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Sample records for comprehensive device simulation

  1. Comprehensive device Simulation modeling of heavily irradiated silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; MacEvoy, B; Hall, G; Passeri, D; Petasecca, M; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2004-01-01

    Radiation hardness is a critical design concern for present and future silicon detectors in high energy physics. Tracking systems at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are expected to operate for ten years and to receive fast hadron fluences equivalent to 10/sup 15/cm /sup -2/ 1-MeV neutrons. Recently, low temperature operating conditions have been suggested as a means of suppressing the negative effects of radiation damage on detector charge collection properties. To investigate this effect, simulations have been carried out using the ISE-TCAD DESSIS device simulator. The so-called "three-level model" has been used. A comprehensive analysis of the influence of the V/sub 2/, C/sub i/O/sub i/ and V/sub 2/O capture cross sections on the effective doping concentration (N/sub eff/) as a function of temperature and fluence has been carried out. The capture cross sections have been varied in the range 10/sup -18/-10/sup -12/ cm/sup 2/. The simulated results are compared with charge collection spectra obtained wit...

  2. Simulation of semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriato, D.

    2001-09-01

    In this thesis a drift diffusion model coupled with self-consistent solutions of Poisson's and Schroedinger's equations, is developed and used to investigate the operation of Gunn diodes and GaN-based LEDs. The model also includes parameters derived from Monte Carlo calculations of the simulated devices. In this way the characteristics of a Monte Carlo approach and of a quantum solver are built into a fast and flexible drift-diffusion model that can be used for testing a large number of heterostructure designs in a time-effective way. The full model and its numerical implementation are described in chapter 2. In chapter 3 the theory of Gunn diodes is presented. A basic model of the dynamics of domain formation and domain transport is described with particular regard to accumulation and dipole domains. Several modes of operation of the Gunn device are described, varying from the resonance mode to the quenched mode. Details about transferred electron devices and negative differential resistance in semiconductor materials are given. In chapter 4 results from the simulation of a simple conventional gunn device confirm the importance of the doping condition at the cathode. Accumulation or dipole domains are achieved respectively with high and low doping densities. The limits of a conventional Gunn diode are explained and solved by introducing the heterostructure Gunn diode. This new design consists of a conventional GaAs transit region coupled with an electron launcher at the cathode, made using an AIGaAs heterostructure step. Simulations show the importance of the insertion of a thin highly-doped layer between the transit region and the electron launcher in order to improve device operation. Chapter 5 is an introduction to Ill-nitrides, in particular GaN and its alloy ln-GaN. We outline the discrepancy in the elastic and piezoelectric parameters found in the literature. Strain, dislocations and piezoelectricity are presented as the main features of a InGaN/GaN system

  3. Plant simulators using gateway devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    One of the most difficult tasks in building a full-scope power plant simulator is modelling the plant process computer. For reasons of cost, it is usually not feasible to include a duplicate process computer within the simulator, although this would provide the highest degree of realism. The recent introduction of gateway devices by several process control manufacturers changes the cost picture considerably. These gateways are capable of emulating Input/Output multiplexers and controllers at significantly less cost. Simulators which use these devices can provide the absolute realism of a duplicate process computer without the associated cost burden. This paper discusses the use of gateways in simulators, and examines the case of a simulator now being built which uses this design technique

  4. [Anesthesia simulators and training devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmannsgruber, M; Good, M; Carovano, R; Lampotang, S; Gravenstein, J S

    1993-07-01

    Simulators and training devices are used extensively by educators in 'high-tech' occupations, especially those requiring an understanding of complex systems and co-ordinated psychomotor skills. Because of advances in computer technology, anaesthetised patients can now be realistically simulated. This paper describes several training devices and a simulator currently being employed in the training of anaesthesia personnel at the University of Florida. This Gainesville Anesthesia Simulator (GAS) comprises a patient mannequin, anaesthesia gas machine, and a full set of normally operating monitoring instruments. The patient can spontaneously breathe, has audible heart and breath sounds, and palpable pulses. The mannequin contains a sophisticated lung model that consumes and eliminates gas according to physiological principles. Interconnected computers controlling the physical signs of the mannequin enable the presentation of a multitude of clinical signs. In addition, the anaesthesia machine, which is functionally intact, has hidden fault activators to challenge the user to correct equipment malfunctions. Concealed sensors monitor the users' actions and responses. A robust data acquisition and control system and a user-friendly scripting language for programming simulation scenarios are key features of GAS and make this system applicable for the training of both the beginning resident and the experienced practitioner. GAS enhances clinical education in anaesthesia by providing a non-threatening environment that fosters learning by doing. Exercises with the simulator are supported by sessions on a number of training devices. These present theoretical and practical interactive courses on the anaesthesia machine and on monitors. An extensive system, for example, introduces the student to the physics and clinical application of transoesophageal echocardiography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. 3D TCAD Simulation for Semiconductor Processes, Devices and Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Technology computer-aided design, or TCAD, is critical to today’s semiconductor technology and anybody working in this industry needs to know something about TCAD.  This book is about how to use computer software to manufacture and test virtually semiconductor devices in 3D.  It brings to life the topic of semiconductor device physics, with a hands-on, tutorial approach that de-emphasizes abstract physics and equations and emphasizes real practice and extensive illustrations.  Coverage includes a comprehensive library of devices, representing the state of the art technology, such as SuperJunction LDMOS, GaN LED devices, etc. Provides a vivid, internal view of semiconductor devices, through 3D TCAD simulation; Includes comprehensive coverage of  TCAD simulations for both optic and electronic devices, from nano-scale to high-voltage high-power devices; Presents material in a hands-on, tutorial fashion so that industry practitioners will find maximum utility; Includes a comprehensive library of devices, re...

  6. Medical simulator with injection device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    medical simulator 611 comprises a vessel 609 representing a simulated blood vessel. The vessel comprises a simulated vessel wall capable of being punctured by an electrically conductive injection needle 503. The vessel wall comprises a first electrically conductive layer for closing an electric

  7. Optoelectronic Devices Advanced Simulation and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Piprek, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices transform electrical signals into optical signals and vice versa by utilizing the sophisticated interaction of electrons and light within micro- and nano-scale semiconductor structures. Advanced software tools for design and analysis of such devices have been developed in recent years. However, the large variety of materials, devices, physical mechanisms, and modeling approaches often makes it difficult to select appropriate theoretical models or software packages. This book presents a review of devices and advanced simulation approaches written by leading researchers and software developers. It is intended for scientists and device engineers in optoelectronics, who are interested in using advanced software tools. Each chapter includes the theoretical background as well as practical simulation results that help to better understand internal device physics. The software packages used in the book are available to the public, on a commercial or noncommercial basis, so that the interested r...

  8. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Cheng Hii

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN. The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service.

  9. Special nuclear material simulation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, John H.; DeMint, Amy; Gooch, Jack; Hawk, Todd; Pickett, Chris A.; Blessinger, Chris; York, Robbie L.

    2014-08-12

    An apparatus for simulating special nuclear material is provided. The apparatus typically contains a small quantity of special nuclear material (SNM) in a configuration that simulates a much larger quantity of SNM. Generally the apparatus includes a spherical shell that is formed from an alloy containing a small quantity of highly enriched uranium. Also typically provided is a core of depleted uranium. A spacer, typically aluminum, may be used to separate the depleted uranium from the shell of uranium alloy. A cladding, typically made of titanium, is provided to seal the source. Methods are provided to simulate SNM for testing radiation monitoring portals. Typically the methods use at least one primary SNM spectral line and exclude at least one secondary SNM spectral line.

  10. Simulator scene display evaluation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, R. F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for aligning and calibrating scene displays in an aircraft simulator has a base on which all of the instruments for the aligning and calibrating are mounted. Laser directs beam at double right prism which is attached to pivoting support on base. The pivot point of the prism is located at the design eye point (DEP) of simulator during the aligning and calibrating. The objective lens in the base is movable on a track to follow the laser beam at different angles within the field of vision at the DEP. An eyepiece and a precision diopter are movable into a position behind the prism during the scene evaluation. A photometer or illuminometer is pivotable about the pivot into and out of position behind the eyepiece.

  11. Comprehensive Solar Sail Simulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar sails as a propulsive device have several potential applications: providing access to previously inaccessible orbits, longer mission times, and increased...

  12. Computer simulation of heterogeneous polymer photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodali, Hari K; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2012-01-01

    Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have the potential for widespread usage due to their low cost per watt and mechanical flexibility. Efficiencies close to 9.0% have been achieved recently in conjugated polymer based organic solar cells (OSCs). These devices were fabricated using solvent-based processing of electron-donating and electron-accepting materials into the so-called bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architecture. Experimental evidence suggests that a key property determining the power-conversion efficiency of such devices is the final morphological distribution of the donor and acceptor constituents. In order to understand the role of morphology on device performance, we develop a scalable computational framework that efficiently interrogates OSCs to investigate relationships between the morphology at the nano-scale with the device performance. In this work, we extend the Buxton and Clarke model (2007 Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. 15 13–26) to simulate realistic devices with complex active layer morphologies using a dimensionally independent, scalable, finite-element method. We incorporate all stages involved in current generation, namely (1) exciton generation and diffusion, (2) charge generation and (3) charge transport in a modular fashion. The numerical challenges encountered during interrogation of realistic microstructures are detailed. We compare each stage of the photovoltaic process for two microstructures: a BHJ morphology and an idealized sawtooth morphology. The results are presented for both two- and three-dimensional structures. (paper)

  13. Computer simulation of heterogeneous polymer photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Hari K.; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2012-04-01

    Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have the potential for widespread usage due to their low cost per watt and mechanical flexibility. Efficiencies close to 9.0% have been achieved recently in conjugated polymer based organic solar cells (OSCs). These devices were fabricated using solvent-based processing of electron-donating and electron-accepting materials into the so-called bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architecture. Experimental evidence suggests that a key property determining the power-conversion efficiency of such devices is the final morphological distribution of the donor and acceptor constituents. In order to understand the role of morphology on device performance, we develop a scalable computational framework that efficiently interrogates OSCs to investigate relationships between the morphology at the nano-scale with the device performance. In this work, we extend the Buxton and Clarke model (2007 Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. 15 13-26) to simulate realistic devices with complex active layer morphologies using a dimensionally independent, scalable, finite-element method. We incorporate all stages involved in current generation, namely (1) exciton generation and diffusion, (2) charge generation and (3) charge transport in a modular fashion. The numerical challenges encountered during interrogation of realistic microstructures are detailed. We compare each stage of the photovoltaic process for two microstructures: a BHJ morphology and an idealized sawtooth morphology. The results are presented for both two- and three-dimensional structures.

  14. Framework for utilizing computational devices within simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Mintál

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there exist several frameworks to utilize a computation power of graphics cards and other computational devices such as FPGA, ARM and multi-core processors. The best known are either low-level and need a lot of controlling code or are bounded only to special graphic cards. Furthermore there exist more specialized frameworks, mainly aimed to the mathematic field. Described framework is adjusted to use in a multi-agent simulations. Here it provides an option to accelerate computations when preparing simulation and mainly to accelerate a computation of simulation itself.

  15. Quantum Mechanical Balance Equation Approach to Semiconductor Device Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cui, Long

    1997-01-01

    This research project was focused on the development of a quantum mechanical balance equation based device simulator that can model advanced, compound, submicron devices, under all transport conditions...

  16. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  17. Comprehension of Action Negation Involves Inhibitory Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eForoni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that action language is comprehended by activating the motor system. We report a study, investigating a critical question in this research field: Do negative sentences activate the motor system? Participants were exposed to sentences in the affirmation and negation forms while the zygomatic muscle activity on the left side of the face was continuously measured (Electromyography technique: EMG. Sentences were descriptions of emotional expressions that mapped either directly upon the zygomatic muscle (e.g., ‘I am smiling’ or did not (e.g., ‘I am frowning’. Reading sentences involving the negation of the activity of a specific muscle (zygomatic major - I am not smiling is shown to lead to the inhibition of this muscle. Reading sentences involving the affirmative form instead (I am smiling leads to the activation of zygomatic mucle. In contrast, sentences describing an activity that is irrelevant to the zygomatic muscle (e.g., ‘I am frowning’ or ‘I am not frowning’ produce no muscle activity. These results extend the range of simulation models to negation and by implication to an abstract domain. We discuss how this research contributes to the grounding of abstract and concrete concepts.

  18. Sentence Comprehension as Mental Simulation: An Information-Theoretic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Vigliocco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that the mental representation resulting from sentence comprehension is not (just an abstract symbolic structure but a “mental simulation” of the state-of-affairs described by the sentence. We present a particular formalization of this theory and show how it gives rise to quantifications of the amount of syntactic and semantic information conveyed by each word in a sentence. These information measures predict simulated word-processing times in a dynamic connectionist model of sentence comprehension as mental simulation. A quantitatively similar relation between information content and reading time is known to be present in human reading-time data.

  19. Building Comprehensive Strategies for Obstetric Safety: Simulation Drills and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Naola; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Sara; Daniels, Kay; Arafeh, Julie; Grenon, Veronique; Welle, Dana; Lipman, Steven

    2016-11-01

    As pioneers in the field of patient safety, anesthesiologists are uniquely suited to help develop and implement safety strategies to minimize preventable harm on the labor and delivery unit. Most existing obstetric safety strategies are not comprehensive, lack input from anesthesiologists, are designed with a relatively narrow focus, or lack implementation details to allow customization for different units. This article attempts to address these gaps and build more comprehensive strategies by discussing the available evidence and multidisciplinary authors' local experience with obstetric simulation drills and optimization of team communication.

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of garment assembly line with simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Thomassey, S.; Chen, Y.; Zeng, X.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive evaluation system is established to assess the garment production performance. It is based on performance indicators and supported with the corresponding results obtained by manual calculation or computer simulation. The assembly lines of a typical men’s shirt are taken as the study objects. With the comprehensive evaluation results, garments production arrangement scenarios are better analysed and then the appropriate one is supposed to be put into actual production. This will be a guidance given to companies on quick decision-making and multi-objective optimization of garment production.

  1. COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATION OF TOKAMAK TURBULENCE AT FINITE RELATIVE GYRORADIUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, R.E.; CANDY, J.; ROSENBLUTH, M.N.

    2002-01-01

    OAK B202 COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATION OF TOKAMAK TURBULENCE AT FINITE RELATIVE GYRORADIUS. A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and allow direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite beta, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ*) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization effects which break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in a cyclic flux tube limit which allows only gyroBohm scaling and a noncyclic radial annulus with physical profile variation. The later requires an adaptive source to maintain equilibrium profiles. Simple ITG simulations demonstrate the broken gyroBohm scaling depends on the actual rotational velocity shear rates competing with mode growth rates, direct comprehensive simulations of the DIII-D ρ*-scaled L-mode experiments are presented as a quantitative test of gyrokinetics and the paradigm

  2. Effects of Video Caption Modes on English Listening Comprehension and Vocabulary Acquisition Using Handheld Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of different display modes of video captions on mobile devices, including non-caption, full-caption, and target-word modes, on the English comprehension and vocabulary acquisition of fifth graders. During the one-month experiment, the status of the students' English listening comprehension and vocabulary…

  3. Modelling toolkit for simulation of maglev devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Roche, J.; Badía-Majós, A.

    2017-01-01

    A stand-alone App1 has been developed, focused on obtaining information about relevant engineering properties of magnetic levitation systems. Our modelling toolkit provides real time simulations of 2D magneto-mechanical quantities for superconductor (SC)/permanent magnet structures. The source code is open and may be customised for a variety of configurations. Ultimately, it relies on the variational statement of the critical state model for the superconducting component and has been verified against experimental data for YBaCuO/NdFeB assemblies. On a quantitative basis, the values of the arising forces, induced superconducting currents, as well as a plot of the magnetic field lines are displayed upon selection of an arbitrary trajectory of the magnet in the vicinity of the SC. The stability issues related to the cooling process, as well as the maximum attainable forces for a given material and geometry are immediately observed. Due to the complexity of the problem, a strategy based on cluster computing, database compression, and real-time post-processing on the device has been implemented.

  4. Analysis and simulation of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Selberherr, Siegfried

    1984-01-01

    The invention of semiconductor devices is a fairly recent one, considering classical time scales in human life. The bipolar transistor was announced in 1947, and the MOS transistor, in a practically usable manner, was demonstrated in 1960. From these beginnings the semiconductor device field has grown rapidly. The first integrated circuits, which contained just a few devices, became commercially available in the early 1960s. Immediately thereafter an evolution has taken place so that today, less than 25 years later, the manufacture of integrated circuits with over 400.000 devices per single chip is possible. Coincident with the growth in semiconductor device development, the literature concerning semiconductor device and technology issues has literally exploded. In the last decade about 50.000 papers have been published on these subjects. The advent of so called Very-Large-Scale-Integration (VLSI) has certainly revealed the need for a better understanding of basic device behavior. The miniaturization of the s...

  5. Comprehensive gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak turbulence at finite relative gyroradius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Candy, J.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and allow direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite beta, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ*) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization effects which break gyro Bohm scaling. The code operates in a cyclic flux tube limit which allows only gyro Bohm scaling and a noncylic radial annulus with physical profile variation. The later requires an adaptive source to maintain equilibrium profiles. Simple ITG simulations demonstrate the broken gyro Bohm scaling paradigm of Garbet and Waltz [Phys. Plasmas 3, 1898 (1996)]. Since broken gyro Bohm scaling depends on the actual rotational velocity shear rates competing with mode growth rates, direct comprehensive simulations of the DIII-D ρ*-scaled L-mode experiments are presented as a quantitative test of gyrokinetics and the paradigm. (author)

  6. Towards the development of a comprehensive model of an electronic portal imaging device using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, S.; Kuncic, Z.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This work represents the first stage of an ongoing study to investigate the physical processes occurring within electronic portal imaging devices (EPlDs), including the effects of optical scattering on image quality and dosimetry. The objective of this work was to develop an initial Monte Carlo model of a linear accelerator (Iinac) beam and an EPID. The ability to simulate the radiation transport of both high energy and optical photons in a single Monte Carlo model was tested. Data from the Phase-space database for external beam radiotherapy (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA) was used with the Geant4 toolkit to construct a model of a Siemens Primus linac 6 MY photon source. Dose profiles and percent depth dose (PDD) curves were extracted from simulations of dose in water and compared to experimental measurements. A preliminary EPID model was developed to incorporate both high energy radiation and optical photon transport. Agreement in dose profiles inside the open beam was within 1.6%. Mean agreement in PDD curves beyond depth of dose maximum was within 6.1 % (local percent difference). The radiation transport of both high energy and optical photons were simulated and visualized in the EPID model. Further work is required to experimentally validate the EPID model. The comparison of simulated dose in water with measurements indicates that the IAEA phase-space may represent an accurate model of a linac source. We have demonstrated the feasibility of developing a comprehensive EPID model incorporating both high energy and optical physics in Geant4. (author)

  7. Optical modeling and simulation of thin-film photovoltaic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Krc, Janez

    2013-01-01

    In wafer-based and thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices, the management of light is a crucial aspect of optimization since trapping sunlight in active parts of PV devices is essential for efficient energy conversions. Optical modeling and simulation enable efficient analysis and optimization of the optical situation in optoelectronic and PV devices. Optical Modeling and Simulation of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Devices provides readers with a thorough guide to performing optical modeling and simulations of thin-film solar cells and PV modules. It offers insight on examples of existing optical models

  8. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, R. E; CANDY, J; HINTON, F. L; ESTRADA-MILA, C; KINSEY, J.E

    2004-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ * ) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated

  9. Simulating fiction: individual differences in literature comprehension revealed with FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Annabel D; Willems, Roel M

    2015-01-01

    When we read literary fiction, we are transported to fictional places, and we feel and think along with the characters. Despite the importance of narrative in adult life and during development, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying fiction comprehension are unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how individuals differently employ neural networks important for understanding others' beliefs and intentions (mentalizing), and for sensori-motor simulation while listening to excerpts from literary novels. Localizer tasks were used to localize both the cortical motor network and the mentalizing network in participants after they listened to excerpts from literary novels. Results show that participants who had high activation in anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC; part of the mentalizing network) when listening to mentalizing content of literary fiction, had lower motor cortex activity when they listened to action-related content of the story, and vice versa. This qualifies how people differ in their engagement with fiction: some people are mostly drawn into a story by mentalizing about the thoughts and beliefs of others, whereas others engage in literature by simulating more concrete events such as actions. This study provides on-line neural evidence for the existence of qualitatively different styles of moving into literary worlds, and adds to a growing body of literature showing the potential to study narrative comprehension with neuroimaging methods.

  10. Semiempirical model for nanoscale device simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Petersen, Dan Erik; Smidstrup, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We present a semiempirical model for calculating electron transport in atomic-scale devices. The model is an extension of the extended Hückel method with a self-consistent Hartree potential that models the effect of an external bias and corresponding charge rearrangements in the device. It is also...... possible to include the effect of external gate potentials and continuum dielectric regions in the device. The model is used to study the electron transport through an organic molecule between gold surfaces, and it is demonstrated that the results are in closer agreement with experiments than ab initio...

  11. Device simulation of charge collection and single-event upset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the author reviews the current status of device simulation of ionizing-radiation-induced charge collection and single-event upset (SEU), with an emphasis on significant results of recent years. The author presents an overview of device-modeling techniques applicable to the SEU problem and the unique challenges this task presents to the device modeler. He examines unloaded simulations of radiation-induced charge collection in simple p/n diodes, SEU in dynamic random access memories (DRAM's), and SEU in static random access memories (SRAM's). The author concludes with a few thoughts on future issues likely to confront the SEU device modeler

  12. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, RE; CANDY, J; HINTON, FL; ESTRADA-MILA, C; KINSEY, JE.

    2004-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ * ) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or a globally with physical profile variation. Rohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, plasma pinches and impurity flow, and simulations at fixed flow rather than fixed gradient are illustrated and discussed

  13. The effect of linguistic devices in information presentation messages on comprehension and recall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tietze, M.I.; Winterboer, A.; Moore, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine the effect of linguistic devices on recall and comprehension in information presentation using both recall and eye-tracking data. In addition, the results were validated via an experiment using Amazon's Mechanical Turk micro-task environment.

  14. Advances in comprehensive gyrokinetic simulations of transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F.L.; Estrada-Mila, C.; Kinsey, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ*) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated. (author)

  15. ESCAF - Failure simulation and reliability calculation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laviron, A.; Berard, C.; Quenee, R.

    1979-01-01

    Reliability studies of nuclear power plant safety functions have, up to now, required the use of large computers. As they are of universal use, these big machines are not very well adapted to deal with reliability problems at low cost. ESCAF has been developed to be substituted for large computers in order to save time and money. ESCAF is a small electronic device which can be used in connection with a minicomputer. It allows to perform complex system reliability analysis (qualitative and quantitative) and to study critical element influences such as common cause failures. In this paper, the device is described and its features and abilities are outlined: easy to implement, swift running, low working cost. Its application range concerns all cases when a good reliability is needed

  16. Simulations Results of an Ankle Rehabilitation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Doroftei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ankle structure is one of the most important structures of the human body. Due to its important role in human’s activities, this joint is the most injured part of the lower limb. For a complete recovery of the range of motion, recovery exercises are mandatory. The introduction of robotic physical recovery systems represents a modern alternative to traditional recovery. In this paper we present the development of a new ankle rehabilitation device, that aims to fully recover the range of motion required for daily activities.

  17. Devices using GPS into driving simulators

    OpenAIRE

    ESPIE, S; GANIEUX, D; TOURNIER, N

    2004-01-01

    Cet article présente un nouvel outil utilisant des données SIG pour obtenir une définition analytique des routes afin que la base de données réponde aux besoins des simulateurs de conduite (modèle dynamique du véhicule, simulation de trafic, module sonore, etc.). Le simulateur peut calculer en temps réel les informations GPS simulées (SIL) et les envoyer au calculateur (HIS) qui fonctionne alors comme s'il équipait un véhicule réel sur une vraie route, dans des conditions réelles.

  18. A MODFLOW Infiltration Device Package for Simulating Storm Water Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Jan; Christensen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a MODFLOW Infiltration Device (INFD) Package that can simulate infiltration devices and their two-way interaction with groundwater. The INFD Package relies on a water balance including inflow of storm water, leakage-like seepage through the device faces, overflow, and change in storage. The water balance for the device can be simulated in multiple INFD time steps within a single MODFLOW time step, and infiltration from the device can be routed through the unsaturated zone to the groundwater table. A benchmark test shows that the INFD Package's analytical solution for stage computes exact results for transient behavior. To achieve similar accuracy by the numerical solution of the MODFLOW Surface-Water Routing (SWR1) Process requires many small time steps. Furthermore, the INFD Package includes an improved representation of flow through the INFD sides that results in lower infiltration rates than simulated by SWR1. The INFD Package is also demonstrated in a transient simulation of a hypothetical catchment where two devices interact differently with groundwater. This simulation demonstrates that device and groundwater interaction depends on the thickness of the unsaturated zone because a shallow groundwater table (a likely result from storm water infiltration itself) may occupy retention volume, whereas a thick unsaturated zone may cause a phase shift and a change of amplitude in groundwater table response to a change of infiltration. We thus find that the INFD Package accommodates the simulation of infiltration devices and groundwater in an integrated manner on small as well as large spatial and temporal scales. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  19. Numerical simulation of the Polywell device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, K.H.; Santarius, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Recent ideas concerning inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) of fusion plasmas coupled with recent experimental results have motivated looking at the problem of confinement of these plasmas in both the gridded (pure electrostatic) and magnetically assisted (via confinement of high beta plasmas in a magnetic cusp) configuration. Questions exist as to the nature of the potential well structure and the confinement properties of high beta plasmas in magnetic cusp configurations. This work focuses on the magnetically assisted concept known as the Polywell trademark. Results are reported on the numerical simulation of IEC plasmas aimed at answering some of these questions. In particular the authors focus on two aspects of the Polywell, namely the structure of the magnetic cusp field in the Polywell configuration and the nature of the confinement of a high beta plasma in a magnetic cusp field. The existence of line cusps in the Polywell is still in dispute. A computer code for modeling the magnetic field structure and mod-B surface has been written and results are presented for the Polywell. Another source of controversy is the nature of the confinement of a high beta plasma in a magnetic cusp, and in particular in the polywell. Results from 2-D Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations aimed at answering some of these questions are presented

  20. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  1. Simulating continuous renal replacement therapy: usefulness of a new simulator device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencía, Santiago; López, Manuel; López-Herce, Jesús; Ferrero, Luis; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Simulation allows the training of life-support procedures without patient risk. We analyzed the performance and usefulness of a new device that makes feasible the external control of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) machines in order to realistically generate clinical conditions and problems in simulated patients. A simple mechanical device was designed according to training needs and then hand made. This device permits the control of all monitorable pressures and therefore allows simulation of a range of clinical situations and eventual complications that might occur in real patients. We tested its performance in vitro and then during 16 high-fidelity patient-simulation scenarios included in the program of pediatric CRRT courses. Student and teacher satisfaction was assessed through an anonymous survey. Quick, accurate, real-time monitor of pressure changes, concordant with the usual clinical problems to be simulated (catheter complications, filter coagulation, inadequate CRRT device settings), were easily achieved with the new device. Instructors rated the device as user friendly and well adapted to the reality being simulated. During scenarios, students were not aware of the simulator and considered that simulated clinical conditions were realistic. Our device may be very useful for training healthcare professionals in CRRT management, thus avoiding risk to patients.

