral precipitation by solar wind-induced compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere: a simple theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We construct a simple model of the plasma flow, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents, and auroral precipitation in Jupiter's magnetosphere, and examine how they respond to compressions and expansions of the system induced by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. The main simplifying assumption is axi-symmetry, the system being modelled principally to reflect dayside conditions. The model thus describes three magnetospheric regions, namely the middle and outer magnetosphere on closed magnetic field lines bounded by the magnetopause, together with a region of open field lines mapping to the tail. The calculations assume that the system is initially in a state of steady diffusive outflow of iogenic plasma with a particular equatorial magnetopause radius, and that the magnetopause then moves rapidly in or out due to a change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. If the change is sufficiently rapid (~2–3 h or less the plasma angular momentum is conserved during the excursion, allowing the modified plasma angular velocity to be calculated from the radial displacement of the field lines, together with the modified magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents and auroral precipitation. The properties of these transient states are compared with those of the steady states to which they revert over intervals of ~1–2 days. Results are shown for rapid compressions of the system from an initially expanded state typical of a solar wind rarefaction region, illustrating the reduction in total precipitating electron power that occurs for modest compressions, followed by partial recovery in the emergent steady state. For major compressions, however, typical of the onset of a solar wind compression region, a brightened transient state occurs in which super-rotation is induced on closed field lines, resulting in a reversal in sense of the usual magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system. Current system reversal results in accelerated auroral

  12. Numerical Simulation of Two-Fluid Mingling Using the Particle Finite Element Method with Applications to Magmatic and Volcanic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mier, M.; Costa, F.; Idelsohn, S.

    2008-12-01

    Many magmatic and volcanic processes (e.g., magma differentiation, mingling, transport in the volcanic conduit) are controlled by the physical properties and flow styles of high-temperature silicate melts. Such processes can be experimentally investigated using analog systems and scaling methods, but it is difficult to find the suitable material and it is generally not possible to quantitatively extrapolate the results to the natural system. An alternative means of studying fluid dynamics in volcanic systems is with numerical models. We have chosen the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on a Delaunay mesh that moves with the fluid velocity, the Navier-Stokes equations in Lagrangian formulation, and linear elements for velocity, pressure, and temperature. Remeshing is performed when the grid becomes too distorted [E. Oñate et al., 2004. The Particle Finite Element Method: An Overview. Int. J. Comput. Meth. 1, 267-307]. The method is ideal for tracking material interfaces between different fluids or media. Methods based on Eulerian reference frames need special techniques, such as level-set or volume-of-fluid, to capture the interface position, and these techniques add a significant numerical diffusion at the interface. We have performed a series of two-dimensional simulations of a classical problem of fluid dynamics in magmatic and volcanic systems: intrusion of a basaltic melt in a silica-rich magma reservoir. We have used realistic physical properties and equations of state for the silicate melts (e.g., temperature, viscosity, and density) and tracked the changes in the system for geologically relevant time scales (up to 100 years). The problem is modeled by the low-Mach-number equations derived from an asymptotic analysis of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations that removes shock waves from the flow but allows however large variations of density due to temperature variations. Non-constant viscosity and volume changes are taken into account

  13. A generalized two-fluid picture of non-driven collisionless reconnection and its relation to whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Dae

    2017-10-01

    A generalized, intuitive two-fluid picture of 2D non-driven collisionless magnetic reconnection is described using results from a full-3D numerical simulation. The relevant two-fluid equations simplify to the condition that the flux associated with canonical circulation Q =me ∇ ×ue +qe B is perfectly frozen into the electron fluid. Q is the curl of P =meue +qe A , which is the electron canonical momenrum. Since ∇ . Q = 0 , the Q flux tubes are incompressible and so have a fixed volume. Because they are perfectly frozen into the electron fluid, the Q flux tubes cannot reconnect. Following the behavior of these Q flux tubes provides an intuitive insight into 2D collisionless reconnection of B . In the reconnection geometry, a small perturbation to the central electron current sheet effectively brings a localized segment of a Q flux tube towards the X-point. This flux tube segment is convected downwards with the central electron current, effectively stretching the flux tube, decreasing its cross-section to maintain a fixed volume and so increasing the magnitude of Q . Also, because Q is the sum of the electron vorticity and the magnetic field, the two terms may change in such a way that one term becomes smaller while the other becomes larger while preserving constant Q flux. This allows magnetic reconnection, which is a conversion of magnetic field into particle velocity, to occur without any dissipation mechanism. The entire process has positive feedback with no restoring mechanism and therefore is an instability. The Q motion provides an interpretation for other phenomena as well, such as spiked central electron current filaments. The simulated reconnection rate was found to agree with a previous analytical calculation having the same geometry. Energy analysis shows that the magnetic energy is converted and propagated mainly in the form of the Poynting flux, while helicity analysis shows that the canonical helicity ∫ P . QdV as a whole must be considered when

  14. Water balance simulations of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell using a two-fluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, M.; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    the predominant transport mechanism is diffusion. Consequently, operating conditions with a high net water transport from anode to cathode should be avoided as it is important to keep the cathode catalyst layer well humidified in order to prevent high protonic losses. Addition of the micro-porous layer did...

  15. Agmatine inhibits nuclear factor-κB nuclear translocation in acute spinal cord compression injury rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa M. Samy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary damage after acute spinal cord compression injury (SCCI exacerbates initial insult. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB-p65 activation is involved in SCCI deleterious effects. Agmatine (Agm showed neuroprotection against various CNS injuries. However, Agm impact on NF-κB signaling in acute SCCI remains to be investigated. The present study compared the effectiveness of Agm therapy and decompression laminectomy (DL in functional recovery, oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic responses, and modulation of NF-κB activation in acute SCCI rat model. Rats were either sham-operated or subjected to SCCI at T8–9, using 2-Fr. catheter. SCCI rats were randomly treated with DL at T8–9, intraperitoneal Agm (100 mg/kg/day, combined (DL/Agm treatment or saline (n = 16/group. After 28-days of neurological follow-up, spinal cords were either subjected to biochemical measurement of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers or histopathology and immuno-histochemistry for NF-κB-p65 and caspase-3 expression (n = 8/group. Agm was comparable to DL in facilitating neurological functions recovery, reducing inflammation (TNF-α/interleukin-6, and apoptosis. Agm was distinctive in combating oxidative stress. Agm neuroprotective effects were paralleled with inhibition of NF-κB-p65 nuclear translocation. Combined pharmacological and surgical interventions were proved superior in functional recovery. In conclusion, present research suggested a new mechanism for Agm neuroprotection in rats SCCI through inhibition of NF-κB activation.

  16. Compressed Sensing for Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jacob Nathan

    Many chemical applications, from spectroscopy to quantum chemistry, involve measuring or computing a large amount of data, and then compressing this data to retain the most chemically-relevant information. In contrast, compressed sensing is an emergent technique that makes it possible to measure or compute an amount of data that is roughly proportional to its information content. In particular, compressed sensing enables the recovery of a sparse quantity of information from significantly undersampled data by solving an ℓ 1-optimization problem. This thesis represents the application of compressed sensing to problems in chemistry. The first half of this thesis is about spectroscopy. Compressed sensing is used to accelerate the computation of vibrational and electronic spectra from real-time time-dependent density functional theory simulations. Using compressed sensing as a drop-in replacement for the discrete Fourier transform, well-resolved frequency spectra are obtained at one-fifth the typical simulation time and computational cost. The technique is generalized to multiple dimensions and applied to two-dimensional absorption spectroscopy using experimental data collected on atomic rubidium vapor. Finally, a related technique known as super-resolution is applied to open quantum systems to obtain realistic models of a protein environment, in the form of atomistic spectral densities, at lower computational cost. The second half of this thesis deals with matrices in quantum chemistry. It presents a new use of compressed sensing for more efficient matrix recovery whenever the calculation of individual matrix elements is the computational bottleneck. The technique is applied to the computation of the second-derivative Hessian matrices in electronic structure calculations to obtain the vibrational modes and frequencies of molecules. When applied to anthracene, this technique results in a threefold speed-up, with greater speed-ups possible for larger molecules. The

  17. CPR PRO® device reduces rescuer fatigue during continuous chest compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized crossover trial using a manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovic, Ivor; Lulic, Dinka; Lulic, Ileana

