WorldWideScience

Sample records for comprehensive disease specific

  1. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonmi Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS mutation.

  2. A Comprehensive, Ethnically Diverse Library of Sickle Cell Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seonmi; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Molina-Estevez, Francisco Javier; Vanuytsel, Kim; Skvir, Nick; Leung, Amy; Rozelle, Sarah S; Shaikho, Elmutaz Mohammed; Weir, Isabelle; Jiang, Zhihua; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Chui, David H K; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Alsultan, Abdulraham; Al-Ali, Amein; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Murphy, George J

    2017-04-11

    Sickle cell anemia affects millions of people worldwide and is an emerging global health burden. As part of a large NIH-funded NextGen Consortium, we generated a diverse, comprehensive, and fully characterized library of sickle-cell-disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients of different ethnicities, β-globin gene (HBB) haplotypes, and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. iPSCs stand to revolutionize the way we study human development, model disease, and perhaps eventually, treat patients. Here, we describe this unique resource for the study of sickle cell disease, including novel haplotype-specific polymorphisms that affect disease severity, as well as for the development of patient-specific therapeutics for this phenotypically diverse disorder. As a complement to this library, and as proof of principle for future cell- and gene-based therapies, we also designed and employed CRISPR/Cas gene editing tools to correct the sickle hemoglobin (HbS) mutation.

  3. How specific are specific comprehension difficulties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønberg, Louise Flensted-Jensen; Petersen, Dorthe Klint

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the occurrence of poor comprehenders, i.e., children identified with reading comprehension difficulties in spite of age-appropriate word reading skills. It supports the findings that some children do show poor reading comprehension in spite of age-appropriate word reading as m...... and daily reading of literary texts were significantly below that of average readers. This study indicates that a lack of reading experience and, likewise, a lack of fluent word reading may be important factors in understanding nine-year-old poor comprehenders’ difficulties....

  4. Reading comprehension in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura L; Rutledge, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Although individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) self-report reading problems and experience difficulties in cognitive-linguistic functions that support discourse-level reading, prior research has primarily focused on sentence-level processing and auditory comprehension. Accordingly, the authors investigated the presence and nature of reading comprehension in PD, hypothesizing that (a) individuals with PD would display impaired accuracy and/or speed on reading comprehension tests and (b) reading performances would be correlated with cognitive test results. Eleven adults with PD and 9 age- and education-matched control participants completed tests that evaluated reading comprehension; general language and cognitive abilities; and aspects of attention, memory, and executive functioning. The PD group obtained significantly lower scores on several, but not all, reading comprehension, language, and cognitive measures. Memory, language, and disease severity were significantly correlated with reading comprehension for the PD group. Individuals in the early stages of PD without dementia or broad cognitive deficits can display reading comprehension difficulties, particularly for high- versus basic-level reading tasks. These reading difficulties are most closely related to memory, high-level language, and PD symptom severity status. The findings warrant additional research to delineate further the types and nature of reading comprehension impairments experienced by individuals with PD.

  5. Hand Specific Representations in Language Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eMoody-Triantis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Theories of embodied cognition argue that language comprehension involves sensory-motor re-enactments of the actions described. However, the degree of specificity of these re-enactments as well as the relationship between action and language remains a matter of debate. Here we investigate these issues by examining how hand-specific information (left or right hand is recruited in language comprehension and action execution. An fMRI study tested right-handed participants in two separate tasks that were designed to be as similar as possible to increase sensitivity of the comparison across task: an action execution go/no-go task where participants performed right or left hand actions, and a language task where participants read sentences describing the same left or right handed actions as in the execution task. We found that language-induced activity did not match the hand-specific patterns of activity found for action execution in primary somatosensory and motor cortex, but it overlapped with pre-motor and parietal regions associated with action planning. Within these pre-motor regions, both right hand actions and sentences elicited stronger activity than left hand actions and sentences - a dominant hand effect -. Importantly, both dorsal and ventral sections of the left pre-central gyrus were recruited by both tasks, suggesting different action features being recruited. These results suggest that (a language comprehension elicits motor representations that are hand-specific and akin to multimodal action plans, rather than full action re-enactments; and (b language comprehension and action execution share schematic hand-specific representations that are richer for the dominant hand, and thus linked to previous motor experience.

  6. Pragmatic comprehension deficit in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Recognizing the specific speech act (Searle, 1969) that a speaker performs with an utterance is a fundamental feature of pragmatic competence. However, little is known about neurocognitive mediation of speech act comprehension. The present research examined the extent to which people with Parkinson's disease (PD) comprehend specific speech acts. In the first experiment, participants read conversational utterances and then performed a lexical decision task (decide whether a target string of letters was a word). Consistent with past research, nonimpaired participants performed this task more quickly when the target string was the speech act associated with the preceding utterance. In contrast, people with PD did not demonstrate this effect, suggesting that speech act activation is slowed or is not an automatic component of comprehension for people with PD. In a second study, participants were given unlimited time to indicate their recognition of the speech act performed with an utterance. PD participants were significantly poorer at this task than were control participants. We conclude that a previously undocumented language disorder exists in PD and that this disorder involves a selective deficit in speech act comprehension. Frontostriatal systems (the systems impaired in PD) likely contribute to normal speech act comprehension.

  7. Metaphor comprehension in Alzheimer's disease: novelty matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of non-conventional (novel) metaphor comprehension. This ability was not related to global cognitive deterioration or to deficits in the cognitive domains of attention, memory and language comprehension. On the other hand, the impairment in verbal reasoning appeared to be relevant for both novel and conventional metaphor comprehension. The relationship between novel metaphor comprehension and performance in the visual-spatial planning task of the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) suggests that executive impairment, possibly related to prefrontal dysfunction, may be responsible for the pAD patients' poor performance in novel metaphor comprehension. The present findings suggest a role of the prefrontal cortex in novel metaphor comprehension.

  8. Gaucher disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Barry E; Weinreb, Neal J

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited error of metabolism due to a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. This leads to excessive storage of glucocerebroside in the liver, spleen, bone, and bone marrow. Patients develop anemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone infarcts, aseptic necrosis of bone, and osteoporosis. There are three types of GD; types 2 and 3 have neurological involvement. With the advent of enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy, the natural history of the disease has been has significantly changed, with a marked decrease in morbidity, especially for type 1 patients. This article reviews a broad spectrum of information regarding Gaucher disease, from the history of the disease to newer therapies still in the investigational stage.

  9. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  10. Investigating Patterns of Errors for Specific Comprehension and Fluency Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriakin, Taylor A.; Kaufman, Alan S.

    2017-01-01

    Although word reading has traditionally been viewed as a foundational skill for development of reading fluency and comprehension, some children demonstrate "specific" reading comprehension problems, in the context of intact word reading. The purpose of this study was to identify specific patterns of errors associated with reading…

  11. Comprehension of prosody in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speedie, L J; Brake, N; Folstein, S E; Bowers, D; Heilman, K M

    1990-07-01

    Patients with Huntington's Disease (HD) who were without dementia were compared to unilateral stroke patients and controls as previously reported in 1983, to discover if they had a prosodic defect. Subjects were presented tape-recorded speech filtered sentences and asked to indicate the tone of voice as happy, sad or angry (affective prosody), or as a question, command or statement (propositional prosody). HD patients were impaired in comprehension of both types of prosody compared to controls but were not different from stroke patients. A second study compared early HD patients with at-risk siblings and spouse controls on comprehension of affective and propositional prosody, discrimination of both types of prosody, rhythm discrimination and tonal memory (Seashore tests). HD patients were impaired in both comprehension and discrimination of all types of prosody. HD patients were less accurate than at-risk patients on the tonal memory task but not on the rhythm discrimination task. These findings suggest compromise in ability to understand the more subtle prosodic aspects of communication which may contribute to social impairment of HD patients very early in the course of the disease.

  12. A comprehensive infectious disease management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Alex; Farley, John D

    2009-01-01

    An efficient electronic management system is now an essential tool for the successful management and monitoring of those affected by communicable infectious diseases (Human Immunodeficiency Virus - HIV, hepatitis C - HEP C) during the course of the treatment. The current methods which depend heavily on manual collecting, compiling and disseminating treatment information are labor-intensive and time consuming. Clinics specialized in the treatment of infectious diseases use a mix of electronic systems that fail to interact with each other, result in data duplication, and do not support treatment of the patient as a whole. The purpose of the Infectious Disease Management System is to reduce the administrative overhead associated with data collection and analysis while providing correlation abilities and decision support in accordance with defined treatment guidelines. This Infectious Disease Management System was developed to: Ensure cost effectiveness by means of low software licensing costs, Introduce a centralized mechanism of collecting and monitoring all infectious disease management data, Automate electronic retrieval of laboratory findings, Introduce a decision support mechanism as per treatment guidelines, Seamlessly integrate of application modules, Provide comprehensive reporting capabilities, Maintain a high level of user friendliness.

  13. Use of Bloom's Taxonomy in Developing Reading Comprehension Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Stephen; Lorie, James

    2013-01-01

    This article is a brief account of the use of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) by staff of the Law School Admission Council in the 1990 development of redesigned specifications for the Reading Comprehension section of the Law School Admission Test. Summary item statistics for the…

  14. Sentence Comprehension in Slovak-Speaking Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Jana; Horváthová, Lubica; Králová, Mária; Cséfalvay, Zsolt

    2017-01-01

    Background: According to some studies, sentence comprehension is diminished in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, but they differ on what underlies the sentence comprehension impairment. Sentence comprehension in AD patients has been studied mainly in the English language. It is less clear how patients with AD speaking a morphologically rich…

  15. A comprehensive global genotype-phenotype database for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillano, Daniel; Oprea, Gabriela-Elena; Schmitz, Yvonne; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Abou Jamra, Rami; Rolfs, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    The ability to discover genetic variants in a patient runs far ahead of the ability to interpret them. Databases with accurate descriptions of the causal relationship between the variants and the phenotype are valuable since these are critical tools in clinical genetic diagnostics. Here, we introduce a comprehensive and global genotype-phenotype database focusing on rare diseases. This database (CentoMD (®)) is a browser-based tool that enables access to a comprehensive, independently curated system utilizing stringent high-quality criteria and a quickly growing repository of genetic and human phenotype ontology (HPO)-based clinical information. Its main goals are to aid the evaluation of genetic variants, to enhance the validity of the genetic analytical workflow, to increase the quality of genetic diagnoses, and to improve evaluation of treatment options for patients with hereditary diseases. The database software correlates clinical information from consented patients and probands of different geographical backgrounds with a large dataset of genetic variants and, when available, biomarker information. An automated follow-up tool is incorporated that informs all users whenever a variant classification has changed. These unique features fully embedded in a CLIA/CAP-accredited quality management system allow appropriate data quality and enhanced patient safety. More than 100,000 genetically screened individuals are documented in the database, resulting in more than 470 million variant detections. Approximately, 57% of the clinically relevant and uncertain variants in the database are novel. Notably, 3% of the genetic variants identified and previously reported in the literature as being associated with a particular rare disease were reclassified, based on internal evidence, as clinically irrelevant. The database offers a comprehensive summary of the clinical validity and causality of detected gene variants with their associated phenotypes, and is a valuable tool

  16. DiseaseConnect: a comprehensive web server for mechanism-based disease-disease connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Chi; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Li, Wenyuan; Wu, Chia-Yu; Mayzus, Ilya; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Sun, Fengzhu; Waterman, Michael; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chaudhary, Preet M; Loscalzo, Joseph; Crandall, Edward; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2014-07-01

    The DiseaseConnect (http://disease-connect.org) is a web server for analysis and visualization of a comprehensive knowledge on mechanism-based disease connectivity. The traditional disease classification system groups diseases with similar clinical symptoms and phenotypic traits. Thus, diseases with entirely different pathologies could be grouped together, leading to a similar treatment design. Such problems could be avoided if diseases were classified based on their molecular mechanisms. Connecting diseases with similar pathological mechanisms could inspire novel strategies on the effective repositioning of existing drugs and therapies. Although there have been several studies attempting to generate disease connectivity networks, they have not yet utilized the enormous and rapidly growing public repositories of disease-related omics data and literature, two primary resources capable of providing insights into disease connections at an unprecedented level of detail. Our DiseaseConnect, the first public web server, integrates comprehensive omics and literature data, including a large amount of gene expression data, Genome-Wide Association Studies catalog, and text-mined knowledge, to discover disease-disease connectivity via common molecular mechanisms. Moreover, the clinical comorbidity data and a comprehensive compilation of known drug-disease relationships are additionally utilized for advancing the understanding of the disease landscape and for facilitating the mechanism-based development of new drug treatments.

  17. Overlapping genetic and child-specific nonshared environmental influences on listening comprehension, reading motivation, and reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Victoria J; Petrill, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the genetic and environmental influences on observed associations between listening comprehension, reading motivation, and reading comprehension. Univariate and multivariate quantitative genetic models were conducted in a sample of 284 pairs of twins at a mean age of 9.81 years. Genetic and nonshared environmental factors accounted for statistically significant variance in listening and reading comprehension, and nonshared environmental factors accounted for variance in reading motivation. Furthermore, listening comprehension demonstrated unique genetic and nonshared environmental influences but also had overlapping genetic influences with reading comprehension. Reading motivation and reading comprehension each had unique and overlapping nonshared environmental contributions. Therefore, listening comprehension appears to be related to reading primarily due to genetic factors whereas motivation appears to affect reading via child-specific, nonshared environmental effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Overlapping Genetic and Child-Specific Nonshared Environmental Influences on Listening Comprehension, Reading Motivation, and Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Victoria J.; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the genetic and environmental influences on observed associations between listening comprehension, reading motivation, and reading comprehension. Univariate and multivariate quantitative genetic models were conducted in a sample of 284 pairs of twins at a mean age of 9.81 years. Genetic and nonshared environmental factors accounted for statistically significant variance in listening and reading comprehension, and nonshared environmental factors accounted for variance in reading motivation. Furthermore, listening comprehension demonstrated unique genetic and nonshared environmental influences but also had overlapping genetic influences with reading comprehension. Reading motivation and reading comprehension each had unique and overlapping nonshared environmental contributions. Therefore, listening comprehension appears to be related to reading primarily due to genetic factors whereas motivation appears to affect reading via child-specific, nonshared environmental effects. PMID:26321677

  19. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  20. Adipokines and cardiovascular disease: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekal, Ales; Vaclavik, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Adipokines are peptides that signal the functional status of adipose tissue to the brain and other target organs. In adipose tissue dysfunction, adipokine secretion is altered, and this can contribute to a spectrum of obesity-associated conditions including cardiovascular disease. Some adipokines have anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective effects (omentin, apelin, adiponectin). Others are pro-inflammatory with negative impact on cardiovascular function (leptin, visfatin, resistin, adipocyte fatty-acid-binding protein). In the first part, this article reviews the endocrine functions of adipose tissue in general, effects of the distribution and composition of fat tissue, and the roles of cortisol and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the development of the inflammatory state of addipose tissue. In the second part, the known cardiovascular effects of different adipokines and their clinical potential are discussed in detail.

  1. Specific Reading Comprehension Disability: Major Problem, Myth, or Misnomer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Mercedes; Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to test three competing hypotheses about the nature of comprehension problems of students who are poor in reading comprehension. Participants in the study were first, second, and third graders, totaling nine cohorts and over 425,000 participants in all. The pattern of results was consistent across all cohorts:…

  2. Specific Reading Comprehension Disability: Major Problem, Myth, or Misnomer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Mercedes; Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to test three competing hypotheses about the nature of comprehension problems of students who are poor in reading comprehension. Participants in the study were first, second, and third graders, totaling nine cohorts and over 425,000 participants in all. The pattern of results was consistent across all cohorts:…

  3. Sentence comprehension in Slovak-speaking patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Jana; Horváthová, Ľubica; Králová, Mária; Cséfalvay, Zsolt

    2017-07-01

    According to some studies, sentence comprehension is diminished in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, but they differ on what underlies the sentence comprehension impairment. Sentence comprehension in AD patients has been studied mainly in the English language. It is less clear how patients with AD speaking a morphologically rich language with grammatical morphemes indicating case and through it even thematic roles process reversible sentences. To compare the comprehension of various syntactic constructions in Slovak-speaking AD patients and cognitively intact elderly people. We were concerned with the influence of the following aspects on sentence comprehension: its length, the order of thematic roles and the presence of a morphological cue placed on the first noun (or at the beginning of a sentence). We used our own Slovak test of sentence comprehension based on matching pictures to spoken sentences. These sentences contain transitive verbs and two nouns (person/animal), one functioning as a subject and the other as an object, which both can perform the action expressed by the verb. We assessed 62 healthy elderly people and two groups of AD patients. The first group consisted of 34 participants with a mild degree of AD and the other group of 43 participants with a moderate degree of AD. Statistical comparisons showed that the elderly controls were significantly better in the comprehension of simple active OVS (object-verb-subject word order) sentences and complex EO sentences (a centre-embedded relative clause with a relative pronoun substituting for an object) than patients with a mild degree of AD. In patients with a moderate degree of AD, comprehension of all tested sentence types was worse than in healthy elderly people. The results also indicated that even mild AD patients have more serious problems with processing sentences with non-canonical order of thematic roles regardless of a morphological cue at the beginning of a sentence. The results point to

  4. Oral Morphosyntactic Competence as a Predictor of Reading Comprehension in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buil-Legaz, Lucía; Aguilar-Mediavilla, Eva; Rodríguez-Ferreiro, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with a diagnosis of specific language impairment (SLI) present impaired oral comprehension. According to the simple view of reading, general amodal linguistic capacity accounts for both oral and reading comprehension. Considering this, we should expect SLI children to display a reading comprehension deficit. However, previous…

  5. Communicative competence in Alzheimer's disease: metaphor and sarcasm comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yohko; Yamaguchi, Tomoharu; Koeda, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deficits of metaphor and sarcasm comprehension in Alzheimer's disease (AD), as pragmatic interpretation such as metaphor and sarcasm comprehension is required in social communication. A total of 31 young normal controls, 104 aged normal controls (ANC), 42 patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 30 patients with mild AD were evaluated by Metaphoric and Sarcastic Scenario Test, which consists of 5 metaphoric and 5 sarcastic questions with 5 answer choices. Scores were analyzed using the repeated measures analysis of variance (metaphor/sarcasm vs 4 participant groups). Sarcasm comprehension, which requires second-order Theory of Mind (ToM), started to deteriorate in ANC, and metaphor comprehension, which requires first-order ToM, started to deteriorate in aMCI, and both deteriorated as disease progressed. Literal interpretation of pragmatic language is characteristic in patients with mild AD. Such misinterpretation would result in social miscommunication, even if they still retained semantic-lexical competence.

  6. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression.

  7. DiseaseConnect: a comprehensive web server for mechanism-based disease–disease connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Chi; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Li, Wenyuan; Wu, Chia-Yu; Mayzus, Ilya; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Sun, Fengzhu; Waterman, Michael; Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Chaudhary, Preet M.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Crandall, Edward; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    The DiseaseConnect (http://disease-connect.org) is a web server for analysis and visualization of a comprehensive knowledge on mechanism-based disease connectivity. The traditional disease classification system groups diseases with similar clinical symptoms and phenotypic traits. Thus, diseases with entirely different pathologies could be grouped together, leading to a similar treatment design. Such problems could be avoided if diseases were classified based on their molecular mechanisms. Connecting diseases with similar pathological mechanisms could inspire novel strategies on the effective repositioning of existing drugs and therapies. Although there have been several studies attempting to generate disease connectivity networks, they have not yet utilized the enormous and rapidly growing public repositories of disease-related omics data and literature, two primary resources capable of providing insights into disease connections at an unprecedented level of detail. Our DiseaseConnect, the first public web server, integrates comprehensive omics and literature data, including a large amount of gene expression data, Genome-Wide Association Studies catalog, and text-mined knowledge, to discover disease–disease connectivity via common molecular mechanisms. Moreover, the clinical comorbidity data and a comprehensive compilation of known drug–disease relationships are additionally utilized for advancing the understanding of the disease landscape and for facilitating the mechanism-based development of new drug treatments. PMID:24895436

  8. Disease specific productivity of american cancer hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A Goldstein

    Full Text Available Research-oriented cancer hospitals in the United States treat and study patients with a range of diseases. Measures of disease specific research productivity, and comparison to overall productivity, are currently lacking.Different institutions are specialized in research of particular diseases.To report disease specific productivity of American cancer hospitals, and propose a summary measure.We conducted a retrospective observational survey of the 50 highest ranked cancer hospitals in the 2013 US News and World Report rankings. We performed an automated search of PubMed and Clinicaltrials.gov for published reports and registrations of clinical trials (respectively addressing specific cancers between 2008 and 2013. We calculated the summed impact factor for the publications. We generated a summary measure of productivity based on the number of Phase II clinical trials registered and the impact factor of Phase II clinical trials published for each institution and disease pair. We generated rankings based on this summary measure.We identified 6076 registered trials and 6516 published trials with a combined impact factor of 44280.4, involving 32 different diseases over the 50 institutions. Using a summary measure based on registered and published clinical trails, we ranked institutions in specific diseases. As expected, different institutions were highly ranked in disease-specific productivity for different diseases. 43 institutions appeared in the top 10 ranks for at least 1 disease (vs 10 in the overall list, while 6 different institutions were ranked number 1 in at least 1 disease (vs 1 in the overall list.Research productivity varies considerably among the sample. Overall cancer productivity conceals great variation between diseases. Disease specific rankings identify sites of high academic productivity, which may be of interest to physicians, patients and researchers.

  9. Network Analysis Identifies Disease-Specific Pathways for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Chiara; Colugnat, Ilaria; Lopiano, Leonardo; Chiò, Adriano; Alberio, Tiziana

    2016-12-21

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive loss of specific neurons in selected regions of the central nervous system. The main clinical manifestation (movement disorders, cognitive impairment, and/or psychiatric disturbances) depends on the neuron population being primarily affected. Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder, whose etiology remains mostly unknown. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra causes an impairment of the motor control. Some of the pathogenetic mechanisms causing the progressive deterioration of these neurons are not specific for Parkinson's disease but are shared by other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the quantitative proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations in different models of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to distinguish between general and Parkinson's disease-specific pattern of neurodegeneration. Then, we merged proteomics data with genetics information from the DisGeNET database. The comparison of gene and protein information allowed us to identify 25 proteins involved uniquely in Parkinson's disease and we verified the alteration of one of them, i.e., transaldolase 1 (TALDO1), in the substantia nigra of 5 patients. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biological processes specifically affected in Parkinson's disease, i.e., proteolysis, mitochondrion organization, and mitophagy. Eventually, we highlighted four cellular component complexes mostly involved in the pathogenesis: the proteasome complex, the protein phosphatase 2A, the chaperonins CCT complex, and the complex III of the respiratory chain.

  10. Comprehensive care in Huntington's disease: a physician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Martha A

    2007-04-30

    Huntington's disease is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with wide-ranging effects on affected individuals and their families. Until a cure is found for the disease, patients and their families will continue to need care over years, even generations. The ideal care for HD is provided by a team, led by a physician, with input from rehabilitation therapists, nurses, psychologists, genetic counselors, social workers, and other health care providers. The goals of care are to maximize the quality of life at all points through the course of the disease, in part by anticipating problems that are likely to arise at the next stage of the illness. We describe below an approach to comprehensive care, and introduce the concept of the "Huntington disease molecule", in which the patient, in the center, is surrounded by a shell of immediate and extended family members, with bonds extended in multiple directions to provider who can give appropriate medical care, education, crisis management, research opportunities, address family issues, maximize function, and prepare for the future.

  11. The Importance of Being Apt: Metaphor Comprehension in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eRoncero

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of aptness in the comprehension of copular metaphors (e.g., Lawyers are sharks by Alzheimer’s Disease (AD patients. Aptness is the extent to which the vehicle (e.g., shark captures salient properties of the topic (e.g.,lawyers. A group of AD patients provided interpretations for metaphors that varied both in aptness and familiarity. Compared to healthy controls, AD patients produced worse interpretations, but interpretation ability was related to a metaphor’s aptness rather than to its familiarity level, and patients with superior abstraction ability produced better interpretations. Therefore, the ability to construct figurative interpretations for metaphors is not always diminished in AD patients nor is it dependent only on the novelty level of the expression. We show that Alzheimer’s patients’ capacity to build figurative interpretations for metaphors is related to both item variables, such as aptness, and participant variables, such as abstraction ability.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien;

    2014-01-01

    their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator...

  13. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; George H Silva; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly us...

  14. The impact of lexical frequency on sentence comprehension in children with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Anne-Lise; Majerus, Steve; Jacob, Laura; Maillart, Christelle

    2014-02-01

    Children with SLI generally exhibit poor sentence comprehension skills. We examined the specific impact of grammatical complexity and lexical frequency on comprehension performance, yielding contrasting results. The present study sheds new light on sentence comprehension in children with SLI by investigating a linguistic factor which has attracted little research interest: the impact of the lexical frequency of known words on sentence comprehension. We also examined the impact of grammatical complexity and sentence length by independently varying these two factors. Fifteen children with SLI, 15 age- and IQ-matched controls, and 15 controls matched on lexical and grammatical skills, performed sentence comprehension tasks in which three linguistic factors were manipulated: lexical frequency (sentences containing words of either low or high lexical frequency), grammatical complexity (sentence containing either a subject relative clause or an object relative clause) and sentence length (either short or long sentences). Results indicated that children with SLI performed more poorly overall compared to age- and IQ-matched children and to lexical and morphosyntactic age-matched children. However, their performance was not more affected by either sentence length or clause type than that of control children. Only lexical frequency affected sentence comprehension to a greater extent in children with SLI relative to the control groups, revealing that SLI children's sentence comprehension abilities are particularly affected by the presence of low-frequency but familiar words.

  15. Computerized trainings in four groups of struggling readers: Specific effects on word reading and comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocki, Anna; Magnan, Annie; Ecalle, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Four groups of poor readers were identified among a population of students with learning disabilities attending a special class in secondary school: normal readers; specific poor decoders; specific poor comprehenders, and general poor readers (deficits in both decoding and comprehension). These students were then trained with a software program designed to encourage either their word decoding skills or their text comprehension skills. After 5 weeks of training, we observed that the students experiencing word reading deficits and trained with the decoding software improved primarily in the reading fluency task while those exhibiting comprehension deficits and trained with the comprehension software showed improved performance in listening and reading comprehension. But interestingly, the latter software also led to improved performance on the word recognition task. This result suggests that, for these students, training interventions focused at the text level and its comprehension might be more beneficial for reading in general (i.e., for the two components of reading) than word-level decoding trainings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunogenetics of autoimmune thyroid diseases: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanna J; Li, Cheuk Wun; Hammerstad, Sara Salehi; Stefan, Mihaela; Tomer, Yaron

    2015-11-01

    Both environmental and genetic triggers factor into the etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Although the exact pathogenesis and causative interaction between environment and genes are unknown, GD and HT share similar immune-mediated mechanisms of disease. They both are characterized by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by thyroidal lymphocytic infiltration, despite being clinically distinct entities with thyrotoxicosis in GD and hypothyroidism in HT. Family and population studies confirm the strong genetic influence and inheritability in the development of AITD. AITD susceptibility genes can be categorized as either thyroid specific (Tg, TSHR) or immune-modulating (FOXP3, CD25, CD40, CTLA-4, HLA), with HLA-DR3 carrying the highest risk. Of the AITD susceptibility genes, FOXP3 and CD25 play critical roles in the establishment of peripheral tolerance while CD40, CTLA-4, and the HLA genes are pivotal for T lymphocyte activation and antigen presentation. Polymorphisms in these immune-modulating genes, in particular, significantly contribute to the predisposition for GD, HT and, unsurprisingly, other autoimmune diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the immunoregulatory genes may functionally hinder the proper development of central and peripheral tolerance and alter T cell interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the immunological synapse. Thus, susceptibility genes for AITD contribute directly to the key mechanism underlying the development of organ-specific autoimmunity, namely the breakdown in self-tolerance. Here we review the major immune-modulating genes that are associated with AITD and their potential functional effects on thyroidal immune dysregulation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Improved cardiac management with a disease management program incorporating comprehensive lipid profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAna, John F; Goldfarb, Neil I; Couto, Joseph; Henry, Michelle A; Piefer, Gary; Rapier, George M

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the improved effectiveness of a disease management treatment protocol incorporating comprehensive lipid profiling and targeted lipid care based on lipid profile findings in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) or congestive heart failure (CHF) enrolled in a managed care plan. This retrospective cohort study, conducted over a 2-year period, compared outcomes between patients with a standard lipid profile to those evaluated with a comprehensive lipid profile. All adult members of the WellMed Medical Management, Inc. managed care health plan diagnosed with IHD or CHF, and continuously enrolled between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2008, were included in the study. Cases were defined as those who had at least 1 comprehensive lipid test (the VAP [vertical auto profile] ultracentrifuge test) during this period (n=1767); they were compared to those who had no lipid testing or traditional standard lipid testing only (controls, n=289). Univariate statistics were analyzed to describe the groups, and bivariate t tests or chi-squares examined differences between the 2 cohorts. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to control for potential confounders. The results show that the case group had lower total costs ($4852.62 vs. $7413.18; P=0.0255), fewer inpatient stays (13.1% vs. 18.3% of controls; P=0.0175) and emergency department visits (11.9% vs. 15.6% of controls; P=0.0832). Prescription use and frequency of lipid measurement suggested improved control resulting from a targeted approach to managing specific dyslipidemias. A treatment protocol incorporating a comprehensive lipid profile appears to improve care and reduce utilization and costs in a disease management program for cardiac patients.

  18. Comprehension of insincere communication in neurodegenerative disease: lies, sarcasm, and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shany-Ur, Tal; Poorzand, Pardis; Grossman, Scott N; Growdon, Matthew E; Jang, Jung Y; Ketelle, Robin S; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P

    2012-01-01

    Comprehension of insincere communication is an important aspect of social cognition requiring visual perspective taking, emotion reading, and understanding others' thoughts, opinions, and intentions. Someone who is lying intends to hide their insincerity from the listener, while a sarcastic speaker wants the listener to recognize they are speaking insincerely. We investigated whether face-to-face testing of comprehending insincere communication would effectively discriminate among neurodegenerative disease patients with different patterns of real-life social deficits. We examined ability to comprehend lies and sarcasm from a third-person perspective, using contextual cues, in 102 patients with one of four neurodegenerative diseases (behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia [bvFTD], Alzheimer's disease [AD], progressive supranuclear palsy [PSP], and vascular cognitive impairment) and 77 healthy older adults (normal controls--NCs). Participants answered questions about videos depicting social interactions involving deceptive, sarcastic, or sincere speech using The Awareness of Social Inference Test. All subjects equally understood sincere remarks, but bvFTD patients displayed impaired comprehension of lies and sarcasm compared with NCs. In other groups, impairment was not disease-specific but was proportionate to general cognitive impairment. Analysis of the task components revealed that only bvFTD patients were impaired on perspective taking and emotion reading elements and that both bvFTD and PSP patients had impaired ability to represent others' opinions and intentions (i.e., theory of mind). Test performance correlated with informants' ratings of subjects' empathy, perspective taking and neuropsychiatric symptoms in everyday life. Comprehending insincere communication is complex and requires multiple cognitive and emotional processes vulnerable across neurodegenerative diseases. However, bvFTD patients show uniquely focal and severe impairments at every level

  19. The Influence of Specific Phonemic Awareness Processes on the Reading Comprehension of African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Oliver W.; Taub, Gordon E.

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates the primary difference between strong and weak readers is their phonemic awareness skills. However, there is no consensus regarding which specific components of phonemic awareness contribute most robustly to reading comprehension. In this study, the relationship among sound blending, sound segmentation, and reading comprehension…

  20. The Influence of Specific Phonemic Awareness Processes on the Reading Comprehension of African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Oliver W.; Taub, Gordon E.

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates the primary difference between strong and weak readers is their phonemic awareness skills. However, there is no consensus regarding which specific components of phonemic awareness contribute most robustly to reading comprehension. In this study, the relationship among sound blending, sound segmentation, and reading comprehension…

  1. Experimental Intervention Research on Students with Specific Poor Comprehension: A Systematic Review of Treatment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hee; Tsai, Shu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Students with specific poor comprehension (SPC) can sound out words accurately, but have difficulty understanding what they read. However, most existing reading intervention studies on students with reading disabilities did not differentiate students with SPC from other types of students with reading disabilities who accompany with decoding…

  2. Use of Bloom's Taxonomy in Developing Reading Comprehension Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Stephen; Lorie, James

    2013-01-01

    This article is a brief account of the use of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) by staff of the Law School Admission Council in the 1990 development of redesigned specifications for the Reading Comprehension section of the Law School Admission Test. Summary item statistics for…

  3. Comprehensive screening for a complete set of Japanese-population-specific filaggrin gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, M; Nomura, T; Ohguchi, Y; Mizuno, O; Suzuki, S; Tsujiuchi, H; Hamajima, N; McLean, W H I; Shimizu, H; Akiyama, M

    2014-04-01

    Mutations in FLG coding profilaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris and are an important predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis. Until now, most case-control studies and population-based screenings have been performed only for prevalent mutations. In this study, we established a high-throughput FLG mutation detection system by real-time PCR with a set of two double-dye probes and conducted comprehensive screening for almost all of the Japanese-population-specific FLG mutations (ten FLG mutations). The present comprehensive screening for all ten FLG mutations provided a more precise prevalence rate for FLG mutations (11.1%, n = 820), which seemed high compared with data of previous reports based on screening for limited numbers of FLG mutations. Our comprehensive screening suggested that population-specific FLG mutations may be a significant predisposing factor for hay fever (odds ratio = 2.01 [95% CI: 1.027-3.936, P < 0.05]), although the sample sizes of this study were too small for reliable subphenotype analysis on the association between FLG mutations and hay fever in the eczema patients and the noneczema individuals, and it is not clear whether the association between FLG mutations and hay fever is due to the close association between FLG mutations and hay fever patients with eczema.

  4. Time, space and emotion: fMRI reveals content-specific activation during text comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Evelyn C; von Cramon, D Yves

    2007-11-12

    Story comprehension involves building a situation model of the text, i.e., a representation containing information on the who, where, when and why of the story. Using fMRI at 3T, domain-specific activations for three different information aspects were sought. Twenty participants read two sentence stories half of which contained inconsistencies concerning emotional, temporal or spatial information. Partly replicating previous results [E.C. Ferstl, M. Rinck, D.Y. von Cramon, Emotional and temporal aspects of situation model processing during text comprehension: an event-related fMRI study, J. Cogn. Neurosci. 17 (2005) 724-739], the anterior lateral prefrontal cortex/orbito-frontal cortex proved important for processing temporal information. The left anterior temporal lobe was particularly important during emotional stories. Most importantly, spatial information elicited bilateral activation in the collateral sulci and the posterior cingulate cortex, areas important for visuo-spatial cognition. These findings provide further evidence for content-specific processes during text comprehension.

  5. Comprehension of Complex Discourse in Different Stages of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldert, Charlotta; Fors, Angelika; Stroberg, Sofia; Hartelius, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Huntington's disease not only affects motor speech control, but also may have an impact on the ability to produce and understand language in communication. Aims: The ability to comprehend basic and complex discourse was investigated in three different stages of Huntington's disease. Methods & Procedures: In this experimental group…

  6. Improving listening comprehension skills relying on metacognitive strategies - focus on vocabulary and specific l2 instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerotijević-Tišma Danica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at investigating the application of an instructional method specifically focused on the expansion of metacognitive awareness and its effect on Serbian EFL students’ listening comprehension. The current study is a follow-up research of a similar study by Vandergrift and Tafaghodtari (2010. However, we sought to expand the previous research by investigating the relationship between the students’ current level of L2 (target language vocabulary and listening test scores. Our study likewise differed in the sample of participants, the target language, teaching and testing material used, and the duration of the very experiment. To answer the proposed research questions we conducted an experiment with 57 Serbian secondary school EFL (English as a Foreign Language learners divided into experimental (n=27 and control group (n=30. The results of the pre- and post-tests of the two groups showed the beneficial effects of developing metacognitive strategies and the strong positive correlation between the level of vocabulary and listening comprehension. The paper underlines important pedagogical implications especially regarding the enhancement of metacognitive awareness and vocabulary proficiency of students in order to improve performance on listening comprehension tasks.

  7. Integration or predictability? A further specification of the functional role of gamma oscillations in language comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eWang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGamma-band neuronal synchronization during sentence-level language comprehension has previously been linked with semantic unification. Here we attempt to further narrow down the functional significance of gamma during language comprehension, by distinguishing between two aspects of semantic unification: successful integration of word meaning into the sentence context, and prediction of upcoming words. We computed Event-Related Potentials (ERPs and frequency band-specific Electroencephalogram (EEG power changes while participants read sentences that contained a critical word that was (1 both semantically congruent and predictable (High-Cloze, HC, (2 semantically congruent but unpredictable (Low-Cloze, LC, or (3 semantically incongruent (and therefore also unpredictable; Semantic Violation, SV. The ERP analysis showed the expected parametric N400 modulation (HC < LC < SV. The time-frequency analysis showed qualitatively different results. In the gamma frequency range, we observed a power increase in response to the critical word in the HC condition, but not in the LC and the SV conditions. Additionally, in the theta frequency range we observed a power increase in the SV condition only. Our data provide evidence that gamma power increases are related to the predictability of an upcoming word based on the preceding sentence context, rather than to the integration of the incoming word's semantics into the preceding context. Further, our theta-band data are compatible with the notion that theta-band synchronization in sentence comprehension might be related to the detection of an error in the language input.

  8. When is category specific in Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R; Gale, Tim M; Leeson, Verity C; Crawford, John R

    2005-08-01

    Mixed findings have emerged concerning whether category-specific disorders occur in Alzheimer's disease. Factors that may contribute to these inconsistencies include: ceiling effects/skewed distributions for control data in some studies; differences in the severity of cognitive deficit in patients; and differences in the type of analysis (in particular, if and how controls are used to analyse single case data). We examined picture naming in Alzheimer's patients and matched elderly healthy normal controls in three experiments. These experiments used stimuli that did and did not produce ceiling effects/skewed data in controls. In Experiment 1, we examined for category effects in individual DAT patients using commonly used analyses for single cases (chi2 and z-scores). The different techniques produced quite different outcomes. In Experiment 2a, we used the same techniques on a different group of patients with similar outcomes. Finally, in Experiment 2b, we examined the same patients but (a) used stimuli that did not produce ceiling effects/skewed distributions in healthy controls, and (b) used statistical methods that did not treat the control sample as a population. We found that ceiling effects in controls may markedly inflate the incidence of dissociations in which living things are differentially impaired and seriously underestimate dissociations in the opposite direction. In addition, methods that treat the control sample as a population led to inflation in the overall number of dissociations detected. These findings have implications for the reliability of category effects previously reported both in Alzheimer patients and in other pathologies. In particular, they suggest that the greater proportion of living than nonliving deficits reported in the literature may be an artifact of the methods used.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities.

  10. Fatty acids in cardiovascular health and disease: a comprehensive update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research dating back to the 1950s reported an association between the consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and risk of coronary heart disease. Recent epidemiological evidence, however, challenges these findings. It is well accepted that the consumption of SFAs increases low-density lipoprotei...

  11. 78 FR 8535 - Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Disease Care Model Announcement AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION... the testing of the Comprehensive End- Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Care Model, a new initiative from the... (CHIP) beneficiaries. We are interested in identifying models designed to improve care for...

  12. Wilson's disease: a comprehensive review of the molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Wang, Jing; Pu, Chunwen; Qiao, Liang; Jiang, Chunmeng

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD), also known as hepatolenticular degeneration, is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder resulting from abnormal copper metabolism. Reduced copper excretion causes an excessive deposition of the copper in many organs such as the liver, central nervous system (CNS), cornea, kidney, joints, and cardiac muscle where the physiological functions of the affected organs are impaired. The underlying molecular mechanisms for WD have been extensively studied. It is now believed that a defect in P-type adenosine triphosphatase (ATP7B), the gene encoding the copper transporting P-type ATPase, is responsible for hepatic copper accumulation. Deposited copper in the liver produces toxic effects via modulating several molecular pathways. WD can be a lethal disease if left untreated. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms causing the aberrant copper deposition and organ damage is the key to developing effective management approaches.

  13. Dietary sodium in chronic kidney disease: a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Julie A; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake.

  14. Textual reading comprehension and naming in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciclara Rinaldi

    Full Text Available Abstract Among linguistic-cognitive failures, the retelling of stories and lexical disorders occur from the onset of AD. Recent studies have discussed whether lexical failures in AD patients include naming actions. Objectives: The aims of this study were to verify naming and reformulation of action difficulties in AD patients and their relationship with the retelling of stories. Our main questions were: Are there two linguistic abilities impaired in the early stages of AD? Is there some correlation between the capacity of naming actions and the retelling of stories? Methods: We assessed 28 elderly participants: 17 with probable AD and 11 control subjects, with schooling ³4 years. The textual reading comprehension was measured using four stories with descriptive and narrative textual structure. The lexical production was verified by 17 actions on video, assessed by the participants' first and second verbal emissions. Results: The results showed that the retelling of stories is a task that discriminates patients with AD from healthy individuals. The naming and reformulation of actions tasks did not show significant differences among the patients and their controls. A positive correlation was found between the difficulties in retelling stories and the reformulation of the naming of actions. Conclusions: These results confirm previous findings that show the preservation of naming actions in patients with AD, which involve familiar actions, and that the retelling of short stories is an instrument that discriminates patients with AD from healthy elders. Results also suggest that the difficulties in retelling are related a breakdown in reformulating information, perhaps stemming from mechanisms of decreased memory work.

  15. The comprehension of Italian relative clauses in poor readers and in children with Specific Language Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Arosio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI and children with Developmental Dyslexia (DD have problems comprehending relative clauses (RCs and find object RCs more difficult than subject RCs, as do typically developing children. Few studies have compared these groups directly, leaving it unclear whether the problems observed in children with DD are similar to those described in SLI. Work with typically developing children has shown that the comprehension of passive RCs is less challenging than that of object RCs. It is argued that this asymmetry depends on intervention effects as modelized in a Relativized Minimality framework. Since movement is challenging for children with SLI and those with DD, examining and comparing their comprehension of object RCs and passive RCs can broaden our understanding of their language deficits. In fact, both structures involve movement, but the moved element and the movement configuration are different. In our study we investigated the comprehension of subject RCs, object RCs and passive RCs in 12 Italian monolingual children with SLI (mean age: 7;6, 13 Italian monolingual children with DD (mean age: 10;7 and 50 typically developing controls matched for age, grammar and vocabulary. Results from a picture selection task show that: (i subject RCs are unproblematic for all children; (ii object RCs are challenging for children with SLI, children with DD and younger typically developing controls; (iii passive RCs are better understood than object RCs in all groups, but still problematic for children with SLI and younger typically developing controls. Our data show that intervention effects are found in children with SLI and children with DD and that those with SLI have a deficit in transferring thematic roles to moved elements. Our results point out that some of the children with DD have a mild grammatical deficit that was undetected or escaped standardized tests.

  16. Fatty acids in cardiovascular health and disease: a comprehensive update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Seth J; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Willett, Walter C; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Rudel, Lawrence L; Maki, Kevin C; Whelan, Jay; Ramsden, Christopher E; Block, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Research dating back to the 1950s reported an association between the consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and risk of coronary heart disease. Recent epidemiological evidence, however, challenges these findings. It is well accepted that the consumption of SFAs increases low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), whereas carbohydrates, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) do not. High-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C increases with SFA intake. Among individuals who are insulin resistant, a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet typically has an adverse effect on lipid profiles (in addition to decreasing HDL-C, it also increases triglyceride and LDL particle concentrations). Consequently, a moderate fat diet in which unsaturated fatty acids replace SFAs and carbohydrates are not augmented is advised to lower LDL-C; compared with a low-fat diet, a moderate-fat diet will lower triglycerides and increase HDL-C. Now, there is some new evidence that is questioning the health benefits of even MUFAs and PUFAs. In addition, in a few recent studies investigators have also failed to demonstrate expected cardiovascular benefits of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. To clarify the clinical pros and cons of dietary fats, the National Lipid Association held a fatty acid symposium at the 2011 National Lipid Association Scientific Sessions. During these sessions, the science regarding the effects of different fatty acid classes on coronary heart disease risk was reviewed.

  17. Employment status in multiple sclerosis: impact of disease-specific and non-disease-specific factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Ivonne; Kern, Simone; Horntrich, Antje; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with high rates of early retirement (ER). A German cohort of MS patients and healthy control subjects (HCs) were compared cross-sectionally to investigate disease- and non-disease-specific factors that are associated with employment status (ES) in MS and to identify predictors of ES in MS. A total of 39 ER MS patients, 48 employed MS patients, and 37 HCs completed a brief neuropsychological battery and questionnaires related to depressive symptoms, fatigue, health-related quality of life (HrQoL) and health locus of control (HLC). Neurological disability was assessed by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC). ER compared with employed MS patients scored significantly higher in neurological disability, depressive symptoms and fatigue and significantly lower in cognitive functioning and HrQoL. Further, both groups differed with regard to age, education, disease course and duration but not in HLC. Neurological disability, age and fatigue were identified as significant predictors of ES in MS. ES in MS was associated with demographic aspects, neurological and cognitive status, depressive symptoms, fatigue and HrQoL but was not associated with HLC. Findings confirm neurological disability, age and fatigue as independent predictors of ES in MS.

  18. Stem cell therapy in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Shu, ShangAn; Kenny, Thomas P; Chang, Christopher; Leung, Patrick S C

    2014-10-01

    The clinical management of autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) has undergone significant changes in the last few decades, leading to remarkable improvements in clinical outcomes of many patients with mild to moderate ARD. On the other hand, severe refractory ARD patients often have high morbidity and mortality. Extensive basic research and clinical evidence has opened the door to new encouraging perspectives, such as the establishment of a role of stem cell transplantation (SCT) in the strategic management of ARD. Given the great heterogeneity of ARD, it is difficult to assign an optimal SCT regimen to all ARD patients. SCT remains a challenging mode of therapy in ARD patients from the standpoints of both efficacy and safety. As the clinical data of SCT in ARD increases and as we improve our understanding of stem cell biology and the downstream effects on the immune system, the future is promising for the development of optimal personalized SCT regimens in ARD.

  19. Three Decades of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment: Evidence Coming From Different Healthcare Settings and Specific Clinical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Alberto; Cella, Alberto; Pilotto, Andrea; Daragjati, Julia; Veronese, Nicola; Musacchio, Clarissa; Mello, Anna Maria; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Prete, Camilla; Panza, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a multidisciplinary diagnostic and treatment process that identifies medical, psychosocial, and functional capabilities of older adults to develop a coordinated plan to maximize overall health with aging. Specific criteria used by CGA programs to evaluate patients include age, medical comorbidities, psychosocial problems, previous or predicted high healthcare utilization, change in living situation, and specific geriatric conditions. However, no universal criteria have been agreed upon to readily identify patients who are likely to benefit from CGA. Evidence from randomized controlled trials and large systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggested that the healthcare setting may modify the effectiveness of CGA programs. Home CGA programs and CGA performed in the hospital were shown to be consistently beneficial for several health outcomes. In contrast, the data are conflicting for posthospital discharge CGA programs, outpatient CGA consultation, and CGA-based inpatient geriatric consultation services. The effectiveness of CGA programs may be modified also by particular settings or specific clinical conditions, with tailored CGA programs in older frail patients evaluated for preoperative assessment, admitted or discharged from emergency departments and orthogeriatric units or with cancer and cognitive impairment. CGA is capable of effectively exploring multiple domains in older age, being the multidimensional and multidisciplinary tool of choice to determine the clinical profile, the pathologic risk and the residual skills as well as the short- and long-term prognosis to facilitate the clinical decision making on the personalized care plan of older persons.

  20. Action verb comprehension in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Collin; Olm, Christopher; Boller, Ashley; McCluskey, Leo; Elman, Lauren; Haley, Jenna; Seltzer, Emily; Chahine, Lama; Woo, John; Rascovsky, Katya; McMillan, Corey; Grossman, Murray

    2014-06-01

    Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have a motor disorder and cognitive difficulties, including difficulty with action verbs. However, the basis for the action verb impairment is unknown. Thirty-six participants with ALS and 22 with Parkinson's disease (PD) were assessed on a simple, two-alternative forced-choice associativity judgment task, where performance was untimed and did not depend on motor functioning. We probed 120 frequency-matched action verbs, cognition verbs, concrete nouns and abstract nouns. Performance was related to T1 MRI imaging of gray matter atrophy. Patients with ALS were significantly impaired relative to healthy senior control participants only for action verbs. Patients with PD did not differ from controls for all word categories. Regression analyses related action verb performance in ALS to motor-associated cortices, but action verb judgments in PD were not related to cortical atrophy. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that action verb difficulty in ALS is related in part to the degradation of action-related conceptual knowledge represented in motor-associated cortex.

  1. Gesture comprehension, knowledge and production in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, M; Rénier, J; Anicet, L; Pasquier, F; Mackowiak-Cordoliani, M A

    2012-07-01

      Although apraxia is a typical consequence of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the profile of apraxic impairments is still subject to debate. Here, we analysed apraxia components in patients with AD with mild-to-moderate or moderately severe dementia.   Thirty-one patients were included. We first evaluated simple gestures, that is, the imitation of finger and hand configurations, symbolic gestures (recognition, production on verbal command and imitation), pantomimes (recognition, production on verbal command, imitation and production with the object), general knowledge and complex gestures (tool-object association, function-tool association, production of complex actions and knowledge about action sequences). Tests for dementia (Mini Mental State Examination and the Dementia Rating Scale), language disorders, visual agnosia and executive function were also administered.   Compared with controls, patients showed significant difficulties (P ≤ 0.01) in subtests relating to simple gestures (except for the recognition and imitation of symbolic gestures). General knowledge about tools, objects and action sequences was less severely impaired. Performance was frequently correlated with the severity of dementia. Multiple-case analyses revealed that (i) the frequency of apraxia depended on the definition used, (ii) ideomotor apraxia was more frequent than ideational apraxia, (iii) conceptual difficulties were slightly more frequent than production difficulties in the early stage of AD and (iv) difficulties in gesture recognition were frequent (especially for pantomimes).   Patients with AD can clearly show gesture apraxia from the mild-moderate stage of dementia onwards. Recognition and imitation disorders are relatively frequent (especially for pantomimes). We did not find conceptual difficulties to be the main problem in early-stage AD. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  2. Targeting Specific Immunologic Pathways in Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Guilherme Piovezani; Faubion, William A; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the immunologic pathways in intestinal inflammation is crucial for the development of new therapies that can maximize patient response and minimize toxicity. Targeting integrins and cytokines is intended to control leukocyte migration to effector sites or inhibit the action of proinflammatory cytokines. New approaches to preventing leukocyte migration may target integrin receptors expressed on the intestinal vascular endothelium. The interleukin (IL)-12/IL-23 pathway has been a therapeutic target of interest in controlling active Crohn's disease (CD). New therapeutic approaches in CD may involve the enhancement of anti-inflammatory cytokine pathways and modulation of cellular responses and intranuclear signals associated with intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Not all reading disabilities are dyslexia: distinct neurobiology of specific comprehension deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Laurie E; Clements-Stephens, Amy; Pugh, Kenneth R; Burns, Scott; Cao, Aize; Pekar, James J; Davis, Nicole; Rimrodt, Sheryl L

    2013-01-01

    Although an extensive literature exists on the neurobiological correlates of dyslexia (DYS), to date, no studies have examined the neurobiological profile of those who exhibit poor reading comprehension despite intact word-level abilities (specific reading comprehension deficits [S-RCD]). Here we investigated the word-level abilities of S-RCD as compared to typically developing readers (TD) and those with DYS by examining the blood oxygenation-level dependent response to words varying on frequency. Understanding whether S-RCD process words in the same manner as TD, or show alternate pathways to achieve normal word-reading abilities, may provide insights into the origin of this disorder. Results showed that as compared to TD, DYS showed abnormal covariance during word processing with right-hemisphere homologs of the left-hemisphere reading network in conjunction with left occipitotemporal underactivation. In contrast, S-RCD showed an intact neurobiological response to word stimuli in occipitotemporal regions (associated with fast and efficient word processing); however, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) abnormalities were observed. Specifically, TD showed a higher-percent signal change within right IFG for low-versus-high frequency words as compared to both S-RCD and DYS. Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, a coupling-by-reading group interaction was found in right IFG for DYS, as indicated by a widespread greater covariance between right IFG and right occipitotemporal cortex/visual word-form areas, as well as bilateral medial frontal gyrus, as compared to TD. For S-RCD, the context-dependent functional interaction anomaly was most prominently seen in left IFG, which covaried to a greater extent with hippocampal, parahippocampal, and prefrontal areas than for TD for low- as compared to high-frequency words. Given the greater lexical access demands of low frequency as compared to high-frequency words, these results may suggest specific weaknesses in accessing

  4. The effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christina; Macoir, Joël; Langlois, Mélanie; Cantin, Léo; Prud'homme, Michel; Monetta, Laura

    2015-02-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) on different language abilities are still controversial and its impact on high-level language abilities such as metaphor comprehension has been overlooked. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of STN electrical stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities such as lexical and semantic capacities. Eight PD individuals with bilateral STN-DBS were first evaluated OFF-DBS and, at least seven weeks later, ON-DBS. Performance on metaphor comprehension, lexical decision, word association and verbal fluency tasks were compared ON and OFF-DBS in addition to motor symptoms evaluation. STN stimulation had a significant beneficial effect on motor symptoms in PD. However, this stimulation did not have any effect on metaphor comprehension or any other cognitive ability evaluated in this study. These outcomes suggest that STN stimulation may have dissociable effects on motor and language functions.

  5. Anomalous gray matter patterns in specific reading comprehension deficit are independent of dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephen; Hoeft, Fumiko; Aboud, Katherine; Cutting, Laurie

    2016-10-01

    Specific reading comprehension deficit (SRCD) affects up to 10 % of all children. SRCD is distinct from dyslexia (DYS) in that individuals with SRCD show poor comprehension despite adequate decoding skills. Despite its prevalence and considerable behavioral research, there is not yet a unified cognitive profile of SRCD. While its neuroanatomical basis is unknown, SRCD could be anomalous in regions subserving their commonly reported cognitive weaknesses in semantic processing or executive function. Here we investigated, for the first time, patterns of gray matter volume difference in SRCD as compared to DYS and typical developing (TD) adolescent readers (N = 41). A linear support vector machine algorithm was applied to whole brain gray matter volumes generated through voxel-based morphometry. As expected, DYS differed significantly from TD in a pattern that included features from left fusiform and supramarginal gyri (DYS vs. TD: 80.0 %, p < 0.01). SRCD was well differentiated not only from TD (92.5 %, p < 0.001) but also from DYS (88.0 %, p < 0.001). Of particular interest were findings of reduced gray matter volume in right frontal areas that were also supported by univariate analysis. These areas are thought to subserve executive processes relevant for reading, such as monitoring and manipulating mental representations. Thus, preliminary analyses suggest that SRCD readers possess a distinct neural profile compared to both TD and DYS readers and that these differences might be linked to domain-general abilities. This work provides a foundation for further investigation into variants of reading disability beyond DYS.

  6. A comprehensive analysis of predicted HLA binding peptides of JE viral proteins specific to north Indian isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pawan; Saxena, Komal; Mishra, Sanjay; Kumar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), a viral disease has significantly increased worldwide especially, in the developing region due to challenges in immunization, vector control and lack of appropriate treatment methods. An effective, yet an expensive heat-killed vaccine is available for the disease. Therefore, the design and development of short peptide vaccine candidate is promising. We used immune-informatics methods to perform a comprehensive analysis of the entire JEV proteome of north Indian isolate to identify the conserved peptides binding known specific HLA alleles among the documented JEV genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. The prediction analysis identified 102 class I (using propred I) and 118 class II (using propred) binding peptides at 4% threshold value. These predicted HLA allele binding peptides were further analyzed for potential conserved region using IEDB (an immune epitope database and analysis resource). This analysis shows that 78.81% of class II (in genotype 2) and 76.47% of HLA I (in genotype 3) bound peptides are conserved. The peptides IPIVSVASL, KGAQRLAAL, LAVFLICVL and FRTLFGGMS, VFLICVLTV, are top ranking with potential super antigenic property by binding to all HLA allele members of B7 and DR4 super-types, respectively. This data finds application in the design and development of short peptide vaccine candidates and diagnostic agents for JE following adequate validation and verification.

  7. Can Consumers Trust Web-Based Information About Celiac Disease? Accuracy, Comprehensiveness, Transparency, and Readability of Information on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Shawna L; Donohue, Michael C; Newton, Kimberly P; Ogletree, Sandra P; Conner, Kristen K; Ingegneri, Sarah E

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects approximately 1% of the US population. Disease is characterized by damage to the small intestinal lining and malabsorption of nutrients. Celiac disease is activated in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary exposure to gluten in wheat and gluten-like proteins in rye and barley. Symptoms are diverse and include gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment requires strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. The Internet is a major source of health information about celiac disease. Nonetheless, information about celiac disease that is available on various websites often is questioned by patients and other health care professionals regarding its reliability and content. Objectives To determine the accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and readability of information on 100 of the most widely accessed websites that provide information on celiac disease. Methods Using the search term celiac disease, we analyzed 100 of the top English-language websites published by academic, commercial, nonprofit, and other professional (nonacademic) sources for accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and reading grade level. Each site was assessed independently by 3 reviewers. Website accuracy and comprehensiveness were probed independently using a set of objective core information about celiac disease. We used 19 general criteria to assess website transparency. Website readability was determined by the Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level. Results for each parameter were analyzed independently. In addition, we weighted and combined parameters to generate an overall score, termed website quality. Results We included 98 websites in the final analysis. Of these, 47 (48%) provided specific information about celiac disease that was less than 95% accurate (ie, the predetermined cut-off considered a minimum acceptable level of accuracy). Independent of whether the information posted was accurate, 51 of

  8. Comprehensive qualification and quantification of triacylglycerols with specific fatty acid chain composition in horse adipose tissue, human plasma and liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ming; Dai, Dongsheng; Li, Lin; Wei, Jinchao; Yang, Hui; Li, Shilei; Zhang, Yangyang; Lin, Yu; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2017-09-01

    High levels of triacylglycerols (TGs) have been linked to cardiovascular disease and liver diseases. Comprehensively analyzing TGs is helpful to understand the TGs functions in these diseases. However, due to the existence of a large number of isomers TGs and the lack of commercial standards, precise analysis of individual triacylglycerol (TG) with specific fatty acid chain composition is full of challenge. In this work, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) were employed for comprehensive qualification and quantification of TGs with specific fatty acid chain composition in horse adipose tissue, human plasma and liver tissues including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and para-carcinoma tissues. Multiple MS detection modes from QTRAP MS and FT-ICR MS were utilized, and hundreds of TG species (including many oxidized TG species) with their specific fatty acid chain compositions have been qualified and quantified. The isomer TGs interference, the isobaric interference, and oxidized TG species interference were firstly indicated. Several isomer TGs, for example, 18:1/20:1/18:2 TG and 20:3/18:1/18:0 TG, which were all 56:4 TG, demonstrated different trends in HCC tissue compared with para-carcinoma tissue, which showed the importance of analysis of TG with specific fatty acid chain composition. In addition, 10 TGs with the degree of unsaturation beyond three were significantly decreased, while 16:0/17:0/18:0 TG, no double bond, was significantly increased in the HCC tissue, which firstly revealed aberrant specific TG metabolism in HCC. This is a systematic report about comprehensive analysis of TGs by UPLC-ESI-MS, which is of significance for accurate analysis of these lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypertext comprehension of deaf and hard-of-hearing students and students with specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.C.; Segers, P.C.J.; Hermans, D.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the reading comprehension of hierarchically structured hypertexts within D/HH students and students with SLI. To our knowledge, it is the first study on hypertext comprehension in D/HH students and students with SLI, and it also considers the role of working memory.

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgA in Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arco, Christina; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Arnaboldi, Paul M

    2017-05-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease is currently dependent on the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of the disease. The significance of serum IgA against B. burgdorferi remains unclear. The production of intrathecal IgA has been noted in patients with the late Lyme disease manifestation, neuroborreliosis, but production of antigen-specific IgA during early disease has not been evaluated. In the current study, we assessed serum IgA binding to the B. burgdorferi peptide antigens, C6, the target of the FDA-cleared C6 EIA, and FlaB(211-223)-modVlsE(275-291), a peptide containing a Borrelia flagellin epitope linked to a modified VlsE sequence, in patients with early and late Lyme disease. Specific IgA was detected in 59 of 152 serum samples (38.8%) from early Lyme disease patients. Approximately 50% of early Lyme disease patients who were seropositive for peptide-specific IgM and/or IgG were also seropositive for peptide-specific IgA. In a subpopulation of patients, high peptide-specific IgA could be correlated with disseminated disease, defined as multiple erythema migrans lesions, and neurological disease complications. These results suggest that there may be an association between elevated levels of antigen-specific IgA and particular disease manifestations in some patients with early Lyme disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgA in Lyme Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina D'Arco

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease is currently dependent on the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of the disease. The significance of serum IgA against B. burgdorferi remains unclear. The production of intrathecal IgA has been noted in patients with the late Lyme disease manifestation, neuroborreliosis, but production of antigen-specific IgA during early disease has not been evaluated. In the current study, we assessed serum IgA binding to the B. burgdorferi peptide antigens, C6, the target of the FDA-cleared C6 EIA, and FlaB(211-223-modVlsE(275-291, a peptide containing a Borrelia flagellin epitope linked to a modified VlsE sequence, in patients with early and late Lyme disease. Specific IgA was detected in 59 of 152 serum samples (38.8% from early Lyme disease patients. Approximately 50% of early Lyme disease patients who were seropositive for peptide-specific IgM and/or IgG were also seropositive for peptide-specific IgA. In a subpopulation of patients, high peptide-specific IgA could be correlated with disseminated disease, defined as multiple erythema migrans lesions, and neurological disease complications. These results suggest that there may be an association between elevated levels of antigen-specific IgA and particular disease manifestations in some patients with early Lyme disease.