  2. Design and Simulation of MEMS Devices using Interval Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugavalli, M; Uma, G; Vasuki, B; Umapathy, M

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of MEMS devices are used to optimize the design, to improve the performance of the device, to reduce time to market, to minimize development time and cost by avoiding unnecessary design cycles and foundry runs. The major design objectives in any device design, is to meet the required functional parameters and the reliability of the device. The functional parameters depend on the geometry of the structure, material properties and process parameters. All model parameters act as input to optimize the functional parameters. The major difficulty the designer faces is the dimensions and properties used in the simulation of the MEMS devices can not be exactly followed during fabrication. In order to overcome this problem, the designer must test the device in simulation for bound of parameters involved in it. The paper demonstrates the use of interval methods to assess the electromechanical behaviour of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) under the presence of manufacturing and process uncertainties. Interval method guides the design of pullin voltage analysis of fixed-fixed beam to achieve a robust and reliable design in a most efficient way. The methods are implemented numerically using Coventorware and analytically using Intlab

  3. Basic simulation models of phase tracking devices using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Tranter, William

    2010-01-01

    The Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), and many of the devices used for frequency and phase tracking, carrier and symbol synchronization, demodulation, and frequency synthesis, are fundamental building blocks in today's complex communications systems. It is therefore essential for both students and practicing communications engineers interested in the design and implementation of modern communication systems to understand and have insight into the behavior of these important and ubiquitous devices. Since the PLL behaves as a nonlinear device (at least during acquisition), computer simulation can be used

  4. Finite element method for simulation of the semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikatanov, L.T.; Kaschiev, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative method for solving the system of nonlinear equations of the drift-diffusion representation for the simulation of the semiconductor devices is worked out. The Petrov-Galerkin method is taken for the discretization of these equations using the bilinear finite elements. It is shown that the numerical scheme is a monotonous one and there are no oscillations of the solutions in the region of p-n transition. The numerical calculations of the simulation of one semiconductor device are presented. 13 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Carbon nanotube and graphene device modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Ki

    The performance of the semiconductors has been improved and the price has gone down for decades. It has been continuously scaled down in size year by year, and now it encounters the fundamental scaling limit. We, therefore, should prepare a new era beyond the conventional semiconductor technologies. One of the most promising devices is possible by carbon nanotube (CNT) or graphene nanoribbon (GNR) in terms of its excellent charge transport properties. Their fundamental material properties and device physics are totally different to those of the conventional devices. In this nano-regime, more sophisticated device modeling and simulation are really needed to elucidate nano-device operation and to save our resources from errors. The numerical simulation works in this dissertation will provide novel view points on the emerging devices. In this dissertation, CNT and GNR devices are numerically studied. The first part of this work is on CNT devices, and a common structure of CNT device has CNT channel, metal source and drain contacts, and gate electrode. We investigate the strain, geometry, and scattering effects on the device performance of CNT field-effect transistors (FETs). It is shown that even a small amount of strain can result in a large effect on the performance of CNTFETs due to the variation of the bandgap and band-structure-limited velocity. A type of strain which produces a larger bandgap results in increased Schottky barrier (SB) height and decreased band-structure-limited velocity, and hence a smaller minimum leakage current, smaller on current, larger maximum achievable Ion/Ioff, and larger intrinsic delay. We also examine geometry effect of partial gate CNTFETs. In the growth process of vertical CNT, underlap between the gate and the bottom electrode is advantageous for transistor operation because it suppresses ambipolar conduction of SBFETs. Both n-type and p-type transistor operations with balanced performance metrics can be achieved on a single

  6. The review of CAD for simulation of microwave devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drach V.E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the article is devoted to a brief review of modern CAD for electromagnetic modeling of microwave devices. Five major CAD systems are described in the article: FEKO, μWave Wizard, Sonnet, AWR Microwave Office, HFSS. The main methods are given for each CAD system used for simulation of microwave structures and the main advantages that distinguish its use.

  7. Device for simulation of integral dose distribution in multifield radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyakov, E K; Voronin, V V; Kolosova, V F; Moskalev, A I; Marova, Yu M; Stavitskii, R V; Yarovoi, V S

    1974-11-15

    Described is a device for simulation of the sum dose distribution at multifield radiation therapy; the device comprises a mechanical unit on which the emission sources and detectors are mounted, an electromechanical scanning equipment, amplifiers, an adder, a position sensor and a recording instrument. The device suggested raises an accuracy of a sick man radiation program elaboration at a remote multifield radiation therapy, permits to estimate the irradiated medium heterogeneity and beam shaper influence on the sum dose distribution and also ensured the information on the sum dose distribution of the relative or absolute units. Additional filters simulating heterogeneity and beam shaping conditions of ionizing radiation may be mounted between the quantum emission sources and detectors, and an amplifier with a variable amplification factor may be placed between the adders and printers. Thus it is possible to obtain a sum dose distribution at static methods of the remote radiation therapy at a high degree of accuracy (up to +-10%).

  8. SIERRA - A 3-D device simulator for reliability modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Jue-Hsien; Arledge, Lawrence A., Jr.; Yang, Ping; Maeda, John T.

    1989-05-01

    SIERRA is a three-dimensional general-purpose semiconductor-device simulation program which serves as a foundation for investigating integrated-circuit (IC) device and reliability issues. This program solves the Poisson and continuity equations in silicon under dc, transient, and small-signal conditions. Executing on a vector/parallel minisupercomputer, SIERRA utilizes a matrix solver which uses an incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioned conjugate gradient square (CGS, BCG) method. The ILU-CGS method provides a good compromise between memory size and convergence rate. The authors have observed a 5x to 7x speedup over standard direct methods in simulations of transient problems containing highly coupled Poisson and continuity equations such as those found in reliability-oriented simulations. The application of SIERRA to parasitic CMOS latchup and dynamic random-access memory single-event-upset studies is described.

  9. A comprehensive model on field-effect pnpn devices (Z2-FET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taur, Yuan; Lacord, Joris; Parihar, Mukta Singh; Wan, Jing; Martinie, Sebastien; Lee, Kyunghwa; Bawedin, Maryline; Barbe, Jean-Charles; Cristoloveanu, Sorin

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive model for field-effect pnpn devices (Z2-FET) is presented. It is based on three current continuity equations coupled to two MOS equations. The model reproduces the characteristic S-shaped I-V curve when the device is driven by a current source. The negative resistance region at intermediate currents occurs as the center junction undergoes a steep transition from reverse to forward bias. Also playing a vital role are the mix and match of the minority carrier diffusion current and the generation recombination current. Physical insights to the key mechanisms at work are gained by regional approximations of the model, from which analytical expressions for the maximum and minimum voltages at the switching points are derived. From 1981 to 2001, he was with the Silicon Technology Department of IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York, where he was Manager of Exploratory Devices and Processes. Areas in which he has worked and published include latchup-free 1-um CMOS, self-aligned TiSi2, 0.5-um CMOS and BiCMOS, shallow trench isolation, 0.25-um CMOS with n+/p + poly gates, SOI, low-temperature CMOS, and 0.1-um CMOS. Since October 2001, he has been a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego. Dr. Yuan Taur was elected a Fellow of the IEEE in 1998. He has served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Electron Device Letters from 1999 to 2011. He authored or co-authored over 200 technical papers and holds 14 U.S. patents. He co-authored a book, ;Fundamentals of Modern VLSI Devices,; published by Cambridge University Press in 1998. The 2nd edition was published in 2009. Dr. Yuan Taur received IEEE Electron Devices Society's J. J. Ebers Award in 2012 ;for contributions to the advancement of several generations of CMOS process technologies.;

  10. Radiological dispersal device outdoor simulation test: Cesium chloride particle characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Don, E-mail: lee.sangdon@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Snyder, Emily G.; Willis, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Fischer, Robert; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Viani, Brian [Simbol Mining Corp., Pleasanton, CA 94566 (United States); Drake, John [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); MacKinney, John [U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Particles were generated from the detonation of simulated radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) using non-radioactive CsCl powder and explosive C4. The physical and chemical properties of the resulting particles were characterized. Two RDD simulation tests were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: one of the simulated RDDs was positioned 1 m above a steel plate and the other was partially buried in soil. Particles were collected with filters at a distance of 150 m from the origin of the RDD device, and particle mass concentrations were monitored to identify the particle plume intensity using real time particle samplers. Particles collected on filters were analyzed via computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (CCSEM/EDX) to determine their size distribution, morphology, and chemical constituents. This analysis showed that particles generated by the detonation of explosives can be associated with other materials (e.g., soil) that are in close proximity to the RDD device and that the morphology and chemical makeup of the particles change depending on the interactions of the RDD device with the surrounding materials.

  11. Radiological dispersal device outdoor simulation test: Cesium chloride particle characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Don; Snyder, Emily G.; Willis, Robert; Fischer, Robert; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Sutton, Mark; Viani, Brian; Drake, John; MacKinney, John

    2010-01-01

    Particles were generated from the detonation of simulated radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) using non-radioactive CsCl powder and explosive C4. The physical and chemical properties of the resulting particles were characterized. Two RDD simulation tests were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: one of the simulated RDDs was positioned 1 m above a steel plate and the other was partially buried in soil. Particles were collected with filters at a distance of 150 m from the origin of the RDD device, and particle mass concentrations were monitored to identify the particle plume intensity using real time particle samplers. Particles collected on filters were analyzed via computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (CCSEM/EDX) to determine their size distribution, morphology, and chemical constituents. This analysis showed that particles generated by the detonation of explosives can be associated with other materials (e.g., soil) that are in close proximity to the RDD device and that the morphology and chemical makeup of the particles change depending on the interactions of the RDD device with the surrounding materials.

  12. Simulator fidelity and training effectiveness: a comprehensive bibliography with selected annotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.L.; Bolton, P.A.; Shikiar, R.; Saari, L.M.

    1984-05-01

    This document contains a comprehensive bibliography on the topic of simulator fidelity and training effectiveness, prepared during the preliminary phases of work on an NRC-sponsored project on the Role of Nuclear Power Plant Simulators in Operator Licensing and Training. Section A of the document is an annotated bibliography consisting of articles and reports with relevance to the psychological aspects of simulator fidelity and the effectiveness of training simulators in a variety of settings, including military. The annotated items are drawn from a more comprehensive bibliography, presented in Section B, listing documents treating the role of simulators in operator training both in the nuclear industry and elsewhere

  13. Plykin type attractor in electronic device simulated in MULTISIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey P.

    2011-12-01

    An electronic device is suggested representing a non-autonomous dynamical system with hyperbolic chaotic attractor of Plykin type in the stroboscopic map, and the results of its simulation with software package NI MULTISIM are considered in comparison with numerical integration of the underlying differential equations. A main practical advantage of electronic devices of this kind is their structural stability that means insensitivity of the chaotic dynamics in respect to variations of functions and parameters of elements constituting the system as well as to interferences and noises.

  14. Accurate characterization of OPVs: Device masking and different solar simulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Søndergaard, Roar R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the prime objects of organic solar cell research has been to improve the power conversion efficiency. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of this property is not straight forward and has led to the recommendation that record devices be tested and certified at a few accredited...... laboratories following rigorous ASTM and IEC standards. This work tries to address some of the issues confronting the standard laboratory in this regard. Solar simulator lamps are investigated for their light field homogeneity and direct versus diffuse components, as well as the correct device area...

  15. Experimental and simulated control of lift using trailing edge devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, A.; Blaylock, M.; van Dam, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Two active aerodynamic load control (AALC) devices coupled with a control algorithm are shown to decrease the change in lift force experienced by an airfoil during a change in freestream velocity. Microtabs are small (1% chord) surfaces deployed perpendicular to an airfoil, while microjets are pneumatic jets with flow perpendicular to the surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge. Both devices are capable of producing a rapid change in an airfoil's lift coefficient. A control algorithm for microtabs has been tested in a wind tunnel using a modified S819 airfoil, and a microjet control algorithm has been simulated for a NACA 0012 airfoil using OVERFLOW. In both cases, the AALC devices have shown the ability to mitigate the changes in lift during a gust.

  16. Experimental and simulated control of lift using trailing edge devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperman, A; Blaylock, M; Van Dam, C P

    2014-01-01

    Two active aerodynamic load control (AALC) devices coupled with a control algorithm are shown to decrease the change in lift force experienced by an airfoil during a change in freestream velocity. Microtabs are small (1% chord) surfaces deployed perpendicular to an airfoil, while microjets are pneumatic jets with flow perpendicular to the surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge. Both devices are capable of producing a rapid change in an airfoil's lift coefficient. A control algorithm for microtabs has been tested in a wind tunnel using a modified S819 airfoil, and a microjet control algorithm has been simulated for a NACA 0012 airfoil using OVERFLOW. In both cases, the AALC devices have shown the ability to mitigate the changes in lift during a gust

  17. Theoretic simulation for CMOS device on total dose radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Baoping; Zhou Heqin; Guo Hongxia; He Chaohui; Zhou Hui; Luo Yinhong; Zhang Fengqi

    2006-01-01

    Total dose effect is simulated for C4007B, CC4007RH and CC4011 devices at different absorbed dose rate by using linear system theory. When irradiation response and dose are linear, total dose radiation and post-irradiation annealing at room temperature are determined for one random by choosing absorbed dose rate, and total dose effect at other absorbed dose rate can be predicted by using linear system theory. The simulating results agree with the experimental results at different absorbed dose rate. (authors)

  18. Mathematical Modelling and Simulation of Electrical Circuits and Semiconductor Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Merten, K; Bulirsch, R

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulation and modelling of electric circuits and semiconductor devices are of primal interest in today's high technology industries. At the Oberwolfach Conference more than forty scientists from around the world, in­ cluding applied mathematicians and electrical engineers from industry and universities, presented new results in this area of growing importance. The contributions to this conference are presented in these proceedings. They include contributions on special topics of current interest in circuit and device simulation, as well as contributions that present an overview of the field. In the semiconductor area special lectures were given on mixed finite element methods and iterative procedures for the solution of large linear systems. For three dimensional models new discretization procedures including software packages were presented. Con­ nections between semiconductor equations and the Boltzmann equation were shown as well as relations to the quantum transport equation. Other issues dis...

  19. Classroom Simulation to Prepare Teachers to Use Evidence-Based Comprehension Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Emily; Alves, Kat D.; Dolenc, Nathan R.; Sebolt, Stephanie; Walton, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    Reading comprehension is an area of weakness for many students, including those with disabilities. Innovative technology methods may play a role in improving teacher readiness to use evidence-based comprehension practices for all students. In this experimental study, researchers examined a classroom simulation (TLE TeachLivE™) to improve…

  20. A multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics method for device simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-07

    Multiscale modeling has become a popular tool for research applying to different areas including materials science, microelectronics, biology, chemistry, etc. In this tutorial review, we describe a newly developed multiscale computational method, incorporating quantum mechanics into electronic device modeling with the electromagnetic environment included through classical electrodynamics. In the quantum mechanics/electromagnetics (QM/EM) method, the regions of the system where active electron scattering processes take place are treated quantum mechanically, while the surroundings are described by Maxwell's equations and a semiclassical drift-diffusion model. The QM model and the EM model are solved, respectively, in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. Potential distributions and current densities at the interface between QM and EM regions are employed as the boundary conditions for the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic simulations, respectively. The method is illustrated in the simulation of several realistic systems. In the case of junctionless field-effect transistors, transfer characteristics are obtained and a good agreement between experiments and simulations is achieved. Optical properties of a tandem photovoltaic cell are studied and the simulations demonstrate that multiple QM regions are coupled through the classical EM model. Finally, the study of a carbon nanotube-based molecular device shows the accuracy and efficiency of the QM/EM method.

  1. Input and output for surgical simulation: devices to measure tissue properties in vivo and a haptic interface for laparoscopy simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottensmeyer, M P; Ben-Ur, E; Salisbury, J K

    2000-01-01

    Current efforts in surgical simulation very often focus on creating realistic graphical feedback, but neglect some or all tactile and force (haptic) feedback that a surgeon would normally receive. Simulations that do include haptic feedback do not typically use real tissue compliance properties, favoring estimates and user feedback to determine realism. When tissue compliance data are used, there are virtually no in vivo property measurements to draw upon. Together with the Center for Innovative Minimally Invasive Therapy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Haptics Group is developing tools to introduce more comprehensive haptic feedback in laparoscopy simulators and to provide biological tissue material property data for our software simulation. The platform for providing haptic feedback is a PHANToM Haptic Interface, produced by SensAble Technologies, Inc. Our devices supplement the PHANToM to provide for grasping and optionally, for the roll axis of the tool. Together with feedback from the PHANToM, which provides the pitch, yaw and thrust axes of a typical laparoscopy tool, we can recreate all of the haptic sensations experienced during laparoscopy. The devices integrate real laparoscopy toolhandles and a compliant torso model to complete the set of visual and tactile sensations. Biological tissues are known to exhibit non-linear mechanical properties, and change their properties dramatically when removed from a living organism. To measure the properties in vivo, two devices are being developed. The first is a small displacement, 1-D indenter. It will measure the linear tissue compliance (stiffness and damping) over a wide range of frequencies. These data will be used as inputs to a finite element or other model. The second device will be able to deflect tissues in 3-D over a larger range, so that the non-linearities due to changes in the tissue geometry will be measured. This will allow us to validate the performance of the model on large tissue

  2. UNIPIC code for simulations of high power microwave devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianguo; Zhang Dianhui; Wang Yue; Qiao Hailiang; Li Xiaoze; Liu Chunliang; Li Yongdong; Wang Hongguang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, UNIPIC code, a new member in the family of fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes for simulations of high power microwave (HPM) generation, is introduced. In the UNIPIC code, the electromagnetic fields are updated using the second-order, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the particles are moved using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The convolutional perfectly matched layer method is used to truncate the open boundaries of HPM devices. To model curved surfaces and avoid the time step reduction in the conformal-path FDTD method, CP weakly conditional-stable FDTD (WCS FDTD) method which combines the WCS FDTD and CP-FDTD methods, is implemented. UNIPIC is two-and-a-half dimensional, is written in the object-oriented C++ language, and can be run on a variety of platforms including WINDOWS, LINUX, and UNIX. Users can use the graphical user's interface to create the geometric structures of the simulated HPM devices, or input the old structures created before. Numerical experiments on some typical HPM devices by using the UNIPIC code are given. The results are compared to those obtained from some well-known PIC codes, which agree well with each other.

  3. UNIPIC code for simulations of high power microwave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianguo; Zhang, Dianhui; Liu, Chunliang; Li, Yongdong; Wang, Yue; Wang, Hongguang; Qiao, Hailiang; Li, Xiaoze

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, UNIPIC code, a new member in the family of fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes for simulations of high power microwave (HPM) generation, is introduced. In the UNIPIC code, the electromagnetic fields are updated using the second-order, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the particles are moved using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The convolutional perfectly matched layer method is used to truncate the open boundaries of HPM devices. To model curved surfaces and avoid the time step reduction in the conformal-path FDTD method, CP weakly conditional-stable FDTD (WCS FDTD) method which combines the WCS FDTD and CP-FDTD methods, is implemented. UNIPIC is two-and-a-half dimensional, is written in the object-oriented C++ language, and can be run on a variety of platforms including WINDOWS, LINUX, and UNIX. Users can use the graphical user's interface to create the geometric structures of the simulated HPM devices, or input the old structures created before. Numerical experiments on some typical HPM devices by using the UNIPIC code are given. The results are compared to those obtained from some well-known PIC codes, which agree well with each other.

  4. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  5. Simulations of backgate sandwich nanowire MOSFETs with improved device performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hengliang; Zhu Huilong; Zhong Jian; Ma Xiaolong; Wei Xing; Zhao Chao; Chen Dapeng; Ye Tianchun

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel backgate sandwich nanowire MOSFET (SNFET), which offers the advantages of ETSOI (dynamic backgate voltage controllability) and nanowire FETs (good short channel effect). A backgate is used for threshold voltage (V t ) control of the SNFET. Compared with a backgate FinFET with a punch-through stop layer (PTSL), the SNFET possesses improved device performance. 3D device simulations indicate that the SNFET has a three times larger overdrive current, a ∼75% smaller off leakage current, and reduced subthreshold swing (SS) and DIBL than those of a backgate FinFET when the nanowire (NW) and the fin are of equal width. A new process flow to fabricate the backgate SNFET is also proposed in this work. Our analytical model suggests that V t control by the backgate can be attributed to the capacitances formed by the frontgate, NW, and backgate. The SNFET devices are compatible with the latest state-of-the-art high-k/metal gate CMOS technology with the unique capability of independent backgate control for nFETs and pFETs, which is promising for sub-22 nm scaling down. (semiconductor devices)

  6. Size Does Matter: Implied Object Size is Mentally Simulated During Language Comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Bjorn B.; Wassenburg, Stephanie I.; Bos, Lisanne T.; Van der Schoot, Menno

    2017-01-01

    Embodied theories of language comprehension propose that readers construct a mental simulation of described objects that contains perceptual characteristics of their real-world referents. The present study is the first to investigate directly whether implied object size is mentally simulated during

  7. Simulating Transient Effects of Pulsed Beams on Beam Intercepting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Herta; Noah Messomo, Etam

    2011-01-01

    The development in the physics community towards higher beam power through the possibilities of particle accelerators lead to challenges for the developers of elements which are exposed to effect of particle beams (beam intercepting devices = BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases - their highly pulsed nature has to be taken into account. The physics requirements are sometimes opposed to the current state of the art. As one possibility of many in combining the different aspects for these ambitious demands, two highly developed computer programs, namely FLUKA and ANSYS AUTODYN, were joined for this dissertation. The former is a widely enhanced Monte-Carlo-code which specializes on the interaction of particles with static matter, while the latter is a versatile explicit code for the simulation of highly dynamic processes. Both computer programs were developed intensively over years and are still continuously enhanced in o...

  8. Motion Simulation of a New Ankle Rehabilitation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Racu (Cazacu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ankle structure holds one of the most important role in the human biomechanics. Due to complexity of everyday activities this joint is the most prone to be injured part of the lower limb. For a complete recovery of the locomotion function, recovery exercises are mandatory. The introduction of robotic physical recovery systems represents a modern alternative to traditional recovery. Based on the 3D virtual model and a previous dimensional synthesis of a new ankle rehabilitation device, its motion simulation is presented in this paper, to prove that it may fully recover the range of motion required for this joint.

  9. Development of quantum device simulator NEMO-VN1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Dinh Sy; Thi Luong, Nguyen; Hoang Minh, Le; Tien Phuc, Tran; Thanh Trung, Pham; Dong, Bui An; Thu Thao, Huynh Lam; Van Le Thanh, Nguyen; Tuan, Thi Tran Anh; Hoang Trung, Huynh; Thi Thanh Nhan, Nguyen; Viet Nga, Dinh

    2009-09-01

    We have developed NEMO-VN1 (NanoElectronic MOdelling), a new modelling tool that simulates a wide variety of quantum devices including Quantum Dot (QD), Resonant Tunneling Diode (RTD), Resonant Tunneling Transistor (RTT), Single Electron Transistor (SET), Molecular FET (MFET), Carbon Nanotube FET (CNTFET), Spin FET (SPINFET). It has a collection of models that allow user to trade off between calculation speed and accuracy. NEMO-VN1 also includes a graphic user interface of Matlab that enables parameter entry, calculation control, intuitive display of calculation results, and in-situ data analysis methods.

  10. Development of quantum device simulator NEMO-VN1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Sy Hien; Nguyen Thi Luong; Le Hoang Minh; Tran Tien Phuc; Pham Thanh Trung; Bui An Dong; Huynh Lam Thu Thao; Nguyen Van Le Thanh; Thi Tran Anh Tuan; Huynh Hoang Trung; Nguyen Thi Thanh Nhan; Dinh Viet Nga

    2009-01-01

    We have developed NEMO-VN1 (NanoElectronic MOdelling), a new modelling tool that simulates a wide variety of quantum devices including Quantum Dot (QD), Resonant Tunneling Diode (RTD), Resonant Tunneling Transistor (RTT), Single Electron Transistor (SET), Molecular FET (MFET), Carbon Nanotube FET (CNTFET), Spin FET (SPINFET). It has a collection of models that allow user to trade off between calculation speed and accuracy. NEMO-VN1 also includes a graphic user interface of Matlab that enables parameter entry, calculation control, intuitive display of calculation results, and in-situ data analysis methods.

  11. Comprehensive support for nuclear decommissioning based on 3D simulation and advanced user interface technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szőke, István; Louka, Michael N.; Bryntesen, Tom-Robert; Edvardsen, Svein-Tore; Bratteli, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing international focus on the need to optimise decommissioning strategies, driven by the anticipation of high costs and major effort for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the coming decades. The goals are to control and mitigate costs and negative impacts on workers, the general public, and the environment. The methods presently employed for many decommissioning tasks do not apply the latest advancements of science and technology. Therefore, there is growing interest in research and development into the adoption of novel techniques for improving safety, reducing costs, and increasing transparency. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the authors' results from investigating how current and emerging technologies can be applied to enhance the international decommissioning strategy, focussing in particular on three-dimensional simulation, virtual reality, advanced user interfaces, mobile and wearable devices, and geographical information systems. Our results demonstrate that emerging technologies have great potential for supporting adoption of new instrumentation, improving data and knowledge management, optimising project plans, briefing and training field operators, and for communication, surveillance, and education in general. (author)

  12. Comprehensive Study of Lanthanum Aluminate High-Dielectric-Constant Gate Oxides for Advanced CMOS Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Suzuki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of the electrical and physical characteristics of Lanthanum Aluminate (LaAlO3 high-dielectric-constant gate oxides for advanced CMOS devices was performed. The most distinctive feature of LaAlO3 as compared with Hf-based high-k materials is the thermal stability at the interface with Si, which suppresses the formation of a low-permittivity Si oxide interfacial layer. Careful selection of the film deposition conditions has enabled successful deposition of an LaAlO3 gate dielectric film with an equivalent oxide thickness (EOT of 0.31 nm. Direct contact with Si has been revealed to cause significant tensile strain to the Si in the interface region. The high stability of the effective work function with respect to the annealing conditions has been demonstrated through comparison with Hf-based dielectrics. It has also been shown that the effective work function can be tuned over a wide range by controlling the La/(La + Al atomic ratio. In addition, gate-first n-MOSFETs with ultrathin EOT that use sulfur-implanted Schottky source/drain technology have been fabricated using a low-temperature process.