    2013-10-01

    The performance of high-quality chest compressions with minimal interruptions is one of the most important elements of the "Chain of Survival." To evaluate the impact of a novel CPR PRO(®) (CPRO) device for manual chest compression on rescuer fatigue, pain, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality. Randomized crossover trial of 24 health care professionals performing continuous chest compression CPR for 10 min with a CPRO device and conventional manual CPR (MCPR). Data about chest compressions were recorded using a manikin. Rescuers' physiologic signs were recorded before and after each session, and heart rate (HR) data were tracked continuously. Fatigue was assessed with ratings of perceived exertion, and pain questionnaire. All subjects completed 10 min of CPR with both methods. Significantly more rest breaks were taken during MCPR sessions (1.7 ± 2 vs. 0.21 ± 0.72). Subjects' perceived exertion was higher after MCPR, as well as the average (120.7 ± 16.8 vs. 110.8 ± 17.6) and maximal HR (134.3 ± 18.5 vs. 123.42 ± 16.5) during testing. Subjects reported more pain in the hands, especially the wrist, after performing MCPR. Average depth of compressions was higher with the CPRO device (4.6 ± 7.0 vs. 4.3 ± 7.9) and declined more slowly over time. Other CPR quality parameters, such as the correct position and complete release of pressure, were also better for CPRO CPR. CPRO device reduces rescuer fatigue and pain during continuous chest compression CPR, which results in a higher quality of CPR in a simulation setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MHD Two-Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer between Two Inclined Parallel Plates in a Rotating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Ramachandra Murty, P; Balaji Prakash, G

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase magnetohydrodynamic convective flow of electrically conducting fluid through an inclined channel is studied under the action of a constant transverse magnetic field in a rotating system. The fluids in the two phases are steady, incompressible, laminar, immiscible, and electrically conducting, having different densities, viscosities, and thermal and electrical conductivities. The transport properties of both the fluids are assumed constant. The bounding infinite inclined parallel plates are maintained at different constant temperatures, making an angle ϕ with the horizontal. Approximate solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are obtained by using a straightforward regular perturbation technique. An in-depth study has been done on the effects of rotation parameter, Hartmann number, inclination angle, the ratio of electrical conductivities, and viscosities of two fluids on the flow. It is observed that the effect of increasing rotation is to decrease the primary velocity. Further it is noticed that as the rotation increases, the secondary velocity increases for smaller rotation, while for larger rotation it decreases. It is also found that the temperature distribution decreases as the rotation increases.

  19. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  20. A DEM study of oedometric compression of model granular materials Initial state influence, stress ratio, elasticity, irreversibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili Mohamed Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A DEM simulation study of spherical beads with elastic-frictional contacts in oedometric compression is carried out for a wide variety of initial states, differing in solid fraction Φ, coordination number z (independent of Φ in dense systems and inherent anisotropy. Stress ratio K0 = σ2/σ1, along with z, Φ and force and fabric anisotropies are monitored in compressions in which axial stress σ1 varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude. K0 tends to remain constant if the material was already one-dimensionally compressed in the assembling stage. Otherwise, it decreases steadily over the investigated stress range. K0 relates to force and fabric anisotropy parameters by a simple formula. Elastic moduli may express the response to very small stress increments about the transversely isotropic equilibrated states, although oedometric compression proves an essentially anelastic process, mainly due to friction mobilization. Despite apparent nearly reversible increases of axial strain ϵ1 (or density Φ, especially in dense samples, internal state evolutions are strongly irreversible, as evidenced by changes in z and K0. Fabric changes are reflected by anisotropic elastic moduli.

  1. Mechanical analysis of transversal iliac fracture stabilization using dynamic compression plate or screws and PMM in polyurethane bone model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.C. Prada

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pelvic fractures correspond to 20 to 30 % of the fractures observed in dogs. Complete fractures, especially with bone axis deviation should be surgically treated. The mechanical study of surgical techniques is of utmost importance to assess the best way of treating these injuries. This study compared, biomechanically, the use of a dynamic compression plate (DCP and screws (group 1 or screws and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA (group 2 to stabilize an iliac fracture using a static test. Sixteen canine synthetic hemi-pelvises (test specimens with a transverse iliac osteotomy were used. After fixation with implants, a load was applied to the acetabulum until failure. Group 1 maximal compressive load was 133.9±18.60 N, displacement at yield 21.10±3.59mm and stiffness 125.22±12.25N/mm. Group 2 maximal compressive load was 183.50±27.38N, displacement at yield 16.66±5.42mm and stiffness 215.68±33.34N/mm. The stabilization with polymethylmethacrylate was stronger than dynamic compression plate since it resisted a greater load in all test specimens.

  2. Validation of a zero-dimensional and two-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikulski, M.; Wierzbicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to reduce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of

  3. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness.

  4. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  5. Compression-extension transition of continental crust in a subduction zone: A parametric numerical modeling study with implications on Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Cathaysia Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xuran; Chan, Lung Sang; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The Cathaysia Block is located in southeastern part of South China, which situates in the west Pacific subduction zone. It is thought to have undergone a compression-extension transition of the continental crust during Mesozoic-Cenozoic during the subduction of Pacific Plate beneath Eurasia-Pacific Plate, resulting in extensive magmatism, extensional basins and reactivation of fault systems. Although some mechanisms such as the trench roll-back have been generally proposed for the compression-extension transition, the timing and progress of the transition under a convergence setting remain ambiguous due to lack of suitable geological records and overprinting by later tectonic events. In this study, a numerical thermo-dynamical program was employed to evaluate how variable slab angles, thermal gradients of the lithospheres and convergence velocities would give rise to the change of crustal stress in a convergent subduction zone. Model results show that higher slab dip angle, lower convergence velocity and higher lithospheric thermal gradient facilitate the subduction process. The modeling results reveal the continental crust stress is dominated by horizontal compression during the early stage of the subduction, which could revert to a horizontal extension in the back-arc region, combing with the roll-back of the subducting slab and development of mantle upwelling. The parameters facilitating the subduction process also favor the compression-extension transition in the upper plate of the subduction zone. Such results corroborate the geology of the Cathaysia Block: the initiation of the extensional regime in the Cathaysia Block occurring was probably triggered by roll-back of the slowly subducting slab.

  6. Micromechanical finite-element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-08-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite-element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% HA. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30, respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical FEA model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any HA loading to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. The results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient- and site-specific composite tissue-engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Micromechanical finite element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone:hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30% HA by volume. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30 respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 MPa to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical finite element analysis (FEA) model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any loading of HA to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. Results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient and site-specific composite tissue engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. PMID:22522129

  8. Compression of Short Text on Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, S.; Gühmann, C.; Fitzek, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The paper details a scheme for lossless compression of a short data series larger than 50 bytes. The method uses arithmetic coding and context modelling with a low-complexity data model. A data model that takes 32 kBytes of RAM already cuts the data size in half. The compression scheme just takes...

  9. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-01

    . Figure 1 highlights the results from the Pd nanoparticle experiment. On the left, 10 frames are reconstructed from a single coded frame—the original frames are shown for comparison. On the right a selection of three frames are shown from reconstructions at compression levels 10,20,30. The reconstructions, which are not post-processed, are true to the original and degrade in a straightforward manner. The final choice of compression level will obviously depend on both the temporal and spatial resolution required for a specific imaging task, but the results indicate that an increase in speed of better than an order of magnitude should be possible for all experiments. References: [1] P Llull, X Liao, X Yuan et al. Optics express 21(9), (2013), p. 10526. [2] J Yang, X Yuan, X Liao et al. Image Processing, IEEE Trans 23(11), (2014), p. 4863. [3] X Yuan, J Yang, P Llull et al. In ICIP 2013 (IEEE), p. 14. [4] X Yuan, P Llull, X Liao et al. In CVPR 2014. p. 3318. [5] EJ Candès, J Romberg and T Tao. Information Theory, IEEE Trans 52(2), (2006), p. 489. [6] P Binev, W Dahmen, R DeVore et al. In Modeling Nanoscale Imaging in Electron Microscopy, eds. T Vogt, W Dahmen and P Binev (Springer US), Nanostructure Science and Technology (2012). p. 73. [7] A Stevens, H Yang, L Carin et al. Microscopy 63(1), (2014), pp. 41.