  12. Hypertext comprehension of deaf and hard-of-hearing students and students with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Helen; Segers, Eliane; Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-02-01

    This paper provides insight into the reading comprehension of hierarchically structured hypertexts within D/HH students and students with SLI. To our knowledge, it is the first study on hypertext comprehension in D/HH students and students with SLI, and it also considers the role of working memory. We compared hypertext versus linear text comprehension in D/HH students and students with SLI versus younger students without language problems who had a similar level of decoding and vocabulary. The results demonstrated no difference in text comprehension between the hierarchically structured hypertext and the linear text. Text comprehension of D/HH students and students with SLI was comparable to that of the students without language problems. In addition, there was a similar positive predictive value of visuospatial and not verbal working memory on hypertext comprehension for all three groups. The findings implicate that educational settings can make use of hierarchically structured hypertexts as well as linear texts and that children can navigate in the digital world from young age on, even if language or working memory problems are present.

  13. Patient-Specific Pluripotent Stem Cells in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpen Durnaoglu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many human neurological diseases are not currently curable and result in devastating neurologic sequelae. The increasing availability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from adult human somatic cells provides new prospects for cellreplacement strategies and disease-related basic research in a broad spectrum of human neurologic diseases. Patient-specific iPSC-based modeling of neurogenetic and neurodegenerative diseases is an emerging efficient tool for in vitro modeling to understand disease and to screen for genes and drugs that modify the disease process. With the exponential increase in iPSC research in recent years, human iPSCs have been successfully derived with different technologies and from various cell types. Although there remain a great deal to learn about patient-specific iPSC safety, the reprogramming mechanisms, better ways to direct a specific reprogramming, ideal cell source for cellular grafts, and the mechanisms by which transplanted stem cells lead to an enhanced functional recovery and structural reorganization, the discovery of the therapeutic potential of iPSCs offers new opportunities for the treatment of incurable neurologic diseases. However, iPSC-based therapeutic strategies need to be thoroughly evaluated in preclinical animal models of neurological diseases before they can be applied in a clinical setting.

  14. Generic and disease-specific measures of quality of life in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Suvosree; Vogel, Asmus; Hansen, Marie-Louise H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD).......The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD)....

  15. Generic and disease-specific measures of quality of life in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Sumangala; Vogel, A.; Hansen, M.L.;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD).......The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD)....

  16. Assessing reading comprehension in adolescent low achievers : Subskills identification and task specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, R.; Oostdam, R.; van Gelderen, A.

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of a validation study of a new test for assessing low-achieving adolescents’ reading comprehension skills – the SALT-reading – we analyzed two issues relevant to the field of reading test development. Using the test results of 200 seventh graders, we examined the possibility of

  17. Comprehensive genotyping in two homogeneous Graves' disease samples reveals major and novel HLA association alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Lung Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism and thyroid eye disease inherited as a complex trait. Although geoepidemiology studies showed relatively higher prevalence of GD in Asians than in Caucasians, previous genetic studies were contradictory concerning whether and/or which human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles are associated with GD in Asians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a case-control association study (499 unrelated GD cases and 504 controls and a replication in an independent family sample (419 GD individuals and their 282 relatives in 165 families. To minimize genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, we included only ethnic Chinese Han population in Taiwan and excluded subjects with hypothyroidism. We performed direct and comprehensive genotyping of six classical HLA loci (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, -DQB1 and -DRB1 to 4-digit resolution. Combining the data of two sample populations, we found that B*46:01 (odds ratio under dominant model [OR]  = 1.33, Bonferroni corrected combined P [P(Bc]  = 1.17 x 10⁻², DPB1*05:01 (OR  = 2.34, P(Bc = 2.58 x 10⁻¹⁰, DQB1*03:02 (OR  = 0.62, P(Bc  = 1.97 x 10⁻², DRB1*15:01 (OR  = 1.68, P(Bc = 1.22 x 10⁻² and DRB1*16:02 (OR  = 2.63, P(Bc  = 1.46 x 10⁻⁵ were associated with GD. HLA-DPB1*05:01 is the major gene of GD in our population and singly accounts for 48.4% of population-attributable risk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These GD-associated alleles we identified in ethnic Chinese Hans, and those identified in other Asian studies, are totally distinct from the known associated alleles in Caucasians. Identification of population-specific association alleles is the critical first step for individualized medicine. Furthermore, comparison between different susceptibility/protective alleles across populations could facilitate generation of novel hypothesis about GD pathophysiology and indicate a new direction for future

  18. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  19. Comprehensive analysis of dengue virus-specific responses supports an HLA-linked protective role for CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Angelo, Michael A; de Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Sidney, John; Greenbaum, Jason A; Fernando, Anira N; Broadwater, Anne; Kolla, Ravi V; De Silva, Aruna D; de Silva, Aravinda M; Mattia, Kimberly A; Doranz, Benjamin J; Grey, Howard M; Shresta, Sujan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-05-28

    The role of CD8(+) T cells in dengue virus infection and subsequent disease manifestations is not fully understood. According to the original antigenic sin theory, skewing of T-cell responses induced by primary infection with one serotype causes less effective response upon secondary infection with a different serotype, predisposing individuals to severe disease. A comprehensive analysis of CD8(+) responses in the general population from the Sri Lankan hyperendemic area, involving the measurement of ex vivo IFNγ responses associated with more than 400 epitopes, challenges the original antigenic sin theory. Although skewing of responses toward primary infecting viruses was detected, this was not associated with impairment of responses either qualitatively or quantitatively. Furthermore, we demonstrate higher magnitude and more polyfunctional responses for HLA alleles associated with decreased susceptibility to severe disease, suggesting that a vigorous response by multifunctional CD8(+) T cells is associated with protection from dengue virus disease.

  20. A case for protein-level and site-level specificity in glycoproteomic studies of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Katherine N; Dodds, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal glycosylation of proteins is known to be either resultant or causative of a variety of diseases. This makes glycoproteins appealing targets as potential biomarkers and focal points of molecular studies on the development and progression of human ailment. To date, a majority of efforts in disease glycoproteomics have tended to center on either determining the concentration of a given glycoprotein, or on profiling the total population of glycans released from a mixture of glycoproteins. While these approaches have demonstrated some diagnostic potential, they are inherently insensitive to the fine molecular detail which distinguishes unique and possibly disease relevant glycoforms of specific proteins. As a consequence, such analyses can be of limited sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy because they do not comprehensively consider the glycosylation status of any particular glycoprotein, or of any particular glycosylation site. Therefore, significant opportunities exist to improve glycoproteomic inquiry into disease by engaging in these studies at the level of individual glycoproteins and their exact loci of glycosylation. In this concise review, the rationale for glycoprotein and glycosylation site specificity is developed in the context of human disease glycoproteomics with an emphasis on N-glycosylation. Recent examples highlighting disease-related perturbations in glycosylation will be presented, including those involving alterations in the overall glycosylation of a specific protein, alterations in the occupancy of a given glycosylation site, and alterations in the compositional heterogeneity of glycans occurring at a given glycosylation site. Each will be discussed with particular emphasis on how protein-specific and site-specific approaches can contribute to improved discrimination between glycoproteomes and glycoproteins associated with healthy and unhealthy states.

  1. Oxidation-Specific Biomarkers and Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoia, Monica L.; Pai, Jennifer K.; Lee, Jun-Hee; Taleb, Adam; Joosten, Michel M.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Yang, Xiaohong; Witztum, Joseph L.; Rimm, Eric B.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to examine the prospective association between oxidation-specific biomarkers, primarily oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) on apolipoprotein B-100-containing lipoproteins (OxPL/apoB) and lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], and risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD). We examine

  2. Personality changes in dementia: are they disease specific and universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Fernando; Pose, Mariángeles; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Torralva, Teresa; López, Pablo; Cetkovich-Bakmas, Marcelo; Manes, Facundo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies about personality changes in dementia suggest that they may be due to the disruption of the biological basis of personality traits, and hence, that they are disease specific and universal. However, evidence about its specificity is still limited and scarce regarding culturally diverse populations. Accordingly, our aim was to compare personality changes in Argentinean patients with Alzheimer disease, behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, and primary progressive aphasia. The closest living relatives of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer disease (n=19), behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (n=16), and primary progressive aphasia (n=15) were asked to complete 2 versions of the personality inventory NEO Personality Inventory-Revised, one for assessing patients' premorbid personality traits, and the other for assessing current traits. All groups showed changes in several domains and facets of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised. Globally, the observed pattern of changes was fairly consistent with previous studies based on the same model of personality. Nevertheless, our results regarding disease-specificity were less conclusive. Even if there were some indicators of specific differences between groups, most traits varied similarly across the 3 groups, revealing a pattern of generalized changes in personality expression after illness onset. More studies are needed that help to distinguish real personality changes from other affective or cognitive symptoms that accompany dementia, as well as further data from culturally diverse populations.

  3. Automated real time constant-specificity surveillance for disease outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownstein John S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For real time surveillance, detection of abnormal disease patterns is based on a difference between patterns observed, and those predicted by models of historical data. The usefulness of outbreak detection strategies depends on their specificity; the false alarm rate affects the interpretation of alarms. Results We evaluate the specificity of five traditional models: autoregressive, Serfling, trimmed seasonal, wavelet-based, and generalized linear. We apply each to 12 years of emergency department visits for respiratory infection syndromes at a pediatric hospital, finding that the specificity of the five models was almost always a non-constant function of the day of the week, month, and year of the study (p Conclusion Modeling the variance of visit patterns enables real-time detection with known, constant specificity at all times. With constant specificity, public health practitioners can better interpret the alarms and better evaluate the cost-effectiveness of surveillance systems.

  4. The Role of Non-specific and Specific Immune Systems in Poultry against Newcastle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND is caused by avian paramyxovirus-1 which belong to Avulavirus genus and Paramyxoviridae family. The birds have abnormalities in humoral (bursa fabricius and cellular (thymus and spleen lymphoid organs. Lesions decrease the immune system. Immune system consists of non-specific and specific immune systems. The main components of non-specific immunity are physical and chemical barrier (feather and skin or mucosa, phagocytic cells (macrophages and natural killer, protein complement and the mediator of inflammation and cytokines. Interferons (IFNs belong to a group of cytokines that play a major role in the nonspecific or innate (natural immunity. The virulent ND virus encodes protein of V gene can be suppressed IFN type I. This leads to non-specific immune system fail to respond to the virulent strains resulting in severe pathogenicity. The defense mechanism of the host is replaced by specific immunity (adaptive immunity when natural immunity fails to overcome the infection. The specific immune system consists of humoral mediated immunity (HMI and cell-mediated immunity (CMI. The cells of immune system that react specifically with the antigen are B lymphocytes producing the antibodies, T lymphocytes that regulate the synthesis of antibodies and T cells as effector or the direct cytotoxic cells. Both non-specific and specific immunities are complementary against the invasion of ND virus in the birds. The objective of this article is to discuss the role of non specific and specific immune system in ND.

  5. Vitamin D in systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Theodor, Emanuel; Segal, Ramit Maoz; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Lately, vitamin D has been linked with metabolic and immunological processes, which established its role as an essential component of human health preservation. Vitamin D has been defined as natural immune modulators, and upon activation of its receptors (VDRs), it regulates calcium metabolism, cellular growth, proliferation and apoptosis, and other immunological functions. Epidemiological data underline a strong correlation between poor vitamin D status and higher risk for chronic inflammatory illnesses of various etiologies, including autoimmune diseases. Epidemiological, genetic, and basic studies indicated a potential role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of certain systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. These studies demonstrate correlation between low vitamin D and prevalence of diseases. In addition, VDRs' polymorphisms observed in some of these autoimmune diseases may further support a plausible pathogenic link. Notably, for some autoimmune disease, no correlation with vitamin D levels could be confirmed. Thus, in the current review we present the body of evidence regarding the plausible roles of vitamin D and VDR's polymorphism in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We summarize the data regarding systemic (i.e., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) and organ-specific (i.e., multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, primary biliary cirrhosis, etc.) autoimmune diseases, in which low level of vitamin D was found comparing to healthy subjects. In addition, we discuss the correlations between vitamin D levels and clinical manifestations and/or activity of diseases. In this context, we address the rational for vitamin D supplementation in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. Further studies addressing the mechanisms by which vitamin D affects autoimmunity and the proper supplementation required are needed.

  6. The genetics of celiac disease: A comprehensive review of clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Cénit, M Carmen; Núñez, Concepción

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a complex immune-related disease with a very strong genetic component. Multiple genetic findings over the last decade have added to the already known MHC influence numerous genetic variants associated to CD susceptibility. Currently, it is well-established that 6 MHC and 39 non-MHC loci, including a higher number of independent genetic variants, are associated to disease risk. Moreover, additional regions have been recently implicated in the disease, which would increase the number of involved loci. Together, the firmly described genetic variants account for roughly 31% of CD heritability, being 25% explained by the MHC influence. These new variants represent markers of disease risk and turn the identification of the causal genes and the causal variants inside the associated loci, as well as their precise biological role on the disease, into a major challenge in CD research. Numerous studies have been developed with this aim showing the high impact of risk variants on gene expression. These studies also indicate a central role of CD4(+) T cells in CD pathogenesis and point to B cells as important players, which is in accordance with the key steps highlighted by the immunological models of pathogenesis. We comprehensively summarize the current knowledge about the genetic architecture of CD, characterized by multiple low-risk variants located within diverse loci which are most likely affecting genes with immune-related functions. These findings are leading to a better understanding of CD pathogenesis and helping in the design of new treatments. The repertoire of potential drug targets for CD has largely broadened last years, bringing us closer to get alternative or complementary treatments to the life-long gluten-free diet, the only effective treatment so far. Epigenetics and microbiota are emerging as potent factors modulating disease risk and putatively affecting disease manifestation, which are also being explored as therapeutic targets.

  7. Improving the Specificity of EEG for Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-B. Vialatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. EEG has great potential as a cost-effective screening tool for Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the specificity of EEG is not yet sufficient to be used in clinical practice. In an earlier study, we presented preliminary results suggesting improved specificity of EEG to early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The key to this improvement is a new method for extracting sparse oscillatory events from EEG signals in the time-frequency domain. Here we provide a more detailed analysis, demonstrating improved EEG specificity for clinical screening of MCI (mild cognitive impairment patients. Methods. EEG data was recorded of MCI patients and age-matched control subjects, in rest condition with eyes closed. EEG frequency bands of interest were θ (3.5–7.5 Hz, α1 (7.5–9.5 Hz, α2 (9.5–12.5 Hz, and β (12.5–25 Hz. The EEG signals were transformed in the time-frequency domain using complex Morlet wavelets; the resulting time-frequency maps are represented by sparse bump models. Results. Enhanced EEG power in the θ range is more easily detected through sparse bump modeling; this phenomenon explains the improved EEG specificity obtained in our previous studies. Conclusions. Sparse bump modeling yields informative features in EEG signal. These features increase the specificity of EEG for diagnosing AD.

  8. Detection of specific IgE antibodies in parasite diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza-Atta M.L.B.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of Th1 or Th2 cells is associated with production of specific immunoglobulin isotypes, offering the opportunity to use antibody measurement for evaluation of T cell function. Schistosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis are diseases associated with Th2 activation. However, an IgE response is not always detected in these patients. In the present study we evaluated specific IgE antibodies to S. mansoni and L. chagasi antigens by ELISA after depletion of serum IgG with protein G immobilized on Sepharose beads or RF-absorbent (purified sheep IgG antibodies anti-human IgG. In schistosomiasis patients, specific IgE to SWAP antigen was demonstrable in only 10 of 21 patients (48% (mean absorbance ± SD = 0.102 ± 0.195 when unabsorbed serum was used. Depletion of IgG with protein G increased the number of specific IgE-positive tests to 13 (62% and the use of RF-absorbent increased the number of positive results to 20 (95% (mean absorbances ± SD = 0.303 ± 0.455 and 0.374 ± 0.477, respectively. Specific IgE anti-L. chagasi antibodies were not detected in unabsorbed serum from visceral leishmaniasis patients. When IgG was depleted with protein G, IgE antibodies were detected in only 3 (11% of 27 patients, and the use of RF-absorbent permitted the detection of this isotype in all 27 visceral leishmaniasis sera tested (mean absorbance ± SD = 0.104 ± 0.03. These data show that the presence of IgG antibodies may prevent the detection of a specific IgE response in these parasite diseases. RF-absorbent, a reagent that blocks IgG-binding sites and also removes rheumatoid factor, was more efficient than protein G for the demonstration of specific IgE antibodies.

  9. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes....

  10. Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Lucio; Follo, Matilde Y; Manzoli, Lucia; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipases are widely occurring and can be found in several different organisms, including bacteria, yeast, plants, animals, and viruses. Phospholipase C (PLC) is a class of phospholipases that cleaves phospholipids on the diacylglycerol (DAG) side of the phosphodiester bond producing DAGs and phosphomonoesters. Among PLCs, phosphoinositide-specific PLC (PI-PLC) constitutes an important step in the inositide signaling pathways. The structures of PI-PLC isozymes show conserved domains as well as regulatory specific domains. This is important, as most PI-PLCs share a common mechanism, but each of them has a peculiar role and can have a specific cell distribution that is linked to a specific function. More importantly, the regulation of PLC isozymes is fundamental in health and disease, as there are several PLC-dependent molecular mechanisms that are associated with the activation or inhibition of important physiopathological processes. Moreover, PI-PLC alternative splicing variants can play important roles in complex signaling networks, not only in cancer but also in other diseases. That is why PI-PLC isozymes are now considered as important molecules that are essential for better understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying both physiology and pathogenesis, and are also potential molecular targets useful for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The roles of cognitive and language abilities in predicting decoding and reading comprehension: comparisons of dyslexia and specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Alexandra A; Park, Yujeong; Lombardino, Linda J

    2016-11-15

    This study aimed to (a) explore the roles of cognitive and language variables in predicting reading abilities of two groups of individuals with reading disabilities (i.e., dyslexia and specific language impairment) and (b) examine which variable(s) is the most predictive in differentiating two groups. Inclusion/exclusion criteria applied to categorize the two groups yielded a total of 63 participants (n = 44 for the dyslexia; n = 19 for the specific language impairment). A stepwise multiple regression approach was conducted to examine which cognitive and/or language variables made the largest contribution to reading abilities (i.e., Phonetic Decoding Efficiency, Word Attack, Sight Word Efficiency, and Passage Comprehension). Results revealed that there were significant differences in which measures of cognitive and language ability predicted individuals with dyslexia and speech and language impairments reading ability, showing that the cognitive and language variables underlying their difficulty with reading abilities were not the same across the two groups. A discriminant function analysis showed that a measure of Verbal Comprehension, Phonological Awareness, and Phonetic Decoding Efficiency can be used to differentiate the two groups. These findings support the tenet that dyslexia and specific language impairment are two subgroups of reading disabilities and that thorough diagnostic evaluations are needed to differentiate between these two subgroups. Distinctions of this nature are central to determining the type and intensity of language-based interventions.

  12. The specificity triad: notions of disease and therapeutic specificity in biomedical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulinari, Shai

    2014-10-18

    Biomedicine is typically defined as the branch of medicine that is based on the principles of biology and biochemistry. A central tenet for biomedicine is the notion of disease and therapeutic specificity, i.e. the idea of tailored treatments for discrete disorders underpinned by specific pathologies. The present paper is concerned with how notions of disease and therapeutic specificity guide biomedical reasoning. To that end, the author proposes a model - the specificity triad - that draws on late philosopher and physician Ludwik Fleck's concept of "style of thought" to offer a frame for investigating the intricate process through which links between disorders, mechanisms, and therapeutics are established by biomedicine. Next by applying the specificity triad model to scrutinize research efforts in two discrete areas of medicine-psychiatry and regenerative medicine-this paper seeks to stimulate pertinent discussions in and about biomedicine. These include discussions on the ambiguous epistemic status of psychiatry within contemporary biomedicine, as well as the relationship between developmental biology - historically relatively disjointed from biomedical enterprise - and the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine.

  13. Specific learning disability and its newest definition: which is comprehensive? And which is insufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, David

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association's proposed definition of specific learning disability ("specific learning disorder") for the DSM-5 reflects current thinking and best practice in learning disabilities. It continues the core conceptualization of learning disability (LD) as well as proposes identification criteria to supplant the discredited aptitude-achievement discrepancy formula. Improvements can be found along with long-standing and new controversies about the nature of LD. The proposed definition both provides a model of a currently acceptable definition and reflects critical issues in the operationalization of LD that the field continues to neglect.

  14. Extra-linguistic influences on sentence comprehension in Italian-speaking children with and without specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettenati, P; Benassi, E; Deevy, P; Leonard, L B; Caselli, M C

    2015-01-01

    Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) in sentence comprehension. These deficits are usually attributed to limitations in the children's understanding of syntax or the lexical items contained in the sentences. This study examines the role that extra-linguistic factors can play in these children's sentence comprehension. Extra-linguistic demands on sentence comprehension are manipulated directly by varying the nature of the materials used. Forty-five Italian-speaking children participated: 15 with SLI (mean age = 4;5), 15 typically developing children matched for age (TD-A, mean age = 4;5), and 15 younger typically developing children matched according to language comprehension test scores (TD-Y, mean age = 3;9). The children responded to sentence comprehension items that varied in their length and/or the number and type of foils that competed with the target picture. The TD-A children were more accurate than the TD-Y children and the children with SLI, but, for all groups, accuracy declined when task demands increased. In particular, sentences containing superfluous adjectives (e.g., Il topo bello copre l'uccello allegro, 'The nice mouse covers the happy bird' where all depicted mice were nice and all birds were happy) yielded higher scores than similar sentences in which each adjective had to be associated with the proper character (e.g., Il cane giallo lava il maiale bianco, 'The yellow dog washes the white pig', where foils included a yellow dog washing a pink pig, and a brown dog washing a white pig). Many errors reflected recency effects, probably influenced by the fact that adjectives modifying the object appear at the end of the sentence in Italian. Differences between conditions were observed even when lexical content, syntactic structure and sentence length were controlled. This finding suggests the need for great care when assessing children's comprehension of sentences. The same syntactic structure and lexical content can vary in

  15. Retinopathy of prematurity: A comprehensive risk analysis for prevention and prediction of disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Leah A.; Morrison, Margaux A.; Hoffman, Robert O.; Yoder, Bradley A.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a blinding morbidity of preterm infants. Our current screening criteria have remained unchanged since their inception and lack the ability to identify those at greatest risk. Objectives We sought to comprehensively analyze numerous proposed maternal, infant, and environmental ROP risk variables in a robustly phenotyped population using logistic regression to determine the most predictive model for ROP development and severity. We further sought to determine the statistical interaction between significant ROP risk variables, which has not previously been done in the field of ROP. We hypothesize that our comprehensive analysis will allow for better identification of risk variables that independently correlate with ROP disease. Going forward, this may allow for improved infant risk stratification along a time continuum from prenatal to postnatal development, making prevention more feasible. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of preterm infants referred for ROP screening in one neonatal intensive care unit from 2010–2015. The primary outcome measure was presence of ROP. Secondary outcome measures were ROP requiring treatment and severe ROP not clearly meeting current treatment criteria. Univariate, stepwise regression and statistical interaction analyses of 57 proposed ROP risk variables was performed to identify variables which were significantly associated with each outcome measure. Results We identified 457 infants meeting our inclusion criteria. Within this cohort, numerous factors showed a significant individual association with our ROP outcome measures; however, stepwise regression analysis found the most predictive model for overall ROP risk included estimated gestational age, birth weight, the need for any surgery, and maternal magnesium prophylaxis. The corresponding Area Under the Curve (AUC) for this model was 0.8641, while the traditional model of gestational age and birth weight predicted

  16. Comprehension and Production of Noun Compounds by Estonian Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrik, Marika; Tamtik, Merli

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined how 12 Estonian-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 60 children with normal speech development (ND) comprehended compound nouns with differing sequence of the components (first task) and how they produced compound nouns to label genuine and accidental categories by using analogy (second task) and…

  17. Breast cancer screening outreach effectiveness: Mammogram-specific reminders vs. comprehensive preventive services birthday letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Diana S M; Gao, Hongyuan; Anderson, Melissa L; Onega, Tracy; Brandzel, Susan; Rabelhofer, Melissa A; Bradford, Susan Carol; Aiello Bowles, Erin J

    2017-09-01

    We compared the effectiveness of two outreach strategies on timely mammography adherence: a mammogram-specific reminder letter (sent just before a woman was due) to a birthday letter (addresses multiple preventive services and not timed around due dates). We evaluated screening mammography adherence following 79,848 mammogram-specific and 151,626 birthday letters mailed between 2002 and 2012 to women aged 40-74years enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Washington. Screening mammogram adherence was specifically tied to due date and was evaluated separately by age group and up-to-date or overdue status at the time of mailing. We used generalized estimating equations to account for correlation between repeated observations, to model the odds of screening mammography adherence by letter type. Among women up-to-date, adherence following birthday letters was 22-76% lower compared to the mammogram-specific reminders, with the greatest decreases in adherence in women aged 70-74. Birthday letters were more effective at activating screening uptake among some subgroups of overdue women aged 50-69 and most overdue women aged 70-74, but universally low adherence rates were observed in overdue women. Increasing number of recommended services for women aged 50-74 who were up-to-date resulted in 12-17% lower mammography adherence, but had no effect in women aged 40-49 or in overdue women. Birthday letters are less effective than mammogram-specific reminder letters at prompting women to undergo timely breast cancer screening, particularly among women up-to-date with screening. Birthday letters may be effective at increasing overall preventive care; however, supplemental outreach may be needed around the due date to increase timely preventive services receipt. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel specific microRNA biomarkers in idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease unrelated to disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingmei; Welker, Noah C; Zhao, Zijin; Li, Yong; Zhang, Jianjun; Reuss, Sarah A; Zhang, Xinjun; Lee, Hwajeong; Liu, Yunlong; Bronner, Mary P

    2014-04-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease can be challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate protein synthesis through post-transcriptional suppression. This study is to identify new miRNA markers in inflammatory bowel disease, and to examine whether miRNA biomarkers might assist in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Illumina small RNA sequencing was performed on non-dysplastic fresh-frozen colonic mucosa samples of the distalmost colectomy tissue from 19 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (10 ulcerative colitis and 9 Crohn disease) and 18 patients with diverticular disease serving as controls. To determine differentially expressed miRNAs, the USeq software package identified 44 miRNAs with altered expression (fold change ≥ 2 and false discovery rate ≤ 0.10) compared with the controls. Among them, a panel of nine miRNAs was aberrantly expressed in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease. Validation assays performed using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) on additional frozen tissue from ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and control groups confirmed specific differential expression in inflammatory bowel disease for miR-31, miR-206, miR-424, and miR-146a (Pdisease controls (n=29), ulcerative colitis (n=36), Crohn disease (n=26), and the other diseases mimicking inflammatory bowel disease including infectious colitis (n=12) and chronic ischemic colitis (n=19), again confirming increased expression specific to inflammatory bowel disease (Pdisease. Furthermore, miR-31 is universally expressed in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease not only in fresh-frozen but also in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

  19. Physiotherapy scoliosis-specific exercises – a comprehensive review of seven major schools

    OpenAIRE

    Berdishevsky, Hagit; Lebel, Victoria Ashley; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette; Rigo, Manuel; Lebel, Andrea; Hennes, Axel; Romano, Michele; Białek, Marianna; M’hango, Andrzej; Betts, Tony; de Mauroy, Jean Claude; Durmala, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a call for change among all stakeholders involved in scoliosis management. Parents of children with scoliosis have complained about the so-called “wait and see” approach that far too many doctors use when evaluating children’s scoliosis curves between 10° and 25°. Observation, Physiotherapy Scoliosis Specific Exercises (PSSE) and bracing for idiopathic scoliosis during growth are all therapeutic interventions accepted by the 2011 International Society on Scol...

  20. Comprehensive Population-Specific Marker Panel for Early Prostate Cancer Diagnostics and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    classes, and wrote manuscripts and grants. For the research part, we hypothesized that a combination panel (DETECT) of genetic biomechanical, socio...cultural and lifestyle population specific biomarkers and factors will provided a valuable PCa screening and risk assessment tool. The PI genotyped 528...significantly associated with prostate cancer risk associated with one of the SNPs in African American men was found in obese men only; if was not

  1. [Specific care plan in different stages of Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Christophe; Villars, Hélène; Nourhashemi, Fati

    2011-09-01

    The management and follow-up of patients with Alzheimers disease have stage-specific characteristics. In the mild stage, the key challenges are above all to improve the early diagnosis and the communication of the diagnosis. With the patient's agreement, a follow-up should be scheduled to assess, at each stage of the disease, cognitive and functional decline, and detect psycho-behavioral, nutritional or mobility complications. In the moderate or severe stages, prevention and treatment of caregiver burnout should be included in the follow-up. Finally, in the very severe stage, end of life and ethical issues should be considered. The followup and the intervention plan should be adapted to each patient, and require coordination between health care professionals and social workers. However, the practical aspects of the follow-up and the ways in which those can be improved are yet to be defined.

  2. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  3. Intervention for Improving Comprehension in 4-6 Year Old Children with Specific Language Impairment: Practicing Inferencing Is a Good Thing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, Chantal; Nadeau, Line; Trudeau, Natacha; Filiatrault-Veilleux, Pamela; Maxes-Fournier, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Few studies report on therapy to improve language comprehension in children with specific language impairment (SLI). We address this gap by measuring the effect of a systematic intervention to improve inferential comprehension using dialogic reading tasks in conjunction with pre-determined questions and cues. Sixteen children with a diagnosis of…

  4. [Is coronary artery spasm a disease specific to women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halna du Fretay, X; Bouzid, M A; Blanchard-Lemoine, B; Benamer, H

    2016-12-01

    Vasospastic angina is considered rare in Europe but with a prevalence probably underestimated and affects preferentially men in published studies, mostly involving Asian populations. Vasospastic angina in the female population have specificities in terms of pathophysiology, clinical presentation and prognosis, as well as diagnostic strategies currently recommended, that we describe from a clinical case. Although known for over 50years, vasospastic angina remains a disease still insufficiently researched, probably even less in women. This form of angina must not however be forgotten, and the appropriate diagnostic strategy must be known and used to improve prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiotherapy scoliosis-specific exercises - a comprehensive review of seven major schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdishevsky, Hagit; Lebel, Victoria Ashley; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette; Rigo, Manuel; Lebel, Andrea; Hennes, Axel; Romano, Michele; Białek, Marianna; M'hango, Andrzej; Betts, Tony; de Mauroy, Jean Claude; Durmala, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a call for change among all stakeholders involved in scoliosis management. Parents of children with scoliosis have complained about the so-called "wait and see" approach that far too many doctors use when evaluating children's scoliosis curves between 10° and 25°. Observation, Physiotherapy Scoliosis Specific Exercises (PSSE) and bracing for idiopathic scoliosis during growth are all therapeutic interventions accepted by the 2011 International Society on Scoliosis Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT). The standard features of these interventions are: 1) 3-dimension self-correction; 2) Training activities of daily living (ADL); and 3) Stabilization of the corrected posture. PSSE is part of a scoliosis care model that includes scoliosis specific education, scoliosis specific physical therapy exercises, observation or surveillance, psychological support and intervention, bracing and surgery. The model is oriented to the patient. Diagnosis and patient evaluation is essential in this model looking at a patient-oriented decision according to clinical experience, scientific evidence and patient's preference. Thus, specific exercises are not considered as an alternative to bracing or surgery but as a therapeutic intervention, which can be used alone or in combination with bracing or surgery according to individual indication. In the PSSE model it is recommended that the physical therapist work as part of a multidisciplinary team including the orthopeadic doctor, the orthotist, and the mental health care provider - all are according to the SOSORT guidelines and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) philosophy. From clinical experiences, PSSE can temporarily stabilize progressive scoliosis curves during the secondary period of progression, more than a year after passing the peak of growth. In non-progressive scoliosis, the regular practice of PSSE could produce a temporary and significant reduction of the Cobb angle. PSSE can also

  6. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease based on disease-specific autoantibody profiles in human sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Nagele

    Full Text Available After decades of Alzheimer's disease (AD research, the development of a definitive diagnostic test for this disease has remained elusive. The discovery of blood-borne biomarkers yielding an accurate and relatively non-invasive test has been a primary goal. Using human protein microarrays to characterize the differential expression of serum autoantibodies in AD and non-demented control (NDC groups, we identified potential diagnostic biomarkers for AD. The differential significance of each biomarker was evaluated, resulting in the selection of only 10 autoantibody biomarkers that can effectively differentiate AD sera from NDC sera with a sensitivity of 96.0% and specificity of 92.5%. AD sera were also distinguishable from sera obtained from patients with Parkinson's disease and breast cancer with accuracies of 86% and 92%, respectively. Results demonstrate that serum autoantibodies can be used effectively as highly-specific and accurate biomarkers to diagnose AD throughout the course of the disease.

  7. Specific circulating immune complexes in acute chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Corral

    1987-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of circulating immune complexes formed by IgM and IgG (CIC-IgM and CIC-IgG was investigated, using antigen-specific enzyme-immunoassays (ELISA, in 30 patients with acute Chagas' disease who showed parasitemia and inoculation chagoma. Control population consisted of patients with chronic T. cruzi infection (30, acute toxoplasmosis 10, leishmaniasis (8, rheumatoid arthritis (3 and healthy individuals with negative serology for Chagas* disease (30. Acute chagasic patients were 100% CIC-IgG and 96.66% CIC-IgM positive whereas immunofluorescence tests yielded 90% and 86.66% of positivity for specific IgG and IgM antibodies, respectively. Chronic patients were 68% CIC-IgG and 0% CIC-IgM positive. The 30 negative and the 21 cross-reaction controls proved negative for ELISA (CIC-IgM and CIC-IgG. The high sensitivity of ELISA assays would allow early immunologic diagnosis, as well as prompt treatment, of acute T. cruzi infection, thus eliminating the problem of the false-positive and false-negative results which affects traditional methods for detection of circulating antibodies.

  8. Systematic comprehensive techno-economic assessment of solar cooling technologies using location-specific climate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtar, Marwan; Ali, Muhammad Tauha; Sgouridis, Sgouris; Armstrong, Peter; Chiesa, Matteo [Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Braeuniger, Simon; Afshari, Afshin [Masdar, Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-12-15

    A methodology for assessing solar cooling technologies is proposed. The method takes into account location specific boundary conditions such as the cooling demand time series, solar resource availability, climatic conditions, component cost and component performance characteristics. This methodology evaluates the techno-economic performance of the solar collector/chiller system. We demonstrate the method by systematic evaluation of 25 feasible combinations of solar energy collection and cooling technologies. The comparison includes solar thermal and solar electric cooling options and is extended to solar cooling through concentrated solar power plants. Solar cooling technologies are compared on an economic and overall system efficiency perspective. This analysis has implication for the importance of solar load fraction and storage size in the design of solar cooling systems. We also stress the importance of studying the relation between cooling demand and solar resource availability, it was found that overlooking this relation might lead to overestimations of the potential of a solar cooling system in the range of 22% to over 100% of the actual potential. (author)

  9. Sleep and awakening disorders in Parkinson’s disease: comprehensive approach to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Romanovna Nodel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the specific features of the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of sleep and awakening disorders in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. It covers the current views of the role of chronobiological mechanisms in the regulation of sleep and awakening in PD. Major approaches to therapy for insomnia, para-, and hypersomnia in these patients are discussed. Data on the efficacy of melatonin in sleep and awakening disorders are given.

  10. A new method for discovering disease-specific MiRNA-target regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Baglioni

    Full Text Available Genes and their expression regulation are among the key factors in the comprehension of the genesis and development of complex diseases. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators that play an important role in gene expression since they are frequently deregulated in pathologies like cardiovascular disease and cancer. In vitro validation of miRNA--targets regulation is often too expensive and time consuming to be carried out for every possible alternative. As a result, a tool able to provide some criteria to prioritize trials is becoming a pressing need. Moreover, before planning in vitro experiments, the scientist needs to evaluate the miRNA-target genes interaction network. In this paper we describe the miRable method whose purpose is to identify new potentially relevant genes and their interaction networks associate to a specific pathology. To achieve this goal miRable follows a system biology approach integrating together general-purpose medical knowledge (literature, Protein-Protein Interaction networks, prediction tools and pathology specific data (gene expression data. A case study on Prostate Cancer has shown that miRable is able to: 1 find new potential miRNA-targets pairs, 2 highlight novel genes potentially involved in a disease but never or little studied before, 3 reconstruct all possible regulatory subnetworks starting from the literature to expand the knowledge on the regulation of miRNA regulatory mechanisms.

  11. A new method for discovering disease-specific MiRNA-target regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Miriam; Russo, Francesco; Geraci, Filippo; Rizzo, Milena; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Pellegrini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Genes and their expression regulation are among the key factors in the comprehension of the genesis and development of complex diseases. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators that play an important role in gene expression since they are frequently deregulated in pathologies like cardiovascular disease and cancer. In vitro validation of miRNA--targets regulation is often too expensive and time consuming to be carried out for every possible alternative. As a result, a tool able to provide some criteria to prioritize trials is becoming a pressing need. Moreover, before planning in vitro experiments, the scientist needs to evaluate the miRNA-target genes interaction network. In this paper we describe the miRable method whose purpose is to identify new potentially relevant genes and their interaction networks associate to a specific pathology. To achieve this goal miRable follows a system biology approach integrating together general-purpose medical knowledge (literature, Protein-Protein Interaction networks, prediction tools) and pathology specific data (gene expression data). A case study on Prostate Cancer has shown that miRable is able to: 1) find new potential miRNA-targets pairs, 2) highlight novel genes potentially involved in a disease but never or little studied before, 3) reconstruct all possible regulatory subnetworks starting from the literature to expand the knowledge on the regulation of miRNA regulatory mechanisms.

  12. Specific toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy to the central chest. A comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskan, Feras; Becker, Gerd; Bleif, Martin [Alb-Fils Kliniken GmbH, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goeppingen (Germany); CyberKnife Suedwest Centre, Radiochirurgicum, Goeppingen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy in the central chest remains an unsettled issue. The collected data concerning the observed complications are poorly understood and are limited in their quantity and quality, thus hampering a precise delineation of treatment-specific toxicity. The majority of complications scored as toxicity grade 5, namely respiratory failure and fatal hemoptysis, are most likely related to multiple competing risks and occurred at different dose fractionation schemas, e. g., 10-12 fractions of 4-5 Gy, 5 fractions of 10 Gy, 3 fractions of 20-22 Gy, and 1 fraction of 15-30 Gy. Further investigations with longer follow-up and more details of patients' pretreatment and tumor characteristics are required. Furthermore, satisfactory documentation of complications and details of dosimetric parameters, as well as limitation of the wide range of possible fractionation schemes is also warranted for a better understanding of the risk factors relevant for macroscopic damage to the serially organized anatomic structure within the central chest. (orig.) [German] Das Risiko fuer schwere Nebenwirkungen der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie bei zentralen Lungentumoren ist bisher schlecht definiert. Nicht nur die begrenzte Zahl der dokumentierten Ereignisse, sondern auch die Vielzahl der verwendeten Fraktionierungsschemata erschwert das Herausarbeiten valider prognostischer Faktoren. Auf Basis dieser Datenlage laesst sich das Risiko fuer Grad-5-Toxizitaeten, insbesondere Atemversagen und toedliche Blutungen, kaum einem bestimmten Dosis- oder Fraktionierungsschema, wie z. B. 10-12 Fraktionen mit 4-5 Gy, 5 Fraktionen mit 10 Gy, 3 Fraktionen mit 20-22 Gy und 1 Fraktion mit 15-30 Gy zuordnen, da multiple patientenspezifische, konkurrierende Risiken dabei einen wesentlichen Einfluss zu haben scheinen. Es wird zukuenftig erforderlich sein, praetherapeutische Patienten- und Tumorcharakteristika genauer zu erfassen, dosimetrische Parameter besser zu

  13. Molecular and clinical dissection of CD24 antibody specificity by a comprehensive comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Glen; Machado, Eda; Bretz, Niko; Rupp, Christian; Winzer, Klaus-Jürgen; König, Anne-Kathleen; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Marmé, Frederik; Costa, Julia; Altevogt, Peter

    2010-07-01

    CD24 is a small, highly glycosylated cell surface protein that is linked to the membrane through a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. It is overexpressed in many human carcinomas and its expression is linked to bad prognosis. Lately, lack or low expression of CD24 was used to identify tumor stem cells resulting in conflicting data on the usefulness of this marker. In many immunohistochemical studies, the mAb SN3b was used but the epitope and specificity of this antibody have never been thoroughly investigated. In other studies based mainly on cytofluorographic analysis, the mAb ML-5 was applied. In this study, we compared the epitope of mAb SN3b to the CD24 mAbs SWA-11 and ML-5 that both bind to the core protein of CD24. Using tissue microarrays and affinity-purified CD24 glycoforms, we observed only a partial overlap of SN3b and SWA11 reactivity. The mAb SN3b recognizes sialic acid most likely on O-linked glycans that can occur independently of the CD24 protein backbone. The SN3b epitope was not related to common sialylated cancer-associated glycan structures. Both SN3b epitope positive or negative CD24 glycoforms supported the binding of P-selectin and Siglec-5. In breast cancer, the SN3b reactivity was associated with bad prognosis, whereas SWA11 was not. In renal cell cancer, the SN3b epitope was completely absent but SWA11 reactivity was a prognostic factor. Our results shed new light on the tumorbiological role of CD24 and resolve discrepancies in the literature related to the use of different CD24 mAbs.

  14. Disease-specific alterations in the enteric virome in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jason M; Handley, Scott A; Baldridge, Megan T; Droit, Lindsay; Liu, Catherine Y; Keller, Brian C; Kambal, Amal; Monaco, Cynthia L; Zhao, Guoyan; Fleshner, Phillip; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; McGovern, Dermot P B; Keshavarzian, Ali; Mutlu, Ece A; Sauk, Jenny; Gevers, Dirk; Xavier, Ramnik J; Wang, David; Parkes, Miles; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-29

    Decreases in the diversity of enteric bacterial populations are observed in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Less is known about the virome in these diseases. We show that the enteric virome is abnormal in CD and UC patients. In-depth analysis of preparations enriched for free virions in the intestine revealed that CD and UC were associated with a significant expansion of Caudovirales bacteriophages. The viromes of CD and UC patients were disease and cohort specific. Importantly, it did not appear that expansion and diversification of the enteric virome was secondary to changes in bacterial populations. These data support a model in which changes in the virome may contribute to intestinal inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis. We conclude that the virome is a candidate for contributing to, or being a biomarker for, human inflammatory bowel disease and speculate that the enteric virome may play a role in other diseases.

  15. Human keratin diseases: hereditary fragility of specific epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corden, L D; McLean, W H

    1996-12-01

    Keratins are heteropolymeric proteins which form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in epithelial cells. Since 1991, mutations in several keratin genes have been found to cause a variety of human diseases affecting the epidermis and other epithelial structures. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was the first mechanobullous disease for which the underlying genetic lesion was found, with mutations in both the K5 and K14 genes rendering basal epidermal keratinocytes less resilient to trauma, resulting in skin fragility. The site of mutation in the keratin protein correlates with phenotypic severity in this disorder. Since mutations were identified in the basal cell keratins, the total number of keratin genes associated with diseases has risen to eleven. The rod domains of suprabasal keratins K1 and K10 are mutated in bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (BCIE; also called epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, EH) and mosaicism for K1/K10 mutations results in a nevoid distribution of EH. An unusual mutation in the VI domain of K1 has also been found to cause diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (DNEPPK). Mutations in palmoplantar specific keratin K9 cause epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) and mutations in the late differentiation suprabasal keratin K2e cause ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). In the last year or so, mutations were discovered in differentiation specific keratins K6a and K16 causing pachyonychia congenita type 1 and K17 mutations occur in pachyonychia congenita type 2. K16 and K17 mutations have also been reported to produce phenotypes with little or no nail changes: K16 mutations can present as focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) and K17 mutations can result in a phenotype resembling steatocystoma multiplex. Recently, mutation of mucosal keratin pair K4 and K13 has been shown to underlie white sponge nevus (WSN). This year, the first mutations in a keratin-associated protein, plectin, were shown to

  16. Are NOD2 polymorphisms linked to a specific disease endophenotype of Crohn's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2011-01-01

    specific properties such as AIEC. Increasing the focus on defining subgroups of patients with similar disease initiations, mechanisms of action, and manifestations in CD may be pivotal for the development and implementation of future individualized treatment strategies of benefit for the single patient...

  17. ADO: a disease ontology representing the domain knowledge specific to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ashutosh; Younesi, Erfan; Gündel, Michaela; Müller, Bernd; Heneka, Michael T; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Biomedical ontologies offer the capability to structure and represent domain-specific knowledge semantically. Disease-specific ontologies can facilitate knowledge exchange across multiple disciplines, and ontology-driven mining approaches can generate great value for modeling disease mechanisms. However, in the case of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, there is a lack of formal representation of the relevant knowledge domain. Alzheimer's disease ontology (ADO) is constructed in accordance to the ontology building life cycle. The Protégé OWL editor was used as a tool for building ADO in Ontology Web Language format. ADO was developed with the purpose of containing information relevant to four main biological views-preclinical, clinical, etiological, and molecular/cellular mechanisms-and was enriched by adding synonyms and references. Validation of the lexicalized ontology by means of named entity recognition-based methods showed a satisfactory performance (F score = 72%). In addition to structural and functional evaluation, a clinical expert in the field performed a manual evaluation and curation of ADO. Through integration of ADO into an information retrieval environment, we show that the ontology supports semantic search in scientific text. The usefulness of ADO is authenticated by dedicated use case scenarios. Development of ADO as an open ADO is a first attempt to organize information related to Alzheimer's disease in a formalized, structured manner. We demonstrate that ADO is able to capture both established and scattered knowledge existing in scientific text. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Proceedings of a Sickle Cell Disease Ontology workshop - Towards the first comprehensive ontology for Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola; Nembaware, Victoria; Adekile, Adekunle; Anie, Kofi A; Inusa, Baba; Brown, Biobele; Campbell, Andrew; Chinenere, Furahini; Chunda-Liyoka, Catherine; Derebail, Vimal K; Geard, Amy; Ghedira, Kais; Hamilton, Carol M; Hanchard, Neil A; Haendel, Melissa; Huggins, Wayne; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Jupp, Simon; Kamga, Karen Kengne; Knight-Madden, Jennifer; Lopez-Sall, Philomène; Mbiyavanga, Mamana; Munube, Deogratias; Nirenberg, Damian; Nnodu, Obiageli; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon Fiifi; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Opap, Kenneth Babu; Panji, Sumir; Park, Miriam; Pule, Gift; Royal, Charmaine; Sangeda, Raphael; Tayo, Bamidele; Treadwell, Marsha; Tshilolo, Léon; Wonkam, Ambroise

    2016-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a debilitating single gene disorder caused by a single point mutation that results in physical deformation (i.e. sickling) of erythrocytes at reduced oxygen tensions. Up to 75% of SCD in newborns world-wide occurs in sub-Saharan Africa, where neonatal and childhood mortality from sickle cell related complications is high. While SCD research across the globe is tackling the disease on multiple fronts, advances have yet to significantly impact on the health and quality of life of SCD patients, due to lack of coordination of these disparate efforts. Ensuring data across studies is directly comparable through standardization is a necessary step towards realizing this goal. Such a standardization requires the development and implementation of a disease-specific ontology for SCD that is applicable globally. Ontology development is best achieved by bringing together experts in the domain to contribute their knowledge. The SCD community and H3ABioNet members joined forces at a recent SCD Ontology workshop to develop an ontology covering aspects of SCD under the classes: phenotype, diagnostics, therapeutics, quality of life, disease modifiers and disease stage. The aim of the workshop was for participants to contribute their expertise to development of the structure and contents of the SCD ontology. Here we describe the proceedings of the Sickle Cell Disease Ontology Workshop held in Cape Town South Africa in February 2016 and its outcomes. The objective of the workshop was to bring together experts in SCD from around the world to contribute their expertise to the development of various aspects of the SCD ontology.

  19. Specific schistosomiasis treatment as a strategy for disease control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The great hope for schistosomiasis treatment began with the development of oxamniquine and praziquantel. These drugs can be administered orally in a single dose and have a high curative power with minor side effects. In this study, we carried out a field experiment involving a population of 3,782 people. The population was examined at four localities in Minas Gerais within the valleys of the Doce and Jequitinhonha Rivers. In this cohort, there were 1,790 patients infected with Schistosoma mansoni (47.3% and we showed that only 1,403 (78.4% could be treated with oxamniquine in a single dose of 12.5-20 mg/kg orally. The other 387 (21.6% were not treated during the first stage because of contraindications (pregnancy or impeditive diseases, absences or refusals. It was observed that, on average, 8.8-17% of the infected patients continued to excrete S. mansoni eggs at the end of the 2nd month after treatment and 30-32% of the cohort was infected by the end of the 24th month. In one of the areas that we followed-up for a total of 30 years, the prevalence of the infection with S. mansoni fell from 60.8-19.3% and the hepatosplenic form of the disease dropped from 5.8-1.3%. We conclude that specific treatment of schistosomiasis reduces the prevalence of infection in the short-term and the morbidity due to schistosomiasis in medium to long-term time frames, but does not help to control disease transmission.

  20. Comprehensive research synopsis and systematic meta-analyses in Parkinson's disease genetics: The PDGene database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Lill

    Full Text Available More than 800 published genetic association studies have implicated dozens of potential risk loci in Parkinson's disease (PD. To facilitate the interpretation of these findings, we have created a dedicated online resource, PDGene, that comprehensively collects and meta-analyzes all published studies in the field. A systematic literature screen of -27,000 articles yielded 828 eligible articles from which relevant data were extracted. In addition, individual-level data from three publicly available genome-wide association studies (GWAS were obtained and subjected to genotype imputation and analysis. Overall, we performed meta-analyses on more than seven million polymorphisms originating either from GWAS datasets and/or from smaller scale PD association studies. Meta-analyses on 147 SNPs were supplemented by unpublished GWAS data from up to 16,452 PD cases and 48,810 controls. Eleven loci showed genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10(-8 association with disease risk: BST1, CCDC62/HIP1R, DGKQ/GAK, GBA, LRRK2, MAPT, MCCC1/LAMP3, PARK16, SNCA, STK39, and SYT11/RAB25. In addition, we identified novel evidence for genome-wide significant association with a polymorphism in ITGA8 (rs7077361, OR 0.88, P  =  1.3 × 10(-8. All meta-analysis results are freely available on a dedicated online database (www.pdgene.org, which is cross-linked with a customized track on the UCSC Genome Browser. Our study provides an exhaustive and up-to-date summary of the status of PD genetics research that can be readily scaled to include the results of future large-scale genetics projects, including next-generation sequencing studies.

  1. German guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery disease - a comprehensive update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawall, Holger; Huppert, Peter; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Zemmrich, Claudia Silke; Ruemenapf, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) is increasing worldwide and is strongly age-related, affecting about 20 % of Germans over 70 years of age. Recent advances in endovascular and surgical techniques as well as clinical study results on comparative treatment methods strengthened the need for a comprehensive review of the published evidence for diagnosis, management, and prevention of PAD. The interdisciplinary guideline exclusively covers distal aorta and atherosclerotic lower extremity artery disease. A systematic literature review and formal consensus finding process, including delegated members of 22 medical societies and two patient self-support organisations were conducted and supervised by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany, AWMF. Three levels of recommendation were defined, A = "is recommended/indicated", B = "should be considered", C = "may be considered", means agreement of expert opinions due to lack of evidence. Altogether 294 articles, including 34 systematic reviews and 98 RCTs have been analysed. The key diagnostic tools and treatment basics have been defined. In patients with intermittent claudication endovascular and/or surgical techniques are treatment options depending on appropriate individual morphology and patient preference. In critical limb ischaemia, revascularisation without delay by means of the most appropriate technique is key. If possible and reasonable, endovascular procedures should be applied first. The TASC classification is no longer recommended as the base of therapeutic decision process due to advances in endovascular techniques and new crural therapeutic options. Limited new data on rehabilitation and follow-up therapies have been integrated. The article summarises major new aspects of PAD treatment from the updated German Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of PAD. Limited scientific evidence still calls for randomised clinical trials to close the present gap of evidence.

  2. Comprehensive Review of the Literature on Existing Punctal Plugs for the Management of Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehangir, Naz; Bever, Greg; Mahmood, S M Jafar; Moshirfar, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Numerous designs of punctal and canalicular plugs are available on the market. This variety presents challenges to ophthalmologists when choosing punctal plugs for the management of various ocular conditions. The aim of this literature review is to provide a classification system for lacrimal occlusive devices based on their location and duration of action as well as to identify different characteristics of each one of them. We want to give a comprehensive overview on punctal and canalicular plugs including their manufacturing companies, indications, and complications that have been reported in various articles. PubMed and Google Scholar were used to identify articles written in English as well as few articles written in Japanese, Chinese, Slovak, and Spanish that had abstracts in English. Nine different companies that manufacture punctal and canalicular plugs were identified and their plugs were included in this review. Punctal and canalicular plugs are used in the management of various ocular conditions including dry eye disease and punctal stenosis as well as in ocular drug delivery. Although they are a relatively safe option, associated complications have been reported in the literature such as infection, allergic reaction, extrusion, and migration.

  3. Comprehensive Review of the Literature on Existing Punctal Plugs for the Management of Dry Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naz Jehangir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous designs of punctal and canalicular plugs are available on the market. This variety presents challenges to ophthalmologists when choosing punctal plugs for the management of various ocular conditions. The aim of this literature review is to provide a classification system for lacrimal occlusive devices based on their location and duration of action as well as to identify different characteristics of each one of them. We want to give a comprehensive overview on punctal and canalicular plugs including their manufacturing companies, indications, and complications that have been reported in various articles. PubMed and Google Scholar were used to identify articles written in English as well as few articles written in Japanese, Chinese, Slovak, and Spanish that had abstracts in English. Nine different companies that manufacture punctal and canalicular plugs were identified and their plugs were included in this review. Punctal and canalicular plugs are used in the management of various ocular conditions including dry eye disease and punctal stenosis as well as in ocular drug delivery. Although they are a relatively safe option, associated complications have been reported in the literature such as infection, allergic reaction, extrusion, and migration.

  4. Chronic phase of Chagas disease: why should it be treated? A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis and evolutive pattern of Chagas disease suggests that the chronic phase should be more widely treated in order to (i eliminate Trypanosoma cruzi and prevent new inflammatory foci and the extension of tissue lesions, (ii promote tissue regeneration to prevent fibrosis, (iii reverse existing fibrosis, (iv prevent cardiomyopathy, megaoesophagus and megacolon and (v reduce or eliminate cardiac block and arrhythmia. All cases of the indeterminate chronic form of Chagas disease without contraindications due to other concomitant diseases or pregnancy should be treated and not only cases involving children or recently infected cases. Patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy grade II of the New York Heart Association classification should be treated with specific chemotherapy and grade III can be treated according to medical-patient decisions. We are proposing the following new strategies for chemotherapeutic treatment of the chronic phase of Chagas disease: (i repeated short-term treatments for 30 consecutive days and interval of 30-60 days for six months to one year and (ii combinations of drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as benznidazole + nifurtimox, benznidazole or nifurtimox + allopurinol or triazole antifungal agents, inhibition of sterol synthesis.

  5. Are NOD2 polymorphisms linked to a specific disease endophenotype of Crohn's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Brix, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The complex and yet unknown etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) might consist of various disease endophenotypes, each of which represent their own pathogenesis. This review focuses on the disease endophenotype linked to polymorphisms in the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2...... is not yet clarified. The enhanced number of pathogenic E. coli in the ileal mucosa of CD as compared to healthy controls may result from a genetically based failure in one of the intestinal bacteria sensing systems, like NOD2, making the ileal epithelium more prone to colonization with microbes harboring...... specific properties such as AIEC. Increasing the focus on defining subgroups of patients with similar disease initiations, mechanisms of action, and manifestations in CD may be pivotal for the development and implementation of future individualized treatment strategies of benefit for the single patient...

  6. Hepatic Differentiation of Murine Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Allows Disease Modelling In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Eggenschwiler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent cells by retrovirus-mediated expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and C-MYC is a promising approach to derive disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In this study, we focused on three murine models for metabolic liver disorders: the copper storage disorder Wilson's disease (toxic-milk mice, tyrosinemia type 1 (fumarylacetoacetate-hydrolase deficiency, FAH−/− mice, and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ mice. Colonies of iPSCs emerged 2-3 weeks after transduction of fibroblasts, prepared from each mouse strain, and were maintained as individual iPSC lines. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated the expression of endogenous pluripotency markers. Hepatic precursor cells could be derived from these disease-specific iPSCs applying an in vitro differentiation protocol and could be visualized after transduction of a lentiviral albumin-GFP reporter construct. Functional characterization of these cells allowed the recapitulation of the disease phenotype for further studies of underlying molecular mechanisms of the respective disease.

  7. TLR2 and TLR4 in autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Yin, Heng; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune diseases are immune disorders characterized by T cell hyperactivity and B cell overstimulation leading to overproduction of autoantibodies. Although the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases remains to be elucidated, environmental factors have been thought to contribute to the initiation and maintenance of auto-respond inflammation. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors belonging to innate immunity that recognize and defend invading microorganisms. Besides these exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns, TLRs can also bind with damage-associated molecular patterns produced under strike or by tissue damage or cells apoptosis. It is believed that TLRs build a bridge between innate immunity and autoimmunity. There are five adaptors to TLRs including MyD88, TRIF, TIRAP/MAL, TRAM, and SARM. Upon activation, TLRs recruit specific adaptors to initiate the downstream signaling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Under certain circumstances, ligation of TLRs drives to aberrant activation and unrestricted inflammatory responses, thereby contributing to the perpetuation of inflammation in autoimmune diseases. In the past, most studies focused on the intracellular TLRs, such as TLR3, TLR7, and TLR9, but recent studies reveal that cell surface TLRs, especially TLR2 and TLR4, also play an essential role in the development of autoimmune diseases and afford multiple therapeutic targets. In this review, we summarized the biological characteristics, signaling mechanisms of TLR2/4, the negative regulators of TLR2/4 pathway, and the pivotal function of TLR2/4 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes.