  13. Mobile Genome Express (MGE: A comprehensive automatic genetic analyses pipeline with a mobile device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hee Yoon

    Full Text Available The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS technology allows to sequence whole exomes or genome. However, data analysis is still the biggest bottleneck for its wide implementation. Most laboratories still depend on manual procedures for data handling and analyses, which translates into a delay and decreased efficiency in the delivery of NGS results to doctors and patients. Thus, there is high demand for developing an automatic and an easy-to-use NGS data analyses system. We developed comprehensive, automatic genetic analyses controller named Mobile Genome Express (MGE that works in smartphones or other mobile devices. MGE can handle all the steps for genetic analyses, such as: sample information submission, sequencing run quality check from the sequencer, secured data transfer and results review. We sequenced an Actrometrix control DNA containing multiple proven human mutations using a targeted sequencing panel, and the whole analysis was managed by MGE, and its data reviewing program called ELECTRO. All steps were processed automatically except for the final sequencing review procedure with ELECTRO to confirm mutations. The data analysis process was completed within several hours. We confirmed the mutations that we have identified were consistent with our previous results obtained by using multi-step, manual pipelines.

  14. Mobile Genome Express (MGE): A comprehensive automatic genetic analyses pipeline with a mobile device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jun-Hee; Kim, Thomas W; Mendez, Pedro; Jablons, David M; Kim, Il-Jin

    2017-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology allows to sequence whole exomes or genome. However, data analysis is still the biggest bottleneck for its wide implementation. Most laboratories still depend on manual procedures for data handling and analyses, which translates into a delay and decreased efficiency in the delivery of NGS results to doctors and patients. Thus, there is high demand for developing an automatic and an easy-to-use NGS data analyses system. We developed comprehensive, automatic genetic analyses controller named Mobile Genome Express (MGE) that works in smartphones or other mobile devices. MGE can handle all the steps for genetic analyses, such as: sample information submission, sequencing run quality check from the sequencer, secured data transfer and results review. We sequenced an Actrometrix control DNA containing multiple proven human mutations using a targeted sequencing panel, and the whole analysis was managed by MGE, and its data reviewing program called ELECTRO. All steps were processed automatically except for the final sequencing review procedure with ELECTRO to confirm mutations. The data analysis process was completed within several hours. We confirmed the mutations that we have identified were consistent with our previous results obtained by using multi-step, manual pipelines.

  15. Simulation of push-pull inverter using wide bandgap devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-badri, Mustafa; Matin, Mohammed A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of wide bandgap devices (SiC-MOSFET) in the design of a push-pull inverter which provides inexpensive low power dc-ac inverters. The parameters used were 1200V SiC MOSFET(C2M0040120D) made by power company ROHM. This modeling was created using parameters that were provided from a device datasheet. The spice model is provided by this company to study the effect of adding this component on push-pull inverter ordinary circuit and compared results between SiC MOSFET and silicon MOSFET (IRFP260M). The results focused on Vout and Vmos stability as well as on output power and MOSFET power loss because it is a very crucial aspect on DC-AC inverter design. These results are done using the National Instrument simulation program (Multisim 14). It was found that power loss is better in the 12 and 15 vdc inverter. The Vout in the SIC MOSFET circuit shows more stability in the high current low resistance load in comparison to the Silicon MOSFET circuit and this will improve the overall performance of the circuit.

  16. Design and simulation of a microfluidic device for acoustic cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Boodaghi, Miad

    2018-03-01

    Experimental acoustic cell separation methods have been widely used to perform separation for different types of blood cells. However, numerical simulation of acoustic cell separation has not gained enough attention and needs further investigation since by using numerical methods, it is possible to optimize different parameters involved in the design of an acoustic device and calculate particle trajectories in a simple and low cost manner before spending time and effort for fabricating these devices. In this study, we present a comprehensive finite element-based simulation of acoustic separation of platelets, red blood cells and white blood cells, using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAWs). A microfluidic channel with three inlets, including the middle inlet for sheath flow and two symmetrical tilted angle inlets for the cells were used to drive the cells through the channel. Two interdigital transducers were also considered in this device and by implementing an alternating voltage to the transducers, an acoustic field was created which can exert the acoustic radiation force to the cells. Since this force is dependent to the size of the cells, the cells are pushed towards the midline of the channel with different path lines. Particle trajectories for different cells were obtained and compared with a theoretical equation. Two types of separations were observed as a result of varying the amplitude of the acoustic field. In the first mode of separation, white blood cells were sorted out through the middle outlet and in the second mode of separation, platelets were sorted out through the side outlets. Depending on the clinical needs and by using the studied microfluidic device, each of these modes can be applied to separate the desired cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A generalized Poisson solver for first-principles device simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost, E-mail: joost.vandevondele@mat.ethz.ch [Nanoscale Simulations, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Brück, Sascha; Luisier, Mathieu [Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-01-28

    Electronic structure calculations of atomistic systems based on density functional theory involve solving the Poisson equation. In this paper, we present a plane-wave based algorithm for solving the generalized Poisson equation subject to periodic or homogeneous Neumann conditions on the boundaries of the simulation cell and Dirichlet type conditions imposed at arbitrary subdomains. In this way, source, drain, and gate voltages can be imposed across atomistic models of electronic devices. Dirichlet conditions are enforced as constraints in a variational framework giving rise to a saddle point problem. The resulting system of equations is then solved using a stationary iterative method in which the generalized Poisson operator is preconditioned with the standard Laplace operator. The solver can make use of any sufficiently smooth function modelling the dielectric constant, including density dependent dielectric continuum models. For all the boundary conditions, consistent derivatives are available and molecular dynamics simulations can be performed. The convergence behaviour of the scheme is investigated and its capabilities are demonstrated.

  18. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  19. 14 CFR 121.409 - Training courses using airplane simulators and other training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training courses using airplane simulators... Program § 121.409 Training courses using airplane simulators and other training devices. (a) Training courses utilizing airplane simulators and other training devices may be included in the certificate holder...

  20. THE ANALYSIS OF THE COMPREHENSIVE INSURANCE DEMAND FOR TURKEY USING UTILITY THEORY AND SYSTEM SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat KIRKAĞAÇ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the demand for comprehensive insurance is analysed using utility theory and system simulation. A simulation study is performed to assess the behaviour of individuals with different income levels for the demand of comprehensive insurance. Simulation assumptions and input-output variables are determined using the real data set from a Turkish insurance company and the report about the insurance activities in Turkey for year 2014. The effects of income level, expected claim severity and premium level on the demand for insurance are investigated. It is concluded that while an increase in income level and expected claim severity causes an increase in the demand, an increase in premium level causes a decrease in the demand.

  1. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  2. Verification of Gyrokinetic Particle of Turbulent Simulation of Device Size Scaling Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhihong; S. ETHIER; T. S. HAHM; W. M. TANG

    2012-01-01

    Verification and historical perspective are presented on the gyrokinetic particle simulations that discovered the device size scaling of turbulent transport and indentified the geometry model as the source of the long-standing disagreement between gyrokinetic particle and continuum simulations.

  3. Adverse Events Involving Radiation Oncology Medical Devices: Comprehensive Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 1991 to 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael J.; Marshall, Deborah C.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Sanghvi, Parag; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology relies on rapidly evolving technology and highly complex processes. The US Food and Drug Administration collects reports of adverse events related to medical devices. We sought to characterize all events involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration's postmarket surveillance Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology devices. Methods and Materials: MAUDE data on RODs from 1991 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems) and 5 device problem categories (software, mechanical, electrical, user error, and dose delivery impact). Outcomes included whether the device was evaluated by the manufacturer, adverse event type, remedial action, problem code, device age, and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by the Pearson χ"2 test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 4234 ROD and 4,985,698 other device adverse event reports. Adverse event reports increased over time, and events involving RODs peaked in 2011. Most ROD reports involved external beam therapy (50.8%), followed by brachytherapy (24.9%) and treatment planning systems (21.6%). The top problem types were software (30.4%), mechanical (20.9%), and user error (20.4%). RODs differed significantly from other devices in each outcome (P<.001). RODs were more likely to be evaluated by the manufacturer after an event (46.9% vs 33.0%) but less likely to be recalled (10.5% vs 37.9%) (P<.001). Device age and time since 510(k) approval were shorter among RODs (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other devices, RODs may experience adverse events sooner after manufacture and market approval. Close postmarket surveillance, improved

  4. Adverse Events Involving Radiation Oncology Medical Devices: Comprehensive Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 1991 to 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Marshall, Deborah C.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Sanghvi, Parag; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology relies on rapidly evolving technology and highly complex processes. The US Food and Drug Administration collects reports of adverse events related to medical devices. We sought to characterize all events involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration's postmarket surveillance Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology devices. Methods and Materials: MAUDE data on RODs from 1991 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems) and 5 device problem categories (software, mechanical, electrical, user error, and dose delivery impact). Outcomes included whether the device was evaluated by the manufacturer, adverse event type, remedial action, problem code, device age, and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by the Pearson χ{sup 2} test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 4234 ROD and 4,985,698 other device adverse event reports. Adverse event reports increased over time, and events involving RODs peaked in 2011. Most ROD reports involved external beam therapy (50.8%), followed by brachytherapy (24.9%) and treatment planning systems (21.6%). The top problem types were software (30.4%), mechanical (20.9%), and user error (20.4%). RODs differed significantly from other devices in each outcome (P<.001). RODs were more likely to be evaluated by the manufacturer after an event (46.9% vs 33.0%) but less likely to be recalled (10.5% vs 37.9%) (P<.001). Device age and time since 510(k) approval were shorter among RODs (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other devices, RODs may experience adverse events sooner after manufacture and market approval. Close postmarket surveillance

  5. Development of a comprehensive database of scattering environmental conditions and simulation constraints for offshore wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hübler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For the design and optimisation of offshore wind turbines, the knowledge of realistic environmental conditions and utilisation of well-founded simulation constraints is very important, as both influence the structural behaviour and power output in numerical simulations. However, real high-quality data, especially for research purposes, are scarcely available. This is why, in this work, a comprehensive database of 13 environmental conditions at wind turbine locations in the North and Baltic Sea is derived using data of the FINO research platforms. For simulation constraints, like the simulation length and the time of initial simulation transients, well-founded recommendations in the literature are also rare. Nevertheless, it is known that the choice of simulation lengths and times of initial transients fundamentally affects the quality and computing time of simulations. For this reason, studies of convergence for both parameters are conducted to determine adequate values depending on the type of substructure, the wind speed, and the considered loading (fatigue or ultimate. As the main purpose of both the database and the simulation constraints is to compromise realistic data for probabilistic design approaches and to serve as a guidance for further studies in order to enable more realistic and accurate simulations, all results are freely available and easy to apply.

  6. [A comprehensive approach to designing of magnetotherapy techniques based on the Atos device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Semiachkin, G P; Tatarenko, D A

    1995-01-01

    The paper determines how to apply a comprehensive approach to designing magnetic therapeutical techniques based on concomitant exposures to two or more physical factors. It shows the advantages of the running pattern of a magnetic field and photostimuli in terms of optimization of physiotherapeutical exposures. An Atos apparatus with an Amblio-1 attachment is used as an example to demonstrate how to apply the comprehensive approach for ophthalmology.

  7. Comprehensive Simulation Lifecycle Management for High Performance Computing Modeling and Simulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are significant logistical barriers to entry-level high performance computing (HPC) modeling and simulation (M IllinoisRocstar) sets up the infrastructure for...

  8. Virtual worlds are an innovative tool for medical device training in a simulated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vishal; Lee, Henry; Taylor, Dave; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Kinross, James; Darzi, Ara

    2012-01-01

    Medical infusion devices are an integral component within the delivery of healthcare management. The aim of this study was to develop a training simulation in the virtual world of Second Life for the management of adverse events associated with infusion devices. Forty nurses were subsequently recruited to participate within the simulation and assess its feasibility.

  9. 14 CFR 121.407 - Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Approval of airplane... Program § 121.407 Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices. (a) Each airplane simulator and other training device that is used in a training course permitted under § 121.409...

  10. Comprehensive model for predicting perceptual image quality of smart mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Xu, Haisong; Luo, M R; Li, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    An image quality model for smart mobile devices was proposed based on visual assessments of several image quality attributes. A series of psychophysical experiments were carried out on two kinds of smart mobile devices, i.e., smart phones and tablet computers, in which naturalness, colorfulness, brightness, contrast, sharpness, clearness, and overall image quality were visually evaluated under three lighting environments via categorical judgment method for various application types of test images. On the basis of Pearson correlation coefficients and factor analysis, the overall image quality could first be predicted by its two constituent attributes with multiple linear regression functions for different types of images, respectively, and then the mathematical expressions were built to link the constituent image quality attributes with the physical parameters of smart mobile devices and image appearance factors. The procedure and algorithms were applicable to various smart mobile devices, different lighting conditions, and multiple types of images, and performance was verified by the visual data.

  11. Recent Progress of Textile-Based Wearable Electronics: A Comprehensive Review of Materials, Devices, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae Sang; Eom, Jimi; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2018-01-01

    Wearable electronics are emerging as a platform for next-generation, human-friendly, electronic devices. A new class of devices with various functionality and amenability for the human body is essential. These new conceptual devices are likely to be a set of various functional devices such as displays, sensors, batteries, etc., which have quite different working conditions, on or in the human body. In these aspects, electronic textiles seem to be a highly suitable possibility, due to the unique characteristics of textiles such as being light weight and flexible and their inherent warmth and the property to conform. Therefore, e-textiles have evolved into fiber-based electronic apparel or body attachable types in order to foster significant industrialization of the key components with adaptable formats. Although the advances are noteworthy, their electrical performance and device features are still unsatisfactory for consumer level e-textile systems. To solve these issues, innovative structural and material designs, and novel processing technologies have been introduced into e-textile systems. Recently reported and significantly developed functional materials and devices are summarized, including their enhanced optoelectrical and mechanical properties. Furthermore, the remaining challenges are discussed, and effective strategies to facilitate the full realization of e-textile systems are suggested. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Simulation of devices mobility to estimate wireless channel quality metrics in 5G networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Yu.; Fedorov, S.; Samuylov, A.; Gaidamaka, Yu.; Molchanov, D.

    2017-07-01

    The problem of channel quality estimation for devices in a wireless 5G network is formulated. As a performance metrics of interest we choose the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio, which depends essentially on the distance between the communicating devices. A model with a plurality of moving devices in a bounded three-dimensional space and a simulation algorithm to determine the distances between the devices for a given motion model are devised.

  13. Security and privacy issues in implantable medical devices: A comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Carmen; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Tapiador, Juan E

    2015-06-01

    Bioengineering is a field in expansion. New technologies are appearing to provide a more efficient treatment of diseases or human deficiencies. Implantable Medical Devices (IMDs) constitute one example, these being devices with more computing, decision making and communication capabilities. Several research works in the computer security field have identified serious security and privacy risks in IMDs that could compromise the implant and even the health of the patient who carries it. This article surveys the main security goals for the next generation of IMDs and analyzes the most relevant protection mechanisms proposed so far. On the one hand, the security proposals must have into consideration the inherent constraints of these small and implanted devices: energy, storage and computing power. On the other hand, proposed solutions must achieve an adequate balance between the safety of the patient and the security level offered, with the battery lifetime being another critical parameter in the design phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A comprehensive cloud-based real-time simulation framework for oblivious power routing in clusters of DC microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, M. Hadi; Boroojeni, Kianoosh G.; Dragicevic, Tomislav

    2017-01-01

    of microgrids. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm has been verified in MATLAB simulation. Furthermore, we propose a comprehensive simulation platform for further implementation of the proposed strategy on OPAL-RT real-time simulator system (RTDS). In our proposed platform, the communication path...

  15. Comprehensive Modelling and Simulation System for Decision Support in the Field of Radiation Potection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecha, Petr; Hofman, Radek

    -, č. 81 (2010), s. 17-18 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0572; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/1596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : decision support * modelling * radiation protection * environmental impact assessment * probability safety assessment Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/AS/pecha-comprehensive modelling and simulation system for decision support in the field of radiation potection.pdf

  16. Electrothermal Simulation of Large-Area Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Kirsch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The lateral charge transport in thin-film semiconductor devices is affected by the sheet resistance of the various layers. This may lead to a non-uniform current distribution across a large-area device resulting in inhomogeneous luminance, for example, as observed in organic light-emitting diodes (Neyts et al., 2006. The resistive loss in electrical energy is converted into thermal energy via Joule heating, which results in a temperature increase inside the device. On the other hand, the charge transport properties of the device materials are also temperature-dependent, such that we are facing a two-way coupled electrothermal problem. It has been demonstrated that adding thermal effects to an electrical model significantly changes the results (Slawinski et al., 2011. We present a mathematical model for the steady-state distribution of the electric potential and of the temperature across one electrode of a large-area semiconductor device, as well as numerical solutions obtained using the finite element method.

  17. Effectiveness of comprehensive fixed appliance treatment used with the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device in Class II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Lorenzo; Alvetro, Lisa; Giuntini, Veronica; Masucci, Caterina; Defraia, Efisio; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2011-07-01

    To assess the dental, skeletal, and soft tissue effects of comprehensive fixed appliance treatment combined with the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device (FRD) in Class II patients. Thirty-two Class II patients (mean age 12.7 ± 1.2 years) were treated consecutively with the FRD protocol and compared with a matched sample of 27 untreated Class II subjects (mean age 12.8 ± 1.3 years). Lateral cephalograms were taken before therapy and at the completion of comprehensive therapy. The mean duration of comprehensive treatment was 2.4 ± 0.4 years. Statistical comparisons were carried out with the Student's t-test (P < .05). The success rate was 87.5%. The FRD group showed a significant restraint in the sagittal skeletal position of the maxilla (also at the soft tissue level), a significant increase in mandibular length, and a significant improvement in maxillo-mandibular sagittal skeletal relationships. The treated group exhibited a significant reduction in overjet and a significant increase in molar relationship. The lower incisors were significantly proclined and intruded, while the lower first molars moved significantly in a mesial and vertical direction. The FRD protocol is effective in correcting Class II malocclusion with a combination of skeletal (mainly maxillary) and dentoalveolar (mainly mandibular) modifications.

  18. Models and Simulations of Carrier Transport in Novel Nanoelectronic Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rondoni, D.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the field of applied science and technology that aims to manipulate, test and produce devices and systems which have dimensions comparable to the atomic and molecular scale, that is few tens of nanometers and smaller. Amongst the wide range of fields touched by nanotechnology,

  19. Auditory Attention and Comprehension During a Simulated Night Shift: Effects of Task Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, June J; Jennings, Kristen S; Phillips, Ginger E; McCubbin, James A

    2016-11-01

    The current study investigated performance on a dual auditory task during a simulated night shift. Night shifts and sleep deprivation negatively affect performance on vigilance-based tasks, but less is known about the effects on complex tasks. Because language processing is necessary for successful work performance, it is important to understand how it is affected by night work and sleep deprivation. Sixty-two participants completed a simulated night shift resulting in 28 hr of total sleep deprivation. Performance on a vigilance task and a dual auditory language task was examined across four testing sessions. The results indicate that working at night negatively impacts vigilance, auditory attention, and comprehension. The effects on the auditory task varied based on the content of the auditory material. When the material was interesting and easy, the participants performed better. Night work had a greater negative effect when the auditory material was less interesting and more difficult. These findings support research that vigilance decreases during the night. The results suggest that auditory comprehension suffers when individuals are required to work at night. Maintaining attention and controlling effort especially on passages that are less interesting or more difficult could improve performance during night shifts. The results from the current study apply to many work environments where decision making is necessary in response to complex auditory information. Better predicting the effects of night work on language processing is important for developing improved means of coping with shiftwork. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  20. Simulation of synaptic coupling of neuron-like generators via a memristive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, S. A.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Gorshkov, O. N.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2017-08-01

    A physical model of synaptically coupled neuron-like generators interacting via a memristive device has been presented. The model simulates the synaptic transmission of pulsed signals between brain neurons. The action on the receiving generator has been performed via a memristive device that demonstrates adaptive behavior. It has been established that the proposed coupling channel provides the forced synchronization with the parameters depending on the memristive device sensitivity. Synchronization modes 1: 1 and 2: 1 have been experimentally observed.

  1. Comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Boris; Dedy, Nicolas J; Bonrath, Esther M; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2017-05-01

    There is no comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum to address cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills for an advanced minimally invasive procedure. 1) To develop and provide evidence of validity for a comprehensive simulation-enhanced training (SET) curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure; (2) to demonstrate transfer of acquired psychomotor skills from a simulation laboratory to live porcine model; and (3) to compare training outcomes of SET curriculum group and chief resident group. University. This prospective single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial allocated 20 intermediate-level surgery residents to receive either conventional training (control) or SET curriculum training (intervention). The SET curriculum consisted of cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical training modules. Psychomotor skills in a live anesthetized porcine model in the OR was the primary outcome. Knowledge of advanced minimally invasive and bariatric surgery and nontechnical skills in a simulated OR crisis scenario were the secondary outcomes. Residents in the SET curriculum group went on to perform a laparoscopic jejunojejunostomy in the OR. Cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills of SET curriculum group were also compared to a group of 12 chief surgery residents. SET curriculum group demonstrated superior psychomotor skills in a live porcine model (56 [47-62] versus 44 [38-53], Ppsychomotor skills in the live porcine model and in the OR in a human patient (56 [47-62] versus 63 [61-68]; P = .21). SET curriculum group demonstrated inferior knowledge (13 [11-15] versus 16 [14-16]; P<.05), equivalent psychomotor skill (63 [61-68] versus 68 [62-74]; P = .50), and superior nontechnical skills (41 [38-45] versus 34 [27-35], P<.01) compared with chief resident group. Completion of the SET curriculum resulted in superior training outcomes, compared with conventional surgery training. Implementation of the SET curriculum can standardize training

  2. Use of a Mobile Device Simulation as a Preclass Active Learning Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Robert D; Oliver, M Cecile; Stanfill, Teresa J; Stevens, Kevin V; Brown, Gary R; Ebinger, Michael; Gay, John M

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that preclass activities introducing new material can increase student performance. In an effort to engage students in an active learning, preclass activity, the authors developed a mobile application. Eighty-four nursing students were assigned a preclass reading exercise, whereas 32 students completed the preclass simulation scenario on their mobile device. All students completed the same electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) quiz 1 week following the lecture. The effects of reading or simulation on student quiz performance was evaluated with a student's paired t test, using an alpha of .05. Students completing the preclass simulation scored higher on the EFM quiz, compared with students assigned the preclass reading (85% versus 70% correct answers, p = .01). Student survey data indicated that the mobile device simulation was perceived as an engaging and desirable instructional tool. Nursing students completing the mobile device EFM preclass simulation outperformed the students who were given the traditional reading assignment. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. A model for plasma discharges simulation in Tokamak devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Antonio M.M.; Silva, Ruy P. da; Galvao, Ricardo M.O.; Kusnetzov, Yuri; Nascimento, I.C.; Cuevas, Nelson

    2001-01-01

    In this work, a 'zero-dimensional' model for simulation of discharges in Tokamak machine is presented. The model allows the calculation of the time profiles of important parameters of the discharge. The model was applied to the TCABR Tokamak to study the influence of parameters and physical processes during the discharges. Basically it is constituted of five differential equations: two related to the primary and secondary circuits of the ohmic heating transformer and the other three conservation equations of energy, charge and neutral particles. From the physical model, a computer program has been built with the objective of obtaining the time profiles of plasma current, the current in the primary of the ohmic heating transformer, the electronic temperature, the electronic density and the neutral particle density. It was also possible, with the model, to simulate the effects of gas puffing during the shot. The results of the simulation were compared with the experimental results obtained in the TCABR Tokamak, using hydrogen gas

  4. On the development of a comprehensive MC simulation model for the Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, E. P.; Moutsatsos, A.; Pantelis, E.; Zoros, E.; Georgiou, E.; Torrens, M.; Karaiskos, P.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model for the Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) radiosurgery unit. Model-based dosimetry calculations were benchmarked in terms of relative dose profiles (RDPs) and output factors (OFs), against corresponding EBT2 measurements. To reduce the rather prolonged computational time associated with the comprehensive PFX model MC simulations, two approximations were explored and evaluated on the grounds of dosimetric accuracy. The first consists in directional biasing of the 60Co photon emission while the second refers to the implementation of simplified source geometric models. The effect of the dose scoring volume dimensions in OF calculations accuracy was also explored. RDP calculations for the comprehensive PFX model were found to be in agreement with corresponding EBT2 measurements. Output factors of 0.819  ±  0.004 and 0.8941  ±  0.0013 were calculated for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimator, respectively, which agree, within uncertainties, with corresponding EBT2 measurements and published experimental data. Volume averaging was found to affect OF results by more than 0.3% for scoring volume radii greater than 0.5 mm and 1.4 mm for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators, respectively. Directional biasing of photon emission resulted in a time efficiency gain factor of up to 210 with respect to the isotropic photon emission. Although no considerable effect on relative dose profiles was detected, directional biasing led to OF overestimations which were more pronounced for the 4 mm collimator and increased with decreasing emission cone half-angle, reaching up to 6% for a 5° angle. Implementation of simplified source models revealed that omitting the sources’ stainless steel capsule significantly affects both OF results and relative dose profiles, while the aluminum-based bushing did not exhibit considerable dosimetric effect. In conclusion, the results of this work suggest that any PFX

  5. RFA Guardian: Comprehensive Simulation of Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment of Liver Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voglreiter, Philip; Mariappan, Panchatcharam; Pollari, Mika; Flanagan, Ronan; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Portugaller, Rupert Horst; Fütterer, Jurgen; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Kolesnik, Marina; Moche, Michael

    2018-01-15

    The RFA Guardian is a comprehensive application for high-performance patient-specific simulation of radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors. We address a wide range of usage scenarios. These include pre-interventional planning, sampling of the parameter space for uncertainty estimation, treatment evaluation and, in the worst case, failure analysis. The RFA Guardian is the first of its kind that exhibits sufficient performance for simulating treatment outcomes during the intervention. We achieve this by combining a large number of high-performance image processing, biomechanical simulation and visualization techniques into a generalized technical workflow. Further, we wrap the feature set into a single, integrated application, which exploits all available resources of standard consumer hardware, including massively parallel computing on graphics processing units. This allows us to predict or reproduce treatment outcomes on a single personal computer with high computational performance and high accuracy. The resulting low demand for infrastructure enables easy and cost-efficient integration into the clinical routine. We present a number of evaluation cases from the clinical practice where users performed the whole technical workflow from patient-specific modeling to final validation and highlight the opportunities arising from our fast, accurate prediction techniques.

