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Sample records for comprehensive wall-function formulation

  1. Formulation of an OTTV for walls of bedroom in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tummu, Preecha; Chirarattananon, Surapong; Hien, Vu Duc; Chaiwiwatworakul, Pipat; Rakkwamsuk, Pattana

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • High and increasing use of air-conditioning in household bedrooms. • Building envelope is the barrier against heat gain into air-conditioned bedroom. • The OTTV form of performance measure for bedroom wall is applicable. • Effects of solar radiation appear strongly in OTTV formulation. - Abstract: Air-conditioning has penetrated to a significant extent in urban households and is increasingly used in all areas in Thailand. Building envelope is the most significant component that affects energy performance of an air-conditioned building. This paper reports results of an attempt to formulate a measure of performance of building envelope enclosing space used under bedroom function. The overall thermal transfer value form of the measure that comprises a heat gain through opaque wall term, a solar radiation gain term, and a conduction heat gain through glazing term proves to apply well. The formulation is validated through the use of two simulation programs on two residential building models with significant variations of the envelope thermal parameters. The work is a part of an effort in an international research program to develop a scheme for rating energy and carbon performance of residential buildings.

  2. Formulation of curcumin delivery with functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes: characteristics and anticancer effects in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Zhang, Nan; Hao, Yongwei; Wang, Yali; Jia, Shasha; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), an important class of artificial nanomaterials with unique physicochemical properties, were used as novel carriers of curcumin. Formulation and evaluation of curcumin-loaded SWCNTs systems for utilizing the curcumin's anticancer potential by circumventing conventional limitations of extremely low aqueous solubility and instability under physiological conditions, and combining SWCNTs photothermal therapy enabled by the strong optical absorbance of SWCNTs in the 0.8-1.4 μm resulting in excessive local heating. After functionalized SWCNTs were confirmed, they were conjugated with curcumin (SWCNT-Cur). Subsequently, the formulation was analyzed for size, zeta-potential and morphology. And the solubility, stability and release of curcumin were assessed using spectrofluorometer, and the solid state of the curcumin was determined using X-ray diffraction and UV spectroscopy. Furthermore, in PC-3 cells, photothermal response was further determined by irradiating laser after the antitumor effect of SWCNT-Cur was evaluated. SWCNTs were functionalized, and subsequent SWCNT-Cur conjugates were found to possess an average size of 170.4 nm, a zeta potential of -12.5 mV and to significantly enhance the solubility and stability of curcumin, overcoming the barriers to adequate curcumin delivery. Moreover, curcumin in SWCNT-Cur was in an amorphous form and could be rapidly released. In PC-3 cells, improved inhibition efficacy was achieved by SWCNT-Cur compared with native curcumin. Meanwhile, the SWCNTs in SWCNT-Cur served not only as scaffolds but also as thermal ablation agents, further inhibiting PC-3 cell growth. SWCNT-Cur assemblies may provide a promising delivery system for curcumin for use in cancer therapy.

  3. Generalized wall function and its application to compressible turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Wu, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    Wall function boundary conditions including the effects of compressibility and heat transfer are improved for compressible turbulent boundary flows. Generalized wall function formulation at zero-pressure gradient is proposed based on coupled velocity and temperature profiles in the entire near-wall region. The parameters in the generalized wall function are well revised. The proposed boundary conditions are integrated into Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code that includes the shear stress transport turbulence model. Numerical results are presented for a compressible boundary layer over a flat plate at zero-pressure gradient. Compared with experimental data, the computational results show that the generalized wall function reduces the first grid spacing in the directed normal to the wall and proves the feasibility and effectivity of the generalized wall function method.

  4. Flame acceleration due to wall friction: Accuracy and intrinsic limitations of the formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirgok, Berk; Sezer, Hayri; Akkerman, V.'Yacheslav

    2015-11-01

    The analytical formulations on the premixed flame acceleration induced by wall friction in two-dimensional (2D) channels [Bychkov et al., Phys. Rev. E 72 (2005) 046307] and cylindrical tubes [Akkerman et al., Combust. Flame 145 (2006) 206] are revisited. Specifically, pipes with one end closed are considered, with a flame front propagating from the closed pipe end to the open one. The original studies provide the analytical formulas for the basic flame and fluid characteristics such as the flame acceleration rate, the flame shape and its propagation speed, as well as the flame-generated flow velocity profile. In the present work, the accuracy of these approaches is verified, computationally, and the intrinsic limitations and validity domains of the formulations are identified. Specifically, the error diagrams are presented to demonstrate how the accuracy of the formulations depends on the thermal expansion in the combustion process and the Reynolds number associated with the flame propagation. It is shown that the 2D theory is accurate enough for a wide range of parameters. In contrast, the zeroth-order approximation for the cylindrical configuration appeared to be quite inaccurate and had to be revisited. It is subsequently demonstrated that the first-order approximation for the cylindrical geometry is very accurate for realistically large thermal expansions and Reynolds numbers. Consequently, unlike the zeroth-order approach, the first-order formulation can constitute a backbone for the comprehensive theory of the flame acceleration and detonation initiation in cylindrical tubes. Cumulatively, the accuracy of the formulations deteriorates with the reduction of the Reynolds number and thermal expansion.

  5. On the adequacy of wall functions to predict condensation rates from steam-noncondensable gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Work investigates the effect of near-wall mesh resolution on CFD predictions. • Case study: turbulent condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. • Wall functions largely underpredict condensation rates at boundary layer onset. • When boundary layer is developed, wall functions predictions are reasonable. • Prescribed wall functions must be compatible with prevailing flow regime. - Abstract: As one looks forward to applying CFD based methods to simulate turbulent flows in larger volumes up to containment scales, the mesh resolution, especially near the walls, becomes one of the main issues dictating the feasibility of the simulation. The wall-function approach is a natural choice to minimize the computational size of the problem and make it tractable. In the current investigation, we compare the wall-function to the fully resolved boundary layer approaches for the prediction of vapor condensation rates on cold walls in the presence of noncondensable gases. We simulate three sets of geometric configurations. The first two sets relate to domains which are small (height of 2 m) and medium (height 4.8 m), and for which experimental heat transfer data are available. In the third set, we look at a hypothetical large 2D rectangular domain in which the condenser height is comparable to that of typical NPP containments (20 m). In the developing region of the boundary layer, it is found that the wall function treatment leads to substantial deviations from the wall resolved approach and available experimental data. Further downstream, however, when the boundary layer is fully developed, the discrepancy is greatly reduced. It is therefore concluded that the wall-function formulation is able to provide predictions of condensation rates that are similar to wall-resolved treatments in simple forced flows for which fully developed boundary layers can be assumed over most of the domain. Care must however be exercised to ensure the chosen wall

  6. Thermo-elastic stress analysis of containment wall penetrations using improved finite element formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, D.T.; Dimopoulos, A.; Heglin, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    An increased application of finite element techniques, particularly in evaluating structural integrity of nuclear containment walls around penetration points, has aroused considerable interest. Due to extreme thermal effects in the vicinity of penetrations, the concrete containment wall is subject to unwarranted cracking effects, which must be controlled in accordance with ASME-III Code. This paper essentially deals with a unique finite element method of analysis in which nonlinear heat transfer problem across the penetration assembly in the nuclear containment drywell wall, is formulated. Using this technique, thermal analysis, dealing with an evaluation of temperature distribution around axisymmetric penetration assembly accomodating main steam lines or other vital piping at 600 0 F, is carried out. The method of analysis considers steady-state heat transfer energy balance across the process-pipe, insulation layer, guard-pipe sleeve, two intermediate air layers and an axisymmetric opening in the concrete containment wall, the outer faces of which are maintained at ambient temperature of 120 0 F. (orig.)

  7. A unified wall function for compressible turbulence modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, K. C.; Chan, A.

    2018-05-01

    Turbulence modelling near the wall often requires a high mesh density clustered around the wall and the first cells adjacent to the wall to be placed in the viscous sublayer. As a result, the numerical stability is constrained by the smallest cell size and hence requires high computational overhead. In the present study, a unified wall function is developed which is valid for viscous sublayer, buffer sublayer and inertial sublayer, as well as including effects of compressibility, heat transfer and pressure gradient. The resulting wall function applies to compressible turbulence modelling for both isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions with the non-zero pressure gradient. Two simple wall function algorithms are implemented for practical computation of isothermal and adiabatic wall boundary conditions. The numerical results show that the wall function evaluates the wall shear stress and turbulent quantities of wall adjacent cells at wide range of non-dimensional wall distance and alleviate the number and size of cells required.

  8. An NPARC Turbulence Module with Wall Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T.-H.

    1997-01-01

    The turbulence module recently developed for the NPARC code has been extended to include wall functions. The Van Driest transformation is used so that the wall functions can be applied to both incompressible and compressible flows. The module is equipped with three two-equation K-epsilon turbulence models: Chien, Shih-Lumley and CMOTR models. Details of the wall functions as well as their numerical implementation are reported. It is shown that the inappropriate artificial viscosity in the near-wall region has a big influence on the solution of the wall function approach. A simple way to eliminate this influence is proposed, which gives satisfactory results during the code validation. The module can be easily linked to the NPARC code for practical applications.

  9. Inverse measurement of wall pressure field in flexible-wall wind tunnels using global wall deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Julian; Patil, Mayuresh; Devenport, William

    2018-02-01

    The Kevlar-wall anechoic wind tunnel offers great value to the aeroacoustics research community, affording the capability to make simultaneous aeroacoustic and aerodynamic measurements. While the aeroacoustic potential of the Kevlar-wall test section is already being leveraged, the aerodynamic capability of these test sections is still to be fully realized. The flexibility of the Kevlar walls suggests the possibility that the internal test section flow may be characterized by precisely measuring small deflections of the flexible walls. Treating the Kevlar fabric walls as tensioned membranes with known pre-tension and material properties, an inverse stress problem arises where the pressure distribution over the wall is sought as a function of the measured wall deflection. Experimental wall deformations produced by the wind loading of an airfoil model are measured using digital image correlation and subsequently projected onto polynomial basis functions which have been formulated to mitigate the impact of measurement noise based on a finite-element study. Inserting analytic derivatives of the basis functions into the equilibrium relations for a membrane, full-field pressure distributions across the Kevlar walls are computed. These inversely calculated pressures, after being validated against an independent measurement technique, can then be integrated along the length of the test section to give the sectional lift of the airfoil. Notably, these first-time results are achieved with a non-contact technique and in an anechoic environment.

  10. An Entropy-Assisted Shielding Function in DDES Formulation for the SST Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The intent of shielding functions in delayed detached-eddy simulation methods (DDES is to preserve the wall boundary layers as Reynolds-averaged Navier–Strokes (RANS mode, avoiding possible modeled stress depletion (MSD or even unphysical separation due to grid refinement. An entropy function fs is introduced to construct a DDES formulation for the k-ω shear stress transport (SST model, whose performance is extensively examined on a range of attached and separated flows (flat-plate flow, circular cylinder flow, and supersonic cavity-ramp flow. Two more forms of shielding functions are also included for comparison: one that uses the blending function F2 of SST, the other which adopts the recalibrated shielding function fd_cor of the DDES version based on the Spalart-Allmaras (SA model. In general, all of the shielding functions do not impair the vortex in fully separated flows. However, for flows including attached boundary layer, both F2 and the recalibrated fd_cor are found to be too conservative to resolve the unsteady flow content. On the other side, fs is proposed on the theory of energy dissipation and independent on from any particular turbulence model, showing the generic priority by properly balancing the need of reserving the RANS modeled regions for wall boundary layers and generating the unsteady turbulent structures in detached areas.

  11. A validated HPTLC method for the quantification of friedelin in Putranjiva roxburghii Wall extracts and in polyherbal formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedar Kalyani Abhimanyu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study HPTLC method was developed and validated for the determination of friedelin in Putranjiva roxburghii Wall (family: Euphorbiaceae leaf, bark extract and in polyherbal formulations. Analysis of samples were performed on TLC aluminium precoated plate (60 F254 by using mobile phase toluene: chloroform (9:1 v/v. Plate was derivatized with vanillin sulphuric acid and scanned at 580 nm. Developed method found to give compact spot for friedelin at Rf value 0.43 ± 0.01. The method was validated using International Council for Harmonization (ICH guidelines including linearity, precision, accuracy, and robustness. Friedelin was found to be present in leaf extract of Putranjiva roxburghii Wall (0.003% w/w, in bark (0.04% w/w, formulation 1 (0.002% w/w and formulation 2 (0.035% w/w. A good linearity relationship was found to be (100–500 ng spot−1 with correlation coefficient (r2 value of 0.9892 for friedelin. Limit of detection and limit of quantitation was found to be 32.15, 97.44 ng/band respectively for friedelin. The developed method was found to be accurate and precise with 0.78%, 0.9% (%RSD for interday and intraday precision. Accuracy of the method was performed by recovery studies at three different concentration levels and the average percentage recovery was found to be 98.55% for friedelin. The proposed method for the quantitation of friedelin was found to be simple, specific, accurate and robust in Putranjiva roxburghii Wall and polyherbal formulations.

  12. Perturbation theory and importance functions in integral transport formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1976-01-01

    Perturbation theory expressions for the static reactivity derived from the flux, collision density, birth-rate density, and fission-neutron density formulations of integral transport theory, and from the integro-differential formulation, are intercompared. The physical meaning and relation of the adjoint functions corresponding to each of the five formulations are established. It is found that the first-order approximation of the perturbation expressions depends on the transport theory formulation and on the adjoint function used. The approximations of the integro-differential formulation corresponding to different first-order approximations of the integral transport theory formulations are identified. It is found that the accuracy of all first-order approximations of the integral transport formulations examined is superior to the accuracy of first-order integro-differential perturbation theory

  13. Materials issues in the design of the ITER first wall, blanket, and divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Smith, D.L.; Wu, C.H.; Shatalov, G.

    1992-01-01

    During the ITER conceptual design study, a property data base was assembled, the key issues were identified, and a comprehensive R ampersand D plan was formulated to resolve these issues. The desired properties of candidate ITER divertor, first wall, and blanket materials are briefly reviewed, and the major materials issues are presented. Estimates of the influence of materials properties on the performance limits of the first wall, blanket, and divertor are presented

  14. An adaptive DES smodel that allows wall-resolved eddy simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Zifei; Durbin, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Detached Eddy Simulation model that mimics dynamic Smagorinsky formulation. • Adaptivity of model allows wall resolved eddy simulation on sufficient grids. • Ability to simulate natural and bypass transition is tested. - Abstract: A modification to the Adaptive-DES method of Yin et al. (2015) is proposed to improve its near-wall behavior. The modification is to the function (C_l_i_m) that imposes a lower limit on the dynamically evaluated coefficient (C_D_E_S). The modification allows Adaptive-DES to converge to wall-resolved eddy simulation, when grid resolution supports it. On coarse grids, or at high Reynolds number, it reverts to shielded DES — that is to DDES. The new formulation predicts results closer to wall-resolved LES than the previous formulation. It provides an ability to simulate transition: it is tested in both orderly and bypass transition. In fully turbulent, attached flow, the modification has little effect. Any improvement in predictions stem from better near-wall behavior of the adaptive method.

  15. Functional duality of the cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latgé, Jean-Paul; Beauvais, Anne

    2014-08-01

    The polysaccharide cell wall is the extracellular armour of the fungal cell. Although essential in the protection of the fungal cell against aggressive external stresses, the biosynthesis of the polysaccharide core is poorly understood. For a long time it was considered that this cell wall skeleton was a fixed structure whose role was only to be sensed as non-self by the host and consequently trigger the defence response. It is now known that the cell wall polysaccharide composition and localization continuously change to adapt to their environment and that these modifications help the fungus to escape from the immune system. Moreover, cell wall polysaccharides could function as true virulence factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Finite-size scaling functions for directed polymers confined between attracting walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owczarek, A L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Prellberg, T [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Rechnitzer, A [Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2 (Canada)

    2008-01-25

    The exact solution of directed self-avoiding walks confined to a slit of finite width and interacting with the walls of the slit via an attractive potential has been recently calculated. The walks can be considered to model the polymer-induced steric stabilization and sensitized flocculation of colloidal dispersions. The large-width asymptotics led to a phase diagram different to that of a polymer attached to, and attracted to, a single wall. The question that arises is: Can one interpolate between the single wall and two wall cases? In this paper, we calculate the exact scaling functions for the partition function by considering the two variable asymptotics of the partition function for simultaneous large length and large width. Consequently, we find the scaling functions for the force induced by the polymer on the walls. We find that these scaling functions are given by elliptic {theta} functions. In some parts of the phase diagram there is more a complex crossover between the single wall and two wall cases and we elucidate how this happens.

  17. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O; Wheeler, M; Zuparic, M

    2009-01-01

    We observe that the partition function of the six-vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP τ function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization)

  18. Executive Function and Reading Comprehension: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follmer, D. Jake

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a meta-analytic review of the relation between executive function and reading comprehension. Results (N = 6,673) supported a moderate positive association between executive function and reading comprehension (r = 0.36). Moderator analyses suggested that correlations between executive function and reading comprehension did not…

  19. Random trees between two walls: exact partition function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouttier, J; Di Francesco, P; Guitter, E

    2003-01-01

    We derive the exact partition function for a discrete model of random trees embedded in a one-dimensional space. These trees have vertices labelled by integers representing their position in the target space, with the solid-on-solid constraint that adjacent vertices have labels differing by ±1. A non-trivial partition function is obtained whenever the target space is bounded by walls. We concentrate on the two cases where the target space is (i) the half-line bounded by a wall at the origin or (ii) a segment bounded by two walls at a finite distance. The general solution has a soliton-like structure involving elliptic functions. We derive the corresponding continuum scaling limit which takes the remarkable form of the Weierstrass p function with constrained periods. These results are used to analyse the probability for an evolving population spreading in one dimension to attain the boundary of a given domain with the geometry of the target (i) or (ii). They also translate, via suitable bijections, into generating functions for bounded planar graphs

  20. An analytical wall-function for turbulent flows and heat transfer over rough walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, K.; Craft, T.J.; Iacovides, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a refined wall-function strategy for the modelling of turbulent forced convection heat transfer over smooth and rough surfaces. In order to include the effects of fine-grain surface roughness, the present study extends a more fundamental work by Craft et al. [Craft, T.J., Gerasimov, A.V., Iacovides, H., Launder, B.E., 2002. Progress in the generalisation of wall-function treatment. Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 23, 148-160] on the development of advanced wall-functions of general applicability. The presently proposed model is validated through comparisons with data available for internal flows through channels and for external flows over flat and curved plates with both smooth and rough surfaces. Then, its further validation in separating flows over a sand dune and a sand-roughened ramp is discussed. The validation results suggest that the presently proposed form can be successfully applied to a wide range of attached and separated turbulent flows with heat transfer over smooth and fine-grain rough surfaces

  1. A comprehensive linear programming tool to optimize formulations of ready-to-use therapeutic foods: An application to Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the standard of care for children suffering from noncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The objective was to develop a comprehensive linear programming (LP) tool to create novel RUTF formulations for Ethiopia. A systematic approach that surveyed inter...

  2. An Integrated Approach for Non-Recursive Formulation of Connection-Coefficients of Orthogonal Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika GARG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an integrated approach is proposed for non-recursive formulation of connection coefficients of different orthogonal functions in terms of a generic orthogonal function. The application of these coefficients arises when the product of two orthogonal basis functions are to be expressed in terms of single basis functions. Two significant advantages are achieved; one, the non-recursive formulations avoid memory and stack overflows in computer implementations; two, the integrated approach provides for digital hardware once-designed can be used for different functions. Computational savings achieved with the proposed non-recursive formulation vis-à-vis recursive formulation, reported in the literature so far, have been demonstrated using MATLAB PROFILER.

  3. Plasma wall particle balance in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisolia, C.; Ghendrih, P.; Pegourie, B.; Grosman, A.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the particle balance between the carbon wall and the plasma is presented. One finds that the effective particle content of the wall which governs the plasma equilibrium density departs from the deposited number of particles. This effect is dominant for the fully desaturated wall. A scaling law of the plasma density in terms of the wall effective particle content has been obtained. Moreover, the experimental data allows to estimate the plasma particle confinement time. Values ranging from 0.2 s to 0.5 s are found depending on the density. An analytical functional dependence of the particle confinement time is obtained

  4. Compactified webs and domain wall partition functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabbir, Khurram [Government College University, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper we use the topological vertex formalism to calculate a generalization of the ''domain wall'' partition function of M-strings. This generalization allows calculation of partition function of certain compactified webs using a simple gluing algorithm similar to M-strings case. (orig.)

  5. [Development of Inhalable Dry Powder Formulations Loaded with Nanoparticles Maintaining Their Original Physical Properties and Functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Functional nanoparticles, such as liposomes and polymeric micelles, are attractive drug delivery systems for solubilization, stabilization, sustained release, prolonged tissue retention, and tissue targeting of various encapsulated drugs. For their clinical application in therapy for pulmonary diseases, the development of dry powder inhalation (DPI) formulations is considered practical due to such advantages as: (1) it is noninvasive and can be directly delivered into the lungs; (2) there are few biocomponents in the lungs that interact with nanoparticles; and (3) it shows high storage stability in the solid state against aggregation or precipitation of nanoparticles in water. However, in order to produce effective nanoparticle-loaded dry powders for inhalation, it is essential to pursue an innovative and comprehensive formulation strategy in relation to composition and powderization which can achieve (1) the particle design of dry powders with physical properties suitable for pulmonary delivery through inhalation, and (2) the effective reconstitution of nanoparticles that will maintain their original physical properties and functions after dissolution of the powders. Spray-freeze drying (SFD) is a relatively new powderization technique combining atomization and lyophilization, which can easily produce highly porous dry powders from an aqueous sample solution. Previously, we advanced the optimization of components and process conditions for the production of SFD powders suitable to DPI application. This review describes our recent results in the development of novel DPI formulations effectively loaded with various nanoparticles (electrostatic nanocomplexes for gene therapy, liposomes, and self-assembled lipid nanoparticles), based on SFD.

  6. Multidisciplinary Optimization of Tilt Rotor Blades Using Comprehensive Composite Modeling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; McCarthy, Thomas R.; Rajadas, John N.

    1997-01-01

    An optimization procedure is developed for addressing the design of composite tilt rotor blades. A comprehensive technique, based on a higher-order laminate theory, is developed for the analysis of the thick composite load-carrying sections, modeled as box beams, in the blade. The theory, which is based on a refined displacement field, is a three-dimensional model which approximates the elasticity solution so that the beam cross-sectional properties are not reduced to one-dimensional beam parameters. Both inplane and out-of-plane warping are included automatically in the formulation. The model can accurately capture the transverse shear stresses through the thickness of each wall while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the inner and outer surfaces of the beam. The aerodynamic loads on the blade are calculated using the classical blade element momentum theory. Analytical expressions for the lift and drag are obtained based on the blade planform with corrections for the high lift capability of rotor blades. The aerodynamic analysis is coupled with the structural model to formulate the complete coupled equations of motion for aeroelastic analyses. Finally, a multidisciplinary optimization procedure is developed to improve the aerodynamic, structural and aeroelastic performance of the tilt rotor aircraft. The objective functions include the figure of merit in hover and the high speed cruise propulsive efficiency. Structural, aerodynamic and aeroelastic stability criteria are imposed as constraints on the problem. The Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser function is used to formulate the multiobjective function problem. The search direction is determined by the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm. The optimum results are compared with the baseline values and show significant improvements in the overall performance of the tilt rotor blade.

  7. Examination of wall functions for a Parabolized Navier-Stokes code for supersonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsbrooks, T.H. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-04-01

    Solutions from a Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code with an algebraic turbulence model are compared with wall functions. The wall functions represent the turbulent flow profiles in the viscous sublayer, thus removing many grid points from the solution procedure. The wall functions are intended to replace the computed profiles between the body surface and a match point in the logarithmic region. A supersonic adiabatic flow case was examined first. This adiabatic case indicates close agreement between computed velocity profiles near the wall and the wall function for a limited range of suitable match points in the logarithmic region. In an attempt to improve marching stability, a laminar to turbulent transition routine was implemented at the start of the PNS code. Implementing the wall function with the transitional routine in the PNS code is expected to reduce computational time while maintaining good accuracy in computed skin friction.

  8. Examination of wall functions for a Parabolized Navier-Stokes code for supersonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsbrooks, T.H. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Solutions from a Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code with an algebraic turbulence model are compared with wall functions. The wall functions represent the turbulent flow profiles in the viscous sublayer, thus removing many grid points from the solution procedure. The wall functions are intended to replace the computed profiles between the body surface and a match point in the logarithmic region. A supersonic adiabatic flow case was examined first. This adiabatic case indicates close agreement between computed velocity profiles near the wall and the wall function for a limited range of suitable match points in the logarithmic region. In an attempt to improve marching stability, a laminar to turbulent transition routine was implemented at the start of the PNS code. Implementing the wall function with the transitional routine in the PNS code is expected to reduce computational time while maintaining good accuracy in computed skin friction.

  9. The adventitia: essential regulator of vascular wall structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Kurt R; Yeager, Michael E; El Kasmi, Karim C; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V; Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette R; Frid, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    The vascular adventitia acts as a biological processing center for the retrieval, integration, storage, and release of key regulators of vessel wall function. It is the most complex compartment of the vessel wall and is composed of a variety of cells, including fibroblasts, immunomodulatory cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), progenitor cells, vasa vasorum endothelial cells and pericytes, and adrenergic nerves. In response to vascular stress or injury, resident adventitial cells are often the first to be activated and reprogrammed to influence the tone and structure of the vessel wall; to initiate and perpetuate chronic vascular inflammation; and to stimulate expansion of the vasa vasorum, which can act as a conduit for continued inflammatory and progenitor cell delivery to the vessel wall. This review presents the current evidence demonstrating that the adventitia acts as a key regulator of vascular wall function and structure from the outside in.

  10. A comprehensive formulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dan; Lyu, Qihui; Ruan, Dan; O’Connor, Daniel; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a widely employed radiation therapy technique, showing comparable dosimetry to static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with reduced monitor units and treatment time. However, the current VMAT optimization has various greedy heuristics employed for an empirical solution, which jeopardizes plan consistency and quality. The authors introduce a novel direct aperture optimization method for VMAT to overcome these limitations. Methods: The comprehensive VMAT (comVMAT) planning was formulated as an optimization problem with an L2-norm fidelity term to penalize the difference between the optimized dose and the prescribed dose, as well as an anisotropic total variation term to promote piecewise continuity in the fluence maps, preparing it for direct aperture optimization. A level set function was used to describe the aperture shapes and the difference between aperture shapes at adjacent angles was penalized to control MLC motion range. A proximal-class optimization solver was adopted to solve the large scale optimization problem, and an alternating optimization strategy was implemented to solve the fluence intensity and aperture shapes simultaneously. Single arc comVMAT plans, utilizing 180 beams with 2° angular resolution, were generated for a glioblastoma multiforme case, a lung (LNG) case, and two head and neck cases—one with three PTVs (H&N{sub 3PTV}) and one with foue PTVs (H&N{sub 4PTV})—to test the efficacy. The plans were optimized using an alternating optimization strategy. The plans were compared against the clinical VMAT (clnVMAT) plans utilizing two overlapping coplanar arcs for treatment. Results: The optimization of the comVMAT plans had converged within 600 iterations of the block minimization algorithm. comVMAT plans were able to consistently reduce the dose to all organs-at-risk (OARs) as compared to the clnVMAT plans. On average, comVMAT plans reduced the max and mean OAR dose by 6

  11. Polarization-induced local pore-wall functionalization for biosensing: from micropore to nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Pham, Pascale; Haguet, Vincent; Sauter-Starace, Fabien; Leroy, Loïc; Roget, André; Descamps, Emeline; Bouchet, Aurélie; Buhot, Arnaud; Mailley, Pascal; Livache, Thierry

    2012-04-03

    The use of biological-probe-modified solid-state pores in biosensing is currently hindered by difficulties in pore-wall functionalization. The surface to be functionalized is small and difficult to target and is usually chemically similar to the bulk membrane. Herein, we demonstrate the contactless electrofunctionalization (CLEF) approach and its mechanism. This technique enables the one-step local functionalization of the single pore wall fabricated in a silica-covered silicon membrane. CLEF is induced by polarization of the pore membrane in an electric field and requires a sandwich-like composition and a conducting or semiconducting core for the pore membrane. The defects in the silica layer of the micropore wall enable the creation of an electric pathway through the silica layer, which allows electrochemical reactions to take place locally on the pore wall. The pore diameter is not a limiting factor for local wall modification using CLEF. Nanopores with a diameter of 200 nm fabricated in a silicon membrane and covered with native silica layer have been successfully functionalized with this method, and localized pore-wall modification was obtained. Furthermore, through proof-of-concept experiments using ODN-modified nanopores, we show that functionalized nanopores are suitable for translocation-based biosensing.

  12. A minimalist functional group (MFG) approach for surrogate fuel formulation

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2018-03-20

    Surrogate fuel formulation has drawn significant interest due to its relevance towards understanding combustion properties of complex fuel mixtures. In this work, we present a novel approach for surrogate fuel formulation by matching target fuel functional groups, while minimizing the number of surrogate species. Five key functional groups; paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, naphthenic CH–CH and aromatic C–CH groups in addition to structural information provided by the Branching Index (BI) were chosen as matching targets. Surrogates were developed for six FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline target fuels, namely FACE A, C, F, G, I and J. The five functional groups present in the fuels were qualitatively and quantitatively identified using high resolution H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A further constraint was imposed in limiting the number of surrogate components to a maximum of two. This simplifies the process of surrogate formulation, facilitates surrogate testing, and significantly reduces the size and time involved in developing chemical kinetic models by reducing the number of thermochemical and kinetic parameters requiring estimation. Fewer species also reduces the computational expenses involved in simulating combustion in practical devices. The proposed surrogate formulation methodology is denoted as the Minimalist Functional Group (MFG) approach. The MFG surrogates were experimentally tested against their target fuels using Ignition Delay Times (IDT) measured in an Ignition Quality Tester (IQT), as specified by the standard ASTM D6890 methodology, and in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM). Threshold Sooting Index (TSI) and Smoke Point (SP) measurements were also performed to determine the sooting propensities of the surrogates and target fuels. The results showed that MFG surrogates were able to reproduce the aforementioned combustion properties of the target FACE gasolines across a wide range of conditions

  13. A minimalist functional group (MFG) approach for surrogate fuel formulation

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Naser, Nimal; Issayev, Gani; Touitou, Jamal; Ghosh, Manik Kumer; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Farooq, Aamir; Dooley, Stephen; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Surrogate fuel formulation has drawn significant interest due to its relevance towards understanding combustion properties of complex fuel mixtures. In this work, we present a novel approach for surrogate fuel formulation by matching target fuel functional groups, while minimizing the number of surrogate species. Five key functional groups; paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, paraffinic CH, naphthenic CH–CH and aromatic C–CH groups in addition to structural information provided by the Branching Index (BI) were chosen as matching targets. Surrogates were developed for six FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline target fuels, namely FACE A, C, F, G, I and J. The five functional groups present in the fuels were qualitatively and quantitatively identified using high resolution H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A further constraint was imposed in limiting the number of surrogate components to a maximum of two. This simplifies the process of surrogate formulation, facilitates surrogate testing, and significantly reduces the size and time involved in developing chemical kinetic models by reducing the number of thermochemical and kinetic parameters requiring estimation. Fewer species also reduces the computational expenses involved in simulating combustion in practical devices. The proposed surrogate formulation methodology is denoted as the Minimalist Functional Group (MFG) approach. The MFG surrogates were experimentally tested against their target fuels using Ignition Delay Times (IDT) measured in an Ignition Quality Tester (IQT), as specified by the standard ASTM D6890 methodology, and in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM). Threshold Sooting Index (TSI) and Smoke Point (SP) measurements were also performed to determine the sooting propensities of the surrogates and target fuels. The results showed that MFG surrogates were able to reproduce the aforementioned combustion properties of the target FACE gasolines across a wide range of conditions

  14. Functional residual capacity increase during laparoscopic surgery with abdominal wall lift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ueda

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The number of laparoscopic surgeries performed is increasing every year and in most cases the pneumoperitoneum method is used. One alternative is the abdominal wall lifting method and this study was undertaken to evaluate changes of functional residual capacity during the abdominal wall lift procedure. Methods: From January to April 2013, 20 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy at a single institution. All patients were anesthetized using propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium. FRC was measured automatically by Engstrom Carestation before the abdominal wall lift and again 15 minutes after the start of the procedure. Results: After abdominal wall lift, there was a significant increase in functional residual capacity values (before abdominal wall lift 1.48 × 103 mL, after abdominal wall lift 1.64 × 103 mL (p < 0.0001. No complications such as desaturation were observed in any patient during this study. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgery with abdominal wall lift may be appropriate for patients who have risk factors such as obesity and respiratory disease.

  15. Wall-crossing, Rogers dilogarithm, and the QK/HK correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Pioline, Boris

    2011-01-01

    When formulated in twistor space, the D-instanton corrected hypermultiplet moduli space in N=2 string vacua and the Coulomb branch of rigid N=2 gauge theories on $R^3 \\times S^1$ are strikingly similar and, to a large extent, dictated by consistency with wall-crossing. We elucidate this similarity by showing that these two spaces are related under a general duality between, on one hand, quaternion-Kahler manifolds with a quaternionic isometry and, on the other hand, hyperkahler manifolds with a rotational isometry, further equipped with a hyperholomorphic circle bundle with a connection. We show that the transition functions of the hyperholomorphic circle bundle relevant for the hypermultiplet moduli space are given by the Rogers dilogarithm function, and that consistency across walls of marginal stability is ensured by the motivic wall-crossing formula of Kontsevich and Soibelman. We illustrate the construction on some simple examples of wall-crossing related to cluster algebras for rank 2 Dynkin quivers. In...

  16. Product design - Molecules, devices, functional products, and formulated products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Ng, Ka M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical product design is a multidisciplinary and diverse subject. This article provides an overview of product design while focusing on product conceptualization. Four product types are considered - molecular products, formulated products, devices and functional products. For molecular products......, computer-aided design tools are used to predict the physicochemical properties of single molecules and blends. For formulated products, an integrated experiment-modeling approach is used to generate the formula with the specified product attributes. For devices and functional products, conceptual product...... design is carried out by modeling the product based on thermodynamics, kinetics and transport processes, by performing experiments, and by decision making based on rule-based methods The results are product specifications in terms of the type of ingredients, composition, and the structure, form, shape...

  17. Chronic abdominal wall pain misdiagnosed as functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Assen, Tijmen; de Jager-Kievit, Jenneke W A J; Scheltinga, Marc R; Roumen, Rudi M H

    2013-01-01

    The abdominal wall is often neglected as a cause of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to identify chronic abdominal wall pain syndromes, such as anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), in a patient population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain, including irritable bowel syndrome, using a validated 18-item questionnaire as an identification tool. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4 Dutch primary care practices employing physicians who were unaware of the existence of ACNES were selected. A total of 535 patients ≥18 years old who were registered with a functional abdominal pain diagnosis were approached when they were symptomatic to complete the questionnaire (maximum 18 points). Responders who scored at least the 10-point cutoff value (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.92) underwent a diagnostic evaluation to establish their final diagnosis. The main outcome was the presence and prevalence of ACNES in a group of symptomatic patients diagnosed with functional abdominal pain. Of 535 patients, 304 (57%) responded; 167 subjects (31%) recently reporting symptoms completed the questionnaire. Of 23 patients who scored above the 10-point cutoff value, 18 were available for a diagnostic evaluation. In half of these subjects (n = 9) functional abdominal pain (including IBS) was confirmed. However, the other 9 patients were suffering from abdominal wall pain syndrome, 6 of whom were diagnosed with ACNES (3.6% prevalence rate of symptomatic subjects; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.6), whereas the remaining 3 harbored a painful lipoma, an abdominal herniation, and a painful scar. A clinically relevant portion of patients previously diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome in a primary care environment suffers from an abdominal wall pain syndrome such as ACNES.

  18. On infinite walls in deformation quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, S.; Walton, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    We examine the deformation quantization of a single particle moving in one dimension (i) in the presence of an infinite potential wall (ii) confined by an infinite square well, and (iii) bound by a delta function potential energy. In deformation quantization, considered as an autonomous formulation of quantum mechanics, the Wigner function of stationary states must be found by solving the so-called *-genvalue ('stargenvalue') equation for the Hamiltonian. For the cases considered here, this pseudo-differential equation is difficult to solve directly, without an ad hoc modification of the potential. Here we treat the infinite wall as the limit of a solvable exponential potential. Before the limit is taken, the corresponding *-genvalue equation involves the Wigner function at momenta translated by imaginary amounts. We show that it can be converted to a partial differential equation, however, with a well-defined limit. We demonstrate that the Wigner functions calculated from the standard Schroedinger wave functions satisfy the resulting new equation. Finally, we show how our results may be adapted to allow for the presence of another, non-singular part in the potential

  19. Function and Biosynthesis of Cell Wall α-1,3-Glucan in Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yoshimi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although α-1,3-glucan is a major cell wall polysaccharide in filamentous fungi, its biological functions remain unclear, except that it acts as a virulence factor in animal and plant pathogenic fungi: it conceals cell wall β-glucan on the fungal cell surface to circumvent recognition by hosts. However, cell wall α-1,3-glucan is also present in many of non-pathogenic fungi. Recently, the universal function of α-1,3-glucan as an aggregation factor has been demonstrated. Applications of fungi with modified cell wall α-1,3-glucan in the fermentation industry and of in vitro enzymatically-synthesized α-1,3-glucan in bio-plastics have been developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in our understanding of the biological functions and biosynthetic mechanism of cell wall α-1,3-glucan in fungi. We briefly consider the history of studies on α-1,3-glucan, overview its biological functions and biosynthesis, and finally consider the industrial applications of fungi deficient in α-1,3-glucan.

  20. MHD stabilization of high β mirror plasma partially enclosed by conducting wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.Z.; Kesner, J.; Lane, B.

    1985-04-01

    An MHD formulation is used to study a wall stabilized high β mirror plasma with isotropic pressure. The stabilizing wall extends axially only a part of the distance between the mirror midplane and throat. We model this arrangement using a wall that approaches the plasma surface in the bad curvature region and is distant from the plasma in the good curvature region. A variational method is used to solve the equation in the distant wall region and an iterative method is used to solve the equation when the wall is close to the plasma. A jump condition is used to connect the regions of close and distant plasma-wall proximity. A simple trial function is used to perform the variational calculation (the choice of trial function is substantiated by an exact numerical solution). The results show that for a low mirror ratio case more conducting wall surface is needed for stability than in the high mirror ratio case. This agrees with the physical mechanism of the wall stabilization

  1. Abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia restores expiratory lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Backer, Vibeke; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory complications secondary to intermittent intra-abdominal hypertension and/or atelectasis are common after abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernias. It is unknown if the respiratory function of this patient group is affected long term or impairs activities...... of daily living. We hypothesized that abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia would not lead to improved, long-term pulmonary function or respiratory quality of life. METHODS: Eighteen patients undergoing open abdominal wall reconstruction with mesh for a large incisional hernia...... (horizontal fascial defect width >10 cm) were compared with 18 patients with an intact abdominal wall who underwent colorectal resection. Patients were examined pre- and 1-year postoperatively. Examined measures included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in first second, peak expiratory flow...

  2. Grid refinement model in lattice Boltzmann method for stream function-vorticity formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Myung Seob [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongyang Mirae University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    In this study, we present a grid refinement model in the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow. That is, the model combines the desirable features of the lattice Boltzmann method and stream function-vorticity formulations. In order to obtain an accurate result, very fine grid (or lattice) is required near the solid boundary. Therefore, the grid refinement model is used in the lattice Boltzmann method for stream function-vorticity formulation. This approach is more efficient in that it can obtain the same accurate solution as that in single-block approach even if few lattices are used for computation. In order to validate the grid refinement approach for the stream function-vorticity formulation, the numerical simulations of lid-driven cavity flows were performed and good results were obtained.

  3. Localization of vector field on dynamical domain wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Higuchi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the previous works (arXiv:1202.5375 and arXiv:1402.1346, the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five dimensional space–time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arXiv:1510.01099 for the U(1 gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali–Shifman mechanism (arXiv:hep-th/9612128, where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza–Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall–Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the (5,μ components (μ=0,1,2,3 of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from the bulk extra dimension if the domain wall universe is expanding.

  4. A Reynolds stress model for near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper formulates a tensorially consistent near-wall second-order closure model. Redistributive terms in the Reynolds stress equations are modeled by an elliptic relaxation equation in order to represent strongly nonhomogeneous effects produced by the presence of walls; this replaces the quasi-homogeneous algebraic models that are usually employed, and avoids the need for ad hoc damping functions. The model is solved for channel flow and boundary layers with zero and adverse pressure gradients. Good predictions of Reynolds stress components, mean flow, skin friction, and displacement thickness are obtained in various comparisons to experimental and direct numerical simulation data. The model is also applied to a boundary layer flowing along a wall with a 90-deg, constant-radius, convex bend.

  5. Updated Lagrangian finite element formulations of various biological soft tissue non-linear material models: a comprehensive procedure and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Molly T; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Simplified material models are commonly used in computational simulation of biological soft tissue as an approximation of the complicated material response and to minimize computational resources. However, the simulation of complex loadings, such as long-duration tissue swelling, necessitates complex models that are not easy to formulate. This paper strives to offer the updated Lagrangian formulation comprehensive procedure of various non-linear material models for the application of finite element analysis of biological soft tissues including a definition of the Cauchy stress and the spatial tangential stiffness. The relationships between water content, osmotic pressure, ionic concentration and the pore pressure stress of the tissue are discussed with the merits of these models and their applications.

  6. Progress in reconstruction of orbital wall after fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Lu Xu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, the orbital wall fracture is a very common facial trauma. The orbital contents are often incarcerated in the fracture cracks resulting in changes in the orbital eye position, then can bring a lifetime of diplopia and enophthalmos, which greatly affects the visual acuity and facial appearance. The purpose of repairing of orbital fracture is reconstructing orbital wall, repairing defect to correct eye position, avoiding enophthalmos and recovering visual function. The review will provide a comprehensive overview of orbital fracture reconstruction.

  7. Abdominal wall reconstruction for incisional hernia optimizes truncal function and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K.; Munim, Kanzah; Kjaer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to examine abdominal wall function in patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for incisional hernia. Background: The literature on abdominal wall function in patients with incisional hernia is sparse. It has been suggested that AWR leads...... to improvement in function, but it is unknown whether this is specific to the abdominal wall or due to an improvement in overall physical fitness. Methods: We performed a prospective case-control study of 18 consecutive patients with large incisional hernia undergoing AWR with linea alba restoration. Truncal...... flexion and extension strength, hand grip strength, leg extension power, and quality of life (SF-36 and Carolinas Comfort Scale) were assessed preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Patients were compared with a control group of patients with an intact abdominal wall undergoing colorectal resection (n...

  8. Stomatal Function Requires Pectin De-methyl-esterification of the Guard Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsbury, Sam; Hunt, Lee; Elhaddad, Nagat; Baillie, Alice; Lundgren, Marjorie; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Scheller, Henrik V; Knox, J Paul; Fleming, Andrew J; Gray, Julie E

    2016-11-07

    Stomatal opening and closure depends on changes in turgor pressure acting within guard cells to alter cell shape [1]. The extent of these shape changes is limited by the mechanical properties of the cells, which will be largely dependent on the structure of the cell walls. Although it has long been observed that guard cells are anisotropic due to differential thickening and the orientation of cellulose microfibrils [2], our understanding of the composition of the cell wall that allows them to undergo repeated swelling and deflation remains surprisingly poor. Here, we show that the walls of guard cells are rich in un-esterified pectins. We identify a pectin methylesterase gene, PME6, which is highly expressed in guard cells and required for stomatal function. pme6-1 mutant guard cells have walls enriched in methyl-esterified pectin and show a decreased dynamic range in response to triggers of stomatal opening/closure, including elevated osmoticum, suggesting that abrogation of stomatal function reflects a mechanical change in the guard cell wall. Altered stomatal function leads to increased conductance and evaporative cooling, as well as decreased plant growth. The growth defect of the pme6-1 mutant is rescued by maintaining the plants in elevated CO 2 , substantiating gas exchange analyses, indicating that the mutant stomata can bestow an improved assimilation rate. Restoration of PME6 rescues guard cell wall pectin methyl-esterification status, stomatal function, and plant growth. Our results establish a link between gene expression in guard cells and their cell wall properties, with a corresponding effect on stomatal function and plant physiology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Static resistance function for steel-plate composite (SC) walls subject to impactive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhl, Jakob C.; Varma, Amit H.; Kim, Joo Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An idealized static resistance function for SC walls is proposed. • The influence of design parameters on static resistance is explained. • SDOF models can accurately estimate global response of SC walls to missile impact. - Abstract: Steel-plate composite (SC) walls consist of a plain concrete core reinforced with two steel faceplates on the surfaces. Modules (consisting of steel faceplates, shear connectors and tie-bars) can be shop-fabricated and shipped to the site for erection and concrete casting, which expedites construction schedule and thus economy. SC structures have recently been used in nuclear power plant designs and are being considered for the next generation of small modular reactors. Design for impactive and impulsive loading is an important consideration for SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities. The authors have previously developed design methods to prevent local failure (perforation) of SC walls due to missile impact. This paper presents the development of static resistance functions for use in single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analyses to predict the maximum displacement response of SC walls subjected to missile impact and designed to resist local failure (perforation). The static resistance function for SC walls is developed using results of numerical analyses and parametric studies conducted using benchmarked 3D finite element (FE) models. The influence of various design parameters are discussed and used to develop idealized bilinear resistance functions for SC walls with fixed edges and simply supported edges. Results from dynamic non-linear FE analysis of SC panels subjected to rigid missile impact are compared with the maximum displacements predicted by SDOF analyses using the bilinear resistance function.

  10. Static resistance function for steel-plate composite (SC) walls subject to impactive loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhl, Jakob C., E-mail: jbruhl@purdue.edu; Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu; Kim, Joo Min, E-mail: kim1493@purdue.edu

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • An idealized static resistance function for SC walls is proposed. • The influence of design parameters on static resistance is explained. • SDOF models can accurately estimate global response of SC walls to missile impact. - Abstract: Steel-plate composite (SC) walls consist of a plain concrete core reinforced with two steel faceplates on the surfaces. Modules (consisting of steel faceplates, shear connectors and tie-bars) can be shop-fabricated and shipped to the site for erection and concrete casting, which expedites construction schedule and thus economy. SC structures have recently been used in nuclear power plant designs and are being considered for the next generation of small modular reactors. Design for impactive and impulsive loading is an important consideration for SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities. The authors have previously developed design methods to prevent local failure (perforation) of SC walls due to missile impact. This paper presents the development of static resistance functions for use in single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analyses to predict the maximum displacement response of SC walls subjected to missile impact and designed to resist local failure (perforation). The static resistance function for SC walls is developed using results of numerical analyses and parametric studies conducted using benchmarked 3D finite element (FE) models. The influence of various design parameters are discussed and used to develop idealized bilinear resistance functions for SC walls with fixed edges and simply supported edges. Results from dynamic non-linear FE analysis of SC panels subjected to rigid missile impact are compared with the maximum displacements predicted by SDOF analyses using the bilinear resistance function.

  11. A comprehensive linear programming tool to optimize formulations of ready-to-use therapeutic foods: an application to Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kelsey N; Adams, Katherine P; Vosti, Stephen A; Ordiz, M Isabel; Cimo, Elizabeth D; Manary, Mark J

    2014-12-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the standard of care for children suffering from noncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The objective was to develop a comprehensive linear programming (LP) tool to create novel RUTF formulations for Ethiopia. A systematic approach that surveyed international and national crop and animal food databases was used to create a global and local candidate ingredient database. The database included information about each ingredient regarding nutrient composition, ingredient category, regional availability, and food safety, processing, and price. An LP tool was then designed to compose novel RUTF formulations. For the example case of Ethiopia, the objective was to minimize the ingredient cost of RUTF; the decision variables were ingredient weights and the extent of use of locally available ingredients, and the constraints were nutritional and product-quality related. Of the new RUTF formulations found by the LP tool for Ethiopia, 32 were predicted to be feasible for creating a paste, and these were prepared in the laboratory. Palatable final formulations contained a variety of ingredients, including fish, different dairy powders, and various seeds, grains, and legumes. Nearly all of the macronutrient values calculated by the LP tool differed by <10% from results produced by laboratory analyses, but the LP tool consistently underestimated total energy. The LP tool can be used to develop new RUTF formulations that make more use of locally available ingredients. This tool has the potential to lead to production of a variety of low-cost RUTF formulations that meet international standards and thereby potentially allow more children to be treated for SAM. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Stochastic modelling of conjugate heat transfer in near-wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozorski, Jacek; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses the conjugate heat transfer in turbulent flows with temperature assumed to be a passive scalar. The Lagrangian approach is applied and the heat transfer is modelled with the use of stochastic particles. The intensity of thermal fluctuations in near-wall turbulence is determined from the scalar probability density function (PDF) with externally provided dynamical statistics. A stochastic model for the temperature field in the wall material is proposed and boundary conditions for stochastic particles at the solid-fluid interface are formulated. The heated channel flow with finite-thickness walls is considered as a validation case. Computation results for the mean temperature profiles and the variance of thermal fluctuations are presented and compared with available DNS data

  13. Stochastic modelling of conjugate heat transfer in near-wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozorski, Jacek [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: jp@imp.gda.pl; Minier, Jean-Pierre [Research and Development Division, Electricite de France, 6 quai Watier, 78400 Chatou (France)

    2006-10-15

    The paper addresses the conjugate heat transfer in turbulent flows with temperature assumed to be a passive scalar. The Lagrangian approach is applied and the heat transfer is modelled with the use of stochastic particles. The intensity of thermal fluctuations in near-wall turbulence is determined from the scalar probability density function (PDF) with externally provided dynamical statistics. A stochastic model for the temperature field in the wall material is proposed and boundary conditions for stochastic particles at the solid-fluid interface are formulated. The heated channel flow with finite-thickness walls is considered as a validation case. Computation results for the mean temperature profiles and the variance of thermal fluctuations are presented and compared with available DNS data.

  14. Comprehensive Study of Plasma-Wall Sheath Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    the floating potential of wall material samples immersed in a low-temperature plasma were studied. Hysteresis is found to be due to secondary electron...continued research into plasma sheath physics. Hysteresis effects observed in the floating potential of wall material samples immersed in a low... Journal of Applied Physics, Volume 119, March 2016, pp. 113305 1-5. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. 8 Figure 2

  15. Vacuum tension effects on the evolution of domain walls in the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurilia, A.

    1984-06-01

    The ''vacuum pressure'' mechanism of the hadronic bag model is taken as a guide to formulate the dynamics of closed domain walls in the cosmological case. The effective action functional suggested by this analogy is a straightforward generalization of the Einstein-Maxwell action: it involves a 3-index antisymmetric potential whose coupling to matter generates two effective cosmological constants, one inside and one outside the domain wall. It is suggested that this mechanism, which is alternative to the introduction of a Higgs potential, is the source of the bubble nucleation process envisaged in the New Inflationary Cosmology. The dynamics of a spherical domain in a de Sitter phase is analyzed and is consistent with the geometrical formulation of shell dynamics proposed long ago by Israel. (author)

  16. An analytical wall-function for recirculating and impinging turbulent heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Kuwata, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Improvement of the analytical wall-function is proposed. ► Strain parameter dependency is introduced to the prescribed eddy viscosity profile of the analytical wall-function. ► The model performance is evaluated in turbulent pipe, channel, back-step, abrupt expansion pipe and plane impinging flows. ► Generally improved heat transfer is obtained in all the test cases with the standard k-e model. -- Abstract: The performance of the analytical wall-function (AWF) of Craft et al. [Craft, T.J., Gerasimov, A.V., Iacovides, H., Launder, B.E., 2002, Progress in the generalisation of wall-function treatments. Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 23, 148–160.] is improved for predicting turbulent heat transfer in recirculating and impinging flows. Since constant parameters of the eddy viscosity formula were used to derive the AWF, the prediction accuracy of the original AWF tends to deteriorate in complex flows where those parameters need changing according to the local turbulence. To overcome such shortcomings, the present study introduces a functional behaviour on the strain parameter into the coefficient of the eddy viscosity of the AWF. The presently modified version of the AWF is validated in turbulent heat transfer of pipe flows, channel flows, back-step flows, pipe flows with abrupt expansion and plane impinging slot jets. The results confirm that the present modification successfully improves the performance of the original AWF for all the flows and heat transfer tested

  17. Validation of a Node-Centered Wall Function Model for the Unstructured Flow Code FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee; Vasta, Veer N.; White, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of two wall function models in the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational uid dynamics (CFD) code FUN3D is described. FUN3D is a node centered method for solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured computational grids. The first wall function model, based on the work of Knopp et al., is used in conjunction with the one-equation turbulence model of Spalart-Allmaras. The second wall function model, also based on the work of Knopp, is used in conjunction with the two-equation k-! turbulence model of Menter. The wall function models compute the wall momentum and energy flux, which are used to weakly enforce the wall velocity and pressure flux boundary conditions in the mean flow momentum and energy equations. These wall conditions are implemented in an implicit form where the contribution of the wall function model to the Jacobian are also included. The boundary conditions of the turbulence transport equations are enforced explicitly (strongly) on all solid boundaries. The use of the wall function models is demonstrated on four test cases: a at plate boundary layer, a subsonic di user, a 2D airfoil, and a 3D semi-span wing. Where possible, different near-wall viscous spacing tactics are examined. Iterative residual convergence was obtained in most cases. Solution results are compared with theoretical and experimental data for several variations of grid spacing. In general, very good comparisons with data were achieved.