  10. Modeling the effect of elastane linear density, fabric thread density, and weave float on the stretch, recovery, and compression properties of bi-stretch woven fabrics for compression garments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maqsood, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of elastane linear density, thread density, and weave float on the stretch, recovery, and compression properties of bi-stretch woven fabrics for compression garments. Fabric samples were produced using elastane core-spun cotton yarns both in the

  11. Compressed sensing for distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coluccia, Giulio; Magli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the state-of-the art in the exciting and timely topic of compressed sensing for distributed systems. It has to be noted that, while compressed sensing has been studied for some time now, its distributed applications are relatively new. Remarkably, such applications are ideally suited to exploit all the benefits that compressed sensing can provide. The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a comprehensive survey of this topic, from the basic concepts to different classes of centralized and distributed reconstruction algorithms, as well as a comparison of these techniques. This book collects different contributions on these aspects. It presents the underlying theory in a complete and unified way for the first time, presenting various signal models and their use cases. It contains a theoretical part collecting latest results in rate-distortion analysis of distributed compressed sensing, as well as practical implementations of algorithms obtaining performance close to...

  12. Experimental Characterization and Material Modelling of an AZ31 Magnesium Sheet Alloy at Elevated Temperatures under Consideration of the Tension-Compression Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Bonk, C.; Dykiert, M.

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium sheet alloys have a great potential as a construction material in the aerospace and automotive industry. However, the current state of research regarding temperature dependent material parameters for the description of the plastic behaviour of magnesium sheet alloys is scarce in literature and accurate statements concerning yield criteria and appropriate characterization tests to describe the plastic behaviour of a magnesium sheet alloy at elevated temperatures in deep drawing processes are to define. Hence, in this paper the plastic behaviour of the well-established magnesium sheet alloy AZ31 has been characterized by means of convenient mechanical tests (e. g. tension, compression and biaxial tests) at temperatures between 180 and 230 °C. In this manner, anisotropic and hardening behaviour as well as differences between the tension-compression asymmetry of the yield locus have been estimated. Furthermore, using the evaluated data from the above mentioned tests, two different yield criteria have been parametrized; the commonly used Hill’48 and an orthotropic yield criterion, CPB2006, which was developed especially for materials with hexagonal close packed lattice structure and is able to describe an asymmetrical yielding behaviour regarding tensile and compressive stress states. Numerical simulations have been finally carried out with both yield functions in order to assess the accuracy of the material models.

  13. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Su, Xingya; Zhao, Longmao

    The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10-3 s-1 to 2.4 × 103 s-1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA) is occurred at the temperature region of 673-973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s-1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel.

  14. Autologous nucleus pulposus transplantation to lumbar 5 dorsal root ganglion after epineurium dissection in rats: a modified model of non-compressive lumbar herniated intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-jun; Song, Wu; Luo, Wen-ying; Wei, Ming; Sun, Lai-bao; Zou, Xue-nong; Liao, Wei-ming

    2011-07-05

    Nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs has proinflammatory characteristics that play a key role in neuropathic pain in lumbar herniated intervertebral disc. One of the most commonly used animal models (the traditional model) of non-compressive lumbar herniated intervertebral disc is created by L4-L5 hemilaminectomy and the application of autologous nucleus pulposus to cover the left L4 and L5 nerve roots in rats. However, such procedures have the disadvantages of excessive trauma and low success rate. We proposed a modified model of non-compressive lumbar herniated intervertebral disc in which only the left L5 dorsal root ganglion is exposed and transplanted with autologous nucleus pulposus following incision of epineurium. We aimed to compare the modified model with the traditional one with regard to trauma and success rate. Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomized into three groups: sham operation group (n = 6), traditional group (n = 12), and modified group (n = 12). The amount of blood loss and operative time for each group were analyzed. The paw withdrawal threshold of the left hind limb to mechanical stimuli and paw withdrawal latency to heat stimuli were examined from the day before surgery to day 35 after surgery. Compared with the traditional group, the modified group had shorter operative time, smaller amount of blood loss, and higher success rate (91.7% versus 58.3%, P lumbar herniated intervertebral disc with less trauma and more stable pain ethology.

  15. Effect of simulated precompression, compression pressure and tableting speed on an offline diffuse transmittance and reflectance near-infrared spectral information of model intact caffeine tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Branko Z; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used in the pharmaceutical industry for monitoring drug content during the tablet manufacturing process. It is of critical importance to understand the effect of process factors on NIRS performance. Design of Experiments (DoE) methodology was applied in this work for the systematic study of the effects of compression pressure, precompression pressure and tableting speed on an average Euclidean distance (AED), which reflects spectral features of the tablets, and root mean-squared error of prediction (RMSEP) as key performance indicator of NIRS calibration models. Caffeine tablets were manufactured in 17 experimental runs in accordance with D-optimal design. Developed diffuse transmittance (DT) and diffuse reflectance (DR) calibration models were tested on five independent test sets to confirm the conclusions of the DoE. Compression pressure and tableting speed have shown significant effect on the studied responses in DT mode, whereas all three studied factors have shown a significant effect in DR mode. Significant factors were considered in the development of the global calibration models. The authors suggest further study of RMSEP and AED responses to draw reliable conclusions on the effects of tableting process factors. The global calibration model in DT mode has shown superior performance compared to DR mode.

  16. Lumbar Facet Joint Compressive Injury Induces Lasting Changes in Local Structure, Nociceptive Scores, and Inflammatory Mediators in a Novel Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Henry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a novel animal model of persisting lumbar facet joint pain. Methods. Sprague Dawley rats were anaesthetized and the right lumbar (L5/L6 facet joint was exposed and compressed to ~1 mm with modified clamps applied for three minutes; sham-operated and naïve animals were used as control groups. After five days, animals were tested for hind-paw sensitivity using von Frey filaments and axial deep tissue sensitivity by algometer on assigned days up to 28 days. Animals were sacrificed at selected times for histological and biochemical analysis. Results. Histological sections revealed site-specific loss of cartilage in model animals only. Tactile hypersensitivity was observed for the ipsi- and contralateral paws lasting 28 days. The threshold at which deep tissue pressure just elicited vocalization was obtained at three lumbar levels; sensitivity at L1>L3/4>L6. Biochemical analyses revealed increases in proinflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-1β. Conclusions. These data suggest that compression of a facet joint induces a novel model of local cartilage loss accompanied by increased sensitivity to mechanical stimuli and by increases in inflammatory mediators. This new model may be useful for studies on mechanisms and treatment of lumbar facet joint pain and osteoarthritis.

  17. Analysis by compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    MEL is a geometric music encoding language designed to allow for musical objects to be encoded parsimoniously as sets of points in pitch-time space, generated by performing geometric transformations on component patterns. MEL has been implemented in Java and coupled with the SIATEC pattern discov...... discovery algorithm to allow for compact encodings to be generated automatically from in extenso note lists. The MEL-SIATEC system is founded on the belief that music analysis and music perception can be modelled as the compression of in extenso descriptions of musical objects....

  18. Mathematical modelling of the beam under axial compression force applied at any point – the buckling problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnucka-Blandzi, Ewa [Institute of Mathematics, Poznan University of Technology (Poland)

    2016-06-08

    The study is devoted to stability of simply supported beam under axial compression. The beam is subjected to an axial load located at any point along the axis of the beam. The buckling problem has been desribed and solved mathematically. Critical loads have been calculated. In the particular case, the Euler’s buckling load is obtained. Explicit solutions are given. The values of critical loads are collected in tables and shown in figure. The relation between the point of the load application and the critical load is presented.

  19. A novel approach for measuring the intrinsic nanoscale thickness of polymer brushes by means of atomic force microscopy: application of a compressible fluid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, José Luis; Llarena, Irantzu; Iturri, Jagoba J; Donath, Edwin; Moya, Sergio Enrique

    2013-12-07

    The thickness of a poly(sulfo propyl methacrylate) (PSPM) brush is determined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging as a function of the loading force at different ionic strengths, ranging from Milli-Q water to 1 M NaCl. Imaging is performed both with a sharp tip and a colloidal probe. The brush thickness strongly depends both on the applied load and on the ionic strength. A brush thickness of 150 nm is measured in Millipore water when applying the minimal loading force. Imaging with an 8 μm silica particle as a colloidal probe results in a thickness of 30 nm larger than that measured with the tip. Increasing the ionic strength causes the well known reduction of the thickness of the brush. The apparent thickness of the brush decreases with increasing loading forces. An empirical model analogous to that of a compressible fluid is applied to describe the dependence of the apparent thickness of the brush with loading force. The model comprises three ionic strength dependent parameters for the brush: thickness at infinite compression, energy, and cohesive force. The meaning and significance of these parameters are discussed. A particular advantage of the model is that it allows for determination of the brush thickness at zero loading force.