  6. Integrating Simulated Physics and Device Virtualization in Control System Testbeds

    OpenAIRE

    Redwood , Owen; Reynolds , Jason; Burmester , Mike

    2016-01-01

    Part 3: INFRASTRUCTURE MODELING AND SIMULATION; International audience; Malware and forensic analyses of embedded cyber-physical systems are tedious, manual processes that testbeds are commonly not designed to support. Additionally, attesting the physics impact of embedded cyber-physical system malware has no formal methodologies and is currently an art. This chapter describes a novel testbed design methodology that integrates virtualized embedded industrial control systems and physics simula...

  7. Device Simulation of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors: Radiation Damage Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourches, N.T.

    2009-01-01

    Vertexing for the future International Linear Collider represents a challenging goal because of the high spatial resolution required with low material budget and high ionizing radiation tolerance. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) represent a good potential solution for this purpose. Up to now many MAPS sensors have been developed. They are based on various architectures and manufactured in different processes. However, up so far, the sensor diode has not been the subject of extensive modelization and simulation. Published simulation studies of sensor-signal formation have been less numerous than measurements on real sensors. This is a cause for concern because such sensor is physically based on the partially depleted diode, in the vicinity of which the electric field collects the minority carriers generated by an incident MIP (minimum ionizing particle). Although the microscopic mechanisms are well known and modelled, the global physical mechanisms for signal formation are not very rigorously established. This is partly due to the presence of a predominant diffusion component in the charge transport. We present here simulations mainly based on the S-PISCES code, in which physical mechanisms affecting transport are taken into account. Diffusion, influence of residual carrier concentration due to the doping level in the sensitive volume, and more importantly charge trapping due to deep levels in the active (detecting) layer are studied together with geometric aspects. The effect of neutron irradiation is studied to assess the effects of deep traps. A comparison with available experimental data, obtained on processed MAPS before or after neutron irradiation will be introduced. Simulated reconstruction of the Minimum Ionizing Particle (MIP) point of impact in two dimensions is also investigated. For further steps, guidelines for process choices of next Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors are introduced. (authors)

  8. Entropy in bimolecular simulations: A comprehensive review of atomic fluctuations-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Summer; Ahmed, Marawan; El-Sheikh, Salah; Barakat, Khaled H

    2015-11-01

    Entropy of binding constitutes a major, and in many cases a detrimental, component of the binding affinity in biomolecular interactions. While the enthalpic part of the binding free energy is easier to calculate, estimating the entropy of binding is further more complicated. A precise evaluation of entropy requires a comprehensive exploration of the complete phase space of the interacting entities. As this task is extremely hard to accomplish in the context of conventional molecular simulations, calculating entropy has involved many approximations. Most of these golden standard methods focused on developing a reliable estimation of the conformational part of the entropy. Here, we review these methods with a particular emphasis on the different techniques that extract entropy from atomic fluctuations. The theoretical formalisms behind each method is explained highlighting its strengths as well as its limitations, followed by a description of a number of case studies for each method. We hope that this brief, yet comprehensive, review provides a useful tool to understand these methods and realize the practical issues that may arise in such calculations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comprehensive joint feedback control for standing by functional neuromuscular stimulation-a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2010-12-01

    Previous investigations of feedback control of standing after spinal cord injury (SCI) using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have primarily targeted individual joints. This study assesses the potential efficacy of comprehensive (trunk, hips, knees, and ankles) joint feedback control against postural disturbances using a bipedal, 3-D computer model of SCI stance. Proportional-derivative feedback drove an artificial neural network trained to produce muscle excitation patterns consistent with maximal joint stiffness values achievable about neutral stance given typical SCI muscle properties. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the baseline case of maximum constant muscle excitations used clinically, the controller reduced UE loading by 55% in resisting external force perturbations and by 84% during simulated one-arm functional tasks. Performance was most sensitive to inaccurate measurements of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion position and hip ab/adduction velocity feedback. In conclusion, comprehensive joint feedback demonstrates potential to markedly improve FNS standing function. However, alternative control structures capable of effective performance with fewer sensor-based feedback parameters may better facilitate clinical usage.

  10. Comprehensive Joint Feedback Control for Standing by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation – a Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations of feedback control of standing after spinal cord injury (SCI) using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) have primarily targeted individual joints. This study assesses the potential efficacy of comprehensive (trunk, hips, knees, and ankles) joint-feedback control against postural disturbances using a bipedal, three-dimensional computer model of SCI stance. Proportional-derivative feedback drove an artificial neural network trained to produce muscle excitation patterns consistent with maximal joint stiffness values achievable about neutral stance given typical SCI muscle properties. Feedback gains were optimized to minimize upper extremity (UE) loading required to stabilize against disturbances. Compared to the baseline case of maximum constant muscle excitations used clinically, the controller reduced UE loading by 55% in resisting external force perturbations and by 84% during simulated one-arm functional tasks. Performance was most sensitive to inaccurate measurements of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion position and hip ab/adduction velocity feedback. In conclusion, comprehensive joint-feedback demonstrates potential to markedly improve FNS standing function. However, alternative control structures capable of effective performance with fewer sensor-based feedback parameters may better facilitate clinical usage. PMID:20923741

  11. Discrete Event Simulation Model of the Polaris 2.1 Gamma Ray Imaging Radiation Detection Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    release; distribution is unlimited DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION MODEL OF THE POLARIS 2.1 GAMMA RAY IMAGING RADIATION DETECTION DEVICE by Andres T...ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION MODEL...modeled. The platform, Simkit, was utilized to create a discrete event simulation (DES) model of the Polaris. After carefully constructing the DES

  12. Modeling and simulation of plasma materials processing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma processing has emerged as a central technology in the manufacture of integrated circuits (ICs) and related industries. These plasmas are weakly to partially ionized gases, typically operated at a few to several hundred mTorr gas pressure, with neutral temperatures ranging from room temperature to 500 degrees K. Electron mean energies are typically a few eV and ion energies in the bulk plasma are about 0.05-0.5 eV. Positive ions axe accelerated in the sheaths to impact surfaces with energies ranging from about 10 eV to hundreds of eV. These energetic ions profoundly affect rates of surface chemical reactions. One of the consequences of the recent rapid growth in the IC industry has been a greater focus on manufacturing productivity. The capital costs of equipment that is used in manufacturing IC's has become a large fraction of the ∼ $1 billion cost of building a wafer fab. There is now a strong economic incentive to develop workstation-based simulations of plasma chemical reactors in order to design, optimize and control plasma reactors. I will summarize efforts to develop such models, including electromagnetic coupling, and transport and kinetics of charged and neutral species. Length and time scale disparities in the plasma tool challenge current simulation approaches, and I will address strategies to attack aspects of this problem. In addition, I will present some of our recent efforts to exploit molecular dynamics simulations employing empirical potentials to get hints about qualitative mechanisms and ideas on how to formulate rate expressions for plasma-surface chemical processes. Video illustrations of selected sets of ion trajectories impacting near-surface regions of the substrate will be presented

  13. Comprehensive Performance Evaluation for Hydrological and Nutrients Simulation Using the Hydrological Simulation Program–Fortran in a Mesoscale Monsoon Watershed, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaofu Li; Chuan Luo; Kaixia Jiang; Rongrong Wan; Hengpeng Li

    2017-01-01

    The Hydrological Simulation Program–Fortran (HSPF) is a hydrological and water quality computer model that was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Comprehensive performance evaluations were carried out for hydrological and nutrient simulation using the HSPF model in the Xitiaoxi watershed in China. Streamflow simulation was calibrated from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2007 and then validated from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 using daily observed data, and nu...

  14. Simulating ecological changes caused by marine energy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchert, Pia; Elsaesser, Bjoern; Pritchard, Daniel; Kregting, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Marine renewable energy from wave and tidal technology has the potential to contribute significantly globally to energy security for future generations. However common to both tidal and wave energy extraction systems is concern regarding the potential environmental consequences of the deployment of the technology as environmental and ecological effects are so far poorly understood. Ecological surveys and studies to investigate the environmental impacts are time consuming and costly and are generally reactive; a more efficient approach is to develop 2 and 3D linked hydrodynamic-ecological modelling which has the potential to be proactive and to allow forecasting of the effects of array installation. The objective of the study was to explore tools which can help model and evaluate possible far- and near field changes in the environment and ecosystem caused by the introduction of arrays of marine energy devices. Using the commercial software, MIKE by DHI, we can predict and model possible changes in the ecosystem. MIKE21 and ECOLab modelling software provide the opportunity to couple high level hydrodynamic models with process based ecological models and/or agent based models (ABM). The flow solutions of the model were determined in an idealised tidal basin with the dimensions similar to that of Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland, a body of water renowned for the location of the first grid-connected tidal turbine, SeaGen. In the first instance a simple process oriented ecological NPZD model was developed which are used to model marine and freshwater systems describing four state variables, Nutrient, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton and Detritus. The ecological model was run and evaluated under two hydrodynamic scenarios of the idealised basin. This included no tidal turbines (control) and an array of 55 turbines, an extreme scenario. Whilst an array of turbines has an effect on the hydrodynamics of the Lough, it is unlikely to see an extreme effect on the NPZD model

  15. Screening of groundwater remedial alternatives for brownfield sites: a comprehensive method integrated MCDA with numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Min; Wang, Mingyu; Han, Zhantao; Liu, Jiankai; Chen, Zhezhou; Liu, Bo; Yan, Yan; Liu, Zhu

    2018-06-01

    Brownfield sites pollution and remediation is an urgent environmental issue worldwide. The screening and assessment of remedial alternatives is especially complex owing to its multiple criteria that involves technique, economy, and policy. To help the decision-makers selecting the remedial alternatives efficiently, the criteria framework conducted by the U.S. EPA is improved and a comprehensive method that integrates multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) with numerical simulation is conducted in this paper. The criteria framework is modified and classified into three categories: qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative criteria, MCDA method, AHP-PROMETHEE (analytical hierarchy process-preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluation) is used to determine the priority ranking of the remedial alternatives and the solute transport simulation is conducted to assess the remedial efficiency. A case study was present to demonstrate the screening method in a brownfield site in Cangzhou, northern China. The results show that the systematic method provides a reliable way to quantify the priority of the remedial alternatives.

  16. Interactions from diffraction data: historical and comprehensive overview of simulation assisted methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Gergely

    2007-01-01

    A large part of statistical mechanics is concerned with the determination of condensed matter structure on the basis of known microscopic interactions. An increasing emphasis has been put on the opposite situation in the last decades as well, where structural data, e.g. pair-distance statistics, are known from diffraction experiments, and one looks for the corresponding interaction functions. The solution of this inverse problem was searched for within the integral equation theories of condensed matter in the early investigations, but before long computer simulation assisted methods were suggested. The interest in this field showed an increasing trend after some attempts appeared in the late 1980s. Several methods were published in the 1990s, and one-two methods appear annually nowadays. In this paper a comprehensive and historical overview is given on the solution of the inverse problem with simulation assisted methods. Emphasis is put on the theoretical grounds of the methods, on the choice of possible input structural functions, on the numerically local or global schemes of the potential modifications, on some advantages and limits of the different methods and on the scientific impact of the methods

  17. Simulation of partially coherent light propagation using parallel computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Tiago C.; Rebordão, José M.

    2017-08-01

    Light acquires or loses coherence and coherence is one of the few optical observables. Spectra can be derived from coherence functions and understanding any interferometric experiment is also relying upon coherence functions. Beyond the two limiting cases (full coherence or incoherence) the coherence of light is always partial and it changes with propagation. We have implemented a code to compute the propagation of partially coherent light from the source plane to the observation plane using parallel computing devices (PCDs). In this paper, we restrict the propagation in free space only. To this end, we used the Open Computing Language (OpenCL) and the open-source toolkit PyOpenCL, which gives access to OpenCL parallel computation through Python. To test our code, we chose two coherence source models: an incoherent source and a Gaussian Schell-model source. In the former case, we divided into two different source shapes: circular and rectangular. The results were compared to the theoretical values. Our implemented code allows one to choose between the PyOpenCL implementation and a standard one, i.e using the CPU only. To test the computation time for each implementation (PyOpenCL and standard), we used several computer systems with different CPUs and GPUs. We used powers of two for the dimensions of the cross-spectral density matrix (e.g. 324, 644) and a significant speed increase is observed in the PyOpenCL implementation when compared to the standard one. This can be an important tool for studying new source models.

  18. RNA Structural Dynamics As Captured by Molecular Simulations: A Comprehensive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    With both catalytic and genetic functions, ribonucleic acid (RNA) is perhaps the most pluripotent chemical species in molecular biology, and its functions are intimately linked to its structure and dynamics. Computer simulations, and in particular atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), allow structural dynamics of biomolecular systems to be investigated with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. We here provide a comprehensive overview of the fast-developing field of MD simulations of RNA molecules. We begin with an in-depth, evaluatory coverage of the most fundamental methodological challenges that set the basis for the future development of the field, in particular, the current developments and inherent physical limitations of the atomistic force fields and the recent advances in a broad spectrum of enhanced sampling methods. We also survey the closely related field of coarse-grained modeling of RNA systems. After dealing with the methodological aspects, we provide an exhaustive overview of the available RNA simulation literature, ranging from studies of the smallest RNA oligonucleotides to investigations of the entire ribosome. Our review encompasses tetranucleotides, tetraloops, a number of small RNA motifs, A-helix RNA, kissing-loop complexes, the TAR RNA element, the decoding center and other important regions of the ribosome, as well as assorted others systems. Extended sections are devoted to RNA–ion interactions, ribozymes, riboswitches, and protein/RNA complexes. Our overview is written for as broad of an audience as possible, aiming to provide a much-needed interdisciplinary bridge between computation and experiment, together with a perspective on the future of the field. PMID:29297679

  19. Simulation calculations using the code Geant III for the EUROGAM device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, F A; Curien, D; Duchene, G; France, G de; Wei, L [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires

    1992-08-01

    Simulation calculations are good tools to determine, at a low cost, the characteristics of a detector. It enables to change the geometry of the counter in an iterative way to optimize its response leading to the best performances for the whole multi-detector device. This kind of calculations have been performed using the Geant III code for the EUROGAM device. (author). 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  20. Simulating The Technological Movements Of The Equipment Used For Manufacturing Prosthetic Devices Using 3D Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicea, Anca-Lucia

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the process of building geometric and kinematic models of a technological equipment used in the process of manufacturing devices. First, the process of building the model for a six axes industrial robot is presented. In the second part of the paper, the process of building the model for a five-axis CNC milling machining center is also shown. Both models can be used for accurate cutting processes simulation of complex parts, such as prosthetic devices.

  1. ANSYS-MATLAB co-simulation of mucus flow distribution and clearance effectiveness of a new simulated cough device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shuai; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin; Zhao, Hongmei; Zhang, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2018-03-05

    Coughing is an irritable reaction that protects the respiratory system from infection and improves mucus clearance. However, for the patients who cannot cough autonomously, an assisted cough device is essential for mucus clearance. Considering the low efficiency of current assisted cough devices, a new simulated cough device based on the pneumatic system is proposed in this paper. Given the uncertainty of airflow rates necessary to clear mucus from airways, the computational fluid dynamics Eulerian wall film model and cough efficiency (CE) were used in this study to simulate the cough process and evaluate cough effectiveness. The Ansys-Matlab co-simulation model was set up and verified through experimental studies using Newtonian fluids. Next, model simulations were performed using non-Newtonian fluids, and peak cough flow (PCF) and PCF duration time were analyzed to determine their influence on mucus clearance. CE growth rate (λ) was calculated to reflect the CE variation trend. From the numerical simulation results, we find that CE rises as PCF increases while the growth rate trends to slow as PCF increases; when PCF changes from 60 to 360 L/min, CE changes from 3.2% to 51.5% which is approximately 16 times the initial value. Meanwhile, keeping a long PCF duration time could greatly improve CE under the same cough expired volume and PCF. The results indicated that increasing the PCF and PCF duration time can improve the efficiency of mucus clearance. This paper provides a new approach and a research direction for control strategy in simulated cough devices for airway mucus clearance. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Simulation of leakage current measurement on medical devices using helmholtz coil configuration with different current flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanto, E.; Chandra, F.; Dinata, R.

    2017-05-01

    Leakage current measurement which can follow IEC standard for medical device is one of many challenges to be answered. The IEC 60601-1 has defined that the limit for a leakage current for Medical Device can be as low as 10 µA and as high as 500 µA, depending on which type of contact (applied part) connected to the patient. Most people are using ELCB (Earth-leakage circuit breaker) for safety purpose as this is the most common and available safety device in market. One type of ELCB devices is RCD (Residual Current Device) and this RCD type can measure the leakage current directly. This work will show the possibility on how Helmholtz Coil Configuration can be made to be like the RCD. The possibility is explored by comparing the magnetic field formula from each device, then it proceeds with a simulation using software EJS (Easy Java Simulation). The simulation will make sure the concept of magnetic field current cancellation follows the RCD concept. Finally, the possibility of increasing the measurement’s sensitivity is also analyzed. The sensitivity is needed to see the possibility on reaching the minimum leakage current limit defined by IEC, 0.01mA.

  3. Simulation of leakage current measurement on medical devices using helmholtz coil configuration with different current flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutanto, E; Chandra, F; Dinata, R

    2017-01-01

    Leakage current measurement which can follow IEC standard for medical device is one of many challenges to be answered. The IEC 60601-1 has defined that the limit for a leakage current for Medical Device can be as low as 10 µA and as high as 500 µA, depending on which type of contact (applied part) connected to the patient. Most people are using ELCB (Earth-leakage circuit breaker) for safety purpose as this is the most common and available safety device in market. One type of ELCB devices is RCD (Residual Current Device) and this RCD type can measure the leakage current directly. This work will show the possibility on how Helmholtz Coil Configuration can be made to be like the RCD. The possibility is explored by comparing the magnetic field formula from each device, then it proceeds with a simulation using software EJS (Easy Java Simulation). The simulation will make sure the concept of magnetic field current cancellation follows the RCD concept. Finally, the possibility of increasing the measurement’s sensitivity is also analyzed. The sensitivity is needed to see the possibility on reaching the minimum leakage current limit defined by IEC, 0.01mA. (paper)

  4. Extended behavioural device modelling and circuit simulation with Qucs-S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, M. E.; Kuznetsov, V.

    2018-03-01

    Current trends in circuit simulation suggest a growing interest in open source software that allows access to more than one simulation engine while simultaneously supporting schematic drawing tools, behavioural Verilog-A and XSPICE component modelling, and output data post-processing. This article introduces a number of new features recently implemented in the 'Quite universal circuit simulator - SPICE variant' (Qucs-S), including structure and fundamental schematic capture algorithms, at the same time highlighting their use in behavioural semiconductor device modelling. Particular importance is placed on the interaction between Qucs-S schematics, equation-defined devices, SPICE B behavioural sources and hardware description language (HDL) scripts. The multi-simulator version of Qucs is a freely available tool that offers extended modelling and simulation features compared to those provided by legacy circuit simulators. The performance of a number of Qucs-S modelling extensions are demonstrated with a GaN HEMT compact device model and data obtained from tests using the Qucs-S/Ngspice/Xyce ©/SPICE OPUS multi-engine circuit simulator.

  5. Modeling and simulation of ventilation devices in nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yumeng

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to develop models and algorithms to simulate efficiently the mass exchanges occurring at the interface between the nuclear waste deep geological repositories and the ventilation excavated galleries. To model such physical processes, one needs to account in the porous medium for the flow of the liquid and gas phases including the vaporization of the water component in the gas phase and the dissolution of the gaseous components in the liquid phase. In the free flow region, a single phase gas free flow is considered assuming that the liquid phase is instantaneously vaporized at the interface. This gas free flow has to be compositional to account for the change of the relative humidity in the free flow region which has a strong feedback on the liquid flow rate at the interface. In chapter 1, three formulations of the gas liquid compositional Darcy flow are studied. Their equivalence from the point of phase transitions is shown and they are compared numerically on 1D and 3D test cases including gas appearance and liquid disappearance. The 3D discretization is based on the Vertex Approximate Gradient (VAG) scheme and takes into account discontinuous capillary pressures. In chapter 2, a reduced model coupling a 3D gas liquid compositional Darcy flow in a fractured porous medium, and a 1D compositional free gas flow is introduced. The VAG discretization is extended to such models taking into account the coupling between the 3D matrix, the 2D network of fractures and the 1D gallery. Its convergence is studied both for the linear single phase stationary model and for a non linear model coupling the Richards equation to a single phase 1D flow or a 1D tracer equation in the gallery. Different test cases with Andra data sets are presented. In Chapter 3, a splitting algorithm to solve the coupling between the gas liquid compositional Darcy flow in the porous medium and the gas compositional free flow in the gallery is developed. The idea is to

  6. Simulation of comprehensive chemistry and atmospheric methane lifetime in the LGM with EMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Sergey; Steil, Benedikt

    2017-04-01

    Past records of atmospheric methane (CH4) abundance/isotope composition may provide a substantial insight on C exchanges in the Earth System (ES). When simulated in the climate models, CH4 helps to identify climate parameters transitions via triggering of its different (natural) sources, with a proviso that its sinks are adequately represented in the model. The latter are still a matter of large uncertainty in the studies focussing on the interpretation of CH4 evolution throughout Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), judging the conferred span of tropospheric CH4 lifetime (λ) of 3-16 yr [1-4]. In this study, we attempt to: (i) deliver the most adequate estimate of the LGM atmospheric sink of CH4 in the EMAC AC-GCM [5] equipped with the comprehensive representation of atmospheric chemistry [6], (ii) reveal the ES and CH4 emission parameters that are most influential for λ and (iii) based on these findings, suggest a parameterisation for λ that may be consistently used in climate models. In pursuing (i) we have tuned the EMAC model for simulating LGM atmospheric chemistry state, including careful revisiting of the trace gases emissions from the biosphere, biomass burning/lightning source, etc. The latter affect the key simulated component bound with λ, viz. the abundance and distribution of the hydroxyl radicals (OH) which, upon reacting with CH4, constitute its main tropospheric sink. Our preliminary findings suggest that OH is buffered in the atmosphere in a similar fashion to preindustrial climate, which in line with the recent studies employing comprehensive chemistry mechanisms (e.g., [3]). The analysis in (ii) suggests that tropospheric λ values may be qualitatively described as a convolution of values typical for zonal domain with high and low photolytic recycling rates (i.e. tropics and extra-tropics), as in the latter a dependence of the zonal average λ value on the CH4 emission strength exists. We further use the extensive diagnostic in EMAC to infer the

  7. Use of a mobile device in mental health rehabilitation: A clinical and comprehensive analysis of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Catherine; Sablier, Juliette; Therrien, Julie-Anne; Charbonneau, Karine; Pelletier, Jean-François; Weiss-Lambrou, Rhoda

    2018-07-01

    This study aimed to test the feasibility of using a mobile device (Apple technology: iPodTouch®, iPhone® or iPad®) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in a rehabilitation and recovery process and to document the parameters to be taken into account and the issues involved in implementing this technology in living environments and mental health care settings. A qualitative multiple case study design and multiple data sources were used to understand each case in depth. A clinical and comprehensive analysis of 11 cases was conducted with exploratory and descriptive aims (and the beginnings of explanation building). The multiple-case analysis brought out four typical profiles to illustrate the extent of integration of a personal digital assistant (PDA) as a tool to support mental health rehabilitation and recovery. Each profile highlights four categories of variables identified as determining factors in this process: (1) state of health and related difficulties (cognitive or functional); (2) relationship between comfort level with technology, motivation and personal effort deployed; (3) relationship between support required and support received; and (4) the living environment and follow-up context. This study allowed us to consider the contexts and conditions to be put in place for the successful integration of mobile technology in a mental health rehabilitation and recovery process.

  8. How Mode of Delivery Affects Comprehension of an Operations Management Simulation: Online vs Face-to-Face Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jason M.; Ellegood, William A.; Solomon, Stanislaus; Baker, Jerrine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to understand how mode of delivery, online versus face-to-face, affects comprehension when teaching operations management concepts via a simulation. Conceptually, the aim is to identify factors that influence the students' ability to learn and retain new concepts. Design/methodology/approach: Leveraging Littlefield…

  9. 14 CFR 141.41 - Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and training aids. 141.41 Section 141.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aids. An applicant for a pilot school certificate or a provisional pilot school certificate must show that its flight simulators, flight training devices, training aids, and equipment meet the following...

  10. Computer simulation of sputtering of graphite target in magnetron sputtering device with two zones of erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanov R.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A computer simulation program for discharge in a magnetron sputtering device with two erosion zones was developed. Basic laws of the graphite target sputtering process and transport of sputtered material to the substrate were taken into account in the Monte Carlo code. The results of computer simulation for radial distributions of density and energy flux of carbon atoms on the substrate (at different values of discharge current and pressure of the working gas confirmed the possibility of obtaining qualitative homogeneous films using this magnetron sputtering device. Also the discharge modes were determined for this magnetron sputtering device, in which it was possible to obtain such energy and density of carbon atoms fluxes, which were suitable for deposition of carbon films containing carbon nanotubes and other nanoparticles.

  11. Non-equilibrium Green function method: theory and application in simulation of nanometer electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Van-Nam

    2014-01-01

    We review fundamental aspects of the non-equilibrium Green function method in the simulation of nanometer electronic devices. The method is implemented into our recently developed computer package OPEDEVS to investigate transport properties of electrons in nano-scale devices and low-dimensional materials. Concretely, we present the definition of the four real-time Green functions, the retarded, advanced, lesser and greater functions. Basic relations among these functions and their equations of motion are also presented in detail as the basis for the performance of analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, we review in detail two recursive algorithms, which are implemented in OPEDEVS to solve the Green functions defined in finite-size opened systems and in the surface layer of semi-infinite homogeneous ones. Operation of the package is then illustrated through the simulation of the transport characteristics of a typical semiconductor device structure, the resonant tunneling diodes. (review)

  12. Cost minimization analysis of different growth hormone pen devices based on time-and-motion simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jaewhan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous pen devices are available to administer recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH, and both patients and health plans have varying issues to consider when selecting a particular product and device for daily use. Therefore, the present study utilized multi-dimensional product analysis to assess potential time involvement, required weekly administration steps, and utilization costs relative to daily rhGH administration. Methods Study objectives were to conduct 1 Time-and-Motion (TM simulations in a randomized block design that allowed time and steps comparisons related to rhGH preparation, administration and storage, and 2 a Cost Minimization Analysis (CMA relative to opportunity and supply costs. Nurses naïve to rhGH administration and devices were recruited to evaluate four rhGH pen devices (2 in liquid form, 2 requiring reconstitution via TM simulations. Five videotaped and timed trials for each product were evaluated based on: 1 Learning (initial use instructions, 2 Preparation (arrange device for use, 3 Administration (actual simulation manikin injection, and 4 Storage (maintain product viability between doses, in addition to assessment of steps required for weekly use. The CMA applied micro-costing techniques related to opportunity costs for caregivers (categorized as wages, non-drug medical supplies, and drug product costs. Results Norditropin® NordiFlex and Norditropin® NordiPen (NNF and NNP, Novo Nordisk, Inc., Bagsværd, Denmark took less weekly Total Time (p ® Pen (GTP, Pfizer, Inc, New York, New York or HumatroPen® (HTP, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. Time savings were directly related to differences in new package Preparation times (NNF (1.35 minutes, NNP (2.48 minutes GTP (4.11 minutes, HTP (8.64 minutes, p Conclusions Time-and-motion simulation data used to support a micro-cost analysis demonstrated that the pen device with the greater time demand has highest net costs.