  18. Systematic evaluation of common lubricants for optimal use in tablet formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shubhajit; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2018-05-30

    As an essential formulation component for large-scale tablet manufacturing, the lubricant preserves tooling by reducing die-wall friction. Unfortunately, lubrication also often results in adverse effects on tablet characteristics, such as prolonged disintegration, slowed dissolution, and reduced mechanical strength. Therefore, the choice of lubricant and its optimal concentration in a tablet formulation is a critical decision in tablet formulation development to attain low die-wall friction while minimizing negative impact on other tablet properties. Three commercially available tablet lubricants, i.e., magnesium stearate, sodium stearyl fumerate, and stearic acid, were systematically investigated in both plastic and brittle matrices to elucidate their effects on reducing die-wall friction, tablet strength, tablet hardness, tablet friability, and tablet disintegration kinetics. Clear understanding of the lubrication efficiency of commonly used lubricants as well as their impact on tablet characteristics would help future tablet formulation efforts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonequilibrium Green's function formulation of quantum transport theory for multi-band semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Peiji; Horing, Norman J.M.; Woolard, Dwight L.; Cui, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a nonequilibrium Green's function formulation of many-body quantum transport theory for multi-band semiconductor systems with a phonon bath. The equations are expressed exactly in terms of single particle nonequilibrium Green's functions and self-energies, treating the open electron-hole system in weak interaction with the bath. A decoupling technique is employed to separate the individual band Green's function equations of motion from one another, with the band-band interaction effects embedded in ''cross-band'' self-energies. This nonequilibrium Green's function formulation of quantum transport theory is amenable to solution by parallel computing because of its formal decoupling with respect to inter-band interactions. Moreover, this formulation also permits coding the simulator of an n-band semiconductor in terms of that for an (n-1)-band system, in step with the current tendency and development of programming technology. Finally, the focus of these equations on individual bands provides a relatively direct route for the determination of carrier motion in energy bands, and to delineate the influence of intra- and inter-band interactions. A detailed description is provided for three-band semiconductor systems

  20. A new wall function boundary condition including heat release effect for supersonic combustion flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhen-Xun; Jiang, Chong-Wen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new wall function including heat release effect is theoretically derived. • The new wall function is a unified form holding for flows with/without combustion. • The new wall function shows good results for a supersonic combustion case. - Abstract: A new wall function boundary condition considering combustion heat release effect (denoted as CWFBC) is proposed, for efficient predictions of skin friction and heat transfer in supersonic combustion flows. Based on a standard flow model including boundary-layer combustion, the Shvab–Zeldovich coupling parameters are introduced to derive a new velocity law-of-the-wall including the influence of combustion. For the temperature law-of-the-wall, it is proposed to use the enthalpy–velocity relation, instead of the Crocco–Busemann equation, to eliminate explicit influence of chemical reactions. The obtained velocity and temperature law-of-the-walls constitute the CWFBC, which is a unified form simultaneously holding for single-species, multi-species mixing and multi-species reactive flows. The subsequent numerical simulations using this CWFBC on an experimental case indicate that the CWFBC could accurately reflect the influences on the skin friction and heat transfer by the chemical reactions and heat release, and show large improvements compared to previous WFBC. Moreover, the CWFBC can give accurate skin friction and heat flux for a coarse mesh with y"+ up to 200 for the experimental case, except for slightly larger discrepancy of the wall heat flux around ignition position.

  1. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  2. Analysis of wall-function approaches using two-equation turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albets-Chico, X.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.; Oliva, A. [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIAT, C/ Colom, 11, 08222 Terrassa (Barcelona) (Spain); Bredberg, J. [Multi-physics/CFD Epsilon, HighTech AB Lindholmspiren 9, SE-41756 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2008-09-15

    This paper focuses the attention on the drawbacks and abilities of wall-function techniques through an analysis of well-known wall-functions from literature. Besides this, some deeper analysis of these tools by means of physical and numerical considerations are carried out in order to improve their limitations when they are applied to predict heat transfer and fluid flow. Accuracy, grid-sensitivity, numerical behaviour and verification of numerical simulations are key aspects in this paper. The main purpose is to obtain tools which are able to predict both fluid flow and heat transfer with low CPU time consumption, reduced grid-sensitivity and a relatively good accuracy. (author)

  3. Spray deposition of steam treated and functionalized single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube films for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xin; Chu, Bryan T T; Johnston, Colin; Sykes, John M; Grant, Patrick S; Ballesteros, Belen; Wang Weiliang

    2009-01-01

    Steam purified, carboxylic and ester functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films with homogeneous distribution and flexible control of thickness and area were fabricated on polymeric and metallic substrates using a modified spray deposition technique. By employing a pre-sprayed polyelectrolyte, the adhesion of the carbon nanotube (CNT) films to the substrates was significantly enhanced by electrostatic interaction. Carboxylic and ester functionalization improved electrochemical performance when immersed in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 and the specific capacitance reached 155 and 77 F g -1 for carboxylic functionalized SWNT and MWNT films respectively. Compared with existing techniques such as hot pressing, vacuum filtration and dip coating, the ambient pressure spray deposition technique is suggested as particularly well suited for preparing CNT films at large scale for applications including providing electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors and paper batteries.

  4. Benchmarking LES with wall-functions and RANS for fatigue problems in thermal–hydraulics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunstall, R., E-mail: ryan.tunstall@manchester.ac.uk [School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Laurence, D.; Prosser, R. [School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Skillen, A. [Scientific Computing Department, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We benchmark LES with blended wall-functions and low-Re RANS for a pipe bend and T-Junction. • Blended wall-laws allow the first cell from the wall to be placed anywhere in the boundary layer. • In both cases LES predictions improve as the first cell wall spacing is reduced. • Near-wall temperature fluctuations in the T-Junction are overpredicted by wall-modelled LES. • The EBRSM outperforms other RANS models for the pipe bend. - Abstract: In assessing whether nuclear plant components such as T-Junctions are likely to suffer thermal fatigue problems in service, CFD techniques need to provide accurate predictions for wall temperature fluctuations. Though it has been established that this is within the capabilities of wall-resolved LES, its high computational cost has prevented widespread usage in industry. In the present paper the suitability of LES with blended wall-functions, that allow the first cell to be placed in any part of the boundary layer, is assessed. Numerical results for the flows through a 90° pipe bend and a T-Junction are compared against experimental data. Both test cases contain areas where equilibrium laws are violated in practice. It is shown that reducing the first cell wall spacing improves agreement with experimental data by limiting the extent from the wall in which the solution is constrained to an equilibrium law. The LES with wall-function approach consistently overpredicts the near-wall temperature fluctuations in the T-Junction, suggesting that it can be considered as a conservative approach. We also benchmark a range of low-Re RANS models. EBRSM predictions for the 90° pipe bend are in significantly better agreement with experimental data than those from the other models. There are discrepancies from all RANS models in the case of the T-Junction.

  5. A Comprehensive Review of Boundary Integral Formulations of Acoustic Scattering Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Zaman

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a review presenting an overview of the developments in boundary integral formulations of the acoustic scattering problems. Generally, the problem is formulated in one of two ways viz. Green’s representation formula, and the Layer-theoretic formulation utilizing either a simple-layer or a double-layer potential. The review presents and expounds the major contributions in this area over the last four decades. The need for a robust and improved formulation of the exterior scattering problem (Neumann or Dirichlet arose due to the fact that the classical formulation failed to yield a unique solution at (acoustic wave-numbers which correspond to eigenvalues (eigenfrequencies of the corresponding interior scattering problem. Moreover, this correlation becomes more pronounced as the wave-numbers become larger i.e. as the (acoustic frequency increases. The robust integral formulations which are discussed here yield Fredholms integral equations of the second kind which are more amenable to computation than the first kind. However, the integral equation involves a hypersingular kernel which creates ill-conditioning in the final matrix representation. This is circumvented by a regularisation technique. An extensive useful list of references is also presented here for researchers in this area.

  6. Dynamic behavior and functional integrity tests on RC shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Kinji; Nasuda, Toshiaki; Shibata, Akenori.

    1991-01-01

    A project consisting of seven subprojects has been conducted to study the dynamic behavior and functional integrity of reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls in reactor buildings. The objective of this project is to obtain the data to improve and prepare the seismic analysis code regarding the nonlinear structural behavior and integrity of reactor buildings during and after earthquakes. The project started in April, 1986, and will end in March, 1994. Seven subprojects are strain rate test, damping characteristic test, ultimate state response test and the verification test for the test of restoring force characteristics regarding dynamic restoring force characteristics and damping performance; the restoring force characteristic test on the shear walls with openings; and pull-out strength test and the test on air leakage through concrete cracks regarding the functional integrity. The objectives of respective subprojects, the test models and the interim results are reported. Three subprojects have been completed by March, 1990. The results of these projects will be used for the overall evaluation. The strain rate test showed that the ultimate strength of shear walls increased with strain rate. A formula for estimating air flow through the cracks in walls was given by the leakage test. (K.I.)

  7. Optimization of a Functional Cookie Formulation by Using Response Surface Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.Y.; Tan, K.S.; Liew, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    A functional cookie formulation containing oligo fructose, dietary fibre and lower calorie, fat and sugar contents than conventional cookies was optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Instant N-Oil II was used as a fat replacer, while Raftilose P95 was used as a sugar substitute with the addition of fructose to enhance sweetness. Selection of the optimal formulation was based on caloric content. An optimized formulation, V1, was obtained from the model Y = 4927.70 - 152.34X 1 - 155.42X 3 + 104.20X 3 2 + 151.71X 3 3 - 95.08X 3 4 , where Instant N-Oil II replaced 30 % of butter and 24.4 %, w/w (30.5 g) fructose replaced 40.0 %, w/w (50.0 g) sucrose. Two additional optimized formulations, S1 and S2, were proposed which contained the same ingredients as V1, but both contained 19.0 %, w/w (23.8 g) Raftilose P95. Also, S2 had a higher fat replacement level (42 %). A reference cookie prepared from a conventional recipe received significantly higher scores (P < 0.05) than the functional cookies V1, S1 and S2 in the sensory evaluation. However, when health benefits of the functional cookies were explained to the panel after the sensory evaluation had concluded, majority of the panelists stated that they would prefer S1, had they known of its health benefits. S1 contained 19.04 % fat, 8.62 % fructose and 0.74 % sucrose, namely, significantly lower fat and sucrose levels and higher fructose content than the conventional cookie. (author)

  8. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Structural and Functional Effects on the Vascular Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Zanetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. Increasing evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect of n-3 PUFA on arterial wall properties is progressively emerging. We reviewed the recent available evidence for the cardiovascular effects of n-3 PUFA focusing on structural and functional properties of the vascular wall. In experimental studies and clinical trials n-3 PUFA have shown the ability to improve arterial hemodynamics by reducing arterial stiffness, thus explaining some of its cardioprotective properties. Recent studies suggest beneficial effects of n-3 PUFA on endothelial activation, which are likely to improve vascular function. Several molecular, cellular, and physiological pathways influenced by n-3 PUFA can affect arterial wall properties and therefore interfere with the atherosclerotic process. Although the relative weight of different physiological and molecular mechanisms and the dose-response on arterial wall properties have yet to be determined, n-3 PUFA have the potential to beneficially impact arterial wall remodeling and cardiovascular outcomes by targeting arterial wall stiffening and endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Influence of radial magnetic field on the peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid in a curved complaint walls channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    Full Text Available Peristaltic transport of Williamson fluid in a curved geometry is modeled. Problem formulation is completed by complaint walls of channel. Radial magnetic field in the analysis is taken into account. Resulting problem formulation is simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Series solution is obtained for small Weissenberg number. Influences of different embedded parameters on the axial velocity and stream function are examined. As expected the velocity in curved channel is not symmetric. Axial velocity is noticed decreasing for Hartman number. Trapped bolus increases for Hartman and curvature parameters. Keywords: Williamson fluid, Curved channel, Radial magnetic field, Complaint walls

  10. Study of the Relap5/mod3.2 wall heat flux partitioning model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari, S.; Hassan, Y.A.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of the subcooled boiling model adapted in RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed in detail for low-pressure conditions and it has been found that the void fraction profile is under-predicted. In general, any subcooled boiling model is composed of individual sub-models that account for the different physical mechanism that govern the overall process, as the wall vapor generation, interfacial shear and condensation etc. The wall heat flux partitioning model is one of the important sub-models that is a constituent of any subcooled boiling model. The function of this model is to apportion the wall heat flux to the different components (as the single/two phase fluid or bubble), as the case may be, in a two-phase flow-boiling scenario adjacent to a heated wall. The ''pumping factor'' approach is generally followed by most of the wall heat flux partitioning models, for partitioning the wall heat flux. In this work, the wall heat flux partitioning model of RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer code is studied; in particular, the ''pumping factor'' formulation in the present code version is assessed for its performance under low-pressure conditions. In addition, three different ''pumping factor'' formulations available in the literature have been introduced into the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. Simulations of two low-pressure subcooled flow boiling experiments were performed with the refined code versions to determine the appropriate pumping factor to be used under these conditions. (author)

  11. Generation of plastic influence functions for J-integral and crack opening displacement of thin-walled pipes with a short circumferential through-wall crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Soon; Choi, Young Hwan; Im, Seyoung

    2014-01-01

    Fracture mechanics parameters such as the J-integral and crack opening displacement (COD), are necessary for Leak-Before-Break (LBB) evaluation. The famous two estimation methods, the GE/EPRI and the Reference Stress Method (RSM), have their applicability limit with regard to the ratio of a pipe mean radius to thickness (R m /t). In order to extend their applicability limit to a thin walled pipe, several finite element analyses are performed for the J-integral and COD, and then new plastic influence functions are developed for thin-walled pipes with a short circumferential through-wall crack. With the newly generated plastic influence functions, the GE/EPRI and the RSM give closer results with those obtained from detailed finite element analyses. In addition, C*-integral and COD rate are estimated by using the new plastic influence functions and they are well matched with elastic–creep finite element analysis results under the power-law creep condition. Since the LBB concept can be applied to a piping system in a Korean Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) which is designed to have thin-walled pipes and to operate in high temperature enough to cause creep, this paper can be applied for the LBB assessment of thin-walled pipes with a short through-wall crack in the SFR

  12. The Gibbs Function, Spontaneity, and Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykodi, R. J.

    1996-05-01

    For the expansion-into-the-vacuum process involving a saturated vapor, previously analyzed by Schomaker and waser and by myself, I assert that in general Delta G (composite) is undefined and that for the special case of bulbs with perfectly rigid walls Delta G (composite) is weakly positive. I show that the seemingly contradictory results of Schomaker and Waser are merely the consequences of their use of eccentric or anti-conventional terminology: they calculate the change in the Availability function for the process and call that change "Delta G (composite)".

  13. A note on the uniqueness of 2D elastostatic problems formulated by different types of potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, José Luis Morales; Vidal, Manuel Cánovas; Nicolás, José Andrés Moreno; López, Francisco Alhama

    2018-05-01

    New additional conditions required for the uniqueness of the 2D elastostatic problems formulated in terms of potential functions for the derived Papkovich-Neuber representations, are studied. Two cases are considered, each of them formulated by the scalar potential function plus one of the rectangular non-zero components of the vector potential function. For these formulations, in addition to the original (physical) boundary conditions, two new additional conditions are required. In addition, for the complete Papkovich-Neuber formulation, expressed by the scalar potential plus two components of the vector potential, the additional conditions established previously for the three-dimensional case in z-convex domain can be applied. To show the usefulness of these new conditions in a numerical scheme two applications are numerically solved by the network method for the three cases of potential formulations.

  14. Effect of amino acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a single-step, rapid microwave-assisted process, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized by -valine amino acid. Formation of amino acid on nanotube surface was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning and transmission ...

  15. Plant cell wall polysaccharide analysis during cell elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoyuan

    Plant cell walls are complex structures whose composition and architecture are important to various cellular activities. Plant cell elongation requires a high level of rearrangement of the cell wall polymers to enable cell expansion. However, the cell wall polysaccharides dynamics during plant cell...... elongation is poorly understood. This PhD project aims to elucidate the cell wall compositional and structural change during cell elongation by using Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP), microscopic techniques and molecular modifications of cell wall polysaccharide. Developing cotton fibre......, pea and Arabidopsis thaliana were selected as research models to investigate different types of cell elongation, developmental elongation and tropism elongation. A set of comprehensive analysis covering 4 cotton species and 11 time points suggests that non-cellulosic polysaccharides contribute...

  16. A Comprehensive Approach for Pectin Chemical and Functional Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Sousa, António Felipe Gomes Teixeira

    In this work, a comprehensive approach for the chemical and functional analysis of pectin was used in order to relate the different extraction conditions used to the polymer structure and the final functional (mainly gelling) properties. A wide range of methods were utilized including chemical an...

  17. Two-phase wall function for modeling of turbulent boundary layer in subcooled boiling flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostjan Koncar; Borut Mavko; Yassin A Hassan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The heat transfer and phase-change mechanisms in the subcooled flow boiling are governed mainly by local multidimensional mechanisms near the heated wall, where bubbles are generated. The structure of such 'wall boiling flow' is inherently non-homogeneous and is further influenced by the two-phase flow turbulence, phase-change effects in the bulk, interfacial forces and bubble interactions (collisions, coalescence, break-up). In this work the effect of two-phase flow turbulence on the development of subcooled boiling flow is considered. Recently, the modeling of two-phase flow turbulence has been extensively investigated. A notable progress has been made towards deriving reliable models for description of turbulent behaviour of continuous (liquid) and dispersed phase (bubbles) in the bulk flow. However, there is a lack of investigation considering the modeling of two-phase flow boundary layer. In most Eulerian two-fluid models standard single-phase wall functions are used for description of turbulent boundary layer of continuous phase. That might be a good approximation at adiabatic flows, but their use for boundary layers with high concentration of dispersed phase is questionable. In this work, the turbulent boundary layer near the heated wall will be modeled with the so-called 'two-phase' wall function, which is based on the assumption of additional turbulence due to bubble-induced stirring in the boundary layer. In the two-phase turbulent boundary layer the wall function coefficients strongly depend on the void fraction. Moreover, in the turbulent boundary layer with nucleating bubbles, the bubble size variation also has a significant impact on the liquid phase. As a basis, the wall function of Troshko and Hassan (2001), developed for adiabatic bubbly flows will be used. The simulations will be performed by a general-purpose CFD code CFX-4.4 using additional models provided by authors. The results will be compared to the boiling

  18. An alternative analytical formulation for the Voigt function applied to resonant effects in nuclear processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Goncalves, Alessandro da C; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    2011-01-01

    The Voigt function H(a,v) is defined as the convolution of the Gaussian and Lorentzian functions. Recent papers puplished in different areas of physics emphasize the importance of the fast and accurate calculation of the Voigt function for different orders of magnitude of variables a and v. An alternative analytical formulation for the Voigt function is proposed in this paper. This formulation is based on the solution of the non-homogeneous ordinary differential equation, satisfied by the Voigt function, using the Frobenius and parameter variation methods. The functional form of the Voigt function, as proposed, proved simple and precise. Systematic tests are accomplished demonstrating some advantages with other existent methods in the literature and with the numeric method of reference.

  19. An alternative analytical formulation for the Voigt function applied to resonant effects in nuclear processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dpalmaster@gmail.com [CNEN-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, 22290-901, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Goncalves, Alessandro da C; Martinez, Aquilino S. [COPPE/UFRJ-Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-10-21

    The Voigt function H(a,v) is defined as the convolution of the Gaussian and Lorentzian functions. Recent papers puplished in different areas of physics emphasize the importance of the fast and accurate calculation of the Voigt function for different orders of magnitude of variables a and v. An alternative analytical formulation for the Voigt function is proposed in this paper. This formulation is based on the solution of the non-homogeneous ordinary differential equation, satisfied by the Voigt function, using the Frobenius and parameter variation methods. The functional form of the Voigt function, as proposed, proved simple and precise. Systematic tests are accomplished demonstrating some advantages with other existent methods in the literature and with the numeric method of reference.

  20. Standardization of Unani polyherbal formulation, Qurse-e-Hummaz: A comprehensive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y T Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increase in the awareness about the advantages of the traditional system of medicines has led to the commercialization of the formulations used for the treatments. Manufacture of these medicines to meet this increasing demand has resulted in a decline in their quality, primarily due to a lack of adequate regulations pertaining to this sector of medicine. Hence, it is necessary to come up with a systematic approach to develop well-designed methodologies for the standardization of polyherbal formulations which are used in traditional systems of medicine. Materials and Methods: Qurs-e-Hummaz formulations were prepared by a qualified “Hakim” (Unani medical practitioner of Faculty of Unani Medicine, Hamdard University, as per the formula and instruction given in National Formulary of Unani Medicine. Results: Various quality control parameters such as organoleptic evaluations (color, odor, taste, and consistency, physicochemical evaluations (loss on drying, disintegration time, moisture content, total ash, acid insoluble ash, water soluble ash, pH of 1 and 10% solution, extractive values, water soluble matter, alcohol-soluble matter, and total phenolic content and thin layer chromatography fingerprint profiling have been carried out in triplicate. The evaluation of contaminants such as heavy metals, aflatoxins, pesticide residues, and microbial contamination has also been carried out in the formulation. Conclusion: Help in maintaining the quality and batch to batch consistency of many important polyherbal formulations.

  1. Boundary-integral equation formulation for time-dependent inelastic deformation in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V; Mukherjee, S

    1977-01-01

    The mathematical structure of various constitutive relations proposed in recent years for representing time-dependent inelastic deformation behavior of metals at elevated temperatues has certain features which permit a simple formulation of the three-dimensional inelasticity problem in terms of real time rates. A direct formulation of the boundary-integral equation method in terms of rates is discussed for the analysis of time-dependent inelastic deformation of arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional metallic bodies subjected to arbitrary mechanical and thermal loading histories and obeying constitutive relations of the kind mentioned above. The formulation is based on the assumption of infinitesimal deformations. Several illustrative examples involving creep of thick-walled spheres, long thick-walled cylinders, and rotating discs are discussed. The implementation of the method appears to be far easier than analogous BIE formulations that have been suggested for elastoplastic problems.

  2. CFD simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer: wall function problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E.; Stathopoulos, T.; Carmeliet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow are essential for a wide variety of atmospheric studies including pollutant dispersion and deposition. The accuracy of such simulations can be seriously compromised when wall-function roughness

  3. Measurement of Function Post Hip Fracture: Testing a Comprehensive Measurement Model of Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hicks, Gregory; Ostir, Glen; Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of physical function post hip fracture has been conceptualized using multiple different measures. This study tested a comprehensive measurement model of physical function. This was a descriptive secondary data analysis including 168 men and 171 women post hip fracture. Using structural equation modeling, a measurement model of physical function which included grip strength, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and performance was tested for fit at 2 and 12 months post hip fracture, and among male and female participants. Validity of the measurement model of physical function was evaluated based on how well the model explained physical activity, exercise, and social activities post hip fracture. The measurement model of physical function fit the data. The amount of variance the model or individual factors of the model explained varied depending on the activity. Decisions about the ideal way in which to measure physical function should be based on outcomes considered and participants. The measurement model of physical function is a reliable and valid method to comprehensively measure physical function across the hip fracture recovery trajectory. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  4. Poly(ethylene-co-butylene) functionalized multi walled carbon nanotubes applied in polypropylene nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Marín, Jose Manuel Roman

    2012-01-01

    A novel functionalized multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was prepared through grafting with α-azido-poly(ethylene-co-butylene) (PEB-N3). The PEB-N3 was prepared through a two step procedure and grafted onto an industrial grade multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) through a highly efficient...

  5. Covalent functionalization of few-wall carbon nanotubes by ferrocene derivatives for bioelectrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allali, Naoual [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, UMR 7564 CNRS-Universite de Lorraine, 54602 Villers-les-Nancy (France); Laboratoire de Structure et Reactivite des Systemes Moleculaires Complexes, UMR 7565 CNRS-Universite de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleaa University of Technology, 97187 Luleaa (Sweden); Urbanova, Veronika; Waldbock, Jeremy; Etienne, Mathieu; Mallet, Martine; Walcarius, Alain; Dossot, Manuel [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, UMR 7564 CNRS-Universite de Lorraine, 54602 Villers-les-Nancy (France); Mamane, Victor; Fort, Yves [Laboratoire de Structure et Reactivite des Systemes Moleculaires Complexes, UMR 7565 CNRS-Universite de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Devaux, Xavier [Insitut Jean Lamour, Department P2M, UMR 7198 CNRS-Universite de Lorraine, Ecole des Mines, 54042 Nancy (France); Vigolo, Brigitte; McRae, Edward [Insitut Jean Lamour, Department CP2S, UMR 7198 CNRS-Universite de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Noel, Maxime [Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleaa University of Technology, 97187 Luleaa (Sweden); Soldatov, Alexander V. [Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleaa University of Technology, 97187 Luleaa (Sweden); Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The present work reports the covalent functionalization of few-wall CNTs (FWCNTs) by ferrocene derivatives to (i) improve their dispersion efficiency in water and (ii) graft electroactive chemical groups on their side-walls in order to promote electron transfer to biomolecules. The functionalized CNTs (f-CNTs) are used to modify a glassy carbon electrode and this modified electrode is used for oxidizing the cofactor NADH (dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Functional exercise capacity, lung function and chest wall deformity in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction The adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS causes changes on the compliance of the chest. These changes may be associated with impaired lung function and reduced functional exercise capacity of these adolescents. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between functional exercise capacity, lung function and geometry of the chest at different stages of AIS.Materials and methods The study was carried out in a cross-sectional design which were evaluated 27 AIS patients at different stages of the disease. For chest wall evaluation, were created geometry angles/distances (A/D, which were quantified by Software Postural Assessment. The functional exercise capacity was assessed by a portable gas analyzer during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT. Besides that, manovacuometry and spirometry were also performed.Results Linear regressions showed that oxygen uptake (peak VO2 was correlated with distance travelled in the ISWT (R2 = 0.52, maximal respiratory pressures, cough peak flow (R2 = 0.59 and some thoracic deformity markers (D1, D2 and A6.Discussion We observed that the chest wall alterations, lung function and respiratory muscle strength are related to the functional exercise capacity and may impair the physical activity performance in AIS patients.Final considerations There is correlation between functional exercise capacity, lung function and geometry of the chest in AIS patients. Our results point to the possible impact of the AIS in the physical activities of these adolescents. Therefore, efforts to prevent the disease progression are extremely important.

  7. 18 CFR 801.5 - Comprehensive plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comprehensive plan. 801... POLICIES § 801.5 Comprehensive plan. (a) The Compact requires that the Commission formulate and adopt a comprehensive plan for the immediate and long-range development and use of the water resources of the basin. (1...

  8. Extension of the Kohn-Sham formulation of density functional theory to finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonis, A.; Däne, M.

    2018-05-01

    Based on Mermin's extension of the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems to non-zero temperature, the Kohn-Sham formulation of density functional theory (KS-DFT) is generalized to finite temperature. We show that present formulations are inconsistent with Mermin's functional containing expressions, in particular describing the Coulomb energy, that defy derivation and are even in violation of rules of logical inference. More; current methodology is in violation of fundamental laws of both quantum and classical mechanics. Based on this feature, we demonstrate the impossibility of extending the KS formalism to finite temperature through the self-consistent solutions of the single-particle Schrödinger equation of T > 0. Guided by the form of Mermin's functional that depends on the eigenstates of a Hamiltonian, determined at T = 0, we base our extension of KS-DFT on the determination of the excited states of a non-interacting system at the zero of temperature. The resulting formulation is consistent with that of Mermin constructing the free energy at T > 0 in terms of the excited states of a non-interacting Hamiltonian (system) that, within the KS formalism, are described by Slater determinants. To determine the excited states at T = 0 use is made of the extension of the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems to excited states presented in previous work applied here to a non-interacting collection of replicas of a non-interacting N-particle system, whose ground state density is taken to match that of K non-interacting replicas of an interacting N-particle system at T = 0 . The formalism allows for an ever denser population of the excitation spectrum of a Hamiltonian, within the KS approximation. The form of the auxiliary potential, (Kohn-Sham potential), is formally identical to that in the ground state formalism with the contribution of the Coulomb energy provided by the derivative of the Coulomb energy in all excited states taken into account. Once the excited states are determined, the

  9. Microcanonical formulation of quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwazaki, A.

    1984-03-01

    A microcanonical formulation of Euclidean quantum field theories is presented. In the formulation, correlation functions are given by a microcanonical ensemble average of fields. Furthermore, the perturbative equivalence of the formulation and the standard functional formulation is proved and the equipartition low is derived in our formulation. (author)

  10. Formulation of disperse systems science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tadros, Tharwat F

    2014-01-01

    This book presents comprehensively the science and technology behind the formulation of disperse systems like emulsions, suspensions, foams and others. Starting with a general introduction, the book covers a broad range of topics like the role of different classes of surfactants, stability of disperse systems, formulation of different dispersions, evaluation of formulations and many more. Many examples are included, too. Written by the experienced author and editor Tharwart Tadros, this book is indispensable for every scientist working in the field.

  11. A Review of Double-Walled and Triple-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Fujisawa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs and TWNTs consist of coaxially-nested two and three single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs. They act as the geometrical bridge between SWNTs and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs, providing an ideal model for studying the coupling interactions between different shells in MWNTs. Within this context, this article comprehensively reviews various synthetic routes of DWNTs’ and TWNTs’ production, such as arc discharge, catalytic chemical vapor deposition and thermal annealing of pea pods (i.e., SWNTs encapsulating fullerenes. Their structural features, as well as promising applications and future perspectives are also discussed.

  12. Electrocatalytic oxidative determination of reserpine at electrochemically functionalized single walled carbon nanotube with polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, Riyaz Ahmad; Naikoo, Gowhar Ahmad; Pitre, Krishna Sadashive

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electrode oxidation mechanism of reserpine at PANI modified-SWCNT/CPE. -- Highlights: • Electropolymerization of polyaniline at SWCNT/CPE. • CV, EIS, CC SEM techniques were used for characterization of electrode. • Electrode showed electrocatalytic activity towards anodic oxidation of reserpine. • Oxidation process as irreversible and adsorption-controlled. • Reserpine in bark of Rauwolfia serpentina and in its pharmaceutical formulations. -- Abstract: In the present work a polyaniline film was successfully deposited by electropolymerization on single walled carbon nanotube paste electrode. The electrode was characterized using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, chronocoulometry and scanning electron microscopy. The modified electrode showed electrocatalytic behaviour towards the anodic oxidation of reserpine. The adsorptive stripping voltammetric behaviour of reserpine at polyaniline film modified single walled carbon nanotube paste electrode (modified-SWCNTPE) was investigated and validated in pharmaceuticals and biological fluids by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV) in 0.02 M phosphate buffer in the pH range of 2.5–8.5. Cyclic voltammetry has shown that the oxidation process is irreversible over the pH range studied and exhibited an adsorption-controlled behaviour. Further, the overall electrode process is mainly diffusion controlled with adsorption effects. The proposed more sensitive AdSDPV method allow quantitation over the range 0.085 μg mL −1 to 0.87 μg mL −1 with the detection limit of 0.407 ng mL −1 and has been successfully used to determine reserpine in bark of Rauwolfia serpentina and in its pharmaceutical formulations

  13. Dynamic loading of the structural wall in a lithium fall fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    In one version of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power reactor, the laser-imploded pellet is surrounded by a thick, annular 'waterfall' of liquid lithium. The fall has three functions: to breed tritium for pellet resupply, to act as an energy sink and heat exchange mdeium with an external power loop, and to protect the first wall of the reactor from excessive neutronic and hydrodynamic loading. Our primary concern here is with this last function. We formulated a simple model of a lithium-fall ICF reactor and calculated the fall disassembly and the subsequent fluid-wall interaction resulting from the energy deposition by the imploded pellet. Two potential mechanisms for wall damage were identified: surface erosion and hoop failure. For single fall designs, the erosion problem appears to be serious. Concentric annuli (multiple fall) or packed jet configurations may be feasible but experiments are needed to clarify the physical model, especially with reg (orig.)ard to /orig.the characteristics of the cavitated liquid lithium and of the two-phase liquid-vapor region.

  14. Fabrication of antibacterial PVA nanocomposite films containing dendritic polymer functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapalidis, Andreas; Sideratou, Zili; Panagiotaki, Katerina N.; Sakellis, Elias; Kouvelos, Evangelos P.; Papageorgiou, Sergios; Katsaros, Fotios

    2018-03-01

    A series of Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite films containing quaternized hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (PEI) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-CNTs@QPEI) are prepared by solvent casting technique. The modified carbon based material exhibits high aqueous solubility, due to the hydrophilic character of the functionalized hyperbranched dendritic polymer. The quaternized PEI successfully wraps around nanotube walls, as polycations provide electrostatic repulsion. Various contents of ox-CNTs@QPEI ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 % w/w were employed to prepare functionalized PVA nanocomposites. The developed films exhibit adequate optical transparency, improved mechanical properties and extremely high antibacterial behavior due to the excellent dispersion of the functionalized carbon nanotubes into the PVA matrix.

  15. Decay constants in soft wall AdS/QCD revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Nelson R.F., E-mail: braga@if.ufrj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Diles, Saulo, E-mail: smdiles@if.ufrj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Contreras, M.A. Martin, E-mail: ma.martin41@uniandes.edu.co [High Energy Group, Department of Physics, Universidad de los Andes, Carrera 1, No 18A-10, Bloque Ip, ZIP 111711, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-12-10

    Phenomenological AdS/QCD models, like hard wall and soft wall, provide hadronic mass spectra in reasonable consistency with experimental and (or) lattice results. These simple models are inspired in the AdS/CFT correspondence and assume that gauge/gravity duality holds in a scenario where conformal invariance is broken through the introduction of an energy scale. Another important property of hadrons: the decay constant, can also be obtained from these models. However, a consistent formulation of an AdS/QCD model that reproduces the observed behavior of decay constants of vector meson excited states is still lacking. In particular: for radially excited states of heavy vector mesons, the experimental data lead to decay constants that decrease with the radial excitation level. We show here that a modified framework of soft wall AdS/QCD involving an additional dimensionfull parameter, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, provides decay constants decreasing with radial excitation level. In this version of the soft wall model the two point function of gauge theory operators is calculated at a finite position of the anti-de Sitter space radial coordinate.

  16. Assessment of left ventricular wall motion and function by cross-sectional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akifumi; Hirata, Shunkichi; Ishikawa, Kyozo

    1982-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of cross-sectional echocardiography (CSE) was evaluated with M-mode echocardiography and radionuclide cardioangiography (RCG) in 50 cases including 30 patients with myocardial infarction. Segmental wall motion by CSE was highly correlated with segmental wall motion and left ventricular ejection fraction by RCG (r = 0.89 in the former, r = -0.84 in the latter). On the other hand, the left ventricular ejection fraction by M-mode echocardiography revealed a fairly well correlation with that by RCG ( r = 0.68). These results suggest that, as compared with RCG, CSE is quite useful in an evaluation of left ventricular function and in a detection of segmental wall motion abnormalities. (author)

  17. CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND NON-INVASIVE COMON CAROTID ARTERY WALL FUNCTIONAL INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection would entail an increase in certain blood biomarkers and active substances derived from activated inflammatory cells which could influence entire vascular endothelial function and deteriorate arterial wall stiffness. We propose that carotid wall functional indices measured with non-invasive ultrasound could we valuable markers of the subclinical cardiac allograft rejection. Aim. Our goal was to analyze the clinical utility of functional common carotid wall (CCW variables measured with high-resolution Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive screening tool for allograft rejection in cardiac transplant patients (pts. Methods. One hundred and seventy one pts included 93 cardiac recipients, 30 dilated cardiomyopathy waiting list pts, and 48 stable coronary artery disease (SCAD pts without decompensated heart failure were included. Along with resistive index (Ri, pulsative index (Pi, and CCW intima-media thickness (IMT, CCW rigidity index (iRIG was estimated using empirical equation. Non-invasive evaluation was performed in cardiac transplant recipients prior the endomyo- cardial biopsy. Results. Neither of Ri, Pi, or CCW IMT were different in studied subgroups. iRIG was signifi- cantly lower in SCAD pts when compared to the dilated cardiomyopathy subgroup. The later had similar values with cardiac transplant recipients without rejection. Antibody-mediated and cellular rejection were found in 22 (23.7% and 17 (18.3% cardiac recipients, respectively. Mean iRIG in pts without rejection was significantly lower in comparison to antibody-mediated rejection and cell-mediated (5514.7 ± 2404.0 vs 11856.1 ± 6643.5 and 16071.9 ± 10029.1 cm/sec2, respectively, p = 0.001. Area under ROC for iRIG was 0.90 ± 0.03 units2. Analysis showed that iRIG values above estimated treshold 7172 cm/sec2 suggested relative risk of any type of rejection 17.7 (95%CI = 6.3–49.9 sensitivity 80.5%, specificity – 81.1%, negative predictive value – 84

  18. The modified couple stress functionally graded Timoshenko beam formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghari, M.; Rahaeifard, M.; Kahrobaiyan, M.H.; Ahmadian, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a size-dependent formulation is presented for Timoshenko beams made of a functionally graded material (FGM). The formulation is developed on the basis of the modified couple stress theory. The modified couple stress theory is a non-classic continuum theory capable to capture the small-scale size effects in the mechanical behavior of structures. The beam properties are assumed to vary through the thickness of the beam. The governing differential equations of motion are derived for the proposed modified couple-stress FG Timoshenko beam. The generally valid closed-form analytic expressions are obtained for the static response parameters. As case studies, the static and free vibration of the new model are respectively investigated for FG cantilever and FG simply supported beams in which properties are varying according to a power law. The results indicate that modeling beams on the basis of the couple stress theory causes more stiffness than modeling based on the classical continuum theory, such that for beams with small thickness, a significant difference between the results of these two theories is observed.

  19. load-displacement and stability characteristics of tidn-walled beams

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    construction. Such structural ... The finite displacement formulation is used for load- displacement .... The other stress term, which is the incremental linear stress term a/ is .... formulation, only two out of the four general governing ..... 119, Paper. No. 2700 ... Deformations Spatial Buckling of Thin-Walled Beams and Frames ...

  20. Capillary condensation in pores with rough walls: a density functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, P; Rzysko, W; Malijevsky, Al; Sokołowski, S

    2007-09-01

    The effect of surface roughness of slit-like pore walls on the capillary condensation of a spherical particles and short chains is studied. The gas molecules interact with the substrate by a Lennard-Jones (9,3) potential. The rough layer at each pore wall has a variable thickness and density and consists of a disordered quenched matrix of spherical particles. The system is described in the framework of a density functional approach and using computer simulations. The contribution due to attractive van der Waals interactions between adsorbate molecules is described by using first-order mean spherical approximation and mean-field approximation.

  1. High-throughput mapping of cell-wall polymers within and between plants using novel microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; Sørensen, Iben; Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena

    2007-01-01

    We describe here a methodology that enables the occurrence of cell-wall glycans to be systematically mapped throughout plants in a semi-quantitative high-throughput fashion. The technique (comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, or CoMPP) integrates the sequential extraction of glycans from...... analysis of mutant and wild-type plants, as demonstrated here for the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants fra8, mur1 and mur3. CoMPP was also applied to Physcomitrella patens cell walls and was validated by carbohydrate linkage analysis. These data provide new insights into the structure and functions of plant...

  2. Conceptual design strategy for liquid-metal-wall inertial-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1981-02-01

    The liquid-metal-wall chamber has emerged as an attractive reactor concept for inertial fusion energy conversion. The principal feature of this concept is a thick, free-flowing blanket of liquid metal used to protect the structure of the reactor. The development and design of liquid-metal-wall chambers over the past decade provides a basis for formulating a conceptual design strategy for such chambers. Both the attractive and unattractive features of a LMW chamber are enumerated, and a design strategy is formulated which accommodates the engineering constraints while minimizing the liquid-metal flow rate

  3. Conceptual design strategy for liquid-metal-wall inertial-fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1981-02-01

    The liquid-metal-wall chamber has emerged as an attractive reactor concept for inertial fusion energy conversion. The principal feature of this concept is a thick, free-flowing blanket of liquid metal used to protect the structure of the reactor. The development and design of liquid-metal-wall chambers over the past decade provides a basis for formulating a conceptual design strategy for such chambers. Both the attractive and unattractive features of a LMW chamber are enumerated, and a design strategy is formulated which accommodates the engineering constraints while minimizing the liquid-metal flow rate.

  4. Scalar and joint velocity-scalar PDF modelling of near-wall turbulent heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozorski, Jacek; Waclawczyk, Marta; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The temperature field in a heated turbulent flow is considered as a dynamically passive scalar. The probability density function (PDF) method with down to the wall integration is explored and new modelling proposals are put forward, including the explicit account for the molecular transport terms. Two variants of the approach are considered: first, the scalar PDF method with the use of externally-provided turbulence statistics; and second, the joint (stand-alone) velocity-scalar PDF method where a near-wall model for dynamical variables is coupled with a model for temperature. The closure proposals are formulated in the Lagrangian setting and resulting stochastic evolution equations are solved with a Monte Carlo method. The near-wall region of a heated channel flow is taken as a validation case; the second-order thermal statistics are of a particular interest. The PDF computation results agree reasonably with available DNS data. The sensitivity of results to the molecular Prandtl number and to the thermal wall boundary condition is accounted for

  5. Fem Formulation for Heat and Mass Transfer in Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2017-08-01

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium can be modelled using three partial differential equations namely, momentum equation, energy equation and mass diffusion. These three equations are coupled to each other by some common terms that turn the whole phenomenon into a complex problem with inter-dependable variables. The current article describes the finite element formulation of heat and mass transfer in porous medium with respect to Cartesian coordinates. The problem under study is formulated into algebraic form of equations by using Galerkin's method with the help of two-node linear triangular element having three nodes. The domain is meshed with smaller sized elements near the wall region and bigger size away from walls.

  6. Amino Acid Functionalization of Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Effects of Dopants and Side Chains as Well as Zwitterionic Stabilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lisha; Zhu, Chang; Fu, Yujie; Yang, Gang

    2017-04-06

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is necessitated in a number of conditions such as drug delivery, and here amino acid functionalization of SWCNTs is conducted within the framework of density functional theory. Functionalization efficiencies of Gly are largely determined by dopants, as a combined effect of atomic radius, electronic configuration, and distortion to SWCNTs. Different functionalization sites in Gly have divergent interaction strengths with M/SWCNTs that decline as O b > N > O a , and this trend seems almost independent of the identity of metallic dopants. B/SWCNT behaves distinctly and prefers to the N site. Dopants affect principally interaction strengths, while amino acids regulate significantly both functionalization configurations and interaction energies. Then focus is given to stabilization of zwitterionic amino acids due to enhanced interactions with the widely used zwitterionic drugs. All metallic dopants render zwitterionic Gly to be the most stable, and side chains in amino acids rather than dopants in M/SWCNTs cause more pronounced effects to zwitterionic stabilizations. Charge transfers between amino acids and M/SWCNTs are closely associated with zwitterionic stabilization effects, and different charge transfer mechanisms between M/SWCNTs and metal ions are interpreted. Thus, this work provides a comprehensive understanding of amino acid functionalization of M/SWCNTs.

  7. Task-modulated activation and functional connectivity of the temporal and frontal areas during speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Q; Zhang, L; Xu, G; Shu, H; Li, P

    2013-05-01

    There is general consensus in the literature that a distributed network of temporal and frontal brain areas is involved in speech comprehension. However, how active versus passive tasks modulate the activation and the functional connectivity of the critical brain areas is not clearly understood. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify intelligibility and task-related effects in speech comprehension. Participants performed a semantic judgment task on normal and time-reversed sentences, or passively listened to the sentences without making an overt response. The subtraction analysis demonstrated that passive sentence comprehension mainly engaged brain areas in the left anterior and posterior superior temporal sulcus and middle temporal gyrus (aSTS/MTG and pSTS/MTG), whereas active sentence comprehension recruited bilateral frontal regions in addition to the aSTS/MTG and pSTS/MTG regions. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during passive sentence comprehension, the left aSTS/MTG was functionally connected with the left Heschl's gyrus (HG) and bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) but no area was functionally connected with the left pSTS/MTG; during active sentence comprehension, however, both the left aSTS/MTG and pSTS/MTG were functionally connected with bilateral superior temporal and inferior frontal areas. While these results are consistent with the view that the ventral stream of the temporo-frontal network subserves semantic processing, our findings further indicate that both the activation and the functional connectivity of the temporal and frontal areas are modulated by task demands. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnon specific heat and free energy of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes: Green's function approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou, E-mail: mbzfjerry2008@126.com [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China); Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhai, Liang-Jun [The School of Mathematics and Physics, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Hua, Ling-Ling [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of magnetic spin correlation on the thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are comprehensively investigated by use of the double-time Green's function method. The influence of temperature, spin quantum number, diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength and external magnetic field to internal energy, free energy, and magnon specific heat are carefully calculated. Compared to the mean field approximation, the consideration of the magnetic correlation effect significantly improves the internal energy values at finite temperature, while it does not so near zero temperature, and this effect is related to the diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength, and spin quantum number. The magnetic correlation effect lowers the internal energy at finite temperature. As a natural consequence of the reduction of the internal energy, the specific heat is reduced, and the free energy is elevated. - Highlights: • Magnon specific heat and free energy of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes (HFM-SWNTs) are investigated. • The magnetic correlations effect has a considerable contribution to the thermodynamics properties of HFM-SWNTs. • Magnetic correlation effects are always to lower the internal energy at finite temperature. • At Curie point, magnetic correlation energy is much less than zero. • The peak values of magnon specific heat curves rise and shift right towards higher temperatures with the diameter of tubes, the anisotropy strength, and the spin quantum number rising.

  9. Functional Anatomy of Listening and Reading Comprehension during Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Madison M.; Duke, Elizabeth S.; Mayo, Jessica; Rosenberger, Lisa R.; Moore, Erin N.; VanMeter, John; Ratner, Nan Bernstein; Vaidya, Chandan J.; Gaillard, William Davis

    2010-01-01

    Listening and reading comprehension of paragraph-length material are considered higher-order language skills fundamental to social and academic functioning. Using ecologically relevant language stimuli that were matched for difficulty according to developmental level, we analyze the effects of task, age, neuropsychological skills, and post-task…

  10. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  11. Wall Climbing Robot Using Electrostatic Adhesion Force Generated by Flexible Interdigital Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic adhesion technology has broad application prospects on wall climbing robots because of its unique characteristics compared with other types of adhesion technologies. A double tracked wall climbing robot based on electrostatic adhesion technology is presented including electrode panel design, mechanical structure design, power supply system design and control system design. A theoretical adhesion model was established and the electrostatic potential and field were expressed by series expansions in terms of solutions of the Laplace function. Based on this model, the electrostatic adhesion force was calculated using the Maxwell stress tensor formulation. Several important factors which may influence the electrostatic adhesion force were analysed and discussed by both FEM simulation and theoretical calculation. In addition, experiments on the adhesion performance of the electrode panel and the climbing performance of the robot on various wall materials were carried out. Both the simulation and experiment results verify the feasibility of electrostatic adhesion technology being applied on wall climbing robots. The theoretical model and calculation method for the electrostatic adhesion force proposed in this paper are also justified.

  12. Executive Functioning and Figurative Language Comprehension in Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Saied; Kaplan, Shani

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the research was to examine executive functioning and figurative language comprehension among students with learning disabilities as compared to students without learning disabilities. As part of the research, we examined 20 students with learning disabilities and 21 students with no learning disabilities, both groups of students…

  13. Implication of Formulation Strategies on the Bioavailability of Selected Plant-Derived Hepatoprotectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Ranjeet Prasad; Kala, Manika; Nivsarkar, Manish; Babu, R Jayachandra

    2017-01-01

    Plant-derived active ingredients with hepatoprotective activity have been used extensively in the treatment of various liver diseases. These compounds are used either in their natural form or the chemical constituents present therein serve as templates for the development of synthetic-based therapeutic entities. Current research interests are focused on formulation development and pharmacokinetic studies of herbal medicines. This article provides a comprehensive review on formulation influences on the preclinical/clinical pharmacokinetics of selected hepatoprotectants such as silymarin, curcumin, glycyrrhizin, andrographolide, phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, and picroside I and II. Both the formulation and pharmacokinetic factors could affect the target-site concentrations of the active herbal components and, thus, the therapeutic responses. This review contributes to the establishment of a comprehensive understanding of the influence of formulation/dosage form on the pharmacokinetic profile of the hepatoprotective compounds.

  14. A Systematic Approach to Strategy Formulation for Medium-Sized Shipyards

    OpenAIRE

    Ma'ruf, Buana

    2007-01-01

    A more comprehensive strategy formulation has an important role for sustainable competitive advantage of the shipbuilding companies in the global market. The nature of shipbuilding industry differs from general industry, therefore a strategy formulation model should be developed based on its own characteristics and business environment. This paper presents a proposed strategy formulation model for medium-sized shipyards both in business and corporate levels. A new approach was developed based...

  15. The structural and electronic properties of monovalent sidewall functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Jamali, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► (6,0)-(13,0) DWCNT, built from (6,0) and (13,0) SWCNTs, is a metallic nanotubes. ► NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) and COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) is semimetal and semiconductor, respectively. ► In NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) electrons transferred mainly from inner tube to NH 2 group. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of (6,0)-(13,0) double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) and monovalent sidewall functionalized DWCNTs with –NH 2 and –COOH groups were studied using density functional theory. The results show that pure (6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs are metallic. However, by functionalizing a DWCNT, local distortions are induced in the outer tube sidewall along the radial direction. The resulting structures, NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) and COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, exhibit significant structural changes, and are semimetal with no energy gap and semiconducting with a small energy gap, respectively. In NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, new electronic states are created and distributed on the outer wall and NH 2 group by electron transfer from the inner tube to the NH 2 group. In COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, new states are created and distributed on the inner wall, but there is insignificant charge transfer between the inner tube and the COOH group. These results confirm that local atomic structural distortion on DWCNTs caused by sidewall functionalization can modify the electronic structures of DWCNTs.

  16. Nonlinear analysis of composite thin-walled helicopter blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfon, J. P.; Rand, O.

    Nonlinear theoretical modeling of laminated thin-walled composite helicopter rotor blades is presented. The derivation is based on nonlinear geometry with a detailed treatment of the body loads in the axial direction which are induced by the rotation. While the in-plane warping is neglected, a three-dimensional generic out-of-plane warping distribution is included. The formulation may also handle varying thicknesses and mass distribution along the cross-sectional walls. The problem is solved by successive iterations in which a system of equations is constructed and solved for each cross-section. In this method, the differential equations in the spanwise directions are formulated and solved using a finite-differences scheme which allows simple adaptation of the spanwise discretization mesh during iterations.

  17. Elliptic blending model : A new near-wall Reynolds-stress turbulence closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manceau, R.; Hanjali?, K.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to modeling the effects of a solid wall in one-point second-moment (Reynolds-stress) turbulence closures is presented. The model is based on the relaxation of an inhomogeneous (near-wall) formulation of the pressure–strain tensor towards the chosen conventional homogeneous

  18. Comprehensive evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis cell wall-anchored proteins in early infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) approach to evaluate their contributions to virulence. Thirty-three predicted cell wall-anchored proteins were identified-a number much larger than those found in related species. The requirement of each cell wall-anchored protein for infective endocarditis was assessed in the rabbit model. It was found that no single cell wall-anchored protein was essential for the development of early infective endocarditis. STM screening was also employed for the evaluation of three predicted sortase transpeptidase enzymes, which mediate the cell surface presentation of cell wall-anchored proteins. The sortase A mutant exhibited a modest (approximately 2-fold) reduction in competitiveness, while the other two sortase mutants were indistinguishable from the parental strain. The combined results suggest that while cell wall-anchored proteins may play a role in S. sanguinis infective endocarditis, strategies designed to interfere with individual cell wall-anchored proteins or sortases would not be effective for disease prevention.

  19. Metatranscriptome Sequencing Reveals Insights into the Gene Expression and Functional Potential of Rumen Wall Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Mann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota of the rumen wall constitute an important niche of rumen microbial ecology and their composition has been elucidated in different ruminants during the last years. However, the knowledge about the function of rumen wall microbes is still limited. Rumen wall biopsies were taken from three fistulated dairy cows under a standard forage-based diet and after 4 weeks of high concentrate feeding inducing a subacute rumen acidosis (SARA. Extracted RNA was used for metatranscriptome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq sequencing technology. The gene expression of the rumen wall microbial community was analyzed by mapping 35 million sequences against the Kyoto Encyclopedia for Genes and Genomes (KEGG database and determining differentially expressed genes. A total of 1,607 functional features were assigned with high expression of genes involved in central metabolism, galactose, starch and sucrose metabolism. The glycogen phosphorylase (EC:2.4.1.1 which degrades (1->4-alpha-D-glucans was among the highest expressed genes being transcribed by 115 bacterial genera. Energy metabolism genes were also highly expressed, including the pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (EC:2.7.9.1 involved in pyruvate metabolism, which was covered by 177 genera. Nitrogen metabolism genes, in particular glutamate dehydrogenase (EC:1.4.1.4, glutamine synthetase (EC:6.3.1.2 and glutamate synthase (EC:1.4.1.13, EC:1.4.1.14 were also found to be highly expressed and prove rumen wall microbiota to be actively involved in providing host-relevant metabolites for exchange across the rumen wall. In addition, we found all four urease subunits (EC:3.5.1.5 transcribed by members of the genera Flavobacterium, Corynebacterium, Helicobacter, Clostridium, and Bacillus, and the dissimilatory sulfate reductase (EC 1.8.99.5 dsrABC, which is responsible for the reduction of sulfite to sulfide. We also provide in situ evidence for cellulose and cellobiose degradation, a key step in fiber-rich feed

  20. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04. The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75.Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone.

  1. On Green's function for 3-D wave-body interaction in a channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu

    1997-01-01

    series of images is evaluated accurately based on an asmptotic analysis. It is demonstrated that the Green's function has a square-root singular behaviour due to the side walls when the wave frequency approaches one of the resonant frequencies. The numerical results for the Green's function has a square......An analytical and numerical study is presented for efficient evaluation of the Green's function that satisfies the linear free surface condition and the non-penetration condition on the channel bottomand the side walls. the formulation is based on the open-sea green's function and the complete......-root singular behaviour due to the side walls when the wave frequency approaches one of the resonant frequencies. The numerical results for the Green's funciton presented in the present paper are believed to have an absolute accuracy of 10-5....