  20. Risk Prediction of New Adjacent Vertebral Fractures After PVP for Patients with Vertebral Compression Fractures: Development of a Prediction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Bin-Yan; He, Shi-Cheng; Zhu, Hai-Dong [Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Zhongda Hospital (China); Wu, Chun-Gen [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (China); Fang, Wen; Chen, Li; Guo, Jin-He; Deng, Gang; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Teng, Gao-Jun, E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com [Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Zhongda Hospital (China)

    2017-02-15

    PurposeWe aim to determine the predictors of new adjacent vertebral fractures (AVCFs) after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) in patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) and to construct a risk prediction score to estimate a 2-year new AVCF risk-by-risk factor condition.Materials and MethodsPatients with OVCFs who underwent their first PVP between December 2006 and December 2013 at Hospital A (training cohort) and Hospital B (validation cohort) were included in this study. In training cohort, we assessed the independent risk predictors and developed the probability of new adjacent OVCFs (PNAV) score system using the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The accuracy of this system was then validated in both training and validation cohorts by concordance (c) statistic.Results421 patients (training cohort: n = 256; validation cohort: n = 165) were included in this study. In training cohort, new AVCFs after the first PVP treatment occurred in 33 (12.9%) patients. The independent risk factors were intradiscal cement leakage and preexisting old vertebral compression fracture(s). The estimated 2-year absolute risk of new AVCFs ranged from less than 4% in patients with neither independent risk factors to more than 45% in individuals with both factors.ConclusionsThe PNAV score is an objective and easy approach to predict the risk of new AVCFs.

  1. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  2. Monitoring of the manufacturing process for ambroxol hydrochloride tablet using NIR-chemometric methods: compression effect on content uniformity model and relevant process parameters testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongqin; Liao, Xiaoxiang; Peng, Feng; Wang, Wan; Liu, Yanxin; Yan, Jin; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to monitor compaction pressure for simultaneously determining the tensile strength and content uniformity, as well as moisture and mean particle size of ambroxol hydrochloride tablets. The content uniformity, compression force and tensile strength of the laboratory samples were obtained by pressing a mixture of active principle and excipient components into tablets. To reduce the spectral baseline shift of the laboratory samples, the compaction pressure applied to the mixture was assessed by a variable pressure test. Production samples were added to the test and subjected to principal component analysis. The expanded partial least-squares (PLS) calibration model used to quantify the active content was more accurate than the model constructed from laboratory samples using the production tablets included in the calibration set. The model showed good predictability, with correlation coefficient (R) 0.9977. The validation and reliability of the content model were evaluated to determine trueness and reliability for the measurement of individual production tablets and the laboratory tablets with drug content ranging from 24 to 36 mg. The PLS calibration models for compression force and tensile strength were constructed using the same spectral set assuming both were highly related. These models yielded high R values (0.9955 and 0.9910). The R values of the moisture and mean particle size were 0.9994 and 0.9919, respectively. This study demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometric techniques can be successfully used to quantitatively monitor the tablet manufacturing process in the pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mona A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  4. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances....

  5. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances...

  6. CO{sub 2} absorption characteristics of a jet loop reactor with a two-fluid swirl nozzle in an alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Go-Eun; Lim, Jun-Heok; Lee, Tae-Yoon; Lee, Jea-Keun [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Ho-Jin [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the performance of a jet loop reactor with the two-fluid swirl nozzle (TSN), CO{sub 2} absorption experiments in an alkaline solution were performed. The experimental results obtained in the reactor were compared with those in a jet loop reactor with the two-fluid conventional nozzle (TCN). The neutralization time of alkaline solution and the CO{sub 2} removal efficiency were used as the indices for a comparison of the reactor performance. Due to the swirling flow, the neutralization times of alkaline solutions by CO{sub 2} in the reactor with the TSN were shortened compared with those in the reactor with the TCN. Also, the instantaneous and/or overall CO{sub 2} removal efficiencies in the reactor with the TSN were higher than those in the reactor with the TCN at the same liquid circulation flow rate.

  7. A High-Order Relativistic Two-Fluid Electrodynamic Scheme with Consistent Reconstruction of Electromagnetic Fields and a Multidimensional Riemann Solver for Electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Balsara, Dinshaw S; Garain, Sudip; Kim, Jinho

    2016-01-01

    In various astrophysics settings it is common to have a two-fluid relativistic plasma that interacts with the electromagnetic field. While it is common to ignore the displacement current in the ideal, classical magnetohydrodynamic limit, when the flows become relativistic this approximation is less than absolutely well-justified. In such a situation, it is more natural to consider a positively charged fluid made up of positrons or protons interacting with a negatively charged fluid made up of electrons. The two fluids interact collectively with the full set of Maxwell's equations. As a result, a solution strategy for that coupled system of equations is sought and found here. Our strategy extends to higher orders, providing increasing accuracy. Three important innovations are reported here. In our first innovation, the magnetic field within each zone is reconstructed in a divergence-free fashion while the electric field within each zone is reconstructed in a form that is consistent with Gauss' law. In our seco...

  8. MPEG-4 video compression optimization research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xianmin

    2011-10-01

    In order to make a large amount of video data compression and effectively with limited network bandwidth to transfer smoothly, this article using the MPEG-4 compression technology to compress video stream. In the network transmission, according to the characteristics of video stream, for transmission technology to carry out full analysis and optimization, and combining current network bandwidth status and protocol, to establish one network model with transferring and playback video streaming effectively. Through a combination of these two areas, significantly improved compression and storage of video files and network transmission efficiency, increased video processing power.

  9. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  10. International magnetic pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12-14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card - its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  11. An experimental and modeling study of iso-octane ignition delay times under homogeneous charge compression ignition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.; Donovan, M.T.; Zigler, B.T.; Palmer, T.R.; Walton, S.M.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Atreya, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Autoignition of iso-octane was examined using a rapid compression facility (RCF) with iso-octane, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon mixtures. The effects of typical homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) conditions on the iso-octane ignition characteristics were studied. Experimental results for ignition delay times, t{sub ign}, were obtained from pressure time-histories. The experiments were conducted over a range of equivalence ratios (f=0.25-1.0), pressures (P=5.12-23 atm), temperatures (T=943-1027 K), and oxygen mole fractions ({chi}{sub O{sub 2}}=9-21%), and with the addition of trace amounts of combustion product gases (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O). It was found that the ignition delay times were well represented by the expression t{sub ign}=1.3x10{sup -4}P{sup -1.05}f{sup -0.77}{chi}{sub O{sub 2}}{sup -1.41}exp(33,700/R{sub (c} {sub al/mol/K)}T), where P is pressure (atm), T is temperature (K), f is the equivalence ratio (based on iso-octane to O{sub 2} molar ratios), {chi}{sub O{sub 2}} is the oxygen mole percent (%), and t{sub ign} is the ignition delay time (ms). Carbon dioxide was found to have no chemical effect on t{sub ign}. Water was found to systematically decrease t{sub ign} by a small amount (less than 14% for the range of conditions studied). The maximum uncertainty in the measured t{sub ign} is +/-12% with an average uncertainty of +/-6%. The performance of several proposed chemical reaction mechanisms (including detailed, reduced, and skeletal mechanisms) was evaluated in the context of the current experimental results.

  12. Building indifferentiable compression functions from the PGV compression functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauravaram, P.; Bagheri, Nasour; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2016-01-01

    , Rogaway and Shrimpton formally proved this result in the ideal cipher model. However, in the indifferentiability security framework introduced by Maurer, Renner and Holenstein, all these 12 schemes are easily differentiable from a fixed input-length random oracle (FIL-RO) even when their underlying block...... are indifferentiable from a FIL-RO. To our knowledge, this is the first result showing that two independent block ciphers are sufficient to design indifferentiable single-block-length compression functions.......Preneel, Govaerts and Vandewalle (PGV) analysed the security of single-block-length block cipher based compression functions assuming that the underlying block cipher has no weaknesses. They showed that 12 out of 64 possible compression functions are collision and (second) preimage resistant. Black...

  13. On the compressibility effects in mixing layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khlifi Hechmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of compressible flows carried out in the past few years have shown that the pressure-strain is the main indicator of the structural compressibility effects. Undoubtedly, this terms plays a key role toward strongly changing magnitude of the turbulent Reynolds stress anisotropy. On the other hand, the incompressible models of the pressure-strain correlation have not correctly predicted compressible turbulence at high speed shear flow. Consequently, a correction of these models is needed for precise prediction of compressibility effects. In the present work, a compressibility correction of the widely used incompressible Launder Reece and Rodi model making their standard coefficients dependent on the turbulent and convective Mach numbers is proposed. The ability of the model to predict the developed mixing layers in different cases from experiments of Goebel and Dutton is examined. The predicted results with the proposed model are compared with DNS and experimental data and those obtained by the compressible model of Adumitroiae et al. and the original LRR model. The results show that the essential compressibility effects on mixing layers are well captured by the proposed model.