  13. Research on ion implantation in MEMS device fabrication by theory, simulation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Minyu; Zhao, Yulong; Jiao, Binbin; Zhu, Lingjian; Zhang, Guodong; Wang, Lei

    2018-06-01

    Ion implantation is widely utilized in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), applied for embedded lead, resistors, conductivity modifications and so forth. In order to achieve an expected device, the principle of ion implantation must be carefully examined. The elementary theory of ion implantation including implantation mechanism, projectile range and implantation-caused damage in the target were studied, which can be regarded as the guidance of ion implantation in MEMS device design and fabrication. Critical factors including implantations dose, energy and annealing conditions are examined by simulations and experiments. The implantation dose mainly determines the dopant concentration in the target substrate. The implantation energy is the key factor of the depth of the dopant elements. The annealing time mainly affects the repair degree of lattice damage and thus the activated elements’ ratio. These factors all together contribute to ions’ behavior in the substrates and characters of the devices. The results can be referred to in the MEMS design, especially piezoresistive devices.

  14. SNOW: a digital computer program for the simulation of ion beam devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boers, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    A digital computer program, SNOW, has been developed for the simulation of dense ion beams. The program simulates the plasma expansion cup (but not the plasma source itself), the acceleration region, and a drift space with neutralization if desired. The ion beam is simulated by computing representative trajectories through the device. The potentials are simulated on a large rectangular matrix array which is solved by iterative techniques. Poisson's equation is solved at each point within the configuration using space-charge densities computed from the ion trajectories combined with background electron and/or ion distributions. The simulation methods are described in some detail along with examples of both axially-symmetric and rectangular beams. A detailed description of the input data is presented

  15. A comprehensive simulation model of the performance of photochromic films in absorbance-modulation-optical-lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apratim Majumder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical lithography is the most prevalent method of fabricating micro-and nano-scale structures in the semiconductor industry due to the fact that patterning using photons is fast, accurate and provides high throughput. However, the resolution of this technique is inherently limited by the physical phenomenon of diffraction. Absorbance-Modulation-Optical Lithography (AMOL, a recently developed technique has been successfully demonstrated to be able to circumvent this diffraction limit. AMOL employs a dual-wavelength exposure system in conjunction with spectrally selective reversible photo-transitions in thin films of photochromic molecules to achieve patterning of features with sizes beyond the far-field diffraction limit. We have developed a finite-element-method based full-electromagnetic-wave solution model that simulates the photo-chemical processes that occur within the thin film of the photochromic molecules under illumination by the exposure and confining wavelengths in AMOL. This model allows us to understand how the material characteristics influence the confinement to sub-diffraction dimensions, of the transmitted point spread function (PSF of the exposure wavelength inside the recording medium. The model reported here provides the most comprehensive analysis of the AMOL process to-date, and the results show that the most important factors that govern the process, are the polarization of the two beams, the ratio of the intensities of the two wavelengths, the relative absorption coefficients and the concentration of the photochromic species, the thickness of the photochromic layer and the quantum yields of the photoreactions at the two wavelengths. The aim of this work is to elucidate the requirements of AMOL in successfully circumventing the far-field diffraction limit.

  16. A comprehensive simulation model of the performance of photochromic films in absorbance-modulation-optical-lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, Apratim; Helms, Phillip L.; Menon, Rajesh, E-mail: rmenon@eng.utah.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Andrew, Trisha L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Optical lithography is the most prevalent method of fabricating micro-and nano-scale structures in the semiconductor industry due to the fact that patterning using photons is fast, accurate and provides high throughput. However, the resolution of this technique is inherently limited by the physical phenomenon of diffraction. Absorbance-Modulation-Optical Lithography (AMOL), a recently developed technique has been successfully demonstrated to be able to circumvent this diffraction limit. AMOL employs a dual-wavelength exposure system in conjunction with spectrally selective reversible photo-transitions in thin films of photochromic molecules to achieve patterning of features with sizes beyond the far-field diffraction limit. We have developed a finite-element-method based full-electromagnetic-wave solution model that simulates the photo-chemical processes that occur within the thin film of the photochromic molecules under illumination by the exposure and confining wavelengths in AMOL. This model allows us to understand how the material characteristics influence the confinement to sub-diffraction dimensions, of the transmitted point spread function (PSF) of the exposure wavelength inside the recording medium. The model reported here provides the most comprehensive analysis of the AMOL process to-date, and the results show that the most important factors that govern the process, are the polarization of the two beams, the ratio of the intensities of the two wavelengths, the relative absorption coefficients and the concentration of the photochromic species, the thickness of the photochromic layer and the quantum yields of the photoreactions at the two wavelengths. The aim of this work is to elucidate the requirements of AMOL in successfully circumventing the far-field diffraction limit.

  17. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genghong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field pointing from right to left (from left to right are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  18. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Genghong; Zhu, Jia; Jiang, Gelei; Sheng, Qiang; Zheng, Yue, E-mail: zhengy35@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Micro& Nano Physics and Mechanics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen, Weijin [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Micro& Nano Physics and Mechanics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China); Wang, Biao, E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge) and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop) with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs) emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field) pointing from right to left (from left to right) are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  19. Simulation and measurement of short infrared pulses on silicon position sensitive device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krapohl, D; Esebamen, O X; Nilsson, H E; Thungstroem, G

    2011-01-01

    Lateral position sensitive devices (PSD) are important for triangulation, alignment and surface measurements as well as for angle measurements. Large PSDs show a delay on rising and falling edges when irradiated with near infra-red light. This delay is also dependent on the spot position relative to the electrodes. It is however desirable in most applications to have a fast response. We investigated the responsiveness of a Sitek PSD in a mixed mode simulation of a two dimensional full sized detector. For simulation and measurement purposes focused light pulses with a wavelength of 850 nm, duration of 1μs and spot size of 280μm were used. The cause for the slopes of rise and fall time is due to time constants of the device capacitance as well as the photo-generation mechanism itself. To support the simulated results, we conducted measurements of rise and fall times on a physical device. Additionally, we quantified the homogeneity of the device by repositioning a spot of light from a pulsed ir-laser diode on the surface area.

  20. Improving hemodynamics of cardiovascular system under a novel intraventricular assist device support via modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shidong; Luo, Lin; Yang, Bibo; Li, Xinghui; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-12-01

    Ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly recognized for supporting blood circulation in heart failure patients who are non-transplant eligible. Because of its volume, the traditional pulsatile device is not easy to implant intracorporeally. Continuous flow LVADs (CF-LVADs) reduce arterial pulsatility and only offer continuous flow, which is different from physiological flow, and may cause long-term complications in the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to design a new pulsatile assist device that overcomes this disadvantage, and to test this device in the cardiovascular system. Firstly, the input and output characteristics of the new device were tested in a simple cardiovascular mock system. A detailed mathematical model was established by fitting the experimental data. Secondly, the model was tested in four pathological cases, and was simulated and coupled with a fifth-order cardiovascular system and a new device model using Matlab software. Using assistance of the new device, we demonstrated that the left ventricle pressure, aortic pressure, and aortic flow of heart failure patients improved to the levels of a healthy individual. Especially, in state IV level heart failure patients, the systolic blood pressure increased from 81.34 mmHg to 132.1 mmHg, whereas the diastolic blood pressure increased from 54.28 mmHg to 78.7 mmHg. Cardiac output increased from 3.21 L/min to 5.16 L/min. The newly-developed assist device not only provided a physiological flow that was similar to healthy individuals, but also effectively improved the ability of the pathological ventricular volume. Finally, the effects of the new device on other hemodynamic parameters are discussed.

  1. The use of typed lambda calculus for comprehension and construction of simulation models in the domain of ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uschold, Michael

    1992-01-01

    We are concerned with two important issues in simulation modelling: model comprehension and model construction. Model comprehension is limited because many important choices taken during the modelling process are not documented. This makes it difficult for models to be modified or used by others. A key factor hindering model construction is the vast modelling search space which must be navigated. This is exacerbated by the fact that many modellers are unfamiliar with the terms and concepts catered to by current tools. The root of both problems is the lack of facilities for representing or reasoning about domain concepts in current simulation technology. The basis for our achievements in both of these areas is the development of a language with two distinct levels; one for representing domain information, and the other for representing the simulation model. Of equal importance, is the fact that we make formal connections between these two levels. The domain we are concerned with is ecological modelling. This language, called Elklogic, is based on the typed lambda calculus. Important features include a rich type structure, the use of various higher order functions, and semantics. This enables complex expressions to be constructed from relatively few primitives. The meaning of each expression can be determined in terms of the domain, the simulation model, or the relationship between the two. We describe a novel representation for sets and substructure, and a variety of other general concepts that are especially useful in the ecological domain. We use the type structure in a novel way: for controlling the modelling search space, rather than a proof search space. We facilitate model comprehension by representing modelling decisions that are embodied in the simulation model. We represent the simulation model separately from, but in terms of a domain mode. The explicit links between the two models constitute the modelling decisions. The semantics of Elklogic enables

  2. Simulation of photons from plasmas for the applications to display devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae June; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jae Koo

    2007-07-01

    Numerical modeling of the photon transport of the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible lights are presented for plasma based display devices. The transport of UV lights which undergo resonance trapping by ground state atoms is solved by using the Holstein equation. After the UV lights are transformed to visible lights at the phosphor surfaces, the visible lights experience complicated traces inside the cell and finally are emitted toward the viewing window after having some power loss within the cell. A three-dimensional ray trace of the visible lights is calculated with a radiosity model. These simulations for the photons strengthen plasma discharge modeling for the application to display devices.

  3. Acoustofluidics: theory and simulation of radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is combined with numerical simulations to optimize designs and functionalities of acoustofluidic devices, i.e. microfluidic devices in which ultrasound waves are used to anipulate biological particles. The resonance frequencies and corresponding modes of the acoustic fields...... are calculated for various specific geometries of glass/silicon chips containing water-filled microchannels. A special emphasis is put on taking the surrounding glass/silicon material into account, thus going beyond the traditional transverse half-wavelength picture. For the resonance frequencies, where...

  4. The use of virtual prototyping and simulation in ITER maintenance device development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, J.; Siuko, M.; Saarinen, H.; Maekinen, H.; Verho, S.; Vilenius, M.; Palmer, J.; Irving, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ITER divertor maintenance takes place approximately every second year. The maintenance occurs in very harsh and mechanically complicated environment. Due to the critical nature of the maintenance operations, the maintenance equipment design and the operation cycle will be verified in DTP2 test platform, in Tampere, Finland. TUT/IHA is working on the ITER divertor maintenance devices. Due to the complexity of the operation environment and tasks to be performed, 3d models and kinematic simulation have been valuable tool when developing the devices. Further, IHA has integrated to the models also dynamic properties of the device, so that it can be discussed as a virtual prototype. The virtual prototype can be used to verify the operation of the device, the operation cycle and also as a platform for developing the control software for the device. For device development, the virtual prototype is used to analyze the dynamic behavior, loading and flexibility of the device. The virtual prototype was also connected to real hardware to verify the operation of one joint. Then, the virtual model in computer was run and the output of the joints was given to a hydraulic cylinder representing disturbance load for an other hydraulic cylinder, which was operating under control software and aiming to move smoothly regardless of the disturbance load. By that way we were able to verify that the real system operates close enough with the simulation model. The virtual model is also used to shorten the time to get the DTP2 platform working. The CMM control software is done with virtual models as ready as possible. The CMM virtual model is connected to one-joint control hardware which allows developing the controller software one joint at time. In this paper, also other possibilities to use virtual prototypes in ITER divertor maintenance development are discussed. (author)

  5. Integrated visualization of simulation results and experimental devices in virtual-reality space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Seiji; Shohji, Mamoru; Kageyama, Akira; Tamura, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    We succeeded in integrating the visualization of both simulation results and experimental device data in virtual-reality (VR) space using CAVE system. Simulation results are shown using Virtual LHD software, which can show magnetic field line, particle trajectory, and isosurface of plasma pressure of the Large Helical Device (LHD) based on data from the magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium simulation. A three-dimensional mouse, or wand, determines the initial position and pitch angle of a drift particle or the starting point of a magnetic field line, interactively in the VR space. The trajectory of a particle and the stream-line of magnetic field are calculated using the Runge-Kutta-Huta integration method on the basis of the results obtained after pointing the initial condition. The LHD vessel is objectively visualized based on CAD-data. By using these results and data, the simulated LHD plasma can be interactively drawn in the objective description of the LHD experimental vessel. Through this integrated visualization, it is possible to grasp the three-dimensional relationship of the positions between the device and plasma in the VR space, opening a new path in contribution to future research. (author)

  6. Analyzing heavy-ion-induced charge collection in Si devices by three-dimensional simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Properties of charge collection in Si devices in response to single-ion bombardment have been studied using transient three-dimensional drift-diffusion simulation. In unloaded Si diodes, the funnel effect is particularly strong in lightly-doped materials for high-density strikes such as 100 MeV Fe, and essentially all charge collection is by funnel-assisted drift. This drift collection may occur at time scales as late as several nanoseconds, much later than is traditionally associated with drift. For more heavily-doped materials or lower-density strikes, such as 5-MeV α-particles, drift and diffusion play more equal roles. In epitaxial structures the funnel is truncated by the heavily-doped substrate, collapses quickly, and a great deal of charge is collected at late times by diffusion. Charge collection in Si circuitry is influenced by the circuit external to the struck device. Loading effects on charge collection were studied using passive external circuit elements as well as by mixed-mode simulation, which allows modeling of active external circuitry. Simulations indicate that the funnel can be significantly affected by the inclusion of passive loads, while active loads may prevent any direct charge collection by funneling. Finally, the use of three-dimensional device simulators is presented as a method of analyzing results obtained from focused ion microbeam experiments

  7. Study and simulation of the time behaviour of MOS transistor devices. Application to a logic assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barocas, Marcel

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to determine, by simulation, the time response of devices based on MOS transistors. After a theoretical study of the MOS element, the author develops a transistor model based on its physical components. This model is firstly used to obtain the transistor static characteristics. The author then studies the time response of the inverter logic circuit which is the basic operator of these circuits. Theoretical results are verified by simulation and by experiments. The author then reports a detailed study of the inverter input impedance, and the decoupling property between logic operators in cascade. The simulation confirms the obtained results. Based on this decoupling property, the output time response of a logic chain is studied by using a simulation software. A general method of determination of the output time response is developed with application to a logic assembly [fr

  8. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichorn, T.; Fernandez, M.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Palomo, F. R.; Peltola, T.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.; Villa, I.; Hidalgo, S.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  9. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichorn, T.; Fernandez, M.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Palomo, F.R.; Peltola, T.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.; Villa, I.; Hidalgo, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  10. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, G., E-mail: geetikajain.hep@gmail.com [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Eber, R. [Institute fur Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Eichorn, T. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (Germany); Fernandez, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (Spain); Lalwani, K. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Messineo, A. [Universita di Pisa & INFN sez. di Pisa (Italy); Palomo, F.R. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Peltola, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); Printz, M. [Institute fur Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Ranjan, K. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Villa, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (Spain); Hidalgo, S. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (Spain)

    2016-07-11

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  11. A comprehensive simulation study on classification of RNA-Seq data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökmen Zararsız

    Full Text Available RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq is a powerful technique for the gene-expression profiling of organisms that uses the capabilities of next-generation sequencing technologies. Developing gene-expression-based classification algorithms is an emerging powerful method for diagnosis, disease classification and monitoring at molecular level, as well as providing potential markers of diseases. Most of the statistical methods proposed for the classification of gene-expression data are either based on a continuous scale (eg. microarray data or require a normal distribution assumption. Hence, these methods cannot be directly applied to RNA-Seq data since they violate both data structure and distributional assumptions. However, it is possible to apply these algorithms with appropriate modifications to RNA-Seq data. One way is to develop count-based classifiers, such as Poisson linear discriminant analysis and negative binomial linear discriminant analysis. Another way is to bring the data closer to microarrays and apply microarray-based classifiers. In this study, we compared several classifiers including PLDA with and without power transformation, NBLDA, single SVM, bagging SVM (bagSVM, classification and regression trees (CART, and random forests (RF. We also examined the effect of several parameters such as overdispersion, sample size, number of genes, number of classes, differential-expression rate, and the transformation method on model performances. A comprehensive simulation study is conducted and the results are compared with the results of two miRNA and two mRNA experimental datasets. The results revealed that increasing the sample size, differential-expression rate and decreasing the dispersion parameter and number of groups lead to an increase in classification accuracy. Similar with differential-expression studies, the classification of RNA-Seq data requires careful attention when handling data overdispersion. We conclude that, as a count

  12. Determining mode excitations of vacuum electronics devices via three-dimensional simulations using the SOS code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Gary

    1988-01-01

    The SOS code is used to compute the resonance modes (frequency-domain information) of sample devices and separately to compute the transient behavior of the same devices. A code, DOT, is created to compute appropriate dot products of the time-domain and frequency-domain results. The transient behavior of individual modes in the device is then plotted. Modes in a coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube (CCTWT) section excited beam in separate simulations are analyzed. Mode energy vs. time and mode phase vs. time are computed and it is determined whether the transient waves are forward or backward waves for each case. Finally, the hot-test mode frequencies of the CCTWT section are computed.

  13. Engineering design of plasma generation devices using Elmer finite element simulation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bondarenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasma generation devices are important technology for many engineering disciplines. The process for acquiring experience for designing plasma devices requires practice, time, and the right tools. The practice and time depend on the individual and the access to the right tools can be a limiting factor to achieve experience and to get an idea on the possible risks. The use of Elmer finite element method (FEM software for verifying plasma engineering design is presented as an accessible tool that can help modeling multi-physics and verifying plasma generation devices. Furthermore, Elmer FEM will be suitable for experienced engineer and can be used for determining the risks in a design or a process that use plasma. A physical experiment was conducted to demonstrate new features of plasma generation technology where results are compared with plasma simulation using Elmer FEM.

  14. SIM Life: a new surgical simulation device using a human perfused cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, J P; Breque, C; Danion, J; Delpech, P O; Oriot, D; Richer, J P

    2017-02-01

    In primary and continuing medical education, simulation is becoming a mandatory technique. In surgery, simulation spreading is slowed down by the distance which exists between the devices currently available on the market and the reality, in particular anatomical, of an operating room. We propose a new model for surgical simulation with the use of cadavers in a circulation model mimicking pulse and artificial respiration available for both open and laparoscopic surgery. The model was a task trainer designed by four experts in our simulation laboratory combining plastic, electronic, and biologic material. The cost of supplies needed for the construction was evaluated. The model was used and tested over 24 months on 35 participants, of whom 20 were surveyed regarding the realism of the model. The model involved a cadaver, connected to a specific device that permits beating circulation and artificial respiration. The demonstration contributed to teaching small groups of up to four participants and was reproducible over 24 months of courses. Anatomic correlation, realism, and learning experience were highly rated by users CONCLUSION: This model for surgical simulation in both open and laparoscopic surgery was found to be realistic, available to assessed objectively performance in a pedagogic program.

  15. Research on simulated devices for Solar photovoltaic grid-connected generation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    quan-zhu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the standpoint of energy conservation and emission reduction, one device simulated photovoltaic grid-connected generation system based on SPWM was designed in the paper. And DC/AC inverter could transduce efficiently direct current to alternating current. The MCU(Micro-Control-Unit, in this system could achieve the control method for maximum-power-point and tracking for frequency and phase. Moreover, the MCU could implement PWM (Plus-Width Modulating through programming. The system showed clearly the whole photovoltaic grid-connected generation system using simulated methods and ways.

  16. Simulation of space protons influence on silicon semiconductor devices using gamma-neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, Y.N.; Zinchenko, V.F.; Ulimov, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the authors focus on the problems of simulating the space proton energy spectra under laboratory gamma-neutron radiation tests of semiconductor devices (SD). A correct simulation of radiation effects implies to take into account and evaluate substantial differences in the processes of formation of primary defects in SD in space environment and under laboratory testing. These differences concern: 1) displacement defects, 2) ionization defects and 3) intensity of radiation. The study shows that: - the energy dependence of nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) is quite universal to predict the degradation of SD parameters associated to displacement defects, and - MOS devices that are sensitive to ionization defects indicated the same variation of parameters under conditions of equality of ionization density generated by protons and gamma radiations. (A.C.)

  17. Simulating threshold voltage shift of MOS devices due to radiation in the low-dose range

    CERN Document Server

    Wan Xin Heng; Gao Wen Yu; Huang Ru; Wang Yang Yuan

    2002-01-01

    An analytical MOSFET threshold voltage shift model due to radiation in the low-dose range has been developed for circuit simulations. Experimental data in the literature shows that the model predictions are in good agreement. It is simple in functional form and hence computationally efficient. It can be used as a basic circuit simulation tool for analysing MOSFET exposed to a nuclear environment up to about 1 Mrad(Si). In accordance with common believe, radiation induced absolute change of threshold voltage was found to be larger in irradiated PMOS devices. However, if the radiation sensitivity is defined in the way authors did it, the results indicated NMOS rather than PMOS devices are more sensitive, specially at low doses. This is important from the standpoint of their possible application in dosimetry

  18. Large-scale simulations of error-prone quantum computation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trieu, Doan Binh

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical concepts of quantum computation in the idealized and undisturbed case are well understood. However, in practice, all quantum computation devices do suffer from decoherence effects as well as from operational imprecisions. This work assesses the power of error-prone quantum computation devices using large-scale numerical simulations on parallel supercomputers. We present the Juelich Massively Parallel Ideal Quantum Computer Simulator (JUMPIQCS), that simulates a generic quantum computer on gate level. It comprises an error model for decoherence and operational errors. The robustness of various algorithms in the presence of noise has been analyzed. The simulation results show that for large system sizes and long computations it is imperative to actively correct errors by means of quantum error correction. We implemented the 5-, 7-, and 9-qubit quantum error correction codes. Our simulations confirm that using error-prone correction circuits with non-fault-tolerant quantum error correction will always fail, because more errors are introduced than being corrected. Fault-tolerant methods can overcome this problem, provided that the single qubit error rate is below a certain threshold. We incorporated fault-tolerant quantum error correction techniques into JUMPIQCS using Steane's 7-qubit code and determined this threshold numerically. Using the depolarizing channel as the source of decoherence, we find a threshold error rate of (5.2±0.2) x 10 -6 . For Gaussian distributed operational over-rotations the threshold lies at a standard deviation of 0.0431±0.0002. We can conclude that quantum error correction is especially well suited for the correction of operational imprecisions and systematic over-rotations. For realistic simulations of specific quantum computation devices we need to extend the generic model to dynamic simulations, i.e. time-dependent Hamiltonian simulations of realistic hardware models. We focus on today's most advanced technology, i

  19. Large-scale simulations of error-prone quantum computation devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trieu, Doan Binh

    2009-07-01

    The theoretical concepts of quantum computation in the idealized and undisturbed case are well understood. However, in practice, all quantum computation devices do suffer from decoherence effects as well as from operational imprecisions. This work assesses the power of error-prone quantum computation devices using large-scale numerical simulations on parallel supercomputers. We present the Juelich Massively Parallel Ideal Quantum Computer Simulator (JUMPIQCS), that simulates a generic quantum computer on gate level. It comprises an error model for decoherence and operational errors. The robustness of various algorithms in the presence of noise has been analyzed. The simulation results show that for large system sizes and long computations it is imperative to actively correct errors by means of quantum error correction. We implemented the 5-, 7-, and 9-qubit quantum error correction codes. Our simulations confirm that using error-prone correction circuits with non-fault-tolerant quantum error correction will always fail, because more errors are introduced than being corrected. Fault-tolerant methods can overcome this problem, provided that the single qubit error rate is below a certain threshold. We incorporated fault-tolerant quantum error correction techniques into JUMPIQCS using Steane's 7-qubit code and determined this threshold numerically. Using the depolarizing channel as the source of decoherence, we find a threshold error rate of (5.2{+-}0.2) x 10{sup -6}. For Gaussian distributed operational over-rotations the threshold lies at a standard deviation of 0.0431{+-}0.0002. We can conclude that quantum error correction is especially well suited for the correction of operational imprecisions and systematic over-rotations. For realistic simulations of specific quantum computation devices we need to extend the generic model to dynamic simulations, i.e. time-dependent Hamiltonian simulations of realistic hardware models. We focus on today's most advanced

  20. Comprehensive electrocardiogram-to-device time for primary percutaneous coronary intervention in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: A report from the American Heart Association mission: Lifeline program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavadia, Jay S; French, William; Hellkamp, Anne S; Thomas, Laine; Bates, Eric R; Manoukian, Steven V; Kontos, Michael C; Suter, Robert; Henry, Timothy D; Dauerman, Harold L; Roe, Matthew T

    2018-03-01

    Assessing hospital-related network-level primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performance for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is challenging due to differential time-to-treatment metrics based on location of diagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG) for STEMI. STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI at 588 PCI-capable hospitals in AHA Mission: Lifeline (2008-2013) were categorized by initial STEMI identification location: PCI-capable hospitals (Group 1); pre-hospital setting (Group 2); and non-PCI-capable hospitals (Group 3). Patient-specific time-to-treatment categories were converted to minutes ahead of or behind their group-specific mean; average time-to-treatment difference for all patients at a given hospital was termed comprehensive ECG-to-device time. Hospitals were then stratified into tertiles based on their comprehensive ECG-to-device times with negative values below the mean representing shorter (faster) time intervals. Of 117,857 patients, the proportion in Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 42%, 33%, and 25%, respectively. Lower rates of heart failure and cardiac arrest at presentation are noted within patients presenting to high-performing hospitals. Median comprehensive ECG-to-device time was shortest at -9 minutes (25th, 75th percentiles: -13, -6) for the high-performing hospital tertile, 1 minute (-1, 3) for middle-performing, and 11 minutes (7, 16) for low-performing. Unadjusted rates of in-hospital mortality were 2.3%, 2.6%, and 2.7%, respectively, but the adjusted risk of in-hospital mortality was similar across tertiles. Comprehensive ECG-to-device time provides an integrated hospital-related network-level assessment of reperfusion timing metrics for primary PCI, regardless of the location for STEMI identification; further validation will delineate how this metric can be used to facilitate STEMI care improvements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical simulation of 3D boundary-driven acoustic streaming in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Junjun; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-02-07

    This article discusses three-dimensional (3D) boundary-driven streaming in acoustofluidic devices. Firstly, the 3D Rayleigh streaming pattern in a microchannel is simulated and its effect on the movement of microparticles of various sizes is demonstrated. The results obtained from this model show good comparisons with 3D experimental visualisations and demonstrate the fully 3D nature of the acoustic streaming field and the associated acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in acoustofluidic devices. This method is then applied to another acoustofluidic device in order to gain insights into an unusual in-plane streaming pattern. The origin of this streaming has not been fully described and its characteristics cannot be explained from the classical theory of Rayleigh streaming. The simulated in-plane streaming pattern was in good agreement with the experimental visualisation. The mechanism behind it is shown to be related to the active sound intensity field, which supports our previous findings on the mechanism of the in-plane acoustic streaming pattern visualised and modelled in a thin-layered capillary device.