  8. Comprehensive longitudinal analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T cell responses during acute HCV infection in the presence of existing HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.S.B. van den Berg; T.A. Ruys; N.M. Nanlohy; S.E. Geerlings; J.T. van der Meer; J.W. Mulder; J.A. Lange; D. van Baarle

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the development of HCV-specific T cell immunity during acute HCV infection in the presence of an existing HIV-1 infection in four HIV-1 infected men having sex with men. A comprehensive analysis of HCV-specific T cell responses was performed at two time points duri

  9. Global, regional, and national age-sex specific mortality for 264 causes of death, 1980-2016 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring levels and trends in premature mortality is crucial to understanding how societies can address prominent sources of early death. The Global Burden of Disease 2016 Study (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of cause-specific mortality for 264 causes in 195 locations

  10. Global, regional, and national age-sex specific mortality for 264 causes of death, 1980-2016 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naghavi, Mohsen; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu; Abbafati, Cristiana; Abbas, Kaja M.; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Aboyans, Victor; Adetokunboh, Olatunji; Arnlov, Johan; Afshin, Ashkan; Agrawal, Anurag; Kiadaliri, Aliasghar Ahmad; Ahmadi, Alireza; Ahmed, Muktar Beshir; Aichour, Amani Nidhal; Aichour, Ibtihel; Aichour, Miloud Taki Eddine; Aiyar, Sneha; Al-Eyadhy, Ayman; Alahdab, Fares; Al-Aly, Ziyad; Alam, Khurshid; Alam, Noore; Alam, Tahiya; Alene, Kefyalew Addis; Ali, Syed Danish; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza; Alkaabi, Juma M.; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Alla, Francois; Allebeck, Peter; Allen, Christine; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Alsharif, Ubai; Altirkawi, Khalid A.; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Amini, Erfan; Ammar, Walid; Amoako, Yaw Ampem; Anber, Nahla; Andersen, Hjalte H.; Andrei, Catalina Liliana; Androudi, Sofia; Ansari, Hossein; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T.; Anwari, Palwasha; Arora, Megha; Artaman, Al; Aryal, Krishna Kumar; Asayesh, Hamid; Asgedom, Solomon W.; Atey, Tesfay Mehari; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Avokpaho, Euripide Frinel G. Arthur; Awasthi, Ashish; Paulina, Beatriz; Quintanilla, Ayala; Bejot, Yannick; Babalola, Tesleem Kayode; Bacha, Umar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Barac, Aleksandra; Barboza, Miguel A.; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L.; Barquera, Simon; Barregard, Lars; Barrero, Lope H.; Baune, Bernhard T.; Bedi, Neeraj; Beghi, Ettore; Bekele, Bayu Begashaw; Bell, Michelle L.; Bennett, James R.; Bensenor, Isabela M.; Berhane, Adugnaw; Bernabe, Eduardo; Betsu, Balem Demtsu; Beuran, Mircea; Bhatt, Samir; Biadgilign, Sibhatu; Bienhoff, Kelly; Bikbov, Boris; Bisanzio, Donal; Bourne, Rupert R. A.; Breitborde, Nicholas J. K.; Negesa, Lemma; Bulto, Bulto; Bumgarner, Blair R.; Butt, Zahid A.; Cardenas, Rosario; Cahuana-Hurtado, Lucero; Cameron, Ewan; Cesar Campuzano, Julio; Car, Josip; Jesus Carrero, Juan; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Castaneda-Orjuela, Carlos A.; Catala-Lopez, Ferran; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chibueze, Chioma Ezinne; Chimed-Ochir, Odgerel; Chisumpa, Vesper Hichilombwe; Chitheer, Abdulaal A.; Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas; Ciobanu, Liliana G.; Cirillo, Massimo; Cohen, Aaron J.; Colombara, Danny; Cooper, Cyrus; Cowie, Benjamin C.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dandona, Lalit; Dandona, Rakhi; Dargan, Paul I.; das Neves, Jose; Davitoiu, Dragos V.; Davletov, Kairat; de Courten, Barbora; Degenhardt, Louisa; Deiparine, Selina; Deribe, Kebede; Deribew, Amare; Dey, Subhojit; Dicker, Daniel; Ding, Eric L.; Djalalinia, Shirin; Huyen Phuc Do,; Doku, David Teye; Douwes-Schultz, Dirk; Driscoll, Tim R.; Dubey, Manisha; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Echko, Michelle; El-Khatib, Ziad Ziad; Ellingsen, Christian Lycke; Enayati, Ahmadali; Erskine, Holly E.; Eskandarieh, Sharareh; Esteghamati, Alireza; Ermakov, Sergey P.; Estep, Kara; E Sa Farinha, Carla Sofia; Faro, Andre; Farzadfar, Farshad; Feigin, Valery L.; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Fernandes, Joao C.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Feyissa, Tesfaye Regassa; Filip, Irina; Finegold, Samuel; Fischer, Florian; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Foigt, Nataliya; Frank, Tahvi; Fraser, Maya; Fullman, Nancy; Furst, Thomas; Furtado, Joao M.; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Garcia-Basteiro, Alberto L.; Gebre, Teshome; Gebregergs, Gebremedhin Berhe; Gebrehiwot, Tsegaye Tewelde; Gebremichael, Delelegn Yilma; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Genova-Maleras, Ricard; Gesesew, Hailay Abrha; Gething, Peter W.; Gillum, Richard F.; Ginawi, Ibrahim Abdelmageem Mohamed; Giref, Ababi Zergaw; Giroud, Maurice; Giussani, Giorgia; Godwin, William W.; Gold, Audra L.; Goldberg, Ellen M.; Gona, Philimon N.; Gopalani, Sameer Vali; Gouda, Hebe N.; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Griswold, Max; Gupta, Prakash C.; Gupta, Rajeev; Gupta, Tanush; Gupta, Vipin; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hailu, Alemayehu Desalegne; Hailu, Gessessew Bugssa; Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi; Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Hamidi, Samer; Hammami, Mouhanad; Hancock, Jamie; Handal, Alexis J.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hao, Yuantao; Harb, Hilda L.; Hareri, Habtamu Abera; Hassanvand, Mohammad Sadegh; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Hay, Simon I.; He, Fei; Hedayati, Mohammad T.; Henry, Nathaniel J.; Beatriz Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Herteliu, Claudiu; Hoek, Hans W.; Horino, Masako; Horita, Nobuyuki; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hostiuc, Sorin; Hotez, Peter J.; Hoy, Damian G.; Huynh, Chantal; Iburg, Kim Moesgaard; Ikeda, Chad; Ileanu, Bogdan Vasile; Irenso, Asnake Ararsa; Irvine, Caleb Mackay Salpeter; Irenso, Asnake Ararsa; Irvine, Caleb Mackay Salpeter; Jurisson, Mikk; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.; Jahanmehr, Nader; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B.; Javanbakht, Mehdi; Jayaraman, Sudha P.; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Jha, Vivekanand; John, Denny; Johnson, Catherine O.; Johnson, Sarah Charlotte; Jonas, Jost B.; Kabir, Zubair; Kadel, Rajendra; Kahsay, Amaha; Kamal, Ritul; Karch, Andre; Karimi, Seyed M.; Karimkhani, Chante; Kasaeian, Amir; Kassaw, Nigussie Assefa; Kassebaum, Nicholas J.; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Kawakami, Norito; Keiyoro, Peter Njenga; Kemmer, Laura; Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khan, Ejaz Ahmad; Khang, Young-Ho; Khoja, Abdullah Tawfih Abdullah; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Khosravi, Mohammad Hossein; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Kieling, Christian; Kievlan, Daniel; Kim, Daniel; Kim, Yun Jin; Kimokoti, Ruth W.; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kivimaki, Mika; Knudsen, Ann Kristin; Kopec, Jacek A.; Kosen, Soewarta; Koul, Parvaiz A.; Koyanagi, Ai; Defo, Barthelemy Kuate; Kulikoff, Xie Rachel; Kumar, G. Anil; Kumar, Pushpendra; Kutz, Michael; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Lal, Dharmesh Kumar; Lalloo, Ratilal; Lallukka, Tea; Lambert, Nkurunziza; Lan, Qing; Lansingh, Van C.; Larsson, Anders; Lee, Paul H.; Leigh, James; Leung, Janni; Levi, Miriam; Li, Yongmei; Kappe, Darya Li; Liang, Xiaofeng; Liben, Misgan Legesse; Lim, Stephen S.; Liu, Angela; Liu, Patrick Y.; Liu, Yang; Lodha, Rakesh; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Lorkowski, Stefan; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Lozano, Rafael; Lucas, Timothy C. D.; Ma, Stefan; Macarayan, Erlyn Rachelle King; Maddison, Emilie R.; Abd el Razek, Mohammed Magdy; Majdan, Marek; Majdzadeh, Reza; Majeed, Azeem; Malekzadeh, Reza; Malhotra, Rajesh; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Manguerra, Helena; Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Mapoma, Chabila C.; Marczak, Laurie B.; Markos, Desalegn; Martinez-Raga, Jose; Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlandio; Martopullo, Ira; McAlinden, Colm; McGaughey, Madeline; McGrath, John J.; Mehata, Suresh; Meier, Toni; Meles, Kidanu Gebremariam; Memiah, Peter; Memish, Ziad A.; Mengesha, Melkamu Merid; Mengistu, Desalegn Tadese; Menota, Bereket Gebremichael; Mensah, George A.; Meretoja, Atte; Meretoja, Tuomo J.; Millear, Anoushka; Miller, Ted R.; Minnig, Shawn; Mirarefin, Mojde; Mirrakhimov, Erkin M.; Misganaw, Awoke; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Mohammad, Karzan Abdulmuhsin; Mohammadi, Alireza; Mohammed, Shafiu; Mokdad, Ali H.; Mola, Glen Liddell D.; Mollenkopf, Sarah K.; Molokhia, Mariam; Monasta, Lorenzo; Montanez Hernandez, Julio C.; Montico, Marcella; Mooney, Meghan D.; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Moraga, Paula; Morawska, Lidia; Morrison, Shane D.; Morozoff, Chloe; Mountjoy-Venning, Cliff; Mruts, Kalayu Birhane; Muller, Kate; Murthy, Gudlavalleti Venkata Satyanarayana; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Nachega, Jean B.; Naheed, Aliya; Naldi, Luigi; Nangia, Vinay; Nascimento, Bruno Ramos; Nasher, Jamal T.; Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Negoi, Ionut; Ngunjiri, Josephine Wanjiku; Cuong Tat Nguyen,; Grant Nguyen,; Minh Nguyen, [No Value; Quyen Le Nguyen, [Unknown; Trang Huyen Nguyen,; Nichols, Emma; Ningrum, Dina Nur Anggraini; Vuong Minh Nong,; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N.; Ogbo, Felix Akpojene; Oh, In-Hwan; Okoro, Anselm; Olagunju, Andrew Toyin; Olsen, Helen E.; Olusanya, Bolajoko Olubukunola; Olusanya, Jacob Olusegun; Ong, Kanyin; Opio, John Nelson; Oren, Eyal; Ortiz, Alberto; Osman, Majdi; Ota, Erika; Pa, Mahesh; Pacella, Rosana E.; Pakhale, Smita; Pana, Adrian; Panda, Basant Kumar; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Papachristou, Christina; Park, Eun-Kee; Patten, Scott B.; Patton, George C.; Paudel, Deepak; Paulson, Katherine; Pereira, David M.; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Perico, Norberto; Pervaiz, Aslam; Petzold, Max; Phillips, Michael Robert; Pigott, David M.; Pinho, Christine; Plass, Dietrich; Pletcher, Martin A.; Polinder, Suzanne; Postma, Maarten J.; Pourmalek, Farshad; Purcell, Caroline; Qorbani, Mostafa; Radfar, Amir; Rafay, Anwar; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rahman, Mohammad Hifz Ur; Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Ranabhat, Chhabi Lal; Rankin, Zane; Rao, Puja C.; Rath, Goura Kishor; Rawaf, Salman; Ray, Sarah E.; Rehm, Jurgen; Reiner, Robert C.; Reitsma, Marissa B.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Rezaei, Satar; Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Rokni, Mohammad Bagher; Ronfani, Luca; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Roth, Gregory A.; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Ruhago, George Mugambage; Saadat, Rizwan S. A. Soheil; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Sadat, Nafis; Safdarian, Mahdi; Safi, Sare; Safiri, Saeid; Sagar, Rajesh; Sahathevan, Ramesh; Salama, Joseph; Salamati, Payman; Salomon, Joshua A.; Samy, Abdallah M.; Sanabria, Juan Ramon; Dolores Sanchez-Nino, Maria; Santomauro, Damian; Santos, Itamar S.; Milicevic, Milena M. Santric; Sartorius, Benn; Satpathy, Maheswar; Shahraz, Saeid; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Schneider, Ione J. C.; Schulhofer-Wohl, Sam; Schutte, Aletta E.; Schwebel, David C.; Schwendicke, Falk; Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Servan-Mori, Edson E.; Shackelford, Katya Anne; Shaikh, Masood Ali; Shamsipour, Mansour; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Sharma, Jayendra; Sharma, Rajesh; She, Jun; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Shey, Muki; Shi, Peilin; Shields, Chloe; Shields, Chloe; Shigematsu, Mika; Shiri, Rahman; Shirude, Shreya; Shiue, Ivy; Shoman, Haitham; Shrime, Mark G.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Silpakit, Naris; Silva, Joao Pedro; Singh, Abhishek; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Skiadaresi, Eirini; Sligar, Amber; Smith, Alison; Smith, David L.; Smith, Mari; Sobaih, Badr H. A.; Soneji, Samir; Sorensen, Reed J. D.; Soriano, Joan B.; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.; Srinivasan, Vinay; Stanaway, Jeffrey D.; Stathopoulou, Vasiliki; Steel, Nicholas; Stein, Dan J.; Steiner, Caitlyn; Steinke, Sabine; Stokes, Mark Andrew; Strong, Mark; Strub, Bryan; Subart, Michelle; Sufiyan, Muawiyyah Babale; Sunguya, Bruno F.; Sur, Patrick J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Sykes, Bryan L.; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Tadakamadla, Santosh Kumar; Takahashi, Ken; Takala, Jukka S.; Talongwa, Roberto Tchio; Tarawneh, Mohammed Rasoul; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Taveira, Nuno; Tegegne, Teketo Kassaw; Tehrani-Banihashemi, Arash; Temsah, Mohamad-Hani; Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Thakur, J. S.; Thamsuwan, Ornwipa; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu Raman; Thomas, Katie E.; Thompson, Alex H.; Thomson, Alan J.; Thrift, Amanda G.; Tobe-Gai, Ruoyan; Topor-Madry, Roman; Torre, Anna; Tortajada, Miguel; Towbin, Jeffrey Allen; Bach Xuan Tran,; Troeger, Christopher; Truelsen, Thomas; Tsoi, Derrick; Tuzcu, Emin Murat; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Ukwaja, Kingsley N.; Undurraga, Eduardo A.; Updike, Rachel; Uthman, Olalekan A.; Uzochukwu, Benjamin S. Chudi; van Boven, Job F. M.; Vasankari, Tommi; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Violante, Francesco S.; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Vollset, Stein Emil; Vos, Theo; Wakayo, Tolassa; Wallin, Mitchell T.; Wang, Yuan-Pang; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weintraub, Robert G.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Werdecker, Andrea; Westerman, Ronny; Whetter, Brian; Whiteford, Harvey A.; Wijeratne, Tissa; Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Woldeyes, Belete Getahun; Wolfe, Charles D. A.; Woodbrook, Rachel; Workicho, Abdulhalik; Xavier, Denis; Xiao, Qingyang; Xu, Gelin; Yaghoubi, Mohsen; Yakob, Bereket; Yano, Yuichiro; Yaseri, Mehdi; Yimam, Hassen Hamid; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Yotebieng, Marcel; Younis, Mustafa Z.; Zaidi, Zoubida; Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Zegeye, Elias Asfaw; Zenebe, Zerihun Menlkalew; Zerfu, Taddese Alemu; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Zhang, Xueying; Zipkin, Ben; Zodpey, Sanjay; Lopez, Alan D.; Murray, Christopher J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Monitoring levels and trends in premature mortality is crucial to understanding how societies can address prominent sources of early death. The Global Burden of Disease 2016 Study (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of cause-specific mortality for 264 causes in 195 locations

  11. A comprehensive breath plume model for disease transmission via expiratory aerosols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan K Halloran

    Full Text Available The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime in temperate regions represents a longstanding, unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at lower humidities and temperatures, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent work with a guinea pig model by Lowen et al. indicated that humidity and temperature do modulate airborne influenza virus transmission, and several investigators have interpreted the observed humidity dependence in terms of airborne virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects two key observations: the effect of ambient temperature on the viral growth kinetics within the animals, and the strong influence of the background airflow on transmission. Here we provide a comprehensive theoretical framework for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting "Gaussian breath plume" are calculated as functions of position, humidity, and temperature. The overall transmission probability is modeled with a combination of the time-dependent viral concentration in the infected animal and the probability of droplet inhalation by the exposed animal downstream. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the results of Lowen et al., without invoking airborne virus survivability. The results also suggest that, at least for guinea pigs, variation in viral kinetics within the infected animals is the dominant factor explaining the increased transmission probability observed at lower temperatures.

  12. Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease based on disease-specific autoantibody profiles in human sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Han

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, hallmarked by a variety of motor disorders and neurological decline, is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. Currently, no diagnostic test exists to identify sufferers, and physicians must rely on a combination of subjective physical and neurological assessments to make a diagnosis. The discovery of definitive blood-borne biomarkers would be a major step towards early and reliable diagnosis. Despite attention devoted to this search, such biomarkers have remained elusive. In the present study, we used human protein microarrays to reveal serum autoantibodies that are differentially expressed among PD and control subjects. The diagnostic significance of each of these autoantibodies was evaluated, resulting in the selection of 10 autoantibody biomarkers that can effectively differentiate PD sera from control sera with a sensitivity of 93.1% and specificity of 100%. PD sera were also distinguishable from sera obtained from Alzheimer's disease, breast cancer, and multiple sclerosis patients with accuracies of 86.0%, 96.6%, and 100%, respectively. Results demonstrate that serum autoantibodies can be used as highly specific and accurate biomarkers for PD diagnosis throughout the course of the disease.

  13. Comprehension of concrete and abstract words in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia and Alzheimer's disease: A behavioral and neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Sven; Vallet, Guillaume T; Montembeault, Maxime; Boukadi, Mariem; Wilson, Maximiliano A; Laforce, Robert Jr; Rouleau, Isabelle; Brambati, Simona M

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the comprehension of concrete, abstract and abstract emotional words in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and healthy elderly adults (HE) Three groups of participants (9 svPPA, 12 AD, 11 HE) underwent a general neuropsychological assessment, a similarity judgment task, and structural brain MRI. The three types of words were processed similarly in the group of AD participants. In contrast, patients in the svPPA group were significantly more impaired at processing concrete words than abstract words, while comprehension of abstract emotional words was in between. VBM analyses showed that comprehension of concrete words relative to abstract words was significantly correlated with atrophy in the left anterior temporal lobe. These results support the view that concrete words are disproportionately impaired in svPPA, and that concrete and abstract words may rely upon partly dissociable brain regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvås, Kristian; Curran, Suzanne; Oksnes, Marianne; Husebye, Eystein S; Huppert, Felicia A; Chatterjee, V Krishna K

    2010-02-01

    Patients with Addison's disease reproducibly self-report impairment in specific dimensions of general well-being questionnaires, suggesting particular deficiencies in health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL). We sought to develop an Addison's disease-specific questionnaire (AddiQoL) that could better quantify altered well-being and treatment effects. Design, Setting, Patients, Intervention, and Outcomes: We reviewed the literature to identify HRQoL issues in Addison's disease and interviewed patients and their partners in-depth to explore various symptom domains. A list of items was generated, and nine expert clinicians and five expert patients assessed the list for impact and clarity. A preliminary questionnaire was presented to 100 Addison's outpatients; the number of items was reduced after analysis of the distribution of the responses. The final questionnaire responses were assessed by Cronbach's alpha and Rasch analysis. Published studies of HRQoL in Addison's disease indicated reduced vitality and general health perception and limitations in physical and emotional functioning. In-depth interviews of 14 patients and seven partners emphasized the impact of the disease on the emotional domain. Seventy HRQoL items were generated; after the expert consultation process and pretesting in 100 patients, the number of items was reduced to 36. Eighty-six patients completed the final questionnaire; the responses showed high internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha 0.95 and Person Separation Index 0.94 (Rasch analysis). We envisage AddiQoL having utility in trials of hormone replacement and management of patients with Addison's disease, analogous to similar questionnaires in GH deficiency (AGHDA) and acromegaly (AcroQoL).

  15. A culturally specific health coaching program targeting cardiovascular disease risk in South Asians: rationale, design, and baseline data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathe, Anita; Flowers, Elena; Mathur, Avantika; Garcia, Donna Malhotra; Kotrys, Jeannette; Gandhi, Rupal; Molina, César; Mathur, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Health coaching is an effective strategy for improving cardiovascular disease risk factors. Coaching interventions have primarily been studied in Caucasians, and the effectiveness in other ethnic groups is not known. Further, adaptation of coaching to include culturally specific components has not been studied. Our aim is to describe a culturally specific coaching program targeted at reducing cardiovascular disease risk in South Asians. Participants initially underwent comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk screening, then received individualized risk assessment and behavioral recommendations. A health coach then contacted participants regularly for one year to provide encouragement with behavior change, troubleshoot challenges, and assess adherence. In the first five years of the program, 3,180 people underwent risk assessment, 3,132 were candidates for coaching, 2,726 indicated a desire to participate in coaching, 1,359 received coaching, and 1,051 completed coaching for at least one year. Culturally specific health coaching is an appealing and feasible intervention for reducing cardiovascular disease risk in South Asians, with very low attrition. Coaching strategies for risk reduction are proven to be effective, but further longitudinal research is needed to determine whether the impact of incorporating cultural specificity improves the effectiveness. This program utilizes non-medically trained personnel as coaches and is relatively inexpensive, with potential for great cost savings in prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  16. The cultural-bound disease "empacho" in Argentina. A comprehensive botanico-historical and ethnopharmacological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Navarro, R; Scarpa, G F

    2013-07-09

    Empacho is one of the most recognized cultural-bound syndromes in Argentina. It is a digestive disorder with many causes, being excessive food intake the most frequent. It is easily diagnosed in household medicine and there are different treatments applied for releasing the obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract. Therapeutics includes the use of medicinal plants and abdominal maneuvers, as well as rituals of magical and/or religious nature. The aim of this work is to analyze the compiled literature, considering documents from the XVIIIth century up to present, related to the employed plant species for the treatment of empacho. The bibliographic and journal collections of several Argentinean and foreign libraries and bookstores were consulted, in addition to the comprehensive review of the specific information found online. Ninety (90) primary sources, spanning three hundred years (from 1710 to 2010) were found; most of them included ethnobotanical studies besides others of medical botany, pharmacobotanical and anthropological origin. A total of 152 plant species used to treat empacho were found in 360 total quotations, being Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin and Clemants; Alternanthera pungens Kunth; Ruta chalepensis L.; Clinopodium gilliesii (Benth.) Kuntze; Aloysia polystachya (Griseb.) Moldenke; Lippia turbinata Griseb., and Pluchea sagittalis (Lam.) Cabrera, the most frequently mentioned. The main therapeutic properties of the medicinal plants cited against empacho are stomachic, purgative, antispasmodic, bitter-tonic, carminative, and cholagogue-choleretic. The variety of regions - spanning most of the country - from which the information comes, as well as the great variety of therapeutic strategies used, diversity of plant species and knowledge related to the treatment of empacho, is directly associated with the great significance that this disorder has within the system of medical-nosologic representations of the Argentinean popular medicine. Copyright

  17. Comprehensive expression analysis suggests overlapping and specific roles of rice glutathione S-transferase genes during development and stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Annapurna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are the ubiquitous enzymes that play a key role in cellular detoxification. Although several GSTs have been identified and characterized in various plant species, the knowledge about their role in developmental processes and response to various stimuli is still very limited. In this study, we report genome-wide identification, characterization and comprehensive expression analysis of members of GST gene family in crop plant rice, to reveal their function(s. Results A systematic analysis revealed the presence of at least 79 GST genes in the rice genome. Phylogenetic analysis grouped GST proteins into seven classes. Sequence analysis together with the organization of putative motifs indicated the potential diverse functions of GST gene family members in rice. The tandem gene duplications have contributed a major role in expansion of this gene family. Microarray data analysis revealed tissue-/organ- and developmental stage-specific expression patterns of several rice GST genes. At least 31 GST genes showed response to plant hormones auxin and cytokinin. Furthermore, expression analysis showed the differential expression of quite a large number of GST genes during various abiotic stress (20, arsenate stress (32 and biotic stress (48 conditions. Many of the GST genes were commonly regulated by developmental processes, hormones, abiotic and biotic stresses. Conclusion The transcript profiling suggests overlapping and specific role(s of GSTs during various stages of development in rice. Further, the study provides evidence for the role of GSTs in mediating crosstalk between various stress and hormone response pathways and represents a very useful resource for functional analysis of selected members of this family in rice.

  18. Hydrocarbon Specificity During Aerobic oil Biodegradation Revealed in Marine Microcosms With the use of Comprehensive, Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, G. D.; Reddy, C. M.; Nelson, R. K.; Valentine, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    In 2003 the National Research Council reported more than 380 million gallons of oil is emitted into the ocean each year from natural seepage and as a result of anthropogenic activities. Many of the hydrocarbons making up this oil are persistent and toxic to marine life. Petroleum emitted into biologically sensitive areas can lead to environmental stress and ecosystem collapse. As a result many studies and a substantial amount of resources have been devoted to creating efficient and effective remediation tools and developing a better understanding of natural hydrocarbon weathering processes occurring in marine environments. The goal of this study is to elucidate patterns and extent of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments. In order to assess the specific molecular transformations occurring in petroleum emitted into oxic marine environments, we prepared microcosm experiments using sediments and seawater collected from the natural oil seeps offshore Coal Oil Point, California. Petroleum recovered from Platform Holly in the Santa Barbara Channel, was added to a sediment-seawater mixture and the microcosm bottles were allowed to incubate under aerobic conditions for slightly more than 100 days. Comprehensive, two-dimensional gas chromatography was employed in this study to quantify changes in the concentrations of individual hydrocarbon compounds because of the increased resolution and resolving power provided with this robust analytical method. We show significant hydrocarbon mass loss due to aerobic biodegradation for hundreds of tracked compounds in the microcosm bottles. The results shown here provide quantitative evidence for broad-scale metabolic specificity during aerobic hydrocarbon degradation in surface and shallow subsurface marine sediments.

  19. Effects of reciprocal teaching on reading comprehension of low-achieving adolescents. The importance of specific teacher skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okkinga, M.; Steensel, R. van; Gelderen, A.J.S. van

    2016-01-01

    Low-achieving adolescents are known to have difficulties with reading comprehension. This article discusses how reciprocal teaching can improve low-achieving adolescents' reading comprehension in whole-classroom settings (as opposed to small-group settings) and to what extent intervention effects ar

  20. How Working Memory Relates to Children's Reading Comprehension: The Importance of Domain-Specificity in Storage and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouwens, Suzan; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    Working memory is considered a well-established predictor of individual variation in reading comprehension in children and adults. However, how storage and processing capacities of working memory in both the phonological and semantic domain relate to reading comprehension is still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the contribution of…

  1. How Working Memory Relates to Children's Reading Comprehension: The Importance of Domain-Specificity in Storage and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouwens, Suzan; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    Working memory is considered a well-established predictor of individual variation in reading comprehension in children and adults. However, how storage and processing capacities of working memory in both the phonological and semantic domain relate to reading comprehension is still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the contribution of…

  2. Quality of life and symptoms in patients with malignant diseases admitted to a comprehensive cancer centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette Sand; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Tange, Ulla Brix;

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life and symptomatology in patients with malignancies admitted to comprehensive cancer centres are rarely investigated. Thus, this study aimed to investigate symptomatology and health-related quality of life of inpatients with cancer.......Quality of life and symptomatology in patients with malignancies admitted to comprehensive cancer centres are rarely investigated. Thus, this study aimed to investigate symptomatology and health-related quality of life of inpatients with cancer....

  3. Comparison of Total Kidney Volume Quantification Methods in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease for a Comprehensive Disease Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Dario; Busutti, Marco; Mignani, Renzo; Magistroni, Riccardo; Corsi, Cristiana

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, the scientific community has been showing increasing interest in the treatments aimed at slowing the progression of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Therefore, in this paper, we test and evaluate the performance of several available methods for total kidney volume (TKV) computation in ADPKD patients - from echography to MRI - in order to optimize patient classification. Two methods based on geometric assumptions (mid-slice [MS], ellipsoid [EL]) and a third one on true contour detection were tested on 40 ADPKD patients at different disease stage using MRI. The EL method was also tested using ultrasound images in a subset of 14 patients. Their performance was compared against TKVs derived from reference manual segmentation of MR images. Patient clinical classification was also performed based on computed volumes. Kidney volumes derived from echography significantly underestimated reference volumes. Geometric-based methods applied to MR images had similar acceptable results. The highly automated method showed better performance. Volume assessment was accurate and reproducible. Importantly, classification resulted in 79, 13, 10, and 2.5% of misclassification using kidney volumes obtained from echo and MRI applying the EL, the MS and the highly automated method respectively. Considering the fact that the image-based technique is the only approach providing a 3D patient-specific kidney model and allowing further analysis including cyst volume computation and monitoring disease progression, we suggest that geometric assumption (e.g., EL method) should be avoided. The contour-detection approach should be used for a reproducible and precise morphologic classification of the renal volume of ADPKD patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper David N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease.

  5. Stem cells, cell therapies, and bioengineering in lung biology and diseases. Comprehensive review of the recent literature 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    A conference, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," was held July 25 to 28, 2011 at the University of Vermont to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are rapidly expanding areas of study that provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, to discuss and debate current controversies, and to identify future research directions and opportunities for basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. The goal of this article, which accompanies the formal conference report, is to provide a comprehensive review of the published literature in lung regenerative medicine from the last conference report through December 2012.

  6. Dietary and Policy Priorities for Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, and Obesity: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-01-12

    Suboptimal nutrition is a leading cause of poor health. Nutrition and policy science have advanced rapidly, creating confusion yet also providing powerful opportunities to reduce the adverse health and economic impacts of poor diets. This review considers the history, new evidence, controversies, and corresponding lessons for modern dietary and policy priorities for cardiovascular diseases, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. Major identified themes include the importance of evaluating the full diversity of diet-related risk pathways, not only blood lipids or obesity; focusing on foods and overall diet patterns, rather than single isolated nutrients; recognizing the complex influences of different foods on long-term weight regulation, rather than simply counting calories; and characterizing and implementing evidence-based strategies, including policy approaches, for lifestyle change. Evidence-informed dietary priorities include increased fruits, nonstarchy vegetables, nuts, legumes, fish, vegetable oils, yogurt, and minimally processed whole grains; and fewer red meats, processed (eg, sodium-preserved) meats, and foods rich in refined grains, starch, added sugars, salt, and trans fat. More investigation is needed on the cardiometabolic effects of phenolics, dairy fat, probiotics, fermentation, coffee, tea, cocoa, eggs, specific vegetable and tropical oils, vitamin D, individual fatty acids, and diet-microbiome interactions. Little evidence to date supports the cardiometabolic relevance of other popular priorities: eg, local, organic, grass-fed, farmed/wild, or non-genetically modified. Evidence-based personalized nutrition appears to depend more on nongenetic characteristics (eg, physical activity, abdominal adiposity, gender, socioeconomic status, culture) than genetic factors. Food choices must be strongly supported by clinical behavior change efforts, health systems reforms, novel technologies, and robust policy strategies targeting economic incentives, schools and

  7. Dietary and Policy Priorities for Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, and Obesity – A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrition is a leading cause of poor health. Nutrition and policy science have advanced rapidly, creating confusion yet also providing powerful opportunities to reduce the adverse health and economic impacts of poor diets. This review considers the history, new evidence, controversies, and corresponding lessons for modern dietary and policy priorities for cardiovascular diseases, obesity, and diabetes. Major identified themes include the importance of evaluating the full diversity of diet-related risk pathways, not just obesity and blood lipids; focusing on foods and overall diet patterns, rather than single isolated nutrients; recognizing the complex influences of different foods on long-term weight regulation, rather than simply counting calories; and characterizing and implementing evidence-based strategies, including policy approaches, for lifestyle change. Evidence-informed dietary priorities include increased fruits, nonstarchy vegetables, nuts, legumes, fish, vegetable oils, yogurt, and minimally processed whole grains; and fewer red meats, processed (e.g., sodium-preserved) meats, and foods rich in refined grains, starch, added sugars, salt, and trans fat. More investigation is needed on cardiometabolic effects of phenolics, dairy fat, probiotics, fermentation, coffee, tea, cocoa, eggs, specific vegetable and tropical oils, vitamin D, individual fatty acids, and diet-microbiome interactions. Little evidence to-date supports cardiometabolic relevance of other popular priorities: e.g., local, organic, grass-fed, farmed/wild, non-GMO. Evidence-based personalized nutrition appears to depend more on non-genetic characteristics (e.g., physical activity, abdominal adiposity, gender, socioeconomic status, culture) than genetic factors. Food choices must be strongly supported by clinical behavior change efforts, health systems reforms, novel technologies, and robust policy strategies, including those targeting economic incentives, schools and workplaces

  8. Mapping the brain's orchestration during speech comprehension: task-specific facilitation of regional synchrony in neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keil Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How does the brain convert sounds and phonemes into comprehensible speech? In the present magnetoencephalographic study we examined the hypothesis that the coherence of electromagnetic oscillatory activity within and across brain areas indicates neurophysiological processes linked to speech comprehension. Results Amplitude-modulated (sinusoidal 41.5 Hz auditory verbal and nonverbal stimuli served to drive steady-state oscillations in neural networks involved in speech comprehension. Stimuli were presented to 12 subjects in the following conditions (a an incomprehensible string of words, (b the same string of words after being introduced as a comprehensible sentence by proper articulation, and (c nonverbal stimulations that included a 600-Hz tone, a scale, and a melody. Coherence, defined as correlated activation of magnetic steady state fields across brain areas and measured as simultaneous activation of current dipoles in source space (Minimum-Norm-Estimates, increased within left- temporal-posterior areas when the sound string was perceived as a comprehensible sentence. Intra-hemispheric coherence was larger within the left than the right hemisphere for the sentence (condition (b relative to all other conditions, and tended to be larger within the right than the left hemisphere for nonverbal stimuli (condition (c, tone and melody relative to the other conditions, leading to a more pronounced hemispheric asymmetry for nonverbal than verbal material. Conclusions We conclude that coherent neuronal network activity may index encoding of verbal information on the sentence level and can be used as a tool to investigate auditory speech comprehension.

  9. Cause-specific mortality among spouses of Parkinson disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. METHODS: All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson...... disease between 1986 and 2009 were identified, and each case was matched to five population controls. We further identified all spouses of those with Parkinson disease (n = 8,515) and also the spouses of controls (n = 43,432). All spouses were followed in nationwide registries until 2011. RESULTS: Among...... men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1...

  10. Geo-Specific disease and the Stroke Belt: Do soils play a role in stroke mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of geo-specific disease is commonly associated with socio-economic factors, such as income and education that can affect the incidence of preventable diseases. However, geo-specific diseases may also be influenced by environmental factors, such as soil and water quality. Local soil and w...

  11. Age-specific Parkinson disease risk in GBA mutation carriers: information for genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Huma Q; Balwani, Manisha; Bier, Louise; Alcalay, Roy N

    2013-02-01

    We sought to estimate age-specific risk of Parkinson disease in relatives of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligate carriers of GBA mutations and who were not ascertained by family history of Parkinson disease. A validated family history of Parkinson disease questionnaire was administered to 119 patients with Gaucher disease who were evaluated at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine from 2009 to 2012; the ages of their parents, siblings, and children, history of Parkinson disease, age at onset of Parkinson disease, and ethnic background were obtained. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate age-specific Parkinson disease penetrance among parents of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligatory GBA mutation carriers. Two participants with Gaucher disease were affected by Parkinson disease (5.4% of those who were 60 years or older). Of the 224 informative parents of patients with Gaucher disease, 11 had Parkinson disease (4.9%). Among the parents (obligatory carriers), cumulative risk of Parkinson disease by ages 65 and 85 was estimated to be 2.2% ±2.1% and 10.9% ±7.2%, respectively. We provide useful age-specific estimates of Parkinson disease penetrance in patients with Gaucher disease and GBA heterozygous carriers for genetic counseling. Although GBA mutations may increase the risk for PD, the vast majority of patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygotes may not develop the disease. Further studies are needed to identify what modifies the risk of Parkinson disease in GBA mutation carriers.

  12. Comprehensive Molecular Profiling of African-American Prostate Cancer to Inform on Prognosis and Disease Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    developed, and are being aggressively marketed to patients, despite little validation in AA men. We hypothesized that comprehensive molecular analysis of a...through signal amplification Aim 3: Development and testing of new agents for imaging the PC microenvironment Projects overlap or parallel: None...overlap or parallel: No scientific or budgetary overlap. Award: PC160336 Title: Interaction between the Inflammatory Microenvironment and Somatic

  13. Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in law enforcement personnel: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Franklin H

    2012-01-01

    Law enforcement is a high-stress occupation that is prone to increasing the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiological studies suggest that police officers and related public safety personnel have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Currently employed police personnel have a high prevalence of traditional risk factors, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, cigarette smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle. Obesity may be more common in police officers compared with civilians, whereas diabetes is present less frequently. Law enforcement personnel are also exposed to occupation-specific risk factors that include sudden physical exertion, acute and chronic psychological stress, shift work, and noise. Workplace programs to promote the health and fitness of police officers are commonly lacking, but can be an effective means for reducing cardiovascular risk. Physicians should be familiar with the essential job tasks required for police officers to determine whether the individual is fit for duty. Governmental agencies have established strategic goals to reduce cardiovascular complications and improve the health and wellness of public safety personnel.

  14. Immunological status in patients with lower limb amputation due to peripheral arterial disease before and after comprehensive rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefančič, Martin; Prešern-Štrukelj, Metka; Vidmar, Gaj; Kotnik, Vladimir; Kopitarl, Andreja Nataša; Ihan, Alojz

    2015-03-01

    The immunological status before and after a comprehensive rehabilitation program was studied. Seven persons (4 males, 3 females, mean age 71.4 years) after lower limb amputation due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) were subject to standard comprehensive rehabilitation program for amputees of four-week duration, which included training in activities of daily living, daily exercise of various types, training of crutch-assisted gait and use of leg prosthesis, and mild transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Before and after rehabilitation, peripherial blood was collected and the number and ratio of white blood cells were determined and analysed for the expression of cell surface antigens (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD25, CD69), cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-4) and phagocytosis/oxidative killing functional tests. Due to strict patient selection criteria excluding serious accompanying disease, immunological parameters were within normal limits already before rehabilitation. After rehabilitation, an increase in oxidative burst was observed in monocytes and neutrophil granulocytes, but statistically significant only in monocytes. The expression of CD69 molecules by T cells and monocytes was significantly increased, as well as the expression of IL-4 by T cells. A significant decrease in the ratio of CD4 to CD8 cells was also found, but not a clinically critical one. It can therefore be concluded that the comprehensive rehabilitation treatment in patients with lower limb amputation due to PAD led to some--prevailingly positive--immunological changes, which were consistent with the patients' improved physical condition and clinical status.

  15. The role of comprehensive eye exams in the early detection of diabetes and other chronic diseases in an employed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaneman, Justin; Kagey, Amy; Soltesz, Stephen; Stone, Julie

    2010-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the cost benefit associated with comprehensive eye exams as a tool for the early detection of diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. A retrospective, claims-based analysis was performed using U.S.-based employees and spouses from a large, national database. Individuals who received first notification of disease as a result of an eye exam were compared to individuals who did not receive early detection and presumably learned of their condition after further disease progression. Total health plan costs, lost time costs, and termination rates were calculated for the 12-month period after the index date. A sizable population first learned of their chronic condition through eye exams as no other claims-based evidence was found to suggest prior knowledge of the condition. All three disease cohorts with early detection during an eye exam had lower first-year health plan costs, missed fewer work days, and were less likely to terminate employment than the respective comparison groups. As employers strive to better manage health and business outcomes, comprehensive eye health exams can provide an opportunity for early disease detection and associated cost savings through referral to primary care providers and condition management programs.

  16. MalaCards: A Comprehensive Automatically-Mined Database of Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Noa; Twik, Michal; Nativ, Noam; Stelzer, Gil; Bahir, Iris; Stein, Tsippi Iny; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2014-09-08

    Systems medicine provides insights into mechanisms of human diseases, and expedites the development of better diagnostics and drugs. To facilitate such strategies, we initiated MalaCards, a compendium of human diseases and their annotations, integrating and often remodeling information from 64 data sources. MalaCards employs, among others, the proven automatic data-mining strategies established in the construction of GeneCards, our widely used compendium of human genes. The development of MalaCards poses many algorithmic challenges, such as disease name unification, integrated classification, gene-disease association, and disease-targeted expression analysis. MalaCards displays a Web card for each of >19,000 human diseases, with 17 sections, including textual summaries, related diseases, related genes, genetic variations and tests, and relevant publications. Also included are a powerful search engine and a variety of categorized disease lists. This unit describes two basic protocols to search and browse MalaCards effectively.

  17. Severe and refractory peptic ulcer disease: the diagnostic dilemma: case report and comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, James L; Duncan, Mona; Bass, Barbara L; Bochicchio, Grant V; Napolitano, Lena M

    2005-11-01

    The recognition of Helicobacter pylori infection as a cause of peptic ulcer disease, medical regimens to eradicate the organism, and the widespread use of proton pump inhibition to suppress gastric acid secretion have revolutionized the management of peptic ulcer disease. As a result, successful medical management of peptic ulcer disease has largely supplanted the need for gastric surgery by general surgeons. Surgery is reserved for complications of the disease, refractory disease, or rare causes of ulcer disease such as gastrinoma and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. In this report, we describe a case of intractable peptic ulcer disease that progressed to gastric outlet obstruction despite maximal medical therapy. We review the diagnostic studies utilized to evaluate the potential etiologies of peptic ulcer disease and the difficulty in diagnosing gastrinoma and Zollinger-Ellison in the setting of potent medical acid suppression therapy.

  18. Association of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy with incidence of autoimmune disease, ischemic heart disease, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Jespersen, Lasse;

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-documented treatment of IgE-mediated allergic disease. Little is known about potential effects of SCIT on the risk of other chronic immune-related diseases. Over the years, a few casuistic reports have caused concern that SCIT might ac...... as a trigger of autoimmune disease....

  19. Plasma YKL-40 and total and disease-specific mortality in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Julia S; Bojesen, Stig E; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Increased plasma YKL-40 is associated with short-term survival in patients with cardiovascular disease and cancer. We tested the hypothesis that increased plasma YKL-40 is associated with total and disease-specific mortality in the general population....

  20. Circulating gluten-specific FOXP3(+)CD39(+) regulatory T cells have impaired suppressive function in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura; Munier, C Mee Ling; Seddiki, Nabila; van Bockel, David; Ontiveros, Noé; Hardy, Melinda Y; Gillies, Jana K; Levings, Megan K; Reid, Hugh H; Petersen, Jan; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P; Zaunders, John J; Tye-Din, Jason A; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2017-03-08

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by dietary gluten. Although the effector T-cell response in patients with celiac disease has been well characterized, the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the loss of tolerance to gluten remains poorly understood. We sought to define whether patients with celiac disease have a dysfunction or lack of gluten-specific forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) Treg cells. Treated patients with celiac disease underwent oral wheat challenge to stimulate recirculation of gluten-specific T cells. Peripheral blood was collected before and after challenge. To comprehensively measure the gluten-specific CD4(+) T-cell response, we paired traditional IFN-γ ELISpot with an assay to detect antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that does not rely on tetramers, antigen-stimulated cytokine production, or proliferation but rather on antigen-induced coexpression of CD25 and OX40 (CD134). Numbers of circulating gluten-specific Treg cells and effector T cells both increased significantly after oral wheat challenge, peaking at day 6. Surprisingly, we found that approximately 80% of the ex vivo circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells were FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells, which reside within the pool of memory CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)CD45RO(+) Treg cells. Although we observed normal suppressive function in peripheral polyclonal Treg cells from patients with celiac disease, after a short in vitro expansion, the gluten-specific FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells exhibited significantly reduced suppressive function compared with polyclonal Treg cells. This study provides the first estimation of FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cell frequency within circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells after oral gluten challenge of patients with celiac disease. FOXP3(+)CD39(+) Treg cells comprised a major proportion of all circulating gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells but had impaired suppressive function, indicating that Treg cell dysfunction might

  1. Cause-specific mortality among spouses of Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate; Nordahl, Helene; Schernhammer, Eva; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-03-01

    Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson disease between 1986 and 2009 were identified, and each case was matched to five population controls. We further identified all spouses of those with Parkinson disease (n = 8,515) and also the spouses of controls (n = 43,432). All spouses were followed in nationwide registries until 2011. Among men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1.05-3.42]) and death from undefined symptoms/abnormal findings (1.25 [1.07-1.47]). Censoring at the time of death of the patient attenuated the findings for all-cause mortality in husbands (1.02 [0.95-1.09]), indicating that part of the association is with bereavement. Still, living with a person with Parkinson disease 5 years after first Parkinson hospitalization was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality for both husbands (1.15 [1.07-1.23]) and wives (1.11 [1.04-1.17]). Caring for a spouse with a serious chronic illness is associated with a slight but consistent elevation in mortality risk.

  2. Obstetric Fistula in Burundi: a comprehensive approach to managing women with this neglected disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Burundi, the annual incidence of obstetric fistula is estimated to be 0.2-0.5% of all deliveries, with 1000-2000 new cases per year. Despite this relatively high incidence, national capacity for identifying and managing obstetric fistula is very limited. Thus, in July 2010, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) set up a specialised Obstetric Fistula Centre in Gitega (Gitega Fistula Centre, GFC), the only permanent referral centre for obstetric fistula in Burundi. A comprehensive model...

  3. Neurological Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Celiac Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present asone or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormalities including ataxia,epilepsy, neuropathy, dementia, and cognitive disorders. Inthis study, we aimed to review the neurological aspects of celiac disease. Early diagnosis and treatment could prevent related disability in patients with celiac disease.

  4. Comprehensive identification of disulfide bonds using non-specific proteinase K digestion and CID-cleavable crosslinking analysis methodology for Orbitrap LC/ESI-MS/MS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makepeace, Karl A T; Serpa, Jason J; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-11-01

    Disulfide bonds are valuable constraints in protein structure modeling. The Cys-Cys disulfide bond undergoes specific fragmentation under CID and, therefore, can be considered as a CID-cleavable crosslink. We have recently reported on the benefits of using non-specific digestion with proteinase K for inter-peptide crosslink determination. Here, we describe an updated application of our CID-cleavable crosslink analysis software and our crosslinking analysis with non-specific digestion methodology for the robust and comprehensive determination of disulfide bonds in proteins, using Orbitrap LC/ESI-MS/MS data.

  5. Domain-specific cognitive impairment in non-demented Parkinson's disease psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Jared T; Perepezko, Kate; Bakker, Catherine C; Dawson, Ted M; Johnson, Vanessa; Mari, Zoltan; Marvel, Cherie L; Mills, Kelly A; Pantelyat, Alexander; Pletnikova, Olga; Rosenthal, Liana S; Shepard, Melissa D; Stevens, Daniel A; Troncoso, Juan C; Wang, Jiangxia; Pontone, Gregory M

    2017-05-16

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), psychosis is associated with cognitive impairment that may be more profound in particular cognitive domains. Our goal was to determine whether psychosis in non-demented PD participants is associated with domain-specific cognitive impairment on the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE). The Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease Research Center of Excellence Longitudinal Study at Johns Hopkins is a prospective study that was initiated in 1998. Clinical assessments are conducted at two-year intervals at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. We analyzed data from 137 enrolled participants with idiopathic PD. Psychosis diagnoses were established by psychiatrist interview per DSM-IV criteria. An incident dementia diagnosis resulted in exclusion from analysis for that evaluation and any future evaluations in that participant. We used logistic regression with generalized estimated equations (GEE) to model the time-varying relationship between MMSE subscale scores and psychosis, adjusting for potential confounding variables identified through univariable analysis. Thirty-one unique psychosis cases were recorded among non-demented participants. Fifty total evaluations with psychosis present were analyzed. In multivariable regressions, psychosis was associated with lower scores on the orientation (relative odds ratio, rOR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.58-0.93; p = 0.011), language (rOR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.48-0.86; p = 0.003), and intersecting pentagon (rOR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.20-0.92 p = 0.030) subscales of the MMSE. In PD, executive dysfunction, disorientation, and impaired language comprehension may be associated with psychosis. Our findings suggest that the corresponding MMSE subscales may be useful in identifying participants with a higher likelihood of developing psychosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Automatic extraction of disease-specific features from Doppler images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Moradi, Mehdi; Parajuli, Nripesh; Syeda-Mahmood, Tanveer

    2017-03-01

    Flow Doppler imaging is widely used by clinicians to detect diseases of the valves. In particular, continuous wave (CW) Doppler mode scan is routinely done during echocardiography and shows Doppler signal traces over multiple heart cycles. Traditionally, echocardiographers have manually traced such velocity envelopes to extract measurements such as decay time and pressure gradient which are then matched to normal and abnormal values based on clinical guidelines. In this paper, we present a fully automatic approach to deriving these measurements for aortic stenosis retrospectively from echocardiography videos. Comparison of our method with measurements made by echocardiographers shows large agreement as well as identification of new cases missed by echocardiographers.

  7. Instruments measuring the disease-specific quality of life of family carers of people with neurodegenerative diseases: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Thomas E; Farina, Nicolas; Brown, Anna; Daley, Stephanie; Bowling, Ann; Basset, Thurstine; Livingston, Gill; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Joanna; Banerjee, Sube

    2017-01-01

    Objective Neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, have a profound impact on those with the conditions and their family carers. Consequently, the accurate measurement of family carers' quality of life (QOL) is important. Generic measures may miss key elements of the impact of these conditions, so using disease-specific instruments has been advocated. This systematic review aimed to identify and examine the psychometric properties of disease-specific outcome measures of QOL of family carers of people with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease and other dementias; Huntington's disease; Parkinson's disease; multiple sclerosis; and motor neuron disease). Design Systematic review. Methods Instruments were identified using 5 electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus and the International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)) and lateral search techniques. Only studies which reported the development and/or validation of a disease-specific measure for adult family carers, and which were written in English, were eligible for inclusion. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) checklist. The psychometric properties of each instrument were examined. Results 676 articles were identified. Following screening and lateral searches, a total of 8 articles were included; these reported 7 disease-specific carer QOL measures. Limited evidence was available for the psychometric properties of the 7 instruments. Psychometric analyses were mainly focused on internal consistency, reliability and construct validity. None of the measures assessed either criterion validity or responsiveness to change. Conclusions There are very few measures of carer QOL that are specific to particular neurodegenerative diseases. The findings of this review emphasise the importance of developing and validating psychometrically robust disease-specific

  8. Comprehensive strategies for the prevention and control of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in Africa: future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muna, Walinjom F T

    2013-01-01

    The countries of the Sub Saharan African region have insufficient resources and healthcare systems that are poorly adapted to cope with the longstanding burden associated with communicable diseases and the ongoing HIV/AIDS pandemic. In addition, the rising burden of non-communicable diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and their risk factors, poses additional challenges. These countries need to urgently develop strategies to address these challenges of disease prevention and control. These strategies will require a new vision and more relevant and 'suitable' vocabulary in dealing with healthcare design, planning and implementation (using a cross-sectorial approach). Lessons learnt from the past (e.g. primary health care) in sub-Saharan Africa and other regions of the world may equally prove useful in developing strategies for the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases. Any potential strategy must emphasize the crucial role of economic, social, and environmental health determinants as well as the use of appropriate health technology.

  9. Development of a multivalent, PrP(Sc)-specific prion vaccine through rational optimization of three disease-specific epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniuk, Kristen; Määttänen, Pekka; Taschuk, Ryan; Airey, T Dean; Potter, Andrew; Cashman, Neil R; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2014-04-07

    Prion diseases represent a novel form of infectivity caused by the propagated misfolding of a self-protein (PrP(C)) into a pathological, infectious conformation (PrP(Sc)). Efforts to develop a prion vaccine have been complicated by challenges and potential dangers associated with induction of strong immune responses to a self protein. There is considerable value in the development of vaccines that are specifically targeted to the misfolded conformation. Conformation specific immunotherapy depends on identification and optimization of disease-specific epitopes (DSEs)(1) that are uniquely exposed upon misfolding. Previously, we reported development of a PrP(Sc)-specific vaccine through empirical expansions of a YYR DSE. Here we describe optimization of two additional prion DSEs, YML of β-sheet 1 and a rigid loop (RL) linking β-sheet 2 to α-helix 2, through in silico predictions of B cell epitopes and further translation of these epitopes into PrP(Sc)-specific vaccines. The optimized YML and RL vaccines retain their properties of immunogenicity, specificity and safety when delivered individually or in a multivalent format. This investigation supports the utility of combining DSE prediction models with algorithms to infer logical peptide expansions to optimize immunogenicity. Incorporation of optimized DSEs into established vaccine formulation and delivery strategies enables rapid development of peptide-based vaccines for protein misfolding diseases.

  10. The role of natural killer cells in autoimmune liver disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, Kelly; Pontarini, Elena; Tentorio, Paolo; Cimino, Matteo; Donadon, Matteo; Torzilli, Guido; Lugli, Enrico; Della Bella, Silvia; Gershwin, M Eric; Mavilio, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are important players of the innate arm of the immune system and provide an early defense against pathogens and tumor-transformed cells. Peripheral blood NK (PB-NK) cells were first identified because of their ability to spontaneously kill tumor-cell targets in vitro without the need for specific antigen priming, which is the reason that they were named 'natural killer' cells. The characterization of NK cells in human tissues and body organs represented another important step forward to better understand their physiology and physiopathology. In this regard, many reports revealed over the past decade a differential anatomic distribution of NK cell subsets in several sites such as the intestine, lung, cervix, placenta and liver as well as in secondary lymphoid organs such as spleen, lymph nodes and tonsils. Among all these tissues, the liver is certainly unique as its parenchyma contains an unusually high number of infiltrating immune cells with 30-50% of total lymphocytes being NK cells. Given the constant liver intake of non-self antigens from the gastrointestinal tract via the portal vein, hepatic NK (H-NK) cells must retain a certain degree of tolerance in the context of their immune-surveillance against dangers to the host. Indeed, the breakdown of the tolerogenic state of the liver-associated immune system has been shown to induce autoimmunity. However, the role of NK cells during the course of autoimmune liver diseases is still being debated mainly because a complete characterization of H-NK cells normally resident in healthy human liver has not yet been fully disclosed. Furthermore, the differences in phenotype and functions between human and mouse H-NK cells often preclude translation of results obtained from murine models into experimental approaches to be performed in humans. Here, we provide an extensive characterization of the phenotype of H-NK cells physiologically resident in the human liver by both mentioning data available

  11. Liver enzymes serum levels in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Bezerra Cavalcanti Sette

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the literature regarding the serum levels of the enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis with and without viral hepatitis. Original articles published up to January 2013 on adult patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis were selected. These articles contained the words “transaminases” “aspartate aminotransferase” “alanine aminotransferase” “gamma glutamyl transferase,” “liver enzymes”, AND “dialysis” OR “hemodialysis”. A total of 823 articles were retrieved. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 49 articles were selected. The patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis had reduced serum levels of aminotransferases due to hemodilution, lower pyridoxine levels, or elevated homocysteine levels. The chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis infected with the hepatitis C virus also had lower aminotransferase levels compared with the infected patients without chronic kidney disease. This reduction is in part due to decreased viremia caused by the dialysis method, the production of a hepatocyte growth factor and endogenous interferon-α, and lymphocyte activation, which decreases viral action on hepatocytes. Few studies were retrieved on gamma-glutamyl transferase serum levels; those found reported that there were no differences between the patients with or without chronic kidney disease. The serum aminotransferase levels were lower in the patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis (with or without viral hepatitis than in the patients with normal renal function; this reduction has a multifactorial origin.

  12. The immunogenetics of Behçet’s disease: A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masaki; Kastner, Daniel L; Remmers, Elaine F

    2015-01-01

    Behçet’s disease is a chronic multisystem inflammatory disorder characterized mainly by recurrent oral ulcers, ocular involvement, genital ulcers, and skin lesions, presenting with remissions and exacerbations. It is thought that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to its onset and development. Although the etiology of Behçet’s disease remains unclear, recent immunogenetic findings are providing clues to its pathogenesis. In addition to the positive association of HLA-B*51, which was identified more than four decades ago, and which has since been confirmed in multiple populations, recent studies report additional independent associations in the major histocompatibility complex class I region. HLA-B*15, -B*27, -B*57, and -A*26 are independent risk factors for Behçet’s disease, while HLA-B*49 and – A*03 are independent class I alleles that are protective for Behçet’s disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified associations with genome-wide significance (P disease pathogenesis. Significant differences in gene function or mRNA expression associated with the risk alleles of the disease susceptibility loci suggest which genes in a disease-associated locus influence disease pathogenesis. These genes encompass both innate and adaptive immunity and confirm the importance of the predominant polarization towards helper T cell (Th) 1 versus Th2 cells, and the involvement of Th17 cells. In addition, epistasis observed between HLA-B*51 and the risk coding haplotype of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protease, ERAP1, provides a clue that an HLA class I-peptide presentation-based mechanism contributes to this complex disease. PMID:26347074

  13. A comprehensive 1000 Genomes-based genome-wide association meta-analysis of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, Theodosios; Nelson, Christopher P; Hopewell, Jemma C; Webb, Thomas R; Zeng, Lingyao; Dehghan, Abbas; Alver, Maris; Armasu, Sebastian M; Auro, Kirsi; Bjonnes, Andrew; Chasman, Daniel I; Chen, Shufeng; Ford, Ian; Franceschini, Nora; Gieger, Christian; Grace, Christopher; Gustafsson, Stefan; Huang, Jie; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kleber, Marcus E; Lau, King Wai; Lu, Xiangfeng; Lu, Yingchang; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mihailov, Evelin; Morrison, Alanna C; Pervjakova, Natalia; Qu, Liming; Rose, Lynda M; Salfati, Elias; Saxena, Richa; Scholz, Markus; Smith, Albert V; Tikkanen, Emmi; Uitterlinden, Andre; Yang, Xueli; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Wei; de Andrade, Mariza; de Vries, Paul S; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Anand, Sonia S; Bertram, Lars; Beutner, Frank; Dedoussis, George; Frossard, Philippe; Gauguier, Dominique; Goodall, Alison H; Gottesman, Omri; Haber, Marc; Han, Bok-Ghee; Huang, Jianfeng; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; Kessler, Thorsten; König, Inke R; Lannfelt, Lars; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mallick, Nadeem H; Mehra, Narinder; Meitinger, Thomas; Memon, Fazal-ur-Rehman; Morris, Andrew P; Nieminen, Markku S; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peters, Annette; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Shah, Svati H; Sinisalo, Juha; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Trompet, Stella; Wang, Laiyuan; Zaman, Khan S; Ardissino, Diego; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bottinger, Erwin P; Buring, Julie E; Chambers, John C; Collins, Rory; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; Demuth, Ilja; Elosua, Roberto; Epstein, Stephen E; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Franco, Oscar H; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Granger, Christopher B; Gu, Dongfeng; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hazen, Stanley L; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Ingelsson, Erik; Iribarren, Carlos; Jukema, J Wouter; Karhunen, Pekka J; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loos, Ruth J F; Melander, Olle; Metspalu, Andres; März, Winfried; Palmer, Colin N; Perola, Markus; Quertermous, Thomas; Rader, Daniel J; Ridker, Paul M; Ripatti, Samuli; Roberts, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Schwartz, Stephen M; Seedorf, Udo; Stewart, Alexandre F; Stott, David J; Thiery, Joachim; Zalloua, Pierre A; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Reilly, Muredach P; Assimes, Themistocles L; Thompson, John R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Kathiresan, Sekar; McPherson, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J; Farrall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Existing knowledge of genetic variants affecting risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) is largely based on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) analysis of common SNPs. Leveraging phased haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project, we report a GWAS meta-analysis of 185 thousand CAD cases and controls, interrogating 6.7 million common (MAF>0.05) as well as 2.7 million low frequency (0.005comprehensive survey of the fine genetic architecture of CAD showing that genetic susceptibility to this common disease is largely determined by common SNPs of small effect size. PMID:26343387

  14. Immunoglobulin G4 -related kidney disease: A comprehensive pictorial review of the imaging spectrum, Mimickers, and clinicopathological characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ni Eun; Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related kidney disease (IgG4-KD) has recently been demonstrated to be an important part of IgG4-related sclerosing disease (IgG4-SD). However, since IgG4-KD is still relatively unfamiliar to radiologists and physicians as compared to IgG4-SD involving other organs, it could, therefore, be easily missed. In this article, we present a comprehensive pictorial review of IgG4-KD with regards to the imaging spectrum, mimickers, and clinicopathologic characteristics, based on our clinical experience with 48 patients during the past 13 years, as well as a literature review. Awareness of the broad imaging spectrum of IgG4-KD and differential diagnosis from its mimickers will thus facilitate its early diagnosis and treatment.

  15. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  16. Protein losing enteropathy: comprehensive review of the mechanistic association with clinical and subclinical disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) has been associated with more than 60 different conditions, including nearly all gastrointestinal diseases (Crohn's disease, celiac, Whipple's, intestinal infections, and so on) and a large number of non-gut conditions (cardiac and liver disease, lupus, sarcoidosis, and so on). This review presents the first attempt to quantitatively understand the magnitude of the PLE in relation to the associated pathology for three different disease categories: 1) increased lymphatic pressure (e.g., lymphangiectasis); 2) diseases with mucosal erosions (e.g., Crohn's disease); and 3) diseases without mucosal erosions (e.g., celiac disease). The PLE with lymphangiectasis results from rupture of the mucosal lymphatics, with retrograde drainage of systemic lymph into the intestinal lumen with the resultant loss of CD4 T cells, which is diagnostic. Mucosal erosion PLE results from macroscopic breakdown of the mucosal barrier, with the epithelial capillaries becoming the rate-limiting factor in albumin loss. The equation derived to describe the relationship between the reduction in serum albumin (CP) and PLE indicates that gastrointestinal albumin clearance must increase by at least 17 times normal to reduce the CP by half. The strengths and limitations of the two quantitative measures of PLE ((51)Cr-albumin or α1-antitrypsin [αAT] clearance) are reviewed. αAT provides a simple quantitative diagnostic test that is probably underused clinically. The strong, unexplained correlation between minor decreases in CP and subsequent mortality in seemingly healthy individuals raises the question of whether subclinical PLE could account for the decreased CP and, if so, could the mechanism responsible for PLE play a role in the increased mortality? A large-scale study correlating αAT clearance with serum albumin concentrations will be required in order to determine the role of PLE in the regulation of the serum albumin concentration of seemingly healthy

  17. Neurological manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of celiac disease: A comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present as one or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormal...

  18. 42 CFR 70.6 - Apprehension and detention of persons with specific diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... diseases. 70.6 Section 70.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... specific diseases. Regulations prescribed in this part authorize the detention, isolation, quarantine, or... of the communicable diseases listed in an Executive Order setting out a list of...