  14. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  15. Compression characteristics of refrigerant-oil mixture in refrigerant compressors. 1st Report. Modeling of leakage and heat transfer; Reigai asshukuki ni okeru reibai-abura kongobutsu no asshuku tokusei. 1. More to dennetsu no model ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, M.; Yanagisawa, T.; Shimizu, T.; Shikata, T. [University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-02-25

    Refrigeration oil is used for lubrication, sealing and cooling in refrigerant compressors, and mixing of the oil with refrigerant has great influences on compression characteristics in the compressors. In the past there were some studies in which the effect of the oil on the compressor performance was analyzed theoretically, but most of them did not discuss well the propriety of the oil treatment in the analysis. In this study, we developed the mathematical compressor model including the effect of the oil on leakage, heat transfer and flow resistance in vane compressors and examined the influence of the ways of treating the oil on the calculated results. When the model employed a quality of two-phase leakage flow equal to that in the compression chamber and a coefficient of heat transfer reflecting thermophysical properties of the oil and the refrigerant, it showed better agreement with experimental results. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jing

    Full Text Available The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10−3 s−1 to 2.4 × 103 s−1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA is occurred at the temperature region of 673–973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s−1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel. Keywords: Railway wheel steel, SHPB, Strain rate, Temperature effect, Strain aging

  17. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since......-connectors in cavity walls was developed. The method takes into account constraint conditions limiting the free length of the wall tie, and the instability in case of pure compression which gives an optimal load bearing capacity. The model is illustrated with examples from praxis....

  18. Digital Data Registration and Differencing Compression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransford, Gary A. (Inventor); Cambridge, Vivien J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A process for X-ray registration and differencing results in more efficient compression. Differencing of registered modeled subject image with a modeled reference image forms a differenced image for compression with conventional compression algorithms. Obtention of a modeled reference image includes modeling a relatively unrelated standard reference image upon a three-dimensional model, which three-dimensional model is also used to model the subject image for obtaining the modeled subject image. The registration process of the modeled subject image and modeled reference image translationally correlates such modeled images for resulting correlation thereof in spatial and spectral dimensions. Prior to compression, a portion of the image falling outside a designated area of interest may be eliminated, for subsequent replenishment with a standard reference image. The compressed differenced image may be subsequently transmitted and/or stored, for subsequent decompression and addition to a standard reference image so as to form a reconstituted or approximated subject image at either a remote location and/or at a later moment in time. Overall effective compression ratios of 100:1 are possible for thoracic X-ray digital images.

  19. Comparison of magnetic field observations of an average magnetic cloud with a simple force free model: the importance of field compression and expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lepping

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ability of the cylindrically symmetric force-free magnetic cloud (MC fitting model of Lepping et al. (1990 to faithfully reproduce actual magnetic field observations by examining two quantities: (1 a difference angle, called β, i.e., the angle between the direction of the observed magnetic field (Bobs and the derived force free model field (Bmod and (2 the difference in magnitudes between the observed and modeled fields, i.e., ΔB(=|Bobs|−|Bmod|, and a normalized ΔB (i.e., ΔB/ is also examined, all for a judiciously chosen set of 50 WIND interplanetary MCs, based on quality considerations. These three quantities are developed as a percent of MC duration and averaged over this set of MCs to obtain average profiles. It is found that, although B> and its normalize version are significantly enhanced (from a broad central average value early in an average MC (and to a lesser extent also late in the MC, the angle is small (less than 8° and approximately constant all throughout the MC. The field intensity enhancements are due mainly to interaction of the MC with the surrounding solar wind plasma causing field compression at front and rear. For example, for a typical MC, ΔB/B> is: 0.21±0.27 very early in the MC, −0.11±0.10 at the center (and −0.085±0.12 averaged over the full "central region," i.e., for 30% to 80% of duration, and 0.05±0.29 very late in the MC, showing a double sign change as we travel from front to center to back, in the MC. When individual MCs are examined we find that over 80% of them possess field enhancements within several to many hours of the front boundary, but only about 30% show such enhancements at their rear portions. The enhancement of the MC's front field is also due to MC expansion, but this is usually a lesser effect compared to compression. It is expected that this compression is manifested as significant distortion to the MC's cross-section from the ideal circle, first suggested by

  20. An overview of semantic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Mark S.

    2010-08-01

    We live in such perceptually rich natural and manmade environments that detection and recognition of objects is mediated cerebrally by attentional filtering, in order to separate objects of interest from background clutter. In computer models of the human visual system, attentional filtering is often restricted to early processing, where areas of interest (AOIs) are delineated around anomalies of interest, then the pixels within each AOI's subtense are isolated for later processing. In contrast, the human visual system concurrently detects many targets at multiple levels (e.g., retinal center-surround filters, ganglion layer feature detectors, post-retinal spatial filtering, and cortical detection / filtering of features and objects, to name but a few processes). Intracranial attentional filtering appears to play multiple roles, including clutter filtration at all levels of processing - thus, we process individual retinal cell responses, early filtering response, and so forth, on up to the filtering of objects at high levels of semantic complexity. Computationally, image compression techniques have progressed from emphasizing pixels, to considering regions of pixels as foci of computational interest. In more recent research, object-based compression has been investigated with varying rate-distortion performance and computational efficiency. Codecs have been developed for a wide variety of applications, although the majority of compression and decompression transforms continue to concentrate on region- and pixel-based processing, in part because of computational convenience. It is interesting to note that a growing body of research has emphasized the detection and representation of small features in relationship to their surrounding environment, which has occasionally been called semantic compression. In this paper, we overview different types of semantic compression approaches, with particular interest in high-level compression algorithms. Various algorithms and

  1. Compression-induced hyperaemia in the rabbit masseter muscle: a model to investigate vascular mechano-sensitivity of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turturici, Marco; Roatta, Silvestro

    2013-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the mechano-sensitivity of the vascular network may underlie rapid dilatory events in skeletal muscles. Previous investigations have been mostly based either on in vitro or on whole-limb studies, neither preparation allowing one to assess the musculo-vascular specificity under physiological conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize the mechano-sensitivity of an exclusively-muscular vascular bed in vivo. In five anesthetized rabbits, muscle blood flow was continuously monitored in the masseteric artery, bilaterally (n = 10). Hyperaemic responses were evoked by compressive stimuli of different extent (50, 100 and 200 mm Hg) and duration (0.5, 1, 2 and 5 s) exerted by a servo-controlled motor on the masseter muscle. Peak amplitude of the hyperaemic response ranged from 340 ± 30% of baseline (at 50 mm Hg) to 459 ± 57% (at 200 mm Hg) (P < 0.05), did not depend on stimulus duration and exhibited very good reliability (ICC = 0.98) when reassessed at 30 min intervals. The time course of the response depended neither on applied pressure nor on the duration of the stimulus. In conclusion, for its high sensitivity and reliability this technique is adequate to characterize mechano-vascular reactivity and may prove useful in the investigation of the underlying mechanisms, with implications in the control of vascular tone and blood pressure in health and disease.

  2. Auditory-model based assessment of the effects of hearing loss and hearing-aid compression on spectral and temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalewski, Borys; MacDonald, Ewen; Strelcyk, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Most state-of-the-art hearing aids apply multi-channel dynamic-range compression (DRC). Such designs have the potential to emulate, at least to some degree, the processing that takes place in the healthy auditory system. One way to assess hearing-aid performance is to measure speech intelligibility....... However, due to the complexity of speech and its robustness to spectral and temporal alterations, the effects of DRC on speech perception have been mixed and controversial. The goal of the present study was to obtain a clearer understanding of the interplay between hearing loss and DRC by means....... Outcomes were simulated using the auditory processing model of Jepsen et al. (2008) with the front end modified to include effects of hearing impairment and DRC. The results were compared to experimental data from normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners....