  2. Fabrication, electrical characterization and device simulation of vertical P3HT field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojian Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertical organic field-effect transistors (VOFETs provide an advantage over lateral ones with respect to the possibility to conveniently reduce the channel length. This is beneficial for increasing both the cut-off frequency and current density in organic field-effect transistor devices. We prepared P3HT (poly[3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl] VOFETs with a surrounding gate electrode and gate dielectric around the vertical P3HT pillar junction. Measured output and transfer characteristics do not show a distinct gate effect, in contrast to device simulations. By introducing in the simulations an edge layer with a strongly reduced charge mobility, the gate effect is significantly reduced. We therefore propose that a damaged layer at the P3HT/dielectric interface could be the reason for the strong suppression of the gate effect. We also simulated how the gate effect depends on the device parameters. A smaller pillar diameter and a larger gate electrode-dielectric overlap both lead to better gate control. Our findings thus provide important design parameters for future VOFETs.

  3. Polysilicon high frequency devices for large area electronics: Characterization, simulation and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botrel, J L [CEA-LETI 17, rue des Martyrs 38054 Grenoble (France); IMEP 23, rue des Martyrs 38016 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: jean-loius.botrel@cea.fr; Savry, O; Rozeau, O; Templier, F [CEA-LETI 17, rue des Martyrs 38054 Grenoble (France); Jomaah, J [IMEP 23, rue des Martyrs 38016 Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-16

    Laser Crystallised Polysilicon Thin Film Transistors have now sufficient good conduction properties to be used in high-frequency applications. In this work, we report the results for 5 {mu}m long polysilicon TFTs obtained at frequencies up to several hundred MHz for applications such as RFID tags or System-On-Panel. In order to investigate the device operation, DC and AC two-dimensional simulations of these devices in the Effective Medium framework have been performed. In the light of simulation results, the effects of carrier trapping and carrier transit on the device capacitances as a function of dimensions are analysed and compared. An equivalent small-signal circuit which accounts for the behaviour of these transistors in all regions of operation is proposed and a model for the most relevant elements of this circuit is presented. To validate our simulation results, scattering-parameters (S-parameters) measurements are performed for several structures such as multi-finger, serpentine and linear architectures and the most meaningful parameters will be given. Cut-off frequencies as high as 300 MHz and maximum oscillation frequencies of about 600 MHz have been extracted.

  4. Simulation Optimization by Genetic Search: A Comprehensive Study with Applications to Production Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yunker, James

    2003-01-01

    In this report, a relatively new simulation optimization technique, the genetic search, is compared to two more established simulation techniques-the pattern search and the response surface methodology search...

  5. Development and Validation of a Mobile Device-based External Ventricular Drain Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morone, Peter J; Bekelis, Kimon; Root, Brandon K; Singer, Robert J

    2017-10-01

    Multiple external ventricular drain (EVD) simulators have been created, yet their cost, bulky size, and nonreusable components limit their accessibility to residency programs. To create and validate an animated EVD simulator that is accessible on a mobile device. We developed a mobile-based EVD simulator that is compatible with iOS (Apple Inc., Cupertino, California) and Android-based devices (Google, Mountain View, California) and can be downloaded from the Apple App and Google Play Store. Our simulator consists of a learn mode, which teaches users the procedure, and a test mode, which assesses users' procedural knowledge. Twenty-eight participants, who were divided into expert and novice categories, completed the simulator in test mode and answered a postmodule survey. This was graded using a 5-point Likert scale, with 5 representing the highest score. Using the survey results, we assessed the module's face and content validity, whereas construct validity was evaluated by comparing the expert and novice test scores. Participants rated individual survey questions pertaining to face and content validity a median score of 4 out of 5. When comparing test scores, generated by the participants completing the test mode, the experts scored higher than the novices (mean, 71.5; 95% confidence interval, 69.2 to 73.8 vs mean, 48; 95% confidence interval, 44.2 to 51.6; P mobile-based EVD simulator that is inexpensive, reusable, and accessible. Our results demonstrate that this simulator is face, content, and construct valid. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  6. Measuring the impact of a 'point of view' disability simulation on nursing students' empathy using the Comprehensive State Empathy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel; Govind, Natalie; Pich, Jacqueline; Hoffman, Kerry; Jeong, Sarah Yeun-Sim; Norton, Carol Anne; Noble, Danielle; Maclellan, Lorna; Robinson-Reilly, Melissa; Everson, Naleya

    2017-12-01

    Although empathy is an integral component of professional practice and person-centred care, a body of research has identified that vulnerable patients groups frequently experience healthcare that is less than optimal and often lacking in empathy. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of an immersive point-of-view simulation on nursing students' empathy towards people with an Acquired Brain Injury. A convenience sample of 390 nursing students from a cohort of 488 participated in the study, giving a response rate of 80%. Students undertook the simulation in pairs and were randomly allocated to the role of either a person with Acquired Brain Injury or a rehabilitation nurse. The simulated 'patients' wore a hemiparesis suit that replicated the experience of dysphasia, hemianopia and hemiparesis. Characteristics of the sample were summarised using descriptive statistics. A two-group pre-test post-test design was used to investigate the impact of the simulation using the Comprehensive State Empathy Scale. t-Tests were performed to analyse changes in empathy pre post and between simulated 'patients' and 'rehabilitation nurses'. On average, participants reported significantly higher mean empathy scores post simulation (3.75, SD=0.66) compared to pre simulation (3.38 SD=0.61); t (398)=10.33, pempathy towards people with a disability. Research with other vulnerable patient groups, student cohorts and in other contexts would be beneficial in taking this work forward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Verification and Analysis of Implementing Virtual Electric Devices in Circuit Simulation of Pulsed DC Electrical Devices in the NI MULTISIM 10.1 Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solov'ev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis results of the implementation potential and evaluation of the virtual electric devices reliability when conducting circuit simulation of pulsed DC electrical devices in the NI Multisim 10.1environment. It analyses metrological properties of electric measuring devices and sensors of the NI Multisim 10.1environment. To calculate the reliable parameters of periodic non-sinusoidal electrical values based on their physical feasibility the mathematical expressions have been defined.To verify the virtual electric devices a circuit model of the power section of buck DC converter with enabled devices under consideration at its input and output is used as a consumer of pulse current of trapezoidal or triangular form. It is used as an example to show a technique to verify readings of virtual electric measuring devices in the NI Multisim 10.1environment.It is found that when simulating the pulsed DC electric devices to measure average and RMS voltage supply and current consumption values it is advisable to use the probe. Electric device power consumption read from the virtual power meter is equal to its average value, and its displayed power factor is inversely proportional to the input current form factor. To determine the RMS pulsed DC current by ammeter and multi-meter it is necessary to measure current by these devices in DC and AC modes, and then determine the RMS value of measurement results.Virtual electric devices verification has proved the possibility of their application to determine the energy performance of transistor converters for various purposes in the circuit simulation in the NI 10.1 Multisim environment, thus saving time of their designing.

  8. Numerical simulation and characterization of trapping noise in InGaP-GaAs heterojunctions devices at high injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallatamby, Jean-Christophe; Abdelhadi, Khaled; Jacquet, Jean-Claude; Prigent, Michel; Floriot, Didier; Delage, Sylvain; Obregon, Juan

    2013-03-01

    Commercially available simulators present considerable advantages in performing accurate DC, AC and transient simulations of semiconductor devices, including many fundamental and parasitic effects which are not generally taken into account in house-made simulators. Nevertheless, while the TCAD simulators of the public domain we have tested give accurate results for the simulation of diffusion noise, none of the tested simulators perform trap-assisted GR noise accurately. In order to overcome the aforementioned problem we propose a robust solution to accurately simulate GR noise due to traps. It is based on numerical processing of the output data of one of the simulators available in the public-domain, namely SENTAURUS (from Synopsys). We have linked together, through a dedicated Data Access Component (DAC), the deterministic output data available from SENTAURUS and a powerful, customizable post-processing tool developed on the mathematical SCILAB software package. Thus, robust simulations of GR noise in semiconductor devices can be performed by using GR Langevin sources associated to the scalar Green functions responses of the device. Our method takes advantage of the accuracy of the deterministic simulations of electronic devices obtained with SENTAURUS. A Comparison between 2-D simulations and measurements of low frequency noise on InGaP-GaAs heterojunctions, at low as well as high injection levels, demonstrates the validity of the proposed simulation tool.

  9. Basic life support: evaluation of learning using simulation and immediate feedback devices1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobase, Lucia; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Tomazini, Edenir Aparecida Sartorelli; Teodoro, Simone Valentim; Ramos, Meire Bruna; Polastri, Thatiane Facholi

    2017-10-30

    to evaluate students' learning in an online course on basic life support with immediate feedback devices, during a simulation of care during cardiorespiratory arrest. a quasi-experimental study, using a before-and-after design. An online course on basic life support was developed and administered to participants, as an educational intervention. Theoretical learning was evaluated by means of a pre- and post-test and, to verify the practice, simulation with immediate feedback devices was used. there were 62 participants, 87% female, 90% in the first and second year of college, with a mean age of 21.47 (standard deviation 2.39). With a 95% confidence level, the mean scores in the pre-test were 6.4 (standard deviation 1.61), and 9.3 in the post-test (standard deviation 0.82, p basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation, according to the feedback device; 43.7 (standard deviation 26.86) mean duration of the compression cycle by second of 20.5 (standard deviation 9.47); number of compressions 167.2 (standard deviation 57.06); depth of compressions of 48.1 millimeter (standard deviation 10.49); volume of ventilation 742.7 (standard deviation 301.12); flow fraction percentage of 40.3 (standard deviation 10.03). the online course contributed to learning of basic life support. In view of the need for technological innovations in teaching and systematization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, simulation and feedback devices are resources that favor learning and performance awareness in performing the maneuvers.

  10. Basic life support: evaluation of learning using simulation and immediate feedback devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Tobase

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate students’ learning in an online course on basic life support with immediate feedback devices, during a simulation of care during cardiorespiratory arrest. Method: a quasi-experimental study, using a before-and-after design. An online course on basic life support was developed and administered to participants, as an educational intervention. Theoretical learning was evaluated by means of a pre- and post-test and, to verify the practice, simulation with immediate feedback devices was used. Results: there were 62 participants, 87% female, 90% in the first and second year of college, with a mean age of 21.47 (standard deviation 2.39. With a 95% confidence level, the mean scores in the pre-test were 6.4 (standard deviation 1.61, and 9.3 in the post-test (standard deviation 0.82, p <0.001; in practice, 9.1 (standard deviation 0.95 with performance equivalent to basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation, according to the feedback device; 43.7 (standard deviation 26.86 mean duration of the compression cycle by second of 20.5 (standard deviation 9.47; number of compressions 167.2 (standard deviation 57.06; depth of compressions of 48.1 millimeter (standard deviation 10.49; volume of ventilation 742.7 (standard deviation 301.12; flow fraction percentage of 40.3 (standard deviation 10.03. Conclusion: the online course contributed to learning of basic life support. In view of the need for technological innovations in teaching and systematization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, simulation and feedback devices are resources that favor learning and performance awareness in performing the maneuvers.

  11. Simulation and inference for stochastic processes with YUIMA a comprehensive R framework for SDEs and other stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Iacus, Stefano M

    2018-01-01

    The YUIMA package is the first comprehensive R framework based on S4 classes and methods which allows for the simulation of stochastic differential equations driven by Wiener process, Lévy processes or fractional Brownian motion, as well as CARMA processes. The package performs various central statistical analyses such as quasi maximum likelihood estimation, adaptive Bayes estimation, structural change point analysis, hypotheses testing, asynchronous covariance estimation, lead-lag estimation, LASSO model selection, and so on. YUIMA also supports stochastic numerical analysis by fast computation of the expected value of functionals of stochastic processes through automatic asymptotic expansion by means of the Malliavin calculus. All models can be multidimensional, multiparametric or non parametric.The book explains briefly the underlying theory for simulation and inference of several classes of stochastic processes and then presents both simulation experiments and applications to real data. Although these ...

  12. Comprehensive Performance Evaluation for Hydrological and Nutrients Simulation Using the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran in a Mesoscale Monsoon Watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaofu; Luo, Chuan; Jiang, Kaixia; Wan, Rongrong; Li, Hengpeng

    2017-12-19

    The Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) is a hydrological and water quality computer model that was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Comprehensive performance evaluations were carried out for hydrological and nutrient simulation using the HSPF model in the Xitiaoxi watershed in China. Streamflow simulation was calibrated from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2007 and then validated from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 using daily observed data, and nutrient simulation was calibrated and validated using monthly observed data during the period from July 2009 to July 2010. These results of model performance evaluation showed that the streamflows were well simulated over the study period. The determination coefficient ( R ²) was 0.87, 0.77 and 0.63, and the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency (Ens) was 0.82, 0.76 and 0.65 for the streamflow simulation in annual, monthly and daily time-steps, respectively. Although limited to monthly observed data, satisfactory performance was still achieved during the quantitative evaluation for nutrients. The R ² was 0.73, 0.82 and 0.92, and the Ens was 0.67, 0.74 and 0.86 for nitrate, ammonium and orthophosphate simulation, respectively. Some issues may affect the application of HSPF were also discussed, such as input data quality, parameter values, etc. Overall, the HSPF model can be successfully used to describe streamflow and nutrients transport in the mesoscale watershed located in the East Asian monsoon climate area. This study is expected to serve as a comprehensive and systematic documentation of understanding the HSPF model for wide application and avoiding possible misuses.

  13. Integrated devices for quantum information and quantum simulation with polarization encoded qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansoni, Linda; Sciarrino, Fabio; Mataloni, Paolo; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    The ability to manipulate quantum states of light by integrated devices may open new perspectives both for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and for novel technological applications. The technology for handling polarization-encoded qubits, the most commonly adopted approach, was still missing in quantum optical circuits until the ultrafast laser writing (ULW) technique was adopted for the first time to realize integrated devices able to support and manipulate polarization encoded qubits.1 Thanks to this method, polarization dependent and independent devices can be realized. In particular the maintenance of polarization entanglement was demonstrated in a balanced polarization independent integrated beam splitter1 and an integrated CNOT gate for polarization qubits was realized and carachterized.2 We also exploited integrated optics for quantum simulation tasks: by adopting the ULW technique an integrated quantum walk circuit was realized3 and, for the first time, we investigate how the particle statistics, either bosonic or fermionic, influences a two-particle discrete quantum walk. Such experiment has been realized by adopting two-photon entangled states and an array of integrated symmetric directional couplers. The polarization entanglement was exploited to simulate the bunching-antibunching feature of non interacting bosons and fermions. To this scope a novel three-dimensional geometry for the waveguide circuit is introduced, which allows accurate polarization independent behaviour, maintaining a remarkable control on both phase and balancement of the directional couplers.

  14. Comparison of 4 supraglotttic devices used by paramedics during simulated CPR : a randomized controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarpak, Łukasz; Kurowski, Andrzej; Truszewski, Zenon; Robak, Oliver; Frass, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Ensuring an open airway during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is fundamental. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of blind intubation during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation by untrained personnel. Four devices were compared in a simulated resuscitation scenario: ILMA (Intavent Direct Ltd, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom), Cobra PLA (Engineered Medical Systems Inc, Indianapolis, IN), Supraglottic Airway Laryngopharyngeal Tube (SALT) (ECOLAB, St. Paul, MN), and Air-Q (Mercury Medical, Clearwater, FL). A group of 210 paramedics intubated a manikin with continuous chest compressions. The mean times to intubation were 40.46 ± 4.64, 33.96 ± 6.23, 17.2 ± 4.63, and 49.23 ± 13.19 seconds (SALT vs ILMA, Cobra PLA, and Air-Q; P blind intubation for the devices were 86.7%, 85.7%, 100%, and 71.4% (SALT vs ILMA, Cobra PLA, and Air-Q; P blind intubation time was the SALT device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical simulation of a cyclone used as an inlet device of a gravitational separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Carlos Alberto Capela [Centro de Pesquisas da PETROBRAS (CENPES), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Tecnologia de Processamento Primario], E-mail: capela@petrobras.com.br; Oliveira Junior, Joao Americo Aguirre; Almeida, Lucilla Coelho de [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mails: joao.aguirre@esss.com.br, lucilla@esss.com.br

    2011-04-15

    This study presents the numerical simulation of the flow inside a gravitational separator to evaluate the influence of each internal device in the separation efficiency. In this first stage, the cyclone - located at the vessel entrance, known as the primary separation - internal flow is investigated. The flow inside cyclones presents rather complex and challenging characteristics, such as: streamlines with high curvature, intense force fields, interaction between primary and secondary flows and anisotropic turbulence. A three-dimensional fluid dynamics study is presented of a gas-liquid two-phase flow in a cyclone. The two-phase flow was modeled using an Eulerian, isothermal approach. The main conclusion of these simulations is the phase separation inside the proposed initial design does not occur by centrifugal effect, as an internal rotating flow is not established, due to an ineffective inlet design. Based on the lack of this expected centrifugal field for a cyclone, it can be concluded that the device does not behave as such. As a result, the device efficiency is limited and possibly small droplets will be carried by the gas stream. Therefore, changes to the cyclone inlet geometry were proposed to better achieve the cyclone effect to increase the separation efficiency. (author)

  16. Modeling and simulation of floating gate nanocrystal FET devices and circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed A. M.

    The nonvolatile memory market has been growing very fast during the last decade, especially for mobile communication systems. The Semiconductor Industry Association International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors states that the difficult challenge for nonvolatile semiconductor memories is to achieve reliable, low power, low voltage performance and high-speed write/erase. This can be achieved by aggressive scaling of the nonvolatile memory cells. Unfortunately, scaling down of conventional nonvolatile memory will further degrade the retention time due to the charge loss between the floating gate and drain/source contacts and substrate which makes conventional nonvolatile memory unattractive. Using nanocrystals as charge storage sites reduces dramatically the charge leakage through oxide defects and drain/source contacts. Floating gate nanocrystal nonvolatile memory, FG-NCNVM, is a candidate for future memory because it is advantageous in terms of high-speed write/erase, small size, good scalability, low-voltage, low-power applications, and the capability to store multiple bits per cell. Many studies regarding FG-NCNVMs have been published. Most of them have dealt with fabrication improvements of the devices and device characterizations. Due to the promising FG-NCNVM applications in integrated circuits, there is a need for circuit a simulation model to simulate the electrical characteristics of the floating gate devices. In this thesis, a FG-NCNVM circuit simulation model has been proposed. It is based on the SPICE BSIM simulation model. This model simulates the cell behavior during normal operation. Model validation results have been presented. The SPICE model shows good agreement with experimental results. Current-voltage characteristics, transconductance and unity gain frequency (fT) have been studied showing the effect of the threshold voltage shift (DeltaVth) due to nanocrystal charge on the device characteristics. The threshold voltage shift due to

  17. Comparing the Effects of Speech-Generating Device Display Organization on Symbol Comprehension and Use by Three Children With Developmental Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton-Hulsey, Andrea; Wegner, Jane; Brady, Nancy C; Bunce, Betty H; Sevcik, Rose A

    2017-05-17

    Three children ages 3;6 to 5;3 with developmental and language delays were provided experience with a traditional grid-based display and a contextually organized visual scene display on a speech-generating device to illustrate considerations for practice and future research in augmentative and alternative communication assessment and intervention. Twelve symbols were taught in a grid display and visual scene display using aided input during dramatic play routines. Teaching sessions were 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. Symbol comprehension and use was assessed pre and post 3 weeks of experience. Comprehension of symbol vocabulary on both displays increased after 3 weeks of experience. Participants 1 and 2 used both displays largely for initiation. Participant 3 had limited expressive use of either display. The methods used in this study demonstrate one way to inform individual differences in learning and preference for speech-generating device displays when making clinical decisions regarding augmentative and alternative communication supports for a child and their family. Future research should systematically examine the role of extant comprehension, symbol experience, functional communication needs, and the role of vocabulary type in the learning and use of grid displays versus visual scene displays.

  18. Full-band quantum simulation of electron devices with the pseudopotential method: Theory, implementation, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, M. G.; Esseni, D.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the theory, implementation, and application of a quantum transport modeling approach based on the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and a full-band empirical pseudopotential Hamiltonian. We here propose to employ a hybrid real-space/plane-wave basis that results in a significant reduction of the computational complexity compared to a full plane-wave basis. To this purpose, we provide a theoretical formulation in the hybrid basis of the quantum confinement, the self-energies of the leads, and the coupling between the device and the leads. After discussing the theory and the implementation of the new simulation methodology, we report results for complete, self-consistent simulations of different electron devices, including a silicon Esaki diode, a thin-body silicon field effect transistor (FET), and a germanium tunnel FET. The simulated transistors have technologically relevant geometrical features with a semiconductor film thickness of about 4 nm and a channel length ranging from 10 to 17 nm. We believe that the newly proposed formalism may find applications also in transport models based on ab initio Hamiltonians, as those employed in density functional theory methods.

  19. The simulation of an imaging gamma-ray Compton backscattering device using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechas, D.; Cristancho, F.; Sarmiento, L.G.; Fajardo, E.

    2014-01-01

    A gamma-backscattering imaging device dubbed Compton Camera, developed at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) and modified and studied at the Nuclear Physics Group of the National University of Colombia in Bogota, uses the back-to-back emission of two gamma rays in the positron annihilation to construct a bidimensional image that represents the distribution of matter in the field-of-view of the camera. This imaging capability can be used in a host of different situations, for example, to identify and study deposition and structural defects, and to help locating concealed objects, to name just two cases. In order to increase the understanding of the response of the Compton Camera and, in particular, its image formation process, and to assist in the data analysis, a simulation of the camera was developed using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. In this work, the images resulting from different experimental conditions are shown. The simulated images and their comparison with the experimental ones already suggest methods to improve the present experimental device. (author)

  20. Simulations and measurements of coupling impedance for modern particle accelerator devices

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2158523; Biancacci, Nicolò; Mostacci, Andrea

    In this document it has been treated the study of the coupling impedance in modern devices, already installed or not, in different particle accelerators. In the specific case: • For a device in-phase of project, several simulations for impedance calculation have been done. • For a component already realized and used, measurements of coupling impedance value have been done. Simulations are used to determine the impact of the interconnect between to magnets, designed for the future particle accelerator FCC, on the overall impedance of the machine which is about 100 km long. In particular has been done a check between theory, simulations and measurements of components already built, allowing a better and deeper study of the component we have analysed. Controls that probably will be helpful to have a clear guideline in future works. The measurements instead concern in an existing component that was already used in LHC, the longest particle accelerator ever realised on the planet, 27 km long. The coupling impe...

  1. Simulation and training of lumbar punctures using haptic volume rendering and a 6DOF haptic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Matthias; Heller, Julika; Handels, Heinz

    2007-03-01

    The lumbar puncture is performed by inserting a needle into the spinal chord of the patient to inject medicaments or to extract liquor. The training of this procedure is usually done on the patient guided by experienced supervisors. A virtual reality lumbar puncture simulator has been developed in order to minimize the training costs and the patient's risk. We use a haptic device with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) to feedback forces that resist needle insertion and rotation. An improved haptic volume rendering approach is used to calculate the forces. This approach makes use of label data of relevant structures like skin, bone, muscles or fat and original CT data that contributes information about image structures that can not be segmented. A real-time 3D visualization with optional stereo view shows the punctured region. 2D visualizations of orthogonal slices enable a detailed impression of the anatomical context. The input data consisting of CT and label data and surface models of relevant structures is defined in an XML file together with haptic rendering and visualization parameters. In a first evaluation the visible human male data has been used to generate a virtual training body. Several users with different medical experience tested the lumbar puncture trainer. The simulator gives a good haptic and visual impression of the needle insertion and the haptic volume rendering technique enables the feeling of unsegmented structures. Especially, the restriction of transversal needle movement together with rotation constraints enabled by the 6DOF device facilitate a realistic puncture simulation.

  2. Design and finite element simulation of vacuum systems for insertion devices in Indus-2 storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, D.P.; Bais, Vijay; Sridhar, R.; Dhimole, Vivek K.; Nitesh, Suthar; Rawal, B.R.; Chogaonkar, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Indus-2 is a 2.5 GeV, 300 mA, Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) located at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. As part of insertion device (ID) development programme two new devices namely, APPLE-2 (Advanced Planar Polarized Light Emitter) type Undulator (also known as U-3 Undulator) and 5 Tesla superconducting wavelength shifter (SWLS) are being developed. APPLE-2 will generate variably polarized synchrotron radiation (SR) required for carrying out magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and magnetic linear dichroism (MLD) experiments and SWLS will generate synchrotron radiation (SR) with critical photon energy of about 20.8 keV for Energy Dispersive XRD beam line. This paper describes design details and finite element analysis results of various simulations carried out for the vacuum systems of these IDs

  3. Three-dimensional two-fluid Braginskii simulations of the large plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Dustin M., E-mail: dustin.m.fisher.gr@dartmouth.edu; Rogers, Barrett N., E-mail: barrett.rogers@dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Rossi, Giovanni D.; Guice, Daniel S.; Carter, Troy A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) is modeled using the 3D Global Braginskii Solver code. Comparisons to experimental measurements are made in the low-bias regime in which there is an intrinsic E × B rotation of the plasma. In the simulations, this rotation is caused primarily by sheath effects and may be a likely mechanism for the intrinsic rotation seen in LAPD. Simulations show strong qualitative agreement with the data, particularly the radial dependence of the density fluctuations, cross-correlation lengths, radial flux dependence outside of the cathode edge, and camera imagery. Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) turbulence at relatively large scales is the dominant driver of cross-field transport in these simulations with smaller-scale drift waves and sheath modes playing a secondary role. Plasma holes and blobs arising from KH vortices in the simulations are consistent with the scale sizes and overall appearance of those in LAPD camera images. The addition of ion-neutral collisions in the simulations at previously theorized values reduces the radial particle flux by about a factor of two, from values that are somewhat larger than the experimentally measured flux to values that are somewhat lower than the measurements. This reduction is due to a modest stabilizing contribution of the collisions on the KH-modes driving the turbulent transport.