  2. The Development of Metaphor Comprehension and Its Relationship with Relational Verbal Reasoning and Executive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriedo, Nuria; Corral, Antonio; Montoro, Pedro R; Herrero, Laura; Ballestrino, Patricia; Sebastián, Iraia

    2016-01-01

    Our main objective was to analyse the different contributions of relational verbal reasoning (analogical and class inclusion) and executive functioning to metaphor comprehension across development. We postulated that both relational reasoning and executive functioning should predict individual and developmental differences. However, executive functioning would become increasingly involved when metaphor comprehension is highly demanding, either because of the metaphors' high difficulty (relatively novel metaphors in the absence of a context) or because of the individual's special processing difficulties, such as low levels of reading experience or low semantic knowledge. Three groups of participants, 11-year-olds, 15-year-olds and young adults, were assessed in different relational verbal reasoning tasks-analogical and class-inclusion-and in executive functioning tasks-updating information in working memory, inhibition, and shifting. The results revealed clear progress in metaphor comprehension between ages 11 and 15 and between ages 15 and 21. However, the importance of executive function in metaphor comprehension was evident by age 15 and was restricted to updating information in working memory and cognitive inhibition. Participants seemed to use two different strategies to interpret metaphors: relational verbal reasoning and executive functioning. This was clearly shown when comparing the performance of the "more efficient" participants in metaphor interpretation with that of the "less efficient" ones. Whereas in the first case none of the executive variables or those associated with relational verbal reasoning were significantly related to metaphor comprehension, in the latter case, both groups of variables had a clear predictor effect.

  3. Fabrication of Antibacterial Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Nanocomposite Films Containing Dendritic Polymer Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Sapalidis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA nanocomposite films containing quaternized hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (PEI functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-CNTs@QPEI are prepared by solvent casting technique. The modified carbon-based material exhibits high aqueous solubility, due to the hydrophilic character of the functionalized hyperbranched dendritic polymer. The quaternized PEI successfully wraps around nanotube walls as polycations provide electrostatic repulsion. Various contents of ox-CNTs@QPEI ranging from 0.05 to 1.0% w/w were employed to prepare functionalized PVA nanocomposites. The developed films exhibit adequate optical transparency, improved mechanical properties and extremely high antibacterial behavior due to the excellent dispersion of the functionalized CNTs into the PVA matrix.

  4. Wall modeled large eddy simulations of complex high Reynolds number flows with synthetic inlet turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Sunil; Tafti, Danesh

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Large eddy simulation. ► Wall layer modeling. ► Synthetic inlet turbulence. ► Swirl flows. - Abstract: Large eddy simulations of complex high Reynolds number flows are carried out with the near wall region being modeled with a zonal two layer model. A novel formulation for solving the turbulent boundary layer equation for the effective tangential velocity in a generalized co-ordinate system is presented and applied in the near wall zonal treatment. This formulation reduces the computational time in the inner layer significantly compared to the conventional two layer formulations present in the literature and is most suitable for complex geometries involving body fitted structured and unstructured meshes. The cost effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed wall model, used with the synthetic eddy method (SEM) to generate inlet turbulence, is investigated in turbulent channel flow, flow over a backward facing step, and confined swirling flows at moderately high Reynolds numbers. Predictions are compared with available DNS, experimental LDV data, as well as wall resolved LES. In all cases, there is at least an order of magnitude reduction in computational cost with no significant loss in prediction accuracy.

  5. The effect of functionalization on structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Cher Hon; Cervini, Raoul; Clarke, Stephen R.; Markovic, Milena Ginic; Matisons, Janis G.; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Huynh, Chi P.; Simon, George P.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of interest in many areas of nanotechnology and used in a number of novel applications. However effective dispersion remains a problem and one solution is to functionalize the nanotubes. Any functionalization that is undertaken must preferably not influence other key properties such as strength and electrical conductivity. In this work, multi-walled CNTs are functionalized for comparison, using a range of oxidative techniques, including thermal treatment, acid reflux, and dry UV-ozonolysis. The effects of these treatments on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and their electrical properties were characterized using a range of surface and compositional techniques. The electrical conductivity of MWCNTs was found to increase with functionalization in all cases, and dry UV-ozonolysis was shown to be the treatment technique which best increased conductivity, whilst at the same time maintaining the structural integrity of the nanotubes, even though the level of modification was less than by the other treatment methods.

  6. How storage and executive functions contribute to children's reading comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouwens, S.; Groen, M.A.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    In the current study we investigated the contribution of storage and separate measures of executive functions to reading comprehension in Dutch 5th graders, while controlling for word recognition and vocabulary. In addition we investigated the relationship between this model and working memory as

  7. The Development of Metaphor Comprehension and Its Relationship with Relational Verbal Reasoning and Executive Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Carriedo

    Full Text Available Our main objective was to analyse the different contributions of relational verbal reasoning (analogical and class inclusion and executive functioning to metaphor comprehension across development. We postulated that both relational reasoning and executive functioning should predict individual and developmental differences. However, executive functioning would become increasingly involved when metaphor comprehension is highly demanding, either because of the metaphors' high difficulty (relatively novel metaphors in the absence of a context or because of the individual's special processing difficulties, such as low levels of reading experience or low semantic knowledge. Three groups of participants, 11-year-olds, 15-year-olds and young adults, were assessed in different relational verbal reasoning tasks-analogical and class-inclusion-and in executive functioning tasks-updating information in working memory, inhibition, and shifting. The results revealed clear progress in metaphor comprehension between ages 11 and 15 and between ages 15 and 21. However, the importance of executive function in metaphor comprehension was evident by age 15 and was restricted to updating information in working memory and cognitive inhibition. Participants seemed to use two different strategies to interpret metaphors: relational verbal reasoning and executive functioning. This was clearly shown when comparing the performance of the "more efficient" participants in metaphor interpretation with that of the "less efficient" ones. Whereas in the first case none of the executive variables or those associated with relational verbal reasoning were significantly related to metaphor comprehension, in the latter case, both groups of variables had a clear predictor effect.

  8. Field theoretic perspectives of the Wigner function formulation of the chiral magnetic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Hou, De-fu; Ren, Hai-cang

    2017-11-01

    We assess the applicability of the Wigner function formulation in its present form to the chiral magnetic effect and note some issues regarding the conservation and the consistency of the electric current in the presence of an inhomogeneous and time-dependent axial chemical potential. The problems are rooted in the ultraviolet divergence of the underlying field theory associated with the axial anomaly and can be fixed with the Pauli-Villars regularization of the Wigner function. The chiral magnetic current with a nonconstant axial chemical potential is calculated with the regularized Wigner function and the phenomenological implications are discussed.

  9. Functional anatomy of listening and reading comprehension during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Madison M; Duke, Elizabeth S; Mayo, Jessica; Rosenberger, Lisa R; Moore, Erin N; VanMeter, John; Ratner, Nan Bernstein; Vaidya, Chandan J; Gaillard, William Davis

    2010-08-01

    Listening and reading comprehension of paragraph-length material are considered higher-order language skills fundamental to social and academic functioning. Using ecologically relevant language stimuli that were matched for difficulty according to developmental level, we analyze the effects of task, age, neuropsychological skills, and post-task performance on fMRI activation and hemispheric laterality. Areas of supramodal language processing are identified, with the most robust region being left-lateralized activation along the superior temporal sulcus. Functionally, this conjunction has a role in semantic and syntactic processing, leading us to refer to this conjunction as "comprehension cortex." Different from adults, supramodal areas for children include less extensive inferior frontal gyrus but more extensive right cerebellum and right temporal pole. Broader neuroanatomical pathways are recruited for reading, reflecting the more active processing and larger set of cognitive demands needed for reading compared to listening to stories. ROI analyses reveal that reading is a less lateralized language task than listening in inferior frontal and superior temporal areas, which likely reflects the difficulty of the task as children in this study are still developing their reading skills. For listening to stories, temporal activation is stable by age four with no correlations with age, neuropsychological skills or post-task performance. In contrast, frontal activation during listening to stories occurs more often in older children, and frontal activation is positively correlated with better performance on comprehension questions, suggesting that the activation of frontal networks may reflect greater integration and depth of story processing. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The functionalization and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Mohd Pauzi [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Center of Water Analysis and Research (ALIR), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Zulkepli, Siti Aminah [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Functionalization is the process of introducing chemical functional groups on the surface of the material. In this study, a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) was functionalized by oxidation treatment using concentrated nitric acid. The functionalized and pristine MWCNTs were analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns exhibit the graphitic properties for all samples. Besides, the XRD results also demonstrate that the percent of crystallinity of MWCNTs increases as the duration of acid treatment increases. The percent of crystallinity increases from 66% to 80% when the pristine MWCNT treated for 12 hours with additional 12 hours reflux process with nitric acid. The IR spectrum for the 12 hours-treated MWCNTs shows the formation of carboxyl functional group. Additional 12 hours reflux process with nitric acid on the 12 hours-treated MWCNTs have shown the loss of existing carboxyl group and only hydroxyl group formed.

  11. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths λ D (electron Debye length), ρ i (ion gyro-radius), and ℓ (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering λ D ≪ρ i ≪ℓ, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ε Dm (λ D /ρ i )→0 and ε mc (ρ i /ℓ)→0 (“asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits”), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS – MPS and MPS – DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ε Dm →0 and ε mc →0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the Bohm–Chodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities

  12. Ultrasound-aided formation of gold nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with mercaptobenzene moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gle; Lee, Kyung G; Lee, Seok Jae; Park, Tae Jung; Wi, Ringbok; Wang, Kye Won; Kim, Do Hyun

    2011-07-01

    A hybrid of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and gold nanoparticle (Au NP) was prepared under ultrasound irradiation. The approach starts with the functionalization of the walls of MWCNTs with mercaptobenzene moieties for the subsequent immobilization of Au NPs. From the Raman spectra, mercaptobenzene was proven to exist on the MWCNTs. Gold ions were added to the aqueous dispersion of functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs), and were reduced with the aid of ultrasound and ammonium hydroxide. The reduced gold nanoparticles were examined from the TEM images. Au NPs adhered specifically on the thiol groups of mercaptobenzene to be deposited uniformly on the outer walls of the f-MWCNTs. The application of ultrasound led to a high yield of MWCNT-Au nanocomposites and to the dense distribution of the Au NPs. Moreover, the synthesis reaction rate of the hybrid was considerably enhanced relative to synthesis with mechanical agitation. Through an adsorption test using gold-binding-peptide-(GBP)-modified biomolecules, the hybrid's potential for biological diagnosis was verified.

  13. MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness in COPD patients using a new method: correlations with pulmonary function tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achenbach, Tobias; Weinheimer, Oliver; Schmitt, Sabine; Freudenstein, Daniela; Kunz, Richard Peter; Dueber, Christoph; Biedermann, Alexander; Buhl, Roland; Goutham, Edula; Heussel, Claus Peter

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of airway-wall dimensions by computed tomography (CT) has proven to be a marker of airway-wall remodelling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. The objective was to correlate the wall thickness of large and small airways with functional parameters of airflow obstruction in COPD patients on multi-detector (MD) CT images using a new quantification procedure from a three-dimensional (3D) approach of the bronchial tree. In 31 patients (smokers/COPD, non-smokers/controls), we quantitatively assessed contiguous MDCT cross-sections reconstructed orthogonally along the airway axis, taking the point-spread function into account to circumvent over-estimation. Wall thickness and wall percentage were measured and the per-patient mean/median correlated with FEV1 and FEV1%. A median of 619 orthogonal airway locations was assessed per patient. Mean wall percentage/mean wall thickness/median wall thickness in non-smokers (29.6%/0.69 mm/0.37 mm) was significantly different from the COPD group (38.9%/0.83 mm/0.54 mm). Correlation coefficients (r) between FEV1 or FEV1% predicted and intra-individual means of the wall percentage were -0.569 and -0.560, respectively, with p<0.001. Depending on the parameter, they were increased for airways of 4 mm and smaller in total diameter, being -0.621 (FEV1) and -0.537 (FEV1%) with p < 0.002. The wall thickness was significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers. In COPD patients, the wall thickness measured as a mean for a given patient correlated with the values of FEV1 and FEV1% predicted. Correlation with FEV1 was higher when only small airways were considered. (orig.)

  14. Archaeologies of landscape : excavating the materialities of Hadrian's Wall.

    OpenAIRE

    Witcher, R. E.; Tolia-Kelly, Divya P.; Hingley, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article interrogates the materiality of Hadrian’s Wall beyond its widespread perception as a monument of/to Ancient Rome. Encounters with this monument have generated multitudinous materialities: hegemonic, conflicting and ambiguous. These trajectories have their own material circulations in both solid and narrative forms. Here, we consider materiality through the cultures inspired by/of the Wall. Through the formulation of an interdisciplinary methodology and praxis, we contribute to la...

  15. Comprehensive Evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis Cell Wall-Anchored Proteins in Early Infective Endocarditis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L.; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) approach to evaluate their contributions to virulence. Thirty-three predicted cell wall-anchored proteins were identified—a number much larger than those found in related species. The requirement of each cell wall-anchored protein for infective endocarditis was assessed in the rabbit model. It was found that no single cell wall-anchored protein was essential for the development of early infective endocarditis. STM screening was also employed for the evaluation of three predicted sortase transpeptidase enzymes, which mediate the cell surface presentation of cell wall-anchored proteins. The sortase A mutant exhibited a modest (∼2-fold) reduction in competitiveness, while the other two sortase mutants were indistinguishable from the parental strain. The combined results suggest that while cell wall-anchored proteins may play a role in S. sanguinis infective endocarditis, strategies designed to interfere with individual cell wall-anchored proteins or sortases would not be effective for disease prevention. PMID:19703977

  16. Design and evaluation of novel topical formulation with olive oil as natural functional active.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Ana Henriques; Silva, Catarina Oliveira; Nicolai, Marisa; Baby, André; Palma, Lídia; Rijo, Patrícia; Ascensão, Lia; Reis, Catarina Pinto

    2017-07-03

    Currently, the innovative skin research is focused on the development of novel topical formulations loaded with natural functional actives. The health benefits of olive oil are unsurpassed and many others are revealed as research studies allow the understanding of its unlimited properties. Olive oil has a protective toning effect on skin, but it is not transported effectively into its layers. Aiming the development of a cosmetic formulation for skin photoprotection and hydration, we have prepared and characterized macro-sized particles, made of a hydrogel polymer, loaded with olive oil. Alginate beads were uniform in shape, with minimal oil leakage, offering interesting prospects for encapsulation of lipophilic and poorly stable molecules, like olive oil. In vitro photoprotection and in vivo tolerance tests were in favor of this application. Thus, this study suggests that the incorporation of the olive oil-loaded particles into a cream formulation provides strong moisturizing properties and a photoprotective potential, when applied to healthy subjects.

  17. A comprehensive screening platform for aerosolizable protein formulations for intranasal and pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhm, Martina; Carle, Stefan; Maigler, Frank; Flamm, Johannes; Kramer, Viktoria; Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Schmid, Otmar; Schindowski, Katharina

    2017-10-30

    Aerosolized administration of biopharmaceuticals to the airways is a promising route for nasal and pulmonary drug delivery, but - in contrast to small molecules - little is known about the effects of aerosolization on safety and efficacy of biopharmaceuticals. Proteins are sensitive against aerosolization-associated shear stress. Tailored formulations can shield proteins and enhance permeation, but formulation development requires extensive screening approaches. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a cell-based in vitro technology platform that includes screening of protein quality after aerosolization and transepithelial permeation. For efficient screening, a previously published aerosolization-surrogate assay was used in a design of experiments approach to screen suitable formulations for an IgG and its antigen-binding fragment (Fab) as exemplary biopharmaceuticals. Efficient, dose-controlled aerosol-cell delivery was performed with the ALICE-CLOUD system containing RPMI 2650 epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface. We could demonstrate that our technology platform allows for rapid and efficient screening of formulations consisting of different excipients (here: arginine, cyclodextrin, polysorbate, sorbitol, and trehalose) to minimize aerosolization-induced protein aggregation and maximize permeation through an in vitro epithelial cell barrier. Formulations reduced aggregation of native Fab and IgG relative to vehicle up to 50% and enhanced transepithelial permeation rate up to 2.8-fold. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional Anatomy of Listening and Reading Comprehension during Development

    OpenAIRE

    Berl, Madison M.; Duke, Elizabeth S.; Mayo, Jessica; Rosenberger, Lisa R.; Moore, Erin N.; VanMeter, John; Ratner, Nan Bernstein; Vaidya, Chandan J.; Gaillard, William Davis

    2010-01-01

    Listening and reading comprehension of paragraph-length material are considered higher-order language skills fundamental to social and academic functioning. Using ecologically relevant language stimuli that were matched for difficulty according to developmental level, we analyze the effects of task, age, neuropsychological skills, and post-task performance on fMRI activation and hemispheric laterality. Areas of supramodal language processing are identified, with the most robust region being l...

  19. Cardiac functional mapping for thallium-201 myocardial perfusion, washout, wall motion and phase using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Mitsuru; Taki, Junichi; Tonami, Norihisa; Hisada, Kinichi; Hirano, Takako; Wani, Hidenobu.

    1986-01-01

    A method for three-dimensional functional mapping of Tl-201 myocardial uptake, washout, wall motion and phase was developed using SPECT. Each parameter was mapped using polar display in the same format. Normal values were determined in Tl-201 exercise study in 16 patients. Myocardial counts were lower in the septum and inferior wall and the difference of counts between anterior and inferior walls were greater in man compared with the perfusion pattern in woman. Washout was slower at septum and inferior wall in man, and slightly slower at inferior wall in woman. In gated blood-pool tomography, length-based and count-based Fourier analyses were applied to calculate the parameters of contraction and phase. The results of both Fourier analyses generally agreed; however, the area of abnormality was slightly different. Phase maps were useful for the assessment of asynergy as well as in patients with conduction disorders. These cardiac functional maps using SPECT were considered to be effective for the understanding of three-dimensional informations of cardiac function. (author)

  20. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF AMOXYCILLIN TRIHYDRATE

    OpenAIRE

    Marella Radhakrishna; K.G.Parthiban; Nelluri Ramarao; Nagapuri Santhoshi Deepika; Perumulla Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to formulate and evaluate balanced Floating Drug Delivery Systems as controlled release modules, which prolongs the release rate of the drugs. Amoxycillin is an anti- bacterial acts by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls. It inhibits cross-linkage between the linear peptidoglycan polymer chains that make up a major component of the cell walls of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Helicobacter pylori exists in the gastric mucous layer or ...

  1. Modeling of shear wall buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A K [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1984-05-01

    Many nuclear power plant buildings, for example, the auxiliary building, have reinforced concrete shear walls as the primary lateral load resisting system. Typically, these walls have low height to length ratio, often less than unity. Such walls exhibit marked shear lag phenomenon which would affect their bending stiffness and the overall stress distribution in the building. The deformation and the stress distribution in walls have been studied which is applicable to both the short and the tall buildings. The behavior of the wall is divided into two parts: the symmetric flange action and the antisymmetry web action. The latter has two parts: the web shear and the web bending. Appropriate stiffness equations have been derived for all the three actions. These actions can be synthesized to solve any nonlinear cross-section. Two specific problems, that of lateral and torsional loadings of a rectangular box, have been studied. It is found that in short buildings shear lag plays a very important role. Any beam type formulation which either ignores shear lag or includes it in an idealized form is likely to lead to erroneous results. On the other hand a rigidity type approach with some modifications to the standard procedures would yield nearly accurate answers.

  2. Enhancement of Palm Oil Extraction Using Cell Wall Degrading Enzyme Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvamany, H.; Jamaliah Md Jahim

    2015-01-01

    In this recent work, application of aqueous enzymatic process to enhance recovery of palm oil was studied. Experiments were carried out to investigate the structural carbohydrate composition of oil palm mesocarp (Elaeis guineensis) and to analyze the effect of different combination of enzymes on the palm oil recovery and degree of digestibility and the respective correlation. The optimum combination of enzymes comprising of Cellic CTec2 (X 1 ), Cellic HTec2 (X 2 ) and Pectinex Ultra SP-L (X 3 ) for Aqueous Enzymatic Oil Extraction Process (AEOEP), were determined using Simplex Lattice mixture design under fixed parameters. Maximum oil recovery of 88 % was achieved with ratio of enzymes at 0.46: 0.34: 0.2 (X 1 :X 2 :X 3 ), at enzyme loading of 30 mg protein/ 10 g substrate, substrate loading of 50 % w/v, pH 4.8, and 2 hours of incubation at 50 degree Celsius. The conversion of reducing sugar at corresponding condition was measured to evaluate the effectiveness of enzymes in degrading fruit cell wall releasing trapped oil. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to indicate the increase in cell wall disintegration leading to higher release of oil with enzymatic treatment. (author)

  3. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh eHaghighatpanah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube – polyethylene and single walled carbon nanotube – polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the single walled carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1% to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the single walled carbon nanotube wall.

  4. The analysis of thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotor with hierarchical warping functions and finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dechao; Deng, Zhongmin; Wang, Xingwei

    2001-08-01

    In the present paper, a series of hierarchical warping functions is developed to analyze the static and dynamic problems of thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotors composed of several layers with single closed cell. This method is the development and extension of the traditional constrained warping theory of thin walled metallic beams, which had been proved very successful since 1940s. The warping distribution along the perimeter of each layer is expanded into a series of successively corrective warping functions with the traditional warping function caused by free torsion or free bending as the first term, and is assumed to be piecewise linear along the thickness direction of layers. The governing equations are derived based upon the variational principle of minimum potential energy for static analysis and Rayleigh Quotient for free vibration analysis. Then the hierarchical finite element method is introduced to form a numerical algorithm. Both static and natural vibration problems of sample box beams are analyzed with the present method to show the main mechanical behavior of the thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotor.

  5. Functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes as template for water storage device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Sanjib; Taraphder, Srabani, E-mail: srabani@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2016-11-10

    Single walled carbon nanotubes, endohedrally functionalized with a protonated/unprotonated carboxylic acid group, are examined as potential templates for water storage using classical molecular dynamics simulation studies. Following a spontaneous entry of water molecules into the core of model functionalized carbon nanotubes (FCNTs), a large fraction of water molecules are found to be trapped inside FCNTs of lengths 50 and 100 Å. Only water molecules near the two open ends of the nanotube are exchanged with the bulk solvent. The residence times of water molecules inside FCNTs are investigated by varying the length of the tube, the length of suspended functional group and the protonation state of the carboxylic acid group. Favorable energetic interactions between the functional group and water, assisted by a substantial gain in rotational entropy, are found to compensate for the entropy loss resulting from restricted translational diffusion of trapped water molecules.

  6. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3je5 mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface. PMID:26729799

  7. Thermal effect on transverse vibrations of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y Q; Liu, X; Liu, G R

    2007-01-01

    Based on the theory of thermal elasticity mechanics, a double-elastic beam model is developed for transverse vibrations of double-walled carbon nanotubes with large aspect ratios. The thermal effect is incorporated in the formulation. With this double-elastic beam model, explicit expressions are derived for natural frequencies and associated amplitude ratios of the inner to the outer tubes for the case of simply supported double-walled carbon nanotubes. The influence of temperature change on the properties of transverse vibrations is discussed. It is demonstrated that some properties of transverse vibrations of double-walled carbon nanotubes are dependent on the change of temperature

  8. A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL FOR THE POWER TRANSFORMER DIGITAL DIFFERENTIAL PROTECTION FUNCTIONING RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Rumiantsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive model for the two-winding power transformer digital differential protection functioning research. Considered comprehensive model is developed in MatLab-Simulink dynamic simulation environment with the help of SimPowerSystems component library and includes the following elements: power supply, three-phase power transformer, wye-connected current transformers and two-winding power transformer digital differential protection model. Each element of the presented model is described in the degree sufficient for its implementation in the dynamic simulation environment. Particular attention is paid to the digital signal processing principles and to the ways of differential and restraining currents forming of the considered comprehensive model main element – power transformer digital differential protection. With the help of this model the power transformer digital differential protection functioning was researched during internal and external faults: internal short-circuit, external short-circuit with and without current transformers saturation on the power transformer low-voltage side. Each experiment is illustrated with differential and restraining currents waveforms of the digital differential protection under research. Particular attention was paid to the digital protection functioning analysis during power transformer abnormal modes: overexcitation and inrush current condition. Typical current waveforms during these modes were showed and their harmonic content was investigated. The causes of these modes were analyzed in details. Digital differential protection blocking algorithms based on the harmonic content were considered. Drawbacks of theses algorithms were observed and the need of their further technical improvement was marked.

  9. A novel way for detection of antiparkinsonism drug entacapone via electrodeposition of silver nanoparticles/functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as an amperometric sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghayeri, Mehdi, E-mail: m.baghayeri@hsu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hakim Sabzevari University, P.O. Box 397, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehrani, Maliheh Barazandeh [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amiri, Amirhassan; Maleki, Behrooz; Farhadi, Samaneh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hakim Sabzevari University, P.O. Box 397, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticles were electrochemically deposited on the film of a metformin functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode (Met-MWCNT/GCE), which fabricated an Ag@Met-MWCNT nanocomposite sensor (Ag@Met-MWCNT/GCE) to detect entacapone (ENT). The Ag@Met-MWCNT nanocomposite was characterized by field emission scanning electrochemical microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, FT-IR and electrochemical tests. The modified electrode showed a large electrocatalytic activity for reduction of ENT. This improved activity indicates that Met@MWCNT plays a crucial role in the dispersion and stabilization of Ag nanoparticles on GCE. Under the optimized conditions the linear range for the detection of the ENT was obtained to be 0.05 to 70.0 μM with a low detection limit of 15.3 nM. The proposed sensor can effectively analyse ENT concentration in pharmaceutical formulations and human urine samples, avoiding interference, and is a promising ENT sensor due to good sensitivity, stability and low cost. - Graphical abstract: Schematic graph for fabrication and application of sensor. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles were electrochemically deposited on the modified glassy carbon electrode. • The modified electrode showed a large electrocatalytic activity for reduction of entacapone. • The proposed sensor can effectively analyse entacapone concentration in pharmaceutical formulations and human urine samples.

  10. Formulation of invariant functional integrals and applications to the quantization of gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, L.C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Introducting a metrical structure into the Configuration Space of Quantum Field Theories with Infinite-Dimensional symetry group, a formulation of Invariant Functional Integrals suitable for their quantization, is obtained. It is apllied to Gauge Theories of Yang-Mills and Polyakov's Bosonic String; obtaining several new facts about them, as well as reproducing some well known results. By following the general idea of invariant functional measures; a fermionic (chiral) change of variables in the fermionic sector of two-dimensional massless Quantum-Chromodynamics is implemented obtaining by the first time, a pure gluonic effective action for the model. In adittion, the complete solution for the Rothe-Stamatesu Model, is obtained. (author) [pt

  11. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2009-12-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of (n,n)@(11,11) double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our calculations reveal the existence of an energetically favorable double-walled nanotube whose interwall distance is about 4.3 Å. Interwall spacing and curvature difference are found to be essential for the electronic states around the Fermi level.

  12. A comprehensive approach to formulation of seaweed-enriched meat products: From technological development to assessment of healthy properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofrades, S; Benedí, J; Garcimartin, A; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Jimenez-Colmenero, F

    2017-09-01

    Meat consumption is influenced by various kinds of factors, among them health implications. Different strategies can be effective in developing meat-based functional foods. These basically entail reducing the presence of compounds with negative health implications and enhancing the presence of beneficial compounds. This article reviews a comprehensive model for the development of meat-based functional foods based on a presentation of the research achieved in terms of the design and development of qualitatively and quantitatively modified meat products (frankfurters, patties and restructured steaks). These were reformulated to incorporate nutrients associated with three different seaweeds (wakame-Undaria pinnatifida; nori-Porphyra umbilicalis; and sea spaghetti-Himanthalia elongata) as sources of bioactive substances, while simultaneously reducing sodium and fat and improving fatty acid profiles. Those seaweeds were chosen, because in terms of composition and health implications, abundance on Spanish coasts, relatively widespread consumption, and suitability in terms of flavour and colour they are better suited than others for use as ingredients in new products. It also discusses the consequences of the use of this type of meat-based functional foods (combination of pork meat and 5% of each seaweed with or without hypercholesterolaemic agent included in the diets) on growing animals (Wistar male rats), and their effects on different aspects of lipoprotein metabolism, oxidative stress and liver structure. This article, then, reports a comprehensive approach to the production of seaweed-enriched meat products, considering aspects of technological development aimed at achieving the functional effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The potential impact of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes on trypsin: A Comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Noordadi

    Full Text Available In this study, we report a detailed experimental, binding free energy calculation and molecular dynamics (MD simulation investigation of the interactions of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-f-MWCNTs with porcine trypsin (pTry. The enzyme exhibits decreased thermostability at 330K in the presence of COOH-f-MWCNTs. Furthermore, the activity of pTry also decreases in the presence of COOH-f-MWCNTs. The restricted diffusion of the substrate to the active site of the enzyme was observed in the experiment. The MD simulation analysis suggested that this could be because of the blocking of the S1 pocket of pTry, which plays a vital role in the substrate selectivity. The intrinsic fluorescence of pTry is quenched with increase in the COOH-f-MWCNTs concentration. Circular dichroism (CD and UV-visible absorption spectroscopies indicate the ability of COOH-f-MWCNTs to experience conformational change in the native structure of the enzyme. The binding free energy calculations also show that electrostatics, π-cation, and π-π stacking interactions play important roles in the binding of the carboxylated CNTs with pTry. The MD simulation results demonstrated that the carboxylated CNTs adsorb to the enzyme stronger than the CNT without the-COOH groups. Our observations can provide an example of the nanoscale toxicity of COOH-f-MWCNTs for proteins, which is a critical issue for in vivo application of COOH-f-MWCNTs.

  14. Prospective randomized controlled intervention trial: Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Improves Cardiac autonomic functions and Quality of life in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To assess the effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Program on glycemic control, quality of life, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 120 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes (n = 56 and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program (n = 64. Standard therapy included advice on diet, walk, and oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was an interactive session in which Sudarshan kriya yoga, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam was taught under guidance of a certified teacher. Change in fasting, post prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin, and quality of life were assessed. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and six months after intervention. Results: There was significant improvement in psychological (P = 0.006 and social domains (P = 0.04 and total quality of life (P = 0.02 in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared to the group following standard therapy alone. In the group following breathing program, the improvement in sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions was statistically significant (P = 0.01, while the change in the standard group was not significant (P = 0.17. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P = 0.07. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P = 0.76. The parameters of glycemic control were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in quality of life and cardiac autonomic functions in the diabetes patients practicing comprehensive yogic breathing

  15. Reinforcement mechanism of multi-anchor wall with double wall facing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kouta; Kobayashi, Makoto; Miura, Kinya; Konami, Takeharu; Hayashi, Taketo

    2017-10-01

    The reinforced soil wall has high seismic performance as generally known. However, the seismic behavior has not been clarified accurately yet, especially on multi-anchor wall with double wall facing. Indefinite behavior of reinforced soil wall during earthquake make us complicated in case with adopting to the abutment, because of arrangement of anchor plate as reinforcement often different according to the width of roads. In this study, a series of centrifuge model tests were carried out to investigate the reinforcement mechanism of multi anchor wall with double wall facing from the perspective of the vertical earth pressure. Several types of reinforce arrangement and rigid wall were applied in order to verify the arch function in the reinforced regions. The test results show unique behavior of vertical earth pressure, which was affected by arch action. All the vertical earth pressure placed behind facing panel, are larger than that of middle part between facing panel despite of friction between backfill and facing panel. Similar results were obtained in case using rigid wall. On the other hands, the vertical earth pressure, which were measured at the 3cm high from bottom of model container, shows larger than that of bottom. This results show the existence of arch action between double walls. In addition, it implies that the wall facing of such soil structure confined the backfill as pseudo wall, which is very reason that the multi anchor wall with double wall facing has high seismic performance.

  16. The multifacet graphically contracted function method. I. Formulation and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, Ron; Brozell, Scott R.; Gidofalvi, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    The basic formulation for the multifacet generalization of the graphically contracted function (MFGCF) electronic structure method is presented. The analysis includes the discussion of linear dependency and redundancy of the arc factor parameters, the computation of reduced density matrices, Hamiltonian matrix construction, spin-density matrix construction, the computation of optimization gradients for single-state and state-averaged calculations, graphical wave function analysis, and the efficient computation of configuration state function and Slater determinant expansion coefficients. Timings are given for Hamiltonian matrix element and analytic optimization gradient computations for a range of model problems for full-CI Shavitt graphs, and it is observed that both the energy and the gradient computation scale as O(N 2 n 4 ) for N electrons and n orbitals. The important arithmetic operations are within dense matrix-matrix product computational kernels, resulting in a computationally efficient procedure. An initial implementation of the method is used to present applications to several challenging chemical systems, including N 2 dissociation, cubic H 8 dissociation, the symmetric dissociation of H 2 O, and the insertion of Be into H 2 . The results are compared to the exact full-CI values and also to those of the previous single-facet GCF expansion form

  17. The multifacet graphically contracted function method. I. Formulation and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Ron; Gidofalvi, Gergely; Brozell, Scott R.

    2014-08-01

    The basic formulation for the multifacet generalization of the graphically contracted function (MFGCF) electronic structure method is presented. The analysis includes the discussion of linear dependency and redundancy of the arc factor parameters, the computation of reduced density matrices, Hamiltonian matrix construction, spin-density matrix construction, the computation of optimization gradients for single-state and state-averaged calculations, graphical wave function analysis, and the efficient computation of configuration state function and Slater determinant expansion coefficients. Timings are given for Hamiltonian matrix element and analytic optimization gradient computations for a range of model problems for full-CI Shavitt graphs, and it is observed that both the energy and the gradient computation scale as O(N2n4) for N electrons and n orbitals. The important arithmetic operations are within dense matrix-matrix product computational kernels, resulting in a computationally efficient procedure. An initial implementation of the method is used to present applications to several challenging chemical systems, including N2 dissociation, cubic H8 dissociation, the symmetric dissociation of H2O, and the insertion of Be into H2. The results are compared to the exact full-CI values and also to those of the previous single-facet GCF expansion form.

  18. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Michael H; Holman, Tara J; Sørensen, Iben

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell wall composition is important for regulating growth rates, especially in roots. However, neither analyses of cell wall composition nor transcriptomes on their own can comprehensively reveal which genes and processes are mediating growth and cell elongation rates. This study reveals...... the benefits of carrying out multiple analyses in combination. Sections of roots from five anatomically and functionally defined zones in Arabidopsis thaliana were prepared and divided into three biological replicates. We used glycan microarrays and antibodies to identify the major classes of glycans......)cellular localization of many epitopes. Extensins were localized in epidermal and cortex cell walls, while AGP glycans were specific to different tissues from root-hair cells to the stele. The transcriptome analysis found several gene families peaking in the REZ. These included a large family of peroxidases (which...

  19. Near-Wall Turbulence Modelling of Rotating and Curved Shear Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Bjoern Anders

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with verification and refinement of turbulence models within the framework of the Reynolds-averaged approach. It pays special attention to modelling the near-wall region, where the turbulence is strongly non-homogeneous and anisotropic. It also studies in detail the effects associated with an imposed rotation of the reference frame or streamline curvature. The objective with near-wall turbulence closure modelling is to formulate a set of equations governing single point turbulence statistics, which can be solved in the region of the flow which extends to the wall. This is in contrast to the commonly adopted wall-function approach in which the wall-boundary conditions are replaced by matching conditions in the logarithmic region. The near-wall models allow more flexibility by not requiring any such universal behaviour. Assessment of the novel elliptic relaxation approach to model the proximity of a solid boundary reveals an encouraging potential used in conjunction with second-moment and eddy-viscosity closures. The most natural level of closure modelling to predict flows affected by streamline curvatures or an imposed rotation of the reference frame is at the second-moment closure (SMC) level. Although SMCs naturally accounts for the effects of system rotation, the usual application of a scalar dissipation rate equation is shown to require ad hoc corrections in some cases in order to give good results. The elliptic relaxation approach is also used in conjunction with non-linear pressure-strain models and very encouraging results are obtained for rotating flows. Rotational induced secondary motions are vital to predicting the effects of system rotation. Some severe weaknesses of non-linear pressure-strain models are also indicated. Finally, a modelling methodology for anisotropic dissipation in nearly homogeneous turbulence are proposed. 84 refs., 56 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Experimental study of the leakage rate through cracked reinforced concrete wall elements for defining the functional failure criteria of containment buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Cho, Nam So

    2004-01-01

    Containment buildings in nuclear power plants should maintain their structural safety as well as their functional integrity during an operation period. To maintain the functional integrity, the wall and dome of the containment buildings have to maintain their air tightness under extreme loading conditions such as earthquakes, missile impact, and severe accidents. For evaluating the functional failure of containments, it is important to predict the leak amount through cracked concrete walls. The leakage through concrete cracks has been studied since 1972. Buss examined the flow rate of air through a pre-existing crack in a slab under air pressure. Rizkalla el al. initiated an experimental study for the leakage of prestressed concrete building segments under uniaxial and biaxial loadings to simulate the loading condition of containment buildings under an internal pressure. Recently, Salmon el al. initiated an experimental program for determining the leak rates in typical reinforced concrete shear walls subjected to beyond design basis earthquakes. This study investigates the cracking behavior of reinforced concrete containment wall elements under a uniaxial tension and addresses the outline of the leakage test for unlined containment wall elements

  1. A conceptual design strategy for liquid-metal-wall inertial fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The liquid-metal-wall chamber has emerged as an attractive reactor concept for inertial fusion energy conversion. The principal feature of this concept is a thick, free-flowing blanket of liquid metal used to protect the structure of the reactor. The development and design of liquid-metal-wall chambers over the past decade are reviewed from the perspective of formulating a conceptual design strategy for such chambers. The basis for the design strategy is set by enumerating both the attractive and unattractive features of a LMW chamber. Past concepts are then reviewed to identify conceptual design approaches and physical configurations that enhance the positive aspects and minimize the negative aspects. A detailed description of the engineering considerations is given, including such topics as the selection of a liquid metal, control of radiation damage, selection of structural material, control of tritium breeding and extraction, control of wall stress, and designing for a given rep-rate. Finally, a design strategy is formulated which accomodates the engineering constraints while minimizing the liquid-metal flow rate. (orig.)

  2. Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhichao; Han, Shuang; Wang, Chao; Li, Jianping; Xu, Guobao

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of the global economy and population, the demand for energy is increasing sharply. The development of environmentally a benign and reliable energy supply is very important and urgent. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), which have a horn-shaped tip at the top of single-walled nanotube, have emerged as exceptionally promising nanomaterials due to their unique physical and chemical properties since 1999. The high purity and thermal stability, combined with microporosity and mesoporosity, high surface area, internal pore accessibility, and multiform functionalization make SWCNHs promising candidates in many applications, such as environment restoration, gas storage, catalyst support or catalyst, electrochemical biosensors, drug carrier systems, magnetic resonance analysis and so on. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of SWCNHs in energy applications, including energy conversion and storage. The commonly adopted method to access SWCNHs, their structural modifications, and their basic properties are included, and the emphasis is on their application in different devices such as fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, Li-S batteries, hydrogen storage, biofuel cells and so forth. Finally, a perspective on SWCNHs’ application in energy is presented. PMID:28347092

  3. Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the growth of the global economy and population, the demand for energy is increasing sharply. The development of environmentally a benign and reliable energy supply is very important and urgent. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs, which have a horn-shaped tip at the top of single-walled nanotube, have emerged as exceptionally promising nanomaterials due to their unique physical and chemical properties since 1999. The high purity and thermal stability, combined with microporosity and mesoporosity, high surface area, internal pore accessibility, and multiform functionalization make SWCNHs promising candidates in many applications, such as environment restoration, gas storage, catalyst support or catalyst, electrochemical biosensors, drug carrier systems, magnetic resonance analysis and so on. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of SWCNHs in energy applications, including energy conversion and storage. The commonly adopted method to access SWCNHs, their structural modifications, and their basic properties are included, and the emphasis is on their application in different devices such as fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, Li-S batteries, hydrogen storage, biofuel cells and so forth. Finally, a perspective on SWCNHs’ application in energy is presented.

  4. Geotechnical Failure of a Concrete Crown Wall on a Rubble Mound Breakwater Considering Sliding Failure and Rupture Failure of Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiani, E.; Burcharth, H. F.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1995-01-01

    Sliding and rupture failure in the rubble mound are considered in this paper. In order to describe these failure modes the wave breaking forces have to be accounted for. Wave breaking forces on a crown wall are determined from Burcharth's wave force formula Burcharth (1992). Overtopping rates...... are calculated for a given design by Bradbury et al. (1988a,b) and compared to acceptable overtopping rates, prior to a determininstic design. The method of foundation stability analysis is presented by the example of a translation slip failure involving kinematically correct slip surfaces and failure zones...... in friction based soil. Rupture failure modes for a crown wall with a plane base and a crown wall with an extended leg on the seaward side will be formulated. The failure modes are described by limit state functions. This allows a deterministic analysis to be performed....

  5. Ultimate limit state design of sheet pile walls by finite elements and nonlinear programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Sven

    2005-01-01

    The design of sheet pile walls by lower bound limit analysis is considered. The design problem involves the determination of the necessary yield moment of the wall, the wall depth and the anchor force such that the structure is able to sustain the given loads. This problem is formulated...... as a nonlinear programming problem where the yield moment of the wall is minimized subject to equilibrium and yield conditions. The finite element discretization used enables exact fulfillment of these conditions and thus, according to the lower bound theorem, the solutions are safe....

  6. Limited transport of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in two natural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasel, Daniela; Bradford, Scott A.; Šimůnek, Jiří; Pütz, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry; Klumpp, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Column experiments were conducted in undisturbed and in repacked soil columns at water contents close to saturation (85–96%) to investigate the transport and retention of functionalized 14 C-labeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in two natural soils. Additionally, a field lysimeter experiment was performed to provide long-term information at a larger scale. In all experiments, no breakthrough of MWCNTs was detectable and more than 85% of the applied radioactivity was recovered in the soil profiles. The retention profiles exhibited a hyper-exponential shape with greater retention near the column or lysimeter inlet and were successfully simulated using a numerical model that accounted for depth-dependent retention. In conclusion, results indicated that the soils acted as a strong sink for MWCNTs. Little transport of MWCNTs is therefore likely to occur in the vadose zone, and this implies limited potential for groundwater contamination in the investigated soils. -- Highlights: •Investigation of undisturbed soil columns and lysimeter. •Transport experiments under water-unsaturated conditions. •Retention profiles were measured and numerically modeled. •Complete retention of MWCNT in undisturbed and repacked soil columns. -- In undisturbed columns and a lysimeter study, complete retention of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes was found in two soils at environmentally relevant conditions

  7. Multi-level nonlinear modeling verification scheme of RC high-rise wall buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Alwaeli, W.; Mwafy, A.; Pilakoutas, K.; Guadagnini, M.

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake-resistant reinforced concrete (RC) high-rise wall buildings are designed and detailed to respond well beyond the elastic range under the expected earthquake ground motions. However, despite their considerable section depth, in terms of analysis, RC walls are still often treated as linear elements, ignoring the effect of deformation compatibility. Due to the limited number of available comprehensive experimental studies on RC structural wall systems subjected to cycling loading, few...

  8. Axial U(1) current in Grabowska and Kaplan's formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yu; Kawai, Hikaru

    2017-06-01

    Recently, Grabowska and Kaplan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 211602 (2016); Phys. Rev. D 94, 114504 (2016)] suggested a nonperturbative formulation of a chiral gauge theory, which consists of the conventional domain-wall fermion and a gauge field that evolves by gradient flow from one domain wall to the other. We introduce two sets of domain-wall fermions belonging to complex conjugate representations so that the effective theory is a 4D vector-like gauge theory. Then, as a natural definition of the axial-vector current, we consider a current that generates simultaneous phase transformations for the massless modes in 4 dimensions. However, this current is exactly conserved and does not reproduce the correct anomaly. In order to investigate this point precisely, we consider the mechanism of the conservation. We find that this current includes not only the axial current on the domain wall but also a contribution from the bulk, which is nonlocal in the sense of 4D fields. Therefore, the local current is obtained by subtracting the bulk contribution from it.

  9. Determining the sub-cellular localization of proteins within Caenorhabditis elegans body wall muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Barbara; Rogalski, Teresa; Viveiros, Ryan; Warner, Adam; Plastino, Lorena; Lorch, Adam; Granger, Laure; Segalat, Laurent; Moerman, Donald G

    2011-01-01

    Determining the sub-cellular localization of a protein within a cell is often an essential step towards understanding its function. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the relatively large size of the body wall muscle cells and the exquisite organization of their sarcomeres offer an opportunity to identify the precise position of proteins within cell substructures. Our goal in this study is to generate a comprehensive "localizome" for C. elegans body wall muscle by GFP-tagging proteins expressed in muscle and determining their location within the cell. For this project, we focused on proteins that we know are expressed in muscle and are orthologs or at least homologs of human proteins. To date we have analyzed the expression of about 227 GFP-tagged proteins that show localized expression in the body wall muscle of this nematode (e.g. dense bodies, M-lines, myofilaments, mitochondria, cell membrane, nucleus or nucleolus). For most proteins analyzed in this study no prior data on sub-cellular localization was available. In addition to discrete sub-cellular localization we observe overlapping patterns of localization including the presence of a protein in the dense body and the nucleus, or the dense body and the M-lines. In total we discern more than 14 sub-cellular localization patterns within nematode body wall muscle. The localization of this large set of proteins within a muscle cell will serve as an invaluable resource in our investigation of muscle sarcomere assembly and function.

  10. Mechanistic formulation of a lineal-quadratic-linear (LQL) model: Split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Mariana; Carlone, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In recent years, several models were proposed that modify the standard linear-quadratic (LQ) model to make the predicted survival curve linear at high doses. Most of these models are purely phenomenological and can only be applied in the particular case of acute doses per fraction. The authors consider a mechanistic formulation of a linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model in the case of split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources. This model provides a comprehensive description of radiation response for arbitrary dose rate and fractionation with only one additional parameter. Methods: The authors use a compartmental formulation of the LQL model from the literature. They analytically solve the model's differential equations for the case of a split-dose experiment and for an exponentially decaying source. They compare the solutions of the survival fraction with the standard LQ equations and with the lethal-potentially lethal (LPL) model. Results: In the case of the split-dose experiment, the LQL model predicts a recovery ratio as a function of dose per fraction that deviates from the square law of the standard LQ. The survival fraction as a function of time between fractions follows a similar exponential law as the LQ but adds a multiplicative factor to the LQ parameter β. The LQL solution for the split-dose experiment is very close to the LPL prediction. For the decaying source, the differences between the LQL and the LQ solutions are negligible when the half-life of the source is much larger than the characteristic repair time, which is the clinically relevant case. Conclusions: The compartmental formulation of the LQL model can be used for arbitrary dose rates and provides a comprehensive description of dose response. When the survival fraction for acute doses is linear for high dose, a deviation of the square law formula of the recovery ratio for split doses is also predicted.

  11. Poloidal variations in toroidal fusion reactor wall power loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    A geometric formulation is developed by the authors for determining poloidal variations in bremmstrahlung, cyclotron radiation, and neutron wall power loadings in toroidal fusion devices. Assuming toroidal symmetry and utilizing a numerical model which partitions the plasma into small cells, it was generally found that power loadings are highest on the outer surface of the torus, although variations are not as large as some have predicted. Results are presented for various plasma power generation configurations, plasma volume fractions, and toroidal aspect ratios, and include plasma and wall blockage effects

  12. Neural correlates and network connectivity underlying narrative production and comprehension: a combined fMRI and PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdulSabur, Nuria Y; Xu, Yisheng; Liu, Siyuan; Chow, Ho Ming; Baxter, Miranda; Carson, Jessica; Braun, Allen R

    2014-08-01

    The neural correlates of narrative production and comprehension remain poorly understood. Here, using positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), contrast and functional network connectivity analyses we comprehensively characterize the neural mechanisms underlying these complex behaviors. Eighteen healthy subjects told and listened to fictional stories during scanning. In addition to traditional language areas (e.g., left inferior frontal and posterior middle temporal gyri), both narrative production and comprehension engaged regions associated with mentalizing and situation model construction (e.g., dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, precuneus and inferior parietal lobules) as well as neocortical premotor areas, such as the pre-supplementary motor area and left dorsal premotor cortex. Narrative comprehension alone showed marked bilaterality, activating right hemisphere homologs of perisylvian language areas. Narrative production remained predominantly left lateralized, uniquely activating executive and motor-related regions essential to language formulation and articulation. Connectivity analyses revealed strong associations between language areas and the superior and middle temporal gyri during both tasks. However, only during storytelling were these same language-related regions connected to cortical and subcortical motor regions. In contrast, during story comprehension alone, they were strongly linked to regions supporting mentalizing. Thus, when employed in a more complex, ecologically-valid context, language production and comprehension show both overlapping and idiosyncratic patterns of activation and functional connectivity. Importantly, in each case the language system is integrated with regions that support other cognitive and sensorimotor domains. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Functional Movement Screen (FMS - kompleksowy system oceny funkcjonalnej pacjenta = Functional Movement Screen (FMS - a comprehensive system for the functional evaluation of the patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Kochański

    2015-04-01

    4 Wydział Kultury Fizycznej, Zdrowia i Turystyki, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego w Bydgoszczy, Polska   Streszczenie   System oceny funkcjonalnej - Functional Movement Screen (FMS został stworzony przez Graya Cooka oraz Lee Burtona w 1995 roku. FMS jest koncepcją, która umożliwia kompleksową analizę jakości podstawowych wzorców ruchowych, ocenę ryzyka kontuzji oraz stwierdzenie istnienia ograniczeń i asymetrii. Test FMS złożony jest z 7 prób (głęboki przysiad, przeniesienie kończyny dolnej nad płotkiem, przysiad w wykroku, ruchomość obręczy barkowej, aktywne uniesienie wyprostowanej kończyny dolnej, ugięcie ramion w podporze, stabilność rotacyjna tułowia. W pracy zaprezentowano test Functional Movement Screen, jako kompleksowy system oceny funkcjonalnej pacjenta.   Słowa kluczowe: Functional Movement Screen, FMS, ocena funkcjonalna, rehabilitacja.   Abstract   Functional Movement Screen (FMS was created by Gray Cook and Lee Burton in 1995. FMS is a concept that allows comprehensive analysis of the quality of basic movement patterns, risk assessment and finding of injury to the limitations and asymmetries. FMS test consists of 7 samples (deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability push up, rotational stability. The paper presents the Functional Movement Screen test, as a comprehensive system of functional assessment of the patient.   Key words: Functional Movement Screen, FMS, functional assessment, rehabilitation.

  14. Stability of a pinned magnetic domain wall as a function of its internal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaigne, F.; Duluard, A.; Briones, J.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (France); Childress, J. R. [HGST San Jose Research Center, 3403 Yerba Buena Rd, San Jose, California 95135 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    It is shown that there are many stable configurations for a domain wall pinned by a notch along a magnetic stripe. The stability of several of these configurations is investigated numerically as a function of the thickness of the magnetic film. The depinning mechanism depends on the structure of the domain wall and on the thickness of the magnetic film. In the case of a spin-valve structure, it appears that the stray fields emerging from the hard layer at the notch location influence the stability of the micromagnetic configuration. Different depinning mechanisms are thus observed for the same film thickness depending on the magnetization orientation of the propagating domain. This conclusion qualitatively explains experimental magnetoresistance measurements.

  15. Domain wall partition function of the eight-vertex model with a non-diagonal reflecting end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wenli; Chen Xi; Feng Jun; Hao Kun; Shi Kangjie; Sun Chengyi; Yang Zhanying; Zhang Yaozhong

    2011-01-01

    With the help of the Drinfeld twist or factorizing F-matrix for the eight-vertex SOS model, we derive the recursion relations of the partition function for the eight-vertex model with a generic non-diagonal reflecting end and domain wall boundary condition. Solving the recursion relations, we obtain the explicit determinant expression of the partition function. Our result shows that, contrary to the eight-vertex model without a reflecting end, the partition function can be expressed as a single determinant.