  19. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Abol Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  20. A comprehensive review of the epidemiology and disease burden of Influenza B in 9 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, Monica; Buijssen, Marleen; Geets, Régine; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije

    2016-04-02

    This review was undertaken to consolidate information on the epidemiology and burden of influenza B, as well as the circulation patterns of influenza B lineage in 9 European countries. Following a comprehensive search of peer-reviewed and gray literature sources, we found that published data on influenza B epidemiology and burden are scarce. Surveillance data show frequent co-circulation of both influenza B lineages during influenza seasons, but little is known about its impact, especially in adults and the clinical burden of influenza B remains unknown. Mismatch between the circulating influenza B lineage and vaccine recommendations has been seen in at least one influenza season in every country. Such observations could impact the effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination programs using trivalent vaccines, which contain only one influenza B lineage (B/Yamagata or B/Victoria) and highlight the need for local studies to better understand the epidemiology and burden of influenza B in these countries.

  1. The sex specificity of navigational strategies in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Laura A; Duffy, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with navigational impairments that limit functional independence. We have now examined the role of cognitive and perceptual mechanisms in the navigational impairment of AD to test the hypothesis that men and women with AD may focus on different navigational cues. We conducted navigational, neuropsychologic, and psychophysical testing in men and women from 3 groups: older normal controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment, and patients with AD. Men and women showed parallel declines in navigational capacities from the older normal control, to the mild cognitive impairment, to the AD groups with men and women making similar numbers of errors but different types of errors. There were small sex differences in neuropsychologic and psychophysical performance but large sex differences in how those measures related to navigational capacity: men showed strong links between visual motion processing and navigation. Women showed strong links between verbal capacities and navigation. The findings of these cross-sectional comparisons suggest that there may be sex differences in the progressive navigational decline of AD: men and women who are impaired to the same degree may suffer somewhat different patterns of decline with men relying more on visuospatial processing and women relying more on verbal mediation.

  2. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. Objective The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. Methods At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Results Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project’s Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620

  3. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-12-02

    The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project's Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620% (95% CI 176%-1777%) for the website

  4. Circulating biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular disease risk; a systematic review and comprehensive overview of meta-analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs C van Holten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of death worldwide. Assessing the risk for cardiovascular disease is an important aspect in clinical decision making and setting a therapeutic strategy, and the use of serological biomarkers may improve this. Despite an overwhelming number of studies and meta-analyses on biomarkers and cardiovascular disease, there are no comprehensive studies comparing the relevance of each biomarker. We performed a systematic review of meta-analyses on levels of serological biomarkers for atherothrombosis to compare the relevance of the most commonly studied biomarkers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Medline and Embase were screened on search terms that were related to "arterial ischemic events" and "meta-analyses". The meta-analyses were sorted by patient groups without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, with cardiovascular disease and heterogeneous groups concerning general populations, groups with and without cardiovascular disease, or miscellaneous. These were subsequently sorted by end-point for cardiovascular disease or stroke and summarized in tables. We have identified 85 relevant full text articles, with 214 meta-analyses. Markers for primary cardiovascular events include, from high to low result: C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, the apolipoprotein A/apolipoprotein B ratio, high density lipoprotein, and vitamin D. Markers for secondary cardiovascular events include, from high to low result: cardiac troponins I and T, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, and cystatin C. For primary stroke, fibrinogen and serum uric acid are strong risk markers. Limitations reside in that there is no acknowledged search strategy for prognostic studies or meta-analyses. CONCLUSIONS: For primary cardiovascular events, markers with strong predictive potential are mainly associated with lipids. For secondary cardiovascular events, markers are more associated with ischemia. Fibrinogen is a

  5. Alloreactivity of Virus-Specific T Cells: Possible Implication of Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Graft-Versus-Leukemia Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Kapp, Markus; Einsele, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution of functional virus-specific T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been intensively investigated. However, the possible role of crossreactivity of these virus-specific T cells against allogeneic targets is still unclear. Theoretically, as in the field of organ transplantation, virus-specific T cells possess crossreactivity potential after allogeneic HSCT. Such crossreactivity is assumed to play a role in graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia effects. In this article, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about crossreactivity of virus-specific T cells. PMID:24133497

  6. Proceedings of a Sickle Cell Disease Ontology workshop — Towards the first comprehensive ontology for Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mulder

    2016-06-01

    The SCD community and H3ABioNet members joined forces at a recent SCD Ontology workshop to develop an ontology covering aspects of SCD under the classes: phenotype, diagnostics, therapeutics, quality of life, disease modifiers and disease stage. The aim of the workshop was for participants to contribute their expertise to development of the structure and contents of the SCD ontology. Here we describe the proceedings of the Sickle Cell Disease Ontology Workshop held in Cape Town South Africa in February 2016 and its outcomes. The objective of the workshop was to bring together experts in SCD from around the world to contribute their expertise to the development of various aspects of the SCD ontology.

  7. Stem Cells, Cell Therapies, and Bioengineering in Lung Biology and Diseases. Comprehensive Review of the Recent Literature 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A conference, “Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases,” was held July 25 to 28, 2011 at the University of Vermont to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are rapidly expanding areas of study that provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, to discuss and debate current controversies, and to identify future research directions and opportunities for basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. The goal of this article, which accompanies the formal conference report, is to provide a comprehensive review of the published literature in lung regenerative medicine from the last conference report through December 2012. PMID:23869446

  8. COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF HYDATID DISEASE OF LIVER AND MANAGEMENT AT PERIPHERAL TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunaharan Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hydatid Disease (HD is a zoonotic disease caused by the larvae of Echinococcosis granulosus, now become a rare clinical entity in teaching medical college hospitals. This is due to the public education about the disease, mode of spread and treatment available. The aim of the study is to review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic methods available, organs affected and treatment available in the tertiary hospitals and outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Data Collection- Patients with upper right abdominal pain with radiological and ultrasound findings are included in the study. About twenty patients are taken for this study. Medical managements, surgical procedure done and outcomes are recorded, tabulated and analysed. Research Design- Prospective Study, Research Setting- KAPV Govt. Medical College and Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Govt. Hospital, Trichy, Tamilnadu. Duration- 7 yrs. (2009 to 2016 Sample Size- Twenty. Inclusion CriteriaPatients between 12 to 70 years of age of both sexes. Patient having right upper abdomen or epigastric pain with positive radiological and ultrasound findings. Patient willing to participate in the study. Exclusion Criteria- Patients more than 70 years not willing to participate in the study patients absconded in between the management. RESULTS Liver is a commonest solid organ affected by the hydatid disease. Most of the diagnosis are made accidentally when the patients are investigated for some other diseases. The commonest clinical presentation is right abdominal or epigastric pain with hepatomegaly. The average age group is 45 years. X-ray abdomen, ultrasound abdomen are the most useful investigations. Asymptomatic uncomplicated small cyst less than 5 cms are managed with medical treatment. Symptomatic large cysts are submitted for surgical intervention. CONCLUSION The main source of income in majority of rural population is agriculture and sheep and cattle grazing. WHO is working towards the

  9. Targeting synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease by administering a specific nutrient combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Nick; Broersen, Laus M; de Wilde, Martijn C; Hageman, Robert J J; Groenendijk, Martine; Sijben, John W C; Kamphuis, Patrick J G H

    2014-01-01

    Synapse loss and synaptic dysfunction are pathological processes already involved in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Synapses consist principally of neuronal membranes, and the neuronal and synaptic losses observed in AD have been linked to the degeneration and altered composition and structure of these membranes. Consequently, synapse loss and membrane-related pathology provide viable targets for intervention in AD. The specific nutrient combination Fortasyn Connect (FC) is designed to ameliorate synapse loss and synaptic dysfunction in AD by addressing distinct nutritional needs believed to be present in these patients. This nutrient combination comprises uridine, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, choline, phospholipids, folic acid, vitamins B12, B6, C, and E, and selenium, and is present in Souvenaid, a medical food intended for use in early AD. It has been hypothesized that FC counteracts synaptic loss and reduces membrane-related pathology in AD by providing nutritional precursors and cofactors that act together to support neuronal membrane formation and function. Preclinical studies formed the basis of this hypothesis which is being validated in a broad clinical study program investigating the potential of this nutrient combination in AD. Memory dysfunction is one key early manifestation in AD and is associated with synapse loss. The clinical studies to date show that the FC-containing medical food improves memory function and preserves functional brain network organization in mild AD compared with controls, supporting the hypothesis that this intervention counteracts synaptic dysfunction. This review provides a comprehensive overview of basic scientific studies that led to the creation of FC and of its effects in various preclinical models.

  10. Domain-specific concept sieving algorithm based on improved comprehensive value%基于综合值修正的领域概念筛选算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦杰; 曹雷; 彭辉; 赖俊

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of domain-specific concept sieving algorithm,the sieving test da-ta was studied,error filtering in some common vocabulary by algorithm were pointed out.The high con-sensus values of common vocabulary led to high comprehensive value were analyzed,the correction param-eters for terminology comprehensive desigued and discussed,the original calculation method improved, and the difference of domain-specific concepts and common vocabulary enlarged.Simulation results show that compared with traditional comprehensive value,the improved comprehensive value has the same vari-ation trend,but larger range.Data experiments results show that the improved algorithm increases the comprehensive value of domain-specific concept,reduces that of common vocabulary,without bringing any im-pact on the sieving of domain-specific concepts,rej ects common vocabulary,and improves the accuracy rate.%为了提高领域概念筛选的准确率,对测试数据进行了筛选,指出了算法误筛选常用词汇的问题,分析了常用词汇的高一致度值导致高综合值的缺陷,设计并探讨了术语综合值修正参数,改进了原有综合值的计算方法,放大了领域概念与常用词汇之间的差别。仿真实验表明,修正后的综合值与原综合值相比,变化趋势一致,但幅度更大。数据实验表明,在不影响领域概念筛选结果的基础上,改进后的筛选算法增大了领域概念的综合值,同时降低了常用词汇的综合值,实现了常用词汇的剔除,提高了准确率。

  11. Motor complications in Parkinson's disease: a comprehensive review of emergent management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques de Sousa, Susana; Massano, João

    2013-11-01

    Motor complications (dyskinesias and motor fluctuations) are a common and disabling problem of dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease, which are often difficult to treat with the current therapeutic strategies. It has been proposed that continuous dopaminergic delivery could reduce the emergence of motor complications, which has been tried with levodopa intestinal infusion or subcutaneous apomorphine infusion. In selected refractory cases, surgical approaches such as deep brain stimulation should be considered. Ongoing clinical and preclinical research tried to lead the field into the discovery of other therapeutic targets and strategies that might prevent or reduce motor complications. These include drugs targeting non-dopaminergic systems (e.g. glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, adenosinergic and cholinergic systems), gene therapy for delivering neurotrophic factors or critical enzymes for dopamine synthesis, and cell therapy. These studies found variable results, some of them promising, with the possibility of new therapeutic armamentarium in the management of Parkinson's disease in the near future.

  12. Protective Effects of Panax Notoginseng Saponins on Cardiovascular Diseases: A Comprehensive Overview of Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS are one of the most important compounds derived from roots of the herb Panax notoginseng which are traditionally used as a hemostatic medicine to control internal and external bleeding in China for thousands of years. To date, at least twenty saponins were identified and some of them including notoginsenoside R1, ginsenoside Rb1, and ginsenoside Rg1 were researched frequently in the area of cardiovascular protection. However, the protective effects of PNS on cardiovascular diseases based on experimental studies and its underlying mechanisms have not been reviewed systematically. This paper reviewed the pharmacology of PNS and its monomers Rb1, Rg1, and R1 in the treatment for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Vitamin D and its effects on cardiovascular diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Aptilon-Duque, Gad; Nostroza-Hernández, María Cristina; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Blachman-Braun, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Vitamin D is a molecule that is actively involved in multiple metabolic pathways. It is mostly known for its implications related to calcium metabolism. It has also been determined that it actively participates in the cardiovascular system, influencing blood pressure, coronary artery disease and other vascular diseases, such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, it has been established that this vitamin is extensively involved in the regulation of both the renin angiotensin aldosterone system and the immune system. In this review, we present the different vitamin D metabolic pathways associated with the cardiovascular pathophysiology, and we include studies in animal and human models, as well as some of the controversies found in the literature. This review also incorporates an overview of the implications in the molecular biology and public health fields.

  14. [Experiences of comprehensive control of parasitic diseases in demonstration plot of Xiangyun County, Yunnan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Bo, Wang; Yan-Hong, Li; Wen-Juan, Li; Du, Zun-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Yong

    2011-10-01

    We established and perfected the system of control work, achieved the expected targets, and explored the advisable pattern for prevention and control on soil-transmitted nematode diseases. To perform the prevention and control on soil-transmitted nematodiasis, there should be the guidance of government, the multi-sectoral cooperation, community participation, paying attention to the organization and management, and highlighting the key points including education and deworming.

  15. Longitudinal patterns of predominant asthma disease activity in pediatric patients enrolled in an asthma-specific disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lyne; Nichols, Breck; Choi Kwong, Kenny Yat; Morphew, Tricia; Jones, Craig A

    2008-08-01

    To determine if patterns of predominant asthma disease activity are more closely related than baseline asthma severity to measures of morbidity (acute asthma attack, emergency room visit/hospitalization, missed school days, and/or steroid burst). Retrospective analysis was performed for inner-city Los Angeles asthmatic children (3 to 18 years of age) during their first year of enrollment in an asthma-specific disease management program. All measures of morbidity were more closely related to patterns of predominant disease activity than baseline severity. We conclude that patterns of predominant disease activity are a more significant predictor of asthma morbidity than is baseline severity.

  16. Detector to detector corrections: a comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azangwe, Godfrey; Grochowska, Paulina; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially u...... measurements, the authors recommend the use of detectors that require relatively little correction, such as unshielded diodes, diamond detectors or microchambers, and solid state detectors such as alanine, TLD, Al2O3:C, or scintillators.......Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially...... useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm2 to 4.2 × 4.2 cm2 and the measurements were extended to larger fields...

  17. Content Validity of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases: An International Delphi Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Andrea; Kirchberger, Inge; Cieza, Alarcos; Stucki, Gerold; Stucki, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The "Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD)" is an application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and represents the typical spectrum of problems in functioning of patients with COPD. The objective of this study was to validate this ICF Core Set from the perspective of physicians. Physicians experienced in COPD treatment were asked about the patients' problems treated by physicians in patients with COPD in a three-round electronic mail survey using the Delphi technique. Responses were linked to the ICF. Seventy-six physicians in 44 countries gave a total of 1330 responses that were linked to 148 different ICF categories. Nine ICF categories were not represented in the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for COPD although at least 75% of the participants have rated them as important. Nineteen concepts were linked to the not yet developed ICF component personal factors and seventeen concepts were not covered by the ICF. The high percentage of ICF categories represented in the ICF Core Set for COPD indicates satisfactory content validity from the perspective of the physicians. However, some issues were raised that were not covered and need to be investigated further.

  18. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined to multivariate data analysis for detection of disease-resistant clones of Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantao, Leandro Wang; Toledo, Bruna Regina; Ribeiro, Fabiana Alves de Lima; Pizetta, Marilia; Pierozzi, Caroline Geraldi; Furtado, Edson Luiz; Augusto, Fabio

    2013-11-15

    In this paper it is reported the use of the chromatographic profiles from volatile fractions of plant clones - in this case, hybrids of Eucalyptus grandis×Eucalyptus urophylla - to determine specimens susceptible to rust disease. The analytes were isolated by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined to fast quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC×GC-qMS). Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) was employed for estimate the correlation between the chromatographic profiles and resistance against Eucalyptus rust, after preliminary variable selection performed by Fisher ratio analysis. The proposed method allowed the differentiation between susceptible and non-susceptible clones and determination of three resistance biomarkers. This approach can be a valuable alternative for the otherwise time-consuming and labor-intensive methods commonly used.

  19. Recent advances in transplantation for primary immune deficiency diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena, M Teresa; Nelson, Robert P

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapeutic option for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a group of diseases which otherwise carry life expectancies that are of limited duration and quality. Survival following HCT for SCID has improved from approximately 23 to 91 % over the last 40 years. Success with SCID prompted efforts to apply HCT to the therapeutic challenge of well over 20 molecularly defined primary immune deficiency diseases (PID). Such success is due to both early recognition of PIDs and advances in the field of transplantation. Such advances include high-resolution HLA DNA donor-recipient matching, expansion of donor sources, better tolerated conditioning, new antibiotics, and wider availability. International collaborative efforts have provided patients and caregivers information that permit better treatment decisions now, and direct clinicians and investigators to ensure progress in the future. Pioneers in screening for SCID have taken steps to correct the fundamental challenge to successful treatment, which is the rapid discovery and characterization of cases and offering the transplant option to an affected child early in life; blood spot testing for T and B cell receptor quantification is now available to a growing fraction of newborns. Organizations including the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium in the USA, The European Society for Primary Immunodeficiency, the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, the United States Immunodeficiency Network, the Immune Deficiency Foundation, and the Jeffrey Modell Foundation are contributing mightily to increase awareness and standardize optimal utilization to the benefit of patients. This review will update the allergist-immunologist concerning disease presentations, indications for transplantation, methodologies, conditioning regimens, and clinical outcomes for patients with PID for which timely HCT is

  20. Comprehensive mutation screening for 10 genes in Chinese patients suffering very early onset inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan; Wang, Xin-Qiong; Yu, Yi; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Gong, Ling; Zhou, Tong; Li, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chun-Di

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform sequencing analysis in patients with very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD) to determine the genetic basis for VEO-IBD in Chinese pediatric patients. METHODS: A total of 13 Chinese pediatric patients with VEO-IBD were diagnosed from May 2012 and August 2014. The relevant clinical characteristics of these patients were analyzed. Then DNA in the peripheral blood from patients was extracted. Next generation sequencing (NGS) based on an Illumina-Miseq platform was used to analyze the exons in the coding regions of 10 candidate genes: IL-10, IL-10RA, IL-10RB, NOD2, FUT2, IL23R, GPR35, GPR65, TNFSF15, and ADAM30. The Sanger sequencing was used to verify the variations detected in NGS. RESULTS: Out of the 13 pediatric patients, ten were diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, and three diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. Mutations in IL-10RA and IL-10RB were detected in five patients. There were four patients who had single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with IBD. Two patients had IL-10RA and FUT2 polymorphisms, and two patients had IL-10RB and FUT2 polymorphisms. Gene variations were not found in the rest four patients. Children with mutations had lower percentile body weight (1.0% vs 27.5%, P = 0.002) and hemoglobin (87.4 g/L vs 108.5 g/L, P = 0.040) when compared with children without mutations. Although the age of onset was earlier, height was shorter, and the response to treatment was poorer in the mutation group, there was no significant difference in these factors between groups. CONCLUSION: IL-10RA and IL-10RB mutations are common in Chinese children with VEO-IBD. Patients with mutations have an earlier disease onset, lower body weight and hemoglobin, and poorer prognosis. PMID:27350736

  1. Disease-specific direct-to-consumer advertising for reminding consumers to take medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutada, Nilesh S; Rollins, Brent L

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between disease-specific direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising, via traditional advertising effectiveness measures, and consumers' self-reported medication-taking behavior. Data were gathered for 514 respondents (age 18 and above) using an online survey panel. Participants were exposed to a disease-specific (i.e., nonbranded) DTC advertising for depression. The advertising stimulus created for the study was based on the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for disease-specific DTC advertising and modeled after current print disease-specific DTC advertising. Participants reviewed the advertising stimulus through the online program and then responded to a questionnaire containing closed-ended questions assessing the constructs. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests. All tests were interpreted at an a priori alpha of 0.05. Significantly more respondents who were highly involved, paid more attention to the advertisement, and were responsive to DTC advertisements in the past indicated that the disease-specific DTC advertising stimulus reminded them to take their depression and other medications. These exploratory results show disease-specific DTC advertising can help people remember to take their prescription medication when viewed, which may lead to more positive medication-taking behavior and increased medication adherence. Additionally, given the fair balance and legal issues surrounding product-specific DTC advertising, disease-specific DTC advertising can serve as an effective component of the marketing mix for pharmaceutical manufacturers. Future research should attempt to study the impact of disease-specific DTC advertising on consumers' actual medication adherence using standardized adherence measures such as prescription records.

  2. Dupuytren Disease: Is There Enough Comprehensive Patient Information on the Internet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Grzegorz; Reinisch, Katharina B; Raptis, Dimitri A; Fertsch, Sonia; Guggenheim, Merlin; Palma, Adrian F

    2017-06-22

    Dupuytren disease is a chronic nonmalign fibroproliferative disorder that causes finger contractures via proliferation of new tissue under the glabrous skin of the hand, resulting in multiple functional limitations for the patient. As many surgical therapy options exist, patients suffering from this condition actively search for information in their environment before consulting a health professional. As little is known about the quality of Web-based patient information, the aim of this study was to conduct its systematic evaluation using a validated tool. A total of 118 websites were included, and qualitative and quantitative assessment was performed using the modified Ensuring Quality Information for Patients (EQIP) tool. This standardized and reproducible tool consists of 36 items to assess available information in three categories: contents, identification, and structure data. Scientific data with restricted access, duplicates, and irrelevant websites were not included. Only 32 websites addressed more than 19 items, and the scores did not significantly differ among the website developers. The median number of items from the EQIP tool was 16, with the top websites addressing 28 out of 36 items. The quality of the newly developed websites did not increase with passing time. This study revealed several shortcomings in the quality of Web-based information available for patients suffering from Dupuytren disease. In the world of continuously growing and instantly available Web-based information, it is the health providers' negligence of the last two decades that there are very few good quality, informative, and educative websites that could be recommended to patients.

  3. Demencia en la enfermedad de Alzheimer: un enfoque integral Dementia in Alzheimer's disease: a comprehensive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor T. Pérez Martínez

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El substrato patológico de la principal de las demencias, lo constituyen las siguientes lesiones: la degeneración neurofibrilar abundante y difusa, las placas neuríticas y el depósito anormal de sustancia amiloide en el cerebro, causante de la toxicidad cerebral. La demencia en la enfermedad de Alzheimer cumple con un patrón clínico-topográfico de tipo cortical característico. Su diagnóstico definitivo es anatomopatológico, pero se puede establecer un diagnóstico probable basado en la clínica y en la evaluación neuropsicológica. No existe tratamiento efectivo concluyente para el deterioro cognitivo de la enfermedad de Alzheimer.The pathological substrate of the main dementia is composed of the following lesions: the diffuse and abundant neurofibrillar degeneration, the neuritic plaques and the abnormal deposit of amyloid substance in the brain, causing cerebral toxicity. Dementia in Alzheimer's disease accomplishes a clinicotopographic pattern of characteristic cortical type. Its definitive diagnosis is anatomopathological, but a probable diagnosis based on the clinic and the neuropsychological evaluation can be established. There is no a concluding effective treatment for the cognitive deterioration of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Lung involvement in connective tissue diseases: a comprehensive review and a focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigliano, Benedetta; Soriano, Alessandra; Margiotta, Domenico; Vadacca, Marta; Afeltra, Antonella

    2013-09-01

    The lungs are frequently involved in Connective Tissue Diseases (CTDs). Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the most common pleuropulmonary manifestations that affects prognosis significantly. In practice, rheumatologists and other physicians tend to underestimate the impact of CTD-ILDs and diagnose respiratory impairment when it has reached an irreversible fibrotic stage. Early investigation, through clinical evidence, imaging and - in certain cases - lung biopsy, is therefore warranted in order to detect a possible ILD at a reversible initial inflammatory stage. In this review, we focus on lung injury during CTDs, with particular attention to ILDs, and examine their prevalence, clinical manifestations and histological patterns, as well as therapeutic approaches and known complications till date. Although several therapeutic agents have been approved, the best treatment is still not certain and additional trials are required, which demand more knowledge of pulmonary involvement in CTDs. Our central aim is therefore to document the impact that lung damage has on CTDs. We will mainly focus on Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), which - unlike other rheumatic disorders - resembles Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) in numerous aspects.

  5. A Comprehensive Review on Dry Eye Disease: Diagnosis, Medical Management, Recent Developments, and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna P. Phadatare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndrome (DES or keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS is a common disorder of the tear film caused by decreased tear production or increased evaporation and manifests with a wide variety of signs and symptoms. The present review from interpretation of the literature gives detailed information on the prevalence, definition, causes, diagnostic tests, and medical management of dry eye disease. A number of systems contribute to the physiological integrity of the ocular surface and disruption of system may or may not produce symptoms. Therefore accurate diagnosis of dry eyes with no or minimal disruption of physiological function is necessary. The paper also discusses different colloidal drug delivery systems and current challenges in the development of topical ophthalmic drug delivery systems for treatment of KCS. Due to the wide prevalence and number of factors involved, newer, more sensitive diagnostic techniques and novel therapeutic agents have been developed to provide ocular delivery systems with high therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this review is to provide awareness among the patients, health care professionals, and researchers about diagnosis and treatment of KCS and recent developments and future challenges in management of dry eye disease.

  6. Simultaneous detection of celiac disease-specific IgA antibodies and total IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Kai; Röber, Nadja; Hiemann, Rico; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter; Reinhold, Dirk; Laass, Martin W; Conrad, Karsten; Roggenbuck, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) serology requires analysis of tissue transglutaminase type-2 (TG2autoAbs), deamidated gliadin (DGAbs), and as reference endomysial autoantibodies (EmA). Total IgA assessment helps to determine IgA-deficient CD patients. The novel multiplex indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) technique CytoBead was used to develop the first quantitative one-step serological CD assay comprising both simultaneous IgA autoAb and total IgA testing. CytoBead CeliAK detecting TG2autoAb, DGAb, EmA, and simultaneously total IgA uses fluorescent microparticles for antigen and antibody immobilization along with monkey-esophagus tissue sections on glass slides. The assay was interpreted visually by classical fluorescent microscopy and digital IIF using AKLIDES(®). Overall, 380 samples (155 CD patients, 5 with IgA deficiency, 68 with cystic fibrosis, 59 with eye disease, 93 blood donors) were run for performance analysis. Data were compared with classical IgA autoAb analysis by ELISA and IIF. Comparing CD-specific IgA autoAb testing by CytoBead with classical IIF and ELISA, very good agreements for EmA, TG2autoAb, and DGAb were determined (Cohen's κ = 0.98, 0.96, 0.85, respectively). The difference between multiplex and single testing revealed a significant difference for TG2autoAb testing only (McNemar, p = 0.0078). Four CD patients and 4 controls demonstrated TG2autoAb positivity by ELISA but were negative by CytoBead. Further, 140/155 (90.9 %) CD patients demonstrated TG2autoAb levels above ten times the upper normal and all five IgA-deficient samples IgA levels IgA deficiency analyses comparable with classical testing by single-parameter assays. Thus, comprehensive CD serology by CytoBead can alleviate the workload in routine laboratories.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of gene-expression profile in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lei Wei,1,* Dong Xu,2,* Yechang Qian,1 Guoyi Huang,1 Wei Ma,1 Fangying Liu,1 Yanhua Shen,1 Zhongfu Wang,1 Li Li,1 Shanfang Zhang,1 Yafang Chen1 1Department of Respiratory Disease, Baoshan District Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Shanghai, 2Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To investigate the gene-expression profile of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients and explore the possible therapeutic targets. Methods: The microarray raw dataset GSE29133, including three COPD samples and three normal samples, was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. After data preprocessing with the Affy package, Student’s t-test was employed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs. The up- and downregulated DEGs were then pooled for gene-ontology and pathway-enrichment analyses using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID. The upstream regulatory elements of these DEGs were also explored by using Whole-Genome rVISTA. Furthermore, we constructed a protein–protein interaction (PPI network for DEGs. The surfactant protein D (SP-D serum level and HLA-A gene frequency in COPD patients and healthy controls were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Results: A total of 39 up- and 15 downregulated DEGs were screened. Most of the upregulated genes were involved in the immune response process, while the downregulated genes were involved in the steroid metabolic process. Moreover, we also found that HLA-A has the highest degree in the PPI network. The SP-D serum level and HLA-A gene frequency in COPD patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (13.62±2.09 ng/mL vs 10.28±2.86 ng/mL; 62.5% vs 12.5%; P<0.05. Conclusion: Our results may help further the understanding of the mechanisms of

  8. Communicating effectiveness of intervention for chronic diseases: what single format can replace comprehensive information?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovring, Henrik; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Kristiansen, Ivar S

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about how GPs should convey information about treatment effectiveness to their patients in the context of cardiovascular disease. Hence we study the concordance of decisions based on one of four single information formats for treatment effectiveness with subsequent...... (NNT), or prolongation of life (POL) without heart attack, and were asked whether they would consent to treatment. Subsequently the same information was conveyed with all four formats jointly accompanied by a pictorial presentation of treatment effectiveness. Again, subjects should consider consent...... to treatment. RESULTS: After being informed about all four formats, 52%-79% of the respondents consented to treatment, depending on level of effectiveness and initial information format. Overall, ARR gave highest concordance, 94% (95% confidence interval (91%; 97%)) between initial and final decision, but ARR...

  9. Comprehensive Assessment of Oxidatively Induced Modifications of DNA in a Rat Model of Human Wilson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Guerrero, Candace R; Liu, Shuo; Amato, Nicholas J; Sharma, Yogeshwar; Gupta, Sanjeev; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-03-01

    Defective copper excretion from hepatocytes in Wilson's disease causes accumulation of copper ions with increased generation of reactive oxygen species via the Fenton-type reaction. Here we developed a nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with the isotope-dilution method for the simultaneous quantification of oxidatively induced DNA modifications. This method enabled measurement, in microgram quantities of DNA, of four oxidative stress-induced lesions, including direct ROS-induced purine cyclonucleosides (cPus) and two exocyclic adducts induced by byproducts of lipid peroxidation, i.e. 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (εdA) and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (εdG). Analysis of liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, which constitute an animal model of human Wilson's disease, and their healthy counterparts [i.e. Long-Evans Agouti rats] showed significantly higher levels of all four DNA lesions in Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats. Moreover, cPus were present at much higher levels than εdA and εdG lesions. In contrast, the level of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-HmdC), an oxidation product of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-mdC), was markedly lower in the liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats, though no differences were observed for the levels of 5-mdC. In vitro biochemical assay showed that Cu(2+) ions could directly inhibit the activity of Tet enzymes. Together, these results suggest that aberrant copper accumulation may perturb genomic stability by elevating oxidatively induced DNA lesions, and by altering epigenetic pathways of gene regulation.

  10. Development of disease-specific quality indicators for danish chiropractic patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Line P; Krog, Birgitte R; Kongsted, Alice;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop disease-specific quality indicators for Danish chiropractic patients with low back pain (LBP) as an initial effort to include chiropractors in the Danish Health Care Quality Programme.......The purpose of this study is to develop disease-specific quality indicators for Danish chiropractic patients with low back pain (LBP) as an initial effort to include chiropractors in the Danish Health Care Quality Programme....

  11. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Part II: specific underlying renal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Ramin, Susan M

    2008-08-01

    The obstetric outcome in women with kidney disease has improved in recent years due to continuous progress in obstetrics and neonatology, as well as better medical management of hypertension and renal disease. However, every pregnancy in these women remains a high-risk pregnancy. When considering the interaction between renal disease and pregnancy, maternal outcomes are related to the initial level of renal dysfunction more than to the specific underlying disease. With regards to fetal outcomes, though, a distinction may exist between renal dysfunction resulting from primary renal disease and that in which renal involvement is part of a systemic disease. In part II of this review, some specific causes of renal failure affecting pregnancy are considered.

  12. Effect of smoking on inflammatory bowel disease: Is it disease or organ specific?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Karban; R Eliakim

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with differing effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Never smoking and formerly smoking increase the risk of UC,whereas smoking exacerbates the course of CD. The potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are yet unknown. A reasonable assumption is that smoking has different effects on the small and large intestine. This assumption is based on animal and human studies that show that the effects of smoking/nicotine on CD and UC depend on the site of inflammation and not on the type of disease.

  13. Reduced peripheral and mucosal Tropheryma whipplei-specific Th1 response in patients with Whipple's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Verena; Kunkel, Désirée; Marth, Thomas; Feurle, Gerhard E; LaScola, Bernard; Ignatius, Ralf; Zeitz, Martin; Schneider, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Whipple's disease is a rare infectious disorder caused by Tropheryma whipplei. Major symptoms are arthropathy, weight loss, and diarrhea, but the CNS and other organs may be affected, too. The incidence of Whipple's disease is very low despite the ubiquitous presence of T. whipplei in the environment. Therefore, it has been suggested that host factors indicated by immune deficiencies are responsible for the development of Whipple's disease. However, T. whipplei-specific T cell responses could not be studied until now, because cultivation of the bacteria was established only recently. Thus, the availability of T. whipplei Twist-Marseille(T) has enabled the first analysis of T. whipplei-specific reactivity of CD4(+) T cells. A robust T. whipplei-specific CD4(+) Th1 reactivity and activation (expression of CD154) was detected in peripheral and duodenal lymphocytes of all healthy (16 young, 27 age-matched, 11 triathletes) and disease controls (17 patients with tuberculosis) tested. However, 32 Whipple's disease patients showed reduced or absent T. whipplei-specific Th1 responses, whereas their capacity to react to other common Ags like tetanus toxoid, tuberculin, actinomycetes, Giardia lamblia, or CMV was not reduced compared with controls. Hence, we conclude that an insufficient T. whipplei-specific Th1 response may be responsible for an impaired immunological clearance of T. whipplei in Whipple's disease patients and may contribute to the fatal natural course of the disease.

  14. Are Classification Criteria for IgG4-RD Now Possible? The Concept of IgG4-Related Disease and Proposal of Comprehensive Diagnostic Criteria in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuichi Okazaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest simultaneous or metachronous lesions in multiorgans characterized by elevated serum levels of IgG4 and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells with various degrees of fibrosis. Two Japanese research committees for IgG4-RD, one from fibrosclerosis (Okazaki team and the other from lymph proliferation (Umehara team supported by the “Research Program for Intractable Disease” of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare of Japan, have agreed with the unified nomenclature as “IgG4-RD” and proposed the comprehensive diagnostic criteria (CDC for IgG4-RD. Validation of the CDC demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity for the practical use of general physicians and nonspecialists but low sensitivity in the organs to be difficult in taking biopsy specimens such as type1 autoimmune pancreatitis (IgG4-related AIP, compared with IgG4-related sialadenitis/dacryoadenitis (Mikulicz's disease and IgG4-related kidney disease. Although the diagnostic criteria covering all IgG4-RD are hard to be established, combination with the CDC and organ-specific diagnostic criteria should improve sensitivity.

  15. Gender-specific changes in quality of life following cardiovascular disease: A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, C.H.M.; Sanderman, R.; Ranchor, A.V; Ormel, J.; Van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Kempen, G.I J M

    2002-01-01

    Gender-specific changes in Quality of Life (QoL) following cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied in 208 patients to determine whether gender-related differences in postmorbid QoL result from differences in disease severity, premorbid QoL, or different CVD-related recovery. Premorbid data were

  16. Gender-specific changes in quality of life following cardiovascular disease : A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, C.H.; Sanderman, R.; Ranchor, A.V.; Ormel, J.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Kempen, G.I.

    2002-01-01

    Gender-specific changes in Quality of Life (QoL) following cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied in 208 patients to determine whether gender-related differences in postmorbid QoL result from differences in disease severity, premorbid QoL, or different CVD-related recovery. Premorbid data were

  17. Gender-specific changes in quality of life following cardiovascular disease : A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, C.H.; Sanderman, R.; Ranchor, A.V.; Ormel, J.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Kempen, G.I.

    2002-01-01

    Gender-specific changes in Quality of Life (QoL) following cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied in 208 patients to determine whether gender-related differences in postmorbid QoL result from differences in disease severity, premorbid QoL, or different CVD-related recovery. Premorbid data were av

  18. Gender-specific changes in quality of life following cardiovascular disease: A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, C.H.M.; Sanderman, R.; Ranchor, A.V; Ormel, J.; Van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Kempen, G.I J M

    2002-01-01

    Gender-specific changes in Quality of Life (QoL) following cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied in 208 patients to determine whether gender-related differences in postmorbid QoL result from differences in disease severity, premorbid QoL, or different CVD-related recovery. Premorbid data were av

  19. Generic and disease-specific quality of life and its predictors among Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yingchun; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Jiankui; Zhou, Yuqiu; Yu, Jianying

    2015-08-30

    This study aims to describe generic and disease-specific quality of life (QOL) and its predictors among Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia. A total of 209 subjects participated in this study: 121 men and 88 women. Their ages ranged from 18 to 64, with a mean age of 33.85 (S.D.=10.84). The total scores of generic and disease-specific QOL were statistically significant, correlated with patients׳ total symptom severity scores and social support scores (all P values less than 0.01). Multiple regression analysis revealed that monthly household income and subjective social support were statistically significant predictors of generic and disease-specific QOL. Duration of hospitalization, support use degree, negative and general psychopathology symptoms were additional significant predictors of disease-specific QOL. This study suggests the importance of improving subjective social support in order to promote generic and disease-specific QOL. Controlling negative and general psychopathology symptoms and improving support use degree could additionally enhance the disease-specific QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Communicating effectiveness of intervention for chronic diseases: what single format can replace comprehensive information?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiansen Ivar S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is uncertainty about how GPs should convey information about treatment effectiveness to their patients in the context of cardiovascular disease. Hence we study the concordance of decisions based on one of four single information formats for treatment effectiveness with subsequent decisions based on all four formats combined with a pictorial representation. Methods A randomized study comprising 1,169 subjects aged 40–59 in Odense, Denmark. Subjects were randomized to receive information in terms of absolute risk reduction (ARR, relative risk reduction (RRR, number needed to treat (NNT, or prolongation of life (POL without heart attack, and were asked whether they would consent to treatment. Subsequently the same information was conveyed with all four formats jointly accompanied by a pictorial presentation of treatment effectiveness. Again, subjects should consider consent to treatment. Results After being informed about all four formats, 52%–79% of the respondents consented to treatment, depending on level of effectiveness and initial information format. Overall, ARR gave highest concordance, 94% (95% confidence interval (91%; 97% between initial and final decision, but ARR was not statistically superior to the other formats. Conclusion Decisions based on ARR had the best concordance with decisions based on all four formats and pictorial representation, but the difference in concordance between the four formats was small, and it is unclear whether respondents fully understood the information they received.

  1. Comprehensive study of early features in spinocerebellar ataxia 2: delineating the prodromal stage of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Cruz-Rivas, Edilia M; Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Lilia-Campins, Jandy; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Peña-Acosta, Arnoy; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimeé; Diaz, Rosalinda; Magaña-Aguirre, Jonathan J; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; Estupiñán-Rodríguez, Annelié; Laffita-Mesa, José M; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Canales-Ochoa, Nalia; González-Zaldivar, Yanetza

    2014-10-01

    The prodromal phase of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) has not been systematically studied. Main findings come from a homogeneous SCA type 2 (SCA2) population living in Cuba. The aim of this study was to characterize extensively the prodromal phase of SCA2 by several approaches. Thirty-seven non-ataxic SCA2 mutation carriers and its age- and sex-matched controls underwent clinical assessments, including standardized neurological exam, structured interviews and clinical scales, and looking for somatic and autonomic features, as well as a neuropsychological battery, antisaccadic recordings, and MRI scans. Main clinical somatic features of non-ataxic mutation carriers were cramps, sensory symptoms, sleep disorders, and hyperreflexia, whereas predominating autonomic symptoms were pollakiuria/nocturia, constipation, and frequent throat clearing. Cognitive impairments included early deficits of executive functions and visual memory, suggesting the involvement of cerebro-cerebellar-cerebral loops and/or reduced cholinergic basal forebrain input to the cortex. Antisaccadic task revealed impaired oculomotor inhibitory control but preserved ability for error correction. Cognitive and antisaccadic deficits were higher as carriers were closer to the estimated onset of ataxia, whereas higher Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) scores were associated most notably to vermis atrophy. The recognition of early features of SCA2 offers novel insights into the prodromal phase and physiopathological base of the disease, allowing the assessment of its progression and the efficacy of treatments, in particular at early phases when therapeutical options should be most effective.

  2. Gambling Disorder during Dopamine Replacement Treatment in Parkinson’s Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Pirritano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambling Disorder (GD is characterized by “the failure to resist gambling impulses despite severe personal, family or occupational consequences”. In the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V, GD replaces the DSM-IV diagnosis of Pathological Gambling (PG. GD estimated prevalence ranges between 0.4% and 3.4% within the adult population and it seems to be more common in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. In this population, GD recently has become more widely recognized as a possible complication of dopamine agonist (DA therapy. This association has aroused great interest for the dramatic impact GD has on patients’ quality of life. Management of PG in patients with PD could be demanding. It is based on patient and caregiver education, modification of dopamine replacement therapy, and in some cases psychoactive drug administration. In this review article, the authors provide an overview of GD pathogenesis during DA therapy as well as a summary of available treatment options.

  3. The discovery of how gender influences age immunological mechanisms in health and disease, and the identification of ageing gender-specific biomarkers, could lead to specifically tailored treatment and ultimately improve therapeutic success rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berghella Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The control of human health and diseases in the elderly population is becoming a challenge, since mean age and life expectation are progressively increasing as well as chronic degenerative diseases. These disorders are of complex diagnosis and they are difficult to be treated, but it is hoped that the predictive medicine will lead to more specific and effective treatment by using specific markers to identify persons with high risk of developing disease, before the clinical manifestation. Peripheral blood targets and biomarkers are currently the most practical, non-invasive means of disease diagnosing, predicting prognosis and therapeutic response. Human longevity is directly correlated with the optimal functioning of the immune system. Recent findings indicate that the sexual dimorphism of T helper (Th cytokine pathways and the regulation of Th cell network homeostasis are normally present in the immune response and undergoes to adverse changes with ageing. Furthermore, immune senescence affects both men and women, but it does not affect them equally. Therefore, we hypothesize that the comprehension of the interferences between these gender specific pathways, the ageing immunological mechanism in pathological or healthy state and the current therapies, could lead to specifically tailored treatment and eventually improve the therapeutic success rates. Reaching this aim requires the identification of ageing gender-specific biomarkers that could easily reveal the above mentioned correlations.

  4. Determination of disease biomarkers in Eucalyptus by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantao, Leandro Wang; Aleme, Helga Gabriela; Passador, Martha Maria; Furtado, Edson Luiz; Ribeiro, Fabiana Alves de Lima; Poppi, Ronei Jesus; Augusto, Fabio

    2013-03-01

    In this paper is reported the use of the chromatographic profiles of volatiles to determine disease markers in plants - in this case, leaves of Eucalyptus globulus contaminated by the necrotroph fungus Teratosphaeria nubilosa. The volatile fraction was isolated by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-fast quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC×GC-qMS). For the correlation between the metabolic profile described by the chromatograms and the presence of the infection, unfolded-partial least squares discriminant analysis (U-PLS-DA) with orthogonal signal correction (OSC) were employed. The proposed method was checked to be independent of factors such as the age of the harvested plants. The manipulation of the mathematical model obtained also resulted in graphic representations similar to real chromatograms, which allowed the tentative identification of more than 40 compounds potentially useful as disease biomarkers for this plant/pathogen pair. The proposed methodology can be considered as highly reliable, since the diagnosis is based on the whole chromatographic profile rather than in the detection of a single analyte.

  5. Comprehensive metabolomics identified lipid peroxidation as a prominent feature in human plasma of patients with coronary heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is a complex human disease associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The underlying mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers for the different types of CHD remain poorly defined. Metabolomics has been increasingly recognized as an enabling technique with the potential to identify key metabolomic features in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology and differentiate different stages of CHD. We performed comprehensive metabolomic analysis in human plasma from 28 human subjects with stable angina (SA, myocardial infarction (MI, and healthy control (HC. Subsequent analysis demonstrated a uniquely altered metabolic profile in these CHD: a total of 18, 37 and 36 differential metabolites were identified to distinguish SA from HC, MI from SA, and MI from HC groups respectively. Among these metabolites, glycerophospholipid (GPL metabolism emerged as the most significantly disturbed pathway. Next, we used a targeted metabolomic approach to systematically analyze GPL, oxidized phospholipid (oxPL, and downstream metabolites derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, such as arachidonic acid and linoleic acid. Surprisingly, lipids associated with lipid peroxidation (LPO pathways including oxidized PL and isoprostanes, isomers of prostaglandins, were significantly elevated in plasma of MI patients comparing to HC and SA, consistent with the notion that oxidative stress-induced LPO is a prominent feature in CHD. Our studies using the state-of-the-art metabolomics help to understand the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CHD; LPO metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers to differentiation MI from SA and HC.

  6. Comprehensive Survey of Domiciliary Triatomine Species Capable of Transmitting Chagas Disease in Southern Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J Grijalva

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is endemic to the southern Andean region of Ecuador, an area with one of the highest poverty rates in the country. However, few studies have looked into the epidemiology, vectors and transmission risks in this region. In this study we describe the triatomine household infestation in Loja province, determine the rate of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in triatomines and study the risk factors associated with infestation.An entomological survey found four triatomine species (Rhodnius ecuadoriensis, Triatoma carrioni, Panstrongylus chinai, and P. rufotuberculatus infesting domiciles in 68% of the 92 rural communities examined. Nine percent of domiciles were infested, and nymphs were observed in 80% of the infested domiciles. Triatomines were found in all ecological regions below 2,200 masl. We found R. ecuadoriensis (275 to 1948 masl and T. carrioni (831 to 2242 masl mostly in bedrooms within the domicile, and they were abundant in chicken coops near the domicile. Established colonies of P. chinai (175 to 2003 masl and P. rufotuberculatus (404 to 1613 masl also were found in the domicile. Triatomine infestation was associated with surrogate poverty indicators, such as poor sanitary infrastructure (lack of latrine/toilet [w = 0.95], sewage to environment [w = 1.0]. Vegetation type was a determinant of infestation [w = 1.0] and vector control program insecticide spraying was a protective factor [w = 1.0]. Of the 754 triatomines analyzed, 11% were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and 2% were infected with T. rangeli.To date, only limited vector control efforts have been implemented. Together with recent reports of widespread sylvatic triatomine infestation and frequent post-intervention reinfestation, these results show that an estimated 100,000 people living in rural areas of southern Ecuador are at high risk for T. cruzi infection. Therefore, there is a need for a systematic, sustained, and monitored vector control intervention that is

  7. Specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens and development of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic and autoimmune diseases have been suggested to be inversely associated. We investigated the association between atopy and development of any and specific types of autoimmune disease. METHODS: We included a total of 14,849 individuals from five population-based studies...... with measurements of atopy defined as specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens. We followed the participants by linkage to the Danish National Patient Register (median follow-up time 11.2 years). Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of autoimmune disease were estimated by Cox regression...

  8. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2014-06-17

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, "targeted therapy" that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  9. Comprehensive mapping of antigen specific T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infected patients with or without spontaneous viral clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shasha; Yan, Hongqing; Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Yonghong; Tu, Zhengkun; Hao, Pei; Chen, Xinyue; Zhong, Jin; Niu, Junqi; Jin, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating protective immunity against HCV is important for the development of a preventative vaccine. We hypothesize that spontaneous resolution of acute HCV infection offers clue to protective immune responses, and that DAA therapy affects the quality and quantity of HCV-specific T cell responses. To test these hypotheses, we performed T cell epitope mapping in 111 HCV-infected individuals including 61 chronically HCV-1b (CHC-1b) infected, 24 chronically HCV-2a (CHC-2a) infected and 26 spontaneously recovered (SPR) patients with 376 overlapping peptides covering the entire HCV polyprotein. Selected T cell epitopes were then used to evaluate T cell responses in another 22 chronically HCV-1b infected patients on DAA therapy. Results showed that SPR had better HCV-specific T cell responses than CHC, as manifested by higher response rate, greater magnitude and broader epitope coverage. In addition, SPR recognized novel epitopes in Core, E1, E2, NS4B, NS5A regions that were not present in the CHC. Furthermore, during the first 24 weeks of DAA therapy, there was no functional immune reconstitution of HCV-specific T cells. These results indicate that T cell responses may be a correlate of protection. Therefore, effective preventative vaccines should elicit a robust T cell response. Although various DAA regimens efficiently cleared viruses from the blood of HCV-infected patients, there was no contemporaneous early T cell immune reconstitution, suggesting that early treatment is needed for preserving the functions of HCV-specific T cells. PMID:28170421

  10. Comprehensive analysis of APOE and selected proximate markers for late-onset Alzheimer's disease: patterns of linkage disequilibrium and disease/marker association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-En; Seltman, Howard; Peskind, Elaine R; Galloway, Nichole; Zhou, Peter X; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Wijsman, Ellen M; Tsuang, Debby W; Devlin, Bernie; Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2007-06-01

    The epsilon(4) allele of APOE confers a two- to fourfold increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), but LOAD pathology does not all fit neatly around APOE. It is conceivable that genetic variation proximate to APOE contributes to LOAD risk. Therefore, we investigated the degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) for a comprehensive set of 50 SNPs in and surrounding APOE using a substantial Caucasian sample of 1100 chromosomes. SNPs in APOE were further molecularly haplotyped to determine their phases. One set of SNPs in TOMM40, roughly 15 kb upstream of APOE, showed intriguing LD with the epsilon(4) allele and was strongly associated with the risk for developing LOAD. However, when all the SNPs were entered into a logit model, only the effect of APOE epsilon(4) remained significant. These observations diminish the possibility that loci in the TOMM40 gene may have a major effect on the risk for LOAD in Caucasians.

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of APOE and Selected Proximate Markers for Late-onset Alzheimer Disease: Pattern of Linkage Disequilibrium and Disease/Marker Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-En; Seltman, Howard; Peskind, Elaine R.; Galloway, Nichole; Zhou, Peter X.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Devlin, Bernie; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2007-01-01

    The ε4 allele of APOE confers a two- to four-fold increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), but LOAD pathology does not all fit neatly around APOE. It is conceivable that genetic variation proximate to APOE contributes to LOAD risk. Therefore, we investigated the degree of linkage disequilibrium (LD) for a comprehensive set of 50 SNPs in and surrounding the APOE using a substantial Caucasian sample of 1100 chromosomes. SNPs in APOE were further molecular haplotyped to determine their phases. One set of SNPs in TOMM40, roughly 15 Kb upstream of APOE, showed intriguing LD with the ε4 allele, and were strongly associated with the risk for developing AD. However, when all the SNPs were entered into a logit model, only the effect of APOE ε4 remained significant. These observations diminish the possibility that loci in the TOMM40 may have a major effect on the risk of LOAD in Caucasians. PMID:17434289

  12. Comprehensive review of the anatomy and physiology of male ejaculation: Premature ejaculation is not a disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppo, Vincenzo; Puppo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Human semen contains spermatozoa secreted by the testes and a mixture of components produced by the bulbo-urethral and Littre (paraurethral) glands, prostate, seminal vesicles, ampulla, and epididymis. Ejaculation is used as a synonym for the external ejection of semen, but it comprises two phases: emission and expulsion. As semen collects in the prostatic urethra, the rapid preorgasmic distension of the urethral bulb is pathognomonic of impeding orgasm, and the man experiences a sensation that ejaculation is inevitable (in women, emission is the only phase of orgasm). The semen is propelled along the penile urethra mainly by the bulbocavernosus muscle. With Kegel exercises, it is possible to train the perineal muscles. Immediately after the expulsion phase the male enters a refractory period, a recovery time during which further orgasm or ejaculation is physiologically impossible. Age affects the recovery time: as a man grows older, the refractory period increases. Sexual medicine experts consider premature ejaculation only in the case of vaginal intercourse, but vaginal orgasm has no scientific basis, so the duration of intercourse is not important for a woman's orgasm. The key to female orgasm are the female erectile organs; vaginal orgasm, G-spot, G-spot amplification, clitoral bulbs, clitoris-urethra-vaginal complex, internal clitoris and female ejaculation are terms without scientific basis. Female sexual dysfunctions are popular because they are based on something that does not exist, i.e. the vaginal orgasm. The physiology of ejaculation and orgasm is not impaired in premature ejaculation: it is not a disease, and non-coital sexual acts after male ejaculation can be used to produce orgasm in women. Teenagers and men can understand their sexual responses by masturbation and learn ejaculatory control with the stop-start method and the squeeze technique. Premature ejaculation must not be classified as a male sexual dysfunction. It has become the center of a

  13. Graft-versus-host disease after liver transplantation: a comprehensive literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Sami; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2012-10-07

    To determine the factors affecting mortality in patients who developed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after liver transplantation (LT). We performed a review of studies of GvHD following LT published in the English literature and accessed the PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases. Using relevant search phrases, 88 articles were identified. Of these, 61 articles containing most of the study parameters were considered eligible for the study. Risk factors were first examined using a univariate Kaplan-Meier model, and variables with a significant association (P < 0.05) were then subjected to multivariate analyses using a Cox proportional-hazards model. The 61 articles reported 87 patients, 58 male and 29 female, mean age, 40.4 ± 15.5 years (range: 8 mo to 74 years), who met the inclusion criteria for the present study. Deaths occurred in 59 (67.8%) patients, whereas 28 (32.2%) survived after a mean follow-up period of 280.8 ± 316.2 d (range: 27-2285 d). Among the most frequent symptoms were rash (94.2%), fever (66.6%), diarrhea (54%), and pancytopenia (54%). The average time period between LT and first symptom onset was 60.6 ± 190.1 d (range: 2-1865 d). The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that pancytopenia (42.8% vs. 59.3%, P = 0.03), diarrhea (39.2% vs. 61.0%, P = 0.04), age difference between the recipient and the donor (14.6 ± 3.1 years vs. 22.6 ± 2.7 years, P < 0.0001), and time from first symptom occurrence to diagnosis or treatment (13.3 ± 2.6 mo vs. 15.0 ± 2.3 mo, P < 0.0001) were significant factors affecting mortality, whereas age, sex, presence of rash and fever, use of immunosuppressive agents, acute rejection before GvHD, etiological causes, time of onset, and donor type were not associated with mortality risk. The Cox proportional-hazards model, determined that an age difference between the recipient and donor was an independent risk factor (P = 0.03; hazard ratio, 7.395, 95% confidence interval, 1.2-46.7). This study showed

  14. An overview of prostate diseases and their characteristics specific to Asian men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie Xia; Di Cui; Qi Jiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we reviewed the features of common prostate diseases,such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH),prostate cancer (PCa)and chronic prostatitis (CP) that are specific to Asian men.Compared to the Westerners,Asians exhibit particular characteristics of prostate diseases.Through summarizing the epidemiology,symptomatology,diagnostics and therapeutics of these diseases,we find that Asians have a lower incidence of PCa than whites,but the incidences of BPH and CP are similar.Asian men with CP often suffer from fewer disease sites,but have a higher frequency of pain during urination rather than after sexual climax.Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used marker for the diagnosis of PCa in both Asian and Western countries.Although the PSA level may be lower in Asians,the threshold used is based on whites.After reviewing the treatments available for these diseases,we did not find a fundamental difference between Asians and whites.Furthermore,the selection for the most appropriate treatment based on the individual needs of patients remains a challenge to urologists in Asia.After considering the traits of prostate diseases that are specific to Asian men,we hope to pave the way for the development of specific diagnostic and therapeutic strategies targeted specifically to Asian men.

  15. Mapping the author gender-distribution of disease-specific medical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Peter; Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2016-01-01

    This short paper responds to a recent call for attention to the “diversity challenge” in biomedical research, specifically with regard to gender diversity. The lack of diversity can be limiting for the progression of knowledge production, a viewpoint shared by both the European Commission......, the League of European Research Universities and the National Institute of Health. We study the gender distribution of authors in medical research, specifically mapped to disease-classifications using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) found in PubMed Medline. The dataset consists of 1,542,050 papers......, spanning from 2008-2015, with full author gender and disease classification, with metadata from PubMed and author affiliation information from Web of Science. The combination of information on disease and gender allows us to map diversity issues to specific diseases. Our hypothesis is that one...

  16. A comprehensive genome-wide study on tissue-specific and abiotic stress-specific miRNAs in Triticum aestivum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Pandey

    Full Text Available Productivity of wheat crop is largely dependent on its growth and development that, in turn, is mainly regulated by environmental conditions, including abiotic stress factors. miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression networks involved in diverse aspects of development and stress responses in plants. Using high-throughput sequencing of eight small RNA libraries prepared from diverse abiotic stresses and tissues, we identified 47 known miRNAs belonging to 20 families, 49 true novel and 1030 candidate novel miRNAs. Digital gene expression analysis revealed that 257 miRNAs exhibited tissue-specific expression and 74 were associated with abiotic stresses. Putative target genes were predicted for miRNAs identified in this study and their grouping into functional categories indicated that the putative targets were involved in diverse biological processes. RLM-RACE of predicted targets of three known miRNAs (miR156, miR160 and miR164 confirmed their mRNA cleavage, thus indicating their regulation at post-transcriptional level by the corresponding miRNAs. Mapping of the sequenced data onto the wheat progenitors and closely related monocots revealed a large number of evolutionary conserved miRNAs. Additional expression profiling of some of these miRNAs in other abiotic stresses underline their involvement in multiple stresses. Our findings provide valuable resource for an improved understanding of the role of miRNAs in stress tolerance as well as plant development.