  4. Three-Dimensional Muscle Architecture and Comprehensive Dynamic Properties of Rabbit Gastrocnemius, Plantaris and Soleus: Input for Simulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Tobias; Leichsenring, Kay; Rode, Christian; Wick, Carolin; Stutzig, Norman; Schubert, Harald; Blickhan, Reinhard; Böl, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The vastly increasing number of neuro-muscular simulation studies (with increasing numbers of muscles used per simulation) is in sharp contrast to a narrow database of necessary muscle parameters. Simulation results depend heavily on rough parameter estimates often obtained by scaling of one muscle parameter set. However, in vivo muscles differ in their individual properties and architecture. Here we provide a comprehensive dataset of dynamic (n = 6 per muscle) and geometric (three-dimensional architecture, n = 3 per muscle) muscle properties of the rabbit calf muscles gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus. For completeness we provide the dynamic muscle properties for further important shank muscles (flexor digitorum longus, extensor digitorum longus, and tibialis anterior; n = 1 per muscle). Maximum shortening velocity (normalized to optimal fiber length) of the gastrocnemius is about twice that of soleus, while plantaris showed an intermediate value. The force-velocity relation is similar for gastrocnemius and plantaris but is much more bent for the soleus. Although the muscles vary greatly in their three-dimensional architecture their mean pennation angle and normalized force-length relationships are almost similar. Forces of the muscles were enhanced in the isometric phase following stretching and were depressed following shortening compared to the corresponding isometric forces. While the enhancement was independent of the ramp velocity, the depression was inversely related to the ramp velocity. The lowest effect strength for soleus supports the idea that these effects adapt to muscle function. The careful acquisition of typical dynamical parameters (e.g. force-length and force-velocity relations, force elongation relations of passive components), enhancement and depression effects, and 3D muscle architecture of calf muscles provides valuable comprehensive datasets for e.g. simulations with neuro-muscular models, development of more realistic muscle models, or

  5. Three-Dimensional Muscle Architecture and Comprehensive Dynamic Properties of Rabbit Gastrocnemius, Plantaris and Soleus: Input for Simulation Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Siebert

    Full Text Available The vastly increasing number of neuro-muscular simulation studies (with increasing numbers of muscles used per simulation is in sharp contrast to a narrow database of necessary muscle parameters. Simulation results depend heavily on rough parameter estimates often obtained by scaling of one muscle parameter set. However, in vivo muscles differ in their individual properties and architecture. Here we provide a comprehensive dataset of dynamic (n = 6 per muscle and geometric (three-dimensional architecture, n = 3 per muscle muscle properties of the rabbit calf muscles gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus. For completeness we provide the dynamic muscle properties for further important shank muscles (flexor digitorum longus, extensor digitorum longus, and tibialis anterior; n = 1 per muscle. Maximum shortening velocity (normalized to optimal fiber length of the gastrocnemius is about twice that of soleus, while plantaris showed an intermediate value. The force-velocity relation is similar for gastrocnemius and plantaris but is much more bent for the soleus. Although the muscles vary greatly in their three-dimensional architecture their mean pennation angle and normalized force-length relationships are almost similar. Forces of the muscles were enhanced in the isometric phase following stretching and were depressed following shortening compared to the corresponding isometric forces. While the enhancement was independent of the ramp velocity, the depression was inversely related to the ramp velocity. The lowest effect strength for soleus supports the idea that these effects adapt to muscle function. The careful acquisition of typical dynamical parameters (e.g. force-length and force-velocity relations, force elongation relations of passive components, enhancement and depression effects, and 3D muscle architecture of calf muscles provides valuable comprehensive datasets for e.g. simulations with neuro-muscular models, development of more realistic

  6. Physical multiscale modeling and numerical simulation of electrochemical devices for energy conversion and storage from theory to engineering to practice

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Alejandro A; Bessler, Wolfgang G

    2015-01-01

    This book reviews the use of innovative physical multiscale modeling methods to deeply understand the electrochemical mechanisms and numerically simulate the structure and properties of electrochemical devices for energy storage and conversion.

  7. Finite temperature simulation studies of spin-flop magnetic random access memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chui, S.T.; Chang, C.-R.

    2006-01-01

    Spin-flop structures are currently being developed for magnetic random access memory devices. We report simulation studies of this system. We found the switching involves an intermediate edge-pinned domain state, similar to that observed in the single layer case. This switching scenario is quite different from that based on the coherent rotation picture. A significant temperature dependence of the switching field is observed. Our result suggests that the interplane coupling and thus the switching field has to be above a finite threshold for the spin-flop switching to be better than conventional switching methods

  8. Physiologically Modulating Videogames or Simulations which Use Motion-Sensing Input Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Stephens, Chad L. (Inventor); Blanson, Nina Marie (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    New types of controllers allow a player to make inputs to a video game or simulation by moving the entire controller itself or by gesturing or by moving the player's body in whole or in part. This capability is typically accomplished using a wireless input device having accelerometers, gyroscopes, and a camera. The present invention exploits these wireless motion-sensing technologies to modulate the player's movement inputs to the videogame based upon physiological signals. Such biofeedback-modulated video games train valuable mental skills beyond eye-hand coordination. These psychophysiological training technologies enhance personal improvement, not just the diversion, of the user.

  9. Optimization of FIBMOS Through 2D Silvaco ATLAS and 2D Monte Carlo Particle-based Device Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, J.; He, X.; Vasileska, D.; Schroder, D. K.

    2001-01-01

    Focused Ion Beam MOSFETs (FIBMOS) demonstrate large enhancements in core device performance areas such as output resistance, hot electron reliability and voltage stability upon channel length or drain voltage variation. In this work, we describe an optimization technique for FIBMOS threshold voltage characterization using the 2D Silvaco ATLAS simulator. Both ATLAS and 2D Monte Carlo particle-based simulations were used to show that FIBMOS devices exhibit enhanced current drive ...

  10. The generic methodology for verification and validation applied to medium range anti-tank simulation training devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogd, J.M.; Roza, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Defense (NL-MoD) has recently acquired an update of its medium range anti tank (MRAT) missile system, called the GILL. The update to the SPIKE Long Range (LR) weapon system is accompanied with the acquisition of new simulation training devices (STDs). These devices are bought

  11. cophesim: a comprehensive phenotype simulator for testing novel association methods [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Y. Zhbannikov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is important in evaluating novel methods when input data is not easily obtainable or specific assumptions are needed. We present cophesim, a software to add the phenotype to generated genotype data prepared with a genetic simulator. The output of cophesim can be used as a direct input for different genome wide association study tools. cophesim is available from https://bitbucket.org/izhbannikov/cophesim.

  12. SIMULATION STUDY OF LONGITUDINAL FORCES IN THE COUPLING DEVICE OF HEAVY FREIGHT TRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Stokłosa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available On the LHS line (Broad-gauge Metallurgical Line, far out West of the railway line with a gauge of 1520 mm, heavy goods trains for a gross weight 5500 tons and a length of 850 m are operated. The article presents the results of a simulation study of the forces that occur in the automatic coupling device of SA-3 type of Russian production train consisting of 60 coal wagons of Russian construction of gross mass 91 tons each. The train moves on the 1520 mm gauge tracks curve S type (the radius of curvature of curves 300 m. Simulation studies were conducted using the Train Module of program to dynamic study multi-elements systems of Universal Mechanism UM 6.0.

  13. Modified Dirac Hamiltonian for efficient quantum mechanical simulations of micron sized devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, K. M. Masum, E-mail: masum.habib@virginia.edu; Ghosh, Avik W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Sajjad, Redwan N. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Representing massless Dirac fermions on a spatial lattice poses a potential challenge known as the Fermion Doubling problem. Addition of a quadratic term to the Dirac Hamiltonian provides a possible way to circumvent this problem. We show that the modified Hamiltonian with the additional term results in a very small Hamiltonian matrix when discretized on a real space square lattice. The resulting Hamiltonian matrix is considerably more efficient for numerical simulations without sacrificing on accuracy and is several orders of magnitude faster than the atomistic tight binding model. Using this Hamiltonian and the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we show several transport phenomena in graphene, such as magnetic focusing, chiral tunneling in the ballistic limit, and conductivity in the diffusive limit in micron sized graphene devices. The modified Hamiltonian can be used for any system with massless Dirac fermions such as Topological Insulators, opening up a simulation domain that is not readily accessible otherwise.

  14. Modified Dirac Hamiltonian for efficient quantum mechanical simulations of micron sized devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, K. M. Masum; Ghosh, Avik W.; Sajjad, Redwan N.

    2016-01-01

    Representing massless Dirac fermions on a spatial lattice poses a potential challenge known as the Fermion Doubling problem. Addition of a quadratic term to the Dirac Hamiltonian provides a possible way to circumvent this problem. We show that the modified Hamiltonian with the additional term results in a very small Hamiltonian matrix when discretized on a real space square lattice. The resulting Hamiltonian matrix is considerably more efficient for numerical simulations without sacrificing on accuracy and is several orders of magnitude faster than the atomistic tight binding model. Using this Hamiltonian and the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we show several transport phenomena in graphene, such as magnetic focusing, chiral tunneling in the ballistic limit, and conductivity in the diffusive limit in micron sized graphene devices. The modified Hamiltonian can be used for any system with massless Dirac fermions such as Topological Insulators, opening up a simulation domain that is not readily accessible otherwise.

  15. Computer simulation of a plasma focus device driven by a magnetic pulser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgescu, N; Zoita, V [Inst. of Physics and Technology of Radiation Devices, Bucharest (Romania); Larour, J [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1997-12-31

    A plasma focus device, driven by a magnetic pulse compression circuit, is simulated by using a PSPICE proffam. The elaborated program is much simpler than the other existing ones, which analyse the circuit by directly solving a system of integral-differential equations. The pre-pulse voltage and the high-voltage rise-times are obtained for a set of values of the bypass impedance (R or L). The optimum bypass impedance turns out to be an inductance. During the discharge period, the plasma load is considered as an LR impedance, each component being time dependent. A method is presented for giving us the possibility to introduce the time varying impedances in a PSPICE program. Finally, a set of simulation results (plasma current and voltage, plasma magnetic energy, plasma sheath mechanical energy, pinch voltage) is shown. The results are in good agreement with the classical experimental data. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs.

  16. A two-parameter preliminary optimization study for a fluidized-bed boiler through a comprehensive mathematical simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabi, Jose A.; Souza-Santos, Marcio L. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mails: jrabi@fem.unicamp.br; dss@fem.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Modeling and simulation of fluidized-bed equipment have demonstrated their importance as a tool for design and optimization of industrial equipment. Accordingly, this work carries on an optimization study of a fluidized-bed boiler with the aid of a comprehensive mathematical simulator. The configuration data of the boiler are based on a particular Babcock and Wilcox Co. (USA) test unit. Due to their importance, the number of tubes in the bed section and the air excess are chosen as the parameters upon which the optimization study is based. On their turn, the fixed-carbon conversion factor and the boiler efficiency are chosen as two distinct optimization objectives. The results from both preliminary searches are compared. The present work is intended to be just a study on possible routes for future optimization of larger boilers. Nonetheless, the present discussion might give some insight on the equipment behavior. (author)

  17. Comprehensive physical models and simulation package for plasma/material interactions during plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-01-01

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) from plasma instabilities remains a major obstacle to a successful tokamak concept. The extent of the damage depends on the detailed physics of the disrupting plasma, as well as on the physics of plasma-material interactions. A comprehensive computer package called high energy interaction with general heterogeneous target systems (HEIGHTS) has been developed and consists of several integrated computer models that follow the beginning of a plasma disruption at the scrape-off layer (SOL) through the transport of the eroded debris and splashed target materials to nearby locations as a result of the deposited energy. The package can study, for the first time, plasma-turbulent behavior in the SOL and predict the plasma parameters and conditions at the divertor plate. Full two-dimensional (2-D) comprehensive radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models are coupled with target thermodynamics and liquid hydrodynamics to evaluate the integrated response of plasma-facing materials. Factors that influence the lifetime of plasma-facing and nearby components, such as loss of vapor cloud confinement and vapor removal due to MHD effects, damage to nearby components due to intense vapor radiation, melt splashing, and brittle destruction of target materials, are also modeled and discussed. (orig.)

  18. Does comprehension of symbolic gestures and corresponding-in-meaning words make use of motor simulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Giovanna Cristina; De Stefani, Elisa; Innocenti, Alessandro; De Marco, Doriana; Gough, Patricia M; Buccino, Giovanni; Gentilucci, Maurizio

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed at determining whether or not the comprehension of symbolic gestures, and corresponding-in-meaning words, makes use of cortical circuits involved in movement execution control. Participants were presented with videos of an actress producing meaningful or meaningless gestures, pronouncing corresponding-in-meaning words or pseudo-words; they were required to judge whether the signal was meaningful or meaningless. Single pulse TMS was applied to forearm primary motor cortex area 150-200 ms after the point when the stimulus meaning could be understood. MEPs were significantly greater when processing meaningless signals as compared to a baseline condition presenting a still-and-silent actress. In contrast, this was not the case for meaningful signals whose motor activation did not differ from that for the baseline stimulus. MEPs were significantly greater for meaningless than meaningful signals and no significant difference was found between gesture and speech. On the basis of these results, we hypothesized that the observation-of/listening-to meaningless signals recruits motor areas. In contrast, this did not occur when the signals were meaningful. Overall, the data suggest that the processes related to comprehension of symbolic gestures and communicative words do not involve primary motor area and probably use brain areas involved in semantics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comprehensive physical models and simulation package for plasma/material interactions during plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1998-01-01

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFCS) from plasma instabilities remains a major obstacle to a successful tokamak concept. The extent of the damage depends on the detailed physics of the disrupting plasma, as well as on the physics of plasma-material interactions. A comprehensive computer package called High Energy Interaction with General Heterogeneous Target Systems (HEIGHTS) has been developed and consists of several integrated computer models that follow the beginning of a plasma disruption at the scrape-off layer (SOL) through the transport of the eroded debris and splashed target materials to nearby locations as a result of the deposited energy. The package can study, for the first time, plasma-turbulent behavior in the SOL and predict the plasma parameters and conditions at the divertor plate. Full two-dimensional (2-D) comprehensive radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models are coupled with target thermodynamics and liquid hydrodynamics to evaluate the integrated response of plasma-facing materials. Factors that influence the lifetime of plasma-facing and nearby components, such as loss of vapor-cloud confinement and vapor removal due to MHD effects, damage to nearby components due to intense vapor radiation, melt splashing, and brittle destruction of target materials, are also modeled and discussed

  20. A comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgaied, A; Fisher, J; Jennings, L M

    2018-02-01

    A more robust pre-clinical wear simulation framework is required in order to simulate wider and higher ranges of activities, observed in different patient populations such as younger more active patients. Such a framework will help to understand and address the reported higher failure rates for younger and more active patients (National_Joint_Registry, 2016). The current study has developed and validated a comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements (TKR). The input mechanical (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) and wear parameters of the moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearing material were independently measured from experimental studies under realistic test conditions, similar to the loading conditions found in the total knee replacements. The wear predictions from the computational wear simulation were validated against the direct experimental wear measurements for size 3 Sigma curved total knee replacements (DePuy, UK) in an independent experimental wear simulation study under three different daily activities; walking, deep squat, and stairs ascending kinematic conditions. The measured compressive mechanical properties of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE material were more than 20% lower than that reported in the literature under tensile test conditions. The pin-on-plate wear coefficient of moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was significantly dependant of the contact stress and the degree of cross-shear at the articulating surfaces. The computational wear predictions for the TKR from the current framework were consistent and in a good agreement with the independent full TKR experimental wear simulation measurements, with 0.94 coefficient of determination of the framework. In addition, the comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework was able to explain the complex experimental wear trends from the three different daily

  1. Micromagnetic simulation of exploratory magnetic logic device with missing corner defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaokuo, E-mail: yangxk0123@163.com; Cai, Li; Zhang, Bin; Cui, Huanqing; Zhang, Mingliang

    2015-11-15

    Magnetic film nanostructures are attractive components of nonvolatile magnetoresistive memories and nanomagnet logic circuits. Recently, we studied switching properties (i.e., null logic preserving) of rectangle shape nanomagnet subjected to fabrication imperfections. Specifically, we presented typical missing corner material-related imperfections and adopted an isosceles triangle to model this defect for nanomagnets. Micromagnetic simulation shows that this kind of imperfections modeling method agrees well with previous experimental observations. Using the proposed defect modeling scheme, we investigate in detail the switching characteristics of different defective stand-alone and coupled nanomagnets. The results suggest that the state transition of defective nanomagnet element highly depends on defect type and device’s aspect ratio, and the defect type B{sub d} needs the largest coercive field, while the defect type D requires the largest null field for switching. These findings can provide key technical parameters and guides for nanomagnet logic circuit design. - Highlights: • We have modeled missing corner defect issue for nanomagnet logic device. • The logic state of defective NML element highly depends on defect type and AR. • The NML device with defect type B{sub d} needs the largest coercive field to reverse state. • The defect type D in the NML devices requires the largest null field to switch.

  2. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  3. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Eric S., E-mail: epaulson@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 and Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  4. 77 FR 75173 - Comprehensive Assessment of the Process for the Review of Device Submissions; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ..., ``Independent Assessment of Review Process Management'', of the commitment letter entitled ``MDUFA Performance Goals and Procedures'' \\1\\ (MDUFA III Commitment Letter). The assessment will be conducted by an... performance commitments relating to the Medical Device User Fee Amendments of 2012 (MDUFA III), which...

  5. Comprehensive modelling and simulation of cylindrical nanoparticles manipulation by using a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Hoshiar, Ali Kafash; Ghofrani, Maedeh

    2017-08-01

    With the expansion of nanotechnology, robots based on atomic force microscope (AFM) have been widely used as effective tools for displacing nanoparticles and constructing nanostructures. One of the most limiting factors in AFM-based manipulation procedures is the inability of simultaneously observing the controlled pushing and displacing of nanoparticles while performing the operation. To deal with this limitation, a virtual reality environment has been used in this paper for observing the manipulation operation. In the simulations performed in this paper, first, the images acquired by the atomic force microscope have been processed and the positions and dimensions of nanoparticles have been determined. Then, by dynamically modelling the transfer of nanoparticles and simulating the critical force-time diagrams, a controlled displacement of nanoparticles has been accomplished. The simulations have been further developed for the use of rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The established virtual reality environment has made it possible to simulate the manipulation of biological particles in a liquid medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comprehensive Validation of Skeletal Mechanism for Turbulent Premixed Methane–Air Flame Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Luca, Stefano

    2017-08-01

    A new skeletal mechanism, consisting of 16 species and 72 reactions, has been developed for lean methane–air premixed combustion from the GRI-Mech 3.0. The skeletal mechanism is validated for elevated unburnt temperatures (800 K) and pressures up to 4 atm, thereby addressing realistic gas turbine conditions. The skeletal mechanism is obtained by applying the directed relation graph method and performing sensitivity analysis on the detailed mechanism. The mechanism has been validated for flame speed and flame structure in a wide range of conditions and configurations. A good agreement between the skeletal mechanism and GRI-3.0 was obtained. The configurations considered include one-dimension laminar premixed flames, laminar non-premixed counterflow burners, and two- and three-dimensional unsteady configurations with variations of temperature, pressure, and composition. The skeletal mechanism allows for the inclusion of accurate finite rate chemistry in large-scale direct numerical simulations of lean turbulent premixed flames. In a large-scale direct numerical simulation, the use of the skeletal mechanism reduces the memory requirements by more than a factor of 3 and accelerates the simulation by a factor of 7 compared with the detailed mechanism. The skeletal mechanism is suitable for unsteady three-dimensional simulations of methane turbulent premixed, non-premixed, and globally lean partially premixed flames and is available as supplementary material.

  7. A comprehensive detailed kinetic mechanism for the simulation of transportation fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Mehl, Marco; Zhang, Kuiwen; Wagnon, Scott; Kukkadapu, Goutham; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.; Zhang, Yinjia; Curran, Henry J.; Al Rachidi, Mariam; Atef, Nour; Sarathy, Mani; Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a recently compiled comprehensive model for transportations fuels resulting from the collaboration of three research groups: LLNL, NUI Galway and KAUST. In the past 5 years new fundamental calculations led to significant improvements in the fidelity of detailed kinetic models of important surrogate components (e.g. n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene…) improving predictions of the combustion behavior of pure components and mixtures. By extending the newly adopted reaction rate rules, mechanisms for components that were not included in the previous LLNL gasoline and diesel surrogate mechanisms were developed (e.g. polyalkylated aromatics, cycloalkanes, components from bio-logical sources…). The major features of this updated and extended model are presented together with validation comparisons, examples of applications and future directions.

  8. A comprehensive detailed kinetic mechanism for the simulation of transportation fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Mehl, Marco

    2017-02-27

    This work presents a recently compiled comprehensive model for transportations fuels resulting from the collaboration of three research groups: LLNL, NUI Galway and KAUST. In the past 5 years new fundamental calculations led to significant improvements in the fidelity of detailed kinetic models of important surrogate components (e.g. n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene…) improving predictions of the combustion behavior of pure components and mixtures. By extending the newly adopted reaction rate rules, mechanisms for components that were not included in the previous LLNL gasoline and diesel surrogate mechanisms were developed (e.g. polyalkylated aromatics, cycloalkanes, components from bio-logical sources…). The major features of this updated and extended model are presented together with validation comparisons, examples of applications and future directions.

  9. Comprehensive 3D-elastohydrodynamic simulation of hermetic compressor crank drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, S.; Hopfgartner, J.; Berger, E.; Zuber, B.; Almbauer, R.; Schöllauf, P.

    2017-08-01

    Mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic losses form the major loss mechanisms of hermetic compressors for refrigeration application. The present work deals with the investigation of the mechanical losses of a hermetic compressor crank drive. Focus is on 3d-elastohydrodynamic (EHD) modelling of the journal bearings, piston-liner contact and piston secondary motion in combination with multi-body and structural dynamics of the crank drive elements. A detailed description of the model development within the commercial software AVL EXCITE Power Unit is given in the work. The model is used to create a comprehensive analysis of the mechanical losses of a hermetic compressor. Further on, a parametric study concerning oil viscosity and compressor speed is carried out which shows the possibilities of the usage of the model in the development process of hermetic compressors for refrigeration application. Additionally, the usage of the results in an overall thermal network for the determination of the thermal compressor behaviour is discussed.

  10. Simulation of electrical discharge in a 3.6 Joule miniature plasma focus device using SIMULINK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, H.; Habibi, M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed and studied in this paper to simulate the electrical discharge circuit of a 3.6 J miniature plasma focus device (PFD) and investigate the effect of inductance variation on voltage spike and current dip. The technique is based on a correlation between the electrical discharge circuit and plasma dynamics in a very small PFD that operates at the energy of 3.6 J. The simulation inputs include the charging voltage, capacitor bank capacitance, current limiter resistance, bypass resistance as well as the time-dependent inductance and resistance of the plasma sheath which are calculated by assuming the plasma dynamics as transit times in going from one phase to the next. The variations of the most important elements in the circuit (i.e. the constant and breakdown inductances) and their effects on the current dip are studied in PFDs with low and high constant inductance. The model demonstrated for achieving a good pinch in the PFD, although the total inductance of the system should be low; however there is always an optimum inductance which causes an appropriate pinch. Furthermore, the electrical power produced by the pulsed power supply, the mechanical energy as well as the magnetic energy which are transferred into the plasma tube were obtained from simulation. The graph of electrical power demonstrated a high instantaneous increment in the power transferred into the plasma as one of the greatest advantages of the pulsed power supply. The simulation was performed using software tools within the MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation environment. The PFD, generating neutrons in the range of 10 6 to 10 10 neutrons per pulse will have substantial use in the physics and engineering applications. (authors)

  11. Comprehensive characterization of ball-milled powders simulating a tribofilm system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Häusler, I., E-mail: ines.haeusler@bam.de; Dörfel, I., E-mail: Ilona.doerfel@bam.de; Peplinski, B., E-mail: Burkhard.peplinski@bam.de; Dietrich, P.M., E-mail: Paul.dietrich@yahoo.de; Unger, W.E.S., E-mail: Wolfgang.Unger@bam.de; Österle, W., E-mail: Werner.Oesterle@bam.de

    2016-01-15

    A model system was used to simulate the properties of tribofilms which form during automotive braking. The model system was prepared by ball milling of a blend of 70 vol.% iron oxides, 15 vol.% molybdenum disulfide and 15 vol.% graphite. The resulting mixture was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and various transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high resolution investigations (HRTEM) with corresponding simulation of the HRTEM images, diffraction methods such as scanning nano-beam electron diffraction (SNBED) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). It could be shown that the ball milling caused a reduction of the grain size of the initial components to the nanometer range. Sometimes even amorphization or partial break-down of the crystal structure was observed for MoS{sub 2} and graphite. Moreover, chemical reactions lead to a formation of surface coverings of the nanoparticles by amorphous material, molybdenum oxides, and iron sulfates as derived from XPS. - Highlights: • Ball milling of iron oxides, MoS{sub 2}, and graphite to simulate a tribofilm • Increasing coefficient of friction after ball milling of the model blend • Drastically change of the diffraction pattern of the powder mixture • TEM & XPS showed the components of the milled mixture and the process during milling. • MoS{sub 2} and graphite suffered a loss in translation symmetry or became amorphous.