  16. Sorption of humic acid to functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Chen, Huilun; Yi, Zhengji; Xing, Baoshan

    2013-01-01

    The environmental behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and humic acid (HA) is a prominent concern, but effect of functionalities on their sorption is not clear yet. Functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MCNT15) and HA were used to study their sorption behavior. Sorption rate of HA to MCNTs was dominantly controlled by its diffusion from liquid-MCNT boundary to MCNT surfaces. The sorption is in the sequence of MCNT15 > MCNT15-NH 2 > MCNT15-OH > MCNT15-COOH > MCNT15-Ni, which was dependent on their surface area and meso- and macro-pore volume. The functionalities of MCNTs regulated the sorption by affecting their interaction mechanisms (i.e., H-bonding, π–π, and hydrophobic interaction). Additionally, the amount of these functionalities on the MCNT surface reduced indirectly the sorption sites due to the steric hindrance. Electrostatic repulsion deceased the sorption of HA by MCNTs with increasing pH. This study demonstrated the importance of functionalities on the MCNTs for the sorption of HA. -- Highlights: •HA sorption kinetics was well fitted using Lagergren pseudo second-order model. •Sorption rate of HA was controlled by diffusion from liquid-MCNT boundary to MCNT surfaces. •Sorption was dependent on their surface area and meso- and macro-pore volume. •Functionalities of MCNTs regulated the sorption by affecting interaction mechanisms. -- The functionalities of MCNTs regulated the sorption behavior between MCNTs and HA

  17. Chemical and functional properties of cell wall polymers from two cherry varieties at two developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, María F; de Escalada Plá, Marina F; Stortz, Carlos A; Rojas, Ana M

    2013-01-30

    The cell wall polysaccharides of Regina and Sunburst cherry varieties at two developmental stages were extracted sequentially, and their changes in monosaccharide composition and functional properties were studied. The loosely-attached pectins presented a lower d-galacturonic acid/rhamnose ratio than ionically-bound pectins, as well as lower thickening effects of their respective 2% aqueous solution: the lowest Newtonian viscosity and shear rate dependence during the pseudoplastic phase. The main constituents of the cell wall matrix were covalently bound pectins (probably through diferulate cross-linkings), with long arabinan side chains at the RG-I cores. This pectin domain was also anchored into the XG-cellulose elastic network. Ripening occurred with a decrease in the proportion of HGs, water extractable GGM and xylogalacturonan, and with a concomitant increase in neutral sugars. Ripening was also associated with higher viscosities and thickening effects, and to larger distribution of molecular weights. The highest firmness and compactness of Regina cherry may be associated with its higher proportion of calcium-bound HGs localized in the middle lamellae of cell walls, as well as to some higher molar proportion of NS (Rha and Ara) in covalently bound pectins. These pectins showed significantly better hydration properties than hemicellulose and cellulose network. Chemical composition and functional properties of cell wall polymers were dependent on cherry variety and ripening stage, and helped explain the contrasting firmness of Regina and Sunburst varieties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I

    2011-01-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  19. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  20. States in the Hilbert space formulation and in the phase space formulation of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosiek, J.; Brzykcy, P.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of testing whether a given matrix in the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics or a function considered in the phase space formulation of quantum theory represents a quantum state. We propose several practical criteria for recognising states in these two versions of quantum physics. After minor modifications, they can be applied to check positivity of any operators acting in a Hilbert space or positivity of any functions from an algebra with a ∗-product of Weyl type. -- Highlights: ► Methods of testing whether a given matrix represents a quantum state. ► The Stratonovich–Weyl correspondence on an arbitrary symplectic manifold. ► Criteria for checking whether a function on a symplectic space is a Wigner function

  1. Cumulative Beam Breakup due to Resistive-Wall Wake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.-M.

    2004-01-01

    The cumulative beam breakup problem excited by the resistive-wall wake is formulated. An approximate analytic method of finding the asymptotic behavior for the transverse bunch displacement is developed and solved. Comparison between the asymptotic analytical expression and the direct numerical solution is presented. Good agreement is found. The criterion of using the asymptotic analytical expression is discussed

  2. Comprehensive joint feedback control for standing by functional neuromuscular stimulation-a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2010-12-01

    Previous investigations of feedback control of standing after spinal cord injury (SCI) using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have primarily targeted individual joints. This study assesses the potential efficacy of comprehensive (trunk, hips, knees, and ankles) joint feedback control against postural disturbances using a bipedal, 3-D computer model of SCI stance. Proportional-derivative feedback drove an artificial neural network trained to produce muscle excitation patterns consistent with maximal joint stiffness values achievable about neutral stance given typical SCI muscle properties. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the baseline case of maximum constant muscle excitations used clinically, the controller reduced UE loading by 55% in resisting external force perturbations and by 84% during simulated one-arm functional tasks. Performance was most sensitive to inaccurate measurements of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion position and hip ab/adduction velocity feedback. In conclusion, comprehensive joint feedback demonstrates potential to markedly improve FNS standing function. However, alternative control structures capable of effective performance with fewer sensor-based feedback parameters may better facilitate clinical usage.

  3. Bladder function after sacrospinous hysteropexy and vaginal wall repair in women with uterovaginal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed Ahmed, Waleed A; Taha, Omima T; Hamdy, Mostafa A; Ibrahim, Zakia M; Elshahat, Amal M

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of repair of uterovaginal prolapse using sacrospinous hysteropexy and vaginal wall repair on the bladder function. The study was conducted at the urogynecology clinic of Suez Canal University Hospitals, Ismailia from January 2014 to March 2016. This study included women with a diagnosis of uterovaginal prolapse and wishing to preserve their uteri. Bladder function was evaluated through assessment of urological symptoms using a standardized questionnaire - the urogenital distress inventory (UDI-6) - in addition to urodynamic studies just before and six-months after the sacrospinous hysteropexy ± associated vaginal wall repair operation. Twenty-seven patients completed the study with a mean age of 36.5 ± 4 years. Only 3 women had sacrospinous hysteropexy with no additional procedures. Other procedures included anterior colporrhaphy (12), posterior colporrhaphy (9) and perineorrhaphy (15). Based on UDI-6, there was no significant difference between the pre- and post-operative symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) [8/27 (29.6%) vs. 9/27 (33.3%) respectively; p value = 0.7]. The pre- and post-operative symptoms of urge urinary incontinence were also insignificantly different [13/27 (48.1%) vs. 15/27 (55.5%); p value = 0.5]. The total score of UDI-6 increased from 24.5 ± (14.2) to 32.8 ± (29.4) which was not statistically significant (p value = 0.12). Urodynamically, voiding dysfunction was found less frequently after the operation, however the difference was statistically insignificant [9/27 (33.3%) vs. 8/27 (29.6%); p value = 0.7]. Sacrospinous hysteropexy and associated vaginal wall repair do not affect the bladder function either subjectively or objectively. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  5. NON-INVASIVE METHODS OF THE WORK-UP FOR ASSESSMENT OF MORPHOLOGIC AND FUNCTIONAL STATE OF THE SIGMOID WALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Mashkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged colonic congestion in children with chronic constipation and dolichosigma are characterized  by a permanent imbalance of gut microflora, secondary inflammation and degeneration of the sigmoid wall. There is plenty of research papers on the optic non-invasive diagnostics in medicine, based on spectrophotometry and laser spectral analysis. Aim: To study morphologic and functional state  of the sigmoid wall for detection of inflammation  and  degeneration in the  sigmoid  wall and  optimization  of treatment of children with dolichosigma  and long-standing constipation. Materials and methods: From 2009 to 2014, 30 children with dolichosigma  were seen in the Department of Pediatric surgery of MONIKI. All patients  were  hospitalized  after unsuccessful conservative  treatment in in-patient  clinics of the Moscow Region. The children underwent a set of investigations  for objective assessment of degree of the secondary  inflammatory and degenerative abnormalities  in the sigmoid wall, such as microbiological assessment, cytological assessment and fluorescent  diagnostics.  Results:  There  was  no   caused  by dolichosigma. It maintains  chronic inflammation  and  may play an indirect  role in abnormalities  of gut  motor  function. Inflammatory and  degenerative abnormalities  were  confirmed by a cytological investigation  of wall-adjacent biopsy of the  sigma. The results of the  complex assessment showed  moderate inflammation  and degeneration in the  sigmoid wall in 20 children; subsequent conservative treatment of chronic colostasis was effective. Ten children had advanced secondary inflammatory and degenerative abnormalities of the  sigmoid  wall, with high  levels of elastin and collagen in the colon wall. Surgery was performed in 6 children with the highest degree of fibrous transformation of the sigma. Conclusion: Complex assessment of the sigmoid wall, including

  6. Screening vaccine formulations for biological activity using fresh human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Roger H; Hakimi, Jalil; Ha, Yukyung; Aboutorabian, Sepideh; Ausar, Salvador F; Hasija, Manvi; Smith, Steven G; Todryk, Stephen M; Dockrell, Hazel M; Rahman, Nausheen

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relevant biological activity of any pharmaceutical formulation destined for human use is crucial. For vaccine-based formulations, activity must reflect the expected immune response, while for non-vaccine therapeutic agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, a lack of immune response to the formulation is desired. During early formulation development, various biochemical and biophysical characteristics can be monitored in a high-throughput screening (HTS) format. However, it remains impractical and arguably unethical to screen samples in this way for immunological functionality in animal models. Furthermore, data for immunological functionality lag formulation design by months, making it cumbersome to relate back to formulations in real-time. It is also likely that animal testing may not accurately reflect the response in humans. For a more effective formulation screen, a human whole blood (hWB) approach can be used to assess immunological functionality. The functional activity relates directly to the human immune response to a complete formulation (adjuvant/antigen) and includes adjuvant response, antigen response, adjuvant-modulated antigen response, stability, and potentially safety. The following commentary discusses the hWB approach as a valuable new tool to de-risk manufacture, formulation design, and clinical progression.

  7. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Park, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ho Sung; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji Beom; Kim, Sung Wng; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-01-01

    V. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers

  8. Idiom Comprehension Deficits in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Korean Autism Social Language Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Bee; Song, Seung Ha; Ham, Ju Hyun; Song, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involves pragmatic impairment of language skills. Among numerous tasks for assessing pragmatic linguistic skills, idioms are important to evaluating high-functioning ASD. Nevertheless, no assessment tool has been developed with specific consideration of Korean culture. Therefore, we designed the Korean Autism Social Language Task (KASLAT) to test idiom comprehension in ASD. The aim of the current study was to introduce this novel psychological tool and evaluate idiom comprehension deficits in high-functioning ASD. Materials and Methods The participants included 42 children, ages 6-11 years, who visited our child psychiatric clinic between April 2014 and May 2015. The ASD group comprised 16 children; the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) group consisted of 16 children. An additional 10 normal control children who had not been diagnosed with either disorder participated in this study. Idiom comprehension ability was assessed in these three groups using the KASLAT. Results Both ASD and ADHD groups had significantly lower scores on the matched and mismatched tasks, compared to the normal control children (matched tasks mean score: ASD 11.56, ADHD 11.56, normal control 14.30; mismatched tasks mean score: ASD 6.50, ADHD 4.31, normal control 11.30). However, no significant differences were found in scores of KASLAT between the ADHD and ASD groups. Conclusion These findings suggest that children with ASD exhibit greater impairment in idiom comprehension, compared to normal control children. The KASLAT may be useful in evaluating idiom comprehension ability. PMID:26446644

  9. Therapeutic evaluation of grain based functional food formulation in a geriatric animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teradal, Deepa; Joshi, Neena; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of wholesome grain based functional food formulation, on clinical and biochemical parameters in 24-30 months old Wistar albino geriatric rats, corresponding to human age 60-75 years. Animals were randomly divided into five, groups. Experimental diets were compared to the basal rat diet (Group I). Four food, formulation were-wheat based (Group II), finger millet based (Group III), wheat based, diet + fenugreek seed powder (Group IV), finger millet based diet + fenugreek powder, (Group V). These five types of diets were fed to the experimental rats for 6 weeks. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated. The results showed that, feed intake was influenced by the type of feed. Diets supplemented with, fenugreek (Group IV) caused a significant increase in serum hemoglobin. The total serum protein values were significantly highest in Group III. Total serum albumin was found to be lower in Group I and highest in Group II. The concentration of BUN was highest in Group I and the lowest in control diet. Serum cholesterol and glucose were significantly reduced in Group IV. Several hematological and serum mineral values were influenced by the type of diet. The type of diet did not influence the organs weight. A moderate hypoglycemic and hypercholesterolemic effect was observed in composite mix fed rats. This study clearly justifies the recommendation to use wholesome grain based functional foods for geriatric population.

  10. Resolvent-based modeling of passive scalar dynamics in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Scott; Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley

    2017-11-01

    The resolvent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations expresses the system state as the output of a linear (resolvent) operator acting upon a nonlinear forcing. Previous studies have demonstrated that a low-rank approximation of this linear operator predicts many known features of incompressible wall-bounded turbulence. In this work, this resolvent model for wall-bounded turbulence is extended to include a passive scalar field. This formulation allows for a number of additional simplifications that reduce model complexity. Firstly, it is shown that the effect of changing scalar diffusivity can be approximated through a transformation of spatial wavenumbers and temporal frequencies. Secondly, passive scalar dynamics may be studied through the low-rank approximation of a passive scalar resolvent operator, which is decoupled from velocity response modes. Thirdly, this passive scalar resolvent operator is amenable to approximation by semi-analytic methods. We investigate the extent to which this resulting hierarchy of models can describe and predict passive scalar dynamics and statistics in wall-bounded turbulence. The support of AFOSR under Grant Numbers FA9550-16-1-0232 and FA9550-16-1-0361 is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Element free Galerkin formulation of composite beam with longitudinal slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Dzulkarnain; Mokhtaram, Mokhtazul Haizad [Department of Civil Engineering, Universiti Selangor, Bestari Jaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Badli, Mohd Iqbal; Yassin, Airil Y. Mohd [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Behaviour between two materials in composite beam is assumed partially interact when longitudinal slip at its interfacial surfaces is considered. Commonly analysed by the mesh-based formulation, this study used meshless formulation known as Element Free Galerkin (EFG) method in the beam partial interaction analysis, numerically. As meshless formulation implies that the problem domain is discretised only by nodes, the EFG method is based on Moving Least Square (MLS) approach for shape functions formulation with its weak form is developed using variational method. The essential boundary conditions are enforced by Langrange multipliers. The proposed EFG formulation gives comparable results, after been verified by analytical solution, thus signify its application in partial interaction problems. Based on numerical test results, the Cubic Spline and Quartic Spline weight functions yield better accuracy for the EFG formulation, compares to other proposed weight functions.

  12. Wall thinning of piping in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Joji; Inada, Fumio; Morita, Ryo; Kawai, Noboru; Yoneda, Kimitoshi

    2005-01-01

    Major mechanisms causing wall thinning of piping in power plants are flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), cavitation erosion and droplet erosion. Their fundamental aspects are reviewed on the basis of literature data. FAC is chemical process and it is affected by hydrodynamic factors, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration and chemical composition of materials. On the other hand, cavitation erosion and droplet erosion are mechanical process and they are mainly affected by hydrodynamic factors and mechanical properties of materials. Evaluation codes for FAC and mitigation methods of FAC and the erosion are also described. Wall thinning of piping is one of public concerns after an accident of a pipe failure at Mihama Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., in August 2004. This paper gives comprehensive understanding of the wall thinning mechanism. (author)

  13. The plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism--a case study of a cell wall plasma membrane signaling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Some of the most important functions of plant cell walls are protection against biotic/abiotic stress and structural support during growth and development. A prerequisite for plant cell walls to perform these functions is the ability to perceive different types of stimuli in both qualitative and quantitative manners and initiate appropriate responses. The responses in turn involve adaptive changes in cellular and cell wall metabolism leading to modifications in the structures originally required for perception. While our knowledge about the underlying plant mechanisms is limited, results from Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggest the cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism represents an excellent example to illustrate how the molecular mechanisms responsible for stimulus perception, signal transduction and integration can function. Here I will review the available knowledge about the yeast cell wall integrity maintenance system for illustration purposes, summarize the limited knowledge available about the corresponding plant mechanism and discuss the relevance of the plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism in biotic stress responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contribution of CT quantified emphysema, air trapping and airway wall thickness on pulmonary function in male smokers with and without COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A A; de Jong, Pim A; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mali, Willem P Th M; Mets, Onno M; Schmidt, Michael; de Koning, Harry J; Aalst, Carlijn van der; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Ginneken, Bram van; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Zanen, Pieter

    2014-09-01

    Emphysema, airway wall thickening and air trapping are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). All three can be quantified by computed tomography (CT) of the chest. The goal of the current study is to determine the relative contribution of CT derived parameters on spirometry, lung volume and lung diffusion testing. Emphysema, airway wall thickening and air trapping were quantified automatically on CT in 1,138 male smokers with and without COPD. Emphysema was quantified by the percentage of voxels below -950 Hounsfield Units (HU), airway wall thickness by the square root of wall area for a theoretical airway with 10 mm lumen perimeter (Pi10) and air trapping by the ratio of mean lung density at expiration and inspiration (E/I-ratio). Spirometry, residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC) and diffusion capacity (Kco) were obtained. Standardized regression coefficients (β) were used to analyze the relative contribution of CT changes to pulmonary function measures. The independent contribution of the three CT measures differed per lung function parameter. For the FEV1 airway wall thickness was the most contributing structural lung change (β = -0.46), while for the FEV1/FVC this was emphysema (β = -0.55). For the residual volume (RV) air trapping was most contributing (β = -0.35). Lung diffusion capacity was most influenced by emphysema (β = -0.42). In a cohort of smokers with and without COPD the effect of different CT changes varies per lung function measure and therefore emphysema, airway wall thickness and air trapping need to be taken in account.

  15. Immobilization of platinum nanoparticles on 3,4-diaminobenzoyl-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube and its electrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Ji-Ye; Jeon, In-Yup; Eo, Soo-Mi; Tan, Loon-Seng; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2012-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are functionalized at the sp 2 C–H defect sites with 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid by a “direct” Friedel–Crafts acylation reaction in a mild polyphosphoric acid/phosphorous pentoxide medium. Owing to enhanced surface polarity, the resulting 3,4-diaminobenzoyl-functionalized MWCNTs (DAB-MWCNT) are highly dispersible in polar solvents, such as ethanol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and methanesulfonic acid. The absorption and emission properties of DAB-MWCNT in solution state are qualitatively shown to be sensitive to the pH in the environment. The DAB-MWCNT is used as a stable platform on which to deposit platinum nanoparticles (PNP). The PNP/DAB-MWCNT hybrid displays high electrocatalytic activity with good electrochemical stability for an oxygen reduction reaction under an alkaline condition.Graphical AbstractMulti-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were functionalized with 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid to produce 3,4-diaminobenzoyl-functionalized MWCNT (DAB-MWCNT). Platinum nanoparticles (PNP) were deposited to DAB-MWCNT. The resulting PNP/DAB-MWCNT hybrid displayed high electrocatalytic activity.

  16. Cell wall proteome analysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis strain MC2 155

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Buck Jeroen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The usually non-pathogenic soil bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis is commonly used as a model mycobacterial organism because it is fast growing and shares many features with pathogenic mycobacteria. Proteomic studies of M. smegmatis can shed light on mechanisms of mycobacterial growth, complex lipid metabolism, interactions with the bacterial environment and provide a tractable system for antimycobacterial drug development. The cell wall proteins are particularly interesting in this respect. The aim of this study was to construct a reference protein map for these proteins in M. smegmatis. Results A proteomic analysis approach, based on one dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS, was used to identify and characterize the cell wall associated proteins of M. smegmatis. An enzymatic cell surface shaving method was used to determine the surface-exposed proteins. As a result, a total of 390 cell wall proteins and 63 surface-exposed proteins were identified. Further analysis of the 390 cell wall proteins provided the theoretical molecular mass and pI distributions and determined that 26 proteins are shared with the surface-exposed proteome. Detailed information about functional classification, signal peptides and number of transmembrane domains are given next to discussing the identified transcriptional regulators, transport proteins and the proteins involved in lipid metabolism and cell division. Conclusion In short, a comprehensive profile of the M. smegmatis cell wall subproteome is reported. The current research may help the identification of some valuable vaccine and drug target candidates and provide foundation for the future design of preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic strategies against mycobacterial diseases.

  17. Literature Review of Shear Performance of Light-weight Steel Framing Wall Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuangnan; Liu, Shen; Liu, Hong

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive review of light-weight steel framing wall panels was carried out. The structure and force characteristics of light-weight steel framing wall panels were introduced. The testing and theoretical research results on the shear behaviour of light-weight steel framing wall panels were summarized in the domestic and foreign. And combined with the existing standards in China, the author's views and ideas are put forward to the problems in the research field of this kind of structural system.

  18. Computational study of the shift of the G band of double-walled carbon nanotubes due to interlayer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Valentin N.; Levshov, Dmitry I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Paillet, Matthieu

    2018-04-01

    The interactions between the layers of double-walled carbon nanotubes induce a measurable shift of the G bands relative to the isolated layers. While experimental data on this shift in freestanding double-walled carbon nanotubes has been reported in the past several years, a comprehensive theoretical description of the observed shift is still lacking. The prediction of this shift is important for supporting the assignment of the measured double-walled nanotubes to particular nanotube types. Here, we report a computational study of the G-band shift as a function of the semiconducting inner layer radius and interlayer separation. We find that with increasing interlayer separation, the G band shift decreases, passes through zero and becomes negative, and further increases in absolute value for the wide range of considered inner layer radii. The theoretical predictions are shown to agree with the available experimental data within the experimental uncertainty.

  19. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella LoMauro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. METHODS: Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. RESULTS: Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1 compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (p<0.01. In contrast to OI type IV patients, whose chest wall geometry and function was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (p<0.01 angle at the sternum (pectus carinatum, paradoxical inspiratory inward motion of the pulmonary rib cage, significant thoraco-abdominal asynchronies and rib cage distortions in supine position (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the restrictive respiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the

  20. New technical knowledge to be implemented to the revision of rules on pipe wall thinning management for PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Junya; Nakamura, Takao; Amano, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Rules for PWR plant pipe wall thinning management were formulated by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers in 2006. Since then thinning management of Japanese PWR plants has been carried out based on this rule. Pipe wall thinning phenomena to be dealt with in this rule have been identified in many piping components of power plants. New technical knowledge has been accumulated since the issuance of 2006 edition. We have formulated these knowledge and information about the thinning phenomena in PWR power plants. Given the history of application of this rule, we have to make our best effort to carry out a study of latest technical knowledge and implement them to the revision of rule and improve pipe wall thinning management. This paper summarizes the new technical knowledge and basis to be implemented to the revision of rules on pipe wall thinning management for PWR plants in Japan. (author)

  1. Chiral symmetry breaking for domain wall fermions in quenched lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lingling

    2001-01-01

    The domain wall fermion formulation exhibits full chiral symmetry for finite lattice spacing except for the effects of mixing between the domain walls. Close to the continuum limit these symmetry breaking effects should be described by a single residual mass. We determine this mass from the conservation law obeyed by the conserved axial current in quenched simulations with β = 5.7 and 6.0 and domain wall separations varying between 12 and 48 on 8 3 x 32 and 16 3 x 32 lattices. Using the resulting values for the residual mass we perform two complete and independent calculations of the pion decay constant. Good agreement is found between these two methods and with experiment

  2. Design Diagrams for the Analysis of Active Pressure on Retaining Walls with the Effect of Line Surcharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadabadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a formulation has been proposed to calculate the pressure on wall and determine the angle of failure wedge based on limit equilibrium method. The mentioned formulation is capable of calculating active pressure coefficient, culmination of forces in failure surface, and pressure distribution on wall with the effect of line surcharge. In addition, based on the proposed method, a simple formula has been proposed to calculate the angle of failure wedge by the effect of surcharge. Moreover, the proposed approach has the advantage of taking into account the effect of surcharge on elastoplastic environment by considering the parameters of soil and determining the extent to which the surcharge is effective in pressure distribution on the wall. However, in most previous methods and specifications, resultant lateral pressure from surcharge in elastic environment had been considered. Finally, based on the obtained results, the design diagrams for different soils and different surcharges have been proposed. According to these diagrams, pressure on wall, pressure distribution on wall, and angle of failure wedge will easily be achieved. Also, a computer program has been written in MATLAB software environment. Using the results of these codes, the pressure on wall with the effect of surcharge, the angle of failure wedge, and pressure distribution on wall will be determined.

  3. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien; Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  4. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien [CEA, LETI-Minatec, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel, E-mail: fabien.sauter@cea.fr, E-mail: michel.dewaard@ujf-grenoble.fr [Inserm U836, Grenoble Institute of Neuroscience, Site Sante la Tronche, Batiment Edmond J Safra, Chemin Fortune Ferrini, BP170, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-05-13

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  5. Comprehensive transcriptome analyses correlated with untargeted metabolome reveal differentially expressed pathways in response to cell wall alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Nathan T; Chen, Han-Yi; Hur, Manhoi; Zhao, Xuefeng; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Li, Xu; Li, Ling; Zabotina, Olga

    2018-03-01

    This research provides new insights into plant response to cell wall perturbations through correlation of transcriptome and metabolome datasets obtained from transgenic plants expressing cell wall-modifying enzymes. Plants respond to changes in their cell walls in order to protect themselves from pathogens and other stresses. Cell wall modifications in Arabidopsis thaliana have profound effects on gene expression and defense response, but the cell signaling mechanisms underlying these responses are not well understood. Three transgenic Arabidopsis lines, two with reduced cell wall acetylation (AnAXE and AnRAE) and one with reduced feruloylation (AnFAE), were used in this study to investigate the plant responses to cell wall modifications. RNA-Seq in combination with untargeted metabolome was employed to assess differential gene expression and metabolite abundance. RNA-Seq results were correlated with metabolite abundances to determine the pathways involved in response to cell wall modifications introduced in each line. The resulting pathway enrichments revealed the deacetylation events in AnAXE and AnRAE plants induced similar responses, notably, upregulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and changes in regulation of primary metabolic pathways that supply substrates to specialized metabolism, particularly those related to defense responses. In contrast, genes and metabolites of lipid biosynthetic pathways and peroxidases involved in lignin polymerization were downregulated in AnFAE plants. These results elucidate how primary metabolism responds to extracellular stimuli. Combining the transcriptomics and metabolomics datasets increased the power of pathway prediction, and demonstrated the complexity of pathways involved in cell wall-mediated signaling.

  6. Formulation of stiffness equation for a three-dimensional isoparametric element with elastic-plastic material and large deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.Y.; Prachuktam, S.; Reich, M.

    1975-01-01

    The formulation of the stiffness equation for an 8 to 21 node isoparametric element with elastic-plastic material and large deformation is presented. The formulation has been implemented in a nonlinear finite element program for the analysis of three-dimensional continuums. To demonstrate the utility of the formulation, a thick-walled cylinder was analyzed and the results are compared favorably with a known solution. The element type presented can be applied not only to 3-D continuums, but also to plate or shell structures, for which degenerated isoparametric elements may be used

  7. Removal of oxidative fragments from chemically functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hamzah Harun; Whitby, Raymond; Khairul Zaman Dahlan; Nik Ghazali Nik Salleh; Mohd Sofian Alias; Mahathir Mohamed; Mohd Yusof Hamzah; Mohd Faizal Abdul Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Acid oxidized multi-walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs) were prepared by refluxing MWCNTs with nitric acid (70 %). To remove the oxidative fragment/ debris, in which partially attached onto the carbon nano tubes lattice, the functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs) then were refluxed with NaOH (1M) and followed with HCl (1M) wash. The presence of carboxylic group that covalently attached onto the MWCNTs lattice are confirmed with acid-base titration. The TEM image shows the comparison of pure MWCNTs, f-MWCNTs and base-acid wash of f-MWCNTs. (author)

  8. 27 years of experience with the comprehensive surgical treatment of prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R I; Tavares, A; Srougi, M; Dénes, F T

    2015-10-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS) presents with three main features: abdominal wall flaccidity, urological abnormalities and cryptorchidism. As a result, urologists must consider the eventual repair of the abdominal wall flaccidity and urinary tract abnormalities, and the mandatory correction of cryptorchidism, as well as decide whether to perform the procedures in a single comprehensive approach or in multiple steps. To report experiences with comprehensive surgical management of prune belly syndrome. From 1987 to 2014, 46 children with PBS were submitted for comprehensive surgical treatment. According to individual needs, treatment aimed to correct the abdominal flaccidity, reconstruct the urinary tract, and perform bilateral orchiopexy and circumcision, which were performed in one procedure. Urinary tract reconstruction was indicated whenever pyelo-ureteral dilatation with evidence of significant stasis and/or vesicoureteral reflux was associated with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). Treatment for this cohort included: 44 abdominoplasties, 40 upper urinary tract reconstructions, 44 cystoplasties associated with three appendico-vesicostomies, 46 bilateral orchiopexies and 36 circumcisions. The median age at surgery was 16 months and children were followed for a median of 143 months. Abdominal appearance and tonus were improved in 90% of the children after the primary surgery and 100% after reoperation. Upper urinary tract reconstruction was performed in most children and long-term follow-up showed functional stabilization of the urinary tract in about 90% of the children, with progression to renal failure in 10%. Lower urinary tract reconstruction was performed in most children (95.6%); on late follow-up, continence was observed in 81% of them, while incontinence was present in 19% and usually associated with polyuria. Adequate bladder emptying was possible in most boys (82.6%), while the remaining required clean intermittent catheterization. Pre-operative UTI

  9. Advanced technologies for plant cell wall evolution and diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik

    Plant cell walls consist of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and phenolic polymers interlinked together in a highly complex network. The detailed analysis of cell walls is challenging because of their inherent complexity and heterogeneity. Also, complex carbohydrates, unlike proteins and nucleotides...... cannot really be synthesised or sequenced. The work described in this thesis is focused to a large extent on the development of a microarray-based high-throughput method for cell wall analysis known as Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling or CoMPP. The procedure uses highly specific molecular...... probes (monoclonal antibodies mAbs and carbohydrate binding modules, CBMs) to rapidly profile polysaccharides across a sample set. During my PhD I have further developed the CoMPP technique and used it for cell wall analysis within the context of a variety of applied and fundamental projects. The data...

  10. DEM analysis of the effect of particle-wall impact on the dispersion performance in carrier-based dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiecheng; Wu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Michael

    2015-06-20

    The impact between particles or agglomerates and a device wall is considered as an important mechanism controlling the dispersion of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particles in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). In order to characterise the influencing factors and better understand the impact induced dispersion process for carrier-based DPIs, the impact behaviour between an agglomerate and a wall is systematically investigated using the discrete element method. In this study, a carrier-based agglomerate is initially formed and then allowed to impact with a target wall. The effects of impact velocity, impact angle and work of adhesion on the dispersion performance are analysed. It is shown that API particles in the near-wall regions are more likely to be dispersed due to the deceleration of the carrier particle resulted from the impact with the wall. It is also revealed that the dispersion ratio increases with increasing impact velocity and impact angle, indicating that the normal component of the impact velocity plays a dominant role on the dispersion. Furthermore, the impact induced dispersion performance for carrier-based DPI formulations can be well approximated using a cumulative Weibull distribution function that is governed by the ratio of overall impact energy and adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of wall potential on the fluid-wall interaction in a cylindrical capillary and a generalized Kelvin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubov, T.S.; Mainwaring, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work a generalized Kelvin equation for a fluid confined in thick-walled cylindrical capillary is developed. This has been accomplished by including the potential energy function for interaction between a solid wall of a capillary and a confined fluid into the Kelvin equation. Using the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, an explicit form of the potential energy functions as expressed by hypergeometrical functions have been derived-firstly, for the interaction between a solid wall and a test atom placed at an arbitrary point in a long open-end capillary, and thereafter for the body-body interaction between the solid wall and a confined Lennard-Jones fluid. Further, this generalized Kelvin equation has been applied to detailed description hysteresis phenomena in such capillaries. All numerical calculations have been carried out for the model argon-graphite system at 90 K

  12. The Important Role of Carbohydrates in the Flavor, Function, and Formulation of Oral Nutritional Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaro Kokkinidou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients who are malnourished or at-risk for malnutrition often benefit from the consumption of oral nutritional supplements (ONS. ONS supply a range of micro- and macro-nutrients, and they can be used to supplement a diet or provide total nutrition. Since ONS are specially formulated products, all ONS ingredients—including carbohydrates—are added ingredients. This may seem to be at odds with the growing public health discourse on the need to reduce “added sugars” in the diet. However, carbohydrate is an essential nutrient for human health and is a critical ingredient in ONS. Helping to educate patients on the value of “added sugars” in ONS may be useful to improve compliance with nutritional recommendations when ONS are indicated. This perspective paper reviews the important roles of “added sugars” in ONS, in terms of flavor, function, and product formulation.

  13. Comprehensive Joint Feedback Control for Standing by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation – a Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations of feedback control of standing after spinal cord injury (SCI) using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have primarily targeted individual joints. This study assesses the potential efficacy of comprehensive (trunk, hips, knees, and ankles) joint-feedback control against postural disturbances using a bipedal, three-dimensional computer model of SCI stance. Proportional-derivative feedback drove an artificial neural network trained to produce muscle excitation patterns consistent with maximal joint stiffness values achievable about neutral stance given typical SCI muscle properties. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the baseline case of maximum constant muscle excitations used clinically, the controller reduced UE loading by 55% in resisting external force perturbations and by 84% during simulated one-arm functional tasks. Performance was most sensitive to inaccurate measurements of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion position and hip ab/adduction velocity feedback. In conclusion, comprehensive joint-feedback demonstrates potential to markedly improve FNS standing function. However, alternative control structures capable of effective performance with fewer sensor-based feedback parameters may better facilitate clinical usage. PMID:20923741

  14. On the Correct Formulation of the First Law of Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanov, Temur Z.

    2006-04-01

    The critical analysis of the generally accepted formulation of the first law of thermodynamics is proposed. The purpose of the analysis is to prove that the standard formulation contains a mathematical error and to offer the correct formulation. The correct formulation is based on the concepts of function and differential of function. Really, if internal energy Uof a system is a function of two independent variables Q=Q(t) (describing of the thermal form of energy) and R=R(t) (describing non-thermal form of energy), then the correct formulation of the first law of thermodynamics is: dU(Q,R)dt=( UQ )RdQdt+( UR )QdRdt, where t and -( UR )Q / ( UR )Q ( UQ ) . - ( UQ )R are time and measure of mutual transformation of forms of energy, correspondingly. General conclusion: standard thermodynamics is incorrect.

  15. A new method of functionalized multi walled carbon nanotubes by natural oil for microorganism cells detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adawiya J.; Marzoog, Thorria R.; Hadi, Iman H.; Jameel, Zainab N.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, new surfactants for Functionalization of Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (F-MWCNTs) with functional groups have been developed by using walnut oil, to improve their surface activity (solubility) and a create free reticules (functional groups) on it. MWCNTs were functionalized with walnut oil via ultra-sonication technique at 25°C for 1h with no drastic fragmentation of MWCNTs. Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and have been employed for the characterizations and analysis. In addition, the antibacterial activity of functionalized MWCNTs against Gram negative. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria are examined.

  16. The electrochemical signature of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes bearing electroactive groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Floch, Fabien; Thuaire, Aurelie; Simonato, Jean-Pierre; Bidan, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    We report the modification and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in view of molecular sensing applications. We found that ultrasonicated SWCNTs present sticking properties that make them adhere on electrode surfaces. This allows excellent characterization of SWCNTs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) before and after chemical functionalization with diazonium salts bearing electroactive groups. Bare SWCNTs presented distinct invariant shapes in CV, used as control curves, in comparison with functionalized SWCNTs for which specific signatures corresponding to the presence of grafted molecules were identified. According to the electronic substituents in the para position of the diazonium salts, divergent behaviours were observed for the grafting reactions. Diazonium salts having electrowithdrawing groups could be grafted without electrochemical induction whereas those bearing electron donating groups required a cathodic potential to generate the formation of the radical species.

  17. The electrochemical signature of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes bearing electroactive groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Floch, Fabien; Thuaire, Aurelie; Simonato, Jean-Pierre [LITEN/DTNM/LCRE, CEA-Grenoble 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Bidan, Gerard [INAC/DIR, CEA-Grenoble 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: jean-pierre.simonato@cea.fr

    2009-04-08

    We report the modification and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in view of molecular sensing applications. We found that ultrasonicated SWCNTs present sticking properties that make them adhere on electrode surfaces. This allows excellent characterization of SWCNTs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) before and after chemical functionalization with diazonium salts bearing electroactive groups. Bare SWCNTs presented distinct invariant shapes in CV, used as control curves, in comparison with functionalized SWCNTs for which specific signatures corresponding to the presence of grafted molecules were identified. According to the electronic substituents in the para position of the diazonium salts, divergent behaviours were observed for the grafting reactions. Diazonium salts having electrowithdrawing groups could be grafted without electrochemical induction whereas those bearing electron donating groups required a cathodic potential to generate the formation of the radical species.

  18. A comprehensive approach to benefit-risk assessment in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarac, Sinan B; Rasmussen, Christian H; Rasmussen, Morten A.

    2012-01-01

    Major regulatory agencies, for example, FDA and EMA, have started to request comprehensive benefit-risk analyses of pharmaceutical products prior to approval or labelling expansion. The purpose of this study is to develop a generally applicable and reliable data-driven benefit-risk assessment......) discussion and formulation of an overall conclusion. To reduce the impact of subjective judgements, scores are assigned to each criterion on the basis of objective information (data) wherever possible. The proposed benefit-risk evaluation approach offers comprehensive, data-driven assessments that can...... method, where two or more drugs/doses can be compared. Our aim is to formulate an approach that is simple to apply, allows direct comparison of different types of risks and benefits, and is tailored for application in different disease areas both during clinical development and in the marketing approval...

  19. Hydrodynamic dispersion in a combined magnetohydrodynamic- electroosmotic-driven flow through a microchannel with slowly varying wall zeta potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, C.; Arcos, J.; Bautista, O.; Méndez, F.

    2017-09-01

    The effective dispersion coefficient of a neutral solute in the combined electroosmotic (EO) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-driven flow of a Newtonian fluid through a parallel flat plate microchannel is studied. The walls of the microchannel are assumed to have modulated and low zeta potentials that vary slowly in the axial direction in a sinusoidal manner. The flow field required to obtain the dispersion coefficient is solved using the lubrication approximation theory. The solution of the electrical potential is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for a symmetric (Z :Z ) electrolyte solution. The EO and MHD effects, together with the variations in the zeta potentials of the walls, are observed to notably modify the axial distribution of the effective dispersion coefficient. The problem is formulated for two cases of the zeta potential function. Note that the dispersion coefficient primarily depends on the Hartmann number, on the ratio of the half height of the microchannel to the Debye length, and on the assumed variation in the zeta potentials of the walls.

  20. Functionalization of silicon-doped single walled carbon nanotubes at the doping site: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chen; Xia Yueyuan; Zhao Mingwen; Liu Xiangdong; Li Feng; Huang Boda; Zhang Hongyu; Zhang Bingyun

    2006-01-01

    We performed ab initio calculations on the cytosine-functionalized silicon-doped single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). The results show that silicon substitutional doping to SWNT can dramatically change the atomic and electronic structures of the SWNT. And more importantly, it may provide an efficient pathway for further sidewall functionalization to synthesize more complicated SWNT based complex materials, for example, our previously proposed base-functionalized SWNTs, because the doping silicon atom can improve the reaction activity of the tube at the doping site due to its preference to form sp3 hybridization bonding

  1. Brassinosteroid Mediated Cell Wall Remodeling in Grasses under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, plants, being sessile, cannot escape from exposure to severe abiotic stresses such as extreme temperature and water deficit. The dynamic structure of plant cell wall enables them to undergo compensatory changes, as well as maintain physical strength, with changing environments. Plant hormones known as brassinosteroids (BRs play a key role in determining cell wall expansion during stress responses. Cell wall deposition differs between grasses (Poaceae and dicots. Grass species include many important food, fiber, and biofuel crops. In this article, we focus on recent advances in BR-regulated cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling in response to stresses, comparing our understanding of the mechanisms in grass species with those in the more studied dicots. A more comprehensive understanding of BR-mediated changes in cell wall integrity in grass species will benefit the development of genetic tools to improve crop productivity, fiber quality and plant biomass recalcitrance.

  2. Finite element formulation for thermal stress analysis of thin reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a finite-element procedure for the thermal stress analysis of thin wall reactor components. A general temperature-dependent constituent relationship is derived from a Gibbs potential function and a temperature-dependent yield surface. This form of constitutive relationship is applicable to problems of small strain. A similar form of a hypoelastic-plastic type is also developed for large strains. The variation of the yield surface with temperature is based upon a temperature-dependent, work-hardening model. The model uses a temperature-equivalent stress-plastic strain diagram which is generated from isothermal unaxial stress-strain data. The above constitutive relationships are incorporated into two computer codes and a previously developed numerical algorithm is used with minor modifications. A set of problems is presented validating the thermal analysis capability of the computer codes to a variety of problem types. (Auth.)

  3. Anisotropy of domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viret; Samson; Warin; Marty; Ott; Sondergard; Klein; Fermon

    2000-10-30

    The resistive effect of domain walls in FePd films with perpendicular anisotropy was studied experimentally as a function of field and temperature. The films were grown directly on MgO substrates, which induces an unusual virgin magnetic configuration composed of 60 nm wide parallel stripe domains. This allowed us to carry out the first measurements of the anisotropy of domain wall resistivity in the two configurations of current perpendicular and parallel to the walls. At 18 K, we find 8.2% and 1.3% for the domain wall magnetoresistance normalized to the wall width (8 nm) in these two respective configurations. These values are consistent with the predictions of Levy and Zhang.

  4. Distortional Mechanics of Thin-Walled Structural Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim

    In several industries such as civil, mechanical, and aerospace, thin-walled structures are often used due to the high strength and effective use of the materials. Because of the increased consumption there has been increasing focus on optimizing and more detailed calculations. However, finely...... number of degrees of freedom. This means that the classical Vlasov thin-walled beam theory for open and closed cross sections is generalized as part of a semi-discretization process by including distortional displacement fields. A novel finite-element-based displacement approach is used in combination...... by discretization of the cross section are now solved analytically and the formulation is valid without special attention and approximation also for closed single or multi-cell cross sections. Furthermore, the found eigenvalues have clear mechanical meaning, since they represent the attenuation of the distortional...

  5. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of interacting tunneling transport: variational grand potential, density functional formulation and nature of steady-state forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyldgaard, P

    2012-01-01

    The standard formulation of tunneling transport rests on an open-boundary modeling. There, conserving approximations to nonequilibrium Green function or quantum statistical mechanics provide consistent but computational costly approaches; alternatively, the use of density-dependent ballistic-transport calculations (e.g., Lang 1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 5335), here denoted ‘DBT’, provides computationally efficient (approximate) atomistic characterizations of the electron behavior but has until now lacked a formal justification. This paper presents an exact, variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic theory for fully interacting tunneling and provides a rigorous foundation for frozen-nuclei DBT calculations as a lowest-order approximation to an exact nonequilibrium thermodynamic density functional evaluation. The theory starts from the complete electron nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics and I identify the operator for the nonequilibrium Gibbs free energy which, generally, must be treated as an implicit solution of the fully interacting many-body dynamics. I demonstrate a minimal property of a functional for the nonequilibrium thermodynamic grand potential which thus uniquely identifies the solution as the exact nonequilibrium density matrix. I also show that the uniqueness-of-density proof from a closely related Lippmann-Schwinger collision density functional theory (Hyldgaard 2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 165109) makes it possible to express the variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic description as a single-particle formulation based on universal electron-density functionals; the full nonequilibrium single-particle formulation improves the DBT method, for example, by a more refined account of Gibbs free energy effects. I illustrate a formal evaluation of the zero-temperature thermodynamic grand potential value which I find is closely related to the variation in the scattering phase shifts and hence to Friedel density oscillations. This paper also discusses the

  6. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters using dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Daniela; Pistone, Alessandro; Ziccarelli, Ida; Espro, Claudia; Galvagno, Signorino; Giofré, Salvatore V; Romeo, Roberto; Cicero, Nicola; Bua, Giuseppe D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Legnani, Laura; Chiacchio, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for heavy metal ion removal from wastewaters were developed. Triazole dendrimers (TD) were built directly onto the carbon nanotube surface by successive click chemistry reactions affording the zero- and first-generation dendrimer-functionalized MWCNT (MWCNT-TD1 and MWCNT-TD2). The Moedritzer-Irani reaction carried out on the amino groups present on the MWCNT-TD2 sample gave the corresponding α-aminophosphonate nanosystem MWCNT-TD2P. Both MWCNT-TD2 and MWCNT-TD2P nanosystems have been characterized by physical, chemical, and morphological analyses. Their chelating abilities towards the toxic metal ions Pb 2+ , Hg 2+ , and Ni 2+ and the harmless Ca 2+ ion have been experimentally evaluated in the two different sets of experiments and at the salt concentrations of 1 mg/mL or 1 μg/mL by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of these studies pointed out the interesting chelating behavior for the phosphonated nanosystem towards the Hg 2+ ion. The complexation mode of the best chelating system MWCNT-TD2P with mercury was investigated through density functional theory (DFT) calculations, suggesting a chelation mechanism involving the two oxygen atoms of the phosphate group. The synthesized dendrimers, supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, have shown the potential to be used for the selective toxic metal ion removal and recovery.

  7. Investigation of the adsorption of polymer chains on amine-functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R; Ajori, S; Rouhi, S

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to study the adsorption of different polymer chains on functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). The nanotubes were functionalized with two different amines: NH2 (a small amine) and CH2-NH2 (a large amine). Considering three different polymer chains, all with the same number of atoms, the effect of polymer type on the polymer-nanotube interaction was studied. In general, it was found that covalent functionalization considerably improved the polymer-DWCNT interaction. By comparing the results obtained with different polymer chains, it was observed that, unlike polyethylene and polyketone, poly(styrene sulfonate) only weakly interacts with the functionalized DWCNTs. Accordingly, the smallest radius of gyration was obtained with adsorbed poly(styrene sulfonate). It was also observed that the DWCNTs functionalized with the large amine presented more stable interactions with polyketone and poly(styrene sulfonate) than with polyethylene, whereas the DWCNTs functionalized with the small amine showed better interfacial noncovalent bonding with polyethylene.

  8. Analysis of moderately thin-walled beam cross-sections by cubic isoparametric elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    In technical beam theory the six equilibrium states associated with homogeneous tension, bending, shear and torsion are treated as individual load cases. This enables the formulation of weak form equations governing the warping from shear and torsion. These weak form equations are solved...... numerically by introducing a cubic-linear two-dimensional isoparametric element. The cubic interpolation of this element accurately represents quadratic shear stress variations along cross-section walls, and thus moderately thin-walled cross-sections are effectively discretized by these elements. The ability...

  9. Near wall combustion modeling in spark ignition engines. Part A: Flame–wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demesoukas, Sokratis; Caillol, Christian; Higelin, Pascal; Boiarciuc, Andrei; Floch, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A model for flame–wall interaction in addition to flame wrinkling by turbulence is proposed. • Two sparkplug positions and two lengths are used in a test engine for model validation. • Flame–wall interaction decreases the maximum values of cylinder pressure and heat release rates. • The impact of combustion chamber geometry is taken into account by the flame–wall interaction model. - Abstract: Research and design in the field of spark ignition engines seek to achieve high performance while conserving fuel economy and low pollutant emissions. For the evaluation of various engine configurations, numerical simulations are favored, since they are quick and less expensive than experiments. Various zero-dimensional combustion models are currently used. Both flame front reactions and post-flame processes contribute to the heat release rate. The first part of this study focuses on the role of the flame front on the heat release rate, by modeling the interaction of the flame front with the chamber wall. Post-flame reactions are dealt with in Part B of the study. The basic configurations of flame quenching in laminar flames are also applicable in turbulent flames, which is the case in spark ignition engines. A simplified geometric model of the combustion chamber was used to calculate the mean flame surface, the flame volume and the distribution of flame surface as a function of the distance from the wall. The flame–wall interaction took into account the geometry of the combustion chamber and of the flame, aerodynamic turbulence and the in-cylinder pressure and temperature conditions, through a phenomenological attenuation function of the wrinkling factor. A modified global wrinkling factor as a function of the mean surface distance distribution from the wall was calculated. The impact of flame–wall interaction was simulated for four configurations of the sparkplug position and length: centered and lateral position, and standard and projected

  10. The Complex Cell Wall Composition of Syncytia Induced by Plant Parasitic Cyst Nematodes Reflects Both Function and Host Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant–parasitic cyst nematodes induce the formation of specialized feeding structures, syncytia, within their host roots. These unique plant organs serve as the sole nutrient resource for development and reproduction throughout the biotrophic interaction. The multinucleate syncytium, which arises through local dissolution of cell walls and protoplast fusion of multiple adjacent cells, has dense cytoplasm containing numerous organelles, surrounded by thickened outer cell walls that must withstand high turgor pressure. However, little is known about how the constituents of the syncytial cell wall and their conformation support its role during nematode parasitism. We used a set of monoclonal antibodies, targeted to a range of plant cell wall components, to reveal the microstructures of syncytial cell walls induced by four of the most economically important cyst nematode species, Globodera pallida, Heterodera glycines, Heterodera avenae and Heterodera filipjevi, in their respective potato, soybean, and spring wheat host roots. In situ fluorescence analysis revealed highly similar cell wall composition of syncytia induced by G. pallida and H. glycines. Both consisted of abundant xyloglucan, methyl-esterified homogalacturonan and pectic arabinan. In contrast, the walls of syncytia induced in wheat roots by H. avenae and H. filipjevi contain little xyloglucan but are rich in feruloylated xylan and arabinan residues, with variable levels of mixed-linkage glucan. The overall chemical composition of syncytial cell walls reflected the general features of root cell walls of the different host plants. We relate specific components of syncytial cell walls, such as abundant arabinan, methyl-esterification status of pectic homogalacturonan and feruloylation of xylan, to their potential roles in forming a network to support both the strength and flexibility required for syncytium function.

  11. The Complex Cell Wall Composition of Syncytia Induced by Plant Parasitic Cyst Nematodes Reflects Both Function and Host Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Lilley, Catherine J; Imren, Mustafa; Knox, J Paul; Urwin, Peter E

    2017-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes induce the formation of specialized feeding structures, syncytia, within their host roots. These unique plant organs serve as the sole nutrient resource for development and reproduction throughout the biotrophic interaction. The multinucleate syncytium, which arises through local dissolution of cell walls and protoplast fusion of multiple adjacent cells, has dense cytoplasm containing numerous organelles, surrounded by thickened outer cell walls that must withstand high turgor pressure. However, little is known about how the constituents of the syncytial cell wall and their conformation support its role during nematode parasitism. We used a set of monoclonal antibodies, targeted to a range of plant cell wall components, to reveal the microstructures of syncytial cell walls induced by four of the most economically important cyst nematode species, Globodera pallida , Heterodera glycines , Heterodera avenae and Heterodera filipjevi , in their respective potato, soybean, and spring wheat host roots. In situ fluorescence analysis revealed highly similar cell wall composition of syncytia induced by G. pallida and H. glycines . Both consisted of abundant xyloglucan, methyl-esterified homogalacturonan and pectic arabinan. In contrast, the walls of syncytia induced in wheat roots by H. avenae and H. filipjevi contain little xyloglucan but are rich in feruloylated xylan and arabinan residues, with variable levels of mixed-linkage glucan. The overall chemical composition of syncytial cell walls reflected the general features of root cell walls of the different host plants. We relate specific components of syncytial cell walls, such as abundant arabinan, methyl-esterification status of pectic homogalacturonan and feruloylation of xylan, to their potential roles in forming a network to support both the strength and flexibility required for syncytium function.

  12. A Set of Functional Brain Networks for the Comprehensive Evaluation of Human Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yul-Wan Sung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many human characteristics must be evaluated to comprehensively understand an individual, and measurements of the corresponding cognition/behavior are required. Brain imaging by functional MRI (fMRI has been widely used to examine brain function related to human cognition/behavior. However, few aspects of cognition/behavior of individuals or experimental groups can be examined through task-based fMRI. Recently, resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI signals have been shown to represent functional infrastructure in the brain that is highly involved in processing information related to cognition/behavior. Using rs-fMRI may allow diverse information about the brain through a single MRI scan to be obtained, as rs-fMRI does not require stimulus tasks. In this study, we attempted to identify a set of functional networks representing cognition/behavior that are related to a wide variety of human characteristics and to evaluate these characteristics using rs-fMRI data. If possible, these findings would support the potential of rs-fMRI to provide diverse information about the brain. We used resting-state fMRI and a set of 130 psychometric parameters that cover most human characteristics, including those related to intelligence and emotional quotients and social ability/skill. We identified 163 brain regions by VBM analysis using regression analysis with 130 psychometric parameters. Next, using a 163 × 163 correlation matrix, we identified functional networks related to 111 of the 130 psychometric parameters. Finally, we made an 8-class support vector machine classifiers corresponding to these 111 functional networks. Our results demonstrate that rs-fMRI signals contain intrinsic information about brain function related to cognition/behaviors and that this set of 111 networks/classifiers can be used to comprehensively evaluate human characteristics.

  13. Fear of cancer recurrence: a theoretical review and novel cognitive processing formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fardell, J.E.; Thewes, B.; Turner, J.; Gilchrist, J.; Sharpe, L.; Smith, A.; Girgis, A.; Butow, P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is prevalent among survivors. However, a comprehensive and universally accepted theoretical framework of FCR to guide intervention is lacking. This paper reviews theoretical frameworks previously used to explain FCR and describes the formulation of a novel

  14. Ab initio study of F- and Cl-functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, H; Feng, Y P; Lin, J Y

    2006-01-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to study the functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes by the chemical absorption of F and Cl atoms. Our results confirmed that the band gap of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes is reduced on addition of F or Cl atoms on the walls of the nanotubes. For metallic armchair nanotubes, the doubly degenerate states crossing the Fermi level were separated by the introduction of F or Cl atoms. An additional energy level emerged near the Fermi level, due to coupling between the carbon nanotube and the F or Cl atom. For zigzag nanotubes, charge transfers of 0.27e from the tube to the Cl atom and of 0.41e to the F atom took place, while for armchair nanotubes, the charge transfers from the nanotube to Cl and F are 0.25 and 0.42e, respectively. The Cl-C and F-C bond lengths were found to be 2.09 and 1.49 A, respectively. The systems show semiconducting behaviour when charged with one electron per halogen atom, but remain metallic under hole injection, regardless of the chirality of the carbon nanotubes

  15. Co-transport of chlordecone and sulfadiazine in the presence of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch and saturated soil column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and mobility of two 14C-labeled contaminants, the hydrophobic chlordecone (CLD) and the readily water-soluble sulfadiazine (SDZ), in the absence or presence of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Th...