  3. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokaltun, Seckin [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Munroe, Norman [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Subramaniam, Shankar [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  4. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  5. Wavelet image compression

    CERN Document Server

    Pearlman, William A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the stages necessary to create a wavelet compression system for images and describes state-of-the-art systems used in image compression standards and current research. It starts with a high level discussion of the properties of the wavelet transform, especially the decomposition into multi-resolution subbands. It continues with an exposition of the null-zone, uniform quantization used in most subband coding systems and the optimal allocation of bitrate to the different subbands. Then the image compression systems of the FBI Fingerprint Compression Standard and the JPEG2000 S

  6. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  7. Perceptual compressive sensing scalability in mobile video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivolarski, Lazar

    2011-09-01

    Scalability features embedded within the video sequences allows for streaming over heterogeneous networks to a variety of end devices. Compressive sensing techniques that will allow for lowering the complexity increase the robustness of the video scalability are reviewed. Human visual system models are often used in establishing perceptual metrics that would evaluate quality of video. Combining of perceptual and compressive sensing approach outlined from recent investigations. The performance and the complexity of different scalability techniques are evaluated. Application of perceptual models to evaluation of the quality of compressive sensing scalability is considered in the near perceptually lossless case and to the appropriate coding schemes is reviewed.

  8. An Assessment of the Impact of Compressibility on Dynamic Stall

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, L.W.; Chandrasekhara, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of compressibility on dynamic stall is assessed, based on a review of past research in this area. A careful discussion of recent research is presented focusing on both model rotor, and 2-D dynamic stall studies where compressibility effects have been quantified. Examples from the various research efforts are discussed, and detailed analysis of the influence of compressibility on the dynamic stall process is presented. Differences between incompressible and compressible dynamic s...

  9. Effect of Compression on the Transmission Loss of Porous Material

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yingchao; BOLTON, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Porous materials are commonly applied in sound absorption in different places. Transmission loss, one of the vital parameters determining the performance of the material, will change when the material is compressed. Usually the compression that might affect the properties to the greatest extent are normal compression and the deformation can be simplified as 1D compression model. In order to verify the prediction, some formulas taking several parameters (porosity, tortuosity, flow resistivity ...

  10. Video Coding Technique using MPEG Compression Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Falade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital video compression technologies have become part of life, in the way visual information is created, communicated and consumed. Some application areas of video compression focused on the problem of optimizing storage space and transmission bandwidth (BW. The two dimensional discrete cosine transform (2-D DCT is an integral part of video and image compression, which is used in Moving Picture Expert Group (MPEG encoding standards. Thus, several video compression algorithms had been developed to reduce the data quantity and provide the acceptable quality standard. In the proposed study, the Matlab Simulink Model (MSM has been used for video coding/compression. The approach is more modern and reduces error resilience image distortion.

  11. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  12. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  13. Temporal compressive imaging for video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qun; Zhang, Linxia; Ke, Jun

    2018-01-01

    In many situations, imagers are required to have higher imaging speed, such as gunpowder blasting analysis and observing high-speed biology phenomena. However, measuring high-speed video is a challenge to camera design, especially, in infrared spectrum. In this paper, we reconstruct a high-frame-rate video from compressive video measurements using temporal compressive imaging (TCI) with a temporal compression ratio T=8. This means that, 8 unique high-speed temporal frames will be obtained from a single compressive frame using a reconstruction algorithm. Equivalently, the video frame rates is increased by 8 times. Two methods, two-step iterative shrinkage/threshold (TwIST) algorithm and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) method, are used for reconstruction. To reduce reconstruction time and memory usage, each frame of size 256×256 is divided into patches of size 8×8. The influence of different coded mask to reconstruction is discussed. The reconstruction qualities using TwIST and GMM are also compared.

  14. MODEL MATEMATIS KENAIKAN SUHU PADA BUTIRAN SELAMA PENGEPRESAN PADA PEMBUATAN TABLET EFFERVESCEN BUAH MARKISA (Mathematical Modeling of Temperature Increasing in the Particles during Compression on Processing of the Passion Fruit Effervescent Tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansar Ansar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was proposing mathematical models to predict the temperature increasing in the spherical form particles during compression on processing of the passion fruit effervescent tablet. The materials used in this research were passion fruit granule. The data of temperature increase on the materials during compression was recorded by the thermocouple. Result of the research was showed the temperature increase will be distributed by conduction to all position in the particle that can predict with the diffusion equation for dimensions three spherical coordinate. The temperature at the particle surface where friction among the contact points of the particle occurred was higher than Tg of materials of the effervescent tablet component. The particles temperature average increase during compression is 33.03oC. Keywords: mathematical models, temperature increase, effervescent tablet, and fassion fruit.   ABSTRAK   Tujuan penelitian ini adalah membuat model matematis untuk memprediksi kenaikan suhu pada butiran yang dianggap berbentuk bola selama pengepresan pada pembuatan tablet effervescen buah markisa. Bahan yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah granula markisa. Data kenaikan suhu pada bahan selama pengepresan diukur dengan termokopel. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kenaikan suhu di permukaan butiran terdistribusi secara konduksi ke seluruh bagian butiran yang dapat didekati dengan persamaan difusivitas panas koordinat bola 3 dimensi. Suhu di permukaan butiran tempat terjadinya gesekan antar titik singgung butiran jauh lebih tinggi dibandingkan dengan suhu Tg bahan komponen penyusun tablet effervescen. Kenaikan rerata suhu butiran selama pengepresan adalah 33,03oC.   Kata kunci: model matematis, distribusi suhu, tablet effervescen, dan buah markisa

  15. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  16. Experiments with automata compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J.; Yu, S; Daley, M; Eramian, M G

    2001-01-01

    Several compression methods of finite-state automata are presented and evaluated. Most compression methods used here are already described in the literature. However, their impact on the size of automata has not been described yet. We fill that gap, presenting results of experiments carried out on

  17. Determination of anisotropic velocity model by reflection tomography of compression and shear modes; Determination de modele de vitesse anisotrope par tomographie de reflexion des modes de compression et de cisaillement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopin, A.

    2001-12-01

    As the jump from 2D to 3D, seismic exploration lives a new revolution with the use of converted PS waves. Indeed PS converted waves are proving their potential as a tool for imaging through gas; lithology discrimination; structural confirmation; and more. Nevertheless, processing converted shear data and in particular determining accurate P and S velocity models for depth imaging of these data is still a challenging problem, especially when the subsurface is anisotropic. To solve this velocity model determination problem we propose to use reflection travel time tomography. In a first step, we derive a new approximation of the exact phase velocity equation of the SV wave in anisotropic (TI) media. This new approximation is valid for non-weak anisotropy and is mathematically simpler to handle than the exact equation. Then, starting from an isotropic reflection tomography tool developed at Lt-'P, we extend the isotropic bending ray tracing method to the anisotropic case and we implement the quantities necessary for the determination of the anisotropy parameters from the travel time data. Using synthetic data we then study the influence of the different anisotropy parameters on the travel times. From this analysis we propose a methodology to determine a complete anisotropic subsurface model (P and S layer velocities, interface geometries, anisotropy parameters). Finally, on a real data set from the Gulf of Mexico we demonstrate that this new anisotropic reflection tomography tool allows us to obtain a reliable subsurface model yielding kinematically correct and mutually coherent PP and PS images in depth; such a result could not be obtained with an isotropic velocity model. Similar results are obtained on a North Sea data set. (author)

  18. Pore network modeling to explore the effects of compression on multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammadreza; Hinebaugh, James; Fishman, Zachary; Tötzke, Christian; Lehnert, Werner; Manke, Ingo; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how compression affects the distribution of liquid water and gaseous oxygen in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layer (GDL) is vital for informing the design of improved porous materials for effective water management strategies. Pore networks extracted from synchrotron-based micro-computed tomography images of compressed GDLs were employed to simulate liquid water transport in GDL materials over a range of compression pressures. The oxygen transport resistance was predicted for each sample under dry and partially saturated conditions. A favorable GDL compression value for a preferred liquid water distribution and oxygen diffusion was found for Toray TGP-H-090 (10%), yet an optimum compression value was not recognized for SGL Sigracet 25BC. SGL Sigracet 25BC exhibited lower transport resistance values compared to Toray TGP-H-090, and this is attributed to the additional diffusion pathways provided by the microporous layer (MPL), an effect that is particularly significant under partially saturated conditions.