  17. Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Haidong; Naghavi, Mohsen; Allen, Christine; Barber, Ryan M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Zian; Coates, Matthew M.; Coggeshall, Megan; Dandona, Lalit; Dicker, Daniel J.; Erskine, Holly E.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Foreman, Kyle; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Fraser, Maya S.; Pullman, Nancy; Gething, Peter W.; Goldberg, Ellen M.; Graetz, Nicholas; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Hay, Simon I.; Huynh, Chantal; Johnson, Catherine; Kassebaum, Nicholas J.; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kulikoff, Xie Rachel; Kutz, Michael; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Larson, Heidi J.; Leung, Janni; Liang, Xiaofeng; Lim, Stephen S.; Lind, Margaret; Lozano, Rafael; Marquez, Neal; Mensah, George A.; Mikesell, Joe; Mokdad, Ali H.; Mooney, Meghan D.; Nguyen, Grant; Nsoesie, Elaine; Pigott, David M.; Pinho, Christine; Roth, Gregory A.; Salomon, Joshua A.; Sandar, Logan; Silpakit, Naris; Sligar, Amber; Sorensen, Reed J. D.; Stanaway, Jeffrey; Steiner, Caitlyn; Teeple, Stephanie; Thomas, Bernadette A.; Troeger, Christopher; VanderZanden, Amelia; Vollset, Stein Emil; Wanga, Valentine; Whiteford, Harvey A.; Wolock, Timothy; Zoeckler, Leo; Abate, Kalkidan Hassen; Abbafati, Cristiana; Abbas, Kaja M.; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abreu, Daisy M. X.; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Abyu, Gebre Yitayih; Achoki, Tom; Adelekan, Ademola Lukman; Ademi, Zanfina; Adou, Arsene Kouablan; Adsuar, Jose C.; Afanvi, Kossivi Agbelenko; Afshin, Ashkan; Agardh, Emilie Elisabet; Agarwal, Arnav; Agrawal, Anurag; Kiadaliri, Aliasghar Ahmad; Ajala, Oluremi N.; Akanda, All Shafqat; Akinyemi, Rufus Olusola; Akinyemiju, Tomi F.; Akseer, Nadia; Al Lami, Faris Hasan; Alabed, Samer; Al-Aly, Ziyad; Alam, Khurshid; Alam, Noore K. M.; Alasfoor, Deena; Aldhahri, Saleh Fahed; Aldridge, Robert William; Alegretti, Miguel Angel; Aleman, Alicia V.; Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw; Alexander, Lily T.; Alhabib, Samia; Ali, Raghib; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Alla, Francois; Allebeck, Peter; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Alsharif, Ubai; Altirkawi, Khalid A.; Martin, Elena Alvarez; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Amegah, Adeladza Kofi; Ameh, Emmanuel A.; Amini, Heresh; Ammar, Walid; Amrock, Stephen Marc; Andersen, Hjalte H.; Anderson, Benjamin; Anderson, Gregory M.; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T.; Aregay, Atsede Fantahun; Arnlov, Johan; Arsenijevic, Valentina S. Arsic; Al Artaman, Ali; Asayesh, Hamid; Asghar, Rana Jawad; Atique, Suleman; Arthur Avokpaho, Euripide Frinel G.; Awasthi, Ashish; Azzopardi, Peter; Bacha, Umar; Badawi, Alaa; Bahit, Maria C.; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Banerjee, Amitava; Barac, Aleksandra; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L.; Barnighausen, Till; Barregard, Lars; Barrero, Lope H.; Basu, Arindam; Basu, Sanjay; Bayou, Yibeltal Tebekaw; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Beardsley, Justin; Bedi, Neeraj; Beghi, Ettore; Belay, Haileeyesus Adamu; Bell, Brent; Bell, Michelle L.; Bello, Aminu K.; Bennett, Derrick A.; Bensenor, Isabela M.; Berhane, Adugnaw; Bernabe, Eduardo; Betsu, Balem Demtsu; Beyene, Addisu Shunu; Bhala, Neeraj; Bhalla, Ashish; Biadgilign, Sibhatu; Bikbov, Boris; Bin Abdulhak, Aref A.; Biroscak, Brian J.; Biryukov, Stan; Bjertness, Espen; Blore, Jed D.; Blosser, Christopher D.; Bohensky, Megan A.; Borschmann, Rohan; Bose, Dipan; Bourne, Rupert R. A.; Brainin, Michael; Brayne, Carol E. G.; Brazinova, Alexandra; Breitborde, Nicholas J. K.; Brenner, Hermann; Brewer, Jerry D.; Brown, Alexandria; Brown, Jonathan; Brugha, Traolach S.; Buckle, Geoffrey Colin; Butt, Zahid A.; Calabria, Bianca; Campos-Novato, Ismael Ricardo; Campuzano, Julio Cesar; Carapetis, Jonathan R.; Cardenas, Rosario; Carpenter, David; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Castaneda-Oquela, Carlos A.; Rivas, Jacqueline Castillo; Catala-Lopez, Ferran; Cavalleri, Fiorella; Cercy, Kelly; Cerda, Jorge; Chen, Wanqing; Chew, Adrienne; Chiang, Peggy Pei -Chia; Chibalabala, Mirriam; Chibueze, Chioma Ezinne; Chimed-Ochir, Odgerel; Chisumpa, Vesper Hichilombwe; Choi, Jee-Young Jasmine; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Christensen, Hanne; Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas; Ciobanu, Liliana G.; Cirillo, Massimo; Cohen, Aaron J.; Colistro, Valentina; Colomar, Mercedes; Colquhoun, Samantha M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Cooper, Leslie Trumbull; Cortinovis, Monica; Cowie, Benjamin C.; Crump, John A.; Damsere-Derry, James; Danawi, Hadi; Dandona, Rakhi; Daoud, Farah; Darby, Sarah C.; Dargan, Paul I.; das Neves, Jose; Davey, Gail; Davis, Adrian C.; Davitoiu, Dragos V.; de Castro, E. Filipa; de Jager, Pieter; De Leo, Diego; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dellavalle, Robert P.; Deribe, Kebede; Deribew, Amare; Dharmaratne, Samath D.; Dhillon, Preet K.; Diaz-Torne, Cesar; Ding, Eric L.; dos Santos, Kadine Priscila Bender; Dossou, Edem; Driscoll, Tim R.; Duan, Leilei; Dubey, Manisha; Bartholow, Bruce; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Lycke, Christian; Elyazar, Iqbal; Endries, Aman Yesuf; Ermakov, Sergey Petrovich; Eshrati, Babak; Esteghamati, Alireza; Estep, Kara; Faghmous, Imad D. A.; Fahimi, Saman; Jose, Emerito; Farid, Talha A.; Sa Farinha, Carla Sofia e; Faro, Andre; Farvid, Maryam S.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Feigin, Valery L.; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Fernandes, Jefferson G.; Fernandes, Joao C.; Fischer, Florian; Fitchett, Joseph R. A.; Flaxman, Abraham; Foigt, Nataliya; Fowkes, F. Gerry R.; Franca, Elisabeth Barboza; Franklin, Richard C.; Friedman, Joseph; Frostad, Joseph; Hirst, Thomas; Futran, Neal D.; Gall, Seana L.; Gambashidze, Ketevan; Gamkrelidze, Amiran; Ganguly, Parthasarathi; Gankpe, Fortune Gbetoho; Gebre, Teshome; Gebrehiwot, Tsegaye Tsewelde; Gebremedhin, Amanuel Tesfay; Gebru, Alemseged Aregay; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Gibney, Katherine B.; Gillum, Richard F.; Gilmour, Stuart; Giref, Ababi Zergaw; Giroud, Maurice; Gishu, Melkamu Dedefo; Giussani, Giorgia; Glaser, Elizabeth; Godwin, William W.; Gomez-Dantes, Hector; Gona, Philimon; Goodridge, Amador; Gopalani, Sameer Vali; Gosselin, Richard A.; Gotay, Carolyn C.; Goto, Atsushi; Gouda, Hebe N.; Greaves, Felix; Gugnani, Harish Chander; Gupta, Rahul; Gupta, Rajeev; Gupta, Vipin; Gutierrez, Reyna A.; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Haile, Demewoz; Hailu, Alemayehu Desalegne; Hailu, Gessessew Bugssa; Halasa, Yara A.; Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi; Hamidi, Samer; Hancock, Jamie; Handal, Alexis J.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hao, Yuantao; Harb, Hilda L.; Harikrishnan, Sivadasanpillai; Haro, Josep Maria; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heredia-Pi, Ileana Beatriz; Heydarpour, Pouria; Hilderink, Henk B. M.; Hoek, Hans W.; Hogg, Robert S.; Horino, Masako; Horita, Nobuyuki; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hotez, Peter J.; Hoy, Damian G.; Hsairi, Mohamed; Htet, Aung Soe; Than Htike, Maung Maung; Hu, Guoqing; Huang, Cheng; Huang, Hsiang; Huiart, Laetitia; Husseini, Abdullatif; Huybrechts, Inge; Huynh, Grace; Iburg, Kim Moesgaard; Innos, Kaire; Inoue, Manami; Iyer, Veena J.; Jacobs, Troy A.; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.; Jahanmehr, Nader; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B.; James, Peter; Javanbakht, Mehdi; Jayaraman, Sudha P.; Jayatilleke, Achala Upendra; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Jensen, Paul N.; Jha, Vivekanand; Jiang, Guohong; Jiang, Ying; Jibat, Tariku; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Jonas, Jost B.; Joshi, Tushar Kant; Kabir, Zubair; Karnak, Ritul; Kan, Haidong; Kant, Surya; Karch, Andre; Karema, Corine Kakizi; Karimkhani, Chante; Karletsos, Dimitris; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Kasaeian, Amir; Katibeh, Marzieh; Kaul, Anil; Kawakami, Norito; Kayibanda, Jeanne Francoise; Keiyoro, Peter Njenga; Kemmer, Laura; Kemp, Andrew Haddon; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Keren, Andre; Kereselidze, Maia; Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khalil, Ibrahim A.; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Khan, Ejaz Ahmad; Khang, Young-Ho; Khera, Sahil; Muthafer Khoja, Tawfik Ahmed; Kieling, Christian; Kim, Daniel; Kim, Yun Jin; Kissela, Brett M.; Kissoon, Niranjan; Knibbs, Luke D.; Knudsen, Ann Kristin; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Kolte, Dhaval; Kopec, Jacek A.; Kosen, Soewarta; Koul, Parvaiz A.; Koyanagi, Ai; Krog, Norun Hjertager; Defo, Barthelemy Kuate; Bicer, Burcu Kucuk; Kudom, Andreas A.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Kulkarni, Veena S.; Kumar, G. Anil; Kwan, Gene F.; Lal, Aparna; Lal, Dharmesh Kumar; Lalloo, Ratilal; Lam, Hilton; Lam, Jennifer O.; Langan, Sinead M.; Lansingh, Van C.; Larsson, Anders; Laryea, Dennis Odai; Latif, Asma Abdul; Lawrynowicz, Alicia Elena Beatriz; Leigh, James; Levi, Miriam; Li, Yongmei; Lindsay, M. Patrice; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Liu, Patrick Y.; Liu, Shiwei; Liu, Yang; Lo, Loon-Tzian; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Lucas, Robyn M.; Lunevicius, Raimundas; Lyons, Ronan A.; Ma, Stefan; Pedro Machado, Vasco Manuel; Mackay, Mark T.; MacLachlan, Jennifer H.; Abd El Razek, Hassan Magdy; Abd El Razek, Mohammed Magdy; Majdan, Marek; Majeed, Azeem; Malekzadeh, Reza; Ayele Manamo, Wondimu Ayele; Mandisarisa, John; Mangalam, Srikanth; Mapoma, Chabila C.; Marcenes, Wagner; Margolis, David Joel; Martin, Gerard Robert; Martinez-Raga, Jose; Marzan, Melvin Barrientos; Masiye, Felix; Mason-Jones, Amanda J.; Massano, Joao; Matzopoulos, Richard; Mayosi, Bongani M.; McGarvey, Stephen Theodore; McGrath, John J.; Mckee, Martin; McMahon, Brian J.; Meaney, Peter A.; Mehari, Alem; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Mena-Rodriguez, Fabiola; Mekonnen, Alemayehu B.; Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Memiah, Peter; Memish, Ziad A.; Mendoza, Walter; Meretoja, Atte; Meretoja, Tuomo J.; Mhimbira, Francis Apolinary; Micha, Renata; Miller, Ted R.; Mirarefin, Mojde; Misganaw, Awoke; Mock, Charles N.; Abdulmuhsin Mohammad, Karzan; Mohammadi, Alireza; Mohammed, Shafiu; Mohan, Viswanathan; Mola, Glen Liddell D.; Monasta, Lorenzo; Montanez Hernandez, Julio Cesar; Montero, Pablo; Montico, Marcella; Montine, Thomas J.; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Morawska, Lidia; Morgan, Katherine; Mori, Rintaro; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mueller, Ulrich; Satyanarayana Murthy, Gudlavalleti Venkata; Murthy, Srinivas; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Nachega, Jean B.; Nagel, Gabriele; Naidoo, Kovin S.; Naik, Nitish; Naldi, Luigi; Nangia, Vinay; Nash, Denis; Nejjari, Chakib; Neupane, Subas; Newton, Charles R.; Newton, John N.; Ng, Marie; Ngalesoni, Frida Namnyak; Ngirabega, Jean de Dieu; Quyen Le Nguyen, [Unknown; Nisar, Muhammad Imran; Nkamedjie Pete, Patrick Martial; Nomura, Marika; Norheim, Ole F.; Norman, Paul E.; Norrving, Bo; Nyakarahuka, Luke; Ogbo, Felix Akpojene; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ojelabi, Foluke Adetola; Olivares, Pedro R.; Olusanya, Bolajoko Olubukunola; Olusanya, Jacob Olusegun; Opio, John Nelson; Oren, Eyal; Ortiz, Alberto; Osman, Majdi; Ota, Erika; Ozdemir, Raziye; Pa, Mahesh; Pandian, Jeyaraj D.; Pant, Puspa Raj; Papachristou, Christina; Park, Eun-Kee; Park, Jae-Hyun; Parry, Charles D.; Parsaeian, Mahboubeh; Caicedo, Angel J. Paternina; Patten, Scott B.; Patton, George C.; Paul, Vinod K.; Pearce, Neil; Pedro, Joao Mario; Stokic, Ljiljana Pejin; Pereira, David M.; Perico, Norberto; Pesudovs, Konrad; Petzold, Max; Phillips, Michael Robert; Piel, Frederic B.; Pillay, Julian David; Plass, Dietrich; Platts-Mills, James A.; Polinder, Suzanne; Pope, C. Arden; Popova, Svetlana; Poulton, Richie G.; Pourmalek, Farshad; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Qorbani, Mostafa; Quame-Amaglo, Justice; Quistberg, D. Alex; Rafay, Anwar; Rahimi, Kazem; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rahman, Mohammad Hifz Ur; Rahman, Sajjad Ur; Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Rajavi, Zhale; Rajsic, Sasa; Raju, Murugesan; Rakovac, Ivo; Rana, Saleem M.; Ranabhat, Chhabi L.; Rangaswamy, Thara; Rao, Puja; Rao, Sowmya R.; Refaat, Amany H.; Rehm, Jurgen; Reitsma, Marissa B.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Resnikofff, Serge; Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Ricci, Stefano; Blancas, Maria Jesus Rios; Roberts, Bayard; Roca, Anna; Rojas-Rueda, David; Ronfani, Luca; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Roy, Ambuj; Roy, Nawal K.; Ruhago, George Mugambage; Sagar, Rajesh; Saha, Sukanta; Sahathevan, Ramesh; Saleh, Muhammad Muhammad; Sanabria, Juan R.; Sanchez-Nino, Maria Dolores; Sanchez-Riera, Lidia; Santos, Itamar S.; Sarmiento-Suarez, Rodrigo; Sartorius, Benn; Satpathy, Maheswar; Savic, Miloje; Sawhney, Monika; Schaub, Michael P.; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Schneider, Ione J. C.; Schottker, Ben; Schutte, Aletta E.; Schwebel, David C.; Seedat, Soraya; Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Servan-Mori, Edson E.; Shackelford, Katya A.; Shaddick, Gavin; Shaheen, Amira; Shahraz, Saeid; Shaikh, Masood Ali; Shakh-Nazarova, Marina; Sharma, Rajesh; She, Jun; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Shen, Jiabin; Shen, Ziyan; Shepard, Donald S.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Shetty, Balakrishna P.; Shi, Peilin; Shibuya, Kenji; Shin, Min-Jeong; Shiri, Rahman; Shiue, Ivy; Shrime, Mark G.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Silberberg, Donald H.; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Silveira, Dayane Gabriele Alves; Silverberg, Jonathan I.; Simard, Edgar P.; Singh, Abhishek; Singh, Gitanjali M.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Singh, Om Prakash; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Singh, Virendra; Soneji, Samir; Soreide, Kjetil; Soriano, Joan B.; Sposato, Luciano A.; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.; Stathopoulou, Vasiliki; Stein, Dan J.; Stein, Murray B.; Stranges, Saverio; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Sunguya, Bruno F.; Sur, Patrick; Swaminathan, Soumya; Sykes, Bryan L.; Szoeke, Cassandra E. I.; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Tabb, Karen M.; Takahashi, Ken; Takala, Jukka S.; Talongwa, Roberto Tchio; Tandon, Nikhil; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Taye, Bineyam; Taylor, Hugh R.; Ao, Braden J. Te; Tedla, Bemnet Amare; Tefera, Worku Mekonnen; Ten Have, Margreet; Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Tesfay, Fisaha Haile; Tessema, Gizachew Assefa; Thomson, Alan J.; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L.; Thrift, Amanda G.; Thurston, George D.; Tillmann, Taavi; Tirschwell, David L.; Tonelli, Marcello; Topor-Madry, Roman; Topouzis, Fotis; Nx, Jeffrey Allen Towb; Traebert, Jefferson; Tran, Bach Xuan; Truelsen, Thomas; Trujillo, Ulises; Tura, Abera Kenay; Tuzcu, Emin Murat; Uchendu, Uche S.; Ukwaja, Kingsley N.; Undurraga, Eduardo A.; Uthman, Olalekan A.; Van Dingenen, Rita; Van Donkelaar, Aaron; Vasankari, Tommi; Vasconcelos, Ana Maria Nogales; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Vidavalur, Ramesh; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Villalpando, Salvador; Violante, Francesco S.; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Wagner, Joseph A.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Wallin, Mitchell T.; Wang, Linhong; Watkins, David A.; Weichenthal, Scott; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weintraub, Robert G.; Werdecker, Andrea; Westerman, Ronny; White, Richard A.; Wijeratne, Tissa; Wilkinson, James D.; Williams, Hywel C.; Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Wolfe, Charles D. A.; Won, Sungho; Wong, John Q.; Woolf, Anthony D.; Xavier, Denis; Xiao, Qingyang; Xu, Gelin; Yakob, Bereket; Yalew, Ayalnesh Zemene; Yan, Lijing L.; Yano, Yuichiro; Yaseri, Mehdi; Ye, Pengpeng; Yebyo, Henock Gebremedhin; Yip, Paul; Yirsaw, Biruck Desalegn; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yonga, Gerald; Younis, Mustafa Z.; Yu, Shicheng; Zaidi, Zoubida; Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Zannad, Faiez; Zavala, Diego E.; Zeeb, Hajo; Zeleke, Berihun M.; Zhang, Hao; Zodpey, Sanjay; Zonies, David; Zuhlke, Liesl Joanna; Vos, Theo; Lopez, Alan D.; Murray, Christopher J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving survival and extending the longevity of life for all populations requires timely, robust evidence on local mortality levels and trends. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides a comprehensive assessment of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes

  18. Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Haidong; Naghavi, Mohsen; Allen, Christine; Barber, Ryan M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Zian; Coates, Matthew M.; Coggeshall, Megan; Dandona, Lalit; Dicker, Daniel J.; Erskine, Holly E.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Foreman, Kyle; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Fraser, Maya S.; Pullman, Nancy; Gething, Peter W.; Goldberg, Ellen M.; Graetz, Nicholas; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Hay, Simon I.; Huynh, Chantal; Johnson, Catherine; Kassebaum, Nicholas J.; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kulikoff, Xie Rachel; Kutz, Michael; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Larson, Heidi J.; Leung, Janni; Liang, Xiaofeng; Lim, Stephen S.; Lind, Margaret; Lozano, Rafael; Marquez, Neal; Mensah, George A.; Mikesell, Joe; Mokdad, Ali H.; Mooney, Meghan D.; Nguyen, Grant; Nsoesie, Elaine; Pigott, David M.; Pinho, Christine; Roth, Gregory A.; Salomon, Joshua A.; Sandar, Logan; Silpakit, Naris; Sligar, Amber; Sorensen, Reed J. D.; Stanaway, Jeffrey; Steiner, Caitlyn; Teeple, Stephanie; Thomas, Bernadette A.; Troeger, Christopher; VanderZanden, Amelia; Vollset, Stein Emil; Wanga, Valentine; Whiteford, Harvey A.; Wolock, Timothy; Zoeckler, Leo; Abate, Kalkidan Hassen; Abbafati, Cristiana; Abbas, Kaja M.; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abreu, Daisy M. X.; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Abyu, Gebre Yitayih; Achoki, Tom; Adelekan, Ademola Lukman; Ademi, Zanfina; Adou, Arsene Kouablan; Adsuar, Jose C.; Afanvi, Kossivi Agbelenko; Afshin, Ashkan; Agardh, Emilie Elisabet; Agarwal, Arnav; Agrawal, Anurag; Kiadaliri, Aliasghar Ahmad; Ajala, Oluremi N.; Akanda, All Shafqat; Akinyemi, Rufus Olusola; Akinyemiju, Tomi F.; Akseer, Nadia; Al Lami, Faris Hasan; Alabed, Samer; Al-Aly, Ziyad; Alam, Khurshid; Alam, Noore K. M.; Alasfoor, Deena; Aldhahri, Saleh Fahed; Aldridge, Robert William; Alegretti, Miguel Angel; Aleman, Alicia V.; Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw; Alexander, Lily T.; Alhabib, Samia; Ali, Raghib; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Alla, Francois; Allebeck, Peter; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Alsharif, Ubai; Altirkawi, Khalid A.; Martin, Elena Alvarez; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Amegah, Adeladza Kofi; Ameh, Emmanuel A.; Amini, Heresh; Ammar, Walid; Amrock, Stephen Marc; Andersen, Hjalte H.; Anderson, Benjamin; Anderson, Gregory M.; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T.; Aregay, Atsede Fantahun; Arnlov, Johan; Arsenijevic, Valentina S. Arsic; Al Artaman, Ali; Asayesh, Hamid; Asghar, Rana Jawad; Atique, Suleman; Arthur Avokpaho, Euripide Frinel G.; Awasthi, Ashish; Azzopardi, Peter; Bacha, Umar; Badawi, Alaa; Bahit, Maria C.; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Banerjee, Amitava; Barac, Aleksandra; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L.; Barnighausen, Till; Barregard, Lars; Barrero, Lope H.; Basu, Arindam; Basu, Sanjay; Bayou, Yibeltal Tebekaw; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Beardsley, Justin; Bedi, Neeraj; Beghi, Ettore; Belay, Haileeyesus Adamu; Bell, Brent; Bell, Michelle L.; Bello, Aminu K.; Bennett, Derrick A.; Bensenor, Isabela M.; Berhane, Adugnaw; Bernabe, Eduardo; Betsu, Balem Demtsu; Beyene, Addisu Shunu; Bhala, Neeraj; Bhalla, Ashish; Biadgilign, Sibhatu; Bikbov, Boris; Bin Abdulhak, Aref A.; Biroscak, Brian J.; Biryukov, Stan; Bjertness, Espen; Blore, Jed D.; Blosser, Christopher D.; Bohensky, Megan A.; Borschmann, Rohan; Bose, Dipan; Bourne, Rupert R. A.; Brainin, Michael; Brayne, Carol E. G.; Brazinova, Alexandra; Breitborde, Nicholas J. K.; Brenner, Hermann; Brewer, Jerry D.; Brown, Alexandria; Brown, Jonathan; Brugha, Traolach S.; Buckle, Geoffrey Colin; Butt, Zahid A.; Calabria, Bianca; Campos-Novato, Ismael Ricardo; Campuzano, Julio Cesar; Carapetis, Jonathan R.; Cardenas, Rosario; Carpenter, David; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Castaneda-Oquela, Carlos A.; Rivas, Jacqueline Castillo; Catala-Lopez, Ferran; Cavalleri, Fiorella; Cercy, Kelly; Cerda, Jorge; Chen, Wanqing; Chew, Adrienne; Chiang, Peggy Pei -Chia; Chibalabala, Mirriam; Chibueze, Chioma Ezinne; Chimed-Ochir, Odgerel; Chisumpa, Vesper Hichilombwe; Choi, Jee-Young Jasmine; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Christensen, Hanne; Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas; Ciobanu, Liliana G.; Cirillo, Massimo; Cohen, Aaron J.; Colistro, Valentina; Colomar, Mercedes; Colquhoun, Samantha M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Cooper, Leslie Trumbull; Cortinovis, Monica; Cowie, Benjamin C.; Crump, John A.; Damsere-Derry, James; Danawi, Hadi; Dandona, Rakhi; Daoud, Farah; Darby, Sarah C.; Dargan, Paul I.; das Neves, Jose; Davey, Gail; Davis, Adrian C.; Davitoiu, Dragos V.; de Castro, E. Filipa; de Jager, Pieter; De Leo, Diego; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dellavalle, Robert P.; Deribe, Kebede; Deribew, Amare; Dharmaratne, Samath D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving survival and extending the longevity of life for all populations requires timely, robust evidence on local mortality levels and trends. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides a comprehensive assessment of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes

  19. Impact of medications on mIBG uptake, with specific attention to the heart: Comprehensive review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Arnold F; Travin, Mark I

    2015-10-01

    A critical review of the literature on drug interactions with mIBG uptake was performed to allow formulation of contemporary guidance regarding withholding medications prior to clinical imaging studies. Published information was extracted on the experimental system used, the quantitative characteristics of the measurements, and whether any data directly examining cardiac tissues were included. Level of evidence for each medication category was assessed on a qualitative scale of very low, low, medium, or high. Strength of medication effect for inhibition of mIBG uptake was judged as none, weak, moderate, or strong. The only medications for which level of evidence was judged high were labetalol and reserpine. Level of evidence was judged medium for tricyclic antidepressants, calcium channel blockers, and antiarrhythmics (specifically amiodarone). Evidence was judged sufficient to recommend withholding labetalol and the tricyclic antidepressants prior to mIBG cardiac imaging. Mechanistic evidence was sufficient to suggest consideration of withdrawal of sympathomimetic amines and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). As there is strong evidence for inhibition of mIBG uptake in only a small number of compounds, clinical decisions regarding withdrawal of concomitant medications should be individualized by considering the potential consequences of a false-positive (artificially low cardiac uptake) imaging result.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of ultrasonic vocalizations in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome reveals limited, call type specific deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Roy

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a well-recognized form of inherited mental retardation, caused by a mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (Fmr1 gene. The gene is located on the long arm of the X chromosome and encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Absence of FMRP in fragile X patients as well as in Fmr1 knockout (KO mice results, among other changes, in abnormal dendritic spine formation and altered synaptic plasticity in the neocortex and hippocampus. Clinical features of FXS include cognitive impairment, anxiety, abnormal social interaction, mental retardation, motor coordination and speech articulation deficits. Mouse pups generate ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs when isolated from their mothers. Whether those social ultrasonic vocalizations are deficient in mouse models of FXS is unknown. Here we compared isolation-induced USVs generated by pups of Fmr1-KO mice with those of their wild type (WT littermates. Though the total number of calls was not significantly different between genotypes, a detailed analysis of 10 different categories of calls revealed that loss of Fmr1 expression in mice causes limited and call-type specific deficits in ultrasonic vocalization: the carrier frequency of flat calls was higher, the percentage of downward calls was lower and that the frequency range of complex calls was wider in Fmr1-KO mice compared to their WT littermates.

  1. Description of comprehensive dental services supported by the Medicare Chronic Disease Dental Scheme in the first 23 months of operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfreeman, Vera; Zoellner, Hans

    2012-02-01

    Australia's Medicare universal insurance system has supported comprehensive dental service through the Chronic Disease Dental Scheme (CDDS) since November 2007. Public debate opposing CDDS includes claims of over-servicing, calls for expansion to universal eligibility, and government threat of closure. Here we examine CDDS services over the first 23 months of operation. CDDS statistics on patient age, gender and item numbers claimed from November 2007 to December 2009 from Medicare were subjected to analysis. The distribution of 404,768 total CDDS patients varied across Australia from 3.6% of the population in NSW to 0.07% in NT, while uptake increased over time. The average patient had 7.58 dental treatments, and the most common were: direct restorations (2.27), preventive and periodontal services (1.46), diagnostic services (1.43), extractions (0.77), and new dentures (0.53). Crown and bridgework appeared over-represented (0.48). Although data do suggest over-servicing in crown and bridgework, there also appears to be significant community need for the CDDS. Clear guidelines for dental clinical diagnosis and treatment planning, as well as a pre-approval process for crown and bridgework is suggested to improve the CDDS, and this could form the basis for expansion to universal eligibility for dental Medicare. © 2012 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2012 Public Health Association of Australia.

  2. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Lu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  3. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-05

    Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  4. Effectiveness of disease-specific self-management education on health outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Tan, Jing-Yu; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Deng, Renli

    2017-08-01

    To update a previously published systematic review on the effectiveness of self-management education (SME) for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Electronic databases were accessed (from inception to July 2016) to find relevant randomized controlled trials. Studies that compared SME with routine methods of care in COPD patients were retrieved. Both data synthesis and descriptive analysis were used for outcome assessment (e.g. quality of life and healthcare utilization). Twenty-four studies were included. Data synthesis showed better quality of life among COPD patients receiving SME. Significant reductions in COPD-related hospital admissions and emergency department visits were identified in the SME group. SME may positively affect the reduction of COPD patients' emotional distress. No significant reduction in smoking rate and mortality rate was observed between groups. No clear evidence supports the improvement of pulmonary functions, dyspnea, and nutritional status in COPD patients with the use of SME. SME can be a useful strategy to improve quality of life and disease-specific knowledge in patients with COPD. It also reduces respiratory-related hospital admissions and emergency department visits in COPD patients. Inclusion of SME as one of the key components for the comprehensive management of COPD is encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Comprehensive TALEN-Based Knockout Library for Generating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Cepeda, Diana A; Lee, Jaecheol; Diecke, Sebastian; Hendel, Ayal; Itzhaki, Ilanit; Ameen, Mohamed; Shrestha, Rajani; Wu, Haodi; Ma, Ning; Shao, Ning-Yi; Seeger, Timon; Woo, Nicole A; Wilson, Kitchener D; Matsa, Elena; Porteus, Matthew H; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Wu, Joseph C

    2017-02-28

    Rationale: Targeted genetic engineering using programmable nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is a valuable tool for precise, site-specific genetic modification in the human genome. Objective: The emergence of novel technologies such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and nuclease-mediated genome editing represent a unique opportunity for studying cardiovascular diseases in vitro. Methods and Results: By incorporating extensive literature and database searches, we designed a collection of TALEN constructs to knockout (KO) eighty-eight human genes that are associated with cardiomyopathies and congenital heart diseases. The TALEN pairs were designed to induce double-strand DNA break near the starting codon of each gene that either disrupted the start codon or introduced a frameshift mutation in the early coding region, ensuring faithful gene KO. We observed that all the constructs were active and disrupted the target locus at high frequencies. To illustrate the general utility of the TALEN-mediated KO technique, six individual genes (TNNT2, LMNA/C, TBX5, MYH7, ANKRD1, and NKX2.5) were knocked out with high efficiency and specificity in human iPSCs. By selectively targeting a dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)-causing mutation (TNNT2 p.R173W) in patient-specific iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes (iPSC-CMs), we demonstrated that the KO strategy ameliorates the DCM phenotype in vitro. In addition, we modeled the Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) in iPSC-CMs in vitro and uncovered novel pathways regulated by TBX5 in human cardiac myocyte development. Conclusions: Collectively, our study illustrates the powerful combination of iPSCs and genome editing technology for understanding the biological function of genes and the pathological significance of genetic variants in human cardiovascular diseases. The methods, strategies, constructs and iPSC lines developed in this study provide a validated, readily available resource for cardiovascular

  6. Attributing the Human Disease Burden of Foodborne Infections to Specific Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pires, Sara Monteiro; Evers, Eric E.; Van Pely, Wilfrid;

    2009-01-01

    for understanding and improving attribution methodologies and for sharing knowledge within the scientific community. We propose harmonized nomenclature, and describe the various approaches for human illness source attribution and their usefulness to address specific public health questions.......Foodborne diseases are an important cause of human illness worldwide. Humans acquire these infections from a variety of sources and routes of transmission. Many efforts have been made in the last decades to prevent and control foodborne diseases, particularly foodborne zoonoses. However...

  7. Age-related differences in celiac disease: Specific characteristics of adult presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santiago; Vivas; Luis; Vaquero; Laura; Rodríguez-Martín; Alberto; Caminero

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease may appear both in early childhood andin elderly subjects. Current knowledge of the disease has revealed some differences associated to the age of presentation. Furthermore, monitoring and prognosis of celiac subjects can vary depending on the pediatric or adult stage. The main objective of this review is to provide guidance for the adult diagnostic and follow-up processes, which must be tailored specifically for adults and be different from pediatric patients.

  8. Prioritizing Disease Candidate Proteins in Cardiomyopathy-Specific Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Based on “Guilt by Association” Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiming; Li, Weiguo; Qu, Xiaoli; Liang, Binhua; Gao, Qianping; Feng, Chenchen; Jia, Xu; Lv, Yana; Zhang, Siya; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial). Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on “guilt by association” analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on “guilt by association” analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way. PMID:23940716

  9. Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex to Promote Metaphor Comprehension in Parkinson Disease: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christina; Monetta, Laura; Langlois, Mélanie; Schneider, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    This single-case research-designed study explored whether intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) could improve metaphor comprehension in people with Parkinson disease (PD) and language impairments. A right-handed participant with PD diagnosed 9 years ago, receiving long-term treatment with levodopa, and with metaphor comprehension impairment was recruited to undergo 10 sessions of sham stimulation (in 2wk), a washout period (6wk), and then 10 sessions of iTBS (in 2wk). Clinical scores of metaphor comprehension and motor evaluation (Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale part III) and transcranial magnetic stimulation to test the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) were used at baseline, postsham, post-iTBS, and at 3 follow-ups (8, 14, and 20wk post-iTBS). Metaphor comprehension was improved after iTBS, and the highest scores were obtained 8 weeks later (P=.01). This improvement was correlated with the increase of the right M1 excitability (r=-.86, P=.03) and with the decrease of transcallosal inhibition latency from the left to the right hemisphere (r=-.88, P=.02). Sham yielded no effect (P>.05). Administration of iTBS over the right DLPFC improved metaphor comprehension likely by a long-term influence on brain synaptic plasticity, including improvement of interhemispheric dialogue. More studies are warranted to confirm these findings in larger samples of participants with PD.

  10. Rapid detection of self-biting disease of mink by specific sequence-characterized amplified regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zong-yue; NING Fang-yong; YANG Hong-yan; WEI Lai; BAI Xiu-juan

    2011-01-01

    Self-biting disease occurred in most farmed fur animals in the world. The mechanism and rapid detection method of this disease has not been reported. We applied bulked sergeant analysis (BSA) in combination with RAPD method to analyze a molecular genetic marker linked with self-biting trait in mink group. The molecular marker was converted into sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCAR) marker for rapid detection of this disease. A single RAPD marker A8 amplified a specific band of 263bp in self-biting minks, which was designated as SRA8-250,and non-specific band of 315bp in both self-biting and healthy minks.The sequences of the bands exhibited 75% and 88% similarity to Canis familiarizes major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅱ region and Macaca mulatta MHC class Ⅰ region, respectively. A SCAR marker SCAR-A8 was designed for the specific fragment SRA8-250 and validated in 30 self-biting minks and 30 healthy minks. Positive amplification of SCAR-A8 was detected in 24 self-biting minks and 12 healthy minks. x2 test showed significant difference (p<0.01) in the detection rate between the two groups. This indicated that SRA8-250 can be used as a positive marker to detect self-biting disease in minks. Furthermore, the finding that self-biting disease links with MHC genes has significant implications for the mechanism of the disease.

  11. Distinct trajectories of disease-specific health status in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H.; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Meine, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is well known that a significant proportion of heart failure patients (10-44 %) do not show improvement in symptoms or functioning from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), yet no study has examined patient-reported health status trajectories after implantation. METHODS: A cohort...... levels after implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Levels of disease-specific health status vary considerably across subgroups of CRT-D patients. Classification into poorer disease-specific health status trajectories was particularly associated with patients' psychological profile and NYHA classification...

  12. Neuron-specific enolase in the intestinal wall in Crohn´s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busikova-Malenovska, P; Danis, D; Bencat, M; Galfiova, P; Kopani, M; Labajova, V; El Hassoun, O; Porubsky, J; Galatova, J

    2014-01-01

    The authors described the localization of neuron-specific enolase in the intestinal wall in Crohn´s disease. We have used samples obtained by biopsy from the colon lining of five people affected by Crohn's disease for our examination. We have processed samples using the formol paraffin technique. From paraffin blocks, we have prepared histological sections approximately 5 μm thick. For immunohistochemic examinations, we have revitalised the sections by acquiring the heat-induced epitope. We detected NSE by monoclonal mouse antibodies against human neuron-specific enolase, clone BBS/NC/VI-H14 (DakoCytomation, Denmark) (Fig. 4, Ref. 7).

  13. General and Disease-specific Scales in Children with Asthma and their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Oktay; Aydogan, Umit; Gulec, Mustafa; Doganer, Yusuf Cetin; Yavuz, Suleyman Tolga

    2017-01-15

    To investigate and compare the efficiency of general and disease-specific life quality scales in children with asthma. Children with asthma, and their parents completed the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT), Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), and also underwent spirometry. 82 children (55 males) with a median (IQR) age of 10.1 (8.9-10.5) years were included. C-ACT, PAQLQ and PedsQL child scores were significantly higher in children with controlled asthma. Quality of life in children, assessed using disease- specific quality of life measures, is better for children with good asthma control.

  14. Recent advances in orally administered cell-specific nanotherapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xiao-Ying; Merlin, Didier; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing disease in gastrointestinal tract. Conventional medications lack the efficacy to offer complete remission in IBD therapy, and usually associate with serious side effects. Recent studies indicated that nanoparticle-based nanotherapeutics may offer precise and safe alternative to conventional medications via enhanced targeting, sustained drug release, and decreased adverse effects. Here, we reviewed orally cell-specific nanotherapeutics developed in recent years. In addition, the various obstacles for oral drug delivery are also reviewed in this manuscript. Orally administrated cell-specific nanotherapeutics is expected to become a novel therapeutic approach for IBD treatment. PMID:27678353

  15. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  16. Enhancing the prioritization of disease-causing genes through tissue specific protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded Magger

    Full Text Available The prioritization of candidate disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge in the post-genomic era. Current state of the art methods exploit a protein-protein interaction (PPI network for this task. They are based on the observation that genes causing phenotypically-similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a PPI network. However, to date, these methods have used a static picture of human PPIs, while diseases impact specific tissues in which the PPI networks may be dramatically different. Here, for the first time, we perform a large-scale assessment of the contribution of tissue-specific information to gene prioritization. By integrating tissue-specific gene expression data with PPI information, we construct tissue-specific PPI networks for 60 tissues and investigate their prioritization power. We find that tissue-specific PPI networks considerably improve the prioritization results compared to those obtained using a generic PPI network. Furthermore, they allow predicting novel disease-tissue associations, pointing to sub-clinical tissue effects that may escape early detection.

  17. Gaucher disease in the liver on hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyala, Rama S. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Teot, Lisa A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Perez Rossello, Jeanette M. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Gaucher disease is a hereditary lipid storage disorder that affects the enzyme beta glucocerebrosidase, causing accumulation of glucocerebroside in macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Accumulation can occur in the liver and spleen, manifesting as hepatosplenomegaly, as well as within the bone marrow. Hepatic involvement is usually diffuse but can occasionally manifest as focal liver lesions. We present a case of a 2-year-old boy with Gaucher disease and an infiltrating liver lesion detected on imaging, which was pathologically shown to be focal changes related to the disease. Imaging characteristics of this lesion using hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MRI, which have not been previously discussed in the literature, are described. (orig.)

  18. Sex-specific lung diseases: effect of oestrogen on cultured cells and in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosung Shim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex prevalence in lung disease suggests that sex-specific hormones may contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of at least some lung diseases, such as lung adenocarcinoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM and benign metastasising leiomyoma (BML. Oestrogen is an important hormone in normal lung development and in the pathogenesis of female predominant pulmonary diseases. In vivo and in vitro studies have facilitated our understanding of disease pathogenesis and discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Oestrogen promoted disease progression in cell and animal models of lung adenocarcinoma, LAM and BML. Specifically, oestrogen enhanced tumour growth and metastasis in animal models of these diseases. Furthermore, 17β-estradiol (E2, the most abundant form of oestrogen in humans, increased the size and proliferation of cultured cells of lung adenocarcinoma and LAM. Coupled with the known mechanisms of oestrogen metabolism and signalling, these model systems may provide insights into the diverse effects of oestrogen and other hormones on lung diseases. Anti-oestrogen treatments that target key events of oestrogen synthesis or signalling, such as aromatase activity, oestrogen receptors and signalling pathways, may offer additional opportunities for clinical trials.

  19. Radioimmunoassay for detection of VP1 specific neutralizing antibodies of foot and mouse disease virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzer, E.J.; Jackson, M.L. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco CA (USA)); Moore, D.M. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY (USA))

    1985-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of antibodies against a specific region of the VP1 protein of the A24 and O1 serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus. The antibody titers from the radioimmunoassay showed a positive correlation with neutralizing antibody titers determined by a mouse protection assay. The specificity of the assay resides in the peptide used as antigen. The assay is rapid, reproducible and does not require the use of whole virions.

  20. Modulation effect of Blu-ray irradiation combined with comprehensive treatment on serum indicators of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia caused by hemolytic disease of newborn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZhang; Xiang-FanZhen; Dan Li; Xiao-YanHu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the modulation effect of Blu-ray irradiation combined with comprehensive treatment on serum indicators of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia caused by hemolytic disease of newborn. Methods:Eighty cases of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia caused by hemolytic disease of newborn were randomly divided into two groups, intervention group received Blu-ray irradiation combined with comprehensive medication and control group received comprehensive medication. Before and after treatment, contents of serum TBIL, MDA, nerve function related molecules as well as liver and kidney function related molecules were detected.Results:After treatment, serum TBIL, MDA, MBP, S-100β, NSE, Cr, BUN, CysC,β2-MG, αα-GST and GLDH levels of both groups were lower than those before treatment; serum TBIL, MDA, MBP, S-100β, NSE, Cr, BUN, CysC,β2-MG,α-GST and GLDH levels of intervention group were lower than those of control group.Conclusion:Blu-ray irradiation combined with comprehensive treatment can more effectively reduce bilirubin level, protect nerve function and reduce oxidative stress damage to liver and kidney function; it has positive value in treatment of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia caused by hemolytic disease of newborn.

  1. The CopenHeartSF trial—comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme for male patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease and impaired sexual function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pernille Palm; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2013-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of people's physical and mental health. Patients with heart disease often suffer from sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction has a negative impact on quality of life and well-being in persons with heart disease, and sexual dysfunction is associated with anxiety...... and depression. Treatment and care possibilities seem to be lacking. Studies indicate that non-pharmacological interventions such as exercise training and psychoeducation possess the potential of reducing sexual dysfunction in patients with heart disease. The CopenHeartSF trial will investigate the effect...... of a comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme versus usual care....

  2. Pancreatic-specific autoantibodies to glycoprotein 2 mirror disease location and behaviour in younger patients with Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanos Dimitrios P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycoprotein 2 (GP2 was discovered as the major autoantigen of Crohn’s disease (CD-specific pancreatic autoantibodies (PAB. We investigated anti-GP2 IgA and IgG antibodies as novel serological parameters in CD and assessed their association with distinct disease phenotypes. Methods Anti-GP2 and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA IgA and IgG were detected by ELISA employing recombinant human GP2 and phosphopeptidomannan, respectively and PAB by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF in 271 sera, 169 with CD and 102 with ulcerative colitis (UC. As healthy controls 160 adult blood donors and 65 children were included. Results Anti-GP2 IgG and/or IgA were more prevalent in CD (51/169, 30.2% than in UC (9/102, 8.9% patients and in controls (9/225, 4% (p  Conclusions Anti-GP2 IgG and IgA, constituting novel CD specific autoantibodies, appear to be associated with distinct disease phenotypes identifying patients at a younger age, with ileocolonic location, and stricturing behaviour with perianal disease.

  3. Linguistic and Cognitive Profiles of 8- to 15-Year-Old Children with Specific Reading Comprehension Difficulties: The Role of Executive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocki, Anna; Sanchez, Monique; Ecalle, Jean; Magnan, Annie

    2017-01-01

    This article presents two studies investigating the role of executive functioning in written text comprehension in children and adolescents. In a first study, the involvement of executive functions in reading comprehension performance was examined in normally developing children in fifth grade. Two aspects of text comprehension were…

  4. Assessment of Newcastle Disease specific T cell proliferation in different inbred MHC chicken lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Pedersen, Asger Roer;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we have described the establishment of an antigen-specific T cell proliferation assay based on recall stimulation with Newcastle disease (ND) antigen; further, we have described the results obtained after recall stimulation of animals containing different Major Histocompatibility...

  5. Epidemiological studies of the relationship between occupational exposures and chronic non-specific lung disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heederik, D.

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis the relationship between occupational exposures, lung function and Chronic Non-Specific Lung Disease is studied. The study comprises an epidemiological analysis of data from the British Pneumoconiosis Field Research among coal miners and an analysis of data gathered in the Zutphen

  6. Category-Specific Naming Deficit in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of a Display by Domain Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannino, Gian Daniele; Perri, Roberta; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni A.

    2007-01-01

    A category-specific naming effect penalizing living things has often been reported in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in other brain damaged populations, while the opposite dissociation (i.e., lower accuracy in naming nonliving than living things) is much rarer. In this study, we investigated whether the use of line drawings…

  7. The contribution of specific diseases to educational disparities in disability-free life expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Nusselder (Wilma); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); M. Huisman (Martijn); H. van Oyen (Herman); P. Deboosere (Patrick); S. Gadeyne (Sylvie); A.E. Kunst (Anton)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. We examined the contribution that specific diseases, as causes of both death and disability, make to educational disparities in disability-free life expectancy (DFLE). Methods. We used disability data from the Belgian Health Interview Survey (1997) and mortality data from the

  8. Age-specific anti-Müllerian hormone and electrocardiographic silent coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramezani Tehrani, F.; Montazeri, S. A.; Khalili, D.; Cheraghi, L.; Broekmans, F. J.; Momenan, A. A.; de Kat, A. C.; Azizi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between age-specific anti-Müllerian hormone level, as a predictor of ovarian reserve status, and electrocardiographic silent coronary artery disease in a population-based, prospective cohort, the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Methods: For the present study, 1

  9. SR-BI as target in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease - A comprehensive appraisal of the cellular functions of SR-BI in physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Menno

    2017-01-31

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is considered an anti-atherogenic lipoprotein species due to its role in reverse cholesterol transport. HDL delivers cholesterol esters to the liver through selective uptake by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). In line with the protective role for HDL in the context of cardiovascular disease, studies in mice and recently also in humans have shown that a disruption of normal SR-BI function predisposes subjects to the development of atherosclerotic lesions and cardiovascular disease. Although SR-BI function has been studied primarily in the liver, it should be acknowledged that the SR-BI protein is expressed in multiple tissues and cell types across the body, albeit at varying levels between the different tissues. Given that SR-BI is widely expressed throughout the body, multiple cell types and tissues can theoretically contribute to the atheroprotective effect of SR-BI. In this review the different functions of SR-BI in normal physiology are highlighted and the (potential) consequences of cell type-specific disruption of SR-BI function for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease susceptibility discussed. It appears that hepatocyte and platelet SR-BI inhibit respectively the development of atherosclerotic lesions and thrombosis, suggesting that SR-BI located on these cell compartments should be regarded as being a protective factor in the context of cardiovascular disease. The relative contribution of SR-BI present on endothelial cells, steroidogenic cells, adipocytes and macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease remains less clear, although proper SR-BI function in these cells does appear to influence multiple processes that impact on cardiovascular disease susceptibility.

  10. mTOR inhibitor-induced interstitial lung disease in cancer patients: Comprehensive review and a practical management algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Annelieke E C A B; Grutters, Jan C; Gerritsen, Winald R; van Erp, Nielka P; van Herpen, Carla M L; Tol, Jolien

    2016-05-15

    Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) have clinically significant activity against various malignancies, such as renal cell carcinoma and breast cancer, but their use can be complicated by several toxicities. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an adverse event of particular importance. Mostly, mTORi-induced ILD remains asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic, but it can also lead to severe morbidity and even mortality. Therefore, careful diagnosis and management of ILD is warranted. The reported incidence of mTORi-induced ILD varies widely because of a lack of uniform diagnostic criteria and active surveillance. Because of the nonspecific clinical features, a broad differential diagnosis that includes (opportunistic) infections should be considered in case of suspicion of mTORi-induced ILD. The exact mechanism or interplay of mechanisms leading to the development of ILD remains to be defined. Suggested mechanisms are either a direct toxic effect or immune-mediated mechanisms, considering mTOR inhibitors have several effects on the immune system. The clinical course of ILD varies widely and is difficult to predict. Consequently, the discrimination between when mTOR inhibitors can be continued safely and when discontinuation is indicated is challenging. In this review, we give a comprehensive review of the incidence, clinical presentation and pathophysiology of mTORi-induced ILD in cancer patients. We present newly developed diagnostic criteria for ILD, which include clinical symptoms as well as basic pulmonary function tests and radiological abnormalities. In conjunction with these diagnostic criteria, we provide a detailed and easily applicable clinical management algorithm.

  11. [Recent knowledge on the linkage of strain specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of human citomegalovirus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Human citomegalovirus (CMV) is a beta-herpesvirus able to establish lifelong persistent infections which usually remain asymptomatic. However, severe diseases may develop in immunocompromised subjects (e.g., AIDS patients and transplant recipients) and if acquired in utero. Circulating CMV clinical strains display genetic polymorphisms in multiple genes, which may be implicated in CMV-induced immunopathogenesis, as well as strain-specific tissue-tropism, viral spread in the host cells and virulence, finally determining the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CMV disease. Current literature report a number of studies regarding the main CMV polymorphic genes (UL55-gB, UL144, UL73-gN, UL74-gO), their diagnostic and therapeutic impact, their potential clinical relevance as prognostic markers. This paper aims to critically analyse the results of these studies and evaluate the linkage of strain-specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of CMV disease and their perspective implications.

  12. Mapping the author gender-distribution of disease-specific medical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Peter; Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2016-01-01

    of the decisive factors for variations in gender distribution is the difference in diseases specific to the male and female bodies. On the most general level, we find that the distribution of authors is highly skewed toward an over-representation of male researchers. The areas, which have the highest...... representation of female researchers, pertain to either the female body or diseases affecting the language or communication of patients. In contrast, medical specialty rather than the male body, specifically the topic of fractures (orthopedic surgery); define the areas with the highest degree of male authors per...... paper. With the overrepresentation of male authors, there is a risk of research on diseases more prevalent among men to become the norm, which can lead to detrimental effects on women's health....

  13. Concise Review: Patient-Specific Stem Cells to Interrogate Inherited Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Joseph C; Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; Songstad, Allison E; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-02-01

    Whether we are driving to work or spending time with loved ones, we depend on our sense of vision to interact with the world around us. Therefore, it is understandable why blindness for many is feared above death itself. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa, are major causes of blindness worldwide. The recent success of gene augmentation trials for the treatment of RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis has underscored the need for model systems that accurately recapitulate disease. With the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers are now able to obtain disease-specific cell types that would otherwise be unavailable for molecular analysis. In the present review, we discuss how the iPSC technology is being used to confirm the pathogenesis of novel genetic variants, interrogate the pathophysiology of disease, and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments. Significance: Stem cell technology has created the opportunity to advance treatments for multiple forms of blindness. Researchers are now able to use a person's cells to generate tissues found in the eye. This technology can be used to elucidate the genetic causes of disease and develop treatment strategies. In the present review, how stem cell technology is being used to interrogate the pathophysiology of eye disease and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments is discussed.

  14. Towards Patient-Specific Modeling of Coronary Hemodynamics in Healthy and Diseased State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen van der Horst

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model describing the primary relations between the cardiac muscle and coronary circulation might be useful for interpreting coronary hemodynamics in case multiple types of coronary circulatory disease are present. The main contribution of the present study is the coupling of a microstructure-based heart contraction model with a 1D wave propagation model. The 1D representation of the vessels enables patient-specific modeling of the arteries and/or can serve as boundary conditions for detailed 3D models, while the heart model enables the simulation of cardiac disease, with physiology-based parameter changes. Here, the different components of the model are explained and the ability of the model to describe coronary hemodynamics in health and disease is evaluated. Two disease types are modeled: coronary epicardial stenoses and left ventricular hypertrophy with an aortic valve stenosis. In all simulations (healthy and diseased, the dynamics of pressure and flow qualitatively agreed with observations described in literature. We conclude that the model adequately can predict coronary hemodynamics in both normal and diseased state based on patient-specific clinical data.

  15. Current roles of specific bacteria in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

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    Lucy McMullen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of alterations in gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD remains unclear. Currently there is conflicting evidence with regards to the roles of specific bacterial species. Escherichia coli (particularly the adherent invasive strain are more prevalent in those with IBD and are associated with higher risk of IBD. However, the organisms are also present in healthy individuals and colonisation does not correlate with the degree of inflammation in IBD. Campylobacter concisus is more prevalent in those with IBD and higher levels of C. concisus specific IgG antibodies are found in the serum of those with IBD compared to healthy controls. Further, C. concisus has immunogenic properties that stimulate an antibody response suggesting the bacteria might trigger or exacerbate disease. Conversely most mycobacteria are unlikely to be causative as they are not presentin microbial stool cultures early in disease. In various studies,Mycobacterium aviumparatuberculosishas been detected both more frequently and not at all in individuals with Crohn's disease. Similar conflict exists with respect to Yersinia enterocolitica,Bacteroidesvulgatus and Helicobacter hepaticus, which are also more prevalent in IBD. However, these organisms appear more likely to contribute to disease persistence than initial disease development. This review aims to summarise the current understanding of key bacterial species implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD.

  16. An atlas of tissue-specific conserved coexpression for functional annotation and disease gene prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Rosario Michael; Ala, Ugo; Molineris, Ivan; Grassi, Elena; Bracco, Chiara; Perego, Gian Paolo; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2011-11-01

    Gene coexpression relationships that are phylogenetically conserved between human and mouse have been shown to provide important clues about gene function that can be efficiently used to identify promising candidate genes for human hereditary disorders. In the past, such approaches have considered mostly generic gene expression profiles that cover multiple tissues and organs. The individual genes of multicellular organisms, however, can participate in different transcriptional programs, operating at scales as different as single-cell types, tissues, organs, body regions or the entire organism. Therefore, systematic analysis of tissue-specific coexpression could be, in principle, a very powerful strategy to dissect those functional relationships among genes that emerge only in particular tissues or organs. In this report, we show that, in fact, conserved coexpression as determined from tissue-specific and condition-specific data sets can predict many functional relationships that are not detected by analyzing heterogeneous microarray data sets. More importantly, we find that, when combined with disease networks, the simultaneous use of both generic (multi-tissue) and tissue-specific conserved coexpression allows a more efficient prediction of human disease genes than the use of generic conserved coexpression alone. Using this strategy, we were able to identify high-probability candidates for 238 orphan disease loci. We provide proof of concept that this combined use of generic and tissue-specific conserved coexpression can be very useful to prioritize the mutational candidates obtained from deep-sequencing projects, even in the case of genetic disorders as heterogeneous as XLMR.

  17. Mathematical functions for modeling the variation of specific medical criteria in some infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streinu-Cercel, Adrian; Costoiu, Sergiu; Mârza, Maria; Aramă, Victoria; Streinu-Cercel, Anca; Mârza, Monica

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the definition of rules for the medical algorithms in some infectious diseases and also the mathematical functions for modeling: interrogation rules to elaborate specific concepts and work methods in HIV/AIDS infection, interrogation rules to elaborate specifically concepts and work methods in SEPSIS, initial conditions regarding the introduction of the notion of stochastic correlation coefficient, determination of the the stochastic correlation coefficient through the method of reciprocal comparison of the variables, determination of the influential ponders through reciprocal comparison of the characteristics. models for the study of the variation of the specific medical criteria of some infectious diseases in the case of adopting the analysis method of reciprocal non comparison.

  18. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to understand intracellular regulatory mechanisms in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which are either common to many autoimmune diseases or specific to some of them. We incorporated large-scale data such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression and demographical information of hundreds of patients and healthy subjects, related to six autoimmune diseases with available large-scale gene expression measurements: multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). These data were analyzed concurrently by statistical and systems biology approaches tailored for this purpose. We found that chemokines such as CXCL1-3, 5, 6 and the interleukin (IL) IL8 tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In addition, the anti-apoptotic gene BCL3, interferon-γ (IFNG), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene physically interact with significantly many genes that tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In general, similar cellular processes tend to be differentially expressed in PBMC in the analyzed autoimmune diseases. Specifically, the cellular processes related to cell proliferation (for example, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, nuclear factor-κB, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, stress-activated protein kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase), inflammatory response (for example, interleukins IL2 and IL6, the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the B-cell receptor), general signaling cascades (for example, mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 and TRK) and apoptosis are activated in most of the analyzed autoimmune diseases. However, our results suggest that in each of the analyzed diseases, apoptosis and chemotaxis are activated via

  19. Cardiovascular Disease Modeling Using Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Tanaka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has opened up a new scientific frontier in medicine. This technology has made it possible to obtain pluripotent stem cells from individuals with genetic disorders. Because iPSCs carry the identical genetic anomalies related to those disorders, iPSCs are an ideal platform for medical research. The pathophysiological cellular phenotypes of genetically heritable heart diseases such as arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, have been modeled on cell culture dishes using disease-specific iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. These model systems can potentially provide new insights into disease mechanisms and drug discoveries. This review focuses on recent progress in cardiovascular disease modeling using iPSCs, and discusses problems and future perspectives concerning their use.

  20. Modeling Cardiovascular Diseases with Patient-Specific Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Paul W.; Diecke, Sebastian; Matsa, Elena; Sharma, Arun; Wu, Haodi; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a source of cells that accurately recapitulate the human cardiac pathophysiology. The application of these cells allows for modeling of cardiovascular diseases, providing a novel understanding of human disease mechanisms and assessment of therapies. Here, we describe a stepwise protocol developed in our laboratory for the generation of hiPSCs from patients with a specific disease phenotype, long-term hiPSC culture and cryopreservation, differentiation of hiPSCs to cardiomyocytes, and assessment of disease phenotypes. Our protocol combines a number of innovative tools that include a codon-optimized mini intronic plasmid (CoMiP), chemically defined culture conditions to achieve high efficiencies of reprogramming and differentiation, and calcium imaging for assessment of cardiomyocyte phenotypes. Thus, this protocol provides a complete guide to use a patient cohort on a testable cardiomyocyte platform for pharmacological drug assessment. PMID:25690476

  1. Periodontal disease bacteria specific to tonsil in IgA nephropathy patients predicts the remission by the treatment.

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    Yasuyuki Nagasawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunoglobulin (IgA nephropathy (IgAN is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world. Some bacteria were reported to be the candidate of the antigen or the pathogenesis of IgAN, but systematic analysis of bacterial flora in tonsil with IgAN has not been reported. Moreover, these bacteria specific to IgAN might be candidate for the indicator which can predict the remission of IgAN treated by the combination of tonsillectomy and steroid pulse. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We made a comprehensive analysis of tonsil flora in 68 IgAN patients and 28 control patients using Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis methods. We also analyzed the relationship between several bacteria specific to the IgAN and the prognosis of the IgAN. Treponema sp. were identified in 24% IgAN patients, while in 7% control patients (P = 0.062. Haemophilus segnis were detected in 53% IgAN patients, while in 25% control patients (P = 0.012. Campylobacter rectus were identified in 49% IgAN patients, while in 14% control patients (P = 0.002. Multiple Cox proportional-hazards model revealed that Treponema sp. or Campylobactor rectus are significant for the remission of proteinuria (Hazard ratio 2.35, p = 0.019. There was significant difference in remission rates between IgAN patients with Treponema sp. and those without the bacterium (p = 0.046, and in remission rates between IgAN patients with Campylobacter rectus and those without the bacterium (p = 0.037 by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Those bacteria are well known to be related with the periodontal disease. Periodontal bacteria has known to cause immune reaction and many diseases, and also might cause IgA nephropathy. CONCLUSION: This insight into IgAN might be useful for diagnosis of the IgAN patients and the decision of treatment of IgAN.

  2. Comprehensive Laboratory Evaluation of a Highly Specific Lateral Flow Assay for the Presumptive Identification of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Suspicious White Powders and Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Jason G.; Prentice, Kristin W.; DePalma, Lindsay; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Chivukula, Sruti; Chapman, Carol; Bell, Melissa; Datta, Shomik; Singh, Ajay; Hoffmaster, Alex; Sarwar, Jawad; Parameswaran, Nishanth; Joshi, Mrinmayi; Thirunavkkarasu, Nagarajan; Krishnan, Viswanathan; Morse, Stephen; Avila, Julie R.; Sharma, Shashi; Estacio, Peter L.; Stanker, Larry; Hodge, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive, multiphase laboratory evaluation of the Anthrax BioThreat Alert® test strip, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFA) for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis spores. The study, conducted at 2 sites, evaluated this assay for the detection of spores from the Ames and Sterne strains of B. anthracis, as well as those from an additional 22 strains. Phylogenetic near neighbors, environmental background organisms, white powders, and environmental samples were also tested. The Anthrax LFA demonstrated a limit of detection of about 106 spores/mL (ca. 1.5 × 105 spores/assay). In this study, overall sensitivity of the LFA was 99.3%, and the specificity was 98.6%. The results indicated that the specificity, sensitivity, limit of detection, dynamic range, and repeatability of the assay support its use in the field for the purpose of qualitatively evaluating suspicious white powders and environmental samples for the presumptive presence of B. anthracis spores. PMID:27661796

  3. Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease and Decreased Risk of Cancer-Specific Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; de la Aleja, Jesús González; Martínez-Salio, Antonio; Louis, Elan D.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The few studies that have assessed the association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer have had conflicting results. In addition, these studies ascertained participants either from treatment settings (ie, service-based studies) or by using a records linkage system (ie, medical records of patients evaluated at clinics or hospitals) and, therefore, were prone to selection bias. Our purpose was to estimate the risk of cancer mortality in a large population-based sample of elderly people, comparing participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (atherosclerotic stroke and coronary disease) to their counterparts without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (ie, controls) in the same population. In this population-based, prospective study (Neurological Disorders of Central Spain, NEDICES), 5262 elderly community-dwelling participants with and without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease were identified and followed for a median of 12.1 years, after which the death certificates of those who died were reviewed. A total of 2701 (53.3%) of 5262 participants died, including 314 (68.6%) of 458 participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and 2387 (49.7%) of 4804 controls. Cancer mortality was reported significantly less often in those with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (15.6%) than in controls (25.6%) (P < 0.001). In an unadjusted Cox model, risk of cancer-specific mortality was decreased in participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (HR = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55−0.98, P = 0.04) vs. those without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (reference group). In an adjusted Cox model, HR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38−0.89; P = 0.01. This population-based, prospective study suggests that there is an inverse association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer mortality. PMID:26266364

  4. Somatic development disorders of children with non specific inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Katarzyna; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Frequency of inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) tends to increase in developing countries. Nearly 25% of cases affects pediatric patients. Inflammatory bowel diseases are often associated with weight loss and stunting in children. Moreover, weight and height deficiencies are often early symptoms. Initially, nonspecific or latent course of disease delays the diagnostic process. Malnutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases can be caused by disorders of digestion and nutrients' absorption, intestinal loss, increased energy expenditure and appetite impairment. Nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory agents lead to disturbance of tissue metabolism - muscle and bone - and retardation of somatic development of affected children. Thus, deficiencies of muscle mass, bone mineral density and body height are observed. Insufficient normalization of somatic features may be the consequence of recurrent nature of disease and specificity of pharmacological treatment. Present work deals with the current state of knowledge concerning the somatic development disorders of children with inflammatory bowel diseases. Abnormal nutritional status, bone mineral density deficits and growth failure of patients have been discussed in the context of their relations and dependencies on inflammatory, nutritional and therapeutic factors.

  5. Allele-specific methylation occurs at genetic variants associated with complex disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Hutchinson

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS. We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81% are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434, Celiac disease (rs2762051, Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875 and height (rs6569648. Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results.