  16. Seismic behavior of reinforced concrete shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.; Gantenbein, F.

    1989-01-01

    Reinforced concrete shear walls have an important contribution to building stiffness. So, it is necessary to know their behavior under seismic loads. The ultimate behavior study of shear walls subjected to dynamic loadings includes: - a description of the nonlinear global model based on cyclic static tests, - nonlinear time history calculations for various forcing functions. The comparison of linear and nonlinear results shows important margins related to the ductility when the bandwidth of the forcing function is narrow and centred on the wall natural frequency

  17. Metaphor Comprehension in Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Case Studies of Two High-Functioning Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melogno, Sergio; D'Ardia, Caterina; Pinto, Maria Antonietta; Levi, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    This article presents case studies on metaphor comprehension in two boys with high-functioning autistic spectrum disorder, aged 9;1 (9 years, 1 month) and 8;11. The participants were assessed twice, before and after an intervention program aimed at improving their social skills. The focus of the article is on the specific patterns exhibited by…

  18. New technical knowledge to be implemented to the revision of rules on pipe wall thinning management for PWR Plants. 2006 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Junya; Amano, Yoichi; Nakamura, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Rules for PWR plant pipe wall thinning management were formulated by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers in 2006. Since then thinning management of Japanese PWR plants has been carried out based on this rule. Pipe wall thinning phenomena to be dealt with in this rule have been identified in many piping components of power plants. New technical knowledge has been accumulated since the issuance of 2006 edition. We have formulated these knowledge and information about the thinning phenomena in PWR power plants. Given the history of application of this rule, we have to make our best effort to carry out a study of latest technical knowledge and implement them to the revision of rule and improve pipe wall thinning management. This paper summarizes the new technical knowledge and basis to be implemented to the revision of rules on pipe wall thinning management for PWR plants in Japan. (author)

  19. Effects of Schmidt number on near-wall turbulent mass transfer in pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Woo; Yang, Kyung Soo [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Large Eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mass transfer in circular-pipe flow has been performed to investigate the characteristics of turbulent mass transfer in the near-wall region. We consider a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow with a constant wall concentration. The Reynolds number under consideration is Re{sub r} = 500 based on the friction velocity and the pipe radius, and the selected Schmidt numbers (Sc) are 0.71, 5, 10, 20 and 100. Dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) models for the turbulent SGS stresses and turbulent mass fluxes were employed to close the governing equations. The current paper reports a comprehensive characterization of turbulent mass transfer in circular-pipe flow, focusing on its near-wall characteristics and Sc dependency. We start with mean fields by presenting mean velocity and concentration profiles, mean Sherwood numbers and mean mass transfer coefficients for the selected values of the parameters. After that, we present the characteristics of fluctuations including root-mean-square (rms) profiles of velocity, concentration, and mass transfer coefficient fluctuations. Turbulent mass fluxes and correlations between velocity and concentration fluctuations are also discussed. The near-wall behaviour of turbulent diffusivity and turbulent Schmidt number is shown, and other authors' correlations on their limiting behaviour towards the pipe wall are evaluated based on our LES results. The intermittent characteristics of turbulent mass transfer in pipe flow are depicted by probability density functions (pdf) of velocity and concentration fluctuations; joint pdfs between them are also presented. Instantaneous snapshots of velocity and concentration fluctuations are shown to supplement our discussion on the turbulence statistics. Finally, we report the results of octant analysis and budget calculation of concentration variance to clarify Sc-dependency of the correlation between near-wall turbulence structures and concentration fluctuation in

  20. Effects of Schmidt number on near-wall turbulent mass transfer in pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang Woo; Yang, Kyung Soo

    2014-01-01

    Large Eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mass transfer in circular-pipe flow has been performed to investigate the characteristics of turbulent mass transfer in the near-wall region. We consider a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow with a constant wall concentration. The Reynolds number under consideration is Re r = 500 based on the friction velocity and the pipe radius, and the selected Schmidt numbers (Sc) are 0.71, 5, 10, 20 and 100. Dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) models for the turbulent SGS stresses and turbulent mass fluxes were employed to close the governing equations. The current paper reports a comprehensive characterization of turbulent mass transfer in circular-pipe flow, focusing on its near-wall characteristics and Sc dependency. We start with mean fields by presenting mean velocity and concentration profiles, mean Sherwood numbers and mean mass transfer coefficients for the selected values of the parameters. After that, we present the characteristics of fluctuations including root-mean-square (rms) profiles of velocity, concentration, and mass transfer coefficient fluctuations. Turbulent mass fluxes and correlations between velocity and concentration fluctuations are also discussed. The near-wall behaviour of turbulent diffusivity and turbulent Schmidt number is shown, and other authors' correlations on their limiting behaviour towards the pipe wall are evaluated based on our LES results. The intermittent characteristics of turbulent mass transfer in pipe flow are depicted by probability density functions (pdf) of velocity and concentration fluctuations; joint pdfs between them are also presented. Instantaneous snapshots of velocity and concentration fluctuations are shown to supplement our discussion on the turbulence statistics. Finally, we report the results of octant analysis and budget calculation of concentration variance to clarify Sc-dependency of the correlation between near-wall turbulence structures and concentration fluctuation in the

  1. Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of Cell Wall Related Genes in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench, a Food, Fodder and Biofuel Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRISHAN MOHAN RAI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass based alternative fuels offer a solution to the world’s ever-increasing energy demand. With the ability to produce high biomass in marginal lands with low inputs, sorghum has a great potential to meet second-generation biofuel needs. Despite the sorghum crop importance in biofuel and fodder industry, there is no comprehensive information available on the cell wall related genes and gene families (biosynthetic and modification. It is important to identify the cell wall related genes to understand the cell wall biosynthetic process as well as to facilitate biomass manipulation. Genome-wide analysis using gene family specific Hidden Markov Model of conserved domains identified 520 genes distributed among 20 gene families related to biosynthesis/modification of various cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin. Chromosomal localization analysis of these genes revealed that about 65% of cell wall related genes were confined to four chromosomes (Chr. 1-4. Further, 53 tandem duplication events involving 146 genes were identified in these gene families which could be associated with expansion of genes within families in sorghum. Additionally, we also identified 137 Simple Sequence Repeats related to 112 genes and target sites for 10 miRNAs in some important families such as cellulose synthase, cellulose synthase-like and laccases, etc. To gain further insight into potential functional roles, expression analysis of these gene families was performed using publicly available data sets in various tissues and under abiotic stress conditions. Expression analysis showed tissue specificity as well as differential expression under abiotic stress conditions. Overall, our study provides a comprehensive information on cell wall related genes families in sorghum which offers a valuable resource to develop strategies for altering biomass composition by plant breeding and genetic engineering approaches.

  2. FORMULATION OF MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM DESCRIBING PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES AT CONCRETE CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Fedosov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the relevance of new scientific research focused on modeling of physical and chemical processes occurring in the cement concrete at their exploitation. The basic types of concrete corrosion are described. The problem of mass transfer processes in a flat reinforced concrete wall at concrete corrosion of the first and the second types has been mathematically formulated.

  3. The coevent formulation of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallden, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Understanding quantum theory has been a subject of debate from its birth. Many different formulations and interpretations have been proposed. Here we examine a recent novel formulation, namely the coevents formulation. It is a histories formulation and has as starting point the Feynman path integral and the decoherence functional. The new ontology turns out to be that of a coarse-grained history. We start with a quantum measure defined on the space of histories, and the existence of zero covers rules out single-history as potential reality (the Kochen Specker theorem casted in histories form is a special case of a zero cover). We see that allowing coarse-grained histories as potential realities avoids the previous paradoxes, maintains deductive non-contextual logic (alas non-Boolean) and gives rise to a unique classical domain. Moreover, we can recover the probabilistic predictions of quantum theory with the use of the Cournot's principle. This formulation, being both a realist formulation and based on histories, is well suited conceptually for the purposes of quantum gravity and cosmology.

  4. Papillae formation on trichome cell walls requires the function of the mediator complex subunit Med25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornero, Christy; Suo, Bangxia; Zahde, Mais; Juveland, Katelyn; Kirik, Viktor

    2017-11-01

    Glassy Hair 1 (GLH1) gene that promotes papillae formation on trichome cell walls was identified as a subunit of the transcriptional mediator complex MED25. The MED25 gene is shown to be expressed in trichomes. The expression of the trichome development marker genes GLABRA2 (GL2) and Ethylene Receptor2 (ETR2) is not affected in the glh1 mutant. Presented data suggest that Arabidopsis MED25 mediator component is likely involved in the transcription of genes promoting papillae deposition in trichomes. The plant cell wall plays an important role in communication, defense, organization and support. The importance of each of these functions varies by cell type. Specialized cells, such as Arabidopsis trichomes, exhibit distinct cell wall characteristics including papillae. To better understand the molecular processes important for papillae deposition on the cell wall surface, we identified the GLASSY HAIR 1 (GLH1) gene, which is necessary for papillae formation. We found that a splice-site mutation in the component of the transcriptional mediator complex MED25 gene is responsible for the near papillae-less phenotype of the glh1 mutant. The MED25 gene is expressed in trichomes. Reporters for trichome developmental marker genes GLABRA2 (GL2) and Ethylene Receptor2 (ETR2) were not affected in the glh1 mutant. Collectively, the presented results show that MED25 is necessary for papillae formation on the cell wall surface of leaf trichomes and suggest that the Arabidopsis MED25 mediator component is likely involved in the transcription of a subset of genes that promote papillae deposition in trichomes.

  5. Transmission of wave energy in curved ducts. [acoustic propagation within rigid walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of circular bends to transmit acoustic energy flux. A formulation of wave-energy flow is developed for motion in curved ducts. A parametric study over a range of frequencies shows the ability of circular bends to transmit energy in the case of perfectly rigid walls.

  6. Nature of the Schwinger term in spinor electrodynamics. [Dispersion formulation,dimensions,green functions,c-number,linear unitarity condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, K; Sasaki, R [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-06-01

    On the basis of the dispersion formulation of field theories the Schwinger term in spinor electrodynamics is shown to be a c-number. The essence of the proof consists in the dimensional argument and the characteristic features of the linear unitarity condition for a set of Green's functions involving the Schwinger term.

  7. A sympletic formulation of relativistic particle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulczyjew, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Particle mechanics is formulated in terms of sympletic relations and infinitesimal symplectic relations. Generating functions of symplectic relations are shown to be classical counterparts of Green's functions of wave mechanics. (author)

  8. A simplectic formulation of relativistic particle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulczyjew, W.M.

    1976-12-01

    Particle mechanics is formulated in terms of symplectic relations and infinitesimal symplectic relations. Generating functions of symplectic relations are shown to be classical counterparts of Green's functions of wave mechanics. (orig.) [de

  9. Chemi- vs physisorption in the radical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes under microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Mamane

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of microwaves on the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs by the diazonium method was studied. The usage of a new approach led to the identification of the strength of the interaction (physical or chemical between the functional groups and the carbon nanotube surface. Moreover, the nature (chemical formula of the adsorbed/grafted functional groups was determined. According to thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, the optimal functionalization level was reached after 5 min of reaction. Prolonged reaction times can lead to undesired reactions such as defunctionalization, solvent addition and polymerization of the grafted functions. The strength (chemi- vs physisorption of the bonds between the grafted functional groups and the SWNTs is discussed showing the occurrence of physical adsorption as a consequence of defunctionalization after 15 min of reaction under microwaves. Several chemical mechanisms of grafting could be identified, and it was possible to distinguish conditions leading to the desired chemical grafting from those leading to undesired reactions such as physisorption and polymerization.

  10. Degenerated shell element for geometrically nonlinear analysis of thin-walled piezoelectric active structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinković, D; Köppe, H; Gabbert, U

    2008-01-01

    Active piezoelectric thin-walled structures, especially those with a notably higher membrane than bending stiffness, are susceptible to large rotations and transverse deflections. Recent investigations conducted by a number of researchers have shown that the predicted behavior of piezoelectric structures can be significantly influenced by the assumption of large displacements and rotations of the structure, thus demanding a geometrically nonlinear formulation in order to investigate it. This paper offers a degenerated shell element and a simplified formulation that relies on small incremental steps for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of piezoelectric composite structures. A set of purely mechanical static cases is followed by a set of piezoelectric coupled static cases, both demonstrating the applicability of the proposed formulation

  11. The electronic fine structure of 4-nitrophenyl functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K; Coleman, Karl S; Dhanak, Vinod R

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance to various CNT based applications. Herein the electronic fine structure of single-walled carbon nanotube films modified with 4-nitrophenyl groups, produced following reaction with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate, was investigated for the first time. Various techniques such as x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies were used to explore the electronic structure, and the results were compared with the measured electrical resistances. A reduction in number of the π electronic states in the valence band consistent with the increased resistance of the functionalized nanotube films was observed.

  12. Aspergillus nidulans cell wall composition and function change in response to hosting several Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-galactopyranose mutase activity mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Kausar Alam

    Full Text Available Deletion or repression of Aspergillus nidulans ugmA (AnugmA, involved in galactofuranose biosynthesis, impairs growth and increases sensitivity to Caspofungin, a β-1,3-glucan synthesis antagonist. The A. fumigatus UgmA (AfUgmA crystal structure has been determined. From that study, AfUgmA mutants with altered enzyme activity were transformed into AnugmA▵ to assess their effect on growth and wall composition in A. nidulans. The complemented (AnugmA::wild type AfugmA strain had wild type phenotype, indicating these genes had functional homology. Consistent with in vitro studies, AfUgmA residues R182 and R327 were important for its function in vivo, with even conservative amino (RK substitutions producing AnugmA? phenotype strains. Similarly, the conserved AfUgmA loop III histidine (H63 was important for Galf generation: the H63N strain had a partially rescued phenotype compared to AnugmA▵. Collectively, A. nidulans strains that hosted mutated AfUgmA constructs with low enzyme activity showed increased hyphal surface adhesion as assessed by binding fluorescent latex beads. Consistent with previous qPCR results, immunofluorescence and ELISA indicated that AnugmA▵ and AfugmA-mutated A. nidulans strains had increased α-glucan and decreased β-glucan in their cell walls compared to wild type and AfugmA-complemented strains. Like the AnugmA▵ strain, A. nidulans strains containing mutated AfugmA showed increased sensitivity to antifungal drugs, particularly Caspofungin. Reduced β-glucan content was correlated with increased Caspofungin sensitivity. Aspergillus nidulans wall Galf, α-glucan, and β-glucan content was correlated in A. nidulans hyphal walls, suggesting dynamic coordination between cell wall synthesis and cell wall integrity.

  13. Comprehensive interrogation of the cellular response to fluorescent, detonation and functionalized nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura; Grobárová, Valéria; Shen, Helen; Man, Han Bin; Míčová, Júlia; Ledvina, Miroslav; Štursa, Jan; Nesladek, Milos; Fišerová, Anna; Ho, Dean

    2014-10-21

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are versatile nanoparticles that are currently being investigated for a variety of applications in drug delivery, biomedical imaging and nanoscale sensing. Although initial studies indicate that these small gems are biocompatible, there is a great deal of variability in synthesis methods and surface functionalization that has yet to be evaluated. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the cellular compatibility of an array of nanodiamond subtypes and surface functionalization strategies. These results demonstrate that NDs are well tolerated by multiple cell types at both functional and gene expression levels. In addition, ND-mediated delivery of daunorubicin is less toxic to multiple cell types than treatment with daunorubicin alone, thus demonstrating the ability of the ND agent to improve drug tolerance and decrease therapeutic toxicity. Overall, the results here indicate that ND biocompatibility serves as a promising foundation for continued preclinical investigation.

  14. Comprehensive interrogation of the cellular response to fluorescent, detonation and functionalized nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura; Grobárová, Valéria; Shen, Helen; Man, Han Bin; Míčová, Júlia; Ledvina, Miroslav; Štursa, Jan; Nesladek, Milos; Fišerová, Anna; Ho, Dean

    2014-09-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are versatile nanoparticles that are currently being investigated for a variety of applications in drug delivery, biomedical imaging and nanoscale sensing. Although initial studies indicate that these small gems are biocompatible, there is a great deal of variability in synthesis methods and surface functionalization that has yet to be evaluated. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the cellular compatibility of an array of nanodiamond subtypes and surface functionalization strategies. These results demonstrate that NDs are well tolerated by multiple cell types at both functional and gene expression levels. In addition, ND-mediated delivery of daunorubicin is less toxic to multiple cell types than treatment with daunorubicin alone, thus demonstrating the ability of the ND agent to improve drug tolerance and decrease therapeutic toxicity. Overall, the results here indicate that ND biocompatibility serves as a promising foundation for continued preclinical investigation.

  15. Reading Comprehension Profiles of High-Functioning Students on the Autism Spectrum: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Pamela; Carnahan, Christina R.; Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, this study sought to understand what influences reading comprehension and how meaning is made from text among high-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Using a think-aloud procedure, 13 individuals ages 7-13 with ASD read 16 passages at their instructional reading level.…

  16. A tale of two neglected systems - structure and function of the thin- and thick-walled sieve tubes in monocotyledonous leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted eBotha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a large body of information relating to the ontogeny, development and the vasculature of eudicotyledonous leaves. However there is less information available concerning the vascular anatomy of monocotyledonous leaves. This is surprising, given that there are two uniquely different phloem systems present in large groups such as grasses and sedges. Monocotyledonous leaves contain marginal, large, intermediate and small longitudinal veins that are interconnected by numerous transverse veins. The longitudinal veins contain two metaphloem sieve tube types, which, based upon their ontogeny and position within the phloem, are termed early (thin-walled and late (thick-walled sieve tubes. Early metaphloem comprises sieve tubes, companion cells and vascular parenchyma cells, whilst the late metaphloem, contains thick-walled sieve tubes that lack companion cells. Thick-walled sieve tubes are generally adjacent to, or no more than one cell removed from the metaxylem. Unlike thin-walled sieve tube-companion cell complexes, thick-walled sieve tubes are connected to parenchyma by pore-plasmodesma units and are generally symplasmically isolated from the thin walled sieve tubes. This paper addresses key structural and functional differences between thin- and thick-walled sieve tubes and explores the unique advantages of alternate transport strategies that this 5 to 7 million year old dual system may offer. It would seem that these two systems may enhance, add to, or play a significant role in increasing the efficiency of solute retrieval as well as of assimilate transfer.

  17. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.

    2015-04-06

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with ‘invisible’ phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.

  18. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function......, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study...... was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery...

  19. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  20. Prediction of wall shear stresses in transitional boundary layers using near-wall mean velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Woo Pyung; Shin, Sung Ho; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2000-01-01

    The local wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer was estimated from the near-wall mean velocity data using the principle of Computational Preston tube Method(CPM). The previous DNS and experimental databases of transitional boundary layers were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and to provide the applicable range of wall unit y + . The skin friction coefficients predicted by the CPM agreed well with those from previous studies. To reexamine the applicability of the CPM, near-wall hot-wire measurements were conducted in developing transitional boundary layers on a flat plate with different freestream turbulence intensities. The intermittency profiles across the transitional boundary layers were reasonably obtained from the conditional sampling technique. An empirical correlation between the representative intermittency near the wall and the free parameter K 1 of the extended wall function of CPM has been newly proposed using the present and other experimental data. The CPM has been verified as a useful tool to measure the wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer with reasonable accuracy

  1. Intermittency and scaling laws for wall bounded turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Benzi, R.; Amati, G.; Casciola, C. M.; Toschi, F.; Piva, R.

    1998-01-01

    Well defined scaling laws clearly appear in wall bounded turbulence, even very close to the wall, where a distinct violation of the refined Kolmogorov similarity hypothesis (RKSH) occurs together with the simultaneous persistence of scaling laws. A new form of RKSH for the wall region is here proposed in terms of the structure functions of order two which, in physical terms, confirms the prevailing role of the momentum transfer towards the wall in the near wall dynamics.

  2. Granular packings with moving side walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, James W.; Grest, Gary Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The effects of movement of the side walls of a confined granular packing are studied by discrete element, molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamical evolution of the stress is studied as a function of wall movement both in the direction of gravity as well as opposite to it. For all wall velocities explored, the stress in the final state of the system after wall movement is fundamentally different from the original state obtained by pouring particles into the container and letting them settle under the influence of gravity. The original packing possesses a hydrostaticlike region at the top of the container which crosses over to a depth-independent stress. As the walls are moved in the direction opposite to gravity, the saturation stress first reaches a minimum value independent of the wall velocity, then increases to a steady-state value dependent on the wall velocity. After wall movement ceases and the packing reaches equilibrium, the stress profile fits the classic Janssen form for high wall velocities, while some deviations remain for low wall velocities. The wall movement greatly increases the number of particle-wall and particle-particle forces at the Coulomb criterion. Varying the wall velocity has only small effects on the particle structure of the final packing so long as the walls travel a similar distance.

  3. Seismic evaluation of reinforced masonry walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, T.E.; Button, M.R.; Mayes, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Masonry walls in operating nuclear plants are in many cases found to be overstressed in terms of allowable stresses when evaluated using current seismic design criteria. However, experimental evidence exists indicating that reinforced masonry walls have a considerable margin between the load levels at which allowable stresses are exceeded and the load levels at which structural distress and loss of function occurs. This paper presents a methodology which allows the actual capacity of reinforced masonry walls under seismic loading to be quantified. The methodology is based on the use of non-linear dynamic analyses and incorporates observed hysteretic behavior for both in-plane and out-of-plane response. Experimental data is used to develop response parameters and to validate the results predicted by the models. Criteria have been concurrently developed to evaluate the deformations and material performance in the walls to ensure adequate margins of safety for the required function. An example of the application of these procedures is provided

  4. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Reed, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: A cytotoxicity study in relation to functionalization, dose and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lulu; Forman, Henry Jay; Ge, Yi; Lunec, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    Chemical functionalization broadens carbon nanotube (CNT) applications, conferring new functions, but at the same time potentially altering toxicity. Although considerable experimental data related to CNT toxicity, at the molecular and cellular levels, have been reported, there is very limited information available for the corresponding mechanism involved (e.g. cell apoptosis and genotoxicity). The threshold dose for safe medical application in relation to both pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes remains ambiguous. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of pristine and functionalized (OH, COOH) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for cell viability, oxidant detection, apoptosis and DNA mutations, to determine the non-toxic dose and influence of functional group in a human lung-cancer cell line exposed to 1-1000μg/ml MWCNTs for 24, 48 and 72h. The findings suggest that pristine MWCNTs induced more cell death than functionalized MWCNTs while functionalized MWCNTs are more genotoxic compared to their pristine form. The level of both dose and dispersion in the matrix used should be taken into consideration before applying further clinical applications of MWCNTs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A method for the direct generation of comprehensive numerical solar building transfer functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.Y. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (China). Dept. of Building Services Engineering

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a method for the direct generation of comprehensive numerical room transfer functions with any derived parameters as output, such as operative temperature or thermal load. Complex conductive, convective and radiant heat transfer processes, or any derived thermal parameters in buildings can be explicitly and precisely described by a generalized thermal network. This allows the s-transfer and z-transfer functions to be directly generated, using semi-symbolic analysis techniques, Cayley's expansion of determinant and Heaviside's expansion theorem. A simple algorithm is developed for finding the roots of the denominator in the inverse transform of the s-transfer functions, which ensures that no single root is missing. The techniques have been applied to generating the transfer functions of a passive solar room with floor heating. The example calculation demonstrates the high efficiency of the computational method. (author)

  7. An axisymmetric PFEM formulation for bottle forming simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhakov, Pavel B.

    2017-01-01

    A numerical model for bottle forming simulation is proposed. It is based upon the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM) and is developed for the simulation of bottles characterized by rotational symmetry. The PFEM strategy is adapted to suit the problem of interest. Axisymmetric version of the formulation is developed and a modified contact algorithm is applied. This results in a method characterized by excellent computational efficiency and volume conservation characteristics. The model is validated. An example modelling the final blow process is solved. Bottle wall thickness is estimated and the mass conservation of the method is analysed.

  8. Towards a comprehensive city emission function (CCEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    The comprehensive city emission function (CCEF) is developed for a heterogeneous light-emitting or blocking urban environments, embracing any combination of input parameters that characterize linear dimensions in the system (size and distances between buildings or luminaires), properties of light-emitting elements (such as luminous building façades and street lighting), ground reflectance and total uplight-fraction, all of these defined for an arbitrarily sized 2D area. The analytical formula obtained is not restricted to a single model class as it can capture any specific light-emission feature for wide range of cities. The CCEF method is numerically fast in contrast to what can be expected of other probabilistic approaches that rely on repeated random sampling. Hence the present solution has great potential in light-pollution modeling and can be included in larger numerical models. Our theoretical findings promise great progress in light-pollution modeling as this is the first time an analytical solution to city emission function (CEF) has been developed that depends on statistical mean size and height of city buildings, inter-building separation, prevailing heights of light fixtures, lighting density, and other factors such as e.g. luminaire light output and light distribution, including the amount of uplight, and representative city size. The model is validated for sensitivity and specificity pertinent to combinations of input parameters in order to test its behavior under various conditions, including those that can occur in complex urban environments. It is demonstrated that the solution model succeeds in reproducing a light emission peak at some elevated zenith angles and is consistent with reduced rather than enhanced emission in directions nearly parallel to the ground.

  9. Stress-intensity factors for a thick-walled cylinder containing an annular imbedded or external or internal surface crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdol, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    The elastostatic axisymmetric problem for a long thick-walled cylinder containing a ring-shaped internal or edge crack is considered. Using the standard transform technique the problem is formulated in terms of an integral equation which has a simple Cauchy kernel for the internal crack and a generalized Cauchy kernel for the edge crack as the dominant part. As examples the uniform axial load and the steady-state thermal stress problems have been solved and the related stress intensity factors have been calculated. Among other findings the results show that in the cylinder under uniform axial stress containing an internal crack the stress intensity factor at the inner tip is always greater than that at the outer tip for equal net ligament thicknesses and in the cylinder with an edge crack which is under a state of thermal stress the stress intensity factor is a decreasing function of the crack depth, tending to zero as the crack depth approaches the wall thickness.

  10. Energy policy formulation for Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, T.

    1981-01-01

    Pakistan is a low income, low energy consumption country. In view of the close interdependence between economic growth and energy consumption, she will need increasing energy supplies in order to maintain her economic growth. This paper develops an energy sector optimization model for the Pakistan economy, which consists of production models for five energy industries, ie oil, gas, coal, electricity (including electricity generated in nuclear power plants) and non-commercial fuels. The model is first used to forecast energy balances for the period 1975 - 2006. The model is then employed to formulate a long-term comprehensive energy policy for Pakistan. Finally the suggested policy is compared with the current official energy programme. (author)

  11. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with amino groups by reacting with supercritical ammonia fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lu; Bai Yongping; Huang Xu; Gao Zhangfei; Meng Linghui; Huang Yudong; Ma Jun

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, supercritical ammonia fluid was utilized to simply functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with amino groups. The successful amino functionalization of MWCNTs was proven and the physicochemical properties of MWCNTs before and after supercritical ammonia fluids modifications were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results also indicated that the supercritical ammonia fluids had the visible effects on the nanostructure of carbon nanotubes. Our novel modification approach provides an easy way to modify MWCNTs with amino groups, which is very useful for realizing 'carbon nanotube economy' in the near future.

  12. Solvent-free functionalization of fullerene C{sub 60} and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes with aromatic amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Calera, Itzel J. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Meza-Laguna, Victor [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Gromovoy, Taras Yu. [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of the Ukraine, Gen. Naumova 17, 03164 Kiev (Ukraine); Chávez-Uribe, Ma. Isabel [Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Vladimir A., E-mail: basiuk@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elbg1111@gmail.com [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with aromatic amines. • The amines add onto nanotube defects, likewise they add onto fullerene C{sub 60}. • The addition takes place at elevated temperature and without organic solvents. • Functionalized nanotubes were characterized by a number of instrumental techniques. - Abstract: We employed a direct one-step solvent-free covalent functionalization of solid fullerene C{sub 60} and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with aromatic amines 1-aminopyrene (AP), 2-aminofluorene (AF) and 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN). The reactions were carried out under moderate vacuum, in a wide temperature range of 180–250 °C, during relatively short time of about 2 h. To confirm successful amine attachment, a large number of analytical techniques were used (depending on the nanomaterial functionalized) such as Fourier transform infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron, {sup 13}C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, temperature-programmed desorption with mass spectrometric detection, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The nucleophilic addition of the aromatic amines to C{sub 60} molecule was studied theoretically by using density functional theory (PBE GGA functional with Grimme dispersion correction in conjunction with the DNP basis set). In the case of crystalline C{sub 60}, the solvent-free technique has a limited applicability due to poor diffusion of vaporous aromatic amines into the bulk. Nevertheless, the approach proposed allows for a facile preparation of aromatic amine-functionalized pristine MWCNTs without contamination with other chemical reagents, detergents and solvents, which is especially important for a vast variety of nanotube applications spanning from nanoelectronics to nanomedicine.

  13. Formulating a comprehensive strategy to counter the menace of malnutrition in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The indispensable role of optimal nutrition in ensuring absolute health status and holistic development of a society is well acknowledged. Malnutrition is considered as a disease of human society that can begin in the womb and eventually lasts till the death. A wide range of socio-cultural and infectious parameters have been determined that can ultimately precipitate malnutrition. Considering the multi-factorial origin of the disease, the strategy to combat malnutrition should also be comprehensive and multi-pronged comprising measures to combat the condition at every level concurrently in the entire nation. The corrective policy essentially requires the coordinated approach of different stakeholders and should be targeted at four different levels - family, community, national, and international. To conclude, diet is a crucial element in the natural history of many public health-related diseases, and owing to the multiple factors that eventually determine the dietary habits, a comprehensive approach is the need of the hour.

  14. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Leonardo, E-mail: lleitao@mdp.edu.ar; Mégevand, Ariel, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar

    2016-04-15

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  15. The influence of wall orientation and exterior surface solar absorptivity on time lag and decrement factor in the Greek region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontoleon, K.J.; Eumorfopoulou, E.A. [Department of Civil Engineering, Laboratory of Building Construction and Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (A.U.Th.), Gr-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this study is to determine how time lag and decrement factor are affected by wall orientation and exterior surface solar absorptivity, for specific climatic conditions. Their influence forms a non-sinusoidal periodical forcing function that simulates suitably the outdoor temperature fluctuations. This novel approach, allows the predictability of building's thermal response in an efficient way. The investigation is carried out for various insulated opaque wall formations comprising typical material elements, during the summer period in the mild Greek region. This study that allows proper building planning procedures, at the very early stages of the envelope design, presents great importance. The analysed configurations are assumed to have an orientation that corresponds to each compass point. In addition, the solar absorptivity of surface coatings is assumed to be varying from 0 to 1. The transient thermal analysis is obtained via a thermal circuit that models accurately the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms on both boundaries and through the multi-layered wall configurations. Moreover, the mathematical formulation and solution of this lumped model is achieved in discrete time steps by adopting the non-linear nodal method. The simulation results are focused on the single and combined effects of orientation and solar absorptivity on the dynamic thermal characteristics of various wall configurations. (author)

  16. Identification of an algal xylan synthase indicates that there is functional orthology between algal and plant cell wall biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Jacob Kruger [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Busse-Wicher, Marta [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry; Poulsen, Christian Peter [Carlsberg Research Lab., Copenhagen (Denmark); Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik [Carlsberg Research Lab., Copenhagen (Denmark); Smith, Peter James [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Yang, Jeong-Yeh [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center; Peña, Maria-Jesus [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Dinesen, Malene Hessellund [Carlsberg Research Lab., Copenhagen (Denmark); Martens, Helle Juel [Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Plant and Environmental Sciences; Melkonian, Michael [Univ. zu Koln (Germany). Botanical Inst., Dept. of Biological Sciences; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu [BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Moremen, Kelley W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center; Wilkerson, Curtis Gene [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Scheller, Henrik Vibe [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology Division; Dupree, Paul [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry; Ulvskov, Peter [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center; Urbanowicz, Breeanna Rae [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC); Harholt, Jesper [Carlsberg Research Lab., Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2018-02-20

    Insights into the evolution of plant cell walls have important implications for comprehending these diverse and abundant biological structures. In order to understand the evolving structure-function relationships of the plant cell wall, it is imperative to trace the origin of its different components. The present study is focused on plant 1,4-β-xylan, tracing its evolutionary origin by genome and transcriptome mining followed by phylogenetic analysis, utilizing a large selection of plants and algae. It substantiates the findings by heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of a charophyte alga xylan synthase. Of the 12 known gene classes involved in 1,4-β-xylan formation, XYS1/IRX10 in plants, IRX7, IRX8, IRX9, IRX14 and GUX occurred for the first time in charophyte algae. An XYS1/IRX10 ortholog from Klebsormidium flaccidum, designated K. flaccidumXYLAN SYNTHASE-1 (KfXYS1), possesses 1,4-β-xylan synthase activity, and 1,4-β-xylan occurs in the K. flaccidum cell wall. Finally, these data suggest that plant 1,4-β-xylan originated in charophytes and shed light on the origin of one of the key cell wall innovations to occur in charophyte algae, facilitating terrestrialization and emergence of polysaccharide-based plant cell walls.

  17. A new formulation for the importance function in the kinetics of subcritical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cristiano da; Senra Martinez, Aquilino; Carvalho da Silva, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this paper we propose a new formulation for the importance function in the kinetics of subcritical systems. ► We analyze the relevance of an external neutron source for the subcritical interval 0.95 eff eff is the multiplication factor according to the physical properties of the nuclear reactor. For the purposes of validation of the proposed method we will use, as a reference method, the expansion in modes of the time-dependent neutron flux for the solution of the onedimensional diffusion equation. It will be presented results that demonstrate the precision of the proposed method when compared to the conventional point kinetic equations. The results show that the new point kinetic equations are rather precise in the subcriticality range considered.

  18. Lagrangian formulation of the general relativistic Poynting-Robertson effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Vittorio; Battista, Emmanuele; Falanga, Maurizio

    2018-04-01

    We propose the Lagrangian formulation for describing the motion of a test particle in a general relativistic, stationary, and axially symmetric spacetime. The test particle is also affected by a radiation field, modeled as a coherent flux of photons traveling along the null geodesics of the background spacetime, including the general relativistic Poynting-Robertson effect. The innovative part of this work is to prove the existence of the potential linked to the dissipative action caused by the Poynting-Robertson effect in general relativity through the help of an integrating factor, depending on the energy of the system. Generally, such kinds of inverse problems involving dissipative effects might not admit a Lagrangian formulation; especially, in general relativity, there are no examples of such attempts in the literature so far. We reduce this general relativistic Lagrangian formulation to the classic case in the weak-field limit. This approach facilitates further studies in improving the treatment of the radiation field, and it contains, for example, some implications for a deeper comprehension of the gravitational waves.

  19. Determination of wall shear stress from mean velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Schultz, Michael P.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining the Reynolds shear stress profile in steady, two-dimensional wall-bounded flows using the mean streamwise velocity. The method is then utilized with experimental data to determine the local wall shear stress. The procedure is applicable to flows on smooth and rough surfaces with arbitrary pressure gradients. It is based on the streamwise component of the boundary layer momentum equation, which is transformed into inner coordinates. The method requires velocity profiles from at least two streamwise locations, but the formulation of the momentum equation reduces the dependence on streamwise gradients. The method is verified through application to laminar flow solutions and turbulent DNS results from both zero and nonzero pressure gradient boundary layers. With strong favorable pressure gradients, the method is shown to be accurate for finding the wall shear stress in cases where the Clauser fit technique loses accuracy. The method is then applied to experimental data from the literature from zero pressure gradient studies on smooth and rough walls, and favorable and adverse pressure gradient cases on smooth walls. Data from very near the wall are not required for determination of the wall shear stress. Wall friction velocities obtained using the present method agree with those determined in the original studies, typically to within 2%.

  20. Topological domain walls in helimagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, P.; Müller, J.; Köhler, L.; Rosch, A.; Kanazawa, N.; Tokura, Y.; Garst, M.; Meier, D.

    2018-05-01

    Domain walls naturally arise whenever a symmetry is spontaneously broken. They interconnect regions with different realizations of the broken symmetry, promoting structure formation from cosmological length scales to the atomic level1,2. In ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials, domain walls with unique functionalities emerge, holding great promise for nanoelectronics and spintronics applications3-5. These walls are usually of Ising, Bloch or Néel type and separate homogeneously ordered domains. Here we demonstrate that a wide variety of new domain walls occurs in the presence of spatially modulated domain states. Using magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we show three fundamental classes of domain walls to arise in the near-room-temperature helimagnet iron germanium. In contrast to conventional ferroics, the domain walls exhibit a well-defined inner structure, which—analogous to cholesteric liquid crystals—consists of topological disclination and dislocation defects. Similar to the magnetic skyrmions that form in the same material6,7, the domain walls can carry a finite topological charge, permitting an efficient coupling to spin currents and contributions to a topological Hall effect. Our study establishes a new family of magnetic nano-objects with non-trivial topology, opening the door to innovative device concepts based on helimagnetic domain walls.

  1. Density functional theory prediction of pKa for carboxylated single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Fu, Aiping; Xue, Xuyan; Guo, Fengna; Huai, Wenbo; Chu, Tianshu; Wang, Zonghua

    2017-06-01

    Density functional calculations have been performed to investigate the acidities for the carboxylated single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene. The pKa values for different COOH-functionalized models with varying lengths, diameters and chirality of nanotubes and with different edges of graphene were predicted using the SMD/M05-2X/6-31G* method combined with two universal thermodynamic cycles. The effects of following factors, such as, the functionalized position of carboxyl group, the Stone-Wales and single vacancy defects, on the acidity of the functionalized nanotube and graphene have also been evaluated. The deprotonated species have undergone decarboxylation when the hybridization mode of the carbon atom at the functionalization site changed from sp2 to sp3 both for the tube and graphene. The knowledge of the pKa values of the carboxylated nanotube and graphene could be of great help for the understanding of the nanocarbon materials in many diverse areas, including environmental protection, catalysis, electrochemistry and biochemistry.

  2. Identification of thermal properties distribution in building wall using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Jordan; Dumoulin, Jean

    2016-04-01

    In the construction sector, most of the measurements carried out from IR camera devices are exploited in a qualitative way (e.g. observation of thermal bridges). However, unless a quantitative analysis is realized, it is not possible to assess the impact of the observed phenomena. Most of research efforts and proposed solutions to identify quantified thermal properties (e.g. U-values) have to be completed, adapted to the built environment and validated in experimental and real conditions to allow quantified assessment of materials thermal properties thanks to IR camera devices [1]. We still need several steps in terms of scientific and technical developments for such technological progress. The H2020 European Built2Spec research project (http://built2spec-project.eu/) aims at giving highlights on that. Heat transfer through the walls are generally model by 1D heat equation in the wall depth. The built is composed by a multilayer domain representing the construction process. In this context, the thermal parameters of the wall are piecewise constant space functions. We propose a methodology to recover the vector of the wall thermal properties (conductivity and capacity) from boundary measurements obtained from an IR camera. It formulates as an inverse problem where the unknown are sought as minimizers of a cost function evaluating the gap between the measures and the model response. This optimization problem is non linear, and we solve it with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm coupled with the conjugate gradient method [2-3]. To shorten the time of the identification process, we use the adjoint method coming from the control theory [4]. This method fasten the gradient computation by solving an associated model, named the adjoint model. We study the ability of the procedure to reconstruct internal wall constitution from different environmental conditions. Furthermore, we propose a controlled experimental test to evaluate the method in laboratory conditions. References

  3. Chamber wall response to target implosion in inertial fusion reactors: new and critical assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.

    2002-01-01

    The chamber walls in inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors are exposed to harsh conditions following each target implosion. Key issues of the cyclic IFE operation include intense photon and ion deposition, wall thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, wall erosion and fatigue lifetime, and chamber clearing and evacuation to ensure desirable conditions prior to next target implosion. Several methods for wall protection have been proposed in the past, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. These methods include use of solid bare walls, gas-filled cavities, and liquid walls/jets. Detailed models have been developed for reflected laser light, emitted photons, and target debris deposition and interaction with chamber components and have been implemented in the comprehensive HEIGHTS software package. The focus of this study is to critically assess the reliability and the dynamic response of chamber walls in IFE systems. Of particular concern is the effect on wall erosion lifetime due to various erosion mechanisms, such as vaporization, chemical and physical sputtering, melt/liquid splashing and explosive erosion, and fragmentation of liquid walls

  4. System identification of timber masonry walls using shaking table test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Timir B.; Guerreiro, Luis; Bagchi, Ashutosh

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic study is important in order to design, repair and rehabilitation of structures. It has played an important role in the behavior characterization of structures; such as: bridges, dams, high rise buildings etc. There had been substantial development in this area over the last few decades, especially in the field of dynamic identification techniques of structural systems. Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) and Time Domain Decomposition are most commonly used methods to identify modal parameters; such as: natural frequency, modal damping and mode shape. The focus of the present research is to study the dynamic characteristics of typical timber masonry walls commonly used in Portugal. For that purpose, a multi-storey structural prototype of such wall has been tested on a seismic shake table at the National Laboratory for Civil Engineering, Portugal (LNEC). Signal processing has been performed of the output response, which is collected from the shaking table experiment of the prototype using accelerometers. In the present work signal processing of the output response, based on the input response has been done in two ways: FDD and Stochastic Subspace Identification (SSI). In order to estimate the values of the modal parameters, algorithms for FDD are formulated and parametric functions for the SSI are computed. Finally, estimated values from both the methods are compared to measure the accuracy of both the techniques.

  5. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  6. Projector Augmented-Wave formulation of response to strain and electric field perturbation within the density-functional perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexandre; Torrent, Marc; Caracas, Razvan

    2015-03-01

    A formulation of the response of a system to strain and electric field perturbations in the pseudopotential-based density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) has been proposed by D.R Hamman and co-workers. It uses an elegant formalism based on the expression of DFT total energy in reduced coordinates, the key quantity being the metric tensor and its first and second derivatives. We propose to extend this formulation to the Projector Augmented-Wave approach (PAW). In this context, we express the full elastic tensor including the clamped-atom tensor, the atomic-relaxation contributions (internal stresses) and the response to electric field change (piezoelectric tensor and effective charges). With this we are able to compute the elastic tensor for all materials (metals and insulators) within a fully analytical formulation. The comparison with finite differences calculations on simple systems shows an excellent agreement. This formalism has been implemented in the plane-wave based DFT ABINIT code. We apply it to the computation of elastic properties and seismic-wave velocities of iron with impurity elements. By analogy with the materials contained in meteorites, tested impurities are light elements (H, O, C, S, Si).

  7. Autonomous learning by simple dynamical systems with a discrete-time formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Agustín M.; Kaluza, Pablo

    2017-05-01

    We present a discrete-time formulation for the autonomous learning conjecture. The main feature of this formulation is the possibility to apply the autonomous learning scheme to systems in which the errors with respect to target functions are not well-defined for all times. This restriction for the evaluation of functionality is a typical feature in systems that need a finite time interval to process a unit piece of information. We illustrate its application on an artificial neural network with feed-forward architecture for classification and a phase oscillator system with synchronization properties. The main characteristics of the discrete-time formulation are shown by constructing these systems with predefined functions.

  8. Psychosocial student functioning in comprehensive dental clinic education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R

    2018-02-17

    The aims were to describe first-year clinical dental students' psychosocial experiences in a known well-functioning comprehensive clinic teaching group (F+Grp) and a known dysfunctional group (Dys-Grp) and, thus, discover and describe phenomena related to psychosocial functioning of students. These groups were compared and contrasted regarding negative stress symptoms, perfectionism and coping with stress. Eight female dental students (mean 26 years old), four in each group, were interviewed after the first clinical year about learning and emotional experiences. The students also rated their perceived stress using a 0-10 scale, where 0 is no stress, and 10 is highest stress. Qualitative analyses involved searching for recurring themes and discovery of categories of clinical and social functioning. All 8 students were revisited as dentists after 8 years and filled out a 15-item survey as longitudinal validation of their first-year clinical experiences and to estimate group consensus and informant accuracy. Both groups suffered from negative stress symptoms attributed to lack of time for clinical tasks, worries about work quality with confusion about their own expectations and worries about how others perceived them. Dys-Grp experienced higher negative stress and maladaptive perfectionism and described crying behaviours, withdrawal and unwillingness to cooperate with others. In contrast, students in F+Grp provided rich content about mutual cooperation related to social networking and positive support. The 8 subjects exhibited high internal consistency (α  =  .98) in their responses to the follow-up survey about their first year of clinic. The comprehensive care teaching clinic environment with students working in groups appeared to provide a possibility for students to support each other for improved stress coping. Unfortunately, the opposite also occurred. Positive, supportive teacher supervision of student challenges related to perfectionism and stress is

  9. Failure modes of low-rise shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Reed, J.W.; Salmon, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of available data concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. These data will be used to address two failure modes associated with shear wall structures. First, the data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls are examined, with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure. Second, the data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary for computing the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional

  10. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  11. Dynamic wall demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsui, L.; Mayhew, W.

    1990-12-01

    The dynamic wall concept is a ventilation strategy that can be applied to a single family dwelling. With suitable construction, outside air can be admitted through the exterior walls of the house to the interior space to function as ventilation air. The construction and performance monitoring of a demonstration house built to test the dynamic wall concept in Sherwood Park, Alberta, is described. The project had the objectives of demonstrating and assessing the construction methods; determining the cost-effectiveness of the concept in Alberta; analyzing the operation of the dynamic wall system; and determining how other components and systems in the house interact with the dynamic wall. The exterior wall construction consisted of vinyl siding, spun-bonded polyolefin-backed (SBPO) rigid fiberglass sheathing, 38 mm by 89 mm framing, fiberglass batt insulation and 12.7 mm drywall. The mechanical system was designed to operate in the dynamic (negative pressure) mode, however flexibility was provided to allow operation in the static (balanced pressure) mode to permit monitoring of the walls as if they were in a conventional house. The house was monitored by an extensive computerized monitoring system. Dynamic wall operation was dependent on pressure and temperature differentials between indoor and outdoor as well as wind speed and direction. The degree of heat gain was found to be ca 74% of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Temperature of incoming dynamic air was significantly affected by solar radiation and measurement of indoor air pollutants found no significant levels. 4 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Cell wall heterogeneity in root development of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Somssich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signalling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modelling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.

  13. A Framework for Assessing Reading Comprehension of Geometric Construction Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Lin; Li, Jian-Lin

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates one issue related to reading mathematical texts by presenting a two-dimensional framework for assessing reading comprehension of geometric construction texts. The two dimensions of the framework were formulated by modifying categories of reading literacy and drawing on key elements of geometric construction texts. Three…

  14. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double....... The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco) mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently...... in different combinations of triple mutants, suggesting their diversity in substrate preference. The overall degree of wall acetylation in the rwa quadruple mutant was reduced by 63% compared with the wild type, and histochemical analysis of the rwa quadruple mutant stem indicates defects in cell...

  15. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  16. PRISM offers a comprehensive genomic approach to transcription factor function prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Wenger, A. M.; Clarke, S. L.; Guturu, H.; Chen, J.; Schaar, B. T.; McLean, C. Y.; Bejerano, G.

    2013-01-01

    The human genome encodes 1500-2000 different transcription factors (TFs). ChIP-seq is revealing the global binding profiles of a fraction of TFs in a fraction of their biological contexts. These data show that the majority of TFs bind directly next to a large number of context-relevant target genes, that most binding is distal, and that binding is context specific. Because of the effort and cost involved, ChIP-seq is seldom used in search of novel TF function. Such exploration is instead done using expression perturbation and genetic screens. Here we propose a comprehensive computational framework for transcription factor function prediction. We curate 332 high-quality nonredundant TF binding motifs that represent all major DNA binding domains, and improve cross-species conserved binding site prediction to obtain 3.3 million conserved, mostly distal, binding site predictions. We combine these with 2.4 million facts about all human and mouse gene functions, in a novel statistical framework, in search of enrichments of particular motifs next to groups of target genes of particular functions. Rigorous parameter tuning and a harsh null are used to minimize false positives. Our novel PRISM (predicting regulatory information from single motifs) approach obtains 2543 TF function predictions in a large variety of contexts, at a false discovery rate of 16%. The predictions are highly enriched for validated TF roles, and 45 of 67 (67%) tested binding site regions in five different contexts act as enhancers in functionally matched cells.

  17. PRISM offers a comprehensive genomic approach to transcription factor function prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Wenger, A. M.

    2013-02-04

    The human genome encodes 1500-2000 different transcription factors (TFs). ChIP-seq is revealing the global binding profiles of a fraction of TFs in a fraction of their biological contexts. These data show that the majority of TFs bind directly next to a large number of context-relevant target genes, that most binding is distal, and that binding is context specific. Because of the effort and cost involved, ChIP-seq is seldom used in search of novel TF function. Such exploration is instead done using expression perturbation and genetic screens. Here we propose a comprehensive computational framework for transcription factor function prediction. We curate 332 high-quality nonredundant TF binding motifs that represent all major DNA binding domains, and improve cross-species conserved binding site prediction to obtain 3.3 million conserved, mostly distal, binding site predictions. We combine these with 2.4 million facts about all human and mouse gene functions, in a novel statistical framework, in search of enrichments of particular motifs next to groups of target genes of particular functions. Rigorous parameter tuning and a harsh null are used to minimize false positives. Our novel PRISM (predicting regulatory information from single motifs) approach obtains 2543 TF function predictions in a large variety of contexts, at a false discovery rate of 16%. The predictions are highly enriched for validated TF roles, and 45 of 67 (67%) tested binding site regions in five different contexts act as enhancers in functionally matched cells.

  18. Effect of FRP on the Energy Absorbed by Steel Shear Walls with Openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ghasemzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It’s for more than three decades that Steel Shear Walls are being used as lateral load resisting system. Definitely,the actual behavior of steel shear walls can be assessed using experimental results. However, solve many of phenomenon like this one should be done using mathematical and theoretical methods due to their special characteristics such as high expenses, lack of laboratory facilities and time limitations. In this study, the behavior of steel plate shear walls with openings in a one-story frame were evaluated and compared in various conditions. For this purpose, different values ​​for the opening in shear wall was considered and exposed to lateral displacement in ABAQUS as a comprehensive finite element software. Then, the impact of FRP arrangement on shear wall was evaluated to represent the structural behavior under various conditions. Result shows that, use of FRP sheets as parallel layers on both sides of shear wall has the best response on energy absorption, so that performance of the model was better than shear wall fully covered with FRP.

  19. Reading comprehension in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura L; Rutledge, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Although individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) self-report reading problems and experience difficulties in cognitive-linguistic functions that support discourse-level reading, prior research has primarily focused on sentence-level processing and auditory comprehension. Accordingly, the authors investigated the presence and nature of reading comprehension in PD, hypothesizing that (a) individuals with PD would display impaired accuracy and/or speed on reading comprehension tests and (b) reading performances would be correlated with cognitive test results. Eleven adults with PD and 9 age- and education-matched control participants completed tests that evaluated reading comprehension; general language and cognitive abilities; and aspects of attention, memory, and executive functioning. The PD group obtained significantly lower scores on several, but not all, reading comprehension, language, and cognitive measures. Memory, language, and disease severity were significantly correlated with reading comprehension for the PD group. Individuals in the early stages of PD without dementia or broad cognitive deficits can display reading comprehension difficulties, particularly for high- versus basic-level reading tasks. These reading difficulties are most closely related to memory, high-level language, and PD symptom severity status. The findings warrant additional research to delineate further the types and nature of reading comprehension impairments experienced by individuals with PD.

  20. 3N scattering in a three-dimensional operator formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckle, W.; Fachruddin, I.; Elster, C.; Golak, J.; Skibinski, R.; Witala, H.

    2010-01-01

    A recently developed formulation for a direct treatment of the equations for two- and three-nucleon bound states as set of coupled equations of scalar functions depending only on vector momenta is extended to three-nucleon scattering. Starting from the spin-momentum dependence occurring as scalar products in two- and three-nucleon forces together with other scalar functions, we present the Faddeev multiple scattering series in which order by order the spin degrees can be treated analytically leading to 3D integrations over scalar functions depending on momentum vectors only. Such formulation is especially important in view of awaiting extension of 3N Faddeev calculations to projectile energies above the pion production threshold and applications of chiral perturbation theory 3N forces, which are to be most efficiently treated directly in such three-dimensional formulation without having to expand these forces into a partial-wave basis. (orig.)

  1. Effect of commercial enzymes on berry cell wall deconstruction in the context of intravineyard ripeness variation under winemaking conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Yu; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho

    2016-01-01

    Significant intravineyard variation in grape berry ripening occurs within vines and between vines. However, no cell wall data are available on such variation. Here we used a checkerboard panel design to investigate ripening variation in pooled grape bunches for enzyme-assisted winemaking...... positively influence the consistency of winemaking and provides a foundation for further research into the relationship between grape berry cell wall architecture and enzyme formulations....

  2. Long-term hepatotoxicity of polyethylene-glycol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danying; Deng, Xiaoyong; Ji, Zongfei; Shen, Xizhong; Dong, Ling; Wu, Minghong; Gu, Taoying; Liu, Yuanfang

    2010-04-01

    The toxicity of polyethylene-glycol functionalized (PEGylated) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and non-PEGylated MWCNTs in vivo was evaluated and compared. Mice were exposed to MWCNTs by intravenous injection. The activity level of glutathione, superoxide dismutase and gene expression in liver, as well as some biochemical parameters and the tumor necrosis factor alpha level in blood were measured over 2 months. The pathological and electron micrographic observations of liver evidently indicate that the damage caused by non-PEGylated MWCNTs is slightly more severe than that of PEGylated MWCNTs, which means that PEGylation can partly, but not substantially, improve the in vivo biocompatibility of MWCNTs.

  3. Bacterial glycobiology: rhamnose-containing cell wall polysaccharides in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistou, Michel-Yves; Sutcliffe, Iain C; van Sorge, Nina M

    2016-07-01

    The composition of the Gram-positive cell wall is typically described as containing peptidoglycan, proteins and essential secondary cell wall structures called teichoic acids, which comprise approximately half of the cell wall mass. The cell walls of many species within the genera Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Lactococcus contain large amounts of the sugar rhamnose, which is incorporated in cell wall-anchored polysaccharides (CWP) that possibly function as homologues of well-studied wall teichoic acids (WTA). The presence and chemical structure of many rhamnose-containing cell wall polysaccharides (RhaCWP) has sometimes been known for decades. In contrast to WTA, insight into the biosynthesis and functional role of RhaCWP has been lacking. Recent studies in human streptococcal and enterococcal pathogens have highlighted critical roles for these complex polysaccharides in bacterial cell wall architecture and pathogenesis. In this review, we provide an overview of the RhaCWP with regards to their biosynthesis, genetics and biological function in species most relevant to human health. We also briefly discuss how increased knowledge in this field can provide interesting leads for new therapeutic compounds and improve biotechnological applications. © FEMS 2016.

  4. Velocity distribution in a turbulent flow near a rough wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsun, A. S.; Pisarevsky, M. I.; Fedoseev, V. N.; Kreps, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    Velocity distribution in the zone of developed wall turbulence, regardless of the conditions on the wall, is described by the well-known Prandtl logarithmic profile. In this distribution, the constant, that determines the value of the velocity, is determined by the nature of the interaction of the flow with the wall and depends on the viscosity of the fluid, the dynamic velocity, and the parameters of the wall roughness.In extreme cases depending on the ratio between the thickness of the viscous sublayer and the size of the roughness the constant takes on a value that does not depend on viscosity, or leads to a ratio for a smooth wall.It is essential that this logarithmic profile is the result not only of the Prandtl theory, but can be derived from general considerations of the theory of dimensions, and also follows from the condition of local equilibrium of generation and dissipation of turbulent energy in the wall area. This allows us to consider the profile as a universal law of velocity distribution in the wall area of a turbulent flow.The profile approximation up to the maximum speed line with subsequent integration makes possible to obtain the resistance law for channels of simple shape. For channels of complex shape with rough walls, the universal profile can be used to formulate the boundary condition when applied to the calculation of turbulence models.This paper presents an empirical model for determining the constant of the universal logarithmic profile. The zone of roughness is described by a set of parameters and is considered as a porous structure with variable porosity.