  19. Cu2+ in layered compounds: origin of the compressed geometry in the model system K2ZnF4:Cu2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramburu, J A; García-Lastra, J M; García-Fernández, P; Barriuso, M T; Moreno, M

    2013-06-17

    Many relevant properties (including superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance) of layered materials containing Cu(2+), Ag(2+), or Mn(3+) ions are commonly related to the Jahn-Teller instability. Along this line, the properties of the CuF6(4-) complex in the K2ZnF4 layered perovskite have recently been analyzed using a parametrized Jahn-Teller model with an imposed strain [Reinen, D. Inorg. Chem.2012, 51, 4458]. Here, we present results of ab initio periodic supercell and cluster calculations on K2ZnF4:Cu(2+), showing unequivocally that the actual origin of the unusual compressed geometry of the CuF6(4-) complex along the crystal c axis in that tetragonal lattice is due to the presence of an electric field due to the crystal surrounding the impurity. Our calculations closely reproduce the experimental optical spectrum. The calculated values of the equilibrium equatorial and axial Cu(2+)-F(-) distances are, respectively, R(ax) = 193 pm and R(eq) = 204 pm, and so the calculated distortion R(ax) - R(eq) = 11 pm is three times smaller than the estimated through the parametrized Jahn-Teller model. As a salient feature, we find that if the CuF6(4-) complex would assume a perfect octahedral geometry (R(ax) = R(eq) = 203 pm) the antibonding a(1g)*(∼3z(2) - r(2)) orbital is placed above b(1g)*(∼x(2) - y(2)) with a transition energy E((2)A(1g) → (2)B(1g)) = 0.34 eV. This surprising fact stresses that about half the experimental value E((2)A(1g) → (2)B(1g)) = 0.70 eV is not due to the small shortening of the axial Cu(2+)-F(-) distance, but it comes from the electric field, E(R)(r), created by the rest of the lattice ions on the CuF6(4-) complex. This internal field, displaying tetragonal symmetry, is thus responsible for the compressed geometry in K2ZnF4:Cu(2+) and the lack of symmetry breaking behind the ligand relaxation. Moreover, we show that the electronic energy gain in this process comes from bonding orbitals and not from antibonding ones. The present

  20. Multiphysics control of a two-fluid coaxial atomizer supported by electric-charge on the liquid jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicoane, Nathanael; Osuna, Rodrigo; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    We present an experimental setup to investigate multiphysics control strategies on atomization of a laminar fluid stream by a coaxial turbulent jet. Spray control (i.e. driving the droplet size distribution and the spatio-temporal location of the droplets towards a desired objective) has many potential engineering applications, but requires a mechanistic understanding of the processes that control droplet formation and transport (primary and secondary instabilities, turbulent transport, hydrodynamic and electric forces on the droplets, ...). We characterize experimentally the break-up dynamics in a canonical coaxial atomizer, and the spray structure (droplet size, location, and velocity as a function of time) in a series of open loop conditions with harmonic forcing of the gas swirl ratio, liquid injection rate, the electric field strength at the nozzle and along the spray development region. The effect of these actuators are characterized for different gas Reynolds numbers ranging from 104-106. This open-loop characterization of the injector will be used to develop reduced order models for feedback control, as well as to validate assumptions underlying an adjoint-based computational control strategy. This work is part of a large-scale project funded by an ONR MURI to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanisms for feedback control of sprays.

  1. Comparison of magnetic field observations of an average magnetic cloud with a simple force free model: the importance of field compression and expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lepping

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ability of the cylindrically symmetric force-free magnetic cloud (MC fitting model of Lepping et al. (1990 to faithfully reproduce actual magnetic field observations by examining two quantities: (1 a difference angle, called β, i.e., the angle between the direction of the observed magnetic field (Bobs and the derived force free model field (Bmod and (2 the difference in magnitudes between the observed and modeled fields, i.e., ΔB(=|Bobs|−|Bmod|, and a normalized ΔB (i.e., ΔB/<B> is also examined, all for a judiciously chosen set of 50 WIND interplanetary MCs, based on quality considerations. These three quantities are developed as a percent of MC duration and averaged over this set of MCs to obtain average profiles. It is found that, although <ΔB> and its normalize version are significantly enhanced (from a broad central average value early in an average MC (and to a lesser extent also late in the MC, the angle <β> is small (less than 8° and approximately constant all throughout the MC. The field intensity enhancements are due mainly to interaction of the MC with the surrounding solar wind plasma causing field compression at front and rear. For example, for a typical MC, ΔB/<B> is: 0.21±0.27 very early in the MC, −0.11±0.10 at the center (and −0.085±0.12 averaged over the full "central region," i.e., for 30% to 80% of duration, and 0.05±0.29 very late in the MC, showing a double sign change as we travel from front to center to back, in the MC. When individual MCs are examined we find that over 80% of them possess field enhancements within several to many hours of the front boundary, but only about 30% show such enhancements at their rear portions. The enhancement of the MC's front field is also due to MC expansion, but this is usually a lesser effect

  2. Peritumoral tissue compression is predictive of exudate flux in a rat model of cerebral tumor: an MRI study in an embedded tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, James R; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Aryal, Madhava P; Keenan, Kelly A; Elmghirbi, Rasha; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Panda, Swayamprava; Lu, Mei; Mikkelsen, Tom; Cabral, Glauber; Brown, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    MRI estimates of extracellular volume and tumor exudate flux in peritumoral tissue are demonstrated in an experimental model of cerebral tumor. Peritumoral extracellular volume predicted the tumor exudate flux. Eighteen RNU athymic rats were inoculated intracerebrally with U251MG tumor cells and studied with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) approximately 18 days post implantation. Using a model selection paradigm and a novel application of Patlak and Logan plots to DCE-MRI data, the distribution volume (i.e. tissue porosity) in the leaky rim of the tumor and that in the tissue external to the rim (the outer rim) were estimated, as was the tumor exudate flow from the inner rim of the tumor through the outer rim. Distribution volume in the outer rim was approximately half that of the inner adjacent region (p tumor exudate flow from the inner rim. Thus, peritumoral extracellular volume predicted the rate of tumor exudate flux. One explanation for these data is that perfusion, i.e. the delivery of blood to the tumor, was regulated by the compression of the mostly normal tissue of the tumor rim, and that the tumor exudate flow was limited by tumor perfusion. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Compression fractures of the back

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most effective way to prevent compression or insufficiency fractures. Getting regular load-bearing exercise (such as walking) can help you avoid bone loss. Alternative Names Vertebral compression fractures Images Compression fracture References Cosman F, de Beur ...

  4. Numerical investigation on soot particles emission in compression ignition diesel engine by using particulate mimic soot model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Fadzli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research via computational method, specifically by detailed-kinetic soot model offers much more advantages than the simple model as more detailed formation/oxidation process is taken into consideration, thus providing better soot mass concentration, soot size, soot number density as well as information regarding other related species. In the present computational study, investigation of in-cylinder soot concentration as well as other emissions in a single cylinder diesel engine has been conducted, using a commercial multidimensional CFD software, CONVERGE CFD. The simulation was carried out for a close-cycle combustion environment from inlet valve closing (IVC to exhaust valve opening (EVO. In this case, detailed-kinetic Particulate Mimic (PM soot model was implemented as to take benefit of the method of moment, instead of commonly implemented simple soot model. Analyses of the results are successfully plotted to demonstrate that the soot size and soot mass concentration are strongly dependent on the detailed soot formation and oxidation process rates. The calculated of soot mass concentration and average soot size at EVO provide the end value of 29.2 mg/m3 and 2.04 × 10−8 m, respectively. Besides, post-processing using EnSight shows the qualitative results of soot concentration along simulation period in the combustion chamber.

  5. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tötzke, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Universität Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Manke, I.; Banhart, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Gaiselmann, G.; Schmidt, V. [Universität Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Bohner, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Müller, B. R.; Kupsch, A.; Hentschel, M. P. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -Prüfung, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Lehnert, W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RTWH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  6. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tötzke, C; Manke, I; Gaiselmann, G; Bohner, J; Müller, B R; Kupsch, A; Hentschel, M P; Schmidt, V; Banhart, J; Lehnert, W

    2015-04-01

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  7. A microstructure-based model for describing strain softening during compression of Al-30%wt Zn alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Borodachenkova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A microstructural-based model, describing the plastic behavior of Al-30wt% Zn alloy, is proposed and the effect of solid solution decomposition, Orowan looping, twinning and grain refinement is analyzed. It is assumed that the plastic deformation process is dominated by strain-induced solute diffusion and dislocation motion. To capture the essential physics, a law describing the evolution of the mean free path of dislocations with plastic strain is proposed which reproduces the experimentally observed strain softening.