  6. Nutritional status influences generic and disease-specific quality of life measures in haemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina Moreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor nutritional status and worse health-related quality of life (QoL have been reported in haemodialysis (HD patients. The utilization of generic and disease specific QoL questionnaires in the same population may provide a better understanding of the significance of nutrition in QoL dimensions. Objective: To assess nutritional status by easy to use parameters and to evaluate the potential relationship with QoL measured by generic and disease specific questionnaires. Methods: Nutritional status was assessed by subjective global assessment adapted to renal patients (SGA, body mass index (BMI, nutritional intake and appetite. QoL was assessed by the generic EuroQoL and disease specific Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQoL-SF questionnaires. Results: The study comprised 130 patients of both genders, mean age 62.7 ± 14.7 years. The prevalence of undernutrition ranged from 3.1% by BMI 25 also had worse scores in some QoL dimensions, but after adjustment the pattern was maintained only in the symptoms and problems dimension of KDQoL-SF (p = 0.011. Conclusion: Our study reveals that even in mildly undernourished HD patients, nutritional status has a significant impact in several QoL dimensions. The questionnaires used provided different, almost complementary perspectives, yet for daily practice EuroQoL is simpler. Assuring a good nutritional status, may positively influence QoL.

  7. Can Neglected Tropical Diseases Compromise Human Wellbeing in Sex-, Age-, and Trait-Specific Ways?

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    David C Geary

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Traits that facilitate competition for reproductive resources or that influence mate choice have evolved to signal resilience to infectious disease and other stressors. As a result, the dynamics of competition and choice can, in theory, be used to generate predictions about sex-, age-, and trait-specific vulnerabilities for any sexually reproducing species, including humans. These dynamics and associated vulnerabilities are reviewed for nonhuman species, focusing on traits that are compromised by exposure to parasites. Using the same approach, sex-, age-, and trait-specific vulnerabilities to parasitic disease are illustrated for children's and adolescent's physical growth and fitness. Suggestions are then provided for widening the assessment of human vulnerabilities to include age-appropriate measures of behavioral (e.g., children's play and cognitive (e.g., language fluency traits. These are traits that are likely to be compromised by infection in age- and sex-specific ways. Inclusion of these types of measures in studies of neglected tropic diseases has the potential to provide a more nuanced understanding of how these diseases undermine human wellbeing and may provide a useful means to study the efficacy of associated treatments.

  8. Sex-specific environmental influences on the development of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiniakou, Eleni; Costenbader, Karen H; Kriegel, Martin A

    2013-11-01

    Sex differences in autoimmune diseases are evolutionarily tied to the fact that the female immune system is confronted with intense alterations during menstrual cycles, pregnancy and childbirth. These events may be associated with breaches in the mucosal epithelial layers that are shielding us from environmental factors. Associations between environmental agents and autoimmune diseases have been described extensively in prior studies. Little evidence, however, exists for sex-specific environmental effects on autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize studies involving this often-neglected aspect. We give examples of environmental factors that may influence the sex bias in autoimmunity. We conclude that most studies do not give insight into sex-specific environmental effects due to the influence of gender-selective social, occupational or other exposures. Prospective studies are needed in order to determine true sex-biased environmental influences. Finally, humanized murine models might aid in better understanding the mechanisms involved in sex-specific environmental effects on autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Retinal Diseases Caused by Mutations in Genes Not Specifically Associated with the Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Feng, Yanming; Li, Jianli; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Lewis, Richard A; Wong, Lee-Jun

    2016-01-01

    When seeking a confirmed molecular diagnosis in the research setting, patients with one descriptive diagnosis of retinal disease could carry pathogenic variants in genes not specifically associated with that description. However, this event has not been evaluated systematically in clinical diagnostic laboratories that validate fully all target genes to minimize false negatives/positives. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing analysis on 207 ocular disease-related genes for 42 patients whose DNA had been tested negative for disease-specific panels of genes known to be associated with retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, or exudative vitreoretinopathy. Pathogenic variants, including single nucleotide variations and copy number variations, were identified in 9 patients, including 6 with variants in syndromic retinal disease genes and 3 whose molecular diagnosis could not be distinguished easily from their submitted clinical diagnosis, accounting for 21% (9/42) of the unsolved cases. Our study underscores the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of retinal disorders and provides valuable reference to estimate the fraction of clinical samples whose retinal disorders could be explained by genes not specifically associated with the corresponding clinical diagnosis. Our data suggest that sequencing a larger set of retinal disorder related genes can increase the molecular diagnostic yield, especially for clinically hard-to-distinguish cases.

  10. Specific and nonspecific B-cell function in the small intestines of patients with Whipple's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhaar, Anika; Moos, Verena; Schinnerling, Katina; Allers, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Fenollar, Florence; LaScola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Schneider, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Whipple's disease is a chronic multisystemic infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei that is characterized by arthritis, weight loss, and diarrhea. The immunological defects in the duodenal mucosa, the site of major replication of the agent underlying the pathogenesis of Whipple's disease, are poorly understood. Mucosal immunoglobulins are essential for the defense against intestinal pathogens; therefore, we analyzed the B-cell response in duodenal specimens and sera of Whipple's disease patients. Whereas systemic immunoglobulin production was affected only marginally, duodenal biopsy specimens of Whipple's disease patients contained reduced numbers of immunoglobulin-positive plasma cells and secreted less immunoglobulin compared to healthy controls but showed a weak secretory IgA response toward T. whipplei. This T. whipplei-specific intestinal immune response was not observed in controls. Thus, we were able to demonstrate that general mucosal immunoglobulin production in Whipple's disease patients is impaired. However, this deficiency does not completely abolish T. whipplei-specific secretory IgA production that nonetheless does not protect from chronic infection.

  11. Negative cancer stereotypes and disease-specific self-concept in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Janice C; Payne, Ada Y M; Mah, Kenneth; Lebel, Sophie; Lee, Ruth N F; Irish, Jonathan; Rodin, Gary; Devins, Gerald M

    2013-05-01

    Life-threatening diseases, such as head and neck cancer (HNCa), can stimulate the emergence of a new disease-specific self-concept. We hypothesized that (i) negative cancer-stereotypes invoke distancing, which inhibits the adoption of a disease-specific self-concept and (ii) patient characteristics, disease and treatment factors, and cancer-related stressors moderate the phenomenon. Head and neck cancer outpatients (N = 522) completed a semantic-differential measure of disease-specific self-concept (perceived similarity to the 'cancer patient') and other self-report measures in structured interviews. Negative cancer-stereotypes were represented by the number of semantic-differential dimensions (0-3) along which respondents evaluated the stereotypic 'cancer patient' negatively (i.e., negative valence). We tested the two-way interactions between negative valence and hypothesized moderator variables. We observed significant negative valence × moderator interactions for the following: (i) patient characteristics (education, employment, social networks); (ii) disease and treatment factors (cancer-symptom burden); and (iii) cancer-related stressors (uncertainty, lack of information, and existential threats). Negative cancer stereotypes were consistently associated with distancing of self from the stereotypic 'cancer patient,' but the effect varied across moderator variables. All significant moderators (except employment and social networks) were associated with increasing perceived similarity to the 'cancer patient' when respondents maintained negative stereotypes; perceived similarity decreased when people were employed or had extensive social networks. Moderator effects were less pronounced when respondents did not endorse negative cancer stereotypes. When they hold negative stereotypes, people with HNCa distance themselves from a 'cancer patient' identity to preserve self-esteem or social status, but exposure to cancer-related stressors and adaptive demands may

  12. Association of immunological cell profiles with specific clinical phenotypes of scleroderma disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cacho, José Manuel; Gallardo, Soledad; Posada, Manuel; Aguerri, Miriam; Calzada, David; Mayayo, Teodoro; González-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Rabasco, Antonio María; Lahoz, Carlos; Cárdaba, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells, NK, and monocytes) and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction) and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient's stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies.

  13. Association of Immunological Cell Profiles with Specific Clinical Phenotypes of Scleroderma Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel López-Cacho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, NK, and monocytes and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient’s stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies.

  14. Specific disruption of hippocampal mossy fiber synapses in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Scott A; Raam, Tara; Antonios, Joseph K; Bushong, Eric A; Koo, Edward H; Ellisman, Mark H; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by deficits in memory and cognition indicating hippocampal pathology. While it is now recognized that synapse dysfunction precedes the hallmark pathological findings of AD, it is unclear if specific hippocampal synapses are particularly vulnerable. Since the mossy fiber (MF) synapse between dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 regions underlies critical functions disrupted in AD, we utilized serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to analyze MF microcircuitry in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). FAD mutant MF terminal complexes were severely disrupted compared to control - they were smaller, contacted fewer postsynaptic spines and had greater numbers of presynaptic filopodial processes. Multi-headed CA3 dendritic spines in the FAD mutant condition were reduced in complexity and had significantly smaller sites of synaptic contact. Significantly, there was no change in the volume of classical dendritic spines at neighboring inputs to CA3 neurons suggesting input-specific defects in the early course of AD related pathology. These data indicate a specific vulnerability of the DG-CA3 network in AD pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of SBEM to assess circuit specific alterations in mouse models of human disease.

  15. Specific disruption of hippocampal mossy fiber synapses in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Wilke

    Full Text Available The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD are characterized by deficits in memory and cognition indicating hippocampal pathology. While it is now recognized that synapse dysfunction precedes the hallmark pathological findings of AD, it is unclear if specific hippocampal synapses are particularly vulnerable. Since the mossy fiber (MF synapse between dentate gyrus (DG and CA3 regions underlies critical functions disrupted in AD, we utilized serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM to analyze MF microcircuitry in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD. FAD mutant MF terminal complexes were severely disrupted compared to control - they were smaller, contacted fewer postsynaptic spines and had greater numbers of presynaptic filopodial processes. Multi-headed CA3 dendritic spines in the FAD mutant condition were reduced in complexity and had significantly smaller sites of synaptic contact. Significantly, there was no change in the volume of classical dendritic spines at neighboring inputs to CA3 neurons suggesting input-specific defects in the early course of AD related pathology. These data indicate a specific vulnerability of the DG-CA3 network in AD pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of SBEM to assess circuit specific alterations in mouse models of human disease.

  16. Neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with acute ischemic brain disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selaković Vesna M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the dynamics of change of neuron-specific enolase concentration in patients with acute ischemic brain disease in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. The study included 103 patients, their mean age 58-66 years. The control group consisted of 16 patients, of matching age and sex, with radicular lesions of discal origin, subjected to diagnostic radiculography. Concentration of neuron-specific enolase was measured by a flouroimmunometric method. The results showed that the concentration of neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with brain ischemic disease within first seven days significantly increased compared to the control. The highest increase of concentration was established in brain infarction, somewhat lower in reversible ischemic attack, and the lowest in transient ischemic attack. Maximal concentration was established on the 3rd-4th day upon the brain infarction. Neuron-specific enolase concentration in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma may be an indicator of pathophysiological processes in the acute phase of brain ischemia and is significant in early diagnostics and therapy of the disease.

  17. Sex-specific patterns and differences in dementia and Alzheimer's disease using informatics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo, Jay Geronimo; Baer, Merritt Rachel; Lester, William T

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health recently highlighted the critical need for explicitly addressing sex differences in biomedical research, including Alzheimer's disease and dementia. The purpose of our study was to perform a sex-stratified analysis of cognitive impairment using diverse medical, clinical, and genetic factors of unprecedented scale and scope by applying informatics approaches to three large Alzheimer's databases. Analyses suggested females were 1.5 times more likely than males to have a documented diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease, and several other factors fell along sex-specific lines and were possibly associated with severity of cognitive impairment.

  18. Stromal transcriptional profiles reveal hierarchies of anatomical site, serum response and disease and identify disease specific pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filer, Andrew; Antczak, Philipp; Parsonage, Greg N; Legault, Holly M; O'Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J; Thomas, Andrew M; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts.

  19. Psychosocial risk factors, interventions and comorbidity in patients with non-specific low back pain in primary care: need for comprehensive and patient-centered care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline eRamond-Roquin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific low back pain (LBP affects many people and has major socio-economic consequences. Traditional therapeutic strategies, mainly focused on biomechanical factors, have had moderate and short-term impact. Certain psychosocial factors have been linked to poor prognosis of LBP and they are increasingly considered as promising targets for management of LBP. Primary health care providers (HCPs are involved in most of the management of people with LBP and they are skilled in providing comprehensive care, including consideration of psychosocial dimensions. This review aims to discuss three pieces of recent research focusing on psychosocial issues in LBP patients in primary care. In the first systematic review, the patients’ or HCPs’ overall judgment about the likely evolution of LBP was the factor most strongly linked to poor outcome, with predictive validity similar to that of multidimensional scales. This result may be explained by the implicit aggregation of many prognostic factors underlying this judgment and suggests the relevance of considering the patients from biopsychosocial and longitudinal points of view. The second review showed that most of the interventions targeting psychosocial factors in LBP in primary care have to date focused on the cognitive-behavioral factors, resulting in little impact. It is unlikely that any intervention focusing on a single factor would ever fit the needs of most patients; interventions targeting determinants from several fields (mainly psychosocial, biomechanical and occupational may be more relevant. Should multiple stakeholders be involved in such interventions, enhanced interprofessional collaboration would be critical to ensure the delivery of coordinated care. Finally, in the third study, the prevalence of psychosocial comorbidity in chronic LBP patients was not found to be significantly higher than in other patients consulting in primary care. Rather than specifically screening for

  20. Characterization of storage material in cultured fibroblasts by specific lectin binding in lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I; Ekblom, P; Laurila, P; Nordling, S; Raivio, K O; Aula, P

    1980-11-01

    The lysosomal storage material in cultured fibroblasts from patients with various lysosomal storage diseases was characterized by fluorescence microscopy using lectins specific for different saccharide moieties. In normal fibroblasts and cultured amniotic fluid cells lectins specific for mannosyl and glucosyl moieties, Con A and LcA gave a bright perinuclear cytoplasmic staining corresponding to the localization of endoplasmic reticulum in the cells. All other lectins stained the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear reticular structure. In fucosidosis fibroblasts, only lectins specific for fucosyl groups LTA and UEA, distinctly stained the lysosomal inclusions. The lysosomes in mannosidosis fibroblasts did not react with Con A and LcA, both specific for mannosyl moieties of glycoconjugates, but were brightly labeled with WGA, a lectin specific for N-acetyl glucosaminyl moieties. In I-cell fibroblasts, the numerous perinuclear phase-dense granules, representing abnormal lysosomes, were labeled with every lectin used. In fibroblasts from patients with Salla disease, a newly discovered lysosomal storage disorder, the lysosomes were brightly stained only with LPA, indicating the presence of increased amounts of sialic acid residues in the lysosomal inclusions.

  1. The Role of Self-Efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Management: Preliminary Validation of a Disease-Specific Measure

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    IBDs require self-management skills that may be influenced by self-efficacy (SE). Self Efficacy represents an individual’s perception of his or her ability to organize and execute the behaviors necessary to manage disease. The goal of this study was to develop a valid and reliable measure of IBD-specific SE that can be used in clinical and research contexts. 122 adults with a verified IBD diagnosis participated in the study. Data were pooled from two sources: patients from an outpatient unive...

  2. Non-Specific Disease Mimicking Malignancy: Two Cases of FDG Uptake in the Extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Eun Jung; Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Ihn Ho [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    FDG PET is an imaging technique used to assess regional differences in glucose metabolism. A variety of diseases, including malignancy, can show abnormal FDG uptake in bone marrow. PET/CT demonstrated non-specific uptake in the extremities of two patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO). Both patients showed focal and symmetric FDG uptake in the bone marrow of the arms and legs. Although the results of these cases were not diagnostic, the unique uptake pattern of PET/CT should be considered a non-specific reactive change as well as malignancy or other possibilities in the initial deferential diagnosis.

  3. Prevalence of collagen VII-specific autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licarete Emilia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoimmunity to collagen VII is typically associated with the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA, but also occurs occasionally in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of our present study was to develop an accurate immunoassay for assessing the presence of autoantibodies against collagen VII in large cohorts of patients and healthy donors. Methods Based on in silico antigenic analysis and previous wetlab epitope mapping data, we designed a chimeric collagen VII construct containing all collagen VII epitopes with higher antigenicity. ELISA was performed with sera from patients with EBA (n = 50, Crohn's disease (CD, n = 50, ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 50, bullous pemphigoid (BP, n = 76, and pemphigus vulgaris (PV, n = 42 and healthy donors (n = 245. Results By ELISA, the receiver operating characteristics analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.98 (95% CI: 0.9638-1.005, allowing to set the cut-off at 0.32 OD at a calculated specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 94%. Running the optimized test showed that serum IgG autoantibodies from 47 EBA (94%; 95% CI: 87.41%-100%, 2 CD (4%; 95% CI: 0%-9.43%, 8 UC (16%; 95% CI: 5.8%-26%, 2 BP (2.63%; 95% CI: 0%-6.23%, and 4 PV (9.52%; 95% CI: 0%-18.4% patients as well as from 4 (1.63%; 95% CI: 0%-3.21% healthy donors reacted with the chimeric protein. Further analysis revealed that in 34%, 37%, 16% and 100% of sera autoantibodies of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 isotype, respectively, recognized the recombinant autoantigen. Conclusions Using a chimeric protein, we developed a new sensitive and specific ELISA to detect collagen specific antibodies. Our results show a low prevalence of collagen VII-specific autoantibodies in inflammatory bowel disease, pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid. Furthermore, we show that the autoimmune response against collagen VII is dominated by IgG4 autoantibodies. The new immunoassay should

  4. Nutritional status influences generic and disease-specific quality of life measures in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana Catarina; Carolino, Elisabete; Domingos, Fernando; Gaspar, Augusta; Ponce, Pedro; Camilo, María Ermelinda

    2013-01-01

    Poor nutritional status and worse healthrelated quality of life (QoL) have been reported in haemodialysis (HD) patients. The utilization of generic and disease specific QoL questionnaires in the same population may provide a better understanding of the significance of nutrition in QoL dimensions. To assess nutritional status by easy to use parameters and to evaluate the potential relationship with QoL measured by generic and disease specific questionnaires. Nutritional status was assessed by subjective global assessment adapted to renal patients (SGA), body mass index (BMI), nutritional intake and appetite. QoL was assessed by the generic EuroQoL and disease specific Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQoL-SF) questionnaires. The study comprised 130 patients of both genders, mean age 62.7 ± 14.7 years. The prevalence of undernutrition ranged from 3.1% by BMI ≤ 18.5 kg/m² to 75.4% for patients below energy and protein intake recommendations. With the exception of BMI classification, undernourished patients had worse scores in nearly all QoL dimensions (EuroQoL and KDQoL-SF), a pattern which was dominantly maintained when adjusted for demographics and disease-related variables. Overweight/ obese patients (BMI ≥ 25) also had worse scores in some QoL dimensions, but after adjustment the pattern was maintained only in the symptoms and problems dimension of KDQoL-SF (p = 0.011). Our study reveals that even in mildly undernourished HD patients, nutritional status has a significant impact in several QoL dimensions. The questionnaires used provided different, almost complementary perspectives, yet for daily practice EuroQoL is simpler. Assuring a good nutritional status, may positively influence QoL. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Disease-specific Data Sheets in the Management of Chronic Conditions - Case Example: Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Narus, Scott P.; Wilcox, Adam; Clayton, Paul D.; Pryor, T. Allan; Towner, Steven; Barlow, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Intermountain Health Care (IHC) has developed a reporting infrastructure that allows researchers to build disease or condition specific data sheets. These reports run directly from an EMR application. The reports extract relevant information from a coded central data repository. Logic may be incorporated into the reports in order to provide decision support to clinicians at the point of care. A diabetes data sheet was one of the first reports developed. Use of the diabetes data sheet grew fro...

  6. Muscle fiber-type distribution, fiber-type-specific damage, and the Pompe disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, L E M; Drost, M R; Schaart, G; de Laat, J; van Doorn, P A; van der Ploeg, A T; Reuser, A J J

    2013-09-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid α-glucosidase deficiency and characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has ameliorated patients' perspectives, but reversal of skeletal muscle pathology remains a challenge. We studied pretreatment biopsies of 22 patients with different phenotypes to investigate to what extent fiber-type distribution and fiber-type-specific damage contribute to clinical diversity. Pompe patients have the same fiber-type distribution as healthy persons, but among nonclassic patients with the same GAA mutation (c.-32-13T>G), those with early onset of symptoms tend to have more type 2 muscle fibers than those with late-onset disease. Further, it seemed that the older, more severely affected classic infantile patients and the wheelchair-bound and ventilated nonclassic patients had a greater proportion of type 2x muscle fibers. However, as in other diseases, this may be caused by physical inactivity of those patients.

  7. Drugs, non-drugs, and disease category specificity: organ effects by ligand pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sosa, A T; Maran, U

    2013-01-01

    Important understanding can be gained from using molecular biology-based and chemistry-based techniques together. Bayesian classifiers have thus been developed in the present work using several statistically significant molecular properties of compiled datasets of drugs and non-drugs, including their disease category or organ. The results show they provide a useful classification and simplicity of several different ligand efficiencies and molecular properties. Early recall of drugs among non-drugs using the classifiers as a ranking tool is also provided. As the chemical space of compounds is addressed together with their anatomical characterization, chemical libraries can be improved to select for specific organ or disease. Eventually, by including even finer detail, the method may help in designing libraries with specific pharmacological or toxicological target chemical space. Alternatively, a lack of statistically significant differences in property density distributions may help in further describing compounds with possibility of activity on several organs or disease groups, and given their very similar or considerably overlapping chemical space, therefore wanted or unwanted side-effects. The overlaps between densities for several properties of organs or disease categories were calculated by integrating the area under the curves where they intersect. The naïve Bayesian classifiers are readily built, fast to score, and easily interpretable.

  8. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: towards combination vaccines for allergic and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlmayr, Johanna; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is an antigen-specific and disease-modifying form of treatment. It is based on the therapeutic administration of the disease-causing allergens to allergic patients. However, the fact that only allergen extracts of insufficient quality are currently available and the possible occurrence of side effects during treatment limit the broad use of SIT and prophylactic vaccination is has not yet been performed. In the last 20 years the DNA sequences of the most common allergens have been isolated and the corresponding allergens have been produced as recombinant allergens. Based on the progress made in the field of allergen characterization it is possible to improve the quality and safety of allergy vaccines and to develop new, more effective strategies for a broad application of SIT and even for prophylactic treatment. Here we discuss the development of combination vaccines for allergy and infectious diseases. This approach is based on the selection of allergen-derived peptides with reduced IgE- and T cell reactivity in order to minimize IgE- and T cell-mediated side effects as well as the potential of the vaccine to induce allergic sensitization. These peptides are fused by recombinant technology onto a viral carrier protein to obtain a combination vaccine which induces protective immunity against allergy and viral infections. The application of such combination vaccines for therapy and prophylaxis of allergy and infectious diseases is discussed.

  9. [Genetics and epigenetics. Explanatory approaches for (gender-specific) mechanisms of disease development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerres, K; Eggermann, T

    2014-09-01

    Whereas the central role of DNA as the carrier of genetic information has long been well known, the impact of epigenetic mechanisms as mediators between genes and environment is now becoming increasingly clear. Epigenetics helps explain the partially reversible interplay between gene function and environment and even permits observation of the transgenerational transmission of epigenetic modifications. Of special interest are gender-specific mechanisms of gene regulation which, among others, offer an explanation for gender differences in human diseases. Since the study of epigenetic mechanisms and their impact on the etiology of common diseases is in its infancy, it is too early to draw general conclusions from the current state of knowledge. Moreover, completely new strategies are needed to research these effects. In addition to molecular findings, definitions of specific phenotypes are required, including biographic data of affected individuals and their ancestors. Epigenetics needs to be viewed in the context of the theory of evolution, classical genetics, and environmental research. Its aim is not to substitute the knowledge in these disciplines, but rather to provide a key to link their findings, thereby opening up new possibilities in terms of interpretation and understanding of gender differences in medicine. If these epigenetic mechanisms are better understood, particularly in terms of specific diseases, it is conceivable that these disorders could be influenced and treated in a more targeted manner in the future.

  10. Patient- and Disease-Specific Factors Associated With Operative Management of de Quervain Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; Liu, Tiffany C; Gordon, Joshua A; Bozentka, David J; Steinberg, David R; Gray, Benjamin L

    2017-09-07

    It remains unclear which factors, patient- or disease-specific, are associated with electing to undergo operative management for de Quervain tendinopathy. Our null hypothesis was that no patient- or disease-specific factors would be associated with the choice of surgical treatment of de Quervain tendinopathy. We performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients diagnosed with de Quervain tendinopathy over 3 years by 1 of 3 fellowship-trained hand surgeons at an urban academic institution. Descriptive statistics were calculated for patient baseline and disease-specific characteristics. Cohorts were compared using bivariate analysis for all collected variables. Binary logistic regression with backward stepwise term selection was performed including independent predictors identified by bivariate analysis. A total of 200 patients were identified for inclusion. Bivariate analysis revealed that surgically treated patients were significantly more likely to have Medicaid insurance, psychiatric illness history, and disabled work status. Regression analysis revealed an association between surgical treatment and 2 of the factors evaluated: Medicaid insurance status and psychiatric illness history. Psychiatric illness and Medicaid insurance status are associated with undergoing surgical release of the first dorsal compartment. These findings support the use of a biopsychosocial framework when treating patients with de Quervain tendinopathy. Prognostic IV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeting B cells in immune-mediated inflammatory disease: a comprehensive review of mechanisms of action and identification of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Thomas; Kinnman, Nils; Tak, Paul P

    2010-03-01

    B cell-depletion therapy, particularly using anti-CD20 treatment, has provided proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response may result in clinical improvements in immune-mediated inflammatory disease. In this review, the mechanisms of action of B cell-targeting drugs are investigated, and potential biomarkers associated with response to treatment in patients with autoimmune diseases are identified. Most available data relate to B cell depletion using anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Treatment leads to significant clinical benefit, but apparently fails to deplete long-lived plasma cells, and discontinuation is associated with relapse. Biomarkers commonly used in studies of B cell-targeted therapies include rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies, and immunoglobulin (Ig) levels. More recently, there has been interest in markers such as B cell phenotype analysis, and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)/a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), the latter particularly in studies of the IgG Fc-transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) fusion protein (atacicept) and anti-BLyS therapy (belimumab). Data from clinical trials of B cell-depleting agents in RA suggest that specific autoantibodies, BLyS, APRIL, and circulating and synovial B lineage cell levels may have potential as biomarkers predictive of response to treatment. Further trials validating these markers against clinical outcomes in RA are required. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Fc receptors and levels of circulating immune cells (including B cells and natural killer cells) may be relevant markers.

  12. [Prenatal sex-specific programming and chronic diseases or Finis Ab Orígine Pendet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arck, P C; Hecher, K

    2014-09-01

    An increasing incidence of chronic immune diseases such as allergies, multiple sclerosis, and type 2 diabetes, as well as obesity and cardiovascular and psychiatric disorders has been reported over the last five decades. Since the human genome has not altered significantly over this period of time, gene-environment interactions are suspected to be responsible for these increased disease incidences. In this context, the prenatal period is believed to significantly contribute to altered disease susceptibilities, which could be associated with environmental factors to which pregnant women were exposed to. This observation has led to a concept entitled 'developmental origin of health and disease', a topic that is enjoying much attention in clinical and basic science research. The aim of these research endeavors is to postulate guidelines for primary disease prevention. Whilst the emerging insights from this field of research provide significant pieces of the puzzle, one area is still largely neglected: the clear identification of a sex-specific programming effect. Thus it is essential that such an approach becomes fully integrated in future research goals.

  13. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S. Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg2 from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10−17) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg2 from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10−4). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg2 despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  14. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Cognitive training in Parkinson disease: cognition-specific vs nonspecific computer training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Ronan; Gschwandtner, Ute; Benz, Nina; Hatz, Florian; Schindler, Christian; Taub, Ethan; Fuhr, Peter

    2014-04-08

    In this study, we compared a cognition-specific computer-based cognitive training program with a motion-controlled computer sports game that is not cognition-specific for their ability to enhance cognitive performance in various cognitive domains in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Patients with PD were trained with either a computer program designed to enhance cognition (CogniPlus, 19 patients) or a computer sports game with motion-capturing controllers (Nintendo Wii, 20 patients). The effect of training in 5 cognitive domains was measured by neuropsychological testing at baseline and after training. Group differences over all variables were assessed with multivariate analysis of variance, and group differences in single variables were assessed with 95% confidence intervals of mean difference. The groups were similar regarding age, sex, and educational level. Patients with PD who were trained with Wii for 4 weeks performed better in attention (95% confidence interval: -1.49 to -0.11) than patients trained with CogniPlus. In our study, patients with PD derived at least the same degree of cognitive benefit from non-cognition-specific training involving movement as from cognition-specific computerized training. For patients with PD, game consoles may be a less expensive and more entertaining alternative to computer programs specifically designed for cognitive training. This study provides Class III evidence that, in patients with PD, cognition-specific computer-based training is not superior to a motion-controlled computer game in improving cognitive performance.

  16. Stromal transcriptional profiles reveal hierarchies of anatomical site, serum response and disease and identify disease specific pathways.

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    Andrew Filer

    Full Text Available Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthritis (OA and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts.

  17. Towards comprehensive and transparent reporting: context-specific additions to the ICF taxonomy for medical evaluations of work capacity involving claimants with chronic widespread pain and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegler, Urban; Anner, Jessica; Glässel, Andrea; Brach, Mirjam; De Boer, Wout; Cieza, Alarcos; Trezzini, Bruno

    2014-08-29

    Medical evaluations of work capacity provide key information for decisions on a claimant's eligibility for disability benefits. In recent years, the evaluations have been increasingly criticized for low transparency and poor standardization. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a comprehensive spectrum of categories for reporting functioning and its determinants in terms of impairments and contextual factors and could facilitate transparent and standardized documentation of medical evaluations of work capacity. However, the comprehensiveness of the ICF taxonomy in this particular context has not been empirically examined. In this study, we wanted to identify potential context-specific additions to the ICF for its application in medical evaluations of work capacity involving chronic widespread pain (CWP) and low back pain (LBP). A retrospective content analysis of Swiss medical reports was conducted by using the ICF for data coding. Concepts not appropriately classifiable with ICF categories were labeled as specification categories (i.e. context-specific additions) and were assigned to predefined specification areas (i.e. precision, coverage, personal factors, and broad concepts). Relevant specification categories for medical evaluations of work capacity involving CWP and LBP were determined by calculating their relative frequency across reports and setting a relevance threshold. Forty-three specification categories for CWP and fifty-two for LBP reports passed the threshold. In both groups of reports, precision was the most frequent specification area, followed by personal factors. The ICF taxonomy represents a universally applicable standard for reporting health and functioning information. However, when applying the ICF for comprehensive and transparent reporting in medical evaluations of work capacity involving CWP and LBP context-specific additions are needed. This is particularly true for the documentation of

  18. CD69 expression on a-gliadin-specific T cells in coeliac disease

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    S Perticarari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a T-cell mediated immunological disease of the small intestine which is triggered in susceptible individuals by ingestion of gluten. The pathogenic mechanism of coeliac disease, and the role that a-gliadin specific T cells play in mucosal lesions and their involvement in peripheral blood is not yet explained at all. Previous studies have reported proliferative response to a-gliadin measured with the classic assay of 3HTdR incorporation. We analysed the activation antigen CD69 on T cells from CD patients and normal individuals following stimulation with a-gliadin and different antigens (tetanus toxoid, peptides unrelated to gliadin and PHA. CD69 coexpression with T cell CD3+ and proliferation marker Ki67 was evaluated with time. CD69 coexpression with T cell CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ was also evaluated. It was found that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of coeliac patients increased their percentage of CD69 positive T cells when stimulated with a-gliadin, in comparison with cells from controls. Significant T cell activation was found only in subjects not treated with the gluten free diet; a positive response was found also in two coeliac patients with selective IgA deficiency, anti-endomisium negative, without circulat- ing IgA anti a-gliadin or anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. The CD69 expression after stimulation was compared with the standard method of 3HTdR incorporation. Our data show that CD69 expression is useful to asses a specific T cell response to a-gliadin in coeliac disease. in a very short time. Moreover, the method allows to investigate T cell response at the lymphocyte subsets level, which represents a useful tool in the diagnosis of coeliac disease.

  19. Specific and combined subjective responses to noise and their association with cardiovascular diseases

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    Zdenka Vandasova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise is one of the most extensive environmental factors affecting the general population. The present study is focused on the association between discomfort caused by noise and the incidence of certain diseases (ischaemic heart disease, stroke and hypertension. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional questionnaire study, conducted in 10 cities in the Czech Republic, comprises two stages with 3592 obtained questionnaires in the first phase and 762 in the second phase. Twelve variables describe subjective responses to noise from different sources at different times of day. The intensity of the associations between variables was measured by correlation coefficient. Logistic regression was used for fitting models of morbidity, and confounders such as age and socio-economic status were included. The hypotheses from the first phase were independently validated using data from the second phase. Results: The general rates of noise annoyance/sleep disturbance had greater correlation with traffic noise variables than with neighbourhood noise variables. Factors significantly associated with diseases are: for hypertension − annoyance by traffic noise (the elderly, odds ratio (OR 1.4 and sleep disturbance by traffic and neighbourhood noise (the elderly, OR 1.6; for ischaemic heart disease − the general rate of noise annoyance (all respondents, OR 1.5 and the adults 30–60 years, OR 1.8 and the general rate of annoyance and sleep disturbance (all respondents, OR 1.3; for stroke − annoyance and sleep disturbance by traffic and neighbourhood noise (all respondents, OR 1.8. Conclusion: Factors that include multiple sources of noise or non-specific noise are associated with the studied diseases more frequently than the source-specific factors.

  20. Targeting Specific HATs for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment: Translating Basic Biology to Therapeutic Possibilities

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    Sheila K. Pirooznia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic epigenetic regulation of neurons is emerging as a fundamental mechanism by which neurons adapt their transcriptional responses to specific developmental and environmental cues. While defects within the neural epigenome have traditionally been studied in the context of early developmental and heritable cognitive disorders, recent studies point to aberrant histone acetylation status as a key mechanism underlying acquired inappropriate alterations of genome structure and function in post-mitotic neurons during the aging process. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that chromatin acetylation status can be impaired during the lifetime of neurons through mechanisms related to loss of function of histone acetyltransferase (HATs activity. Several HATs have been shown to participate in vital neuronal functions such as regulation of neuronal plasticity and memory formation. As such, dysregulation of such HATs has been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with age-associated neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline. In order to counteract the loss of HAT function in neurodegenerative diseases, the current therapeutic strategies involve the use of small molecules called histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors that antagonize HDAC activity and thus enhance acetylation levels. Although this strategy has displayed promising therapeutic effects, currently used HDAC inhibitors lack target specificity, raising concerns about their applicability. With rapidly evolving literature on HATs and their respective functions in mediating neuronal survival and higher order brain function such as learning and memory, modulating the function of specific HATs holds new promises as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the recent progress in research regarding epigenetic histone acetylation mechanisms underlying neuronal activity and cognitive function. We discuss the current understanding of specific HDACs and

  1. DNA methylation analysis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease suggests distinct disease-specific and remodeling signatures after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Markus; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Kolarova, Julia; Bens, Susanne; Itzel, Timo; Teufel, Andreas; Herrmann, Alexander; Brosch, Mario; Hinrichsen, Holger; Erhart, Wiebke; Egberts, Jan; Sipos, Bence; Schreiber, Stefan; Häsler, Robert; Stickel, Felix; Becker, Thomas; Krawczak, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Siebert, Reiner; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder in industrialized countries. Liver samples from morbidly obese patients (n = 45) with all stages of NAFLD and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by array-based DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiling. NAFLD-specific expression and methylation differences were seen for nine genes coding for key enzymes in intermediate metabolism (including PC, ACLY, and PLCG1) and insulin/insulin-like signaling (including IGF1, IGFBP2, and PRKCE) and replicated by bisulfite pyrosequening (independent n = 39). Transcription factor binding sites at NAFLD-specific CpG sites were >1,000-fold enriched for ZNF274, PGC1A, and SREBP2. Intraindividual comparison of liver biopsies before and after bariatric surgery showed NAFLD-associated methylation changes to be partially reversible. Postbariatric and NAFLD-specific methylation signatures were clearly distinct both in gene ontology and transcription factor binding site analyses, with >400-fold enrichment of NRF1, HSF1, and ESRRA sites. Our findings provide an example of treatment-induced epigenetic organ remodeling in humans.

  2. Comprehensive microarray-based analysis for stage-specific larval camouflage pattern-associated genes in the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus

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    Futahashi Ryo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body coloration is an ecologically important trait that is often involved in prey-predator interactions through mimicry and crypsis. Although this subject has attracted the interest of biologists and the general public, our scientific knowledge on the subject remains fragmentary. In the caterpillar of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus, spectacular changes in the color pattern are observed; the insect mimics bird droppings (mimetic pattern as a young larva, and switches to a green camouflage coloration (cryptic pattern in the final instar. Despite the wide variety and significance of larval color patterns, few studies have been conducted at a molecular level compared with the number of studies on adult butterfly wing patterns. Results To obtain a catalog of genes involved in larval mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, we constructed expressed sequence tag (EST libraries of larval epidermis for P. xuthus, and P. polytes that contained 20,736 and 5,376 clones, respectively, representing one of the largest collections available in butterflies. A comparison with silkworm epidermal EST information revealed the high expression of putative blue and yellow pigment-binding proteins in Papilio species. We also designed a microarray from the EST dataset information, analyzed more than five stages each for six markings, and confirmed spatial expression patterns by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Hence, we succeeded in elucidating many novel marking-specific genes for mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, including pigment-binding protein genes, the melanin-associated gene yellow-h3, the ecdysteroid synthesis enzyme gene 3-dehydroecdysone 3b-reductase, and Papilio-specific genes. We also found many cuticular protein genes with marking specificity that may be associated with the unique surface nanostructure of the markings. Furthermore, we identified two transcription factors, spalt and ecdysteroid signal-related E75, as genes

  3. The Myotonic Dystrophy Health Index: Italian validation of a disease-specific outcome measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Valeria A; Lizio, Andrea; Greco, Lucia; Gragnano, Gaia; Zanolini, Alice; Gualandris, Marco; Iatomasi, Marino; Heatwole, Chad

    2017-07-10

    The Myotonic Dystrophy Health Index (MDHI) is a disease-specific, self-reported outcome measure that assesses total disease burden and 17 areas of Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) specific health. This study translated the MDHI into Italian and validated the instrument using a cohort of Italian DM1 patients. Italian DM1 patients were interviewed regarding the form and content of the instrument. Thirty-eight DM1 patients were subsequently recruited to test the reliability and concurrent validity of the instrument by serially completing the MDHI and a battery of clinical tests. Lastly, we determined the internal consistency of the Italian MDHI and each of its subscales. The internal consistency was excellent in the total Italian MDHI score and acceptable in all of its subscales; the test-retest reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95); Italian MDHI total scores and subscales were associated with neuromuscular function, cognitive and social health, respiratory function, and quality of life. Overall, the Italian MDHI is valid and well suited to measure the multi-dimensional aspects of disease burden in Myotonic Dystrophy clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modified inoculation and disease assessment methods reveal host specificity in Erwinia tracheiphila-Cucurbitaceae interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareno, Eric S; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a greenhouse trial to determine specific compatible interactions between Erwinia tracheiphila strains and cucurbit host species. Using a modified inoculation system, E. tracheiphila strains HCa1-5N, UnisCu1-1N, and MISpSq-N were inoculated to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cv. 'Sweet Burpless', melon (Cucumis melo) cv. 'Athena Hybrid', and squash (Cucubita pepo) cv. 'Early Summer Crookneck'. We observed symptoms and disease progression for 30 days; recorded the number of days to wilting of the inoculated leaf (DWIL), days to wilting of the whole plant (DWWP), and days to death of the plant (DDP). We found significant interactions between host cultivar and pathogen strains, which imply host specificity. Pathogen strains HCa1-5N and UnisCu1-1N isolated from Cucumis species exhibited more virulence in cucumber and melon than in squash, while the reverse was true for strain MISpSq-N, an isolate from Cucurbita spp. Our observations confirm a previous finding that E. tracheiphila strains isolated from Cucumis species were more virulent on Cucumis hosts and those from Cucubita were more virulent on Cucubita hosts. This confirmation helps in better understanding the pathosystem and provides baseline information for the subsequent development of new disease management strategies for bacterial wilt. We also demonstrated the efficiency of our modified inoculation and disease scoring methods.

  5. Health-related quality of life of food allergic patients measured with generic and disease-specific questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flokstra-de Blok, B. M. J.; van der Velde, J. L.; Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; Oude Elberink, J. N. G.; DunnGalvin, A.; Hourihane, J. O'B.; Duiverman, E. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    2010-01-01

    P>Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) has never been measured with both generic and disease-specific questionnaires in the same group of food allergic patients. The aim of this study was to compare HRQL of food allergic patients as measured with generic and disease-specific questionnai

  6. The relationship between specific anxiety syndromes and somatic symptoms in adolescents with asthma and other chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, S.; van Beest, I.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The impact of a chronic disease on the emotional well-being of children and adolescents is controversial in the literature. This study tested the hypotheses that 1) a specific approach is required to assess emotional deviations in adolescents with chronic diseases and 2) specific anxiety symptoms ar

  7. Diagnostic and prognostic potential of the macrophage specific receptor CD163 in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Krautbauer, Sabrina

    2013-12-01

    CD163 is a scavenger receptor for the endocytosis of hemoglobin and hemoglobin/haptoglobin complexes and is nearly exclusively expressed on monocytes and macrophages. CD163 is induced by IL-10 and glucocorticoids while proinflammatory cytokines like TNF reduce its expression. The cytokine IL-6 which exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory effects depending on the signaling pathway activated strongly upregulates CD163. Anti-inflammatory cells involved in the down-modulation of inflammation express high CD163 which controls immune response. Ligands of the toll-like receptors 2, 4 and 5 stimulate ectodomain shedding of CD163 thereby releasing soluble CD163 (sCD163) which mediates cellular uptake of free hemoglobin. Soluble CD163 circulates in blood and is increased in serum of critically ill patients, in chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases. Serum concentrations of sCD163 are related to disease severity and are suitable biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic drug monitoring in several inflammatory disorders. Raised sCD163 even predicts comorbidity and mortality in some diseases. Relationship of CD163/sCD163 and disease severity demonstrates a fundamental role of monocytes/macrophages in various diseases. CD163 is a target to specifically deliver drugs to macrophages intending advanced therapeutic efficiency and minimization of adverse reactions. In this review article factors regulating CD163 expression and shedding, current knowledge on the function of CD163 and sCD163, and inflammatory diseases where CD163 and/or sCD163 are mostly increased are summarized.

  8. Lung fibrosis quantified by HRCT in scleroderma patients with different disease forms and ANA specificities

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    S. Mancin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the prevalence of interstitial lung fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc and its relationship with the different clinical forms of disease and ANA specificities. Methods: fifty patients with SSc were submitted to pulmonary high resolution computed tomography (HRCT. Lung abnormalities were evaluated according to Warrick’s score that considers both the severity and the extent of fibrotic lesions. Results: pulmonary HRCT abnormalities were observed in 84% of SSc patients. Ground glass aspects (60%, irregular pleural margins (56% and septal/subpleural lines (68% were the most common lesions. The distribution of these abnormalities favoured the posterior basilar segments of both lungs. HRCT findings were significantly more frequent in males and in patients with the cutaneous diffuse form of SSc and with the specific antibody anti-Scl70. Conclusions: HRCT is a very useful method for the diagnosis of interstitial lung fibrosis in SSc. Warrick’s score permits to quantify the HRCT findings and to evaluate their relationship with the disease clinical forms and ANA specificities.

  9. Pediatric Crohn disease patients exhibit specific ileal transcriptome and microbiome signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Yael; Tickle, Timothy L.; Dexheimer, Phillip J.; Kim, Mi-Ok; Tang, Dora; Karns, Rebekah; Baldassano, Robert N.; Noe, Joshua D.; Rosh, Joel; Markowitz, James; Heyman, Melvin B.; Griffiths, Anne M.; Crandall, Wallace V.; Mack, David R.; Baker, Susan S.; Huttenhower, Curtis; Keljo, David J.; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Kugathasan, Subra; Walters, Thomas D.; Aronow, Bruce; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Gevers, Dirk; Denson, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between the host and gut microbial community likely contribute to Crohn disease (CD) pathogenesis; however, direct evidence for these interactions at the onset of disease is lacking. Here, we characterized the global pattern of ileal gene expression and the ileal microbial community in 359 treatment-naive pediatric patients with CD, patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and control individuals. We identified core gene expression profiles and microbial communities in the affected CD ilea that are preserved in the unaffected ilea of patients with colon-only CD but not present in those with UC or control individuals; therefore, this signature is specific to CD and independent of clinical inflammation. An abnormal increase of antimicrobial dual oxidase (DUOX2) expression was detected in association with an expansion of Proteobacteria in both UC and CD, while expression of lipoprotein APOA1 gene was downregulated and associated with CD-specific alterations in Firmicutes. The increased DUOX2 and decreased APOA1 gene expression signature favored oxidative stress and Th1 polarization and was maximally altered in patients with more severe mucosal injury. A regression model that included APOA1 gene expression and microbial abundance more accurately predicted month 6 steroid-free remission than a model using clinical factors alone. These CD-specific host and microbe profiles identify the ileum as the primary inductive site for all forms of CD and may direct prognostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25003194

  10. Nonmelanoma skin cancer: disease-specific quality-of-life concerns and distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiotis, George; Roberts, Nicole; Czajkowska, Zofia; Khanna, Manish; Körner, Annett

    2014-01-01

    To provide a better understanding of the disease-specific quality-of-life (QOL) concerns of patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Cross-sectional. Skin cancer clinic of Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 56 patients with basal cell carcinoma and/or squamous cell carcinoma. Descriptive and inferential statistics applied to quantitative self-report data. Importance of appearance, psychological distress, and QOL. The most prevalent concerns included worries about tumor recurrence, as well as the potential size and conspicuousness of the scar. Skin cancer-specific QOL concerns significantly predicted distress manifested through anxious and depressive symptomology. In addition, the social concerns related to the disease were the most significant predictor of distress. The findings of this study provide healthcare professionals with a broad picture of the most prevalent NMSC-specific concerns, as well as the concerns that are of particular importance for different subgroups of patients. Nurses are in a position to provide pivotal psychosocial and informational support to patients, so they need to be aware of the often-overlooked psychosocial effects of NMSC to address these issues and provide optimal care.

  11. Therapy for dominant inherited diseases by allele-specific RNA interference: successes and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochet, Delphine; Prudhon, Bernard; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Bitoun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved mechanism for post-transcriptional gene silencing mediated by messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation. RNAi is commonly induced by synthetic siRNA or shRNA which recognizes the targeted mRNA by base pairing and leads to target-mRNA degradation. RNAi may discriminate between two sequences only differing by one nucleotide conferring a high specificity of RNAi for its target mRNA. This property was used to develop a particular therapeutic strategy called "allele-specific-RNA interference" devoted to silence the mutated allele of genes causing dominant inherited diseases without affecting the normal allele. Therapeutic benefit was now demonstrated in cells from patients and animal models, and promising results of the first phase Ib clinical trial using siRNA-based allele-specific therapy were reported in Pachyonychia Congenita, an inherited skin disorder due to dominant mutations in the Keratin 6 gene. Our purpose is to review the successes of this strategy aiming to treat dominant inherited diseases and to highlight the pitfalls to avoid.

  12. Brain region-specificity of palmitic acid-induced abnormalities associated with Alzheimer's disease

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    Melrose Joseph

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease mostly affecting the basal forebrain, cortex and hippocampus whereas the cerebellum is relatively spared. The reason behind this region-specific brain damage in AD is not well understood. Here, we report our data suggesting "differential free fatty acid metabolism in the different brain areas" as a potentially important factor in causing the region-specific damage observed in AD brain. Findings The astroglia from two different rat brain regions, cortex (region affected in AD and cerebellum (unaffected region, were treated with 0.2 mM of palmitic acid. The conditioned media were then transferred to the cortical neurons to study the possible effects on the two main, AD-associated protein abnormalities, viz. BACE1 upregulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau. The conditioned media from palmitic-acid treated cortical astroglia, but not the cerebellar astroglia, significantly elevated levels of phosphorylated tau and BACE1 in cortical neurons as compared to controls (47 ± 7% and 45 ± 4%, respectively. Conclusion The present data provide an experimental explanation for the region-specific damage observed in AD brain; higher fatty acid-metabolizing capacity of cortical astroglia as compared to cerebellar astroglia, may play a causal role in increasing vulnerability of cortex in AD, while sparing cerebellum.

  13. Transcriptional Signatures as a Disease-Specific and Predictive Inflammatory Biomarker for Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Hara; Wang, Xujing; Kaldunski, Mary; Jia, Shuang; Kramer, Joanna; Pavletich, Scott J.; Reske, Melissa; Gessel, Trevor; Yassai, Maryam; Quasney, Michael W.; Dahmer, Mary K.; Gorski, Jack; Hessner, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The complex milieu of inflammatory mediators associated with many diseases is often too dilute to directly measure in the periphery, necessitating development of more sensitive measurements suitable for mechanistic studies, earlier diagnosis, guiding therapeutic decisions, and monitoring interventions. We previously demonstrated that plasma samples from recent-onset Type 1 diabetes (RO T1D) patients induce a proinflammatory transcriptional signature in freshly drawn peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) relative to that of unrelated healthy controls (HC). Here, using cryopreserved PBMC, we analyzed larger RO T1D and HC cohorts, examined T1D progression in pre-onset samples, and compared the RO T1D signature to those associated with three disorders characterized by airway infection and inflammation. The RO T1D signature, consisting of interleukin-1 cytokine family members, chemokines involved in immunocyte chemotaxis, immune receptors, and signaling molecules, was detected during early pre-diabetes and found to resolve post-onset. The signatures associated with cystic fibrosis patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, patients with confirmed bacterial pneumonia, and subjects with H1N1 influenza all reflected immunological activation, yet each were distinct from one another and negatively correlated with that of T1D. This study highlights the remarkable capacity of cells to serve as biosensors capable of sensitively and comprehensively differentiating immunological states. PMID:22972474

  14. Specificity of anti-tau antibodies when analyzing mice models of Alzheimer's disease: problems and solutions.

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    Franck R Petry

    Full Text Available Aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein are found in a group of diseases called tauopathies, which includes Alzheimer's disease. The causes and consequences of tau hyperphosphorylation are routinely investigated in laboratory animals. Mice are the models of choice as they are easily amenable to transgenic technology; consequently, their tau phosphorylation levels are frequently monitored by Western blotting using a panel of monoclonal/polyclonal anti-tau antibodies. Given that mouse secondary antibodies can recognize endogenous mouse immunoglobulins (Igs and the possible lack of specificity with some polyclonal antibodies, non-specific signals are commonly observed. Here, we characterized the profiles of commonly used anti-tau antibodies in four different mouse models: non-transgenic mice, tau knock-out (TKO mice, 3xTg-AD mice, and hypothermic mice, the latter a positive control for tau hyperphosphorylation. We identified 3 tau monoclonal antibody categories: type 1, characterized by high non-specificity (AT8, AT180, MC1, MC6, TG-3, type 2, demonstrating low non-specificity (AT270, CP13, CP27, Tau12, TG5, and type 3, with no non-specific signal (DA9, PHF-1, Tau1, Tau46. For polyclonal anti-tau antibodies, some displayed non-specificity (pS262, pS409 while others did not (pS199, pT205, pS396, pS404, pS422, A0024. With monoclonal antibodies, most of the interfering signal was due to endogenous Igs and could be eliminated by different techniques: i using secondary antibodies designed to bind only non-denatured Igs, ii preparation of a heat-stable fraction, iii clearing Igs from the homogenates, and iv using secondary antibodies that only bind the light chain of Igs. All of these techniques removed the non-specific signal; however, the first and the last methods were easier and more reliable. Overall, our study demonstrates a high risk of artefactual signal when performing Western blotting with routinely used anti-tau antibodies, and proposes

  15. Sex-specific risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline: pregnancy and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia M; Garovic, Vesna D; Kantarci, Kejal; Barnes, Jill N; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Mielke, Michelle M; Joyner, Michael J; Shuster, Lynne T; Rocca, Walter A

    2013-03-28

    Understanding the biology of sex differences is integral to personalized medicine. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline are two related conditions, with distinct sex differences in morbidity and clinical manifestations, response to treatments, and mortality. Although mortality from all-cause cardiovascular diseases has declined in women over the past five years, due in part to increased educational campaigns regarding the recognition of symptoms and application of treatment guidelines, the mortality in women still exceeds that of men. The physiological basis for these differences requires further research, with particular attention to two physiological conditions which are unique to women and associated with hormonal changes: pregnancy and menopause. Both conditions have the potential to impact life-long cardiovascular risk, including cerebrovascular function and cognition in women. This review draws on epidemiological, translational, clinical, and basic science studies to assess the impact of hypertensive pregnancy disorders on cardiovascular disease and cognitive function later in life, and examines the effects of post-menopausal hormone treatments on cardiovascular risk and cognition in midlife women. We suggest that hypertensive pregnancy disorders and menopause activate vascular components, i.e., vascular endothelium and blood elements, including platelets and leukocytes, to release cell-membrane derived microvesicles that are potential mediators of changes in cerebral blood flow, and may ultimately affect cognition in women as they age. Research into specific sex differences for these disease processes with attention to an individual's sex chromosomal complement and hormonal status is important and timely.

  16. The research of Proactive Coping Behavior of Patients with Chronic Non-Specific Lung Disease

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    Marija A. Yaroslavskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to study the patterns of using proactive coping and adherences to it's different types in patients with chronic non-specifi c lung diseases. Participants of the study (N=180 were 30 to 60 years old. The Proactive Coping Inventory was used to assess the patients' psychological status. According to the results of the study patients with chronic non-specifi c lung diseases use dif-ferent types of proactive coping behavior while solving problematic and stressful situations. The research revealed that patients with bronchial asthma don't have the skills of independent decision making, definition of objectives, considering of options in solving conflicts or other inconvenient situations sufficiently developed. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are less satisfied with the emotional support that they receive from their relatives and closest people, it's harder for them to reveal their feelings and emotions than for those who suffer from bronchial asthma and healthy ones. The results of the study may be useful in developing educational systems of proactive coping behavior skills for patients with chronic non-specific lung diseases for their health and well-being support.

  17. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

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    Matthis Synofzik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”. The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability. Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease.

  18. Profiles of microbial fatty acids in the human metabolome are disease-specific

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    Zhanna A Ktsoyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by a diverse and dense symbiotic microbiota, the composition of which is the result of host-microbe co-evolution and co-adaptation. This tight integration creates intense crosstalk and signalling between the host and microbiota at the cellular and metabolic levels. In many genetic or infectious diseases the balance between host and microbiota may be compromised resulting in erroneous communication. Consequently, the composition of the human metabolome, which includes the gut metabolome, may be different in health and disease states in terms of microbial products and metabolites entering systemic circulation. To test this hypothesis, we measured the level of hydroxy, branched, cyclopropyl and unsaturated fatty acids, aldehydes, and phenyl derivatives in blood of patients with a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, and in patients with peptic ulceration (PU resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection. Discriminant function analysis of a data matrix consisting of 94 cases as statistical units (37 FMF patients, 14 PU patients, and 43 healthy controls and the concentration of 35 microbial products in the blood as statistical variables revealed a high accuracy of the proposed model (all cases were correctly classified. This suggests that the profile of microbial products and metabolites in the human metabolome is specific for a given disease and may potentially serve as a biomarker for disease.

  19. A majority of Huntington's disease patients may be treatable by individualized allele-specific RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria Stella; Jaspers, Leonie; Spronkmans, Christine; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Di Maria, Emilio; Donato, Stefano Di; Kaemmerer, William F

    2009-06-01

    Use of RNA interference to reduce huntingtin protein (htt) expression in affected brain regions may provide an effective treatment for Huntington disease (HD), but it remains uncertain whether suppression of both wild-type and mutant alleles in a heterozygous patient will provide more benefit than harm. Previous research has shown suppression of just the mutant allele is achievable using siRNA targeted to regions of HD mRNA containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To determine whether more than a minority of patients may be eligible for an allele-specific therapy, we genotyped DNA from 327 unrelated European Caucasian HD patients at 26 SNP sites in the HD gene. Over 86% of the patients were found to be heterozygous for at least one SNP among those tested. Because the sites are genetically linked, one cannot use the heterozygosity rates of the individual SNPs to predict how many sites (and corresponding allele-specific siRNA) would be needed to provide at least one treatment possibility for this percentage of patients. By computing all combinations, we found that a repertoire of allele-specific siRNA corresponding to seven sites can provide at least one allele-specific siRNA treatment option for 85.6% of our sample. Moreover, we provide evidence that allele-specific siRNA targeting these sites are readily identifiable using a high throughput screening method, and that allele-specific siRNA identified using this method indeed show selective suppression of endogenous mutant htt protein in fibroblast cells from HD patients. Therefore, allele-specific siRNA are not so rare as to be impractical to find and use therapeutically.

  20. [Rare diseases: specific ethical and legal aspects of genetic counseling and screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Caro, Javier

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the specific rights of patients with rare diseases from a dual perspective. On the one hand, they concern a new generation of patients' rights that arise once the consolidation of basic rights has occurred, fundamentally after the application of Law 41/2002 (on Regulating Patient Autonomy and Rights and Obligations in the Field of Health Documentation and Information) and its development by the autonomous communities. On the other hand, the fundamental question raises a serious issue related to these patients, which involves the principles of equality, equity, non-discrimination and solidarity. This is aimed at promoting legislative measures to protect patients' equality of access to health and social services, with the ultimate aim of improving their quality of life. The author has given special relevance in his study to the treatment of rare diseases that are genetic in origin, and to the importance of adequate genetic counseling.

  1. Sex-specific patterns and differences in dementia and Alzheimer’s disease using informatics approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo, Jay Geronimo; Baer, Merritt Rachel; Lester, William T.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women’s Health recently highlighted the critical need for explicitly addressing sex differences in biomedical research, including Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The purpose of our study was to perform a sex-stratified analysis of cognitive impairment using diverse medical, clinical and genetic factors of unprecedented scale and scope by applying informatics approaches to three large Alzheimer’s databases. Analyses suggested females were 1.5 times more likely than males to have a documented diagnosis of probable Alzheimer’s disease, and several other factors fell along sex-specific lines and were possibly associated with severity of cognitive impairment PMID:27105335

  2. Prostate-specific antigen-positive extramammary Paget's disease--association with prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne; Hager, Henrik; Steiniche, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare intraepidermal adenocarcinoma that primarily affects the anogenital region. Cases of EMPD reacting with PSA (prostate-specific antigen) have previously been associated with underlying prostate cancer. However, a recent case of EMPD in our department has...... led us to question the value of PSA as an indicator of underlying prostate cancer. Clinical and pathological data were obtained for 16 cases of EMPD. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from the primary skin lesions were investigated using PSA and other immunohistochemical markers. 5...... of the 16 cases of EMPD stained positive for PSA (2 women and 3 men). However, no reactivity was seen for the prostatic marker P501S. Three of the five patients had been diagnosed with internal malignant disease-two with prostate cancer, stage 1. Immunohistochemical investigations of the tumour specimens...