  5. Parameter-free method for the shape optimization of stiffeners on thin-walled structures to minimize stress concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Shibutan, Yoji [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shimoda, Masatoshi [Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a parameter-free shape optimization method for the strength design of stiffeners on thin-walled structures. The maximum von Mises stress is minimized and subjected to the volume constraint. The optimum design problem is formulated as a distributed-parameter shape optimization problem under the assumptions that a stiffener is varied in the in-plane direction and that the thickness is constant. The issue of nondifferentiability, which is inherent in this min-max problem, is avoided by transforming the local measure to a smooth differentiable integral functional by using the Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser function. The shape gradient functions are derived by using the material derivative method and adjoint variable method and are applied to the H{sup 1} gradient method for shells to determine the optimal free-boundary shapes. By using this method, the smooth optimal stiffener shape can be obtained without any shape design parameterization while minimizing the maximum stress. The validity of this method is verified through two practical design examples.

  6. Mechanical properties of PET composites using multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by inorganic and itaconic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. May-Pat

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were oxidized by two different acid treatments and further functionalized with itaconic acid (IA. The functionalized MWCNTs were used to fabricate Poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET composites by melt mixing. The presence of functional groups on the surface of the treated MWCNTs was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The MWCNTs oxidized with a concentrated mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 exhibited more oxygen containing functional groups (OH, COOH but also suffer larger structural degradation than those oxidized by a mild treatment based on diluted HNO3 followed by H2O2. PET composites were fabricated using the oxidized-only and oxidized followed by functionalization with IA MWCNTs. PET composites fabricated with MWCNT oxidized by mild conditions showed improved tensile strength and failure strain, while harsh MWCNT oxidation render them overly brittle.

  7. Continuous-release formulation for environmental doses to moving receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepho, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric dispersion models frequently assume a puff release or several puff releases, each of which are described separately. A dispersion model should better describe a continuous release as more puffs are assumed, but the computational cost and bookkeeping difficulty increases with additional puffs. A new formulism is derived in this work which replaces the puff approximation. With the new continuous release formulation, radioactive dose calculations to moving receptors are more accurately calculated without any great additional computation. There are several advantages of a continuous release formulation. With this formulation, a dose rate to a moving receptor is calculated as a function of time. The dose-rate will increase (decrease) as the bulk of the release gets closer (farther) to (from) the receptor which is at position x(t), y(t). The receptor may follow any x, y trajectory as a function of time, and the dose rate will be calculated along the path

  8. Cell wall composition and candidate biosynthesis gene expression during rice development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall...... components remain obscure. To better understand the patterns of cell wall accumulation and identify genes that act in grass cell wall biosynthesis, we characterized 30 samples from aerial organs of rice (Oryza sativa cv. Kitaake) at 10 developmental time points, 3-100 d post-germination. Within these samples......, we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had...

  9. Detection of cardiac wall motion defects with combined amplitude/phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Bonow, R.O.; Pace, L.; Brunetti, A.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier phase images have been used with some success to detect and quantify left ventricular (LV) wall motion defects. In abnormal regions of the LV, wall motion asynchronies often cause the time activity curve (TAC) to be shifted in phase. Such regional shifts are detected by analysis of the distribution function of phase values over the LV. However, not all wall motion defects result in detectable regional phase abnormalities. Such abnormalities may cause a reduction in the magnitude of contraction (and hence TAC amplitude) without any appreciable change in TAC shape(and hence phase). In an attempt to improve the sensitivity of the Fourier phase method for the detection of wall motion defects the authors analyzed the distribution function of Fourier amplitude as well as phase. 26 individuals with normal cardiac function and no history of cardiac disease served as controls. The goal was to detect and quantify wall motion as compared to the consensus of 3 independent observers viewing the scintigraphic cines. 26 subjects with coronary artery disease and mild wall motion defects (22 with normal EF) were studied ate rest. They found that analysis of the skew of thew amplitude distribution function improved the sensitivity for the detection of wall motion abnormalities at rest in the group from 65% to 85% (17/26 detected by phase alone, 22/26 by combined phase and amplitude analysis) while retaining a 0 false positive rate in the normal group. The authors conclude that analysis of Fourier amplitude distribution functions can significantly increase the sensitivity of phase imaging for detection of wall motion abnormalities

  10. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  11. Inference comprehension in text reading: Performance of individuals with right- versus left-hemisphere lesions and the influence of cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silagi, Marcela Lima; Radanovic, Marcia; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Mendonça, Lucia Iracema Zanotto; Mansur, Leticia Lessa

    2018-01-01

    Right-hemisphere lesions (RHL) may impair inference comprehension. However, comparative studies between left-hemisphere lesions (LHL) and RHL are rare, especially regarding reading comprehension. Moreover, further knowledge of the influence of cognition on inferential processing in this task is needed. To compare the performance of patients with RHL and LHL on an inference reading comprehension task. We also aimed to analyze the effects of lesion site and to verify correlations between cognitive functions and performance on the task. Seventy-five subjects were equally divided into the groups RHL, LHL, and control group (CG). The Implicit Management Test was used to evaluate inference comprehension. In this test, subjects read short written passages and subsequently answer five types of questions (explicit, logical, distractor, pragmatic, and other), which require different types of inferential reasoning. The cognitive functional domains of attention, memory, executive functions, language, and visuospatial abilities were assessed using the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT). The LHL and RHL groups presented difficulties in inferential comprehension in comparison with the CG. However, the RHL group presented lower scores than the LHL group on logical, pragmatic and other questions. A covariance analysis did not show any effect of lesion site within the hemispheres. Overall, all cognitive domains were correlated with all the types of questions from the inference test (especially logical, pragmatic, and other). Attention and visuospatial abilities affected the scores of both the RHL and LHL groups, and only memory influenced the performance of the RHL group. Lesions in either hemisphere may cause difficulties in making inferences during reading. However, processing more complex inferences was more difficult for patients with RHL than for those with LHL, which suggests that the right hemisphere plays an important role in tasks with higher comprehension demands

  12. Inference comprehension in text reading: Performance of individuals with right- versus left-hemisphere lesions and the influence of cognitive functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Lima Silagi

    Full Text Available Right-hemisphere lesions (RHL may impair inference comprehension. However, comparative studies between left-hemisphere lesions (LHL and RHL are rare, especially regarding reading comprehension. Moreover, further knowledge of the influence of cognition on inferential processing in this task is needed.To compare the performance of patients with RHL and LHL on an inference reading comprehension task. We also aimed to analyze the effects of lesion site and to verify correlations between cognitive functions and performance on the task.Seventy-five subjects were equally divided into the groups RHL, LHL, and control group (CG. The Implicit Management Test was used to evaluate inference comprehension. In this test, subjects read short written passages and subsequently answer five types of questions (explicit, logical, distractor, pragmatic, and other, which require different types of inferential reasoning. The cognitive functional domains of attention, memory, executive functions, language, and visuospatial abilities were assessed using the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT.The LHL and RHL groups presented difficulties in inferential comprehension in comparison with the CG. However, the RHL group presented lower scores than the LHL group on logical, pragmatic and other questions. A covariance analysis did not show any effect of lesion site within the hemispheres. Overall, all cognitive domains were correlated with all the types of questions from the inference test (especially logical, pragmatic, and other. Attention and visuospatial abilities affected the scores of both the RHL and LHL groups, and only memory influenced the performance of the RHL group.Lesions in either hemisphere may cause difficulties in making inferences during reading. However, processing more complex inferences was more difficult for patients with RHL than for those with LHL, which suggests that the right hemisphere plays an important role in tasks with higher comprehension

  13. Test Review: Naglieri, J. A., Goldstein, S. (2013), "Comprehensive Executive Function Inventory." North Tonawanda, NY: Multi-Health Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Melanie; McCrimmon, Adam W.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a description and review of the "Comprehensive Executive Function Inventory" (CEFI; Naglieri & Goldstein, 2013), published by Multi-Health Systems Inc. (MHS). It is a rating scale developed to measure a wide array of Executive Function (EF) abilities in individuals aged 5 through 18 years. Completed by a parent,…

  14. Reliability assessment and probability based design of reinforced concrete containments and shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Ellingwood, B.; Shinozuka, M.

    1986-03-01

    This report summarizes work completed under the program entitled, ''Probability-Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures.'' Under this program, the probabilistic models for various static and dynamic loads were formulated. The randomness and uncertainties in material strengths and structural resistance were established. Several limit states of concrete containments and shear walls were identified and analytically formulated. Furthermore, the reliability analysis methods for estimating limit state probabilities were established. These reliability analysis methods can be used to evaluate the safety levels of nuclear structures under various combinations of static and dynamic loads. They can also be used to generate analytically the fragility data for PRA studies. In addition to the development of reliability analysis methods, probability-based design criteria for concrete containments and shear wall structures have also been developed. The proposed design criteria are in the load and resistance factor design (LRFD) format. The load and resistance factors are determined for several limit states and target limit state probabilities. Thus, the proposed design criteria are risk-consistent and have a well-established rationale. 73 refs., 18 figs., 16 tabs

  15. Investigation of the functional role of CSLD proteins in plant cell wall deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Erik Etlar [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-11-21

    The overall goal of this research proposal was to characterize the molecular machinery responsible for polarized secretion of cell wall components in Arabidopsis thaliana. We have used the polarized expansion that occurs during root hair cell growth to identify membrane trafficking pathways involved in polarized secretion of cell wall components to the expanding tips of these cells, and we have recently shown that CSLD3 is preferentially targeted to the apical plasma membranes in root hair cells, where it plays essential roles during cell wall deposition in these cells. The specific aims of the project are designed to answer the following objective: Identification of the cell wall polysaccharide class that CSLD proteins synthesize.

  16. Structure and function of the first full-length murein peptide ligase (Mpl) cell wall recycling protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debanu; Hervé, Mireille; Feuerhelm, Julie; Farr, Carol L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Elsliger, Marc-André; Knuth, Mark W; Klock, Heath E; Miller, Mitchell D; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Deacon, Ashley M; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-03-18

    Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, an essential polymer made by enzymes in the Mur pathway. These proteins are specific to bacteria, which make them targets for drug discovery. MurC, MurD, MurE and MurF catalyze the synthesis of the peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine by the sequential addition of amino acids onto UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc). MurC-F enzymes have been extensively studied by biochemistry and X-ray crystallography. In gram-negative bacteria, ∼30-60% of the bacterial cell wall is recycled during each generation. Part of this recycling process involves the murein peptide ligase (Mpl), which attaches the breakdown product, the tripeptide L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate, to UDP-MurNAc. We present the crystal structure at 1.65 Å resolution of a full-length Mpl from the permafrost bacterium Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 (PaMpl). Although the Mpl structure has similarities to Mur enzymes, it has unique sequence and structure features that are likely related to its role in cell wall recycling, a function that differentiates it from the MurC-F enzymes. We have analyzed the sequence-structure relationships that are unique to Mpl proteins and compared them to MurC-F ligases. We have also characterized the biochemical properties of this enzyme (optimal temperature, pH and magnesium binding profiles and kinetic parameters). Although the structure does not contain any bound substrates, we have identified ∼30 residues that are likely to be important for recognition of the tripeptide and UDP-MurNAc substrates, as well as features that are unique to Psychrobacter Mpl proteins. These results provide the basis for future mutational studies for more extensive function characterization of the Mpl sequence-structure relationships.

  17. Structure and function of the first full-length murein peptide ligase (Mpl cell wall recycling protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debanu Das

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, an essential polymer made by enzymes in the Mur pathway. These proteins are specific to bacteria, which make them targets for drug discovery. MurC, MurD, MurE and MurF catalyze the synthesis of the peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine by the sequential addition of amino acids onto UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc. MurC-F enzymes have been extensively studied by biochemistry and X-ray crystallography. In gram-negative bacteria, ∼30-60% of the bacterial cell wall is recycled during each generation. Part of this recycling process involves the murein peptide ligase (Mpl, which attaches the breakdown product, the tripeptide L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate, to UDP-MurNAc. We present the crystal structure at 1.65 Å resolution of a full-length Mpl from the permafrost bacterium Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 (PaMpl. Although the Mpl structure has similarities to Mur enzymes, it has unique sequence and structure features that are likely related to its role in cell wall recycling, a function that differentiates it from the MurC-F enzymes. We have analyzed the sequence-structure relationships that are unique to Mpl proteins and compared them to MurC-F ligases. We have also characterized the biochemical properties of this enzyme (optimal temperature, pH and magnesium binding profiles and kinetic parameters. Although the structure does not contain any bound substrates, we have identified ∼30 residues that are likely to be important for recognition of the tripeptide and UDP-MurNAc substrates, as well as features that are unique to Psychrobacter Mpl proteins. These results provide the basis for future mutational studies for more extensive function characterization of the Mpl sequence-structure relationships.

  18. Green's function and boundary elements of multifield materials

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Qing-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Green's Function and Boundary Elements of Multifield Materials contains a comprehensive treatment of multifield materials under coupled thermal, magnetic, electric, and mechanical loads. Its easy-to-understand text clarifies some of the most advanced techniques for deriving Green's function and the related boundary element formulation of magnetoelectroelastic materials: Radon transform, potential function approach, Fourier transform. Our hope in preparing this book is to attract interested readers and researchers to a new field that continues to provide fascinating and technologically important challenges. You will benefit from the authors' thorough coverage of general principles for each topic, followed by detailed mathematical derivation and worked examples as well as tables and figures where appropriate. In-depth explanations of the concept of Green's function Coupled thermo-magneto-electro-elastic analysis Detailed mathematical derivation for Green's functions.

  19. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  20. Generalization of the Hofmann-Zotter combined-function formulation for application to 50x50 GeV e+e- storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakazaki, L.E.; Talman, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Though all existing strong-focusing electron storage rings have separated-function lattices, the combined-function lattice would reduce energy loss to synchrotron radiation. Robinson and Hofmann and Zotter have shown how to overcome the anti-damping that was once thought to rule out this possibility. Their formulation is generalized to achieve a more realistic machine design having FODO cells to incorporate the inevitable straight sections between magnets and to allow for any subsequent insertion of nonlinear elements. An analysis is performed to estimate the energy savings for a 50x50 GeV e+e- facility using combined-function magnets

  1. Probability density function of a puff dispersing from the wall of a turbulent channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    Study of dispersion of passive contaminants in turbulence has proved to be helpful in understanding fundamental heat and mass transfer phenomena. Many simulation and experimental works have been carried out to locate and track motions of scalar markers in a flow. One method is to combine Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian Scalar Tracking (LST) to record locations of markers. While this has proved to be useful, high computational cost remains a concern. In this study, we develop a model that could reproduce results obtained by DNS and LST for turbulent flow. Puffs of markers with different Schmidt numbers were released into a flow field at a frictional Reynolds number of 150. The point of release was at the channel wall, so that both diffusion and convection contribute to the puff dispersion pattern, defining different stages of dispersion. Based on outputs from DNS and LST, we seek the most suitable and feasible probability density function (PDF) that represents distribution of markers in the flow field. The PDF would play a significant role in predicting heat and mass transfer in wall turbulence, and would prove to be helpful where DNS and LST are not always available.

  2. Cognitive Modules Utilized for Narrative Comprehension in Children: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    OpenAIRE

    Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Holland, Scott K.; Plante, Elena

    2005-01-01

    The ability to comprehend narratives constitutes an important component of human development and experience. The neural correlates of auditory narrative comprehension in children were investigated in a large-scale functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study involving 313 subjects ages 5–18. Using group Independent Component Analysis (ICA), bilateral task-related components were found comprising the primary auditory cortex, the mid-superior temporal gyrus, the hippocampus, the angular g...

  3. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas Fadel; Bekyarova, Elena; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Zahrani, Ali; Al-Agel, Faisal Abdulaziz M; Al-Marzouki, Fahad M.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  4. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  5. Green's functions potential fields on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Melnikov, Yuri A

    2017-01-01

    This book is comprehensive in its classical mathematical physics presentation, providing the reader with detailed instructions for obtaining Green's functions from scratch. Green's functions is an instrument easily accessible to practitioners who are engaged in design and exploitation of machines and structures in modern engineering practice. To date, there are no books available on the market that are devoted to the Green's function formalism for equations covered in this volume. The reader, with an undergraduate background in applied mathematics, can become an active user of the Green's function approach. For the first time, Green's functions are discussed for a specific class of problems dealing with potential fields induced in thin-wall structures and therefore, the reader will have first-hand access to a novel issue. This Work is accessible to researchers in applied mathematics, mechanics, and relevant disciplines such as engineering, as well as to upper level undergraduates and graduate students.

  6. Dynamics of strings between walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Minoru; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke

    2009-01-01

    Configurations of vortex strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories in 3+1 dimensions. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string end points in the wall effective action. In the first method we explicitly obtain the effective Lagrangian in the strong coupling limit, which is written in terms of hypergeometric functions, and find the 90 deg. scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1) N gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well-separated strings.

  7. Functional Properties at Domain Walls in BiFeO3: Electrical, Magnetic, and Structural investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Yang, C.-H.; Yu, P.; Gajek, M.; Seidel, J.; Ramesh, R.; Wang, F.; Chu, Y.-H.; Martin, L. W.; Spaldin, N.; Rother, A.

    2009-03-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) is a widely studied robust ferroelectric, antiferromagnetic multiferroic. Conducting-atomic force microscopy studies reveal the presence of enhanced conductivity at certain types of domain walls in BFO. We have completed detailed TEM studies of the physical structure at these domain walls as well as in-depth DFT calculations of the evolution of electronic structure at these domain walls. These studies reveal two major contributions to the observed conduction: the formation of an electrostatic potential at the domain walls as well as a structurally-driven change in the electronic structure (i.e., a lower band gap locally) at the domain walls. We will discuss the use of optical characterization techniques as a way of probing this change in electronic structure at domain walls as well as detailed IV characterization both in atmospheric and UHV environments. Finally, the evolution of magnetism at these domain walls has been studied through the use of photoemission measurements. Initial findings point to a significant change in the magnetic order at these domain walls in BFO.

  8. Understanding the relationship between cotton fiber properties and non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajasundaram, Dhivyaa; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    cotton fibers, which are of both biological and industrial importance. To this end, we attempted to study cotton fiber characteristics together with glycan arrays using regression based approaches. Taking advantage of the comprehensive microarray polymer profiling technique (CoMPP), 32 cotton lines from...... different cotton species were studied. The glycan array was generated by sequential extraction of cell wall polysaccharides from mature cotton fibers and screening samples against eleven extensively characterized cell wall probes. Also, phenotypic characteristics of cotton fibers such as length, strength...

  9. The influence of anatomic variance in the coronary artery on cardiac function with PCI after acute inferior wall myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hongming; Feng Jue; Fang Fengning; Wu Heping; Wang Fengqin; Ma Huili

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the influence in anatomic variance of coronary artery on function of left and right ventricles after acute inferior myocardial infarction (AIMI) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention therapy (PCI). Methods: Forty-seven inferior AIMI patients were divided into 2 groups: 12 left dominant group [including equipollent case, i.e. inferior wall of left ventricle supplied by left circumflex coronary artery (LCX), right ventricle by right coronary artery (RCA)] and 35 right dominant group (both inferior wall and right ventricle were supplied by RCA). Equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) were used for comparing the influence between different coronary artery flow patterns on biventricular hemodynamics, blood supply and prognosis of PCI after 3 months. Results: Comparison of ventricular function in left and right dominant coronal artery type groups discharged 7- 10 d after PCI, there were differences in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) [(63.03 ± 5.64)% vs (57.67 ± 7.35)%, P=0.012], peak ejection rate (PER) [(3.52 ± 0.66) end-diastolic volume (EDV)/s vs (2.93 ± 0.73) EDV/s, P =0.011], peak filling rate (PFR) [(2.71 ± 0.88) EDV/s vs (2.11 ± 0.45 ) EDV/s, P=0.004], left free-wall regional ejection fraction [(81.94 ± 20.75)% vs (67.25 ± 16.54)%, P = O.032], and right free-wall regional ejection fraction [(57.86 ± 11.77)% vs (67.83 ± 10.38)%, P=0.012], right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) [(37.89 ± 3.86)% vs (41.67 ± 4.81)%, P=0.09]. After 3 months,there was difference only in RVEF [(44.60 ± 5.29)% vs (48.00 ± 3.30)%, P=0.043], but no difference in myocardial perfusion of left ventricle (P=0.357). Conclusions: In acute stage of AIMI right dominant group, there was more severe injury of right ventricle, in convalescent stage most of the right ventricular function resumed. The sustained right ventricular function in part of the patients can be demonstrated by ERNA

  10. Benchmark study of ionization potentials and electron affinities of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Hu, Zhubin; Jiang, Yanrong; He, Xiao; Sun, Zhenrong; Sun, Haitao

    2018-05-01

    The intrinsic parameters of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) are closely related to their unique properties and associated applications. In this work, we demonstrated the success of optimal tuning method based on range-separated (RS) density functionals for both accurate and efficient prediction of vertical IPs and electron affinities (EAs) of a series of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes C20n H20 (n  =  2–6) compared to the high-level IP/EA equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions (IP/EA-EOM-CCSD). Notably, the resulting frontier orbital energies (–ε HOMO and –ε LUMO) from the tuning method exhibit an excellent approximation to the corresponding IPs and EAs, that significantly outperform other conventional density functionals. In addition, it is suggested that the RS density functionals that possess both a fixed amount of exact exchange in the short-range and a correct long-range asymptotic behavior are suitable for calculating electronic structures of finite-sized CNTs. Next the performance of density functionals for description of various molecular properties such as chemical potential, hardness and electrophilicity are assessed as a function of tube length. Thanks to the efficiency and accuracy of this tuning method, the related behaviors of much longer armchair single-walled CNTs until C200H20 were studied. Lastly, the present work is proved to provide an efficient theoretical tool for future materials design and reliable characterization of other interesting properties of CNT-based systems.

  11. Proverb Comprehension as a Function of Reading Proficiency in Preadolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippold, Marilyn A.; Allen, Melissa M.; Kirsch, Dixon I.

    2001-01-01

    Proverb comprehension through reading was examined in 42 preadolescent students, 24 of whom were identified as "proficient readers," and 18 as "less proficient readers." Comprehension on both unfamiliar concrete and abstract proverbs was associated with reading proficiency, word knowledge, and analogical reasoning. (Contains references.)…

  12. Entropy Stable Summation-by-Parts Formulations for Compressible Computational Fluid Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Carpenter, M.H.

    2016-11-09

    A systematic approach based on a diagonal-norm summation-by-parts (SBP) framework is presented for implementing entropy stable (SS) formulations of any order for the compressible Navier–Stokes equations (NSE). These SS formulations discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy equality for smooth problems. They are also valid for discontinuous flows provided sufficient dissipation is added at shocks and discontinuities to satisfy an entropy inequality. Admissible SBP operators include all centred diagonal-norm finite-difference (FD) operators and Legendre spectral collocation-finite element methods (LSC-FEM). Entropy stable multiblock FD and FEM operators follows immediately via nonlinear coupling operators that ensure conservation, accuracy and preserve the interior entropy estimates. Nonlinearly stable solid wall boundary conditions are also available. Existing SBP operators that lack a stability proof (e.g. weighted essentially nonoscillatory) may be combined with an entropy stable operator using a comparison technique to guarantee nonlinear stability of the pair. All capabilities extend naturally to a curvilinear form of the NSE provided that the coordinate mappings satisfy a geometric conservation law constraint. Examples are presented that demonstrate the robustness of current state-of-the-art entropy stable SBP formulations.

  13. The JET ITER-like wall experiment: First results and lessons for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Lorne, E-mail: Lorne.Horton@jet.efda.org [EFDA-CSU Culham, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► JET has recently completed the installation of an ITER-like wall. ► Important operational aspects have changed with the new wall. ► Initial experiments have confirmed the expected low fuel retention. ► Disruption dynamics have change dramatically. ► Development of wall-compatible, ITER-relevant regimes of operation has begun. -- Abstract: The JET programme is strongly focused on preparations for ITER construction and exploitation. To this end, a major programme of machine enhancements has recently been completed, including a new ITER-like wall, in which the plasma-facing armour in the main vacuum chamber is beryllium while that in the divertor is tungsten—the same combination of plasma-facing materials foreseen for ITER. The goal of the initial experimental campaigns is to fully characterise operation with the new wall, concentrating in particular on plasma-material interactions, and to make direct comparisons of plasma performance with the previous, carbon wall. This is being done in a progressive manner, with the input power and plasma performance being increased in combination with the commissioning of a comprehensive new real-time protection system. Progress achieved during the first set of experimental campaigns with the new wall, which took place from September 2011 to July 2012, is reported.

  14. A synthetic glycan microarray enables epitope mapping of plant cell wall glycan-directed antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruprecht, Colin; Bartetzko, Max P; Senf, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    In the last three decades, more than 200 monoclonal antibodies have been raised against most classes of plant cell wall polysaccharides by different laboratories world-wide. These antibodies are widely used to identify differences in plant cell wall components in mutants, organ and tissue types......, and developmental stages. Despite their importance and broad use, the precise binding epitope for only a few of these antibodies has been determined. Here, we use a plant glycan microarray equipped with 88 synthetic oligosaccharides to comprehensively map the epitopes of plant cell wall glycan-directed antibodies....... Our results reveal the binding epitopes for 78 arabinogalactan-, rhamnogalacturonan-, xylan-, and xyloglucan-directed antibodies. We demonstrate that, with knowledge of the exact epitopes recognized by individual antibodies, specific glycosyl hydrolases can be implemented into immunological cell wall...

  15. Selective detection of SO2 at room temperature based on organoplatinum functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cid, C.C.; Jimenez-Cadena, G.; Riu, J.; Maroto, A.; Rius, F.X.; Batema, G.D.; van Koten, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that for the first time can selectively detect a single gaseous molecule in air by chemically functionalizing the SWCNTs with a selective molecular receptor. As a target model we used SO2. The

  16. Optimization of formulation and processing of Moringa oleifera and spirulina complex tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhu, Fan; Lin, Dan; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Yichao; Mark, Bohn

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To prepare a more comprehensive nutrition, more balanced proportion of natural nutritional supplement tablets with Moringa oleifera leaves and spirulina the two nutrients which have complementary natural food ingredients. Method: On the basis of research M. oleifera leaves with spirulina nutrient composition was determined on M. oleifera leaves and spirulina ratio of raw materials, and the choice of microcrystalline cellulose, sodium salt of caboxy methyl cellulose(CMC),magnesium stearate excipient, through single factor and orthogonal experiment, selecting the best formula tablets prepared by powder direct compression technology, for preparation of M. oleifera and spirulina complex tablets. Results: The best ratio of raw material for the M. oleifera leaves powder: spirulina powder was 7:3, the best raw materials for the tablet formulation was 88.5%, 8.0% microcrystalline cellulose, CMC 2.0%, stearin magnesium 1.5%, the optimum parameters for the raw material crushing 200-300 mesh particle size, moisture content of 7%, tableting pressure 40 kN. Conclusion: Through formulation and process optimization, we can prepare more comprehensive and balanced nutrition M. oleifera and spirulina complex tablets, its sheet-shaped appearance, piece weight variation, hardness, friability, disintegration and other indicators have reached the appropriate quality requirements.

  17. Intraventricular flow alterations due to dyssynchronous wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Audrey M.; Lai, Hong Kuan; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Roughly 30% of patients with systolic heart failure suffer from left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD), in which mechanical discoordination of the ventricle walls leads to poor hemodynamics and suboptimal cardiac function. There is currently no clear mechanistic understanding of how abnormalities in septal-lateral (SL) wall motion affects left ventricle (LV) function, which is needed to improve the treatment of LVD using cardiac resynchronization therapy. We use an experimental flow phantom with an LV physical model to study mechanistic effects of SL wall motion delay on LV function. To simulate mechanical LVD, two rigid shafts were coupled to two segments (apical and mid sections) along the septal wall of the LV model. Flow through the LV model was driven using a piston pump, and stepper motors coupled to the above shafts were used to locally perturb the septal wall segments relative to the pump motion. 2D PIV was used to examine the intraventricular flow through the LV physical model. Alterations to SL delay results in a reduction in the kinetic energy (KE) of the flow field compared to synchronous SL motion. The effect of varying SL motion delay from 0% (synchronous) to 100% (out-of-phase) on KE and viscous dissipation will be presented. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  18. In vivo imaging of the airway wall in asthma: fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy in relation to histology and lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bel Elisabeth H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway remodelling is a feature of asthma including fragmentation of elastic fibres observed in the superficial elastin network of the airway wall. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM is a new and non-invasive imaging technique performed during bronchoscopy that may visualize elastic fibres, as shown by in vitro spectral analysis of elastin powder. We hypothesized that FCFM images capture in vivo elastic fibre patterns within the airway wall and that such patterns correspond with airway histology. We aimed to establish the concordance between the bronchial elastic fibre pattern in histology and FCFM. Second, we examined whether elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM were different between asthmatic subjects and healthy controls. Finally, the association between these patterns and lung function parameters was investigated. Methods In a cross-sectional study comprising 16 subjects (8 atopic asthmatic patients with controlled disease and 8 healthy controls spirometry and bronchoscopy were performed, with recording of FCFM images followed by endobronchial biopsy at the airway main carina. Elastic fibre patterns in histological sections and FCFM images were scored semi-quantitatively. Agreement between histology and FCFM was analysed using linearly weighted kappa κw. Results The patterns observed in histological sections and FCFM images could be divided into 3 distinct groups. There was good agreement between elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM patterns (κw 0.744. The semi-quantitative pattern scores were not different between asthmatic patients and controls. Notably, there was a significant difference in post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted between the different patterns by histology (p = 0.001 and FCFM (p = 0.048, regardless of asthma or atopy. Conclusion FCFM captures the elastic fibre pattern within the airway wall in humans in vivo. The association between post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted and

  19. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of surface amino-functionalized water-dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, Goran; Marinkovic, Aleksandar [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Obradovic, Maja [Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Njegoseva 12, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Radmilovic, Velimir [National Centre for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Colic, Miodrag [Institute for Medical Research, Military Medical Academy, Crnotravska 17, 11002 Belgrade (Serbia); Aleksic, Radoslav [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Uskokovic, Petar S., E-mail: puskokovic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2009-06-30

    Surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), with amino groups via chemical modification of carboxyl groups introduced on the nanotube surface, using O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (N-HATU) and N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIEA) is reported. The N-HATU coupling agent provides faster reaction rate and the reaction occurs at lower temperature compared to amidation and acylation-amidation chemistry. The amines, 1,6-hexanediamine (HDA), diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PDA) were used. The resulting materials were characterized with different techniques such as FTIR, XRD, elemental analysis, TGA, TEM, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. MWCNTs functionalized with PDA posses the best dispersibility and electron transfer properties in comparison to the others amines. Functionalized MWCNTs, at the concentrations between 1 and 50 {mu}g ml{sup -1}, were not cytotoxic for the fibroblast L929 cell line. However, the concentrations of MWCNTs higher of 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} reduced cell growth and this effect correlated positively with the degree of their uptake by L929 cells.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of surface amino-functionalized water-dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, Goran; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Obradovic, Maja; Radmilovic, Velimir; Colic, Miodrag; Aleksic, Radoslav; Uskokovic, Petar S.

    2009-01-01

    Surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), with amino groups via chemical modification of carboxyl groups introduced on the nanotube surface, using O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (N-HATU) and N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIEA) is reported. The N-HATU coupling agent provides faster reaction rate and the reaction occurs at lower temperature compared to amidation and acylation-amidation chemistry. The amines, 1,6-hexanediamine (HDA), diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PDA) were used. The resulting materials were characterized with different techniques such as FTIR, XRD, elemental analysis, TGA, TEM, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. MWCNTs functionalized with PDA posses the best dispersibility and electron transfer properties in comparison to the others amines. Functionalized MWCNTs, at the concentrations between 1 and 50 μg ml -1 , were not cytotoxic for the fibroblast L929 cell line. However, the concentrations of MWCNTs higher of 10 μg ml -1 reduced cell growth and this effect correlated positively with the degree of their uptake by L929 cells.

  1. The Effect of Displacement Mode of Rigid Retaining Walls on Shearing Bands by Active Earth Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sekkel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work treats the physical modeling of failure mechanisms by active earth pressure. This last is developed by retaining wall movement. A lot of research showed that wall displacement has a significant effect on active earth pressure. A good comprehension of active earth pressure phenomenon and its failure mechanisms help us to better conceive retaining walls. The conception of a small-scale model allowed the realization of active earth pressure tests, while displacing the mobile wall toward the outside of the massif. The studied material is that of Schneebeli; light two-dimensional material made of cylindrical plastic rollers, simulating granular non-cohesive soil. The evolution of shearing zones under continuous and discontinuous displacement modes of mobile walls by correlation pictures allows the investigation of the localization of deformations and failure mechanisms.

  2. Influence of Coherent Structures on the Wall Shear Stress in Axial Flow Between a Cylinder and a Plane Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabbouchi, Imed; Guellouz, Mohamed Sadok; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    Synchronised hot-film and hot-wire measurements were made in the narrower region of a rectangular channel containing a cylindrical rod. The hot-film probe was mounted flush with the channel bottom wall to measure the wall shear stress, while the hot-wire probe was placed at a fixed position, selected in order to easily detect the passage of coherent structures. Mean and rms profiles of the wall shear stress show the influence of the gap to diameter ratio on their respective distributions. The latter presented peculiarities that could only be explained by the presence of coherent structures in the flow between the rod and the wall. Evidence of this presence is seen in the velocity power spectra. The strong influence of the coherent structures on the wall shear stress spatial and temporal distributions is established through velocity-wall shear stress cross-correlations functions and through conditionally sampled measurements

  3. HIV-positive patients’ and their families’ comprehension of HIV- and AIDS-related information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedina E. de Wet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite acknowledgement of the importance of sharing HIV- and AIDS-related information with people living with HIV, it is still unclear as to what their actual comprehension is of this information. This research was part of a larger project, Tswaragano, conducted in the North-West Province, South Africa, which explored and described the competence, ability and strengths of the family of the HIV-positive patient during home support. This research focused on Potchefstroom in the North-West Province. This article focuses on research with the objective being to explore and describe the comprehension of HIV-positive patients and their families with regard to HIV- and AIDS-related information, and to formulate recommendations to improve their comprehension of this information. A quantitative, explorative and descriptive survey design was followed. Data were collected by means of questionnaires completed by HIV-positive patients (n = 79 and their family members (n = 34. Descriptive statistical analysis by means of frequency analysis was conducted. Ethical considerations and mechanisms to enhance validity and reliability are discussed. The results indicated that both HIV-positive respondents and their families face social and financial challenges due to unemployment and low income. A strength found in this research is that the majority of respondents are linked to a church, which can be a valuable platform to share information on HIV and AIDS. With regards to sharing, sources and comprehension of HIV- and AIDS-related information, it is apparent that respondents perceived that pre- and post-counselling provided an opportunity for information sharing, but that they need health care workers to spend more time with them, to be non-judgemental and to make more use of visual aids. It furthermore seems that the majority of HIV-positive respondents in this study did comprehend the need for and negotiate for safer sexual practices. It was concluded that

  4. HIV-positive patients’ and their families’ comprehension of HIV- and AIDS-related information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedina E. de Wet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite acknowledgement of the importance of sharing HIV- and AIDS-related information with people living with HIV, it is still unclear as to what their actual comprehension is of this information. This research was part of a larger project, Tswaragano, conducted in the North-West Province, South Africa, which explored and described the competence, ability and strengths of the family of the HIV-positive patient during home support. This research focused on Potchefstroom in the North-West Province. This article focuses on research with the objective being to explore and describe the comprehension of HIV-positive patients and their families with regard to HIV- and AIDS-related information, and to formulate recommendations to improve their comprehension of this information. A quantitative, explorative and descriptive survey design was followed. Data were collected by means of questionnaires completed by HIV-positive patients (n= 79 and their family members (n= 34. Descriptive statistical analysis by means of frequency analysis was conducted. Ethical considerations and mechanisms to enhance validity and reliability are discussed. The results indicated that both HIV-positive respondents and their families face social and financial challenges due to unemployment and low income. A strength found in this research is that the majority of respondents are linked to a church, which can be a valuable platform to share information on HIV and AIDS. With regards to sharing, sources and comprehension of HIV- and AIDS-related information, it is apparent that respondents perceived that pre- and post-counselling provided an opportunity for information sharing, but that they need health care workers to spend more time with them, to be non-judgemental and to make more use of visual aids. It furthermore seems that the majority of HIV-positive respondents in this study did comprehend the need for and negotiate for safer sexual practices. It was concluded that although

  5. Development of pipe wall thinning prediction software 'FALSET'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Morita, Ryo; Inada, Fumio; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pipe wall thinning in power plants has been managed for maintaining plant integrity and safety with great importance. The target thinning phenomena are Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and Liquid Droplet Impingement Erosion (LDI). At present, the management is based on thinning rate and residual lifetime evaluation using pipe wall thickness measurement results. For the future, more safety and improvement in the management is required, and in this sense, prediction method of wall thinning is willing to be introduced. Therefore, prediction model of FAC and LDI have been constructed in CRIEPI, and to utilize these models to actual plant piping management easily, prediction software 'FALSET' is developed. FALSET has equipped with essential function for pipe wall thinning management in power plants, as follows; (1) Information and condition input of plant piping system and its component, (2) Wall thinning rate evaluation with CRIEPI's FAC/LDI prediction model, (3) Loading of wall thickness measurement data files and graphics of data trend, (4) Residual lifetime evaluation considering both measured and predicted thinning rate, (5) Statistical process and graphics of thinning rate and residual lifetime for multi-piping systems. With further verification and improvement of each function, there will be a perspective for this FALSET to be utilized as a management tool in power plants. (author)

  6. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Joseph A. H.; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms. PMID:26370936

  7. Liposome-based Formulation for Intracellular Delivery of Functional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Chatin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular delivery of biologically active protein represents an important emerging strategy for both fundamental and therapeutic applications. Here, we optimized in vitro delivery of two functional proteins, the β-galactosidase (β-gal enzyme and the anti-cytokeratin8 (K8 antibody, using liposome-based formulation. The guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipid bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC (bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol combined to the colipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE (dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine was shown to efficiently deliver the β-gal intracellularly without compromising its activity. The lipid/protein molar ratio, protein amount, and culture medium were demonstrated to be key parameters affecting delivery efficiency. The protein itself is an essential factor requiring selection of the appropriate cationic lipid as illustrated by low K8 binding activity of the anti-K8 antibody using guanidinium-based liposome. Optimization of various lipids led to the identification of the aminoglycoside lipid dioleyl succinyl paromomycin (DOSP associated with the imidazole-based helper lipid MM27 as a potent delivery system for K8 antibody, achieving delivery in 67% of HeLa cells. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy showed that the structure of supramolecular assemblies BGTC:DOPE/β-gal and DOSP:MM27/K8 were different depending on liposome types and lipid/protein molar ratio. Finally, we observed that K8 treatment with DOSP:MM27/K8 rescues the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent chloride efflux in F508del-CFTR expressing cells, providing a new tool for the study of channelopathies.

  8. A new formulation for the Doppler broadening function relaxing the approximations of Beth–Plackzec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Gonçalves, Alessandro C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • One of the Beth–Placzek approximation were relaxed. • An additional term in the form of an integral is obtained. • A new mathematical formulation for the Doppler broadening function is proposed. - Abstract: In all nuclear reactors some neutrons can be absorbed in the resonance region and, in the design of these reactors, an accurate treatment of the resonant absorptions is essential. Apart from that, the resonant absorption varies with fuel temperature due to the Doppler broadening of the resonances. The thermal agitation movement in the reactor core is adequately represented in the microscopic cross-section of the neutron-core interaction through the Doppler broadening function. This function is calculated numerically in modern systems for the calculation of macro-group constants, necessary to determine the power distribution of a nuclear reactor. It can also be applied to the calculation of self-shielding factors to correct the measurements of the microscopic cross-sections through the activation technique and used for the approximate calculations of the resonance integrals in heterogeneous fuel cells. In these types of application we can point at the need to develop precise analytical approximations for the Doppler broadening function to be used in the calculation codes that calculate the values of this function. However, the Doppler broadening function is based on a series of approximations proposed by Beth–Plackzec. In this work a relaxation of these approximations is proposed, generating an additional term in the form of an integral. Analytical solutions of this additional term are discussed. The results obtained show that the new term is important for high temperatures.

  9. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF FUTURE MUSIC ART TEACHERS’ TRAINING FOR SINGING ACTIVITY OF COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL SENIOR STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article the functional analysis of future music art teachers’ training for singing activity of comprehensive school senior students is depicted. This issue is very important because improving educators and musicians’ training contributes not only to professional selfactualisation, but also to young generation’s encouraging for thorough learning music art works and their creative development in the process of group music tuitions. Extracurricular singing activity also plays an important part. It reveals art images to students, enriching creativity experience, forms the spiritual world, develops independent thinking, awakens creativity. The author points out the main functions of future music art teachers’ training. They are system and value, information, communication, creative and transformative, projective functions. The special attention is paid to characterizing the features of each function. The author claims that system and value function relates to the necessity to analyze the results of the educational process that contributes to productive solving problems by students and main tasks of music training. Information function is a subject background of art music teachers’ and pedagogical activities. Communicative function is realized in a teacher’s ability to develop the student’ initiative to plan cooperative activities, to be able to distribute duties, to carry out instructions, to coordinate cooperative activities, to create special situations for the implementation of educational influence. The analysis of pedagogical and methodological literature shows that The creative and transformative function is manifested in the creative use of pedagogical and methodological ideas in specific pedagogical conditions. The projective function is thought to promote the most complete realization of content of comprehensive and art education. Functional analysis of students’ training of art faculties at pedagogical universities to

  10. Functionality of innovative and generic celluloses in metronidazole formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cristina Díaz Ramírez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The wide variety of excipients available calls for evaluation of their functionality, in this case of the pharmaceutical performance of microcrystalline celluloses and sodium cross-linked carboxymethylcelluloses from different sources. This evaluation includes parameters such as powder flow, compactibility, ejection pressure and dissolution from fast-release tablets as well as from floating granules and controlled-release tablets. In a previous study, the excipient Carmacel® presented better disintegration properties compared to Croscarmellose®. However, the evaluation showed better compactibility performance for Croscarmellose®. These characteristics were observed using pure excipients. Nevertheless, these advantages have not been confirmed in tests employing immediate-release or modified-release formulations containing metronidazole. Regarding microcrystalline celluloses, the present comparative evaluation between pure Alfacel ® types 101 and 102 and pure Avicel® types 101 and 102 showed better compactibility performance for the latter. However, for metronidazole formulations, this advantage was not evident in the innovative excipient. Notwithstanding, this study revealed better compactibility performance of microcrystalline cellulose type 101. In terms of powder flow properties, Avicel® and Alfacel® showed similar performance. However, the results revealed better powder flow employing microcrystalline cellulose type 102 for both excipients. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the employment of innovative and generic excipients have both advantages and disadvantages. The observed differences however, tend to disappear as the excipients are diluted in a formulation, thereby equalizing their influence on product performance.A variedade de excipientes disponível no mercado requer adequada seleção desses no que se refere à sua funcionalidade, como no caso de celuloses microcristalinas (Avicel® 101 e 102 e Alfacel

  11. Integrated Life Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Exterior Wall Systems for Residential Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Broun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the breakdown of primary energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of two common types of exterior walls in the U.K.: insulated concrete form (ICF and cavity walls. A comprehensive assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental performance of each exterior wall system over 50 years of service life in Edinburgh and Bristol. The results indicate that for both wall systems, use phase is the major contributor to the overall environmental impacts, mainly due to associated electricity consumption. For the ICF wall system in Edinburgh, 91% of GHG emissions were attributed to the use phase, with 7.8% in the pre-use and 1.2% in end-of-life phases. For the same system in Bristol, emissions were 89%, 9% and 2%, respectively. A similar trend was observed for cavity wall systems in both locations. It was concluded that in each scenario, the ICF wall system performed better when compared to the cavity wall system. The results of the sensitivity analysis clearly show that the uncertainties relevant to the change of the thickness of the wall are quite tolerable: variable up to 5%, as far as energy and greenhouse emissions are concerned.

  12. Stomatal cell wall composition: distinctive structural patterns associated with different phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtein, Ilana; Shelef, Yaniv; Marom, Ziv; Zelinger, Einat; Schwartz, Amnon; Popper, Zoë A; Bar-On, Benny; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Stomatal morphology and function have remained largely conserved throughout ∼400 million years of plant evolution. However, plant cell wall composition has evolved and changed. Here stomatal cell wall composition was investigated in different vascular plant groups in attempt to understand their possible effect on stomatal function. A renewed look at stomatal cell walls was attempted utilizing digitalized polar microscopy, confocal microscopy, histology and a numerical finite-elements simulation. The six species of vascular plants chosen for this study cover a broad structural, ecophysiological and evolutionary spectrum: ferns ( Asplenium nidus and Platycerium bifurcatum ) and angiosperms ( Arabidopsis thaliana and Commelina erecta ) with kidney-shaped stomata, and grasses (angiosperms, family Poaceae) with dumbbell-shaped stomata ( Sorghum bicolor and Triticum aestivum ). Three distinct patterns of cellulose crystallinity in stomatal cell walls were observed: Type I (kidney-shaped stomata, ferns), Type II (kidney-shaped stomata, angiosperms) and Type III (dumbbell-shaped stomata, grasses). The different stomatal cell wall attributes investigated (cellulose crystallinity, pectins, lignin, phenolics) exhibited taxon-specific patterns, with reciprocal substitution of structural elements in the end-walls of kidney-shaped stomata. According to a numerical bio-mechanical model, the end walls of kidney-shaped stomata develop the highest stresses during opening. The data presented demonstrate for the first time the existence of distinct spatial patterns of varying cellulose crystallinity in guard cell walls. It is also highly intriguing that in angiosperms crystalline cellulose appears to have replaced lignin that occurs in the stomatal end-walls of ferns serving a similar wall strengthening function. Such taxon-specific spatial patterns of cell wall components could imply different biomechanical functions, which in turn could be a consequence of differences in

  13. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Comprehensive Utilization Technology of Solar Wall System%太阳墙系统综合利用技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任庚坡; 房玉娜

    2014-01-01

    With the worsening of energy situation,renewable energy including solar is increasingly concerned . This article introduces the general situation of utilization of solar energy and a new kind of solar thermal tech-nology---solar wall system.The paper illustrates the working principles and features of the solar wall sys-tem,with cases of factory building and general building respectively.In the last part,the paper analyses the economics and Promotion potential for replication of solar wall system.Solar Wall system has good economic returns,high thermal efficiency and good fresh air effect.By combining the rooftop photovoltaic system and solar wall,photovoltaic/solar thermal utilization can be achieved,and the utilization of solar energy is im-proved.%介绍了太阳能利用概况及一种新的太阳能热利用技术---太阳墙系统,阐述其工作原理及特点,并列举在厂房和一般建筑的应用案例,分析了太阳墙的经济性和推广潜力。太阳墙系统具有经济效益好、热效率高、新风效果好的优点;通过屋顶光伏发电系统与太阳墙的结合,可实现光电/光热综合利用,提高太阳能利用率。

  15. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  16. First-principles study of structural and work function properties for nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Xiji; Li, Detian; Cai, Jianqiu; Luo, Haijun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Substitutional nitrogen atom doping in capped (5, 5) SWNT is investigated. • Serious defects appear from breaks of C−N bonds with N contents of above 23.3 at.%. • Work function drops after N doping and may reach 4.1 eV. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of the capped (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), including the structural stability, the work function, and the charge transfer performance, are investigated for the substitutional nitrogen atom doping under different concentrations by first-principles density functional theory. The geometrical structure keeps almost intact with single or two N atom doping, while C−N bonds may break up with serious defects for N concentrations of 23.3 at.% and above. The SWNT remains metallic and the work function drops after doping due to the upward shift of Fermi level, leading to the increase of the electrical conductivity. N doping enhances the oxygen reduction activity stronger than N adsorption because of higher charge transfers.

  17. Cell Wall Composition and Candidate Biosynthesis Gene Expression During Rice Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra; Peck, Matthew L.; Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E.; Williams, Brian; Chiniquy, Dawn M.; Saha, Prasenjit; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Conlin, Brian; Zhu, Lan; Hahn, Michael G.; Willats, William G. T.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Bartley, Laura E.

    2016-08-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall components remain obscure. To better understand the patterns of cell wall accumulation and identify genes that act in grass cell wall biosynthesis, we characterized 30 samples from aerial organs of rice (Oryza sativa cv. Kitaake) at 10 developmental time points, 3-100 d post-germination. Within these samples, we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had previously been identified as being highly expressed in rice. Most cell wall components vary significantly during development, and correlations among them support current understanding of cell walls. We identified 92 significant correlations between cell wall components and gene expression and establish nine strong hypotheses for genes that synthesize xylans, mixed linkage glucan and pectin components. This work provides an extensive analysis of cell wall composition throughout rice development, identifies genes likely to synthesize grass cell walls, and provides a framework for development of genetically improved grasses for use in lignocellulosic biofuel production and agriculture.

  18. Immobile defects in ferroelastic walls: Wall nucleation at defect sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; Salje, E. K. H.; Ding, X.; Sun, J.

    2018-02-01

    Randomly distributed, static defects are enriched in ferroelastic domain walls. The relative concentration of defects in walls, Nd, follows a power law distribution as a function of the total defect concentration C: N d ˜ C α with α = 0.4 . The enrichment Nd/C ranges from ˜50 times when C = 10 ppm to ˜3 times when C = 1000 ppm. The resulting enrichment is due to nucleation at defect sites as observed in large scale MD simulations. The dynamics of domain nucleation and switching is dependent on the defect concentration. Their energy distribution follows the power law with exponents during yield between ɛ ˜ 1.82 and 2.0 when the defect concentration increases. The power law exponent is ɛ ≈ 2.7 in the plastic regime, independent of the defect concentration.

  19. Numerical simulation using vorticity-vector potential formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    An accurate and efficient computational method is needed for three-dimensional incompressible viscous flows in engineering applications. On solving the turbulent shear flows directly or using the subgrid scale model, it is indispensable to resolve the small scale fluid motions as well as the large scale motions. From this point of view, the pseudo-spectral method is used so far as the computational method. However, the finite difference or the finite element methods are widely applied for computing the flow with practical importance since these methods are easily applied to the flows with complex geometric configurations. However, there exist several problems in applying the finite difference method to direct and large eddy simulations. Accuracy is one of most important problems. This point was already addressed by the present author on the direct simulations on the instability of the plane Poiseuille flow and also on the transition to turbulence. In order to obtain high efficiency, the multi-grid Poisson solver is combined with the higher-order, accurate finite difference method. The formulation method is also one of the most important problems in applying the finite difference method to the incompressible turbulent flows. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations have been solved so far in the primitive variables formulation. One of the major difficulties of this method is the rigorous satisfaction of the equation of continuity. In general, the staggered grid is used for the satisfaction of the solenoidal condition for the velocity field at the wall boundary. However, the velocity field satisfies the equation of continuity automatically in the vorticity-vector potential formulation. From this point of view, the vorticity-vector potential method was extended to the generalized coordinate system. In the present article, we adopt the vorticity-vector potential formulation, the generalized coordinate system, and the 4th-order accurate difference method as the

  20. Mitigation of Autoignition Due to Premixing in a Hypervelocity Flow Using Active Wall Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Preinjection of fuel on the forebody of an airbreathing vehicle is a proposed method to gain access to hypervelocity flight Mach numbers. However, this creates the possibility of autoignition either near the wall or in the core of the flow, thereby consuming fuel prematurely as well as increasing the amount of pressure drag on the vehicle. The computational fluid dynamics code VULCAN was used to conduct three dimensional simulations of the reacting flow in the vicinity of hydrogen injectors on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 notional flight vehicle forebody to determine the location where autoignition occurs. Active wall cooling strategies were formulated and simulated in response to regions of autoignition. It was found that tangential film cooling using hydrogen or helium were both able to nearly or completely eliminate wall autoignition in the flow domain of interest.