  8. A constitutive model for the compressive response of metallic closed-cell foams including micro-inertia effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthélémy Romain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams have known a keen interest in the last decades. Their ability to undergo very large deformations while transmitting low stress levels make them capable of performing functions of protective layers against intense loadings and of energy absorbers, for instance. The behaviour of metal foams varies considerably between quasi-static and dynamic regimes. Those differences can be linked to the strain-rate sensitivity of the skeleton material and to micro-inertial effects (induced by the crushing of the foam cells. In the present work, a micromechanical model has been developed to take into account micro-inertia effects on the macroscopic behaviour of closed-cell foams under dynamic loading conditions. The proposed modelling is based on the dynamic homogenisation procedure introduced by Molinari and Mercier (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49 (2001 1497–1516. Within this framework, the macrostress is the sum of two terms. The first one is a static stress, that can be described with any existing model of metal foam. The second contribution is a dynamic stress related to micro-inertia effects. Considering an initially spherical shell as a Representative Volume Element (RVE of the foam material, a closed-form expression of the dynamic stress was obtained. The proposed modelling was applied to shock propagation in aluminium foams (it should however be noted that the present theory is not restricted to uniaxial deformation but can be applied to arbitrary loadings. From experimental data of the literature, it is observed that incorporating micro-inertia effects allows one to achieve a better description of the foam shock response. This indicates that micro-inertia may have a significant influence on the dynamic behaviour of metallic foams.

  9. Comparison of Open-Hole Compression Strength and Compression After Impact Strength on Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates for the Ares I Composite Interstage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Nettles, Alan T.; Jackson, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    Notched (open hole) composite laminates were tested in compression. The effect on strength of various sizes of through holes was examined. Results were compared to the average stress criterion model. Additionally, laminated sandwich structures were damaged from low-velocity impact with various impact energy levels and different impactor geometries. The compression strength relative to damage size was compared to the notched compression result strength. Open-hole compression strength was found to provide a reasonable bound on compression after impact.

  10. Data compression. [reduction, storage, and transmission of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babkin, V. F.; Kryukov, A. B.; Shtarkov, Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    An approach to data compression is discussed in which the effect achieved by compression is evaluated by the closeness of the approach to the minimum possible volume. An attempt is made to systematize the known results on data compression. The review contains: description of methods of data compression based on statistical coding and information theory; application of methods of interpolation and extrapolation; a specific compression method (related to description of the histogram of a sample); some criteria of effectiveness and methods of service information representation; and discussion of models suggested for theoretical analysis.

  11. Lossless Compression of Digital Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo

    Presently, tree coders are the best bi-level image coders. The currentISO standard, JBIG, is a good example.By organising code length calculations properly a vast number of possible models (trees) can be investigated within reasonable time prior to generating code.A number of general-purpose coders...... are constructed by this principle. A multi-pass free tree coding scheme produces excellent compression results for all test images. A multi-pass fast free template coding scheme produces much better results than JBIG for difficult images, such as halftonings. Rissanen's algorithm `Context' is presented in a new...... version that is substantially faster than its precursorsand brings it close to the multi-pass coders in compression performance.Handprinted characters are of unequal complexity; recent work by Singer and Tishby demonstrates that utilizing the physiological process of writing one can synthesize cursive...

  12. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  13. Compressive light field displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzstein, Gordon; Lanman, Douglas; Hirsch, Matthew; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Raskar, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Light fields are the multiview extension of stereo image pairs: a collection of images showing a 3D scene from slightly different perspectives. Depicting high-resolution light fields usually requires an excessively large display bandwidth; compressive light field displays are enabled by the codesign of optical elements and computational-processing algorithms. Rather than pursuing a direct "optical" solution (for example, adding one more pixel to support the emission of one additional light ray), compressive displays aim to create flexible optical systems that can synthesize a compressed target light field. In effect, each pixel emits a superposition of light rays. Through compression and tailored optical designs, fewer display pixels are necessary to emit a given light field than a direct optical solution would require.

  14. Reference Based Genome Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Chern, Bobbie; Manolakos, Alexandros; No, Albert; Venkat, Kartik; Weissman, Tsachy

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing technology has advanced to a point where storage is becoming the central bottleneck in the acquisition and mining of more data. Large amounts of data are vital for genomics research, and generic compression tools, while viable, cannot offer the same savings as approaches tuned to inherent biological properties. We propose an algorithm to compress a target genome given a known reference genome. The proposed algorithm first generates a mapping from the reference to the target genome, and then compresses this mapping with an entropy coder. As an illustration of the performance: applying our algorithm to James Watson's genome with hg18 as a reference, we are able to reduce the 2991 megabyte (MB) genome down to 6.99 MB, while Gzip compresses it to 834.8 MB.

  15. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  16. Deep Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shikha; Singhal, Vanika; Majumdar, Angshul

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of extracting deeply learned features directly from compressive measurements. There has been no work in this area. Existing deep learning tools only give good results when applied on the full signal, that too usually after preprocessing. These techniques require the signal to be reconstructed first. In this work we show that by learning directly from the compressed domain, considerably better results can be obtained. This work extends the recently proposed fram...

  17. Compressed Sensing in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Jérôme; Starck, Jean-Luc; Ottensamer, Roland

    2008-11-01

    Recent advances in signal processing have focused on the use of sparse representations in various applications. A new field of interest based on sparsity has recently emerged: compressed sensing. This theory is a new sampling framework that provides an alternative to the well-known Shannon sampling theory. In this paper, we investigate how compressed sensing (CS) can provide new insights into astronomical data compression. We first give a brief overview of the compressed sensing theory which provides very simple coding process with low computational cost, thus favoring its use for real-time applications often found onboard space mission. In practical situations, owing to particular observation strategies (for instance, raster scans) astronomical data are often redundant; in that context, we point out that a CS-based compression scheme is flexible enough to account for particular observational strategies. Indeed, we show also that CS provides a new fantastic way to handle multiple observations of the same field view, allowing us to recover low level details, which is impossible with standard compression methods. This kind of CS data fusion concept could lead to an elegant and effective way to solve the problem ESA is faced with, for the transmission to the earth of the data collected by PACS, one of the instruments onboard the Herschel spacecraft which will launched in late 2008/early 2009. We show that CS enables to recover data with a spatial resolution enhanced up to 30% with similar sensitivity compared to the averaging technique proposed by ESA.

  18. Role of Compressibility on Tsunami Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Ali; Kirby, James T.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we aim to reduce the discrepancies between tsunami arrival times evaluated from tsunami models and real measurements considering the role of ocean compressibility. We perform qualitative studies to reveal the phase speed reduction rate via a modified version of the Mild Slope Equation for Weakly Compressible fluid (MSEWC) proposed by Sammarco et al. (2013). The model is validated against a 3-D computational model. Physical properties of surface gravity waves are studied and compared with those for waves evaluated from an incompressible flow solver over realistic geometry for 2011 Tohoku-oki event, revealing reduction in phase speed.Plain Language SummarySubmarine earthquakes and submarine mass failures (SMFs), can generate long gravitational waves (or tsunamis) that propagate at the free surface. Tsunami waves can travel long distances and are known for their dramatic effects on coastal areas. Nowadays, numerical models are used to reconstruct the tsunamigenic events for many scientific and socioeconomic aspects i.e. Tsunami Early Warning Systems, inundation mapping, risk and hazard analysis, etc. A number of typically neglected parameters in these models cause discrepancies between model outputs and observations. Most of the tsunami models predict tsunami arrival times at distant stations slightly early in comparison to observations. In this study, we show how ocean compressibility would affect the tsunami wave propagation speed. In this framework, an efficient two-dimensional model equation for the weakly compressible ocean has been developed, validated and tested for simplified and real cases against three dimensional and incompressible solvers. Taking the effect of compressibility, the phase speed of surface gravity waves is reduced compared to that of an incompressible fluid. Then, we used the model for the case of devastating Tohoku-Oki 2011 tsunami event, improving the model accuracy. This study sheds light for future model development

  19. Wavelets: Applications to Image Compression-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    discussions on non-unifornl quantizers, interested read- ers can refer [3]. Entropy Encoder. This is the last component in the compression model. Till now, we have devised models for an alternate repre- sentation of the image, in which its interpixel redundan- cies were reduced. This last model, which is a loss less technique ...

  20. OPTIMISATION OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF PERIWINKLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a regression model is developed to predict and optimise the compressive strength of periwinkle shell aggregate concrete using Scheffe's regression theory. The results obtained from the derived regression model agreed favourably with the experimental data. The model was tested for adequacy using a student ...