  3. Circulating Organ-Specific MicroRNAs Serve as Biomarkers in Organ-Specific Diseases: Implications for Organ Allo- and Xeno-Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Hara, Hidetaka; Dai, Yifan; Mou, Lisha; Cooper, David K. C.; Wu, Changyou; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types possess different miRNA expression profiles, and cell/tissue/organ-specific miRNAs (or profiles) indicate different diseases. Circulating miRNA is either actively secreted by living cells or passively released during cell death. Circulating cell/tissue/organ-specific miRNA may serve as a non-invasive biomarker for allo- or xeno-transplantation to monitor organ survival and immune rejection. In this review, we summarize the proof of concept that circulating organ-specific miRNAs serve as non-invasive biomarkers for a wide spectrum of clinical organ-specific manifestations such as liver-related disease, heart-related disease, kidney-related disease, and lung-related disease. Furthermore, we summarize how circulating organ-specific miRNAs may have advantages over conventional methods for monitoring immune rejection in organ transplantation. Finally, we discuss the implications and challenges of applying miRNA to monitor organ survival and immune rejection in allo- or xeno-transplantation. PMID:27490531

  4. Peripheral sympathetic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease without autonomic failure is heart selective and disease specific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Hwang, Eui-Hyo; Matsunari, Ichiro; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan); Komai, Kiyonobu; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Sakajiri, Kenichi [Department of the Neurology, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate by means of iodine-123-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy the peripheral sympathetic function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) without autonomic failure and in patients with related neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism. Seventy patients (33 men and 37 women, mean age 63{+-}9.7 years) with parkinsonism and ten control subjects underwent MIBG scintigraphy. Of these 70 patients, 41 were diagnosed as having idiopathic PD, 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 6 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 2 corticobasal degeneration (CBD); the remaining 12 were diagnosed as having neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism (P-nism) that did not meet the diagnostic criteria of any specific disease. Cardiac planar and tomographic imaging studies and subsequent whole-body imaging were performed 20 min and 3 h after the injection of 111 MBq MIBG. The early MIBG heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio in PD (1.61{+-}0.29) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.24{+-}0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.15{+-}0.31, P<0.01), MSA (2.08{+-}0.31, P<0.05) and PSP (2.30{+-}0.24, P<0.01). The delayed H/M ratio in PD (1.47{+-}0.34) was also significantly lower than that in the control group (2.37{+-}0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.13{+-}0.38, P<0.01), PSP (2.36{+-}0.36, P<0.01) and MSA (2.17{+-}0.36, P<0.01). In patients with PD, early and delayed H/M ratios were significantly decreased in disease stages I, II and III (established using the Hoehn and Yahr criteria) as compared with control subjects, and there were no significant differences among the stages. Only PD showed a significantly higher washout rate (WR) than that in the control subjects (27%{+-}8.0% vs 11%{+-}4.2%, P<0.01). Early and delayed uptake ratios of the lung, parotid gland, thyroid gland, liver and femoral muscles in each of the patient groups were not significantly different from those in control subjects. Only the early and delayed uptake ratios of

  5. A validated disease specific prediction equation for resting metabolic rate in underweight patients with COPD

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    Anita Nordenson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Anita Nordenson2, Anne Marie Grönberg1,2, Lena Hulthén1, Sven Larsson2, Frode Slinde11Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; 2Department of Internal Medicine/Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: Malnutrition is a serious condition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Successful dietary intervention calls for calculations of resting metabolic rate (RMR. One disease-specific prediction equation for RMR exists based on mainly male patients. To construct a disease-specific equation for RMR based on measurements in underweight or weight-losing women and men with COPD, RMR was measured by indirect calorimetry in 30 women and 11 men with a diagnosis of COPD and body mass index <21 kg/m2. The following variables, possibly influencing RMR were measured: length, weight, middle upper arm circumference, triceps skinfold, body composition by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance, lung function, and markers of inflammation. Relations between RMR and measured variables were studied using univariate analysis according to Pearson. Gender and variables that were associated with RMR with a P value <0.15 were included in a forward multiple regression analysis. The best-fit multiple regression equation included only fat-free mass (FFM: RMR (kJ/day = 1856 + 76.0 FFM (kg. To conclude, FFM is the dominating factor influencing RMR. The developed equation can be used for prediction of RMR in underweight COPD patients.Keywords: pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive, basal metabolic rate, malnutrition, body composition

  6. A large-scale analysis of tissue-specific pathology and gene expression of human disease genes and complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart

    2008-01-01

    Heritable diseases are caused by germ-line mutations that, despite tissuewide presence, often lead to tissue-specific pathology. Here, we make a systematic analysis of the link between tissue-specific gene expression and pathological manifestations in many human diseases and cancers. Diseases were...... to be overexpressed in the normal tissues where defects cause pathology. In contrast, cancer genes and complexes were not overexpressed in the tissues from which the tumors emanate. We specifically identified a complex involved in XY sex reversal that is testis-specific and down-regulated in ovaries. We also...... identified complexes in Parkinson disease, cardiomyopathies, and muscular dystrophy syndromes that are similarly tissue specific. Our method represents a conceptual scaffold for organism-spanning analyses and reveals an extensive list of tissue-specific draft molecular pathways, both known and unexpected...

  7. Disease-specific quality-of-life measurement tools for haemophilia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remor, E; Young, N L; Von Mackensen, S; Lopatina, E G

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the state of the art in measuring quality of life in haemophila populations. The paper reviews the measures recently included in haemophila trials in the published literature. It also summarizes the development of four new disease-specific measures of health-related quality of life. Two of these were developed for children (the Haemo-QoL and the CHO-KLAT), and two for adults (the Hemofilia-QoL and the Hemolatin-QoL). These new measures show promise for use in clinical trials. Further research is in progress to complete the psychometric testing and cross-cultural validation.

  8. Segment-specific association between cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH and degenerative joint disease (DJD

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    Peterson Cynthia K

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH is a recently described phenomenon of unknown etiology and clinical significance. Global assessment of pillar hyperplasia of the cervical spine as a unit has not shown a relationship with degenerative joint disease, but a more sensible explanation of the architectural influence of CPH on cervical spine biomechanics may be segment-specific. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the level of association between degenerative joint disease (DJD and cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH in an age- and gender-matched sample on a [cervical spine] by-level basis. Research Methods Two-hundred and forty radiographs were collected from subjects ranging in age between 40 and 69 years. The two primary outcome measures used in the study were the segmental presence/absence of cervical pillar hyperplasia from C3 to C6, and segment-specific presence/absence of degenerative joint disease from C1 to C7. Contingency Coefficients, at the 5% level of significance, at each level, were used to determine the strength of the association between CPH and DJD. Odds Ratios (OR with their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI were also calculated at each level to assess the strength of the association. Results Our study suggests that an approximately two-to-one odds, or a weak-to-moderate correlation, exists at C4 and C5 CPH and adjacent level degenerative disc disease (DDD; with the strongest (overall associations demonstrated between C4 CPH and C4–5 DDD and between C5 CPH and C5–6 DDD. Age-stratified results demonstrated a similar pattern of association, even reaching the initially hypothesized OR ≥ 5.0 (95% CI > 1.0 or "moderately-strong correlation of C ≥ .4 (p ≤ .05" in some age categories, including the 40–44, 50–59, and 60–64 years of age subgroups; these ORs were as follows: OR = 5.5 (95% CI 1.39–21.59; OR = 6.7 (95% CI 1.65–27.34; and OR = 5.3 (95% CI 1.35–21.14, respectively

  9. Serotype-specific changes in invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feikin, Daniel R; Kagucia, Eunice W; Loo, Jennifer D;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccine-serotype (VT) invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) rates declined substantially following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into national immunization programs. Increases in non-vaccine-serotype (NVT) IPD rates occurred in some sites, presumably...... representing serotype replacement. We used a standardized approach to describe serotype-specific IPD changes among multiple sites after PCV7 introduction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Of 32 IPD surveillance datasets received, we identified 21 eligible databases with rate data ≥ 2 years before and ≥ 1 year after PCV7...... introduction. Expected annual rates of IPD absent PCV7 introduction were estimated by extrapolation using either Poisson regression modeling of pre-PCV7 rates or averaging pre-PCV7 rates. To estimate whether changes in rates had occurred following PCV7 introduction, we calculated site specific rate ratios...

  10. Epitope-specific antibody levels in tuberculosis: biomarkers of protection, disease and response to treatment.

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    Graham H Bothamley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies restricted to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can measure epitope-specific antibody levels in a competition assay. Immunodominant epitopes were defined from clinical samples and related to the clinical spectrum of disease. Antibody to the immunodominant epitopes was associated with HLA-DR15. Occupational exposure showed a different response and was consistent with recognition of dormancy related proteins and protection despite exposure to tuberculosis. Studies in leprosy revealed the importance of immune deviation and the relationships between T and B cell epitopes. During treatment, antibody levels increased, epitope spreading occurred, but the affinity constants remained the same after further antigen exposure, suggesting constraints on the process of epitope selection. Epitope-specific antibody levels have a potential role as biomarkers for new vaccines which might prevent the progression of latent to active tuberculosis and as tools to measure treatment effects on subpopulations of tubercle bacilli.

  11. Efficient and allele-specific genome editing of disease loci in human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cory; Abalde-Atristain, Leire; He, Chaoxia; Brodsky, Brett R; Braunstein, Evan M; Chaudhari, Pooja; Jang, Yoon-Young; Cheng, Linzhao; Ye, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Efficient and precise genome editing is crucial for realizing the full research and therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Engineered nucleases including CRISPR/Cas9 and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) provide powerful tools for enhancing gene-targeting efficiency. In this study, we investigated the relative efficiencies of CRISPR/Cas9 and TALENs in human iPSC lines for inducing both homologous donor-based precise genome editing and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated gene disruption. Significantly higher frequencies of NHEJ-mediated insertions/deletions were detected at several endogenous loci using CRISPR/Cas9 than using TALENs, especially at nonexpressed targets in iPSCs. In contrast, comparable efficiencies of inducing homologous donor-based genome editing were observed at disease-associated loci in iPSCs. In addition, we investigated the specificity of guide RNAs used in the CRISPR/Cas9 system in targeting disease-associated point mutations in patient-specific iPSCs. Using myeloproliferative neoplasm patient-derived iPSCs that carry an acquired JAK2-V617F point mutation and α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency patient-derived iPSCs that carry an inherited Z-AAT point mutation, we demonstrate that Cas9 can specifically target either the mutant or the wild-type allele with little disruption at the other allele differing by a single nucleotide. Overall, our results demonstrate the advantages of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in allele-specific genome targeting and in NHEJ-mediated gene disruption.

  12. Age-specific epigenetic drift in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

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    Sun-Chong Wang

    Full Text Available Despite an enormous research effort, most cases of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD still remain unexplained and the current biomedical science is still a long way from the ultimate goal of revealing clear risk factors that can help in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of the disease. Current theories about the development of LOAD hinge on the premise that Alzheimer's arises mainly from heritable causes. Yet, the complex, non-Mendelian disease etiology suggests that an epigenetic component could be involved. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in post-mortem brain samples and lymphocytes, we have performed an analysis of DNA methylation across 12 potential Alzheimer's susceptibility loci. In the LOAD brain samples we identified a notably age-specific epigenetic drift, supporting a potential role of epigenetic effects in the development of the disease. Additionally, we found that some genes that participate in amyloid-beta processing (PSEN1, APOE and methylation homeostasis (MTHFR, DNMT1 show a significant interindividual epigenetic variability, which may contribute to LOAD predisposition. The APOE gene was found to be of bimodal structure, with a hypomethylated CpG-poor promoter and a fully methylated 3'-CpG-island, that contains the sequences for the epsilon4-haplotype, which is the only undisputed genetic risk factor for LOAD. Aberrant epigenetic control in this CpG-island may contribute to LOAD pathology. We propose that epigenetic drift is likely to be a substantial mechanism predisposing individuals to LOAD and contributing to the course of disease.

  13. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease and Periodic Limb Movements: A Comprehensive Review of Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Treatment Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Dyveke P

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) or Willis-Ekbom Disease is a common, but frequently under- recognized and misdiagnosed condition seen in many subspecialty practices including neurology, sleep medicine, primary care and rheumatology. Periodic limb movements are a frequent co-morbid diagnosis in RLS. Despite prior beliefs that the condition was "benign", it has been demonstrated to have a considerable impact on sufferers quality of life, physically and psychologically, as well as socially. This chapter is meant as a comprehensive review of RLS encompassing epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment considerations.

  14. Disease-specific mortality burdens in a rural Gambian population using verbal autopsy, 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasseh, Momodou; Howie, Stephen R C; Gomez, Pierre; Scott, Susana; Roca, Anna; Cham, Mamady; Greenwood, Brian; Corrah, Tumani; D'Alessandro, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    To estimate and evaluate the cause-of-death structure and disease-specific mortality rates in a rural area of The Gambia as determined using the InterVA-4 model. Deaths and person-years of observation were determined by age group for the population of the Farafenni Health and Demographic Surveillance area from January 1998 to December 2007. Causes of death were determined by verbal autopsy (VA) using the InterVA-4 model and ICD-10 disease classification. Assigned causes of death were classified into six broad groups: infectious and parasitic diseases; cancers; other non-communicable diseases; neonatal; maternal; and external causes. Poisson regression was used to estimate age and disease-specific mortality rates, and likelihood ratio tests were used to determine statistical significance. A total of 3,203 deaths were recorded and VA administered for 2,275 (71%). All-age mortality declined from 15 per 1,000 person-years in 1998-2001 to 8 per 1,000 person-years in 2005-2007. Children aged 1-4 years registered the most marked (74%) decline from 27 to 7 per 1,000 person-years. Communicable diseases accounted for half (49.9%) of the deaths in all age groups, dominated by acute respiratory infections (ARI) (13.7%), malaria (12.9%) and pulmonary tuberculosis (10.2%). The leading causes of death among infants were ARI (5.59 per 1,000 person-years [95% CI: 4.38-7.15]) and malaria (4.11 per 1,000 person-years [95% CI: 3.09-5.47]). Mortality rates in children aged 1-4 years were 3.06 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: 2.58-3.63) for malaria, and 1.05 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: 0.79-1.41) for ARI. The HIV-related mortality rate in this age group was 1.17 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: 0.89-1.54). Pulmonary tuberculosis and communicable diseases other than malaria, HIV/AIDS and ARI were the main killers of adults aged 15 years and over. Stroke-related mortality increased to become the leading cause of death among the elderly aged 60 years or more in 2005-2007. Mortality in

  15. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham TJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy J Cunningham,1 Earl S Ford,1 Janet B Croft,1 Melissa T Merrick,2 Italia V Rolle,3 Wayne H Giles1 1Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in the general population. Materials and methods: Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results: Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61, sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10, living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81, witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72, and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80 during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs

  16. Chinese specific characteristics of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a retrospective analysis of 57 cases.

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    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD is a fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disorder. However, no studies have reported Chinese specific characteristics of sCJD. We aimed to identify differences in sCJD between Chinese patients and patients from other countries. METHODS: The data from 57 Chinese sCJD patients were retrospectively analyzed, including demographic data, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, electroencephalograms (EEGs, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI scans, positron emission tomography (PET scans, and pathological results. RESULT: The disease was pathologically confirmed in 11 patients. 39 cases were diagnosed as probable sCJD, and 7 were possible. Of the total cases, 33 were male, and 24 were female. The onset age ranged from 36 to 75 years (mean: 55.5, median: 57. Disease onset before the age of 60 occurred in 57.9% of patients. The disease duration from onset to death ranged 5-22 months (mean: 11.6, median: 11, and 51.9% of patients died 7 to 12 months after disease onset. The majority of patients presented with sub-acute onset with progressive dementia. 3 of the 9 patients who took 14-3-3 protein analysis had positive results (33.3%. The sensitivity of EEG was 79.6% (43/54. For DWI and PET examinations, the sensitivities were 94% (47/50 and 94.1% (16/17, respectively. In seven patients who did not show typical hyper-intensities on the first DWI examination, abnormalities of hypo-metabolism in the cerebral cortex were clearly detected by PET. In 13 out of the 17 patients, PET detected extra abnormal regions in addition to the hyper-intense areas observed in DWI. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to indicate that Chinese sCJD patients have a much earlier onset age and a longer disease duration than other populations, which is most likely related to racial differences. The longer disease duration may also be a probable characteristic of Asian populations. PET had high sensitivity for the

  17. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency causes organ-specific autoimmune disease.

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    Koji Hase

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expressed by germinal center B cells is a central regulator of somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. Humans with AID mutations develop not only the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2 associated with B cell hyperplasia, but also autoimmune disorders by unknown mechanisms. We report here that AID-/- mice spontaneously develop tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in non-lymphoid tissues including the stomach at around 6 months of age. At a later stage, AID-/- mice develop a severe gastritis characterized by loss of gastric glands and epithelial hyperplasia. The disease development was not attenuated even under germ-free (GF conditions. Gastric autoantigen -specific serum IgM was elevated in AID-/- mice, and the serum levels correlated with the gastritis pathological score. Adoptive transfer experiments suggest that autoimmune CD4+ T cells mediate gastritis development as terminal effector cells. These results suggest that abnormal B-cell expansion due to AID deficiency can drive B-cell autoimmunity, and in turn promote TLO formation, which ultimately leads to the propagation of organ-specific autoimmune effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, AID plays an important role in the containment of autoimmune diseases by negative regulation of autoreactive B cells.

  18. Specific Inhibition of β-Secretase Processing of the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Halima, Saoussen; Mishra, Sabyashachi; Raja, K Muruga Poopathi; Willem, Michael; Baici, Antonio; Simons, Kai; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp; Haass, Christian; Caflisch, Amedeo; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2016-03-08

    Development of disease-modifying therapeutics is urgently needed for treating Alzheimer disease (AD). AD is characterized by toxic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides produced by β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). β-secretase inhibitors reduce Aβ levels, but mechanism-based side effects arise because they also inhibit β-cleavage of non-amyloid substrates like Neuregulin. We report that β-secretase has a higher affinity for Neuregulin than it does for APP. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the affinities and catalytic efficiencies of β-secretase are higher toward non-amyloid substrates than toward APP. We show that non-amyloid substrates are processed by β-secretase in an endocytosis-independent manner. Exploiting this compartmentalization of substrates, we specifically target the endosomal β-secretase by an endosomally targeted β-secretase inhibitor, which blocked cleavage of APP but not non-amyloid substrates in many cell systems, including induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons. β-secretase inhibitors can be designed to specifically inhibit the Alzheimer process, enhancing their potential as AD therapeutics without undesired side effects. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Specific Inhibition of β-Secretase Processing of the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saoussen Ben Halima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of disease-modifying therapeutics is urgently needed for treating Alzheimer disease (AD. AD is characterized by toxic β-amyloid (Aβ peptides produced by β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. β-secretase inhibitors reduce Aβ levels, but mechanism-based side effects arise because they also inhibit β-cleavage of non-amyloid substrates like Neuregulin. We report that β-secretase has a higher affinity for Neuregulin than it does for APP. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the affinities and catalytic efficiencies of β-secretase are higher toward non-amyloid substrates than toward APP. We show that non-amyloid substrates are processed by β-secretase in an endocytosis-independent manner. Exploiting this compartmentalization of substrates, we specifically target the endosomal β-secretase by an endosomally targeted β-secretase inhibitor, which blocked cleavage of APP but not non-amyloid substrates in many cell systems, including induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived neurons. β-secretase inhibitors can be designed to specifically inhibit the Alzheimer process, enhancing their potential as AD therapeutics without undesired side effects.

  20. Disease-specific quality indicators, guidelines, and outcome measures in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, M; Bombardieri, S

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of quality of care is becoming increasingly important, but as yet no standard set of measures to assess quality has been developed. The ACR Quality Measures Committee has selected the following areas of study to develop quality indicators: diagnostic/classification criteria, outcome measures/response criteria, treatment guidelines/management recommendations, definition of quality indicators, and definition of data collection systems. The aim of the present review is to evaluate existing guidelines and outcome measures concerning disease/activity monitoring, autoantibody and laboratory assessment, outcomes, and therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that could be used to define disease-specific quality indicators. Much data is available in the literature that could serve to define a starter set of quality indicators for SLE. Monitoring issues are discussed in the ACR and EULAR recommendations. As far as therapy is concerned, the ACR has provided indicators for rheumatoid arthritis that could also be applied to SLE, as well as indications for anti-malarial monitoring. The outcomes measures most frequently used in SLE are damage and death, but organ-specific definitions of outcome and response are being evaluated. The development of quality measures for SLE is just beginning; existing information could serve to construct a starter set of indicators such as the one proposed here. Certainly much progress will be made in the near future. A practical, user-friendly tool for physicians that will help them deliver high quality care to populations is also needed.

  1. Disease modeling and lentiviral gene transfer in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from late-onset Pompe disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Glycogen accumulation is seen in the affected organ such as skeletal muscle, heart, and liver. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is frequently seen in the infantile onset Pompe disease. On the other hand, cardiovascular complication of the late-onset Pompe disease is considered as less frequent and severe than that of infantile onset. There are few investigations which show cardiovascular complication of late onset Pompe disease due to the shortage of appropriate disease model. We have generated late-onset Pompe disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC and differentiated them into cardiomyocytes. Differentiated cardiomyocyte shows glycogen accumulation and lysosomal enlargement. Lentiviral GAA rescue improves GAA enzyme activity and glycogen accumulation in iPSC. The efficacy of gene therapy is maintained following the cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lentiviral GAA transfer ameliorates the disease-specific change in cardiomyocyote. It is suggested that Pompe disease iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte is replicating disease-specific changes in the context of disease modeling, drug screening, and cell therapy.

  2. Relapse and disease specific survival in 1143 Danish women diagnosed with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Nikoline Marie Schou; Karlsen, Mona Aarenstrup; Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the rate of relapse as well as disease-free, overall, and disease-specific survival in women with borderline ovarian tumour (BOT). Furthermore, the study aims to identify the clinical parameters correlated to relapse. METHODS: National clinical data...... of women diagnosed with BOT from January 2005 to January 2013 constituted the basis for our study population. The prognostic influence of clinical variables was evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: A total of 1143 women were eligible for analysis, with 87.9% in FIGO stage I and 12.......1% in FIGO stages II-IV. Relapse of BOT was detected in 3.7%, hereof 40.5% with malignant transformation. The five-year disease-free survival was 97.6% in FIGO stage I and 87.3% in FIGO stages II-IV. Younger age, laparoscopic surgical approach, fertility sparing surgery, FIGO stages II-IV, bilateral tumour...

  3. A comprehensive questionnaire for the assessment of health-related quality of life in coeliac disease (CDQL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjerning, Halfdan; Hourihane, Jonathan O'b; Husby, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease in genetically susceptible individuals, induced by ingested gluten. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD). The GFD involves restrictions in diet that may impact on a person's Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). AIM...

  4. Engineering neprilysin activity and specificity to create a novel therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl I Webster

    Full Text Available Neprilysin is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase that degrades a wide range of peptide substrates. It has received attention as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease due to its ability to degrade the peptide amyloid beta. However, its broad range of peptide substrates has the potential to limit its therapeutic use due to degradation of additional peptides substrates that tightly regulate many physiological processes. We sought to generate a soluble version of the ectodomain of neprilysin with improved activity and specificity towards amyloid beta as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease. Extensive amino acid substitutions were performed at positions surrounding the active site and inner surface of the enzyme and variants screened for activity on amyloid beta 1-40, 1-42 and a variety of other physiologically relevant peptides. We identified several mutations that modulated and improved both enzyme selectivity and intrinsic activity. Neprilysin variant G399V/G714K displayed an approximately 20-fold improved activity on amyloid beta 1-40 and up to a 3,200-fold reduction in activity on other peptides. Along with the altered peptide substrate specificity, the mutant enzyme produced a markedly altered series of amyloid beta cleavage products compared to the wild-type enzyme. Crystallisation of the mutant enzyme revealed that the amino acid substitutions result in alteration of the shape and size of the pocket containing the active site compared to the wild-type enzyme. The mutant enzyme offers the potential for the more efficient degradation of amyloid beta in vivo as a therapeutic for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Identifying disease-specific genes based on their topological significance in protein networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherba David

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of key target nodes within complex molecular networks remains a common objective in scientific research. The results of pathway analyses are usually sets of fairly complex networks or functional processes that are deemed relevant to the condition represented by the molecular profile. To be useful in a research or clinical laboratory, the results need to be translated to the level of testable hypotheses about individual genes and proteins within the condition of interest. Results In this paper we describe novel computational methodology capable of predicting key regulatory genes and proteins in disease- and condition-specific biological networks. The algorithm builds shortest path network connecting condition-specific genes (e.g. differentially expressed genes using global database of protein interactions from MetaCore. We evaluate the number of all paths traversing each node in the shortest path network in relation to the total number of paths going via the same node in the global network. Using these numbers and the relative size of the initial data set, we determine the statistical significance of the network connectivity provided through each node. We applied this method to gene expression data from psoriasis patients and identified many confirmed biological targets of psoriasis and suggested several new targets. Using predicted regulatory nodes we were able to reconstruct disease pathways that are in excellent agreement with the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Conclusion The systematic and automated approach described in this paper is readily applicable to uncovering high-quality therapeutic targets, and holds great promise for developing network-based combinational treatment strategies for a wide range of diseases.

  6. Environmental drivers of Culicoides phenology: how important is species-specific variation when determining disease policy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate R Searle

    Full Text Available Since 2006, arboviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae have caused significant disruption to ruminant production in northern Europe. The most serious incursions involved strains of bluetongue virus (BTV, which cause bluetongue (BT disease. To control spread of BTV, movement of susceptible livestock is restricted with economic and animal welfare impacts. The timing of BTV transmission in temperate regions is partly determined by the seasonal presence of adult Culicoides females. Legislative measures therefore allow for the relaxation of ruminant movement restrictions during winter, when nightly light-suction trap catches of Culicoides fall below a threshold (the 'seasonally vector free period': SVFP. We analysed five years of time-series surveillance data from light-suction trapping in the UK to investigate whether significant inter-specific and yearly variation in adult phenology exists, and whether the SVFP is predictable from environmental factors. Because female vector Culicoides are not easily morphologically separated, inter-specific comparisons in phenology were drawn from male populations. We demonstrate significant inter-specific differences in Culicoides adult phenology with the season of Culicoides scoticus approximately eight weeks shorter than Culicoides obsoletus. Species-specific differences in the length of the SVFP were related to host density and local variation in landscape habitat. When the Avaritia Culicoides females were modelled as a group (as utilised in the SFVP, we were unable to detect links between environmental drivers and phenological metrics. We conclude that the current treatment of Avaritia Culicoides as a single group inhibits understanding of environmentally-driven spatial variation in species phenology and hinders the development of models for predicting the SVFP from environmental factors. Culicoides surveillance methods should be adapted to focus on concentrated assessments

  7. Environmental drivers of Culicoides phenology: how important is species-specific variation when determining disease policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Kate R; Barber, James; Stubbins, Francesca; Labuschagne, Karien; Carpenter, Simon; Butler, Adam; Denison, Eric; Sanders, Christopher; Mellor, Philip S; Wilson, Anthony; Nelson, Noel; Gubbins, Simon; Purse, Bethan V

    2014-01-01

    Since 2006, arboviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have caused significant disruption to ruminant production in northern Europe. The most serious incursions involved strains of bluetongue virus (BTV), which cause bluetongue (BT) disease. To control spread of BTV, movement of susceptible livestock is restricted with economic and animal welfare impacts. The timing of BTV transmission in temperate regions is partly determined by the seasonal presence of adult Culicoides females. Legislative measures therefore allow for the relaxation of ruminant movement restrictions during winter, when nightly light-suction trap catches of Culicoides fall below a threshold (the 'seasonally vector free period': SVFP). We analysed five years of time-series surveillance data from light-suction trapping in the UK to investigate whether significant inter-specific and yearly variation in adult phenology exists, and whether the SVFP is predictable from environmental factors. Because female vector Culicoides are not easily morphologically separated, inter-specific comparisons in phenology were drawn from male populations. We demonstrate significant inter-specific differences in Culicoides adult phenology with the season of Culicoides scoticus approximately eight weeks shorter than Culicoides obsoletus. Species-specific differences in the length of the SVFP were related to host density and local variation in landscape habitat. When the Avaritia Culicoides females were modelled as a group (as utilised in the SFVP), we were unable to detect links between environmental drivers and phenological metrics. We conclude that the current treatment of Avaritia Culicoides as a single group inhibits understanding of environmentally-driven spatial variation in species phenology and hinders the development of models for predicting the SVFP from environmental factors. Culicoides surveillance methods should be adapted to focus on concentrated assessments of species-specific

  8. Determinants of gliadin-specific T cell selection in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jan; van Bergen, Jeroen; Loh, Khai Lee; Kooy-Winkelaar, Yvonne; Beringer, Dennis X; Thompson, Allan; Bakker, Sjoerd F; Mulder, Chris J J; Ladell, Kristin; McLaren, James E; Price, David A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Reid, Hugh H; Koning, Frits

    2015-06-15

    In HLA-DQ8-associated celiac disease (CD), the pathogenic T cell response is directed toward an immunodominant α-gliadin-derived peptide (DQ8-glia-α1). However, our knowledge of TCR gene usage within the primary intestinal tissue of HLA-DQ8 (+) CD patients is limited. We identified two populations of HLA-DQ8-glia-α1 tetramer(+) CD4(+) T cells that were essentially undetectable in biopsy samples from patients on a gluten-free diet but expanded rapidly and specifically after antigenic stimulation. Distinguished by expression of TRBV9, both T cell populations displayed biased clonotypic repertoires and reacted similarly against HLA-DQ8-glia-α1. In particular, TRBV9 paired most often with TRAV26-2, whereas the majority of TRBV9(-) TCRs used TRBV6-1 with no clear TRAV gene preference. Strikingly, both tetramer(+)/TRBV9(+) and tetramer(+)/TRBV9(-) T cells possessed a non-germline-encoded arginine residue in their CDR3α and CDR3β loops, respectively. Comparison of the crystal structures of three TRBV9(+) TCRs and a TRBV9(-) TCR revealed that, as a result of distinct TCR docking modes, the HLA-DQ8-glia-α1 contacts mediated by the CDR3-encoded arginine were almost identical between TRBV9(+) and TRBV9(-) TCRs. In all cases, this interaction centered on two hydrogen bonds with a specific serine residue in the bound peptide. Replacement of serine with alanine at this position abrogated TRBV9(+) and TRBV9(-) clonal T cell proliferation in response to HLA-DQ8-glia-α1. Gluten-specific memory CD4(+) T cells with structurally and functionally conserved TCRs therefore predominate in the disease-affected tissue of patients with HLA-DQ8-mediated CD. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Disease-specific structural changes in thalamus and dentatorubrothalamic tract in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surova, Yulia; Hall, Sara; Widner, Haakan [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Markus [Lund University, Lund University Bioimaging Center, Lund (Sweden); Laett, Jimmy [Skaane University Hospital, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Lampinen, Bjoern [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Lindberg, Olof [Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Nilsson, Christer [Skaane University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Westen, Danielle van [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Hansson, Oskar [Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Memory Clinic, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to identify disease-specific changes of the thalamus, basal ganglia, pons, and midbrain in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple system atrophy with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-P) using diffusion tensor imaging and volumetric analysis. MRI diffusion and volumetric data were acquired in a derivation of 30 controls and 8 patients with PSP and a validation cohort comprised of controls (n = 21) and patients with PSP (n = 27), PD (n = 10), and MSA-P (n = 11). Analysis was performed using regions of interest (ROI), tract-based spatial statistic (TBSS), and tractography and results compared between diagnostic groups. In the derivation cohort, we observed increased mean diffusivity (MD) in the thalamus, superior cerebellar peduncle, and the midbrain in PSP compared to controls. Furthermore, volumetric analysis showed reduced thalamic volumes in PSP. In the validation cohort, the observations of increased MD were replicated by ROI-based analysis and in the thalamus by TBSS-based analysis. Such differences were not found for patients with PD in any of the cohorts. Tractography of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRTT) showed increased MD in PSP patients from both cohorts compared to controls and in the validation cohort in PSP compared to PD and MSA patients. Increased MD in the thalamus and along the DRTT correlated with disease stage and motor function in PSP. Patients with PSP, but not PD or MSA-P, exhibit signs of structural abnormalities in the thalamus and in the DRTT. These changes are associated with disease stage and impaired motor function. (orig.)

  10. Maximum inspiratory pressure as a clinically meaningful trial endpoint for neuromuscular diseases: A comprehensive review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Schoser; Fong, E. (Edward); Geberhiwot, T. (Tarekegn); Hughes, D. (Derralynn); Kissel, J.T. (John T.); Madathil, S.C. (Shyam C.); Orlikowski, D. (David); Polkey, M.I. (Michael I.); M. Roberts (Mark); H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); Young, P. (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractRespiratory muscle strength is a proven predictor of long-term outcome of neuromuscular disease (NMD), including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and spinal muscular atrophy. Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), a sensitive measure of respiratory muscle

  11. The comprehensive treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease%慢性阻塞性肺疾病的综合治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌志强

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually refers to a limited airflow characteristics of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, and it is a preventable and treatable disease.Treatment for COPD should be preventing, advocate a healthy lifestyle for positive intervention,taking comprehensive treatment according to the reversible factors around each link in the course of the COPD, in order to slow down disease progression, reduce the acute exacerbation, and make the patient in the best physical and mental health state.In this paper,we make a brief introduction of clinical comprehensive treatment on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,and hoping to provide some help for the future work.%目的:慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)通常指具有气流受限特征的慢性支气管炎和(或)肺气肿,是一种可预防、可治疗的疾病。对COPD的治疗应从预防着手,倡导健康的生活方式,针对可逆因素进行积极干预,围绕COPD病程中的各个环节综合治疗,延缓病情进展,减少急性加重,使患者处于最佳身心健康状态。本文就慢性阻塞性肺疾病的临床综合治疗作一简单介绍,以期望对未来工作有所帮助。

  12. Specificity of the STAT4 genetic association for severe disease manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly E Taylor

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a genetically complex disease with heterogeneous clinical manifestations. A polymorphism in the STAT4 gene has recently been established as a risk factor for SLE, but the relationship with specific SLE subphenotypes has not been studied. We studied 137 SNPs in the STAT4 region genotyped in 4 independent SLE case series (total n = 1398 and 2560 healthy controls, along with clinical data for the cases. Using conditional testing, we confirmed the most significant STAT4 haplotype for SLE risk. We then studied a SNP marking this haplotype for association with specific SLE subphenotypes, including autoantibody production, nephritis, arthritis, mucocutaneous manifestations, and age at diagnosis. To prevent possible type-I errors from population stratification, we reanalyzed the data using a subset of subjects determined to be most homogeneous based on principal components analysis of genome-wide data. We confirmed that four SNPs in very high LD (r(2 = 0.94 to 0.99 were most strongly associated with SLE, and there was no compelling evidence for additional SLE risk loci in the STAT4 region. SNP rs7574865 marking this haplotype had a minor allele frequency (MAF = 31.1% in SLE cases compared with 22.5% in controls (OR = 1.56, p = 10(-16. This SNP was more strongly associated with SLE characterized by double-stranded DNA autoantibodies (MAF = 35.1%, OR = 1.86, p<10(-19, nephritis (MAF = 34.3%, OR = 1.80, p<10(-11, and age at diagnosis<30 years (MAF = 33.8%, OR = 1.77, p<10(-13. An association with severe nephritis was even more striking (MAF = 39.2%, OR = 2.35, p<10(-4 in the homogeneous subset of subjects. In contrast, STAT4 was less strongly associated with oral ulcers, a manifestation associated with milder disease. We conclude that this common polymorphism of STAT4 contributes to the phenotypic heterogeneity of SLE, predisposing specifically to more severe disease.

  13. Epidemiological simulation modeling and spatial analysis for foot-and-mouth disease control strategies: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premashthira, Sith; Salman, Mo D; Hill, Ashley E; Reich, Robin M; Wagner, Bruce A

    2011-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most serious transboundary, contagious viral diseases of cloven-hoofed livestock, because it can spread rapidly with high morbidity rates when introduced into disease-free herds or areas. Epidemiological simulation modeling can be developed to study the hypothetical spread of FMD and to evaluate potential disease control strategies that can be implemented to decrease the impact of an outbreak or to eradicate the virus from an area. Spatial analysis, a study of the distributions of events in space, can be applied to an area to investigate the spread of animal disease. Hypothetical FMD outbreaks can be spatially analyzed to evaluate the effect of the event under different control strategies. The main objective of this paper is to review FMD-related articles on FMD epidemiology, epidemiological simulation modeling and spatial analysis with the focus on disease control. This review will contribute to the development of models used to simulate FMD outbreaks under various control strategies, and to the application of spatial analysis to assess the outcome of FMD spread and its control.

  14. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azangwe, Godfrey, E-mail: g.azangwe@iaea.org; Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna; Meghzifene, Ahmed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Lechner, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Andersen, Claus E.; Beierholm, Anders R.; Helt-Hansen, Jakob [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukumura, Akifumi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Yajima, Kaori [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, 7-16, Nihonbashikodenmacho, chuou-ku, Tokyo 103-0001 (Japan); Gouldstone, Clare; Sharpe, Peter [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Medical Physics Department, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm{sup 2} to 4.2 × 4.2 cm{sup 2} and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm{sup 3} to 0.3 cm{sup 3}). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm{sup 3} air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: The results demonstrate

  15. Development and validation of the disease-specific Short Bowel Syndrome-Quality of Life (SBS-QoL) scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berghöfer, P; Fragkos, K C; Baxter, J P

    2013-01-01

    Subjects with short bowel syndrome (SBS) have impaired quality of life (QoL). No disease-specific instrument has been available to measure treatment-induced changes in QoL over time. Therefore, the aim was to develop and validate an SBS-specific QoL scale.......Subjects with short bowel syndrome (SBS) have impaired quality of life (QoL). No disease-specific instrument has been available to measure treatment-induced changes in QoL over time. Therefore, the aim was to develop and validate an SBS-specific QoL scale....

  16. Metacognitive and language-specific knowledge in native and foreign language reading comprehension: an emprical study among Dutch students in grades 6, 8 and 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, R.; Hulstijn, J.; Bossers, B.

    1998-01-01

    This article gives the results of a study among 685 students in grades 6, 8 and 10 in the Netherlands to whom we administered grade-appropriate measures of reading comprehension and vocabulary knowledge in their native language (NL), Dutch, as well as, in grades 8 and 10, in English as a foreign lan

  17. Metacognitive and language-specific knowledge in native and foreign language reading comprehension: an emprical study among Dutch students in grades 6, 8 and 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, R.; Hulstijn, J.; Bossers, B.

    1998-01-01

    This article gives the results of a study among 685 students in grades 6, 8 and 10 in the Netherlands to whom we administered grade-appropriate measures of reading comprehension and vocabulary knowledge in their native language (NL), Dutch, as well as, in grades 8 and 10, in English as a foreign lan

  18. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Impact of HIV on HCV Immune Responses and Its Association with Liver Disease Progression in a Unique Plasma Donor Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksa, Ushani S.; Lawrence, Tessa M.; Peng, Yan-Chun; Liu, Jinghua; Xu, Keyi; Hu, Ke; Qin, Ling; Liu, Ning; Sun, Huanqin; Yan, Hui-Ping; Repapi, Emmanouela; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; McKeating, Jane A.; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-1 infected patients. Our understanding of the impact of HIV infection on HCV specific immune responses and liver disease outcome is limited by the heterogeneous study populations with genetically diverse infecting viruses, varying duration of infection and anti-viral treatment. Methods Viral-specific immune responses in a cohort of 151 HCV mono- and HIV co-infected former plasma donors infected with a narrow source of virus were studied. HCV and HIV specific T cell responses were correlated with clinical data. Results HIV-1 accelerated liver disease progression and decreased HCV specific T cell immunity. The magnitude of HCV specific T cell responses inversely correlated with lower HCV RNA load and reduced liver injury as assessed by non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis. HIV co-infection reduced the frequency of HCV specific CD4+ T cells with no detectable effect on CD8+ T cells or neutralizing antibody levels. Conclusion Our study highlights the impact of HIV co-infection on HCV specific CD4+ T cell responses in a unique cohort of patients for both HCV and HIV and suggests a crucial role for these cells in controlling chronic HCV replication and liver disease progression. PMID:27455208

  19. A rehabilitation model as key to comprehensive care in the era of HIV as a chronic disease in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Verusia; Hanass-Hancock, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In the era of widespread access to antiretroviral therapy, people living with HIV survive; however, this comes with new experiences of comorbidities and HIV-related disability posing new challenges to rehabilitation professionals and an already fragile health system in Southern Africa. Public health approaches to HIV need to include not only prevention, treatment and support but also rehabilitation. While some well-resourced countries have developed rehabilitation approaches for HIV, resource-poor settings of Southern Africa lack a model of care that includes rehabilitation approaches providing accessible and comprehensive care for people living with HIV. In this study, a learning in action approach was used to conceptualize a comprehensive model of care that addresses HIV-related disability and a feasible rehabilitation framework for resource-poor settings. The study used qualitative methods in the form of a focus group discussion with thirty participants including people living with HIV, the multidisciplinary healthcare team and community outreach partners at a semi-rural health facility in South Africa. The discussion focused on barriers and enablers of access to rehabilitation. Participants identified barriers at various levels, including transport, physical access, financial constraints and poor multi-stakeholder team interaction. The results of the group discussions informed the design of an inclusive model of HIV care. This model was further informed by established integrated rehabilitation models. Participants emphasized that objectives need to respond to policy, improve access to patient-centered care and maintain a multidisciplinary team approach. They proposed that guiding principles should include efficient communication, collaboration of all stakeholders and leadership in teams to enable staff to implement the model. Training of professional staff and lay personnel within task-shifting approaches was seen as an essential enabler to implementation. The

  20. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  1. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  2. Specific features of clostridium difficile colitis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Through its specific biological, epidemiological, diagnostic and infection management features, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI can be considered a major health concern, especially in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients. In this particular infection, many IBD risk factors are triggered due to bowel inflammation, antibiotics use, microbiota changes, immunosuppressive therapy use and surgical intervention. Thus, each IBD and diarrhea patient must be tested for CDI. Clinical features show different initial infectious stages such as mild, fulminate and refractory. It has been shown that CDI presents recurrent episodes. CDI treatment consists of metronidazole, vancomycin or fidaxomicin, as well as prophylactic measures. It was recently shown that antibiotic doses must be gradually reduced in order to avoid CDI relapses. Fecal transplantation, effective in CDI management, remains controversial in CDI patients with concurrent IBD.

  3. Differential vulnerability of neurons in Huntington's disease: The role of cell type-specific features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ina; You, YiMei; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Brady, Scott T.; Morfini, Gerardo A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine tract in huntingtin (Htt) protein results in Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder involving progressive loss of motor and cognitive function. Contrasting with the ubiquitous tissue expression of polyglutamine-expanded Htt (polyQ-Htt), HD pathology is characterized by the increased vulnerability of specific neuronal populations within the striatum and the cerebral cortex. Morphological, biochemical, and functional characteristics of neurons affected in HD that might render these cells more vulnerable to the toxic effects of polyQ-Htt are covered in this review. The differential vulnerability of neurons observed in HD is discussed in the context of various major pathogenic mechanisms proposed to date, and in line with evidence showing a “dying-back” pattern of degeneration in affected neuronal populations. PMID:20236390

  4. Erythroid-specific Expression of β-globin by Sleeping Beauty Transposon for Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianhui; Kren, Betsy T.; Park, Chang Won; Bilgim, Rasim; Wong, Phillip Y-P.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) results predominately from a single monogenic mutation that affects thousands of individuals worldwide. Gene therapy approaches have focused on using viral vectors to transfer wild type β- or γ-globin transgenes into hematopoietic stem cells for long-term expression of the recombinant globins. In this study, we investigated the use of a novel non-viral vector system, the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon (Tn) to insert a wild type β-globin expression cassette into the human genome for sustained expression of β-globin. We initially constructed a β-globin expression vector composed of the hybrid cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer: chicken β-actin promoter (CAGGS) and full length β-globin cDNA, as well as truncated forms lacking either the 3′ or 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs), to optimize efficient expression of β-globin. β-globin with its 5′ UTR was efficiently expressed from its cDNA in K-562 cells induced with hemin. However, expression was constitutive and not erythroid-specific. We then constructed cis SB-Tn-β-globin plasmids using a minimal β-globin gene driven by the hybrid promoters; IHK (human ALAS2 intron 8 erythroid-specific enhancer, HS40 core element from human αLCR, ankyrin-1 promoter); IHβp (human ALAS2 intron 8 erythroid-specific enhancer, HS40 core element from human αLCR, β-globin promoter;) or HS3βp (HS3 core element from human βLCR, β-globin promoter) to establish erythroid-specific expression of β-globin. Stable genomic insertion of the minimal gene and expression of the β-globin transgene for > 5 months at a level comparable to the endogenous γ-globin gene were achieved using a SB-Tn β-globin cis construct. Interestingly, erythroid-specific expression of β-globin driven by IHK was regulated primarily at the translational level, in contrast to post-transcriptional regulation in non-erythroid cells. The SB-Tn system is a promising nonviral vector for efficient genomic insertion conferring stable

  5. Analysis of five chronic inflammatory diseases identifies 27 new associations and highlights disease-specific patterns at shared loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellinghaus, David; Jostins, Luke; Spain, Sarah L.; Cortes, Adrian; Bethune, Joern; Han, Buhm; Park, Yu Rang; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Pouget, Jennie G.; Huebenthal, Matthias; Folseraas, Trine; Wang, Yunpeng; Esko, Tonu; Metspalu, Andres; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Pers, Tune H.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Collij, Valerie; D'Amato, Mauro; Halfvarson, Jonas; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Lieb, Wolfgang; Degenhardt, Franziska; Forstner, Andreas J.; Hofmann, Andrea; Schreiber, Stefan; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Brunak, Soren; Dale, Anders M.; Trembath, Richard C.; Weidinger, Stephan; Weichenthal, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Elder, James T.; Barker, Jonathan N. W. N.; Andreassen, Ole A.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Parkes, Miles; Brown, Matthew A.; Franke, Andre

    We simultaneously investigated the genetic landscape of ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis to investigate pleiotropy and the relationship between these clinically related diseases. Using high-density genotype data from more than

  6. Clinical performance improvement series. Classic CQI integrated with comprehensive disease management as a model for performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M S; Bernard, D B

    1999-08-01

    In recent years, health and disease management has emerged as an effective means of delivering, integrating, and improving care through a population-based approach. Since 1997 the University of Pennsylvania Health System (UPHS) has utilized the key principles and components of continuous quality improvement (CQI) and disease management to form a model for health care improvement that focuses on designing best practices, using best practices to influence clinical decision making, changing processes and systems to deploy and deliver best practices, and measuring outcomes to improve the process. Experience with 28 programs and more than 14,000 patients indicates significant improvement in outcomes, including high physician satisfaction, increased patient satisfaction, reduced costs, and improved clinical process and outcome measures across multiple diseases. DIABETES DISEASE MANAGEMENT: In three months a UPHS multidisciplinary diabetes disease management team developed a best practice approach for the treatment of all patients with diabetes in the UPHS. After the program was pilot tested in three primary care physician sites, it was then introduced progressively to additional practice sites throughout the health system. The establishment of the role of the diabetes nurse care managers (certified diabetes educators) was central to successful program deployment. Office-based coordinators ensure incorporation of the best practice protocols into routine flow processes. A disease management intranet disseminates programs electronically. Outcomes of the UPHS health and disease management programs so far demonstrate success across multiple dimensions of performance-service, clinical quality, access, and value. The task of health care leadership today is to remove barriers and enable effective implementation of key strategies, such as health and disease management. Substantial effort and resources must be dedicated to gain physician buy-in and achieve compliance. The

  7. Evidence for gender-specific transcriptional profiles of nigral dopamine neurons in Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Simunovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data suggest that the male gender is one of the risks factors for the development of Parkinson Disease (PD. Also, differences in the clinical manifestation and the course of PD have been observed between males and females. However, little is known about the molecular aspects underlying gender-specificity in PD. To address this issue, we determined the gene expression profiles of male and female dopamine (DA neurons in sporadic PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed Affymetrix-based microarrays on laser microdissected DA neurons from postmortem brains of sporadic PD patients and age-matched controls across genders. Pathway enrichment demonstrated that major cellular pathways involved in PD pathogenesis showed different patterns of deregulation between males and females with more prominent downregulation of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, synaptic transmission and transmission of nerve impulse in the male population. In addition, we found upregulation of gene products for metabolic processes and mitochondrial energy consumption in the age-matched male control neurons. On the single cell level, selected data validation using quantitative Real-Time (qRT-PCR was consistent with microarray raw data and supported some of the observations from data analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: On the molecular level, our results provide evidence that the expression profiles of aged normal and PD midbrain DA neurons are gender-specific. The observed differences in the expression profiles suggest a disease bias of the male gender, which could be in concordance with clinical observations that the male gender represents a risk factor for sporadic PD. Validation of gene expression by qRT-PCR supported the microarray results, but also pointed to several caveats involved in data interpretation.

  8. Enhanced genetic maps from family-based disease studies: population-specific comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buyske Steven

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate genetic maps are required for successful and efficient linkage mapping of disease genes. However, most available genome-wide genetic maps were built using only small collections of pedigrees, and therefore have large sampling errors. A large set of genetic studies genotyped by the NHLBI Mammalian Genotyping Service (MGS provide appropriate data for generating more accurate maps. Results We collected a large sample of uncleaned genotype data for 461 markers generated by the MGS using the Weber screening sets 9 and 10. This collection includes genotypes for over 4,400 pedigrees containing over 17,000 genotyped individuals from different populations. We identified and cleaned numerous relationship and genotyping errors, as well as verified the marker orders. We used this dataset to test for population-specific genetic maps, and to re-estimate the genetic map distances with greater precision; standard errors for all intervals are provided. The map-interval sizes from the European (or European descent, Chinese, and Hispanic samples are in quite good agreement with each other. We found one map interval on chromosome 8p with a statistically significant size difference between the European and Chinese samples, and several map intervals with significant size differences between the African American and Chinese samples. When comparing Palauan with European samples, a statistically significant difference was detected at the telomeric region of chromosome 11p. Several significant differences were also identified between populations in chromosomal and genome lengths. Conclusions Our new population-specific screening set maps can be used to improve the accuracy of disease-mapping studies. As a result of the large sample size, the average length of the 95% confidence interval (CI for a 10 cM map interval is only 2.4 cM, which is considerably smaller than on previously published maps.

  9. Raman spectroscopy of blood serum for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics: specificity relative to other types of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikova, Elena; Kazakov, Oleksandr; Halamkova, Lenka; Celmins, Dzintra; Malone, Paula; Molho, Eric; Zimmerman, Earl A; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-07-01

    The key moment for efficiently and accurately diagnosing dementia occurs during the early stages. This is particularly true for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this proof-of-concept study, we applied near infrared (NIR) Raman microspectroscopy of blood serum together with advanced multivariate statistics for the selective identification of AD. We analyzed data from 20 AD patients, 18 patients with other neurodegenerative dementias (OD) and 10 healthy control (HC) subjects. NIR Raman microspectroscopy differentiated patients with more than 95% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrated the high discriminative power of artificial neural network (ANN) classification models, thus revealing the high potential of this developed methodology for the differential diagnosis of AD. Raman spectroscopic, blood-based tests may aid clinical assessments for the effective and accurate differential diagnosis of AD, decrease the labor, time and cost of diagnosis, and be useful for screening patient populations for AD development and progression. Multivariate data analysis of blood serum Raman spectra allows for the differentiation between patients with Alzheimer's disease, other types of dementia and healthy individuals.

  10. Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles for specifically detecting biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che-Chuan; Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Horng, Herng-Er; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, K H; Shih, B Y; Chen, Ta-Fu; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2011-09-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles biofunctionalized with antibodies against β-amyloid-40 (Aβ-40) and Aβ-42, which are promising biomarkers related to Alzheimer's disease (AD), were synthesized. We characterized the size distribution, saturated magnetizations, and stability of the magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with anti-Aβ antibody. In combination with immunomagnetic reduction technology, it is demonstrated such biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles are able to label Aβs specifically. The ultralow-detection limits of assaying Aβs in vitro using the magnetic nanoparticles via immunomagnetic reduction are determined to a concentration of ∼10 ppt (10 pg/mL). Further, immunomagnetic reduction signals of Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 in human plasma from normal samples and AD patients were analyzed, and the results showed a significant difference between these two groups. These results show the feasibility of using magnetic nanoparticles with Aβs as reagents for assaying low-concentration Aβs through immunomagnetic reduction, and also provide a promising new method for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease from human blood plasma.

  11. Subtype and regional-specific neuroinflammation in sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; López-González, Irene; Thüne, Katrin; Carmona, Margarita; Zafar, Saima; Andréoletti, Olivier; Zerr, Inga; Ferrer, Isidre

    2014-01-01

    The present study identifies deregulated cytokines and mediators of the immune response in the frontal cortex and cerebellum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) MM1 and VV2 subtypes compared to age-matched controls. Deregulated genes include pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors, colony stimulating factors, cathepsins, members of the complement system, and members of the integrin and CTL/CTLD family with particular regional and sCJD subtype patterns. Analysis of cytokines and mediators at protein level shows expression of selected molecules and receptors in neurons, in astrocytes, and/or in microglia, thus suggesting interactions between neurons and glial cells, mainly microglia, in the neuroinflammatory response in sCJD. Similar inflammatory responses have been shown in the tg340 sCJD MM1 mice, revealing a progressive deregulation of inflammatory mediators with disease progression. Yet, inflammatory molecules involved are subjected to species differences in humans and mice. Moreover, inflammatory-related cell signaling pathways NFκB/IKK and JAK/STAT are activated in sCJD and sCJD MM1 mice. Together, the present observations show a self-sustained complex inflammatory and inflammatory-related responses occurring already at early clinical stages in animal model and dramatically progressing at advanced stages of sCJD. Considering this scenario, measures tailored to modulate (activate or inhibit) specific molecules could be therapeutic options in CJD.

  12. Preclinical studies on specific gene therapy for recessive retinal degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Knut; Chauveau, Christine; Rolling, Fabienne

    2010-10-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are non-lethal and have a wide level of genetic heterogeneity. Many of the genes involved have now been identified and their function elucidated, providing a major step towards the development of gene-based treatments. The most widely used vectors for ocular gene delivery are based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) because they mediate long-term transgene expression in a variety of retinal cell types and elicit minimal immune responses. Extensive preclinical evaluation of gene transfer strategies in small and large animal models is key to the development of successful gene-based therapies for the retina. These preclinical studies have already allowed the field to reach the point where gene therapy to treat inherited blindness has been brought to clinical trial. In this manuscript, we focus on recombinant AAV-mediated specific gene therapy for recessive retinal degenerative diseases we describe the preclinical studies for the treatment of retinal degeneration caused by retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells or photoreceptor defects and the immune response induced by retinal rAAV gene transfer.

  13. A Surveillance Model for Human Avian Influenza with a Comprehensive Surveillance System for Local-Priority Communicable Diseases in South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafusa, Shigeki; Muhadir, Andi; Santoso, Hari; Tanaka, Kohtaroh; Anwar, Muhammad; Sulistyo, Erwan Tri; Hachiya, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    The government of Indonesia and the Japan International Cooperation Agency launched a three-year project (2008–2011) to strengthen the surveillance of human avian influenza cases through a comprehensive surveillance system of local-priority communicable diseases in South Sulawesi Province. Based on findings from preliminary and baseline surveys, the project developed a technical protocol for surveillance and response activities in local settings, consistent with national guidelines. District surveillance officers (DSOs) and rapid-response-team members underwent training to improve surveillance and response skills. A network-based early warning and response system for weekly reports and a short message service (SMS) gateway for outbreak reports, both encompassing more than 20 probable outbreak diseases, were introduced to support existing paper-based systems. Two further strategies were implemented to optimize project outputs: a simulation exercise and a DSO-centered model. As a result, the timeliness of weekly reports improved from 33% in 2009 to 82% in 2011. In 2011, 65 outbreaks were reported using the SMS, with 64 subsequent paper-based reports. All suspected human avian influenza outbreaks up to September 2011 were reported in the stipulated format. A crosscutting approach using human avian influenza as the core disease for coordinating surveillance activities improved the overall surveillance system for communicable diseases. PMID:23532690

  14. Predicting spring barley yield from variety-specific yield potential, disease resistance and straw length, and from environment-specific disease loads and weed pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergård, Hanne; Kristensen, Kristian; Pinnschmidt, Hans O.;

    2008-01-01

    For low-input crop production, well-characterised varieties increase the possibilities of managing diseases and weeds. This analysis aims at developing a framework for analyzing grain yield using external varietal information about disease resistance, weed competitiveness and yield potential...... and quantifying the impact of susceptibility grouping and straw length scores (as a measure for weed competitiveness) for predicting spring barley grain yield under variable biotic stress levels. The study comprised 52 spring barley varieties and 17 environments, i.e., combinations of location, growing system...... and year. Individual varieties and their interactions with environments were analysed by factorial regression of grain yield on external variety information combined with observed environmental disease loads and weed pressure. The external information was based on the official Danish VCU testing. The most...

  15. Characterization of new specific copper chelators as potential drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michel; Robert, Anne; Sournia-Saquet, Alix; Vendier, Laure; Meunier, Bernard

    2014-05-26

    The non-controlled redox-active metal ions, especially copper, in the brain of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) should be considered at the origin of the intense oxidative damage in the AD brain. Several bis(8-aminoquinoline) ligands, such as 1 and PA1637, are able to chelate Cu(2+) with high affinity, and are specific chelators of copper with respect to iron and zinc. They are able to efficiently extract Cu(2+) from a metal-loaded amyloid. In addition, these tetradentate ligands are specific for the chelation of Cu(2+) compared with Cu(+). Consequently, the copper ion is easily released from the bis(8-aminoquinoline) ligand under reductive conditions, and can be trapped again by a protein having some affinity for copper such as human serum albumin (HSA) proteins. In addition, the copper is not efficiently released from [Cu(CQ)2] in reductive conditions. The catalytic production of H2O2 by [Cu(2+)-Aβ(1-28)]/ascorbate is inhibited in vitro by the bis(8-aminoquinoline) 1, suggesting that 1 should be able to play a protective role against oxidative damages induced by copper-loaded amyloids.

  16. Low specificity and sensitivity of smell identification testing for the diagnosis of Parkinson?s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayela Rodríguez-Violante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to determine if the University of Pennsylvania’s Smell Identification Test (UPSIT is an accurate diagnostic tool for olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Method: We included 138 non-demented PD subjects and 175 control subjects matched by gender. Smell identification was tested using UPSIT. Results: The mean number of UPSIT items correctly identified by controls was 27.52±5.88; the mean score for PD subjects was 19.66±6.08 (p=<0.001. UPSIT sensitivity was 79.7% with a specificity of 68.5% using a cut-off score of ≤25. The overall accuracy for the diagnosis of PD was of 75.3%. Conclusion: UPSIT accuracy and specificity were lower than what has been previously reported. Our data demonstrates that 17.5% of items of the UPSIT were not well identified by healthy controls. Further research of the identification of a truly cross-cultural test is warranted.

  17. Low specificity and sensitivity of smell identification testing for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Gonzalez-Latapi, Paulina; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh; Martínez-Ramírez, Daniel; Morales-Briceño, Hugo; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if the University of Pennsylvania's Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) is an accurate diagnostic tool for olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD). We included 138 non-demented PD subjects and 175 control subjects matched by gender. Smell identification was tested using UPSIT. The mean number of UPSIT items correctly identified by controls was 27.52 ± 5.88; the mean score for PD subjects was 19.66 ± 6.08 (p=<0.001). UPSIT sensitivity was 79.7% with a specificity of 68.5% using a cut-off score of ≤ 25. The overall accuracy for the diagnosis of PD was of 75.3%. UPSIT accuracy and specificity were lower than what has been previously reported. Our data demonstrates that 17.5% of items of the UPSIT were not well identified by healthy controls. Further research of the identification of a truly cross-cultural test is warranted.

  18. The pervasiveness of interleukin-1 in Alzheimer pathogenesis: a role for specific polymorphisms in disease risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, W.S.T.; Nicoll, J.A.R.; Grimaldi, L.M.E.; Sheng, J.G.; Mrak, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been implicated as a key molecule in Alzheimer pathogenesis based on findings of an IL-1 overexpression in Alzheimer brain that is directly related to plaque progression and tangle formation, and on findings that IL-1 induces excessive synthesis, translation, and processing of neuronal β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) as well as synthesis of most known plaque-associated proteins. In addition, IL-1 activates astrocytes, with the important consequence of over-expression of the neuritogenic cytokine S100β and overgrowth of dystrophic neurites in neuritic plaques. As further evidence of the importance of IL-1 in Alzheimer pathogenesis, two new genetic studies of inheritance of specific polymorphisms in IL-1 genes in Alzheimer and control patients show that homozygosity for a specific IL-1A gene polymorphism at least triples risk for development of Alzheimer’s disease. This increase is associated with earlier age of onset. Homozygosity for this polymorphism plus another in the IL-1B gene further increases risk. PMID:10959036

  19. [The immunological mechanisms contributing to the clinical efficacy of allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) in allergic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Ilan; Mahlab-Guri, Keren; Sthoeger, Zev

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has increased dramatically in the western world. In the last 2 decades, the frequency of asthma and allergic rhinitis has doubled. Allergen specific immunotherapy [SIT] has been used successfully for more than 100 years for the treatment of allergic disorders. Allergen SIT provides not only symptomatic relief, but it is potentially curative. The immunologic mechanisms of allergen SIT include all parts of the immune system. Regulatory T cells (TR1, Treg), have a major pivotal role in the success of immunotherapy. Along with the regulatory T cells, elevated suppressor cytokines (IL-10), suppression of TH2 cells, increasing titer of specific IgG4 and gradual decline in the number and function of basophils and mast cells also contribute to the success of the treatment (SIT). The above immune mechanisms are connected and related to each other acting at different times with the treatment with SIT. In this review we focused on the current knowledge and understanding of the different immune mechanisms which are involved in the success of SIT.

  20. Risk Factors in the Initial Presentation of Specific Cardiovascular Disease Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-03

    Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina; Chronic Stable Angina; Ischemic Stroke; Cerebrovascular Accident; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Sudden Coronary Death; Ventricular Arrhythmia; Sudden Death; Cardiac Arrest; Heart Failure

  1. mTOR inhibitor-induced interstitial lung disease in cancer patients : Comprehensive review and a practical management algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Annelieke E C A B; Grutters, JC; Gerritsen, Winald R; van Erp, Nielka P; van Herpen, Carla M L; Tol, Jolien

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) have clinically significant activity against various malignancies, such as renal cell carcinoma and breast cancer, but their use can be complicated by several toxicities. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an adverse event of particular importance. Mo

  2. Validation of a New Questionnaire with Generic and Disease-Specific Qualities: The Mcgill Copd Quality of Life Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Pakhale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A validated health-related quality of life questionnaire in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with advantages of both generic- and disease-specific questionnaires is needed to capture patients’ perspectives of severity and impact of the disease. The McGill COPD questionnaire was created to include these advantages in English and French. It assesses three domains: symptoms, physical function and feelings with 29 items (12 from the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey with 17 from the previously developed COPD-specific module.