  1. Formulation, functional evaluation and ex vivo performance of thermoresponsive soluble gels - A platform for therapeutic delivery to mucosal sinus tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preeti; Cabot, Peter J; Wallwork, Benjamin; Panizza, Benedict J; Parekh, Harendra S

    2017-01-01

    Mucoadhesive in situ gelling systems (soluble gels) have received considerable attention recently as effective stimuli-transforming vectors for a range of drug delivery applications. Considering this fact, the present work involves systematic formulation development, optimization, functional evaluation and ex vivo performance of thermosensitive soluble gels containing dexamethasone 21-phosphate disodium salt (DXN) as the model therapeutic. A series of in situ gel-forming systems comprising the thermoreversible polymer poloxamer-407 (P407), along with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and chitosan were first formulated. The optimized soluble gels were evaluated for their potential to promote greater retention at the mucosal surface, for improved therapeutic efficacy, compared to existing solution/suspension-based steroid formulations used clinically. Optimized soluble gels demonstrated a desirable gelation temperature with Newtonian fluid behaviour observed under storage conditions (4-8°C), and pseudoplastic fluid behaviour recorded at nasal cavity/sinus temperature (≈34°C). The in vitro characterization of formulations including rheological evaluation, textural analysis and mucoadhesion studies of the gel form were investigated. Considerable improvement in mechanical properties and mucoadhesion was observed with incorporation of HPMC and chitosan into the gelling systems. The lead poloxamer-based soluble gels, PGHC4 and PGHC7, which were carried through to ex vivo permeation studies displayed extended drug release profiles in conditions mimicking the human nasal cavity, which indicates their suitability for treating a range of conditions affecting the nasal cavity/sinuses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduction in Left Ventricular Wall Stress and Improvement in Function in Failing Hearts using Algisyl-LVR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Zhihong, Zhang; Hinson, Andrew; Guccione, Julius M.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of Algisyl-LVR, a treatment under clinical development, is intended to treat patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. This treatment was recently used for the first time in patients who had symptomatic heart failure. In all patients, cardiac function of the left ventricle (LV) improved significantly, as manifested by consistent reduction of the LV volume and wall stress. Here we describe this novel treatment procedure and the methods used to quantify its effects on LV wall stress and function. Algisyl-LVR is a biopolymer gel consisting of Na+-Alginate and Ca2+-Alginate. The treatment procedure was carried out by mixing these two components and then combining them into one syringe for intramyocardial injections. This mixture was injected at 10 to 19 locations mid-way between the base and apex of the LV free wall in patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), together with mathematical modeling, was used to quantify the effects of this treatment in patients before treatment and at various time points during recovery. The epicardial and endocardial surfaces were first digitized from the MR images to reconstruct the LV geometry at end-systole and at end-diastole. Left ventricular cavity volumes were then measured from these reconstructed surfaces. Mathematical models of the LV were created from these MRI-reconstructed surfaces to calculate regional myofiber stress. Each LV model was constructed so that 1) it deforms according to a previously validated stress-strain relationship of the myocardium, and 2) the predicted LV cavity volume from these models matches the corresponding MRI-measured volume at end-diastole and end-systole. Diastolic filling was simulated by loading the LV endocardial surface with a prescribed end-diastolic pressure. Systolic contraction was simulated by concurrently loading the endocardial surface with a prescribed end-systolic pressure and adding active contraction in the myofiber direction. Regional myofiber stress at end-diastole and

  3. Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS): formulation development, characterization, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Bandopadhyay, Shantanu; Kapil, Rishi; Singh, Ramandeep; Katare, O

    2009-01-01

    Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) possess unparalleled potential in improving oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Following their oral administration, these systems rapidly disperse in gastrointestinal fluids, yielding micro- or nanoemulsions containing the solubilized drug. Owing to its miniscule globule size, the micro/nanoemulsifed drug can easily be absorbed through lymphatic pathways, bypassing the hepatic first-pass effect. We present an exhaustive and updated account of numerous literature reports and patents on diverse types of self-emulsifying drug formulations, with emphasis on their formulation, characterization, and systematic optimization strategies. Recent advancements in various methodologies employed to characterize their globule size and shape, ability to encapsulate the drug, gastrointestinal and thermodynamic stability, rheological characteristics, and so forth, are discussed comprehensively to guide the formula-tor in preparing an effective and robust SEDDS formulation. Also, this exhaustive review offers an explicit discussion on vital applications of the SEDDS in bioavailability enhancement of various drugs, outlining an overview on myriad in vitro, in situ, and ex vivo techniques to assess the absorption and/ or permeation potential of drugs incorporated in the SEDDS in animal and cell line models, and the subsequent absorption pathways followed by them. In short, the current article furnishes an updated compilation of wide-ranging information on all the requisite vistas of the self-emulsifying formulations, thus paving the way for accelerated progress into the SEDDS application in pharmaceutical research.

  4. On-Off Switches for Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Zhong Wang; Richard A.Dixon

    2012-01-01

    Secondary cell walls provide plants with rigidity and strength to support their body weight and ensure water and nutrient transport.They also provide textiles,timber,and potentially second-generation biofuels for human use.Genes responsible for synthesis of the different cell wall components,namely cellulose,hemicelluloses,and lignin,are coordinately expressed and under transcriptional regulation.In the past several years,cell wall-related NAC and MYB transcription factors have been intensively investigated in different species and shown to be master switches of secondary cell wall biosynthesis.Positive and negative regulators,which function upstream of NAC master switches,have also been identified in different plant tissues.Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of cell wall synthesis will facilitate the engineering of plant feedstocks suitable for biofuel production.

  5. A global model for SF6 plasmas coupling reaction kinetics in the gas phase and on the surface of the reactor walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkoris, George; Panagiotopoulos, Apostolos; Gogolides, Evangelos; Goodyear, Andy; Cooke, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Gas phase and reactor wall-surface kinetics are coupled in a global model for SF 6 plasmas. A complete set of gas phase and surface reactions is formulated. The rate coefficients of the electron impact reactions are based on pertinent cross section data from the literature, which are integrated over a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function. The rate coefficients of the surface reactions are adjustable parameters and are calculated by fitting the model to experimental data from an inductively coupled plasma reactor, i.e. F atom density and pressure change after the ignition of the discharge. The model predicts that SF 6 , F, F 2 and SF 4 are the dominant neutral species while SF 5 + and F - are the dominant ions. The fit sheds light on the interaction between the gas phase and the reactor walls. A loss mechanism for SF x radicals by deposition of a fluoro-sulfur film on the reactor walls is needed to predict the experimental data. It is found that there is a net production of SF 5 , F 2 and SF 6 , and a net consumption of F, SF 3 and SF 4 on the reactor walls. Surface reactions as well as reactions between neutral species in the gas phase are found to be important sources and sinks of the neutral species.

  6. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William George Tycho; Lange, Lene

    2016-01-01

    the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire...... viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction......Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during...

  7. Multicomponent density functional theory embedding formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culpitt, Tanner; Brorsen, Kurt R.; Pak, Michael V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Ave, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) methods have been developed to treat two types of particles, such as electrons and nuclei, quantum mechanically at the same level. In the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) approach, all electrons and select nuclei, typically key protons, are treated quantum mechanically. For multicomponent DFT methods developed within the NEO framework, electron-proton correlation functionals based on explicitly correlated wavefunctions have been designed and used in conjunction with well-established electronic exchange-correlation functionals. Herein a general theory for multicomponent embedded DFT is developed to enable the accurate treatment of larger systems. In the general theory, the total electronic density is separated into two subsystem densities, denoted as regular and special, and different electron-proton correlation functionals are used for these two electronic densities. In the specific implementation, the special electron density is defined in terms of spatially localized Kohn-Sham electronic orbitals, and electron-proton correlation is included only for the special electron density. The electron-proton correlation functional depends on only the special electron density and the proton density, whereas the electronic exchange-correlation functional depends on the total electronic density. This scheme includes the essential electron-proton correlation, which is a relatively local effect, as well as the electronic exchange-correlation for the entire system. This multicomponent DFT-in-DFT embedding theory is applied to the HCN and FHF{sup −} molecules in conjunction with two different electron-proton correlation functionals and three different electronic exchange-correlation functionals. The results illustrate that this approach provides qualitatively accurate nuclear densities in a computationally tractable manner. The general theory is also easily extended to other types of partitioning schemes for multicomponent systems.

  8. Functional valve assessment: the emerging role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dipan J

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of valvular heart disease is increasing along with the life span of the population. In assessing individuals with valve disease, echocardiography is the primary imaging modality used by clinicians both for initial assessment and for longitudinal evaluation. Information regarding valve morphology and function, cardiac chamber size, wall thickness, ventricular function, and estimates of pulmonary artery pressures can be readily obtained and integrated to formulate an assessment of valve disease severity. In some instances, body habitus or the presence of coexisting lung disease may result in suboptimal acoustic windows on echocardiography, which may lead to technically difficult studies. Additionally, in some patients, information from clinical history and physical examination or other diagnostic tests may be discordant with echocardiographic findings. In these instances, there is a significant clinical role for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The diagnostic capabilities of CMR have increased substantially over the past 20 years due to hardware and software advances. Today, CMR has a number of unique advantages over other imaging modalities - primarily, it provides a view of the entire heart without limitations from inadequate imaging windows or body habitus. Furthermore, CMR can obtain imaging data in any imaging plane prescribed by the scan operator, which makes it ideal for accurate investigation of all cardiac valves - aortic, mitral, pulmonic, and tricuspid. In addition, CMR for valve assessment is noninvasive, free of ionizing radiation, and in most instances does not require contrast administration. Since a comprehensive review of the role of CMR in all valve lesions is beyond the scope of this article, we will focus on the most common valvular indication for performance of clinical CMR techniques and an overview of selected validation and reproducibility studies. The objectives of a comprehensive CMR study for evaluating mitral

  9. The functional role of the periphery in emotional language comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Havas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Language can impact emotion, even when it makes no reference to emotion states. For example, reading sentences with positive meanings (The water park is refreshing on the hot summer day induces patterns of facial feedback congruent with the sentence emotionality (smiling, whereas sentences with negative meanings induce a frown. Moreover, blocking facial afference with botox selectively slows comprehension of emotional sentences. Therefore, theories of cognition should account for emotion-language interactions above the level of explicit emotion words, and the role of peripheral feedback in comprehension. For this special issue exploring frontiers in the role of the body and environment in cognition, we propose a theory in which facial feedback provides a context-sensitive constraint on the simulation of actions described in language. Paralleling the role of emotions in real-world behavior, our account proposes that 1 facial expressions accompany sudden shifts in well-being as described in language; 2 facial expressions modulate emotion states during reading; and 3 emotion states prepare the reader for an effective simulation of the ensuing language content. To inform the theory and guide future research, we outline a framework based on internal models for motor control. To support the theory, we assemble evidence from diverse areas of research. Taking a functional view of emotion, we tie the theory to behavioral and neural evidence for a role of facial feedback in cognition. Our theoretical framework provides a detailed account that can guide future research on the role of emotional feedback in language processing, and on interactions of language and emotion. It also highlights the bodily periphery as relevant to theories of embodied cognition.

  10. Preparation and characterization of silver nanoparticles immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by poly(dopamine) functionalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yi; Lu Yonglai; Zhang Liqun; Liu Li; Dai Yajie; Wang Wencai

    2012-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) functionalized with poly(dopamine) (PDA) were found to cause the immobilization of silver nanoparticles on the surface. The PDA functional layer not only improved the dispersion of MWNTs in aqueous solution, but also was used as a platform for subsequent silver nanoparticle immobilization. The surface morphology of the functionalized MWNTs was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that PDA layers with controlled thickness on the nanometer scale were formed on MWNT surfaces by in situ spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine, and that high-density of homogeneously dispersed spherical silver nanoparticles with sizes of 3–4 nm were immobilized on their outer surface. The space between spherical silver nanoparticles is less than 10 nm. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results showed that the Ag nanoparticles on the surface of hybrids exist in the zero valent state.

  11. Dynamic modeling and response of soil-wall systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.

    1993-10-01

    The study reported herein is the third in a series of investigations motivated by need to gain improved understanding of the responses to earthquakes of deeply embedded and underground tanks storing radioactive wastes, and to develop rational but simple methods of analysis and design for such systems. Following a brief review of the errors that may result from the use of a popular model for evaluating the dynamic soil forces induced in a base-excited rigid wall retaining an elastic stratum, the sources of the errors are identified and a modification is proposed which defines correctly the action of the system. In the proposed modification, the stratum is modeled by a series of elastically supported, semi-infinite horizontal bars with distributed mass instead of massless springs. The concepts involved are introduced by reference to a system composed of a fixed-based wall and a homogeneous elastic stratum, and are then applied to the analysis of more complex soil-wall systems. Both harmonic and transient excitations are considered, and comprehensive numerical solutions are presented which elucidate the actions involved and the effects and relative importance of the relevant parameters

  12. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E.; Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J.; Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K.; Boon, P.; Troost, J.; Vermeulen, J.; Aldenkamp, A.

    2002-01-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  13. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E. [MRI Department -1 K12, Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Maastricht, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K. [Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boon, P. [Department of Medical Psychology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Troost, J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Vermeulen, J. [S.E.I.N Heemstede, Psychological Laboratory, Achterweg 5, 2103 SW Heemstede (Netherlands); Aldenkamp, A. [Epilepsy Center ' Kempenhaeghe' , Postbus 61, 5900 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  14. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  15. Plant cell wall proteomics: mass spectrometry data, a trove for research on protein structure/function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Zhang, Yu; San Clemente, Hélène; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2009-09-01

    Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organelles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identification, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of multigene families can be differentiated. Two lectins presenting 93% amino acid identity were identified using peptide mass fingerprinting. Although the identification of structural proteins such as extensins or hydroxyproline/proline-rich proteins (H/PRPs) is arduous, different types of MS spectra were exploited to identify and characterize an H/PRP. Maturation events in a couple of cell wall proteins (CWPs) were analyzed using site mapping. N-glycosylation of CWPs as well as the hydroxylation or oxidation of amino acids were also explored, adding information to improve our understanding of CWP structure/function relationships. A bioinformatic tool was developed to locate by means of MS the N-terminus of mature secreted proteins and N-glycosylation.

  16. The mecillinam resistome reveals a role for peptidoglycan endopeptidases in stimulating cell wall synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ghee Chuan; Cho, Hongbaek; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2017-07-01

    Bacterial cells are typically surrounded by an net-like macromolecule called the cell wall constructed from the heteropolymer peptidoglycan (PG). Biogenesis of this matrix is the target of penicillin and related beta-lactams. These drugs inhibit the transpeptidase activity of PG synthases called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), preventing the crosslinking of nascent wall material into the existing network. The beta-lactam mecillinam specifically targets the PBP2 enzyme in the cell elongation machinery of Escherichia coli. Low-throughput selections for mecillinam resistance have historically been useful in defining mechanisms involved in cell wall biogenesis and the killing activity of beta-lactam antibiotics. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-Seq) as a high-throughput method to identify nearly all mecillinam resistance loci in the E. coli genome, providing a comprehensive resource for uncovering new mechanisms underlying PG assembly and drug resistance. Induction of the stringent response or the Rcs envelope stress response has been previously implicated in mecillinam resistance. We therefore also performed the Tn-Seq analysis in mutants defective for these responses in addition to wild-type cells. Thus, the utility of the dataset was greatly enhanced by determining the stress response dependence of each resistance locus in the resistome. Reasoning that stress response-independent resistance loci are those most likely to identify direct modulators of cell wall biogenesis, we focused our downstream analysis on this subset of the resistome. Characterization of one of these alleles led to the surprising discovery that the overproduction of endopeptidase enzymes that cleave crosslinks in the cell wall promotes mecillinam resistance by stimulating PG synthesis by a subset of PBPs. Our analysis of this activation mechanism suggests that, contrary to the prevailing view in the field, PG synthases and PG cleaving enzymes need not function in multi-enzyme complexes

  17. The mecillinam resistome reveals a role for peptidoglycan endopeptidases in stimulating cell wall synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghee Chuan Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells are typically surrounded by an net-like macromolecule called the cell wall constructed from the heteropolymer peptidoglycan (PG. Biogenesis of this matrix is the target of penicillin and related beta-lactams. These drugs inhibit the transpeptidase activity of PG synthases called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, preventing the crosslinking of nascent wall material into the existing network. The beta-lactam mecillinam specifically targets the PBP2 enzyme in the cell elongation machinery of Escherichia coli. Low-throughput selections for mecillinam resistance have historically been useful in defining mechanisms involved in cell wall biogenesis and the killing activity of beta-lactam antibiotics. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-Seq as a high-throughput method to identify nearly all mecillinam resistance loci in the E. coli genome, providing a comprehensive resource for uncovering new mechanisms underlying PG assembly and drug resistance. Induction of the stringent response or the Rcs envelope stress response has been previously implicated in mecillinam resistance. We therefore also performed the Tn-Seq analysis in mutants defective for these responses in addition to wild-type cells. Thus, the utility of the dataset was greatly enhanced by determining the stress response dependence of each resistance locus in the resistome. Reasoning that stress response-independent resistance loci are those most likely to identify direct modulators of cell wall biogenesis, we focused our downstream analysis on this subset of the resistome. Characterization of one of these alleles led to the surprising discovery that the overproduction of endopeptidase enzymes that cleave crosslinks in the cell wall promotes mecillinam resistance by stimulating PG synthesis by a subset of PBPs. Our analysis of this activation mechanism suggests that, contrary to the prevailing view in the field, PG synthases and PG cleaving enzymes need not function in multi

  18. Quantum infinite square well with an oscillating wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, M.L.; Mateo, J.; Negro, J.; Nieto, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A linear matrix equation is considered for determining the time dependent wave function for a particle in a one-dimensional infinite square well having one moving wall. By a truncation approximation, whose validity is checked in the exactly solvable case of a linearly contracting wall, we examine the cases of a simple harmonically oscillating wall and a non-harmonically oscillating wall for which the defining parameters can be varied. For the latter case, we examine in closer detail the dependence on the frequency changes, and we find three regimes: an adiabatic behabiour for low frequencies, a periodic one for high frequencies, and a chaotic behaviour for an intermediate range of frequencies.

  19. Toxicological evaluation of a dietary supplement formulated for male sexual health prior to market release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewell, A; Qureshi, I; Endres, J; Horváth, J; Financsek, I; Neal-Kababick, J; Jade, K; Schauss, A G

    2010-06-01

    The dietary supplement, 112 Degrees, was formulated with the goal of supporting sexual functioning in men. Due to rampant problems with drug adulteration for this category of products, a comprehensive screening for active pharmaceutical agents, with an emphasis on drugs prescribed for erectile dysfunction such as type 5 phosphodiesterase (PDE-5) inhibitors, and known unapproved PDE-5 drug analogues, was performed along with preclinical toxicology studies prior to the introduction of this product into the marketplace. 112 Degrees was found to be free of all pharmaceutical adulterants tested, and was not mutagenic, clastogenic, or genotoxic as demonstrated by the Ames test, chromosomal aberration assay, and mouse micronucleus assay, respectively. The LD(50) in the 14-day acute oral toxicity study was greater than 5000 mg/kg, the highest dose tested. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 30 years of battling the cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latgé, J P

    2017-01-01

    In Aspergillus fumigatus, like in other pathogenic fungi, the cell wall is essential for fungal growth as well as for resisting environmental stresses such as phagocytic killing. Most of the chemical analyses undertaken on the cell wall of A. fumigatus are focused on the mycelial cell wall because it is the vegetative stage of the fungus. However, the cell walls of the mycelium and conidium (which is the infective propagule) are different especially at the level of the surface layer, which plays a significant role in the interaction between A. fumigatus conidia and phagocytic cells of the immune system. In spite of the essential function of the cell wall in fungal life, progresses have been extremely slow in the understanding of biosynthesis as well in the identification of the key host responses against the cell wall components. A major difficulty is the fact that the composition and structural organization of the cell wall is not immutably set and is constantly reshuffled depending on the environmental conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The thin-walled abnormity measurement technology research based on CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bin

    2014-01-01

    The character of the thin-walled irregular parts is: the measured parameters for spatial structure size, need to design special measurement positioning fixture to complete detection, the wall thickness is very thin, and the processing is composite, its size is small and shape is complex, it is difficulty to collect image edge by using the optical measurement method. In this paper, a special measurement method of CCD that based on the image measurement technique was advanced, this kind of parts was measured quickly, accurately and automaticly through design the high precision positioning fixture and image acquisition method. At the same time, the comprehensive evaluation standard was given to assess the measurement accuracy method, and the reliability of measurement method was ensured. (author)

  2. Comparison of functional network connectivity for passive-listening and active-response narrative comprehension in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingying; Holland, Scott K

    2014-05-01

    Comprehension of narrative stories plays an important role in the development of language skills. In this study, we compared brain activity elicited by a passive-listening version and an active-response (AR) version of a narrative comprehension task by using independent component (IC) analysis on functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 21 adolescents (ages 14-18 years). Furthermore, we explored differences in functional network connectivity engaged by two versions of the task and investigated the relationship between the online response time and the strength of connectivity between each pair of ICs. Despite similar brain region involvements in auditory, temporoparietal, and frontoparietal language networks for both versions, the AR version engages some additional network elements including the left dorsolateral prefrontal, anterior cingulate, and sensorimotor networks. These additional involvements are likely associated with working memory and maintenance of attention, which can be attributed to the differences in cognitive strategic aspects of the two versions. We found significant positive correlation between the online response time and the strength of connectivity between an IC in left inferior frontal region and an IC in sensorimotor region. An explanation for this finding is that longer reaction time indicates stronger connection between the frontal and sensorimotor networks caused by increased activation in adolescents who require more effort to complete the task.

  3. Comprehensive protein profiling by multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis using cross-linked polyacrylamide coated capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaorong; Gao, Lin; Pu, Qiaosheng; Lu, Joann J; Wang, Xingjia

    2006-02-01

    We have recently developed a new process to create cross-linked polyacrylamide (CPA) coatings on capillary walls to suppress protein-wall interactions. Here, we demonstrate CPA-coated capillaries for high-efficiency (>2 x 10(6) plates per meter) protein separations by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Because CPA virtually eliminates electroosmotic flow, positive and negative proteins cannot be analyzed in a single run. A "one-sample-two-separation" approach is developed to achieve a comprehensive protein analysis. High throughput is achieved through a multiplexed CZE system.

  4. Watermelon configurations with wall interaction: exact and asymptotic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krattenthaler, C [Institut Camille Jordan, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, 21, avenue Claude Bernard, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-06-15

    We perform an exact and asymptotic analysis of the model of n vicious walkers interacting with a wall via contact potentials, a model introduced by Brak, Essam and Owczarek. More specifically, we study the partition function of watermelon configurations which start on the wall, but may end at arbitrary height, and their mean number of contacts with the wall. We improve and extend the earlier (partially nonrigorous) results by Brak, Essam and Owczarek, providing new exact results, and more precise and more general asymptotic results, in particular full asymptotic expansions for the partition function and the mean number of contacts. Furthermore, we relate this circle of problems to earlier results in the combinatorial and statistical literature.

  5. Watermelon configurations with wall interaction: exact and asymptotic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krattenthaler, C

    2006-01-01

    We perform an exact and asymptotic analysis of the model of n vicious walkers interacting with a wall via contact potentials, a model introduced by Brak, Essam and Owczarek. More specifically, we study the partition function of watermelon configurations which start on the wall, but may end at arbitrary height, and their mean number of contacts with the wall. We improve and extend the earlier (partially nonrigorous) results by Brak, Essam and Owczarek, providing new exact results, and more precise and more general asymptotic results, in particular full asymptotic expansions for the partition function and the mean number of contacts. Furthermore, we relate this circle of problems to earlier results in the combinatorial and statistical literature

  6. Watermelon configurations with wall interaction: exact and asymptotic results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krattenthaler, C.

    2006-06-01

    We perform an exact and asymptotic analysis of the model of n vicious walkers interacting with a wall via contact potentials, a model introduced by Brak, Essam and Owczarek. More specifically, we study the partition function of watermelon configurations which start on the wall, but may end at arbitrary height, and their mean number of contacts with the wall. We improve and extend the earlier (partially nonrigorous) results by Brak, Essam and Owczarek, providing new exact results, and more precise and more general asymptotic results, in particular full asymptotic expansions for the partition function and the mean number of contacts. Furthermore, we relate this circle of problems to earlier results in the combinatorial and statistical literature.

  7. [Use and versatility of titanium for the reconstruction of the thoracic wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córcoles Padilla, Juan Manuel; Bolufer Nadal, Sergio; Kurowski, Krzysztof; Gálvez Muñoz, Carlos; Rodriguez Paniagua, José Manuel

    2014-02-01

    Chest wall deformities/defects and chest wall resections, as well as complex rib fractures require reconstruction with various prosthetic materials to ensure the basic functions of the chest wall. Titanium provides many features that make it an ideal material for this surgery. The aim is to present our initial results with this material in several diseases. From 2008 to 2012, 14 patients were operated on and titanium was used for reconstruction of the chest wall. A total of 7 patients had chest wall tumors, 2 with sternal resection, 4 patients with chest wall deformities/defects and 3 patients with severe rib injury due to traffic accident. The reconstruction was successful in all cases, with early extubation without detecting problems in the functionality of the chest wall at a respiratory level. Patients with chest wall tumors including sternal resections were extubated in the operating room as well as the chest wall deformities. Chest trauma cases were extubated within 24h from internal rib fixation. There were no complications related to the material used and the method of implementation. Titanium is an ideal material for reconstruction of the chest wall in several clinical situations allowing for great versatility and adaptability in different chest wall reconstructions. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  9. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili; Abdurahman, Ayjamal; Gü lseren, Oğuz; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  10. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche, which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  11. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-02-16

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  12. Chamber wall response to target implosion in inertial fusion reactors : new and critical assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.

    2002-01-01

    The chamber walls in inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors are exposed to harsh conditions following each target implosion. Key issues of the cyclic IFE operation include intense photon and ion deposition, wall thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, wall erosion and fatigue lifetime, and chamber clearing and evacuation to ensure desirable conditions prior to target implosion. Several methods for wall protection have been proposed in the past, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. These methods include use of solid bare walls, gas-filled cavities, and liquid walls/jets. Detailed models have been developed for reflected laser light, emitted photons, and target debris deposition and interaction with chamber components and have been implemented in the comprehensive HEIGHTS software package. The hydrodynamic response of gas filled cavities and photon radiation transport of the deposited energy has been calculated by means of new and advanced numerical techniques. Fragmentation models of liquid jets as a result of the deposited energy have also been developed, and the impact on chamber clearing dynamics has been evaluated. Th focus of this study is to critically assess the reliability and the dynamic response of chamber walls in various proposed protection methods for IFE systems. Of particular concern is the effect on wall erosion lifetime of various erosion mechanisms, such as vaporization, chemical and physical sputtering, melt/liquid splashing and explosive erosion, and fragmentation of liquid walls

  13. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by click chemistry as sensing platform for sensitized electrochemical immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Honglan; Ling Chen; Huang Ru; Qiu Xiaoying; Shangguan Li; Gao Qiang; Zhang Chengxiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Single-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with protein by click chemistry. ► The SWNTs conjugated with protein showed excellent dispersion in water and kept good bioacitvity. ► A competitive electrochemical immunoassay for the determination of anti-IgG was developed with high sensitivity and good stability. - Abstract: The application of the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3 + 2] Huisgen cycloaddition to the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the protein and the use of the artificial SWNTs as a sensing platform for sensitive immunoassay were reported. Covalent functionalization of azide decorated SWNTs with alkyne modified protein was firstly accomplished by the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3 + 2] Huisgen cycloaddition. FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron micrograph were used to characterize the protein-functionalized SWNTs. It was found that the SWNTs conjugated with the proteins showed excellent dispersion in water and kept good bioacitivity when immunoglobulin (IgG) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were chosen as model proteins. As a proof-of-concept, IgG-functionalized SWNTs were immobilized onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode by simple casting method as immunosensing platform and a sensitive competitive electrochemical immunoassay was developed for the determination of anti-immunoglobulin (anti-IgG) using HRP as enzyme label. The fabrication of the immunosensor were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with the redox probe [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3−/4− . The SWNTs as immobilization platform showed better sensitizing effect, a detection limit of 30 pg mL −1 (S/N = 3) was obtained for anti-IgG. The proposed strategy provided a stable immobilization method and sensitized recognition platform for analytes. This work demonstrated that the click coupling of SWNTs with protein was an effective

  14. Comprehensive reliability allocation method for CNC lathes based on cubic transformed functions of failure mode and effects analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Zhu, Yunpeng; Ren, Hongrui; Zhang, Yimin

    2015-03-01

    Reliability allocation of computerized numerical controlled(CNC) lathes is very important in industry. Traditional allocation methods only focus on high-failure rate components rather than moderate failure rate components, which is not applicable in some conditions. Aiming at solving the problem of CNC lathes reliability allocating, a comprehensive reliability allocation method based on cubic transformed functions of failure modes and effects analysis(FMEA) is presented. Firstly, conventional reliability allocation methods are introduced. Then the limitations of direct combination of comprehensive allocation method with the exponential transformed FMEA method are investigated. Subsequently, a cubic transformed function is established in order to overcome these limitations. Properties of the new transformed functions are discussed by considering the failure severity and the failure occurrence. Designers can choose appropriate transform amplitudes according to their requirements. Finally, a CNC lathe and a spindle system are used as an example to verify the new allocation method. Seven criteria are considered to compare the results of the new method with traditional methods. The allocation results indicate that the new method is more flexible than traditional methods. By employing the new cubic transformed function, the method covers a wider range of problems in CNC reliability allocation without losing the advantages of traditional methods.

  15. Cytocompatibility studies of vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Raw material and functionalized by oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, A.O., E-mail: loboao@yahoo.com [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Laboratorio de Nanotecnologia Biomedica, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Corat, M.A.F. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio, CEMIB, UNICAMP, Campinas/SP (Brazil); Antunes, E.F. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, ITA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Pacheco-Soares, C. [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Compartimentos Celulares, UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); and others

    2012-05-01

    It was presented a strong difference on cell adhesion and proliferation of functionalized vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (VACNT) scaffolds compared to raw-VACNT. Biocompatibility in vitro tests were performed on raw-VACNT after superficial modification by oxygen plasma, which changes its superhydrophobic character to superhydrophilic. Two cytocompatibility tests were applied: 1) total lactate dehydrogenase colorimetric assay for the study of proliferating cells; and 2) cellular adhesion by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that superhydrophilic VACNT scaffolds stimulate cell growth with proliferation up to 70% higher than normal growth of cell culture.

  16. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eEbine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall.

  17. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  18. Towards Lax Formulation of Integrable Hierarchies of Topological Type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlet, G.; van de Leur, J.; Posthuma, H.; Shadrin, S.

    2014-01-01

    To each partition function of cohomological field theory one can associate an Hamiltonian integrable hierarchy of topological type. The Givental group acts on such partition functions and consequently on the associated integrable hierarchies. We consider the Hirota and Lax formulations of the

  19. Towards Lax Formulation of Integrable Hierarchies of Topological Type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Leur, Johannes; Carlet, Guido; Shadrin, Sergey; Posthuma, Hessel

    2014-01-01

    To each partition function of cohomological field theory one can associate an Hamiltonian integrable hierarchy of topological type. The Givental group acts on such partition functions and consequently on the associated integrable hierarchies. We consider theHirota and Lax formulations of the

  20. Influence of humidity on the phase behavior of API/polymer formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudic, Anke; Ji, Yuanhui; Luebbert, Christian; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous formulations of APIs in polymers tend to absorb water from the atmosphere. This absorption of water can induce API recrystallization, leading to reduced long-term stability during storage. In this work, the phase behavior of different formulations was investigated as a function of relative humidity. Indomethacin and naproxen were chosen as model APIs and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVPVA64) as excipients. The formulations were prepared by spray drying. The water sorption in pure polymers and in formulations was measured at 25°C and at different values of relative humidity (RH=25%, 50% and 75%). Most water was absorbed in PVP-containing systems, and water sorption was decreasing with increasing API content. These trends could also be predicted in good agreement with the experimental data using the thermodynamic model PC-SAFT. Furthermore, the effect of absorbed water on API solubility in the polymer and on the glass-transition temperature of the formulations was predicted with PC-SAFT and the Gordon-Taylor equation, respectively. The absorbed water was found to significantly decrease the API solubility in the polymer as well as the glass-transition temperature of the formulation. Based on a quantitative modeling of the API/polymer phase diagrams as a function of relative humidity, appropriate API/polymer compositions can now be selected to ensure long-term stable amorphous formulations at given storage conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Formulating viscous hydrodynamics for large velocity gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Viscous corrections to relativistic hydrodynamics, which are usually formulated for small velocity gradients, have recently been extended from Navier-Stokes formulations to a class of treatments based on Israel-Stewart equations. Israel-Stewart treatments, which treat the spatial components of the stress-energy tensor τ ij as dynamical objects, introduce new parameters, such as the relaxation times describing nonequilibrium behavior of the elements τ ij . By considering linear response theory and entropy constraints, we show how the additional parameters are related to fluctuations of τ ij . Furthermore, the Israel-Stewart parameters are analyzed for their ability to provide stable and physical solutions for sound waves. Finally, it is shown how these parameters, which are naturally described by correlation functions in real time, might be constrained by lattice calculations, which are based on path-integral formulations in imaginary time

  2. Optimization Formulations for the Maximum Nonlinear Buckling Load of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Esben; Lund, Erik

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on criterion functions for gradient based optimization of the buckling load of laminated composite structures considering different types of buckling behaviour. A local criterion is developed, and is, together with a range of local and global criterion functions from literature......, benchmarked on a number of numerical examples of laminated composite structures for the maximization of the buckling load considering fiber angle design variables. The optimization formulations are based on either linear or geometrically nonlinear analysis and formulated as mathematical programming problems...... solved using gradient based techniques. The developed local criterion is formulated such it captures nonlinear effects upon loading and proves useful for both analysis purposes and as a criterion for use in nonlinear buckling optimization. © 2010 Springer-Verlag....

  3. The superflow state of 3He-B at a diffusive wall. Quasiclassical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopnin, N.B.; Soininen, P.I.

    1992-01-01

    The authors report first computations considering effects of a rough wall on the counterflow state in superfluid 3 He-B for high flow velocities. Using the quasiclassical Green's-function formalism supplemented by the boundary conditions for a diffusive wall, they calculate the order-parameter field and the supercurrent near a container wall for various pressures and temperatures. One of the results is that the current density at the wall as a function of the flow has a maximum at the velocity which is about half of the pair breaking velocity

  4. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, Glen; Scott, Willms

    2008-01-01

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and

  5. Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemilentsau, A; Ya Slepyan, G; Maksimenko, S A

    2009-01-01

    Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube (CNT) is investigated theoretically in this paper. The analysis is based on the fluctuation-dissipative theorem in the Callen-Welton form. The Dyson equation for the Green dyadic of the electromagnetic field in the presence of CNT is formulated and a method for its numerical solution is elaborated. We show that the photonic density of states spectrum has a nontrivial resonant structure in the terahertz range in the vicinity of the metallic single-wall CNT. The origin of these resonances is the surface plasmon resonances on the CNT's edges.

  6. Comprehensive analysis of coding-lncRNA gene co-expression network uncovers conserved functional lncRNAs in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Jing; Huang, Shulan; Xiang, Shuanglin; Hu, Xiang; Liu, Changning

    2018-05-09

    Zebrafish is a full-developed model system for studying development processes and human disease. Recent studies of deep sequencing had discovered a large number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in zebrafish. However, only few of them had been functionally characterized. Therefore, how to take advantage of the mature zebrafish system to deeply investigate the lncRNAs' function and conservation is really intriguing. We systematically collected and analyzed a series of zebrafish RNA-seq data, then combined them with resources from known database and literatures. As a result, we obtained by far the most complete dataset of zebrafish lncRNAs, containing 13,604 lncRNA genes (21,128 transcripts) in total. Based on that, a co-expression network upon zebrafish coding and lncRNA genes was constructed and analyzed, and used to predict the Gene Ontology (GO) and the KEGG annotation of lncRNA. Meanwhile, we made a conservation analysis on zebrafish lncRNA, identifying 1828 conserved zebrafish lncRNA genes (1890 transcripts) that have their putative mammalian orthologs. We also found that zebrafish lncRNAs play important roles in regulation of the development and function of nervous system; these conserved lncRNAs present a significant sequential and functional conservation, with their mammalian counterparts. By integrative data analysis and construction of coding-lncRNA gene co-expression network, we gained the most comprehensive dataset of zebrafish lncRNAs up to present, as well as their systematic annotations and comprehensive analyses on function and conservation. Our study provides a reliable zebrafish-based platform to deeply explore lncRNA function and mechanism, as well as the lncRNA commonality between zebrafish and human.

  7. LRP1 functions as an atheroprotective integrator of TGFbeta and PDFG signals in the vascular wall: implications for Marfan syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Boucher

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional receptor LRP1 controls expression, activity and trafficking of the PDGF receptor-beta in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC. LRP1 is also a receptor for TGFbeta1 and is required for TGFbeta mediated inhibition of cell proliferation.We show that loss of LRP1 in VSMC (smLRP(- in vivo results in a Marfan-like syndrome with nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated Smad2/3, disruption of elastic layers, tortuous aorta, and increased expression of the TGFbeta target genes thrombospondin-1 (TSP1 and PDGFRbeta in the vascular wall. Treatment of smLRP1(- animals with the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone abolished nuclear pSmad accumulation, reversed the Marfan-like phenotype, and markedly reduced smooth muscle proliferation, fibrosis and atherosclerosis independent of plasma cholesterol levels.Our findings are consistent with an activation of TGFbeta signals in the LRP1-deficient vascular wall. LRP1 may function as an integrator of proliferative and anti-proliferative signals that control physiological mechanisms common to the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome and atherosclerosis, and this is essential for maintaining vascular wall integrity.

  8. Comprehensive Evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis Cell Wall-Anchored Proteins in Early Infective Endocarditis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L.; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) a...

  9. Stability equation and two-component Eigenmode for domain walls in scalar potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, G.S.; Graca, E.L.; Rodrigues, R. de Lima

    2002-08-01

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics involving a two-component representation and two-component eigenfunctions is applied to obtain the stability equation associated to a potential model formulated in terms of two coupled real scalar fields. We investigate the question of stability by introducing an operator technique for the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) and non-BPS states on two domain walls in a scalar potential model with minimal N 1-supersymmetry. (author)

  10. Performance of the PDX neutral beam wall armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Williams, M.D.

    1985-02-01

    The PDX wall armor was designed to function as an inner wall thermal armor, a neutral beam diagnostic, and a large area inner toroidal plasma limiter. In this paper we discuss its thermal performance as wall armor during two years of PDX neutral beam heating experiments. During this period it provided sufficient inner wall protection to permit perpendicular heating injections into normal and disruptive plasmas as well as injections in the absence of plasma involving special experiments, calibrations, and tests important for the optimization and development of the PDX neutral beam injection system. Many of the design constraints and performance issues encountered in this work are relevant to the design of larger fusion devices

  11. Psychosocial student functioning in comprehensive dental clinic education: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    2018-01-01

    also rated their perceived stress using a 0-10 scale, where 0 is no stress, and 10 is highest stress. Qualitative analyses involved searching for recurring themes and discovery of categories of clinical and social functioning. All 8 students were revisited as dentists after 8 years and filled out a 15...... expectations and worries about how others perceived them. Dys-Grp experienced higher negative stress and maladaptive perfectionism and described crying behaviours, withdrawal and unwillingness to cooperate with others. In contrast, students in F+Grp provided rich content about mutual cooperation related...... to social networking and positive support. The 8 subjects exhibited high internal consistency (α = .98) in their responses to the follow-up survey about their first year of clinic. Conclusions: The comprehensive care teaching clinic environment with students working in groups appeared to provide...

  12. Experimental and numerical study of heat transfer across insulation wall of a refrigerated integral panel van

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glouannec, Patrick; Michel, Benoit; Delamarre, Guillaume; Grohens, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical design study of an insulation wall for refrigerated vans. The thermophysical properties of the insulating multilayer panel, the external environment impact (solar irradiation, temperature, etc.) and durability are taken into account. Different tools are used to characterize the thermal performances of the insulation walls and the thermal properties of the insulation materials are measured. In addition, an experiment at the wall scale is carried out and a 2D FEM model of heat and mass transfer within the wall is formulated. Three configurations are studied with this design approach. Multilayer insulation walls containing reflective multi-foil insulation, aerogel and phase change materials (PCM) are tested. Promising results are obtained with these materials, especially the reduction of peak heat transfer and energy consumption during the daytime period. Furthermore, the major influence of solar irradiation is highlighted as it can increase the peak heat transfer crossing the insulation wall by up to 43%. Nevertheless, we showed that the use of reflective multi-foil insulation and aerogel layers allowed decreasing this impact by 27%. - Highlights: • A design study of an insulation wall for a refrigerated van is carried out. • Experimental and numerical studies of multilayer insulation walls are performed. • The major influence of solar irradiation is highlighted. • New insulation materials (reflective multi-foil, aerogel and PCM) are tested

  13. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Mollet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed.

  14. Inner-outer interactions in a rough wall turbulent boundary layer over hemispherical roughness using PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathikonda, Gokul; Clark, Caitlyn; Christensen, Kenneth T.

    2017-11-01

    Inner-outer interactions over rough-wall boundary layer were investigated using high frame-rate, PIV measurements in a Refractive index-matched (RIM) facility. Flows over canonical smooth-wall and hexagonally-packed hemispherical roughness under transitionally rough flow conditions (and with Reτ 1500) were measured using a dual camera PIV system with different fields of view (FOVs) and operating simultaneously. The large FOV measures the large scales and boundary layer parameters, while the small FOV measures the small scales very close to the wall with high spatial ( 7y*) and temporal ( 2.5t*) resolutions. Conditional metrics were formulated to investigate these scale interactions in a spatio-temporal sense using the PIV data. It was found that the observations complement the interaction structure made via hotwire experiments and DNS in previous studies over both smooth and rough-wall flows, with a strong correlation between the large scales and small scale energies indicative of the amplitude modulation interactions. Additionally, frequency and scale modulations were also investigated with limited success. These experiments highlight the similarities and differences in these interactions between the smooth- and rough-wall flows.

  15. Note on pesticide residues as a function of formulation used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, K.A.

    1976-01-01

    The total quantities of pesticides needed for adequate pest control may be minimized by the correct choice of methods of formulation and application. This will diminish the total burden of residues in the environment but not necessarily in the crop. Radiolabelled pesticides are useful for small-scale and laboratory tests to elucidate the principles which determine the behaviour of pesticides in the environment and to check analytical methods used for field-scale tests. (author)

  16. Expression and Function of Cell Wall-Bound Cationic Peroxidase in Asparagus Somatic Embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Nakagawa, Naoki; Sakurai, Naoki; Nevins, Donald J.

    2003-01-01

    Cultured asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L. cv Y6) cells induced to regenerate into whole plants through somatic embryogenesis secreted a 38-kD protein into cell walls. The full-length cDNA sequence of this protein (Asparagus officinalis peroxidase 1 [AoPOX1]) determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed similarity with plant peroxidases. AoPOX1 transcripts were particularly abundant during early somatic embryogenesis. To evaluate the in vivo function of AoPOX1 protein, purified recombinant AoPOX1 protein was reacted with a series of phenolic substrates. The AoPOX1 protein was effective in the metabolism of feruloyl (o-methoxyphenol)-substituted substrates, including coniferyl alcohol. The reaction product of coniferyl alcohol was fractionated and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, indicating that the oxidation product of coniferyl alcohol in the presence of AoPOX1 was dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol. The concentration of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol in the cultured medium of the somatic embryos was in the range of 10−8 m. Functions of the AoPOX1 protein in the cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:12692335

  17. Studies on first wall and plasma wall interaction in JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes studies on first wall and plasma wall interaction in JT-60. Main results are as follows; (1) To select JT-60 first wall material, various RandD were done in FY1975 ∼ 1976. Mo was selected as first wall materials of limiters and divertor plates because of its reliability under a high heat flux condition. (2) Development of low-Z material has been done to reduce impurity problem of Mo first wall. As a result, titanium carbide (TiC) was selected as a coating material on the Mo. High heat load testing has been done for TiC coated Mo limiter same as JT-60. This material can survive under the condition of 1 kW/cm 2 x 10 s, expected in JT-60 limiter design. (3) To reduce high heat load on the divertor plate, separatrix swing is proposed. Optimum frequency of the sweeping is evaluated to be 2 Hz in JT-60. For a discharge with heating power of 30 MW and duration time of 10 s, in addition to the separatrix swing, remote radiative cooling in the divertor region is necessary. Moreover, calculations of erosion thickness have been done for stainless steel, Mo, graphite, TiC and silicon caibide under high heat flux during plasma disruption. (4) In divertor experiments in JT-60, divertor functions on particle, heat load and impurity controls have been demonstrated. In elctron density of 6 x 10 19 m -3 , particle fueling rate of 20 MW NB heating (3 Pa m 3 /s) can be exhausted by divertor pumping system. Effectiveness of remote radiative cooling is demonstrated under the condition of 20 MW NB heating power. Also, separatrix swing is demonstrated to reduce heat load on the divertor plate. Total radiation in main plasma is 5 ∼ 10% of total absorbed power. (author) 120 refs

  18. A density functional study of nitrogen adsorption in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jie; Wang Yao; Li Wenjun; Wei Fei; Yu Yangxin

    2007-01-01

    An understanding of the adsorption behaviour of nitrogen in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is necessary for obtaining information on its pores by nitrogen adsorption manometry. Non-local density functional theory was used to simulate nitrogen adsorption behaviour, including the adsorption isotherms, equilibrium density profiles and potential energy of the nitrogen molecules at 77 K, inside SWCNTs with diameters ranging from 0.696 to 3.001 nm. With increasing diameter, nitrogen adsorption changes from continuous filling in one dimension to a two-stage adsorption that corresponds to monolayer formation followed by multilayer condensation. The average density of the adsorbed nitrogen and the density profiles, especially in small diameter SWCNTs, were used to analyse the adsorbate phase at the saturation pressure. The results indicate that the type of pore filling depends primarily on the ratio of the SWCNT diameter to the adsorbate molecular diameter. The filling of SWCNTs is not a simple capillary condensation process, but is dominated by geometrical limitation

  19. European validation of The Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Osteoarthritis from the perspective of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Martin; Wild, Heike

    2017-09-15

    To validate the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Comprehensive Core Set for Osteoarthritis from the patient perspective in Europe. This multicenter cross-sectional study involved 375 patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Trained health professionals completed the Comprehensive Core Set, and patients completed the Short-Form 36 questionnaire. Content validity was evaluated by calculating prevalences of impairments in body function and structures, limitations in activities and participation and environmental factors, which were either barriers or facilitators. Convergent construct validity was evaluated by correlating the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories with the Short-Form 36 Physical Component Score and the SF-36 Mental Component Score in a subgroup of 259 patients. The prevalences of all body function, body structure and activities and participation categories were >40%, >32% and >20%, respectively, and all environmental factors were relevant for >16% of patients. Few categories showed relevant differences between knee and hip osteoarthritis. All body function categories and all but two activities and participation categories showed significant correlations with the Physical Component Score. Body functions from the ICF chapter Mental Functions showed higher correlations with the Mental Component Score than with the Physical Component Score. This study supports the validity of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Comprehensive Core Set for Osteoarthritis. Implications for Rehabilitation Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Sets were developed as practical tools for application in multidisciplinary assessments. The validity of the Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Osteoarthritis in this study supports its application in European patients with

  20. Multiple scattering formulation of two-dimensional acoustic and electromagnetic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose, E-mail: datorma1@upvnet.upv.es, E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es [Grupo de Fenomenos Ondulatorios, Departamento de IngenierIa Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n (Edificio 7F), ES-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    A multiple scattering formulation of two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterials is presented. This approach is comprehensive and can lead to frequency-dependent effective parameters (scalar bulk modulus and tensorial mass density), as it is possible to have not only positive or negative ellipsoidal refractive index, but also positive or negative hyperbolic refractive index. The correction due to multiple scattering interactions is included in the theory and it is demonstrated that its contribution is important only for lattices with high filling fractions. Since the surface fields on the scatterers are mainly responsible for the anomalous behavior of the resulting effective medium, complex scatterers can be used to engineer the frequency response. Anisotropic effects are also discussed within this formulation and some numerical examples are reported. A homogenization theory is also extended to electromagnetic wave propagation in 2D lattices of dielectric structures, where Mie resonances are found to be responsible for the metamaterial behavior.

  1. Comparison of usefulness of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as an independent predictor of cardiac function among admission cardiac serum biomarkers in patients with anterior wall versus nonanterior wall ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeck, Joost D E; Verouden, Niels J W; Kuijt, Wichert J; Koch, Karel T; Van Straalen, Jan P; Fischer, Johan; Groenink, Maarten; Bilodeau, Luc; Tijssen, Jan G P; Krucoff, Mitchell W; De Winter, Robbert J

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prognostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP), among other serum biomarkers, on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging parameters of cardiac function and infarct size in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. We measured NT-pro-BNP, cardiac troponin T, creatinine kinase-MB fraction, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and creatinine on the patients' arrival at the catheterization laboratory in 206 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The NT-pro-BNP levels were divided into quartiles and correlated with left ventricular function and infarct size measured by CMR imaging at 4 to 6 months. Compared to the lower quartiles, patients with nonanterior wall myocardial infarction in the highest quartile of NT-pro-BNP (> or = 260 pg/ml) more often had a greater left ventricular end-systolic volume (68 vs 39 ml/m(2), p pro-BNP level of > or = 260 pg/ml was the strongest independent predictor of left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with nonanterior wall myocardial infarction compared to the other serum biomarkers (beta = -5.8; p = 0.019). In conclusion, in patients with nonanterior wall myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, an admission NT-pro-BNP level of > or = 260 pg/ml was a strong, independent predictor of left ventricular function assessed by CMR imaging at follow-up. Our findings suggest that NT-pro-BNP, a widely available biomarker, might be helpful in the early risk stratification of patients with nonanterior wall myocardial infarction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Open-Trial Pilot Study of a Comprehensive Outpatient Psychosocial Treatment for Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Christopher; Lipinski, Alanna M.; Thomeer, Marcus L.; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; Donnelly, James P.; McDonald, Christin A.; Volker, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility and initial outcomes of a comprehensive outpatient psychosocial treatment (MAXout) for children aged 7-12 years with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder. The 18-week treatment, two 90-minute sessions per week, included instruction and therapeutic activities targeting social/social communication skills,…

  3. Executive Dysfunction among Children with Reading Comprehension Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locascio, Gianna; Mahone, E. Mark; Eason, Sarah H.; Cutting, Laurie E.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging research supports the contribution of executive function (EF) to reading comprehension; however, a unique pattern has not been established for children who demonstrate comprehension difficulties despite average word recognition ability (specific reading comprehension deficit; S-RCD). To identify particular EF components on which children…

  4. Local wall power loading variations in thermonuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    A 2 1/2-dimensional geometric model is presented that allows calculation of power loadings at various points on the first wall of a thermonuclear fusion device. Given average wall power loadings for brems-strahlung, cyclotron radiation charged particles, and neutrons, which are determined from various plasma-physics computation models, local wall heat loads are calculated by partitioning the plasma volume and surface into cells and superimposing the heating effects of the individual cells on selected first-wall differential areas. Heat loads from the entire plasma are thus determined as a function of position on the first-wall surface. Significant differences in local power loadings were found for most fusion designs, and it was therefore concluded that the effect of local power loading variations must be taken into account when calculating temperatures and heat transfer rates in fusion device first walls

  5. Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  6. Understanding plant cell-wall remodelling during the symbiotic interaction between Tuber melanosporum and Corylus avellana using a carbohydrate microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillo, Fabiano; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Henrissat, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    . An important feature of these interactions concerns changes in the cell-wall composition during interaction with other organisms. In ectomycorrhizae, plant and fungal cell walls come into direct contact, and represent the interface between the two partners. However, very little information is available...... on the re-arrangement that could occur within the plant and fungal cell walls during ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Taking advantage of the Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP) technology, the current study has had the aim of monitoring the changes that take place in the plant cell wall in Corylus...

  7. Altered Aortic Upper Wall TDI Velocity Is Inversely Related with Left Ventricular Diastolic Function in Operated Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassareo, Pier Paolo; Saba, Luca; Marras, Andrea R; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients often develop progressive aortic root dilatation due to an impairment in aortic elastic properties. (1) to assess aortic elasticity at the level of the aortic upper wall by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI); (2) to evaluate the influence of aortic elasticity on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in TOF patients. Twenty-eight postoperative TOF patients (14 males, 14 females. Mean age: 25.7 ± 1.6 years) and 28 age- and sex-matched normal subjects were examined. Aortic distensibility and stiffness index were calculated. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities, LV systolic and diastolic parameters were assessed by TDI. Aortic distensibility was significantly lower (P = .024), and aortic stiffness index significantly higher (P = .036) in TOF patients compared to controls. E/E' was significantly higher in TOF than in control group (P < .001). Aortic upper wall early diastolic velocity (AWEDV) was significantly correlated with aortic stiffness index (r: -0.42; P < .03), aortic distensibility (r = 0.54; P < .004), left atrial volume (r = -0.62; P = .0004), and E/E' ratio (r = -0.87; P < .0001). The latter relationship remained significant even when excluding the influence of age at surgery (r = -0.60; P < .0007) and of previous palliative surgery (r = -0.53; P < .02). Aortic elastic properties can be directly assessed using TDI to measure AWEDV. Aortic elasticity is significantly lower in postoperative TOF patients, exerting a negative effect also on LV diastolic function, with a potential long-term influence on clinical status. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Abnormal Motion of the Interventricular Septum after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: Comprehensive Evaluation with MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Hoon; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Chang, Huk Jae; Park, Kay Hyun; Lim, Cheong; Kim, Shin Jae; Kang, Joon Won; Lim, Tae Hwan

    2010-01-01

    To define the mechanism associated with abnormal septal motion (ASM) after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) using comprehensive MR imaging techniques. Eighteen patients (mean age, 58 ± 12 years; 15 males) were studied with comprehensive MR imaging using rest/stress perfusion, rest cine, and delayed enhancement (DE)-MR techniques before and after CABG. Myocardial tagging was also performed following CABG. Septal wall motion was compared in the ASM and non-ASM groups. Preoperative and postoperative results with regard to septal wall motion in the ASM group were also compared. We then analyzed circumferential strain after CABG in both the septal and lateral walls in the ASM group. All patients had normal septal wall motion and perfusion without evidence of non-viable myocardium prior to surgery. Postoperatively, ASM at rest and/or stress state was documented in 10 patients (56%). However, all of these had normal rest/stress perfusion and DE findings at the septum. Septal wall motion after CABG in the ASM group was significantly lower than that in the non- ASM group (2.1±5.3 mm vs. 14.9±4.7 mm in the non-ASM group; p < 0.001). In the ASM group, the degree of septal wall motion showed a significant decrease after CABG (preoperative vs. postoperative = 15.8±4.5 mm vs. 2.1±5.3 mm; p = 0.007). In the ASM group after CABG, circumferential shortening of the septum was even larger than that of the lateral wall (-20.89±5.41 vs. -15.41±3.7, p < 0.05) Abnormal septal motion might not be caused by ischemic insult. We suggest that ASM might occur due to an increase in anterior cardiac mobility after incision of the pericardium

  9. Characteristics of wall pressure over wall with permeable coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Woo Seog; Shin, Seungyeol; Lee, Seungbae [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Fluctuating wall pressures were measured using an array of 16 piezoelectric transducers beneath a turbulent boundary layer. The coating used in this experiment was an open cell, urethane type foam with a porosity of approximately 50 ppi. The ultimate objective of the coating is to provide a mechanical filter to reduce the wall pressure fluctuations. The ultimate objective of the coating is to provide a mechanical filter to reduce the wall pressure fluctuations. The boundary layer on the flat plate was measured by using a hot wire probe, and the CPM method was used to determine the skin friction coefficient. The wall pressure autospectra and streamwise wavenumber frequency spectra were compared to assess the attenuation of the wall pressure field by the coating. The coating is shown to attenuate the convective wall pressure energy. However, the relatively rough surface of the coating in this investigation resulted in a higher mean wall shear stress, thicker boundary layer, and higher low frequency wall pressure spectral levels compared to a smooth wall.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation of diastolic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, F.; Reiser, M.F.; Theisen, D.; Schwab, F.; Beckmann, B.M.; Schuessler, F.; Kaeaeb, S.; Zinsser, D.; Goelz, T.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has a prevalence of approximately 0.2% and is clinically asymptomatic in many patients or presents with unspecific symptoms. This explains the importance of imaging for the diagnosis of HCM as well as for the assessment of the clinical course. The definitive finding in HCM is myocardial hypertrophy with thickening of the ventricular wall ≥ 15 mm. While echocardiography is an excellent screening tool magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a comprehensive analysis of the heart in HCM. This includes a detailed analysis of the distribution and extent of myocardial hypertrophy, a thorough evaluation of systolic and diastolic cardiac function, the assessment of the presence and extent of dynamic outflow tract obstruction as well as the description of the systolic anterior motion (SAM) phenomenon of the mitral valve with secondary mitral insufficiency. When contrast material is administered, additional information about myocardial perfusion as well as the presence and extent of myocardial fibrosis can be obtained. This study compared systolic functional parameters as well as end systolic and end diastolic wall thickness of patients with and without diastolic dysfunction. (orig.) [de

  11. Analytical Solution of Flow and Heat Transfer over a Permeable Stretching Wall in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dayyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Boundary layer flow through a porous medium over a stretching porous wall has seen solved with analytical solution. It has been considered two wall boundary conditions which are power-law distribution of either wall temperature or heat flux. These are general enough to cover the isothermal and isoflux cases. In addition to momentum, both first and second laws of thermodynamics analyses of the problem are investigated. The governing equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The transformed ordinary equations are solved analytically using homotopy analysis method. A comprehensive parametric study is presented, and it is shown that the rate of heat transfer increases with Reynolds number, Prandtl number, and suction to the surface.

  12. A new divided-wall heat integrated distillation column (HIDiC) for batch processing: Feasibility and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, Amiya K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel heat integrated configuration is proposed for batch distillation. • The shell is divided into two closed semi-cylinders by a metal wall. • An open-loop variable manipulation policy is formulated. • The column improves its energy efficiency and economic performance. - Abstract: This work introduces a new heat integrated distillation column (HIDiC) for batch processing. Under this scheme, the entire cylindrical shell is proposed to divide vertically by a metal wall into two closed semi-cylinders. Aiming to generate an internal heat source, a heat pump system is employed over the left hand division to elevate the pressure of the right hand part with the application of HIDiC concept. This new divided-wall HIDiC column utilizes its own energy source by transferring heat from the high pressure (HP) to low pressure (LP) side, thereby reducing the utility consumption in both the still and condenser. To make this thermal integration technology more effective, a typical tray configuration is proposed in both sides of the divided-wall. Unlike the continuous flow distillation, the batch column shows unsteady state process characteristics that make its operation more challenging. With this, an open-loop variable manipulation policy is formulated so that the dynamics of the heat integrated column remain close, if not same, with its conventional counterpart. This is a necessary condition required for a fair comparison between them. Finally, the proposed configuration is illustrated by a binary column, showing an improvement in energy savings, entropy generation and cost over its conventional analogous. This thermally integrated configuration is relatively simple than the traditional HIDiC in terms of design and operation.

  13. 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference-August 2-7,2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohnen, Debra [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2009-08-07

    Plant cell walls are a complex cellular compartment essential for plant growth, development and response to biotic and abiotic stress and a major biological resource for meeting our future bioenergy and natural product needs. The goal of the 2009 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Research Conference is to summarize and critically evaluate the current level of understanding of the structure, synthesis and function of the whole plant extracellular matrix, including the polysaccharides, proteins, lignin and waxes that comprise the wall, and the enzymes and regulatory proteins that drive wall synthesis and modification. Innovative techniques to study how both primary and secondary wall polymers are formed and modified throughout plant growth will be emphasized, including rapid advances taking place in the use of anti-wall antibodies and carbohydrate binding proteins, comparative and evolutionary wall genomics, and the use of mutants and natural variants to understand and identify wall structure-function relationships. Discussions of essential research advances needed to push the field forward toward a systems biology approach will be highlighted. The meeting will include a commemorative lecture in honor of the career and accomplishments of the late Emeritus Professor Bruce A. Stone, a pioneer in wall research who contributed over 40 years of outstanding studies on plant cell wall structure, function, synthesis and remodeling including emphasis on plant cell wall beta-glucans and arabinogalactans. The dwindling supply of fossil fuels will not suffice to meet our future energy and industrial product needs. Plant biomass is the renewable resource that will fill a large part of the void left by vanishing fossil fuels. It is therefore critical that basic research scientists interact closely with industrial researchers to critically evaluate the current state of knowledge regarding how plant biomass, which is largely plant cell walls, is synthesized and utilized by the plant. A final

  14. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  15. Development of a ceramic material to cover walls to be applied in diagnostic radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frimaio, Audrew

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to formulate a ceramic composition for wall coating seeking to contribute to the optimization of diagnosis rooms' shielding. The work was based on experimental measures of X-radiation attenuation (80 and 100 kV) using ceramic coating materials containing different ceramic bases (red, white, gres, stoneware porcelain tiles, etc). Among the appraised ceramic bases, the white gres presented better attenuation properties and it was considered the most suitable material for the targets of this work. Different formulations of white gres were studied and altered in order to obtain better attenuation properties. Simulations of ceramic compositions using gres coating were made maintaining the percentages of 12-20% clay; 6-18% kaolin; 12-25% phyllite; 8-14% quartz; 1018% feldspar; 32-40% pegmatite and 6-8% talc in the composition of the necessary raw-material. The quantitative and qualitative chemical compositions of these materials were also evaluated and the most common representative elements are SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , CaO and Ti 2 O 3 . Formulations containing Pb and Ba oxides were studied, considering that CaO can be replaced by PbO or BaO. The attenuation properties for X-radiation were investigated by computer simulations considering the incident and transmitted X-ray spectra for the different studied compositions and they were compared to the properties of the reference materials Pb, Ba and BaSO 4 (barite). The results obtained with the simulations indicated the formulated composition of gres ceramic base that presented better attenuation properties considering the X-ray energies used in diagnosis (80, 100 and 150 kV). Ceramic plates based on the formulated compositions that presented lower percentage differences related to Pb were experimentally produced and physically tested as wall coating and protecting barrier. Properties as flexion resistance module, density, load rupture, water absorption and X radiation attenuation were evaluated for

  16. Scalable Fabrication of High-Performance Transparent Conductors Using Graphene Oxide-Stabilized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Inks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxiang He

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent development in liquid-phase processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs has revealed rod-coating as a promising approach for large-scale production of SWNT-based transparent conductors. Of great importance in the ink formulation is the stabilizer having excellent dispersion stability, environmental friendly and tunable rheology in the liquid state, and also can be readily removed to enhance electrical conductivity and mechanical stability. Herein we demonstrate the promise of graphene oxide (GO as a synergistic stabilizer for SWNTs in water. SWNTs dispersed in GO is formulated into inks with homogeneous nanotube distribution, good wetting and rheological properties, and compatible with industrial rod coating practice. Microwave treatment of rod-coated films can reduce GOs and enhance electro-optical performance. The resultant films offer a sheet resistance of ~80 Ω/sq at 86% transparency, along with good mechanical flexibility. Doping the films with nitric acid can further decrease the sheet resistance to ~25 Ω/sq. Comparing with the films fabricated from typical surfactant-based SWNT inks, our films offer superior adhesion as assessed by the Scotch tape test. This study provides new insight into the selection of suitable stabilizers for functional SWNT inks with strong potential for printed electronics.

  17. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bancha Satirapoj

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi. The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN.

  18. Primary motor cortex functionally contributes to language comprehension: An online rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Nikola; Feurra, Matteo; Shpektor, Anna; Myachykov, Andriy; Shtyrov, Yury

    2017-02-01

    Among various questions pertinent to grounding human cognitive functions in a neurobiological substrate, the association between language and motor brain structures is a particularly debated one in neuroscience and psychology. While many studies support a broadly distributed model of language and semantics grounded, among other things, in the general modality-specific systems, theories disagree as to whether motor and sensory cortex activity observed during language processing is functional or epiphenomenal. Here, we assessed the role of motor areas in linguistic processing by investigating the responses of 28 healthy volunteers to different word types in semantic and lexical decision tasks, following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of primary motor cortex. We found that early rTMS (delivered within 200ms of word onset) produces a left-lateralised and meaning-specific change in reaction speed, slowing down behavioural responses to action-related words, and facilitating abstract words - an effect present only during semantic, but not lexical, decision. We interpret these data in light of action-perception theory of language, bolstering the claim that motor cortical areas play a functional role in language comprehension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J. David

    2011-01-01

    An action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity is presented. The action is a functional of the spacetime metric and the gauge source vector. An action principle for the Z4 formulation of general relativity has been proposed recently by Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela. The relationship between the generalized harmonic action and the Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela action is discussed in detail.

  20. Histochemical effects of γ radiation on soft fruit cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foa, E.; Jona, R.; Vallania, R.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation effects in peaches, tomatoes, cherries and grapes on the composition of cell wall polysaccharides were investigated by histochemical techniques. Cell wall polysaccharides, separated by a modified Jensen's method were pectins, hemicellulose, non-cellulosic polysaccharides and cellulose. The extinction values of Periodic Acid Schiff stained tissues was measured by microscopical photometry. Irradiation induced highly significant changes in polysaccharide composition of mesocarp cell walls; these changes were found to be a function of time of irradiation after harvest and of the species tested. A general influence on polysaccharide molecules was not found. Variations produced by irradiation are postulated to be an interference with a regulatory system rather than a breakdown of a functional molecule (metabolic enzyme or polysaccharide. (author)

  1. TURVA-2012: Formulation of radionuclide release scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, Nuria; Hjerpe, Thomas; Snellman, Margit; Ikonen, Ari; Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and application for a construction licence for a repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site in south-western Finland. This paper gives a summary of the scenarios and the methodology followed in formulating them as described in TURVA-2012: Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios (Posiva, 2013). The scenarios are further analysed in TURVA-2012: Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System and TURVA-2012: Biosphere Assessment (Posiva, 2012a, 2012b). The formulation of scenarios takes into account the safety functions of the main barriers of the repository system and the uncertainties in the features, events, and processes (FEP) that may affect the entire disposal system (i.e. repository system plus the surface environment) from the emplacement of the first canister until the far future. In the report TURVA-2012: Performance Assessment (2012d), the performance of the engineered and natural barriers has been assessed against the loads expected during the evolution of the repository system and the site. Uncertainties have been identified and these are taken into account in the formulation of radionuclide release scenarios. The uncertainties in the FEP and evolution of the surface environment are taken into account in formulating the surface environment scenarios used ultimately in estimating radiation exposure. Formulating radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system links the reports Performance Assessment and Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios for the Repository System. The formulation of radionuclide release scenarios for the surface environment brings together biosphere description and the surface environment FEP and is the link to the assessment of the surface environment scenarios summarised in TURVA-2012: Biosphere Assessment. (authors)

  2. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  3. Effects of Atelocollagen Formulation Containing Oligonucleotide on Endothelial Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hanai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atelocollagen is a major animal protein that is used as a highly biocompatible biomaterial. To date, atelocollagen has been used as an effective drug delivery technology to sustain the release of antitumor proteins and to enhance the antitumor activity of oligonucleotides in in vivo models. However, the biological effects of this technology are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of atelocollagen on endothelial paracellular barrier function. An atelocollagen formulation containing oligonucleotides specifically increased the permeability of two types of endothelial cells, and the change was dependent on the molecular size, structure of the oligonucleotides used and the concentrations of the oligonucleotide and atelocollagen in the formulation. An immunohistochemical examination revealed that the formulation had effects on the cellular skeleton and intercellular structure although it did not affect the expression of adherens junction or tight junction proteins. These changes were induced through p38 MAP kinase signaling. It is important to elucidate the biological functions of atelocollagen in order to be able to exploit its drug delivery properties.

  4. Recent developments on new formulations based on nutrient-dense ingredients for the production of healthy-functional bread: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaie, Somayeh; Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Jafari, Seid Mahdi

    2014-11-01

    Bread is one of the oldest functional foods which its health effects have been investigated in many studies. The current communication presents a review of published studies in recent years on the topic and looks at possible future trends in the improved nutritional and health qualities which have been applied in the bakery industry, directing it further to the formulation design and production of functional breads. The results show that many beneficial ingredients such as dietary fibers, phenolic antioxidants, marine ingredients, and n-3 fatty acids can be used in the bread industry to increase its functionality and result in healthy products, low in calories, cholesterol and celiac disease. Moreover, the use of psyllium seed, amaranth seed, chestnut flour and prebiotics in gluten-free bread (GFB) baking may be the promising frontier to improve overall appearance, quality, sensory properties, and shelf-life of GFB.

  5. Bloch walls in a nickel single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.; Treimer, W.

    2001-01-01

    We present a consistent theory for the dependence of the magnetic structure in bulk samples on external static magnetic fields and corresponding experimental results. We applied the theory of micromagnetism to this crystal and calculated the Bloch wall thickness as a function of external magnetic fields. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental data, so that the Bloch wall thickness of a 71 deg. nickel single crystal was definitely determined with some hundred of nanometer

  6. Clustering Of Left Ventricular Wall Motion Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelogrlic, Z.; Jakopin, J.; Gyergyek, L.

    1982-11-01

    A method for detection of wall regions with similar motion was presented. A model based on local direction information was used to measure the left ventricular wall motion from cineangiographic sequence. Three time functions were used to define segmental motion patterns: distance of a ventricular contour segment from the mean contour, the velocity of a segment and its acceleration. Motion patterns were clustered by the UPGMA algorithm and by an algorithm based on K-nearest neighboor classification rule.

  7. The perspective awareness model - Eliciting multiple perspectives to formulate high quality decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Laurel

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of attention is given to the importance of communication in environmental remediation and radioactive waste management. However, very little attention is given to eliciting multiple perspectives so as to formulate high quality decisions. Plans that are based on a limited number of perspectives tend to be narrowly focused whereas those that are based on a wide variety of perspectives tend to be comprehensive, higher quality, and more apt to be put into application. In addition, existing methods of dialogue have built-in limitations in that they typically draw from the predominant thinking patterns which focus in some areas but ignore others. This can result in clarity but a lack of comprehensiveness. This paper presents a Perspective Awareness Model which helps groups such as partnering teams, interagency teams, steering committees, and working groups elicit a wide net of perspectives and viewpoints. The paper begins by describing five factors that makes cooperation among such groups challenging. Next, a Perspective Awareness Model that makes it possible to manage these five factors is presented. The two primary components of this model --- the eight 'Thinking Directions' and the 'Shared Documentation' --- are described in detail. Several examples are given to illustrate how the Perspective Awareness Model can be used to elicit multiple perspectives to formulate high quality decisions in the area of environmental remediation and radioactive waste management. (authors)

  8. Alternative to domain wall fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, H.

    2002-01-01

    An alternative to commonly used domain wall fermions is presented. Some rigorous bounds on the condition number of the associated linear problem are derived. On the basis of these bounds and some experimentation it is argued that domain wall fermions will in general be associated with a condition number that is of the same order of magnitude as the product of the condition number of the linear problem in the physical dimensions by the inverse bare quark mass. Thus, the computational cost of implementing true domain wall fermions using a single conjugate gradient algorithm is of the same order of magnitude as that of implementing the overlap Dirac operator directly using two nested conjugate gradient algorithms. At a cost of about a factor of two in operation count it is possible to make the memory usage of direct implementations of the overlap Dirac operator independent of the accuracy of the approximation to the sign function and of the same order as that of standard Wilson fermions

  9. Charge-field formulation of quantum electrodynamics (QEMED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiter, D.

    1980-01-01

    By expressing classical electron theory in terms of 'charge-field' functional structures, it is shown that a finite formulation of the classical electrodynamics of point charges emerges in a simple and elegant fashion. This is used to construct a 'charge-field' quantum electrodynamic theory. It is found that interacting photon states are generated as a secondary manifestation of electron-positron quantization, and do not require the usual 'free' canonical quantization scheme. The possibility is discussed that this approach may lead to a better formulation of quantum electrodynamics in the Heisenberg picture and suggests a crucial experimental test to distinguish this new 'charge-field' quantum electrodynamics 'QEMED' from the standard QED formulation. Specifically QEMED predicts that the 'Einstein principle of separability' should be found to be valid for correlated photon polarization measurements, in which the polarizers are changed more rapidly than a characteristic photon travel time. Such an experiment (Aspect 1976) can distinguish between QEMED and QED in a complete and clear-cut fashion. (U.K.)

  10. Mixed finite-element formulations in piezoelectricity and flexoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sheng; Purohit, Prashant K; Aravas, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Flexoelectricity, the linear coupling of strain gradient and electric polarization, is inherently a size-dependent phenomenon. The energy storage function for a flexoelectric material depends not only on polarization and strain, but also strain-gradient. Thus, conventional finite-element methods formulated solely on displacement are inadequate to treat flexoelectric solids since gradients raise the order of the governing differential equations. Here, we introduce a computational framework based on a mixed formulation developed previously by one of the present authors and a colleague. This formulation uses displacement and displacement-gradient as separate variables which are constrained in a 'weighted integral sense' to enforce their known relation. We derive a variational formulation for boundary-value problems for piezo- and/or flexoelectric solids. We validate this computational framework against available exact solutions. Our new computational method is applied to more complex problems, including a plate with an elliptical hole, stationary cracks, as well as tension and shear of solids with a repeating unit cell. Our results address several issues of theoretical interest, generate predictions of experimental merit and reveal interesting flexoelectric phenomena with potential for application.

  11. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  12. Fundamental vortices, wall-crossing, and particle-vortex duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chiung; Yi, Piljin [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Yoshida, Yutaka [Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2017-05-18

    We explore 1d vortex dynamics of 3d supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories, as inferred from factorization of exact partition functions. Under Seiberg-like dualities, the 3d partition function must remain invariant, yet it is not a priori clear what should happen to the vortex dynamics. We observe that the 1d quivers for the vortices remain the same, and the net effect of the 3d duality map manifests as 1d Wall-Crossing phenomenon; although the vortex number can shift along such duality maps, the ranks of the 1d quiver theory are unaffected, leading to a notion of fundamental vortices as basic building blocks for topological sectors. For Aharony-type duality, in particular, where one must supply extra chiral fields to couple with monopole operators on the dual side, 1d wall-crossings of an infinite number of vortex quiver theories are neatly and collectively encoded by 3d determinant of such extra chiral fields. As such, 1d wall-crossing of the vortex theory encodes the particle-vortex duality embedded in the 3d Seiberg-like duality. For N=4, the D-brane picture is used to motivate this 3d/1d connection, while, for N=2, this 3d/1d connection is used to fine-tune otherwise ambiguous vortex dynamics. We also prove some identities of 3d supersymmetric partition functions for the Aharony duality using this vortex wall-crossing interpretation.

  13. Thermal stress and creep fatigue limitations in first wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Harkness, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic performance of a lithium cooled cylindrical first wall module has been analyzed as a function of the incident neutron wall loading. Three criteria were established for the purpose of defining the maximum wall loading allowable for modules constructed of Type 316 stainless steel and a vanadium alloy. Of the three, the maximum structural temperature criterion of 750 0 C for vanadium resulted in the limiting wall loading value of 7 MW/m 2 . The second criterion limited thermal stress levels to the yield strength of the alloy. This led to the lowest wall loading value for the Type 316 stainless steel wall (1.7 MW/m 2 ). The third criterion required that the creep-fatigue characteristics of the module allow a lifetime of 10 MW-yr/m 2 . At wall temperatures of 600 0 C, this lifetime could be achieved in a stainless steel module for wall loadings less than 3.2 MW/m 2 , while the same lifetime could be achieved for much higher wall loadings in a vanadium module

  14. Hydrogen atom in the phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracia-Bondia, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using a coordinate transformation which regularizes the classical Kepler problem, we show that the hydrogen-atom case may be analytically solved via the phase-space formulation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The problem is essentially reduced to that of a four-dimensional oscillator whose treatment in the phase-space formulation is developed. Furthermore, the method allows us to calculate the Green's function for the H atom in a surprisingly simple way

  15. Functional equations and Green's functions for augmented scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klauder, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Certain noncanonical self-coupled scalar quantum field theories, previously formulated by means of functional integration, are herein recast into the form of functional differential equations for the Green's functional. From these expressions the set of coupled equations relating the Green's functions is obtained. The new equations are compared with those of the conventional formulation, and are proposed as alternatives, especially for nonrenormalizable models when the conventional equations fail

  16. Evolution of Immiscibly Blended Functionalized Polymers with Respect to Cure Parameters and Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Nicholas Walter Medicus

    Powder coatings are becoming ubiquitous in the coating marketplace due to the absence of solvents in their formulation, but they have yet to see implementation in low-reflectance outdoor applications. This demand could be met by utilizing polymer blends formulated with low loadings of matting agents and pigments. The goal of this research is a thorough characterization of prototype low-reflectance coatings through several analytical techniques. Prototypical thermoset blends consist of functionalized polyurethanes rendered immiscible by differences in polar and hydrogen bonding characteristics, resulting in a surface roughened by droplet domains. Analysis of both pigmented and control clear films was performed. This research project had three primary aims: (1) determine the composition of the resin components of the polymer blend; (2) to monitor the evolution of domains before and during curing of clear polymer blends; (3) to monitor the evolution of these domains when pigments are added to these blends. The clear films enabled unhindered analysis by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy on the binder. However, these domains provided no spectroscopic signatures despite their observation by optical microscopy. This necessitated the development of a new procedure for cross-section preparation that leaves no contamination from polishing media, which enabled Raman mapping of the morphology via an introduced marker peak from styrene monomer. The clears were analyzed as a powder and as films that were quenched at various cure-times using FTIR, Raman, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermomechanical methods to construct a model of coating evolution based on cure parameters and polymer dynamics. Domains were observed in the powder, and underwent varying rates of coarsening as the cure progressed. TEM, scanning electron microscopy and thermomechanical methods were also used on pigmented systems at different states of the cure, including in

  17. Comparison of an impec and a semi-implicit formulation for compositional reservoir simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. B. Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In compositional reservoir simulation, a set of non-linear partial differential equations must be solved. In this work, two numerical formulations are compared. The first formulation is based on an implicit pressure and explicit composition (IMPEC procedure, and the second formulation uses an implicit pressure and implicit saturation (IMPSAT. The main goal of this work is to compare the formulations in terms of computational times for solving 2D and 3D compositional reservoir simulation case studies. In the comparison, both UDS (Upwind difference scheme and third order TVD schemes were used. The computational results for the aforementioned formulations and the two interpolation functions are presented for several case studies involving homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs. Based on our comparison of IMPEC and IMPSAT formulations using several case studies presented in this work, the IMPSAT formulation was faster than the IMPEC formulation.

  18. Product Design – From Molecules to Formulations to Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Ng, Ka M.

    2014-01-01

    Product design is a multidisciplinary and diverse subject. This article focuses on product conceptualization (what-to-make) and briefly reviews the corresponding manufacturing processes (how-to-make). Four product types are considered – molecular products, formulated products, devices...... and functional products. For molecular products, computer-aided design tools are used to predict the physicochemical properties of single molecules and blends. For formulated products, an integrated experiment-molecular modelling approach to generate the formula with the specified product attributes is followed....... For devices and functional products, conceptual product design is carried out by modelling the product based on thermodynamics, kinetics and transport processes, by performing experiments, and by decision making based on experience. The results are product specifications in terms of the type of ingredients...

  19. Towards improved modeling of steel-concrete composite wall elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecchio, Frank J.; McQuade, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Improved analysis of double skinned steel concrete composite containment walls. → Smeared rotating crack concept applied in formulation of new analytical model. → Model implemented into finite element program; numerically stable and robust. → Models behavior of shear-critical elements with greater ease and improved accuracy. → Accurate assessments of strength, deformation and failure mode of test specimens. - Abstract: The Disturbed Stress Field Model, a smeared rotating crack model for reinforced concrete based on the Modified Compression Field Theory, is adapted to the analysis of double-skin steel-concrete wall elements. The computational model is then incorporated into a two-dimensional nonlinear finite element analysis algorithm. Verification studies are undertaken by modeling various test specimens, including panel elements subject to uniaxial compression, panel elements subjected to in-plane shear, and wall specimens subjected to reversed cyclic lateral displacements. In all cases, the analysis model is found to provide accurate calculations of structural load capacities, pre- and post-peak displacement responses, post-peak ductility, chronology of damage, and ultimate failure mode. Minor deficiencies are found in regards to the accurate portrayal of faceplate buckling and the effects of interfacial slip between the faceplates and the concrete. Other aspects of the modeling procedure that are in need of further research and development are also identified and discussed.

  20. Electrochemical Characterization of O2 Plasma Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrode for Legionella pneumophila DNA Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Jun-Yong; Hyup Kim, Jun; Kug Kim, Sun; Lee, Cheol Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2010-08-01

    An electrochemical DNA sensor for Legionella pneumophila detection was constructed using O2 plasma functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film as a working electrode (WE). The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results revealed that the electrocatalytic activity of plasma functionalized MWCNT (pf-MWCNT) significantly changed depending on O2 plasma treatment time due to some oxygen containing functional groups on the pf-MWCNT surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra were also presented the changes of their surface morphologies and oxygen composition before and after plasma treatment. From a comparison study, it was found that the pf-MWCNT WEs had higher electrocatalytic activity and more capability of probe DNA immobilization: therefore, electrochemical signal changes by probe DNA immobilization and hybridization on pf-MWCNT WEs were larger than on Au WEs. The pf-MWCNT based DNA sensor was able to detect a concentration range of 10 pM-100 nM of target DNA to detect L. pneumophila.

  1. Comprehensive Benefit Evaluation of the Wind-PV-ES and Transmission Hybrid Power System Consideration of System Functionality and Proportionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huizheng Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the background of decreasing fossil fuels and increasing environmental pollution, the wind-photovoltaic energy storage and transmission hybrid power system (or called the wind-PV-ES and transmission hybrid system has become a strategic choice to achieve energy sustainability. However, the comprehensive benefit evaluation of such a combined power system is in a relatively blank state in China, which will hinder the reasonable and orderly development of this station. Four parts, the technical performance, economic benefit, ecological impact and social benefit, are considered in this paper, and a multi-angle evaluation index system of the wind-PV-ES and transmission system is designed. The projection pursuit model is used to evaluated system functionality conventionally; relative entropy theory is used to evaluate the system functionality simultaneously; and a comprehensive benefit evaluation model of the technique for order preference by similar to ideal solution (TOPSIS considering both system functionality and proportionality is constructed. Finally, the national demonstration station of the wind-PV-ES-transmission system is taken as an example to testify to the practicability and validity of the evaluation index system and model.

  2. Molecular perspective on diazonium adsorption for controllable functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shangchao; Hilmer, Andrew J; Mendenhall, Jonathan D; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2012-05-16

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using diazonium salts allows modification of their optical and electronic properties for a variety of applications, ranging from drug-delivery vehicles to molecular sensors. However, control of the functionalization process remains a challenge, requiring molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of diazonium ions onto heterogeneous, charge-mobile SWCNT surfaces, which are typically decorated with surfactants. In this paper, we combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, experiments, and equilibrium reaction modeling to understand and model the extent of diazonium functionalization of SWCNTs coated with various surfactants (sodium cholate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide). We show that the free energy of diazonium adsorption, determined using simulations, can be used to rank surfactants in terms of the extent of functionalization attained following their adsorption on the nanotube surface. The difference in binding affinities between linear and rigid surfactants is attributed to the synergistic binding of the diazonium ion to the local "hot/cold spots" formed by the charged surfactant heads. A combined simulation-modeling framework is developed to provide guidance for controlling the various sensitive experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired extent of SWCNT functionalization.

  3. On the Partitioning of Wall Heat Flux in Subcooled Flow Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, In-Cheol; Hoang, Nhan Hien; Euh, Dong-Jin; Song, Chul-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    This region has been treated successfully by two-fluid model coupled with a population balance model or interfacial area transport equation (IATE). The second region is near-wall heat transfer which has been commonly described by a wall heat flux partitioning model coupled with models of nucleation site density (NSD), bubble departure diameter and bubble release frequency. Since the phase change process in the near-wall heat transfer is really complex, comprising different heat transfer mechanisms, bubble dynamics, bubble nucleation and thermal response of heated surface, the modeling of the second region is still a great challenge despite intensive efforts. Numerous models and correlations have been proposed to aim for computing the near-wall heat transfer. The models of nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter and bubble release frequency are used to quantify these components. The models closely related to each other. The heat flux partitioning model controls the wall and liquid temperatures. Then, it turns to control the boiling parameters, i.e. nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter and bubble release frequency. In this study, the partitioning of wall heat flux is taken into account. The existing issues occurred with previous models of the heat flux partitioning are pointed out and then a new model which considers the heat transfer caused by evaporation of superheated liquid at bubble boundary and the actual period of transient conduction term is formulated. The new model is then validated with a collected experimental database. This paper presented a new heat flux partitioning model in which the heat transfer by evaporation of the superheated liquid at the bubble boundary and the active period of the transient conduction were considered. The new model was validated with the experimental data of the subcooled flow boiling of water obtained by Phillips

  4. When double-wall carbon nanotubes can become metallic or semiconducting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Azadi, Sam; Refii-tabar, Hashem

    2007-01-01

    The electronic properties of double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are investigated via density functional theory. The DWCNTs are separated into four categories wherein the inner-outer nanotubes are metal-metal, metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-metal and semiconductor-semiconductor single-wall nanotubes. The band structure of the DWCNTs, the local density of states of the inner and outer nanotubes, and the total density of states are calculated. We found that for the metal-metal DWCNTs, the inner and outer nanotubes remain metallic for different distances between the walls, while for the metal-semiconductor DWCNTs, decreasing the distance between the walls leads to a phase transition in which both nanotubes become metallic. In the case of semiconductor-metal DWCNTs, it is found that at some distance the inner wall becomes metallic, while the outer wall becomes a semiconductor, and if the distance is decreased, both walls become metallic. Finally, in the semiconductor-semiconductor DWCNTs, if the two walls are far from each other, then the whole DWCNT and both walls remain semiconducting. By decreasing the wall distance, first the inner, and then the outer, nanotube becomes metallic

  5. Measuring the immune system: a comprehensive approach for the analysis of immune functions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Maren; Dychus, Nicole; Ebel, Melanie; Damaschke, Jürgen; Maydych, Viktoriya; Wolf, Oliver T; Kleinsorge, Thomas; Watzl, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    The immune system is essential to provide protection from infections and cancer. Disturbances in immune function can therefore directly affect the health of the affected individual. Many extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as exposure to chemicals, stress, nutrition and age have been reported to influence the immune system. These influences can affect various components of the immune system, and we are just beginning to understand the causalities of these changes. To investigate such disturbances, it is therefore essential to analyze the different components of the immune system in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we demonstrate such an approach which provides information about total number of leukocytes, detailed quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of lymphocyte subsets, cytokine levels in serum and functional properties of T cells, NK cells and monocytes. Using samples from a cohort of 24 healthy volunteers, we demonstrate the feasibility of our approach to detect changes in immune functions.

  6. Comprehensive evaluation of functional and anatomical disorders of the patients with distal occlusion and accompanying obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabiev, F. H.; Dobrodeev, A. S.; Libin, P. V.; Kotov, I. I.; Ovsyannikov, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper defines the therapeutic and rehabilitation approach to the patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies, accompanied by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with posterior occlusion, accompanied by OSA, allows for objective evaluation of intensity of a dento-facial anomaly and accompanying respiratory disorders in the nasal and oral pharynx, which allows for the pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA to be identified, and an optimal plan for surgical procedures to be developed. The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies provides high functional and aesthetic results.

  7. Smooth muscle cell function and organization of the resistance artery wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güvenç Tuna, B.

    2014-01-01

    Remodeling of the vascular wall occurs in several cardiovascular pathologies. A structural change in diameter necessarily involves reorganization in both cellular and extracellular matrix components. The significance of matrix remodeling in vascular pathologies is well appreciated, while plasticity

  8. Fundamental Reform of Payment for Adult Primary Care: Comprehensive Payment for Comprehensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Robert A.; Schoenbaum, Stephen C.; Gardner, Laurence B.

    2007-01-01

    Primary care is essential to the effective and efficient functioning of health care delivery systems, yet there is an impending crisis in the field due in part to a dysfunctional payment system. We present a fundamentally new model of payment for primary care, replacing encounter-based imbursement with comprehensive payment for comprehensive care. Unlike former iterations of primary care capitation (which simply bundled inadequate fee-for-service payments), our comprehensive payment model represents new investment in adult primary care, with substantial increases in payment over current levels. The comprehensive payment is directed to practices to include support for the modern systems and teams essential to the delivery of comprehensive, coordinated care. Income to primary physicians is increased commensurate with the high level of responsibility expected. To ensure optimal allocation of resources and the rewarding of desired outcomes, the comprehensive payment is needs/risk-adjusted and performance-based. Our model establishes a new social contract with the primary care community, substantially increasing payment in return for achieving important societal health system goals, including improved accessibility, quality, safety, and efficiency. Attainment of these goals should help offset and justify the costs of the investment. Field tests of this and other new models of payment for primary care are urgently needed. PMID:17356977

  9. The transcription factor Rap1p is required for tolerance to cell-wall perturbing agents and for cell-wall maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Baranwal, Shivani; Thakare, Mayur Jankiram; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2015-01-02

    Yeast repressor activator protein (Rap1p) is involved in genomic stability and transcriptional regulation. We explored the function of Rap1p in yeast physiology using Rap1p truncation mutants. Our results revealed that the N-terminal truncation of Rap1p (Rap1ΔN) leads to hypersensitivity towards elevated temperature and cell-wall perturbing agents. Cell wall analysis showed an increase in the chitin and glucan content in Rap1ΔN cells as compared with wild type cells. Accordingly, mutant cells had a twofold thicker cell wall, as observed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, Rap1ΔN cells had increased levels of phosphorylated Slt2p, a MAP kinase of the cell wall integrity pathway. Mutant cells also had elevated levels of cell wall integrity response transcripts. Taken together, our findings suggest a connection between Rap1p and cell wall homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  11. Chirality correlation within Dirac eigenvectors from domain wall fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, T.; Christ, N.; Cristian, C.; Liao, X.; Liu, G.; Mawhinney, R.; Wu, L.; Zhestkov, Y.; Dawson, C.

    2002-01-01

    In the dilute instanton gas model of the QCD vacuum, one expects a strong spatial correlation between chirality and the maxima of the Dirac eigenvectors with small eigenvalues. Following Horvath et al. we examine this question using lattice gauge theory within the quenched approximation. We extend the work of those authors by using weaker coupling, β=6.0, larger lattices, 16 4 , and an improved fermion formulation, domain wall fermions. In contrast with this earlier work, we find a striking correlation between the magnitudes of the chirality density, |ψ † (x)γ 5 ψ(x)|, and the normal density, ψ † (x)ψ(x), for the low-lying Dirac eigenvectors

  12. Conduction at domain walls in oxide multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, J.; Martin, L. W.; He, Q.; Zhan, Q.; Chu, Y.-H.; Rother, A.; Hawkridge, M. E.; Maksymovych, P.; Yu, P.; Gajek, M.; Balke, N.; Kalinin, S. V.; Gemming, S.; Wang, F.; Catalan, G.; Scott, J. F.; Spaldin, N. A.; Orenstein, J.; Ramesh, R.

    2009-03-01

    Domain walls may play an important role in future electronic devices, given their small size as well as the fact that their location can be controlled. Here, we report the observation of room-temperature electronic conductivity at ferroelectric domain walls in the insulating multiferroic BiFeO3. The origin and nature of the observed conductivity are probed using a combination of conductive atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and first-principles density functional computations. Our analyses indicate that the conductivity correlates with structurally driven changes in both the electrostatic potential and the local electronic structure, which shows a decrease in the bandgap at the domain wall. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential for device applications of such conducting nanoscale features.

  13. Assessing children's inference generation: what do tests of reading comprehension measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer-Crane, Claudine; Snowling, Margaret J

    2005-06-01

    Previous research suggests that children with specific comprehension difficulties have problems with the generation of inferences. This raises important questions as to whether poor comprehenders have poor comprehension skills generally, or whether their problems are confined to specific inference types. The main aims of the study were (a) using two commonly used tests of reading comprehension to classify the questions requiring the generation of inferences, and (b) to investigate the relative performance of skilled and less-skilled comprehenders on questions tapping different inference types. The performance of 10 poor comprehenders (mean age 110.06 months) was compared with the performance of 10 normal readers (mean age 112.78 months) on two tests of reading comprehension. A qualitative analysis of the NARA II (form 1) and the WORD comprehension subtest was carried out. Participants were then administered the NARA II, WORD comprehension subtest and a test of non-word reading. The NARA II was heavily reliant on the generation of knowledge-based inferences, while the WORD comprehension subtest was biased towards the retention of literal information. Children identified by the NARA II as having comprehension difficulties performed in the normal range on the WORD comprehension subtests. Further, children with comprehension difficulties performed poorly on questions requiring the generation of knowledge-based and elaborative inferences. However, they were able to answer questions requiring attention to literal information or use of cohesive devices at a level comparable to normal readers. Different reading tests tap different types of inferencing skills. Lessskilled comprehenders have particular difficulty applying real-world knowledge to a text during reading, and this has implications for the formulation of effective intervention strategies.

  14. Variable-viscosity thermal hemodynamic slip flow conveying nanoparticles through a permeable-walled composite stenosed artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O. Anwar

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for simulating viscous, incompressible, steady-state blood flow containing copper nanoparticles and coupled heat transfer through a composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. Wall slip hydrodynamic and also thermal buoyancy effects are included. The artery is simulated as an isotropic elastic tube, following Joshi et al. (2009), and a variable viscosity formulation is employed for the flowing blood. The equations governing the transport phenomena are non-dimensionalized and the resulting boundary value problem is solved analytically in the steady state subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions. Numerical computations are conducted to quantify the effects of relevant hemodynamic, thermophysical and nanoscale parameters emerging in the model on velocity and temperature profiles, wall shear stress, impedance resistance and also streamline distributions. The model may be applicable to drug fate transport modeling with nanoparticle agents and also to the optimized design of nanoscale medical devices for diagnosing stenotic diseases in circulatory systems.

  15. The carbohydrate-binding module (CBM)-like sequence is crucial for rice CWA1/BC1 function in proper assembly of secondary cell wall materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kanna; Ito, Sachiko; Fujii, Takeo; Suzuki, Ryu; Takenouchi, Sachi; Nakaba, Satoshi; Funada, Ryo; Sano, Yuzou; Kajita, Shinya; Kitano, Hidemi; Katayama, Yoshihiro

    2010-11-01

    We recently reported that the cwa1 mutation disturbed the deposition and assembly of secondary cell wall materials in the cortical fiber of rice internodes. Genetic analysis revealed that cwa1 is allelic to bc1, which encodes glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored COBRA-like protein with the highest homology to Arabidopsis COBRA-like 4 (COBL4) and maize Brittle Stalk 2 (Bk2). Our results suggested that CWA1/BC1 plays a role in assembling secondary cell wall materials at appropriate sites, enabling synthesis of highly ordered secondary cell wall structure with solid and flexible internodes in rice. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of CWA1/BC1, as well as its orthologs (COBL4, Bk2) and other BC1-like proteins in rice, shows weak similarity to a family II carbohydrate-binding module (CBM2) of several bacterial cellulases. To investigate the importance of the CBM-like sequence of CWA1/BC1 in the assembly of secondary cell wall materials, Trp residues in the CBM-like sequence, which is important for carbohydrate binding, were substituted for Val residues and introduced into the cwa1 mutant. CWA1/BC1 with the mutated sequence did not complement the abnormal secondary cell walls seen in the cwa1 mutant, indicating that the CBM-like sequence is essential for the proper function of CWA1/BC1, including assembly of secondary cell wall materials.

  16. Domain walls at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, C.A. de; Marques, G.C.; Silva, A.J. da; Ventura, I.

    1983-08-01

    It is suggested that the phase transition of lambda phi 4 theory as a function of temperature coincides with the spontaneous appearance of domain walls. Based on one-loop calculations, T sub(c) = 4M/√ lambda is estimated as the temperature for these domains to because energetically favored, to be compared with T sub(c) = 4.9M/√ lambda from effective potential calculations (which are performed directly in the broken phase). Domain walls, as well as other Types of fluctuations, disorder the system above T sub(c), leading to =0. The critical exponent for the specific heat above T sub(c) is computed; and α=2/3 + 0 (√ lambda) is obtained. (Author) [pt

  17. Strategic Functionalization of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Manipulate Their Electronic and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Brendan Joel

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are unique materials that exhibit chirality-specific properties due to their one-dimensional confinement. As a result, they are explored for a wide range of applications including single-photon sources in communications devices. Despite progress in this area, SWCNTs still suffer from a relatively narrow range of energies of emission features that fall short of the 1500 nm desired for long-distance lossless data transfer. One approach that is frequently used to resolve this involves chemical functionalization with aryl groups. However, this approach is met with a number of fundamental issues. First, chirality-specific SWCNTs must be acquired for subsequent functionalization. Synthesis of such samples has thus far eluded experimental efforts. As such, post-synthetic non-covalent functionalization is required to break bundles and create disperse SWCNTs that can undergo further separation, processing, and functionalization. Second, a number of low-energy emission features are introduced upon functionalization across a 200 nm range. The origin of such diverse emission features remains unknown. The research presented here focuses on computationally addressing these issues. A series of polyfluorene polymers possessing sidechains of varying length are explored using molecular mechanics to determine the impact of alkyl sidechains on SWCNT-conjugated polymer interaction strength and morphology. Additionally, density functional theory (DFT) and linear-response time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to explore the effect of functionalization on emission features. A prerequisite to these calculations involves constructing finite-length SWCNT systems with similar electronic structure to their infinite counterparts: a methodological approach for the formation of such systems is presented. The optical features for aryl-functionalized SWCNTs are then explored. It is shown that the predominant effect on the energies of emission features involves

  18. Large N saddle formulation of quadratic building block theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    I develop a large N saddle point formulation for the broad class of 'theories of quadratic building blocks'. Such theories are those on which the sums over internal indices are contained in quadratic building blocks, e.g. PHI 2 = Σsup(N)sub(a-1)PHi sup(a)sup(a). The formulation applies as well to fermions, derivative coupling and non-polynomial interactions. In a related development, closed Schwinger-Dyson equations for Green functions of the building blocks are derived and solved for large N. (orig.)

  19. Unified formulation of radiation conditions for the wave equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2002-01-01

    A family of radiation conditions for the wave equation is derived by truncating a rational function approxiamtion of the corresponding plane wave representation, and it is demonstrated how these boundary conditions can be formulated in terms of fictitious surface densities, governed by second......-order wave equations on the radiating surface. Several well-established radiation boundary conditions appear as special cases, corresponding to different choice of the coefficients in the rational approximation. The relation between these choices is established, and an explicit formulation in terms...

  20. Seismic Behaviour of Composite Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boita, Ioana-Emanuela; Dan, Daniel; Stoian, Valeriu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper is presented an experimental study conducted at the “Politehnica” University of Timisoara, Romania. This study provides results from a comprehensive experimental investigation on the behaviour of composite steel fibre reinforced concrete shear walls (CSFRCW) with partially or totally encased profiles. Two experimental composite steel fibre reinforced concrete walls (CSFRCW) and, as a reference specimen, a typical reinforced concrete shear wall (RCW), (without structural reinforcement), were fabricated and tested under constant vertical load and quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loads, in displacement control. The tests were performed until failure. The tested specimens were designed as 1:3 scale steel-concrete composite elements, representing a three storeys and one bay element from the base of a lateral resisting system made by shear walls. Configuration/arrangement of steel profiles in cross section were varied within the specimens. The main objective of this research consisted in identifying innovative solutions for composite steel-concrete shear walls with enhanced performance, as steel fibre reinforced concrete which was used in order to replace traditional reinforced concrete. A first conclusion was that replacing traditional reinforcement with steel fibre changes the failure mode of the elements, as from a flexural mode, in case of element RCW, to a shear failure mode for CSFRCW. The maximum lateral force had almost similar values but test results indicated an improvement in cracking response, and a decrease in ductility. The addition of steel fibres in the concrete mixture can lead to an increase of the initial cracking force, and can change the sudden opening of a crack in a more stable process.

  1. Contributions of the wall boundary layer to the formation of the counter-rotating vortex pair in transverse jets

    KAUST Repository

    SCHLEGEL, FABRICE

    2011-04-08

    Using high-resolution 3-D vortex simulations, this study seeks a mechanistic understanding of vorticity dynamics in transverse jets at a finite Reynolds number. A full no-slip boundary condition, rigorously formulated in terms of vorticity generation along the channel wall, captures unsteady interactions between the wall boundary layer and the jet - in particular, the separation of the wall boundary layer and its transport into the interior. For comparison, we also implement a reduced boundary condition that suppresses the separation of the wall boundary layer away from the jet nozzle. By contrasting results obtained with these two boundary conditions, we characterize near-field vortical structures formed as the wall boundary layer separates on the backside of the jet. Using various Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics, it is demonstrated that several near-wall vortical structures are formed as the wall boundary layer separates. The counter-rotating vortex pair, manifested by the presence of vortices aligned with the jet trajectory, is initiated closer to the jet exit. Moreover tornado-like wall-normal vortices originate from the separation of spanwise vorticity in the wall boundary layer at the side of the jet and from the entrainment of streamwise wall vortices in the recirculation zone on the lee side. These tornado-like vortices are absent in the case where separation is suppressed. Tornado-like vortices merge with counter-rotating vorticity originating in the jet shear layer, significantly increasing wall-normal circulation and causing deeper jet penetration into the crossflow stream. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  2. Acute toxicity of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes: A biochemical, histopathologic and proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Homa; Ramezani, Mohammad; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Behnam, Behzad; Razavi Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Hashem Nia, Azadeh; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Matbou Riahi, Maryam; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2017-09-25

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) showed promising potentials in different biomedical applications but their safe use in humans and probable toxicities are still challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this project, PEGylated and Tween functionalized SWCNTs were prepared. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into nine groups, including PEGylated SWCNTs (75,150μg/mouse) and PEG, Tween80 suspended SWCNTs, Tween 80 and a control group (intact mice). One or 7 days after intravenous injection, the mice were killed and serum and livers were collected. The oxidative stress markers, biochemical and histopathological changes were studied. Subsequently, proteomics approach was used to investigate the alterations of protein expression profiles in the liver. Results showed that there were not any significant differences in malondealdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) levels and biochemical enzymes (ALT and AST) between groups, while the histopathological observations of livers showed some injuries. The results of proteomics analysis revealed indolethylamine N-Methyltransferase (INMT), glycine N-Methyltransferase (GNMT), selenium binding protein (Selenbp), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), TNF receptor associated protein 1(Trap1), peroxiredoxin-6 (Prdx6), electron transport flavoprotein (Etf-α), regucalcin (Rgn) and ATP5b proteins were differentially expressed in functionalized SWCNTs groups. Western blot analyses confirmed that the changes in Prdx6 were consistent with 2-DE gel analysis. In summary, acute toxicological study on two functionalized SWCNTs did not show any significant toxicity at selected doses. Proteomics analysis also showed that following exposure to functionalized SWCNTs, the expression of some proteins with antioxidant activity and detoxifying properties were increased in liver tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hidden imperfect synchronization of wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardu, Sedat F

    2010-03-01

    Instantaneous amplitude and phase concept emerging from analytical signal formulation is applied to the wavelet coefficients of streamwise velocity fluctuations in the buffer layer of a near wall turbulent flow. Experiments and direct numerical simulations show both the existence of long periods of inert zones wherein the local phase is constant. These regions are separated by random phase jumps. The local amplitude is globally highly intermittent, but not in the phase locked regions wherein it varies smoothly. These behaviors are reminiscent of phase synchronization phenomena observed in stochastic chaotic systems. The lengths of the constant phase inert (laminar) zones reveal a type I intermittency behavior, in concordance with saddle-node bifurcation, and the periodic orbits of saddle nature recently identified in Couette turbulence. The imperfect synchronization is related to the footprint of coherent Reynolds shear stress producing eddies convecting in the low buffer.

  4. Wall-slip effects in SnAgCu solder pastes used in electronics assembly applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, S.; Ekere, N.N.; Durairaj, R.; Marks, A.E.; Seman, A.

    2009-01-01

    Solder paste is the most important strategic bonding material used in the assembly of surface mount components in electronics manufacturing. As the trend towards miniaturisation of electronic products continues, there is an increasing demand for better understanding of the flow and deformation that is, the rheological behaviour of solder paste formulations. Wall slip plays an important role in characterising the flow behaviour of solder paste materials. The problem of wall slip arises due to the various attractive and repulsive forces acting between the solder particles and the walls of the measuring geometry. These interactions could lead to the presence of a thin solvent layer adjacent to the wall, which gives rise to slippage. In rheological measurements, slip effects can generally be avoided by using roughened surfaces for measuring geometries. In this paper, a novel technique is developed to study the effect of wall slip in the rheological measurements of lead-free solder paste. The viscosity and oscillatory data obtained for three different solder paste samples (from measuring geometries of different surface roughness) have been analysed and compared. In viscosity measurements, slip effects were dominant at low shear rates and the use of serrated surfaces was found to be quite effective in minimizing slip effects. Oscillatory measurements were also affected by roughening the surfaces of measuring geometries.

  5. Decay constants in soft wall AdS/QCD revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson R.F. Braga

    2016-12-01

    We show here that a modified framework of soft wall AdS/QCD involving an additional dimensionfull parameter, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, provides decay constants decreasing with radial excitation level. In this version of the soft wall model the two point function of gauge theory operators is calculated at a finite position of the anti-de Sitter space radial coordinate.

  6. The Role of Pectin Acetylation in the Organization of Plant Cell Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fimognari, Lorenzo

    adopt defined 3D organization to allow their composition/interactions to be tweaked upon developmental need. Failure to build functional cell wall architecture will affect plant growth and resistance to stresses. In this PhD dissertation I explored the role of pectin acetylation in controlling...... wall organization, namely polysaccharides-to-polysaccharides interactions. These results suggest that cell wall acetylation is a mechanism that plants evolved to control cell wall organization. In Manuscript III, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis mutants trichome birefringence like (tbl) 10......All plant cells are surrounded by one or more cell wall layers. The cell wall serves as a stiff mechanical support while it allows cells to expand and provide a protective barrier to invading pathogens. Cell walls are dynamic structures composed of entangled cell wall polysaccharides that must...

  7. Comprehensive report, June 1973--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: the molecular basis of disease resistance; synthesis of phytoalexins by plants; host-pathogen interactions; structure and function of primary cell walls; and production of galactanase by Bacillus subtilis. (HLW)

  8. Inactivation of the Ecs ABC transporter of Staphylococcus aureus attenuates virulence by altering composition and function of bacterial wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing-Marie Jonsson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Ecs is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter present in aerobic and facultative anaerobic gram-positive Firmicutes. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis Ecs causes pleiotropic changes in the bacterial phenotype including inhibition of intramembrane proteolysis. The molecule(s transported by Ecs is (are still unknown.In this study we mutated the ecsAB operon in two Staphylococcus aureus strains, Newman and LS-1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of these Ecs deficient mutants revealed a defect in growth, increased autolysis and lysostaphin sensitivity, altered composition of cell wall proteins including the precursor form of staphylokinase and an altered bacterial surface texture. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the Ecs deficiency changed expression of the virulence factor regulator protein Rot accompanied by differential expression of membrane transport proteins, particularly ABC transporters and phosphate-specific transport systems, protein A, adhesins and capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis proteins. Virulence of the ecs mutants was studied in a mouse model of hematogenous S. aureus infection. Mice inoculated with the ecs mutant strains developed markedly milder infections than those inoculated with the wild-type strains and had consequently lower mortality, less weight loss, milder arthritis and decreased persistence of staphylococci in the kidneys. The ecs mutants had higher susceptibility to ribosomal antibiotics and plant alkaloids chelerythrine and sanguinarine.Our results show that Ecs is essential for staphylococcal virulence and antimicrobial resistance probably since the transport function of Ecs is essential for the normal structure and function of the cell wall. Thus targeting Ecs may be a new approach in combating staphylococcal infection.

  9. Inactivation of the Ecs ABC transporter of Staphylococcus aureus attenuates virulence by altering composition and function of bacterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Juuti, Jarmo T; François, Patrice; AlMajidi, Rana; Pietiäinen, Milla; Girard, Myriam; Lindholm, Catharina; Saller, Manfred J; Driessen, Arnold J M; Kuusela, Pentti; Bokarewa, Maria; Schrenzel, Jacques; Kontinen, Vesa P

    2010-12-02

    Ecs is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter present in aerobic and facultative anaerobic gram-positive Firmicutes. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis Ecs causes pleiotropic changes in the bacterial phenotype including inhibition of intramembrane proteolysis. The molecule(s) transported by Ecs is (are) still unknown. In this study we mutated the ecsAB operon in two Staphylococcus aureus strains, Newman and LS-1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of these Ecs deficient mutants revealed a defect in growth, increased autolysis and lysostaphin sensitivity, altered composition of cell wall proteins including the precursor form of staphylokinase and an altered bacterial surface texture. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the Ecs deficiency changed expression of the virulence factor regulator protein Rot accompanied by differential expression of membrane transport proteins, particularly ABC transporters and phosphate-specific transport systems, protein A, adhesins and capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis proteins. Virulence of the ecs mutants was studied in a mouse model of hematogenous S. aureus infection. Mice inoculated with the ecs mutant strains developed markedly milder infections than those inoculated with the wild-type strains and had consequently lower mortality, less weight loss, milder arthritis and decreased persistence of staphylococci in the kidneys. The ecs mutants had higher susceptibility to ribosomal antibiotics and plant alkaloids chelerythrine and sanguinarine. Our results show that Ecs is essential for staphylococcal virulence and antimicrobial resistance probably since the transport function of Ecs is essential for the normal structure and function of the cell wall. Thus targeting Ecs may be a new approach in combating staphylococcal infection.