  3. Filarial-specific antibody response in East African bancroftian filariasis: effects of host infection, clinical disease, and filarial endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaoko, Walter G; Simonsen, Paul E; Meyrowitsch, Dan W;

    2006-01-01

    The effect of host infection, chronic clinical disease, and transmission intensity on the patterns of specific antibody responses in Bancroftian filariasis was assessed by analyzing specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgE profiles among adults from two communities with high and low Wuchereria ba...

  4. Who will deliver comprehensive healthy lifestyle interventions to combat non-communicable disease? Introducing the healthy lifestyle practitioner discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Hivert, Marie-France; Williams, Mark A; Briggs, Paige D; Guazzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Unhealthy lifestyle characteristics (i.e., physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor diet, and smoking) as well as associated poor health metrics (i.e., dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension) are the primary reasons for the current non-communicable disease crisis. Compared to those with the poorest of lifestyles and associated health metrics, any movement toward improving lifestyle and associated health metrics improves health outcomes. To address the non-communicable disease crisis we must: 1) acknowledge that healthy lifestyle (HL) interventions are a potent medicine; and 2) move toward a healthcare system that embraces primordial as much as, if not more than, secondary prevention with a heavy focus on HL medicine. This article introduces the Healthy Lifestyle Practitioner, focused on training health professionals to deliver HL medicine.

  5. Comprehensive nursing intervention control study on Parkinson's disease%综合护理干预对帕金森症的应用效果探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 周阴娥; 巩玉艳

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical application effect of comprehensive nursing intervention for Parkinson's disease. Methods 80 cases of PD were randomly divided into treatment group and control group,the control group using conventional methods of nursing,the treatment group was given comprehensive nursing intervention,two groups were analyzed and compared the clinical effect of prognosis of stem. Results after nursing intervention,the patients in the treatment group the ADL score was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.05),quality of life was significantly better than the control group (P <0.05).Conclusion comprehensive nursing intervention can significantly improve the activity of daily living in patients with PD,improve the negative emotional reaction, improve the quality of life of patients,is worthy of clinical promotion.%目的:探讨综合护理干预对帕金森症(PD)的临床应用效果。方法将80例PD患者随机分为治疗组和对照组,对照组采用常规护理方法,治疗组给予综合护理干预,分析比较2组的临床效果。结果经护理干预后,治疗组患者ADL评分显著高于对照组(P<0.05),生活质量显著优于对照组(P<0.05)。结论综合护理干预能够显著提高PD患者的日常生活活动能力,改善负性情绪反应,提高患者的生活质量,值得临床推广。

  6. Specificity and sensitivity of esophageal motor abnormality in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) and related diseases: a cineradiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W L; Schultz, J C

    1986-01-01

    Using cineradiography, we studied esophageal peristalsis in patients with suspected systemic sclerosis and related diseases, and in patients without known esophageal disease who had been referred for upper gastrointestinal series. Patterns of peristaltic abnormality were identified, and specificity and sensitivity values calculated. Esophageal aperistalsis was 100% specific, and consistently weak peristalsis after all, swallows was 88% specific for systemic sclerosis. Specificity decreased to 70% in patients over age 60. Abnormal peristalsis after some, but not all, swallows had only 52% specificity. Consistently abnormal peristalsis (absent or diminished) was 67% sensitive for scleroderma. Although a high sensitivity value (87%) for cineradiography can be obtained by considering any peristaltic abnormality as a sign of scleroderma, this is achieved at the price of an undesirably high number of false positives (specificity 40%).

  7. Analysis of five chronic inflammatory diseases identifies 27 new associations and highlights disease-specific patterns at shared loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinghaus, David; Jostins, Luke; Spain, Sarah L; Cortes, Adrian; Bethune, Jörn; Han, Buhm; Park, Yu Rang; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Pouget, Jennie G; Hübenthal, Matthias; Folseraas, Trine; Wang, Yunpeng; Esko, Tonu; Metspalu, Andres; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Pers, Tune H; Weersma, Rinse K; Collij, Valerie; D'Amato, Mauro; Halfvarson, Jonas; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Lieb, Wolfgang; Degenhardt, Franziska; Forstner, Andreas J; Hofmann, Andrea; Schreiber, Stefan; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Brunak, Søren; Dale, Anders M; Trembath, Richard C; Weidinger, Stephan; Weichenthal, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Elder, James T; Barker, Jonathan NWN; Andreassen, Ole A; McGovern, Dermot P; Karlsen, Tom H; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Parkes, Miles; Brown, Matthew A; Franke, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We simultaneously investigated the genetic landscape of ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis to investigate pleiotropy and the relationship between these clinically related diseases. Using high-density genotype data from more than 86,000 individuals of European-ancestry we identified 244 independent multi-disease signals including 27 novel genome-wide significant susceptibility loci and 3 unreported shared risk loci. Complex pleiotropy was supported when contrasting multi-disease signals with expression data sets from human, rat and mouse, and epigenetic and expressed enhancer profiles. The comorbidities among the five immune diseases were best explained by biological pleiotropy rather than heterogeneity (a subgroup of cases that is genetically identical to another disease, possibly due to diagnostic misclassification, molecular subtypes, or excessive comorbidity). In particular, the strong comorbidity between primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease is likely the result of a unique disease, which is genetically distinct from classical inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes. PMID:26974007

  8. Time Series Modeling of Pathogen-Specific Disease Probabilities with Subsampled Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Leigh; Wakefield, Jon; Bauer, Cici; Self, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Many diseases arise due to exposure to one of multiple possible pathogens. We consider the situation in which disease counts are available over time from a study region, along with a measure of clinical disease severity, for example, mild or severe. In addition, we suppose a subset of the cases are lab tested in order to determine the pathogen responsible for disease. In such a context, we focus interest on modeling the probabilities of disease incidence given pathogen type....

  9. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Bo Wang; Xiaoqing Zhang; Xue-Jun Li

    2013-01-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease.Here,we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene,survival motor neuron (SMN),in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons.Notably,the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated.Furthermore,these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-A7 (lacking exon 7)knockdown,and were specific to spinal motor neurons.Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes,including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss.Finally,knockdown of SMNFL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors.The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine,a potent antioxidant,which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death.Thus,we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model,which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity,cell type specificity,and phenotype reversibility.Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  10. Multimorbidity as specific disease combinations, an important predictor factor for mortality in octogenarians: the Octabaix study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Assumpta; Formiga, Francesc; Sanz, Héctor; Almeda, Jesús; Padrós, Glòria

    2017-01-01

    Background The population is aging and multimorbidity is becoming a common problem in the elderly. Objective To explore the effect of multimorbidity patterns on mortality for all causes at 3- and 5-year follow-up periods. Materials and methods A prospective community-based cohort (2009–2014) embedded within a randomized clinical trial was conducted in seven primary health care centers, including 328 subjects aged 85 years at baseline. Sociodemographic variables, sensory status, cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidity, and geriatric tests were analyzed. Multimorbidity patterns were defined as combinations of two or three of 16 specific chronic conditions in the same individual. Results Of the total sample, the median and interquartile range value of conditions was 4 (3–5). The individual morbidities significantly associated with death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3; 4.7), atrial fibrillation (AF; HR: 2.41; 95% CI: 1.3; 4.3), and malignancy (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0; 3.6) at 3-year follow-up; whereas dementia (HR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.3; 3.2), malignancy (HR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.2; 2.8), and COPD (HR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.1; 2.8) were the most associated with mortality at 5-year follow-up, after adjusting using Barthel functional index (BI). The two multimorbidity patterns most associated with death were AF, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and visual impairment (HR: 4.19; 95% CI: 2.2; 8.2) at 3-year follow-up as well as hypertension, CKD, and malignancy (HR: 3.24; 95% CI: 1.8; 5.8) at 5 years, after adjusting using BI. Conclusion Multimorbidity as specific combinations of chronic conditions showed an effect on mortality, which would be higher than the risk attributable to individual morbidities. The most important predicting pattern for mortality was the combination of AF, CKD, and visual impairment after 3 years. These findings suggest that a new approach is required to target multimorbidity in

  11. A comprehensive visual rating scale of brain magnetic resonance imaging: application in elderly subjects with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment, and normal cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Park, So Young; Park, Young Ho; Baek, Min Jae; Lim, Jae-Sung; Youn, Young Chul; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows cerebral structural changes. However, a unified comprehensive visual rating scale (CVRS) has seldom been studied. Thus, we combined brain atrophy and small vessel disease scales and used an MRI template as a CVRS. The aims of this study were to design a simple and reliable CVRS, validate it by investigating cerebral structural changes in clinical groups, and made comparison to the volumetric measurements. Elderly subjects (n = 260) with normal cognition (NC, n = 65), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 101), or Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 94) were evaluated with brain MRI according to the CVRS of brain atrophy and small vessel disease. Validation of the CVRS with structural changes, neuropsychological tests, and volumetric analyses was performed. The CVRS revealed a high intra-rater and inter-rater agreement and it reflected the structural changes of subjects with NC, MCI, and AD better than volumetric measures (CVRS-coronal: F = 13.5, p brain. It reflected cerebral structural changes of clinical groups and correlated with the age better than volumetric measures.

  12. Specific autoantibody profiles and disease subgroups correlate with circulating micro-RNA in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttge, Dirk M; Carlsen, Anting Liu; Teku, Gabriel; Steen, Samantha O; Wildt, Marie; Vihinen, Mauno; Hesselstrand, Roger; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the expression profiles of cell-free plasma miRNAs in SSc and to characterize their correlation with disease subgroups (lcSSc and dcSSc) and with autoantibody profiles. Using quantitative RT-PCR, the abundance of 45 mature miRNAs in plasma was determined in 95 patients (lcSSc = 63; dcSSc = 32), representing the following autoantibody subgroups: ACA, anti-DNA topoisomerase I, anti-RNA polymerase III and anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein. MiRNA data were correlated with clinical and paraclinical data. Multiple regression was used to model membership of the lcSSc, dcSSc and autoantibody subgroups, based on miRNA expression profiles. Thirty-six miRNAs were measurable in all samples. Four (miRNA-223, -181b, -342-3p and -184) were differently expressed in lcSSc and dcSSc (false discovery rate < 0.05). Ten miRNAs exhibited statistically significantly different levels in one or more autoantibody groups, and five (miRNA-409, -184, -92a, -29a and -101) remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Multiple regression models accurately predicted ACA and anti-DNA topoisomerase I antibody-positive patients (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.97 and 0.93, respectively) as well as membership of the dcSSc and lcSSc groups (AUC = 0.88). Circulating miRNA profiles differ between lcSSc and dcSSc patients and between patients with different autoantibodies. This is the first time autoantibody profiles, disease phenotypes and plasma miRNA profiles have been shown to correlate in an autoimmune disease. The data support a pathobiological role of miRNAs because specific miRNAs associate with autoantibody profiles of known diagnostic and prognostic value. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Comprehensive clinical evaluation of a large Spanish family with Anderson-Fabry disease, novel GLA mutation and severe cardiac phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román-Monserrat, Irene; Moreno-Flores, Victoria; López-Cuenca, David; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Elena; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Beatriz; Alegría-Fernández, Marisol; Poza-Cisneros, Gabriela; Piñero-Fernández, Juan A; Sornichero-Martínez, Javier; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R

    2014-06-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked multisystemic lysosomal-storage condition. We describe a large family with a novel GLA mutation: p.M187R/g7219 T>G. Anamnesis/physical-exam, blood/urine analysis, α-Gal-A activity and/or genetic study of at-risk individuals and multidisciplinary evaluation in confirmed cases. 4 males and 13 heterozygous-females displayed the mutation. Cardiac/renal/neurological disease was diagnosed at a mean age of 41/29/39 years in males and 51/56/46 years in females. Onset mean age was 20 years versus 42 years. 9/15 had cardiomyopathy. Delta wave suggestive of accessory pathway was identified in 1 male and 2 females. 1 female had cardiac arrest (ventricular fibrillation, 61 years). 2 females and 1 male died suddenly (63, 64 and 57 years). Cardiac-subscore of Mainz Severity-Score-Index was severe for males and females over 40 years. 4/15(26%) developed early renal disease. 2 males needed dialysis. 1 male died at 69 years in spite of kidney-heart transplant. We describe the largest genetically confirmed Spanish family using multidisciplinary evaluation and MSSI calculation. The novel mutation p.M187R/g7219 T>G is associated with a particularly malignant cardiac phenotype in males and females over 40 years. Severity was higher than that of the largest Spanish FOS-cohort. Short-PR with delta is being reported for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Discovery of temporal and disease association patterns in condition-specific hospital utilization rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimovich, Julian S.; Venkatesh, Arjun K.; Coppi, Andreas; Li, Shu-Xia; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying temporal variation in hospitalization rates may provide insights about disease patterns and thereby inform research, policy, and clinical care. However, the majority of medical conditions have not been studied for their potential seasonal variation. The objective of this study was to apply a data-driven approach to characterize temporal variation in condition-specific hospitalizations. Using a dataset of 34 million inpatient discharges gathered from hospitals in New York State from 2008–2011, we grouped all discharges into 263 clinical conditions based on the principal discharge diagnosis using Clinical Classification Software in order to mitigate the limitation that administrative claims data reflect clinical conditions to varying specificity. After applying Seasonal-Trend Decomposition by LOESS, we estimated the periodicity of the seasonal component using spectral analysis and applied harmonic regression to calculate the amplitude and phase of the condition’s seasonal utilization pattern. We also introduced four new indices of temporal variation: mean oscillation width, seasonal coefficient, trend coefficient, and linearity of the trend. Finally, K-means clustering was used to group conditions across these four indices to identify common temporal variation patterns. Of all 263 clinical conditions considered, 164 demonstrated statistically significant seasonality. Notably, we identified conditions for which seasonal variation has not been previously described such as ovarian cancer, tuberculosis, and schizophrenia. Clustering analysis yielded three distinct groups of conditions based on multiple measures of seasonal variation. Our study was limited to New York State and results may not directly apply to other regions with distinct climates and health burden. A substantial proportion of medical conditions, larger than previously described, exhibit seasonal variation in hospital utilization. Moreover, the application of clustering tools yields groups

  15. Apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer disease: Genotype-specific risks by age and sex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickeboeller, H. [INSERM, Paris (France)]|[IMSE, Munich (Germany); Babron, M.C.; Clerget-Darpoux, F. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The distribution of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes as a function of age and sex has been examined in a French population of 417 Alzheimer disease (AD) patients and 1,030 control subjects. When compared to the APOE {epsilon}3 allele, an increased risk associated with the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (odds ratio [OR] [{epsilon}4] = 2.7 with 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0-3.6; P < .001) and a protective effect of the APOE {epsilon}2 allele (OR[{epsilon}2] = 0.5 with 95% CI = 0.3-0.98; P = .012) were retrieved. An effect of the {epsilon}4 allele dosage on susceptibility was confirmed (OR[{epsilon}4/{epsilon}4] vs. the {epsilon}3/{epsilon}3 genotype = 11.2 [95% CI = 4.0-31.6]; OR[{epsilon}3/{epsilon}4] vs. the {epsilon}3/{epsilon}3 genotype = 2.2 [95% Cl = 1.5-3.5]). The frequency of the {epsilon}4 allele was lower in male cases than in female cases, but, since a similar difference was found in controls, this does not lead to a difference in OR between sex. ORs for the {epsilon}4 allele versus the {epsilon}3 allele, OR({epsilon}4), were not equal in all age classes: OR({epsilon}4) in the extreme groups with onset at < 60 years or > 79 years were significantly lower than those from the age groups 60-79 years. In {epsilon}3/{epsilon}4 individuals, sex-specific lifetime risk estimates by age 85 years (i.e., sex-specific penetrances by age 85 years) were 0.14 (95% CI 0.04-0.30) for men and 0.17 (95% CI 0.09-0.28) for women. 53 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Frequency-specific Alterations of Large-scale Functional Brain Networks in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Qin; Ya-Peng Li; Shun Zhang; Ying Xiong; Lin-Ying Guo; Shi-Qi Yang; Yi-Hao Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background:Previous studies have indicated that the cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be due to topological deteriorations of the brain network.However,whether the selection of a specific frequency band could impact the topological properties is still not clear.Our hypothesis is that the topological properties of AD patients are also frequency-specific.Methods:Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from l0 right-handed moderate AD patients (mean age:64.3 years; mean mini mental state examination [MMSE]:18.0) and 10 age and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age:63.6 years; mean MMSE:28.2) were enrolled in this study.The global efficiency,the clustering coefficient (CC),the characteristic path length (CpL),and "small-world" property were calculated in a wide range of thresholds and averaged within each group,at three different frequency bands (0.01-0.06 Hz,0.06-0.11 Hz,and 0.11-0.25 Hz).Results:At lower-frequency bands (0.01-0.06 Hz,0.06-0.11 Hz),the global efficiency,the CC and the "small-world" properties of AD patients decreased compared to controls.While at higher-frequency bands (0.11-0.25 Hz),the CpL was much longer,and the "small-world" property was disrupted in AD,particularly at a higher threshold.The topological properties changed with different frequency bands,suggesting the existence of disrupted global and local functional organization associated with AD.Conclusions:This study demonstrates that the topological alterations of large-scale functional brain networks inAD patients are frequency dependent,thus providing fundamental support for optimal frequency selection in future related research.

  17. Tract-specific atrophy in focal epilepsy: Disease, genetics, or seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David N; Raffelt, David; Curwood, Evan; Tsai, Meng-Han; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Connelly, Alan; Jackson, Graeme D

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether genetics, underlying pathology, or repeated seizures contribute to atrophy in specific white matter tracts. Medically refractory unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS-TLE, n = 26) was studied as an archetype of focal epilepsy, using fixel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging. A genetic effect was assessed in first-degree relatives of HS-TLE subjects who did not have epilepsy themselves (HS-1°Rel; n = 26). The role of disease process was uncovered by comparing HS-TLE to unilateral TLE with normal clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-neg TLE; n = 26, matched for seizure severity). The effect of focal seizures was inferred from lateralized atrophy common to both HS-TLE and MRI-neg TLE, in comparison to healthy controls (n = 76). HS-1 °Rel had bilaterally small hippocampi, but no focal white matter atrophy was detected, indicating a limited effect of genetics. HS-TLE subjects had lateralized atrophy of most temporal lobe tracts, and hippocampal volumes in HS-TLE correlated with parahippocampal cingulum and anterior commissure atrophy, indicating an effect of the underlying pathology. Ipsilateral atrophy of the tapetum, uncinate, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus was found in both HS-TLE and MRI-neg TLE, suggesting a common lateralized effect of focal seizures. Both epilepsy groups had bilateral atrophy of the dorsal cingulum and corpus callosum fibers, which we interpret as a consequence of bilateral insults (potentially generalized seizures and/or medications). Underlying pathology, repeated focal seizures, and global insults each contribute to atrophy in specific tracts. Genetic factors make less of a contribution in this cohort. A multifactorial model of white matter atrophy in focal epilepsy is proposed. Ann Neurol 2017;81:240-250. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  18. Serotype Specific Invasive Capacity and Persistent Reduction in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Inci; Hanage, William P.; Lipsitch, Marc; Shea, Kimberly M.; Stevenson, Abbie; Finkelstein, Jonathan; Huang, Susan S.; Lee, Grace M.; Kleinman, Ken; Pelton, SI

    2011-01-01

    Defining the propensity of Streptoccocus pneumoniae (SP) serotypes to invade sterile body sites following nasopharyngeal (NP) acquisition has the potential to inform about how much invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) may occur in a typical population with a given distribution of carriage serotypes. Data from enhanced surveillance for IPD in Massachusetts children ≤7 years in 2003/04, 2006/07 and 2008/09 seasons and surveillance of SP NP carriage during the corresponding respiratory seasons in 16 Massachusetts communities in 2003/04 and 8 of the 16 communities in both 2006/07 and 2008/09 were used to compute a serotype specific “invasive capacity (IC)” by dividing the incidence of IPD due to serotype x by the carriage prevalence of that same serotype in children of the same age. A total of 206 IPD and 806 NP isolates of SP were collected during the study period. An approximate 50-fold variation in the point estimates between the serotypes having the highest (18C, 33F, 7F, 19A, 3 and 22F) and lowest (6C, 23A, 35F, 11A, 35B, 19F, 15A, and 15BC) IC was observed. Point estimates of IC for most of the common serotypes currently colonizing children in Massachusetts were low and likely explain the continued reduction in IPD from the pre-PCV era in the absence of specific protection against these serotypes. Invasive capacity differs among serotypes and as new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are introduced, ongoing surveillance will be essential to monitor whether serotypes with high invasive capacity emerge (e.g. 33F, 22F) as successful colonizers resulting in increased IPD incidence due to replacement serotypes. PMID:21029807

  19. HY-Specific Induced Regulatory T Cells Display High Specificity and Efficacy in the Prevention of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Heinrichs, Jessica; Haarberg, Kelley; Semple, Kenrick; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Liu, Chen; Anasetti, Claudio; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Naturally derived regulatory T cells (nTregs) may prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) while preserving graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. However, clinical application of nTregs has been severely hampered by their scarce availability and non-selectivity. To overcome these limitations, we took alternative approaches to generate Ag-specific induced Tregs (iTregs) and tested their efficacy and selectivity in the prevention of GVHD in pre-clinical models of bone marrow transplantation (BM...

  20. Novel MLPA procedure using self-designed probes allows comprehensive analysis for CNVs of the genes involved in Hirschsprung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antiñolo Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hirschsprung disease is characterized by the absence of intramural ganglion cells in the enteric plexuses, due to a fail during enteric nervous system formation. Hirschsprung has a complex genetic aetiology and mutations in several genes have been related to the disease. There is a clear predominance of missense/nonsense mutations in these genes whereas copy number variations (CNVs have been seldom described, probably due to the limitations of conventional techniques usually employed for mutational analysis. In this study, we have looked for CNVs in some of the genes related to Hirschsprung (EDNRB, GFRA1, NRTN and PHOX2B using the Multiple Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA approach. Methods CNVs screening was performed in 208 HSCR patients using a self-designed set of MLPA probes, covering the coding region of those genes. Results A deletion comprising the first 4 exons in GFRA1 gene was detected in 2 sporadic HSCR patients and in silico approaches have shown that the critical translation initiation signal in the mutant gene was abolished. In this study, we have been able to validate the reliability of this technique for CNVs screening in HSCR. Conclusions The implemented MLPA based technique presented here allows CNV analysis of genes involved in HSCR that have not been not previously evaluated. Our results indicate that CNVs could be implicated in the pathogenesis of HSCR, although they seem to be an uncommon molecular cause of HSCR.

  1. Current Development in Elderly Comprehensive Assessment and Research Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantong Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA is a core and an essential part of the comprehensive care of the aging population. CGA uses specific tools to summarize elderly status in several domains that may influence the general health and outcomes of diseases of elderly patients, including assessment of medical, physical, psychological, mental, nutritional, cognitive, social, economic, and environmental status. Here, in this paper, we review different assessment tools used in elderly patients with chronic diseases. The development of comprehensive assessment tools and single assessment tools specially used in a dimension of CGA was discussed. CGA provides substantial insight into the comprehensive management of elderly patients. Developing concise and effective assessment instruments is helpful to carry out CGA widely to create a higher clinical value.

  2. [Oral cavity microflora in patients with non-specific ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrakova, O A; Muliar, E A; Voropaeva, E A; Babin, V N; Dubinin, A V; Briko, N I

    2009-01-01

    Results of study of microecological disorders in oral cavity of patients with non-specific ulcerative colitis (NSUC) and Crohn's disease (CD) and control subjects (patients with hypertension). Condition of mucosa was assessed on the basis of morphological data and electrophoretic mobility of cell nuclei, whereas structure of microbiocenosis and metabolic activity of microflora--on the basis of saliva bacterial culture and contents and profile of volatile fat acids in it. Detection rate of negative charge of the cell nuclei (decrease of functional activity of epithelium) was significantly higher in patients with NSUC and CD (66.6%) compared with controls (10%). This fact was directly related with hypercolonization of oral cavity by Gram-negative microflora. Lesions of mucosa which are characteristic of NSUC and CD and determined by pathologic immune mechanisms correlated with quantity of pathogenic microflora (Staphylococcus aureus and Candida). Marked differences of chromatograms' patterns were observed in patients with NSUC and CD indicating the suppression of anaerobic microflora in patients with CD and hypercolonization of oral cavity by anaerobic microflora in majority of patients with NSUC.

  3. Subtype and regional-specific neuroinflammation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc eLlorens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study identifies deregulated cytokines and mediators of the immune response in the frontal cortex and cerebellum of sCJD MM1 and VV2 subtypes compared to age-matched controls. Deregulated genes include pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors, colony stimulating factors, cathepsins, members of the complement system, and members of the integrin and CTL/CTLD family with particular regional and sCJD subtype patterns. Analysis of cytokines and mediators at protein level shows expression of selected molecules and receptors in neurons and/or in astrocytes and/or in microglia thus suggesting interactions between neurons and glial cells, mainly microglia, in the neuroinflammatory response in sCJD. Similar inflammatory responses have been shown in the tg340 sCJD MM1 mice, revealing a progressive deregulation of inflammatory mediators with disease progression. Yet inflammatory molecules involved are subjected to species differences in humans and mice. Moreover, inflammatory-related cell signalling pathways NFκB/IKK and JAK/STAT are activated in sCJD and sCJD MM1 mice. Together, the present observations show a self-sustained complex inflammatory and inflammatory-related responses occurring already at early clinical stages in animal model and dramatically progressing at advanced stages of sCJD. Considering this scenario, measures tailored to modulate (activate or inhibit specific molecules could be therapeutic options in CJD.

  4. Multimorbidity as specific disease combinations, an important predictor factor for mortality in octogenarians: the Octabaix study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrer A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Assumpta Ferrer,1 Francesc Formiga,2,3 Héctor Sanz,4 Jesús Almeda,5,6 Glòria Padrós7 On behalf of the Octabaix Study Group 1Primary Healthcare Department, Centre ‘El Plà’, DAP Metropolitana Sud ICS, 2Geriatric Unit, Internal Medicine Service, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L´Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, 3Bellvitge Biomedical Research Department Institute, IDIBELL, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, 4ISGlobal, Barcelona Ctr Int Health Res (CRESIB, Hospital Clínic – Barcelona University, 5Support Unit Research for Primary Care, Primary Health Care Department of Costa Ponent, IDIAP, ICS, 6CIBER Department of Epidemiology Service (CIBERESP, 7Clinical Laboratory Department, L´Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain Background: The population is aging and multimorbidity is becoming a common problem in the elderly.Objective: To explore the effect of multimorbidity patterns on mortality for all causes at 3- and 5-year follow-up periods.Materials and methods: A prospective community-based cohort (2009–2014 embedded within a randomized clinical trial was conducted in seven primary health care centers, including 328 subjects aged 85 years at baseline. Sociodemographic variables, sensory status, cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidity, and geriatric tests were analyzed. Multimorbidity patterns were defined as combinations of two or three of 16 specific chronic conditions in the same individual.Results: Of the total sample, the median and interquartile range value of conditions was 4 (3–5. The individual morbidities significantly associated with death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3; 4.7, atrial fibrillation (AF; HR: 2.41; 95% CI: 1.3; 4.3, and malignancy (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0; 3.6 at 3-year follow-up; whereas dementia (HR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.3; 3.2, malignancy (HR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.2; 2.8, and COPD (HR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.1; 2.8 were the most associated with

  5. Comprehensive behavioral and molecular characterization of a new knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease: zQ175.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana B Menalled

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive and psychiatric manifestations. Since the mutation responsible for the disease was identified as an unstable expansion of CAG repeats in the gene encoding the huntingtin protein in 1993, numerous mouse models of HD have been generated to study disease pathogenesis and evaluate potential therapeutic approaches. Of these, knock-in models best mimic the human condition from a genetic perspective since they express the mutation in the appropriate genetic and protein context. Behaviorally, however, while some abnormal phenotypes have been detected in knock-in mouse models, a model with an earlier and more robust phenotype than the existing models is required. We describe here for the first time a new mouse line, the zQ175 knock-in mouse, derived from a spontaneous expansion of the CAG copy number in our CAG 140 knock-in colony [1]. Given the inverse relationship typically observed between age of HD onset and length of CAG repeat, since this new mouse line carries a significantly higher CAG repeat length it was expected to be more significantly impaired than the parent line. Using a battery of behavioral tests we evaluated both heterozygous and homozygous zQ175 mice. Homozygous mice showed motor and grip strength abnormalities with an early onset (8 and 4 weeks of age, respectively, which were followed by deficits in rotarod and climbing activity at 30 weeks of age and by cognitive deficits at around 1 year of age. Of particular interest for translational work, we also found clear behavioral deficits in heterozygous mice from around 4.5 months of age, especially in the dark phase of the diurnal cycle. Decreased body weight was observed in both heterozygotes and homozygotes, along with significantly reduced survival in the homozygotes. In addition, we detected an early and significant decrease of striatal gene markers from 12 weeks of age

  6. Demonstration of Aleutian disease virus-specific lymphocyte response in mink with progressive Aleutian disease: comparison of sapphire and pastel mink infected with different virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, R E; Bloom, M E; Coe, J E

    1983-09-01

    Lymphocyte blastogenesis was used to study the antiviral lymphocyte response of sapphire (Aleutian) and pastel (nonAleutian) mink inoculated with Pullman or Utah 1 Aleutian disease virus (ADV). Both mink genotypes developed a virus-specific response when inoculated with Utah 1 ADV. In contrast, after inoculation of Pullman ADV, sapphire mink had a positive virus-specific response, whereas pastel mink did not. Response occurred late after infection (8 wk) and correlated with the development of progressive Aleutian disease (AD). The response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and concanavalin A (Con A) was also determined. Most mink of either genotype, inoculated with either virus strain, maintained an anti-KLH response during disease. Most mink also responded to Con A, although some exhibited suppressed Con A response late in the disease course. These results indicated that mink develop an anti-ADV lymphocyte response during progressive AD and are not immunosuppressed with regard to other antigens or mitogens.

  7. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Stordal, Ketil; Hansen, Tine Plato

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  8. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacopino, A.M.; Christakos, S. (Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin{center dot}mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Using classification models for the generation of disease-specific medications from biomedical literature and clinical data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqin; Haug, Peter J; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2017-05-01

    Mining disease-specific associations from existing knowledge resources can be useful for building disease-specific ontologies and supporting knowledge-based applications. Many association mining techniques have been exploited. However, the challenge remains when those extracted associations contained much noise. It is unreliable to determine the relevance of the association by simply setting up arbitrary cut-off points on multiple scores of relevance; and it would be expensive to ask human experts to manually review a large number of associations. We propose that machine-learning-based classification can be used to separate the signal from the noise, and to provide a feasible approach to create and maintain disease-specific vocabularies. We initially focused on disease-medication associations for the purpose of simplicity. For a disease of interest, we extracted potentially treatment-related drug concepts from biomedical literature citations and from a local clinical data repository. Each concept was associated with multiple measures of relevance (i.e., features) such as frequency of occurrence. For the machine purpose of learning, we formed nine datasets for three diseases with each disease having two single-source datasets and one from the combination of previous two datasets. All the datasets were labeled using existing reference standards. Thereafter, we conducted two experiments: (1) to test if adding features from the clinical data repository would improve the performance of classification achieved using features from the biomedical literature only, and (2) to determine if classifier(s) trained with known medication-disease data sets would be generalizable to new disease(s). Simple logistic regression and LogitBoost were two classifiers identified as the preferred models separately for the biomedical-literature datasets and combined datasets. The performance of the classification using combined features provided significant improvement beyond that using

  10. Electroencephalography-driven approach to prodromal Alzheimer's disease diagnosis: from biomarker integration to network-level comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretti DV

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Davide Vito Moretti Rehabilitation in Alzheimer’s Disease Operative Unit, IRCCS San Giovanni di Dio, Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy Abstract: Decay of the temporoparietal cortex is associated with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Additionally, shrinkage of the temporoparietal cerebral area has been connected with an increase in α3/α2 electroencephalogram (EEG power ratio in prodromal AD. Furthermore, a lower regional blood perfusion has been exhibited in patients with a higher α3/α2 proportion when contrasted with low α3/α2 proportion. Furthermore, a lower regional blood perfusion and reduced hippocampal volume has been exhibited in patients with higher α3/α2 when contrasted with lower α3/α2 EEG power ratio. Neuropsychological evaluation, EEG recording, and magnetic resonance imaging were conducted in 74 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Estimation of cortical thickness and α3/α2 frequency power ratio was conducted for each patient. A subgroup of 27 patients also underwent single-photon emission computed tomography evaluation. In view of α3/α2 power ratio, the patients were divided into three groups. The connections among cortical decay, cerebral perfusion, and memory loss were evaluated by Pearson’s r coefficient. Results demonstrated that higher α3/α2 frequency power ratio group was identified with brain shrinkage and cutdown perfusion inside the temporoparietal projections. In addition, decay and cutdown perfusion rate were connected with memory shortfalls in patients with MCI. MCI subgroup with higher α3/α2 EEG power ratio are at a greater risk to develop AD dementia. Keywords: prodromal AD, EEG, SPECT, MRI, alpha rhythm, hippocampal atrophy

  11. Generation of healthy mice from gene-corrected disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Wu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the murine model of tyrosinemia type 1 (fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase [FAH] deficiency; FAH⁻/⁻ mice as a paradigm for orphan disorders, such as hereditary metabolic liver diseases, we evaluated fibroblast-derived FAH⁻/⁻-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells as targets for gene correction in combination with the tetraploid embryo complementation method. First, after characterizing the FAH⁻/⁻ iPS cell lines, we aggregated FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cells with tetraploid embryos and obtained entirely FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cell-derived mice that were viable and exhibited the phenotype of the founding FAH⁻/⁻ mice. Then, we transduced FAH cDNA into the FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cells using a third-generation lentiviral vector to generate gene-corrected iPS cells. We could not detect any chromosomal alterations in these cells by high-resolution array CGH analysis, and after their aggregation with tetraploid embryos, we obtained fully iPS cell-derived healthy mice with an astonishing high efficiency for full-term development of up to 63.3%. The gene correction was validated functionally by the long-term survival and expansion of FAH-positive cells of these mice after withdrawal of the rescuing drug NTBC (2-(2-nitro-4-fluoromethylbenzoyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that both a liver-specific promoter (transthyretin, TTR-driven FAH transgene and a strong viral promoter (from spleen focus-forming virus, SFFV-driven FAH transgene rescued the FAH-deficiency phenotypes in the mice derived from the respective gene-corrected iPS cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that a lentiviral gene repair strategy does not abrogate the full pluripotent potential of fibroblast-derived iPS cells, and genetic manipulation of iPS cells in combination with tetraploid embryo aggregation provides a practical and rapid approach to evaluate the efficacy of gene correction of human diseases in mouse models.

  12. Differentiation of five strains of infectious bursal disease virus: Development of a strain-specific multiplex PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, M.; Kabell, Susanne; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a major cause of disease problems in the poultry industry and vaccination has therefore been applied intensively to control the infection. The classical methods of detection and characterization of IBDV are by the use of immunodiffusion test and histopath......Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a major cause of disease problems in the poultry industry and vaccination has therefore been applied intensively to control the infection. The classical methods of detection and characterization of IBDV are by the use of immunodiffusion test...... and histopathology. Since these methods are laborious and have low specificity alternatives are needed. In the present study, we report the development of a strain-specific multiplex RT-PCR technique, which can detect and differentiate between field strains of IBDV and vaccine virus strains including a so-called hot...

  13. Disease-specific health-related quality of life instruments for IgE-mediated food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvilla, S A; Dubois, A E J; Flokstra-de Blok, B M J

    2014-01-01

    This is one of seven interlinked systematic reviews undertaken on behalf of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology as part of their Guidelines for Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis, which focuses on instruments developed for IgE-mediated food allergy. Disease-specific questionnaires...... are significantly more sensitive than generic ones in measuring the response to interventions or future treatments, as well as estimating the general burden of food allergy. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to identify which disease-specific, validated instruments can be employed to enable assessment....... From the 17 eligible studies, we identified seven disease-specific HRQL instruments, which were then subjected to detailed quality appraisal. This revealed that these instruments have undergone formal development and validation processes, and have robust psychometric properties, and therefore provide...

  14. Effect of autoimmune diseases on risk and survival in histology-specific lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-12-01

    Patients with autoimmune diseases are at an increased risk of cancer due to underlying dysregulation of the immune system or treatment. Data on cancer incidence, mortality and survival after autoimmune diseases would provide further information on the clinical implications. We systematically analysed data on lung cancer in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent incident lung cancers or lung cancer deaths up to 2008 in patients hospitalised for autoimmune disease after 1964. Increased risks of lung cancer were recorded for SIRs after 12 autoimmune diseases, SMRs after 11 autoimmune diseases and HRs after two autoimmune diseases. The highest SIRs and SMRs, respectively, were seen after discoid lupus erythematosus (4.71 and 4.80), polymyosistis/dermatomyositis (4.20 and 4.17), systemic lupus erythematosus (2.47 and 2.69), rheumatic fever (2.07 and 2.07) and systemic sclerosis (2.19 and 1.98). Autoimmune disease did not influence survival overall but some autoimmune diseases appeared to impair survival in small cell carcinoma. All autoimmune diseases that had an SIR >2.0 are known to present with lung manifestations, suggesting that the autoimmune process contributes to lung cancer susceptibility. The data on survival are reassuring that autoimmune diseases do not influence prognosis in lung cancer.

  15. Electroencephalography-driven approach to prodromal Alzheimer's disease diagnosis: from biomarker integration to network-level comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Davide Vito

    2016-01-01

    Decay of the temporoparietal cortex is associated with prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additionally, shrinkage of the temporoparietal cerebral area has been connected with an increase in α3/α2 electroencephalogram (EEG) power ratio in prodromal AD. Furthermore, a lower regional blood perfusion has been exhibited in patients with a higher α3/α2 proportion when contrasted with low α3/α2 proportion. Furthermore, a lower regional blood perfusion and reduced hippocampal volume has been exhibited in patients with higher α3/α2 when contrasted with lower α3/α2 EEG power ratio. Neuropsychological evaluation, EEG recording, and magnetic resonance imaging were conducted in 74 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Estimation of cortical thickness and α3/α2 frequency power ratio was conducted for each patient. A subgroup of 27 patients also underwent single-photon emission computed tomography evaluation. In view of α3/α2 power ratio, the patients were divided into three groups. The connections among cortical decay, cerebral perfusion, and memory loss were evaluated by Pearson's r coefficient. Results demonstrated that higher α3/α2 frequency power ratio group was identified with brain shrinkage and cutdown perfusion inside the temporoparietal projections. In addition, decay and cutdown perfusion rate were connected with memory shortfalls in patients with MCI. MCI subgroup with higher α3/α2 EEG power ratio are at a greater risk to develop AD dementia.

  16. Electroencephalography-driven approach to prodromal Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis: from biomarker integration to network-level comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Davide Vito

    2016-01-01

    Decay of the temporoparietal cortex is associated with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Additionally, shrinkage of the temporoparietal cerebral area has been connected with an increase in α3/α2 electroencephalogram (EEG) power ratio in prodromal AD. Furthermore, a lower regional blood perfusion has been exhibited in patients with a higher α3/α2 proportion when contrasted with low α3/α2 proportion. Furthermore, a lower regional blood perfusion and reduced hippocampal volume has been exhibited in patients with higher α3/α2 when contrasted with lower α3/α2 EEG power ratio. Neuropsychological evaluation, EEG recording, and magnetic resonance imaging were conducted in 74 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Estimation of cortical thickness and α3/α2 frequency power ratio was conducted for each patient. A subgroup of 27 patients also underwent single-photon emission computed tomography evaluation. In view of α3/α2 power ratio, the patients were divided into three groups. The connections among cortical decay, cerebral perfusion, and memory loss were evaluated by Pearson’s r coefficient. Results demonstrated that higher α3/α2 frequency power ratio group was identified with brain shrinkage and cutdown perfusion inside the temporoparietal projections. In addition, decay and cutdown perfusion rate were connected with memory shortfalls in patients with MCI. MCI subgroup with higher α3/α2 EEG power ratio are at a greater risk to develop AD dementia. PMID:27462146

  17. Metabolic therapy in the comprehensive treatment of patients with comorbidity of chronic pancreatitis and stable coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Babinets

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic therapy is one of the few ways to restore normal functions of all the vital organs and systems. The goal of the research was to explore the effectiveness of a course of treatment using metabolic drug Vazonat (meldonium dihydrate to correct prooxidant-antioxidant and trophological disorders in patients with comorbid course of chronic pancreatitis (CP and stable coronary artery disease (SCAD. The study included 90 patients with CP in combination with SCAD, who were divided into two groups (depending on the treatment program: I group (45 patients received conventional treatment (CT; group II (45 patients in addition to CT received Vazonat as follows: 5 ml intravenous bolus injection 1 time a day for 10 days followed by administration of 1 capsule (250 mg, 2 times per day for one month. It has been shown that the addition of Vazonat to the treatment of patients with comorbidity of CP and SCAD is more conducive to improving the performance and trophological prooxidant-antioxidant status than the standard basic therapy.

  18. Effect of a Comprehensive Health Care Program by Korean Medicine Doctors on Medical Care Utilization for Common Infectious Diseases in Child-Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the role of traditional medicine in community health improvement increases, a comprehensive health care program for infectious diseases management in child-care centers by Korean medicine doctors was developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the program intervention on infection-related medical care utilization among children. The study used a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group, comparing pre- and post-intervention data of the same children. The program implemented interventions in terms of management, education, and medical examination for the teachers, parents, and children in 12-week period. The frequency of utilization, cost, and prescription days of drugs and antibiotics due to infectious diseases prior to the intervention were compared with those during the 3-month intervention, using health insurance claim data. A panel analysis was also conducted to support the findings. A significant reduction (12% in infection-related visit days of hospitals was observed with the intervention (incident rate ratio = 0.88, P=0.01. And medical cost, drug prescription days, and antibiotics prescription days were decreased, although not statistically significant. A further cost-effectiveness analysis in terms of social perspectives, considering the opportunity costs for guardians to take children to medical institutions, would be needed.

  19. Health-related quality of life in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD): a report from the comprehensive sickle cell centers clinical trial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Carlton; LeBeau, Petra; Rhee, Seungshin; Lieff, Susan; Kesler, Karen; Ballas, Samir; Rogers, Zora; Wang, Winfred

    2011-02-01

    Adults with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) experience multiple disease-related complications, but few studies have examined relationships between these events and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). We determined the number and type of previous or co-occurring SCD-related complications and their reported HRQOL in a cohort of 1,046 adults from the Comprehensive Sickle Cell Centers (CSCC). Participants had a median age of 28.0 years (48% male, 73% SS or Sβ⁰ thalassemia) and had experienced several SCD-related complications (mean 3.8 ± 2.0), which were influenced by age, gender, and hemoglobinopathy type (P < 0.0001). In multivariate models, increasing age reduced all SF-36 scales scores (P < 0.05) except mental health, while female gender additionally diminished physical function and vitality scale scores (P < 0.01). Of possible complications, only vaso-occlusive crisis, asthma, or avascular necrosis diminished SF-36 scale scores. Chronic antidepressants usage predominantly diminished scores on bodily pain, vitality, social functioning, emotional role, and mental health scales, whereas chronic opioid usage diminished all scale scores (P < 0.01). Our study documents substantial impairment of HRQOL in adults with SCD that was influenced by only a few of many possible medical complications. It suggests that more effective treatments of persistent pain and depression would provide the largest HRQOL benefit.

  20. A Disease-Specific Hybrid Rotation Increases Opportunities for Deliberate Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Mackenzie R; Graff-Baker, Amanda N; Moren, Alexis M; Brown, Sarah; Fair, Kelly A; Kiraly, Laszlo N; De La Melena, Violeta Tammy; Pommier, SuEllen J; Deveney, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating deliberate practice (DP) into residency curricula may optimize education. DP includes educationally protected time, continuous expert feedback, and a focus on a limited number of technical skills. It is strongly associated with mastery level learning. Determine if a multidisciplinary breast rotation (MDB) increases DP opportunities. Beginning in 2010, interns completed the 4-week MDB. Three days a week were spent in surgery and surgical clinic. Half-days were in breast radiology, pathology, medical oncology, and didactics. The MDB was retrospectively compared with a traditional community rotation (TCR) and a university surgical oncology service (USOS) using rotation feedback and resident operative volume. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon; an academic tertiary care general surgery residency program. General surgery residents at Oregon Health and Science University participating in either the MDB, TCR or USOS. A total of 31 interns rated the opportunity to perform procedures significantly higher for MDB than TCR or USOS (4.6 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.9 and 4.1 ± 1.0, p rotation or USOS. The MDB incorporates multidisciplinary care into a unique, disease-specific, and educationally focused rotation. It is highly rated and affords a greater opportunity for DP than either the USOS or TCR. DP is strongly associated with mastery learning and this novel rotation structure could maximize intern education in the era of limited work hours. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reinforcement learning and dopamine in schizophrenia: dimensions of symptoms or specific features of a disease group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz eDeserno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in reinforcement learning are a key finding in schizophrenia and have been proposed to be linked to elevated levels of dopamine neurotransmission. Behavioral deficits in reinforcement learning and their neural correlates may contribute to the formation of clinical characteristics of schizophrenia. The ability to form predictions about future outcomes is fundamental for environmental interactions and depends on neuronal teaching signals, like reward prediction errors. While aberrant prediction errors, that encode non-salient events as surprising, have been proposed to contribute to the formation of positive symptoms, a failure to build neural representations of decision values may result in negative symptoms. Here, we review behavioral and neuroimaging research in schizophrenia and focus on studies that implemented reinforcement learning models. In addition, we discuss studies that combined reinforcement learning with measures of dopamine. Thereby, we suggest how reinforcement learning abnormalities in schizophrenia may contribute to the formation of psychotic symptoms and may interact with cognitive deficits. These ideas point towards an interplay of more rigid versus flexible control over reinforcement learning. Pronounced deficits in the flexible or model-based domain may allow for a detailed characterization of well-established cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients based on computational models of learning. Finally, we propose a framework based on the potentially crucial contribution of dopamine to dysfunctional reinforcement learning on the level of neural networks. Future research may strongly benefit from computational modeling but also requires further methodological improvement for clinical group studies. These research tools may help to improve our understanding of disease-specific mechanisms and may help to identify clinically relevant subgroups of the heterogeneous entity schizophrenia.

  2. Reinforcement learning and dopamine in schizophrenia: dimensions of symptoms or specific features of a disease group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Lorenz; Boehme, Rebecca; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2013-12-23

    Abnormalities in reinforcement learning are a key finding in schizophrenia and have been proposed to be linked to elevated levels of dopamine neurotransmission. Behavioral deficits in reinforcement learning and their neural correlates may contribute to the formation of clinical characteristics of schizophrenia. The ability to form predictions about future outcomes is fundamental for environmental interactions and depends on neuronal teaching signals, like reward prediction errors. While aberrant prediction errors, that encode non-salient events as surprising, have been proposed to contribute to the formation of positive symptoms, a failure to build neural representations of decision values may result in negative symptoms. Here, we review behavioral and neuroimaging research in schizophrenia and focus on studies that implemented reinforcement learning models. In addition, we discuss studies that combined reinforcement learning with measures of dopamine. Thereby, we suggest how reinforcement learning abnormalities in schizophrenia may contribute to the formation of psychotic symptoms and may interact with cognitive deficits. These ideas point toward an interplay of more rigid versus flexible control over reinforcement learning. Pronounced deficits in the flexible or model-based domain may allow for a detailed characterization of well-established cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients based on computational models of learning. Finally, we propose a framework based on the potentially crucial contribution of dopamine to dysfunctional reinforcement learning on the level of neural networks. Future research may strongly benefit from computational modeling but also requires further methodological improvement for clinical group studies. These research tools may help to improve our understanding of disease-specific mechanisms and may help to identify clinically relevant subgroups of the heterogeneous entity schizophrenia.

  3. Specific systemic lupus erythematosus disease manifestations in the six months prior to conception are associated with similar disease manifestations during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, S K; Massarotti, E; Guan, H; Fine, A; Bermas, B L; Costenbader, K H

    2015-10-01

    Past studies have focused on aggregate lupus disease activity during pregnancy and have produced conflicting results. Our study evaluated lupus activity based on involvement of five specific organ systems during the six months prior to conception and during pregnancy. We assessed 147 pregnancies among 113 women followed at Brigham and Women's Lupus Center, 1990-2013. Organ-specific activity included hematologic disorder, nephritis, skin disease, arthritis, and serositis. We hypothesized that the presence of organ-specific activity six months prior to conception would increase the risk for that same type of activity during pregnancy. Our study population was 68% white; 100% had a positive ANA and 30% had a history of nephritis. Among women with organ-specific lupus activity during the six months before conception, the crude odds for the same type of activity during pregnancy was 7.7- to 32.5-fold higher compared to women without that type of activity immediately before conception. An adjusted logistic regression model also indicated significantly higher odds of organ-specific activity during pregnancy if that type of activity were present six months before conception. Approaching lupus based on specific organ systems may be a useful way for women and their physicians to consider the potential risk for disease activity during pregnancy.

  4. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Imaizumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P and dorsoventral (D-V axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Alzheimer’s disease (AD by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs.

  5. The Colorectal cancer disease-specific transcriptome may facilitate the discovery of more biologically and clinically relevant information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proutski Vitali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, there are no clinically reliable predictive markers of response to the current treatment regimens for advanced colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to compare and assess the power of transcriptional profiling using a generic microarray and a disease-specific transcriptome-based microarray. We also examined the biological and clinical relevance of the disease-specific transcriptome. Methods DNA microarray profiling was carried out on isogenic sensitive and 5-FU-resistant HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines using the Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus2.0 array and the Almac Diagnostics Colorectal cancer disease specific Research tool. In addition, DNA microarray profiling was also carried out on pre-treatment metastatic colorectal cancer biopsies using the colorectal cancer disease specific Research tool. The two microarray platforms were compared based on detection of probesets and biological information. Results The results demonstrated that the disease-specific transcriptome-based microarray was able to out-perform the generic genomic-based microarray on a number of levels including detection of transcripts and pathway analysis. In addition, the disease-specific microarray contains a high percentage of antisense transcripts and further analysis demonstrated that a number of these exist in sense:antisense pairs. Comparison between cell line models and metastatic CRC patient biopsies further demonstrated that a number of the identified sense:antisense pairs were also detected in CRC patient biopsies, suggesting potential clinical relevance. Conclusions Analysis from our in vitro and clinical experiments has demonstrated that many transcripts exist in sense:antisense pairs including IGF2BP2, which may have a direct regulatory function in the context of colorectal cancer. While the functional relevance of the antisense transcripts has been established by many studies, their functional role is currently unclear

  6. Glia Open Access Database (GOAD): A comprehensive gene expression encyclopedia of glia cells in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtman, Inge R; Noback, Michiel; Bijlsma, Marieke; Duong, Kim N; van der Geest, Marije A; Ketelaars, Peer T; Brouwer, Nieske; Vainchtein, Ilia D; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2015-09-01

    Recently, the number of genome-wide transcriptome profiles of pure populations of glia cells has drastically increased, resulting in an unprecedented amount of data that offer opportunities to study glia phenotypes and functions in health and disease. To make genome-wide transcriptome data easily accessible, we developed the Glia Open Access Database (GOAD), available via www.goad.education. GOAD contains a collection of previously published and unpublished transcriptome data, including datasets from isolated microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes both at homeostatic and pathological conditions. It contains an intuitive web-based interface that consists of three features that enable searching, browsing, analyzing, and downloading of the data. The first feature is differential gene expression (DE) analysis that provides genes that are significantly up and down-regulated with the associated fold changes and p-values between two conditions of interest. In addition, an interactive Venn diagram is generated to illustrate the overlap and differences between several DE gene lists. The second feature is quantitative gene expression (QE) analysis, to investigate which genes are expressed in a particular glial cell type and to what degree. The third feature is a search utility, which can be used to find a gene of interest and depict its expression in all available expression data sets by generating a gene card. In addition, quality guidelines and relevant concepts for transcriptome analysis are discussed. Finally, GOAD is discussed in relation to several online transcriptome tools developed in neuroscience and immunology. In conclusion, GOAD is a unique platform to facilitate integration of bioinformatics in glia biology.

  7. [Western blot technique standardization for specific diagnosis of Chagas disease using excretory-secretory antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Hermes; Jara, César; Davelois, Kelly; Iglesias, Miguel; Benites, Adderly; Espinoza, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of Western Blot for the specific diagnosis of Chagas disease using excretory-secretory antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. Antigens were obtained after twenty hours of incubation in Eagle’s Minimum Essential Medium, which were prepared at a protein concentration of 0.2 ug/uL to be faced with 10 mL pool of serum from patients with Chagas disease and a conjugated anti-IgG labeled with peroxidase. The presence of the following antigens was observed: 10, 12, 14, 15, 19, 20, 23, 26, 30, 33, 36, 40, 42, 46, 58, 63, 69, 91, 100, and 112 kDa; of which antigens of 10, 12, 14, 15, 19, 20, 23, and 26 kDa were considered to be specific using pools of serum from patients with other parasitosis and serum from people with no parasites. The sensitivity of the technique was assessed using individual serum from 65 patients with Chagas disease; and the specificity with serum from 40 patients with other parasitosis, and serums from five people who did not have parasites. The technique has a sensitivity of 95.4% in the detection of one to eight specific bands, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 93.7%. Western Blot technique with excretory-secretory antigens of T. cruzi epimastigotes is effective in the diagnosis of Chagas disease in Peru; therefore, it can be used as a confirmatory test.

  8. Imaging of community-acquired pneumonia: Roles of imaging examinations, imaging diagnosis of specific pathogens and discrimination from noninfectious diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi; Nambu; Katsura; Ozawa; Noriko; Kobayashi; Masao; Tago

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews roles of imaging examinations in the management of community-acquired pneumonia(CAP), imaging diagnosis of specific CAP and discrimination between CAP and noninfectious diseases. Chest radiography is usually enough to confirm the diagnosis of CAP, whereas computed tomography is required to suggest specific pathogens and to discriminate from noninfectious diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and some cases of viral pneumonia sometimes show specific imaging findings. Peribronchial nodules, especially tree-in-bud appearance, are fairly specific for infection. Evidences of organization, such as concavity of the opacities, traction bronchiectasis, visualization of air bronchograms over the entire length of the bronchi, or mild parenchymal distortion are suggestive of organizing pneumonia. We will introduce tips to effectively make use of imaging examinations in the management of CAP.

  9. Commensal Bacteroides species induce colitis in host-genotype-specific fashion in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Seth M.; Bijanki, Vinieth N.; Nava, Gerardo M.; Sun, Lulu; Malvin, Nicole P.; Donermeyer, David L.; Dunne, W. Michael; Allen, Paul M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal microbiota is important for induction of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with complex shifts in microbiota composition, but it is unclear whether specific bacterial subsets induce IBD and, if so, whether their proportions in the microbiota are altered during disease. Here we fulfilled Koch’s postulates in host-genotype-specific fashion using a mouse model of IBD with human-relevant disease-susceptibility mutations. From screening experiments we isolated common commensal Bacteroides species, introduced them into antibiotic-pretreated mice, and quantitatively re-isolated them in culture. The bacteria colonized IBD-susceptible and non-susceptible mice equivalently, but induced disease exclusively in susceptible animals. Conversely, commensal Enterobacteriaceae were >100-fold enriched during spontaneous disease but an Enterobacteriaceae isolate failed to induce disease in antibiotic-pretreated mice despite robust colonization. We thus demonstrate that IBD-associated microbiota alterations do not necessarily reflect underlying disease etiology. These findings establish important experimental criteria and a conceptual framework for understanding microbial contributions to IBD. PMID:21575910

  10. The burden of disease of dental anxiety: generic and disease-specific quality of life in patients with and without extreme levels of dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaire, J.H.; Houtem, C.M. van; Ross, J.N.; Schuller, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare disease-specific (oral health-related) quality of life (OHRQoL), assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), and generic (health-related) quality of life (HRQoL), assessed using the EuroQol5D (EQ-5D-5L), in patients with severe dental anxiety (who

  11. The burden of disease of dental anxiety : generic and disease-specific quality of life in patients with and without extreme levels of dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaire, J. H.; van Houtem, C. M. H. H.; Ross, J. N.; Schuller, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare disease-specific (oral health-related) quality of life (OHRQoL), assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), and generic (health-related) quality of life (HRQoL), assessed using the EuroQol5D (EQ-5D-5L), in patients with severe dental anxiety (who

  12. 综合心理治疗对冠心病疗效的影响%Effect of Comprehensive Psychotherapy Efficacy for Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐谭; 刘如平; 袁俊强

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究在冠心病治疗中综合心理治疗的影响。方法选取我院在2014年5月~2015年5月收治的冠心病患者80例患者,采用抽签的方式将其分为对照组和观察组,两组患者均采用相同的治疗和护理方法,而观察组在此基础上给予综合心理治疗方式,比较两组患者的治疗效果。结果观察组的治疗总有效率及住院天数均明显优于对照组,且差异明显,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在冠心病治疗中采用综合心理治疗方式可提升治疗效果。%Objective Explore the combined effects of psychotherapy in the treatment of coronary heart disease.Methods Admitted to our hospital during the May 2014 to May 2015 80 patients with coronary heart disease, the use of drawing lots will be divided into a control group and the observation group, patients in both groups with the same treatment and care, and the observation group were comprehensive psychological treatment based on this, the therapeutic effect of two groups were compared.Results Treatment observation group total effective rate and the number of days of hospitalization were significantly better than the control group, and the difference was significant, statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusion In coronary artery disease in an integrated psychological treatment can improve the therapeutic effect.

  13. An Early Look at the Association Between State Medicaid Expansion and Disparities in Cardiovascular Diseases: A Comprehensive Population Health Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christopher K; Zhang, Ning Jackie

    2017-02-13

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases nationally and disproportionately affects low-income individuals. There are substantial disparities on CVD outcomes that stem from the lack of health insurance among low-income populations. The Affordable Care Act expands Medicaid health insurance to low-income populations, and aims to increase the utilization of health, social, and economic preventive services to reduce health disparities and prevent chronic diseases. The authors analyzed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to understand the potential impact of Medicaid expansion on disparities in CVD among low-income populations. Logistic regression models examined the association between CVD self-reported outcomes among low-income adults with incomes at or below 138% of the federal poverty level in states that have chosen to expand Medicaid and those states choosing not to expand, controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, behavioral, social, and health variables that affect CVD. Overall, the results show that adults in Medicaid expansion states have significantly lower odds of experiencing poor heart health compared to those in non-Medicaid expansion states (odds ratio = 0.767, 95% confidence interval 0.667-0.882). Additionally, significant findings were found between the association of CVD and demographic, socioeconomic, health, and health behavioral covariates. Policy makers should consider policies, systems, and interventions that increase access to a comprehensive set of preventive, population health, and socioeconomic services targeting the key determinants of CVD and other outcomes when expanding Medicaid and designing state plans and waivers.

  14. Primary respiratory chain disease causes tissue-specific dysregulation of the global transcriptome and nutrient-sensing signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    Full Text Available Primary mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC diseases are heterogeneous in etiology and manifestations but collectively impair cellular energy metabolism. Mechanism(s by which RC dysfunction causes global cellular sequelae are poorly understood. To identify a common cellular response to RC disease, integrated gene, pathway, and systems biology analyses were performed in human primary RC disease skeletal muscle and fibroblast transcriptomes. Significant changes were evident in muscle across diverse RC complex and genetic etiologies that were consistent with prior reports in other primary RC disease models and involved dysregulation of genes involved in RNA processing, protein translation, transport, and degradation, and muscle structure. Global transcriptional and post-transcriptional dysregulation was also found to occur in a highly tissue-specific fashion. In particular, RC disease muscle had decreased transcription of cytosolic ribosomal proteins suggestive of reduced anabolic processes, increased transcription of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, shorter 5'-UTRs that likely improve translational efficiency, and stabilization of 3'-UTRs containing AU-rich elements. RC disease fibroblasts showed a strikingly similar pattern of global transcriptome dysregulation in a reverse direction. In parallel with these transcriptional effects, RC disease dysregulated the integrated nutrient-sensing signaling network involving FOXO, PPAR, sirtuins, AMPK, and mTORC1, which collectively sense nutrient availability and regulate cellular growth. Altered activities of central nodes in the nutrient-sensing signaling network were validated by phosphokinase immunoblot analysis in RC inhibited cells. Remarkably, treating RC mutant fibroblasts with nicotinic acid to enhance sirtuin and PPAR activity also normalized mTORC1 and AMPK signaling, restored NADH/NAD(+ redox balance, and improved cellular respiratory capacity. These data specifically highlight a common

  15. Primary Respiratory Chain Disease Causes Tissue-Specific Dysregulation of the Global Transcriptome and Nutrient-Sensing Signaling Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Tsukikawa, Mai; Peng, Min; Polyak, Erzsebet; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ostrovsky, Julian; McCormack, Shana; Place, Emily; Clarke, Colleen; Reiner, Gail; McCormick, Elizabeth; Rappaport, Eric; Haas, Richard; Baur, Joseph A.; Falk, Marni J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are heterogeneous in etiology and manifestations but collectively impair cellular energy metabolism. Mechanism(s) by which RC dysfunction causes global cellular sequelae are poorly understood. To identify a common cellular response to RC disease, integrated gene, pat