  12. Connecting Artificial Brains to Robots in a Comprehensive Simulation Framework: The Neurorobotics Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falotico, Egidio; Vannucci, Lorenzo; Ambrosano, Alessandro; Albanese, Ugo; Ulbrich, Stefan; Vasquez Tieck, Juan Camilo; Hinkel, Georg; Kaiser, Jacques; Peric, Igor; Denninger, Oliver; Cauli, Nino; Kirtay, Murat; Roennau, Arne; Klinker, Gudrun; Von Arnim, Axel; Guyot, Luc; Peppicelli, Daniel; Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Ros, Eduardo; Maier, Patrick; Weber, Sandro; Huber, Manuel; Plecher, David; Röhrbein, Florian; Deser, Stefan; Roitberg, Alina; van der Smagt, Patrick; Dillman, Rüdiger; Levi, Paul; Laschi, Cecilia; Knoll, Alois C.; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Combined efforts in the fields of neuroscience, computer science, and biology allowed to design biologically realistic models of the brain based on spiking neural networks. For a proper validation of these models, an embodiment in a dynamic and rich sensory environment, where the model is exposed to a realistic sensory-motor task, is needed. Due to the complexity of these brain models that, at the current stage, cannot deal with real-time constraints, it is not possible to embed them into a real-world task. Rather, the embodiment has to be simulated as well. While adequate tools exist to simulate either complex neural networks or robots and their environments, there is so far no tool that allows to easily establish a communication between brain and body models. The Neurorobotics Platform is a new web-based environment that aims to fill this gap by offering scientists and technology developers a software infrastructure allowing them to connect brain models to detailed simulations of robot bodies and environments and to use the resulting neurorobotic systems for in silico experimentation. In order to simplify the workflow and reduce the level of the required programming skills, the platform provides editors for the specification of experimental sequences and conditions, environments, robots, and brain–body connectors. In addition to that, a variety of existing robots and environments are provided. This work presents the architecture of the first release of the Neurorobotics Platform developed in subproject 10 “Neurorobotics” of the Human Brain Project (HBP).1 At the current state, the Neurorobotics Platform allows researchers to design and run basic experiments in neurorobotics using simulated robots and simulated environments linked to simplified versions of brain models. We illustrate the capabilities of the platform with three example experiments: a Braitenberg task implemented on a mobile robot, a sensory-motor learning task based on a robotic controller

  13. Connecting Artificial Brains to Robots in a Comprehensive Simulation Framework: The Neurorobotics Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falotico, Egidio; Vannucci, Lorenzo; Ambrosano, Alessandro; Albanese, Ugo; Ulbrich, Stefan; Vasquez Tieck, Juan Camilo; Hinkel, Georg; Kaiser, Jacques; Peric, Igor; Denninger, Oliver; Cauli, Nino; Kirtay, Murat; Roennau, Arne; Klinker, Gudrun; Von Arnim, Axel; Guyot, Luc; Peppicelli, Daniel; Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Ros, Eduardo; Maier, Patrick; Weber, Sandro; Huber, Manuel; Plecher, David; Röhrbein, Florian; Deser, Stefan; Roitberg, Alina; van der Smagt, Patrick; Dillman, Rüdiger; Levi, Paul; Laschi, Cecilia; Knoll, Alois C; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Combined efforts in the fields of neuroscience, computer science, and biology allowed to design biologically realistic models of the brain based on spiking neural networks. For a proper validation of these models, an embodiment in a dynamic and rich sensory environment, where the model is exposed to a realistic sensory-motor task, is needed. Due to the complexity of these brain models that, at the current stage, cannot deal with real-time constraints, it is not possible to embed them into a real-world task. Rather, the embodiment has to be simulated as well. While adequate tools exist to simulate either complex neural networks or robots and their environments, there is so far no tool that allows to easily establish a communication between brain and body models. The Neurorobotics Platform is a new web-based environment that aims to fill this gap by offering scientists and technology developers a software infrastructure allowing them to connect brain models to detailed simulations of robot bodies and environments and to use the resulting neurorobotic systems for in silico experimentation. In order to simplify the workflow and reduce the level of the required programming skills, the platform provides editors for the specification of experimental sequences and conditions, environments, robots, and brain-body connectors. In addition to that, a variety of existing robots and environments are provided. This work presents the architecture of the first release of the Neurorobotics Platform developed in subproject 10 "Neurorobotics" of the Human Brain Project (HBP). At the current state, the Neurorobotics Platform allows researchers to design and run basic experiments in neurorobotics using simulated robots and simulated environments linked to simplified versions of brain models. We illustrate the capabilities of the platform with three example experiments: a Braitenberg task implemented on a mobile robot, a sensory-motor learning task based on a robotic controller, and a

  14. Electrotactile Feedback for Handheld Devices with Touch Screen and Simulation of Roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinsoy, M E; Merchel, S

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel electrotactile display that can be integrated into current handheld devices with touch screens. In this display, tactile information is presented to the fingertip of the user by transmitting small currents through electrodes. Experiments were conducted to investigate the perception of simulated textures using this electrotactile display technique. One fundamental feature of texture, which is the focus of this study, is roughness. The aim of the first experiment was to investigate the relationship between electrotactile stimulation parameters such as current and pulse frequency and the perception of roughness. An increase in the current magnitude resulted in an increase in perceived roughness. The aim of the second experiment was to investigate parameter combinations of electrotactile stimuli can be used to simulate textures. Subjects adjusted the intensity and frequency of the current stimuli until the simulated textures were perceived as being equal to reference textures such as sandpapers of varying grit numbers and grooved woods with varying groove widths. Subjects tended to find an electrotactile stimulus with a high current magnitude and a low pulse frequency more suitable to represent rough surfaces. They tended to find just-perceptible current magnitudes suitable for very smooth surfaces and did not show a preference for any frequency.

  15. Numerical simulation of droplet formation regimes and sizes in microfluidic T-junction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Vanapalli, Siva

    2014-11-01

    The T-junction geometry has been widely used for producing monodisperse droplets in microfluidic devices. Droplet formation regimes and sizes are expected to depend on a variety of conditions including flow rates, capillary number, channel geometry and viscosity ratio. Experiments have investigated drop production at a T-junction in a narrow control parameter space and developed analytical models for specific operating regimes. In this study, we take advantage of numerical simulations based on volume-of-fluid method to explore this broad parameter space systematically, and contrast our results with prior experimental data. We find our simulations predict well the regimes of squeezing, dripping and jetting. We also observe that our drop size data is in good agreement with three different experimental reports. Although our results match experimental data, the analytical models do not agree with each other since they are based on specific operating conditions. We use numerical simulations to elucidate the missing components in the physics of drop formation at a T-junction, with an attempt to reconcile existing analytical models.

  16. A review of recent advances in the spherical harmonics expansion method for semiconductor device simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, K; Jungemann, C; Hong, S-M; Bina, M; Grasser, T; Jüngel, A

    The Boltzmann transport equation is commonly considered to be the best semi-classical description of carrier transport in semiconductors, providing precise information about the distribution of carriers with respect to time (one dimension), location (three dimensions), and momentum (three dimensions). However, numerical solutions for the seven-dimensional carrier distribution functions are very demanding. The most common solution approach is the stochastic Monte Carlo method, because the gigabytes of memory requirements of deterministic direct solution approaches has not been available until recently. As a remedy, the higher accuracy provided by solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation is often exchanged for lower computational expense by using simpler models based on macroscopic quantities such as carrier density and mean carrier velocity. Recent developments for the deterministic spherical harmonics expansion method have reduced the computational cost for solving the Boltzmann transport equation, enabling the computation of carrier distribution functions even for spatially three-dimensional device simulations within minutes to hours. We summarize recent progress for the spherical harmonics expansion method and show that small currents, reasonable execution times, and rare events such as low-frequency noise, which are all hard or even impossible to simulate with the established Monte Carlo method, can be handled in a straight-forward manner. The applicability of the method for important practical applications is demonstrated for noise simulation, small-signal analysis, hot-carrier degradation, and avalanche breakdown.

  17. Semiconductor device models for circuit simulation power electronics; Modeles de composants semiconducteurs pour la simulation des circuits en electronique de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berraies, M.O.

    1998-09-10

    In this thesis, an alternative strategy based on a regional approach to modeling and a new partition of the model library in the simulation is proposed. The main objective is to substitute for the usual concept of `one device, on model` that of an adaptable assembly of a limited number of submodels associated with well-identified regions of semiconductor structures. In other words, the library will only contain the primitive building-blocks of the power device models. This strategy guarantees the compatibility of the various semiconductor models in terms of physical concepts, validity domain, accuracy, homogeneity of parameter identification procedures, similarly of implementation in the simulator. This approach has been applied to PIN diodes and IGBTs for experimental validation. The next step consisted on the simulation of circuit involving several interacting devices. A simple IGBT/PIN diode chopper cell has been chosen. The results obtained compare well with experiment. This demonstrates the consistency of the proposed approach. (author) 43 refs.

  18. Use of a mobile device by nursing home residents for long-term care comprehensive geriatric self-assessment: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fanpin; Chang, Polun; Hou, I-Ching; Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Lan, Chung-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term-care comprehensive geriatric assessments, such as the Minimum Data Set 3.0, are used to evaluate the clinical, psychological, and personal status of residents in long-term-care nursing facilities. Nursing staff conducts assessment interviews, thereby increasing the workload of nurses and the cost of patient care. This study explored the ability of nursing home residents to use two different mobile devices for a geriatric self-assessment. Study participants were residents of long-term-care nursing homes. A modified Minimum Data Set 3.0 was converted to a format for use with a 6-inch mobile pad and a 3.7-inch mobile smartphone. The survey completion rate and the response time were measured. A Technology Assessment Model questionnaire analyzed the participants' experience. All participants were able to use a 6-inch pad, with an average completion rate of 92.9% and an average time for completion of 21 minutes. Only 20% of the participants could complete the assessment with the 3.7-inch smartphone. The participants found the 6-inch pad easier to use than the 3.7-inch smartphone. This exploratory study suggests that nursing home residents are able to use a mobile device to perform a geriatric self-assessment and delineates the importance of the ergonomics of the device.

  19. Semiconductor device simulation by a new method of solving poisson, Laplace and Schrodinger equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, M. J.; Adibi, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we have extended and completed our previous work, that was introducing a new method for finite differentiation. We show the applicability of the method for solving a wide variety of equations such as poisson, Laplace and Schrodinger. These equations are fundamental to the most semiconductor device simulators. In a section, we solve the Shordinger equation by this method in several cases including the problem of finding electron concentration profile in the channel of a HEMT. In another section, we solve the Poisson equation by this method, choosing the problem of SBD as an example. Finally we solve the Laplace equation in two dimensions and as an example, we focus on the VED. In this paper, we have shown that, the method can get stable and precise results in solving all of these problems. Also the programs which have been written based on this method become considerably faster, more clear, and more abstract

  20. A tool for simulating collision probabilities of animals with marine renewable energy devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál Schmitt

    Full Text Available The mathematical problem of establishing a collision probability distribution is often not trivial. The shape and motion of the animal as well as of the the device must be evaluated in a four-dimensional space (3D motion over time. Earlier work on wind and tidal turbines was limited to a simplified two-dimensional representation, which cannot be applied to many new structures. We present a numerical algorithm to obtain such probability distributions using transient, three-dimensional numerical simulations. The method is demonstrated using a sub-surface tidal kite as an example. Necessary pre- and post-processing of the data created by the model is explained, numerical details and potential issues and limitations in the application of resulting probability distributions are highlighted.

  1. A tool for simulating collision probabilities of animals with marine renewable energy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Pál; Culloch, Ross; Lieber, Lilian; Molander, Sverker; Hammar, Linus; Kregting, Louise

    2017-01-01

    The mathematical problem of establishing a collision probability distribution is often not trivial. The shape and motion of the animal as well as of the the device must be evaluated in a four-dimensional space (3D motion over time). Earlier work on wind and tidal turbines was limited to a simplified two-dimensional representation, which cannot be applied to many new structures. We present a numerical algorithm to obtain such probability distributions using transient, three-dimensional numerical simulations. The method is demonstrated using a sub-surface tidal kite as an example. Necessary pre- and post-processing of the data created by the model is explained, numerical details and potential issues and limitations in the application of resulting probability distributions are highlighted.

  2. Computer Simulation of Robotic Device Components in 3D Printer Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kiselev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a relevant problem "Computer simulation of robotic device components in manufacturing on a 3D printer" and highlights the problem of computer simulation based on the cognitive programming technology of robotic device components. The paper subject is urgent because computer simulation of force-torque and accuracy characteristics of robot components in terms of their manufacturing properties and conditions from polymeric and metallic materials is of paramount importance for programming and manufacturing on the 3D printers. Two types of additive manufacturing technologies were used:1. FDM (Fused deposition modeling - layered growth of products from molten plastic strands;2. SLM (Selective laser melting - selective laser sintering of metal powders, which, in turn, create:• conditions for reducing the use of expensive equipment;• reducing weight and increasing strength through optimization of  the lattice structures when using a bionic design;• a capability to implement mathematical modeling of individual components of robotic and other devices in terms of appropriate characteristics;• a 3D printing capability to create unique items, which cannot be made by other known methods.The paper aim was to confirm the possibility of ensuring the strength and accuracy characteristics of cases when printing from polymeric and metallic materials on a 3D printer. The investigation emphasis is on mathematical modeling based on the cognitive programming technology using the additive technologies in their studies since it is, generally, impossible to make the obtained optimized structures on the modern CNC machines.The latter allows us to create a program code to be clear to other developers without cost, additional time for development, adaptation and implementation.Year by year Russian companies increasingly use a 3D-print system in mechanical engineering, aerospace industry, and for scientific purposes. Machines for the additive

  3. Simulation of a model nanopore sensor: Ion competition underlies device behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mádai, Eszter; Valiskó, Mónika; Dallos, András; Boda, Dezső

    2017-12-01

    We study a model nanopore sensor with which a very low concentration of analyte molecules can be detected on the basis of the selective binding of the analyte molecules to the binding sites on the pore wall. The bound analyte ions partially replace the current-carrier cations in a thermodynamic competition. This competition depends both on the properties of the nanopore and the concentrations of the competing ions (through their chemical potentials). The output signal given by the device is the current reduction caused by the presence of the analyte ions. The concentration of the analyte ions can be determined through calibration curves. We model the binding site with the square-well potential and the electrolyte as charged hard spheres in an implicit background solvent. We study the system with a hybrid method in which we compute the ion flux with the Nernst-Planck (NP) equation coupled with the Local Equilibrium Monte Carlo (LEMC) simulation technique. The resulting NP+LEMC method is able to handle both strong ionic correlations inside the pore (including finite size of ions) and bulk concentrations as low as micromolar. We analyze the effect of bulk ion concentrations, pore parameters, binding site parameters, electrolyte properties, and voltage on the behavior of the device.

  4. NIMROD Simulations of the HIT-SI and HIT-SI3 Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Tom; Hossack, Aaron; Chandra, Rian; Everson, Chris

    2017-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI) experiment uses a set of inductively driven helicity injectors to apply non-axisymmetric current drive on the edge of the plasma, driving an axisymmetric spheromak equilibrium in a central confinement volume. Significant improvements have been made to extended MHD modeling of HIT-SI, with both the resolution of disagreement at high injector frequencies in HIT-SI in addition to successes with the new upgraded HIT-SI3 device. Previous numerical studies of HIT-SI, using a zero-beta eMHD model, focused on operations with a drive frequency of 14.5 kHz, and found reduced agreement with both the magnetic profile and current amplification at higher frequencies (30-70 kHz). HIT-SI3 has three helicity injectors which are able to operate with different mode structures of perturbations through the different relative temporal phasing of the injectors. Simulations that allow for pressure gradients have been performed in the parameter regimes of both devices using the NIMROD code and show improved agreement with experimental results, most notably capturing the observed Shafranov-shift due to increased beta observed at higher finj in HIT-SI and the variety of toroidal perturbation spectra available in HIT-SI3. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02- 96ER54361.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation study of the ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Ohnishi, M.; Okada, H.

    1993-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation code is developed for the ICRF heating in helical systems, which takes into account finite beta effects, complicated orbits of high energetic particles, Coulomb collisions, and interactions between the particles and the applied waves. The code is used to investigate the ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device. The configuration of the magnetic fields changes significantly due to finite beta effects in the Large Helical Device. The resonance layer position is found to be crucial to the heating efficiency as the plasma beta increases. When the strength of the resonance magnetic field is set to the value at the magnetic axis, the higher heat efficiency is obtained and no clear difference of the heat efficiency due to the finite beta effects is found at the high ICRF wave power region. However the radial profile of the transferred power to majority ions and electrons from minority ions changes by the deformation of the trapped particle orbits due to the finite beta effects. The heat efficiency is improved if the radial electric field, E r , is positive (E r is directed radially outward) and it is also improved by supplying 3 He minority ions rather than proton minority ions. (author)

  6. Global Simulations of the Inner Regions of Protoplanetary Disks with Comprehensive Disk Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2017-08-01

    The gas dynamics of weakly ionized protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are largely governed by the coupling between gas and magnetic fields, described by three non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) effects (Ohmic, Hall, ambipolar). Previous local simulations incorporating these processes have revealed that the inner regions of PPDs are largely laminar and accompanied by wind-driven accretion. We conduct 2D axisymmetric, fully global MHD simulations of these regions (˜1-20 au), taking into account all non-ideal MHD effects, with tabulated diffusion coefficients and approximate treatment of external ionization and heating. With the net vertical field aligned with disk rotation, the Hall-shear instability strongly amplifies horizontal magnetic field, making the overall dynamics dependent on initial field configuration. Following disk formation, the disk likely relaxes into an inner zone characterized by asymmetric field configuration across the midplane, which smoothly transitions to a more symmetric outer zone. Angular momentum transport is driven by both MHD winds and laminar Maxwell stress, with both accretion and decretion flows present at different heights, and modestly asymmetric winds from the two disk sides. With anti-aligned field polarity, weakly magnetized disks settle into an asymmetric field configuration with supersonic accretion flow concentrated at one side of the disk surface, and highly asymmetric winds between the two disk sides. In all cases, the wind is magneto-thermal in nature, characterized by a mass loss rate exceeding the accretion rate. More strongly magnetized disks give more symmetric field configuration and flow structures. Deeper far-UV penetration leads to stronger and less stable outflows. Implications for observations and planet formation are also discussed.

  7. Comprehensive ab initio simulations of turbulence in ITER-relevant fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenko, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The astonishing improvements achieved in supercomputing capabilities over the past two decades have allowed groundbreaking new insights into the physics of plasma turbulence. Even though much has been learned already, fundamental challenges related to predicting the performance of future fusion reactors still remain. In particular, today's fusion experiments routinely achieve a transition to a high-confinement mode (H-mode) with a strong transport barrier at the plasma boundary. Understanding the formation conditions of this barrier and its characteristic size and height are crucial to predicting the efficiency of future fusion reactors, but a fully consistent numerical treatment has still been lacking up to now. A main challenge in the treatment of such barriers is their extreme profile variation, implying their susceptibility to finite-size effects. Global simulation capabilities such as demonstrated within the framework of the present project are thus essential in order to understand the dynamics of the edge transport barrier. Both present and future projects employing the GENE code will build on the experience established within this SuperMUC project and tackle this challenging issue. Another increasingly important field relates to turbulence studies in stellarators, which represent an alternative machine design for future fusion applications. With its newly developed capability of studying turbulence in stellarator geometry (i.e. retaining magnetic geometry variations within a magnetic surface), the GENE code is uniquely suited for this problem. With the new German stellarator experiment Wendelstein 7-X nearing completion, existing predictions already made with GENE for stellarator turbulence will be put to the test, and possibilities for validation will emerge. Due to the complex magnetic geometry, stellarator turbulence simulations have extreme computational requirements and will thus continue to challenge the available supercomputing capabilities also in

  8. Global Simulations of the Inner Regions of Protoplanetary Disks with Comprehensive Disk Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue-Ning, E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The gas dynamics of weakly ionized protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are largely governed by the coupling between gas and magnetic fields, described by three non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) effects (Ohmic, Hall, ambipolar). Previous local simulations incorporating these processes have revealed that the inner regions of PPDs are largely laminar and accompanied by wind-driven accretion. We conduct 2D axisymmetric, fully global MHD simulations of these regions (∼1–20 au), taking into account all non-ideal MHD effects, with tabulated diffusion coefficients and approximate treatment of external ionization and heating. With the net vertical field aligned with disk rotation, the Hall-shear instability strongly amplifies horizontal magnetic field, making the overall dynamics dependent on initial field configuration. Following disk formation, the disk likely relaxes into an inner zone characterized by asymmetric field configuration across the midplane, which smoothly transitions to a more symmetric outer zone. Angular momentum transport is driven by both MHD winds and laminar Maxwell stress, with both accretion and decretion flows present at different heights, and modestly asymmetric winds from the two disk sides. With anti-aligned field polarity, weakly magnetized disks settle into an asymmetric field configuration with supersonic accretion flow concentrated at one side of the disk surface, and highly asymmetric winds between the two disk sides. In all cases, the wind is magneto-thermal in nature, characterized by a mass loss rate exceeding the accretion rate. More strongly magnetized disks give more symmetric field configuration and flow structures. Deeper far-UV penetration leads to stronger and less stable outflows. Implications for observations and planet formation are also discussed.

  9. A quality assurance device for the accuracy of the isocentres of teletherapy and simulation machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Altschuler, Martin D.

    2000-01-01

    A new quality assurance device has been designed to measure the location and wobble of the radiation isocentre of linacs and simulation machines as a function of gantry rotation. The radiation isocentre is the intersection in space of the central x-rays of a linac or simulation machine at different gantry angles. Six radio-opaque markers 1 mm in size are embedded in a radio-transparent calibration object (specifically, a hollowed cube) in such a way that the markers are non-coplanar and uniquely identifiable in radiographic projections. The projective radiographs are obtained on the films held by the film holder attached to the gantry during the QA procedure. The marker positions of the calibration object define a known 3D reference frame, and their image positions on each radiograph determine the projective (3D to 2D matrix) transformation for that radiograph. Once the transformation is found, a 3D ray from the radiation source to any radiograph pixel becomes known. The radiographic pixels are coordinated (positioned and scaled) with respect to the projected image of radio-opaque fiducial cross-hairs fixed to a block tray and thus to the gantry. We select the central ray to correspond to the radiographic pixel whose rays at different gantry angles intersect in the smallest spatial domain. That pixel is found by a spiral search in the radiograph outward from the image of the radio-opaque cross-hair intersection. The wobble of the isocentre is defined by the set of points (on the central rays) at closest approach to the isocentre. The device was tested and compared with commercially available QA devices. It is able to locate the isocentre to within 0.5 mm. The offset of this derived radiation isocentre from the intersection of the positioning lasers can be found. To do this, the calibration object is initially placed so that the laser intersection point falls on a seventh radio-opaque marker near the centre of the hollow cube calibration object. The seventh marker

  10. Wearables and the Internet of Things for Health: Wearable, Interconnected Devices Promise More Efficient and Comprehensive Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, David; Milliard, Sharlin T J; Gomez, Melinda; Schwartz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In our recent book Health-e Everything: Wearables and the Internet of Things for Health, we capture in an interactive e-book format some global thought-leader perspectives as well as early examples of case studies and novel innovations that are driving this emerging technology domain. Here, we provide a brief snapshot of key findings related to these novel technologies and use cases, which are driving both health care practitioners and health consumers (patients). As technologists, having a firm understanding of customer-driven innovation and the actual user benefits of interconnective devices for health will help us engineer better solutions that are more targeted to the triple aim of better, faster, and cheaper health solutions.

  11. Development the interface system of master-slave manipulator and external input device on the graphic simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, T. J.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    The master-slave manipulator is the generally used as remote handling device in the hot cell, in which the high level radioactive materials such as spent fuels are handled. To analyze the motion of remote handling device and to simulate the remote handling operation task in the hot cell, the 3D graphic simulator which has been installed the master-slave manipulator is established. Also the interface program of external input device with 6 DOF(degree of Freedom) is developed and connected to graphic simulator with LLTI(Low Level Tele-operation Interface) which provides a uniquely optimized, high speed, bidirectional communication interface to one or more of system and processes

  12. Simulation analysis of dust-particle transport in the peripheral plasma in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Mamoru; Masuzaki, Suguru; Kawamura, Gakushi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Pigarov, Alexander Yu.; Smirnov, Roman D.

    2014-01-01

    The function of the peripheral plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) on transport of dusts is investigated using a dust transport simulation code (DUSTT) in a non-axisymmetric geometry. The simulation shows that the transport of the dusts is dominated by the plasma flow (mainly by ion drag force) formed in the peripheral plasma. The trajectories of dusts are investigated in two probable situations: release of spherical iron dusts from the inboard side of the torus, and drop of spherical carbon dusts from a divertor plate installed near an edge of an upper port. The trajectories in these two situations are calculated in various sized dust cases. From a viewpoint of protection of the main plasma from dust penetration, it proves that there are two functions in the LHD peripheral plasma. One is sweeping of dusts by the effect of the plasma flow in the divertor legs, and another one is evaporation/sublimation of dusts by heat load onto the dusts in the ergodic layer. (author)

  13. Comprehensive representation of the Lennard-Jones equation of state based on molecular dynamics simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieprzyk, S.; Brańka, A. C.; Maćkowiak, Sz.; Heyes, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    The equation of state (EoS) of the Lennard-Jones fluid is calculated using a new set of molecular dynamics data which extends to higher temperature than in previous studies. The modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (MBWR) equation, which goes up to ca. T ˜ 6, is reparametrized with new simulation data. A new analytic form for the EoS, which breaks the fluid range into two regions with different analytic forms and goes up to ca. T ≃ 35, is also proposed. The accuracy of the new formulas is at least as good as the MBWR fit and goes to much higher temperature allowing it to now encompass the Amagat line. The fitted formula extends into the high temperature range where the system can be well represented by inverse power potential scaling, which means that our specification of the equation of state covers the entire (ρ, T) plane. Accurate analytic fit formulas for the Boyle, Amagat, and inversion curves are presented. Parametrizations of the extrema loci of the isochoric, CV, and isobaric, CP, heat capacities are given. As found by others, a line maxima of CP terminates in the critical point region, and a line of minima of CP terminates on the freezing line. The line of maxima of CV terminates close to or at the critical point, and a line of minima of CV terminates to the right of the critical point. No evidence for a divergence in CV in the critical region is found.

  14. Simulation of Ventricular, Cavo-Pulmonary, and Biventricular Ventricular Assist Devices in Failing Fontan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Molfetta, Arianna; Amodeo, Antonio; Fresiello, Libera; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Iacobelli, Roberta; Pilati, Mara; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2015-07-01

    Considering the lack of donors, ventricular assist devices (VADs) could be an alternative to heart transplantation for failing Fontan patients, in spite of the lack of experience and the complex anatomy and physiopathology of these patients. Considering the high number of variables that play an important role such as type of Fontan failure, type of VAD connection, and setting (right VAD [RVAD], left VAD [LVAD], or biventricular VAD [BIVAD]), a numerical model could be useful to support clinical decisions. The aim of this article is to develop and test a lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system simulating and comparing the VAD effects on failing Fontan. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data of 10 Fontan patients were used to simulate the baseline patients' condition using a dedicated lumped parameter model. Starting from the simulated baseline and for each patient, a systolic dysfunction, a diastolic dysfunction, and an increment of the pulmonary vascular resistance were simulated. Then, for each patient and for each pathology, the RVAD, LVAD, and BIVAD implantations were simulated. The model can reproduce patients' baseline well. In the case of systolic dysfunction, the LVAD unloads the single ventricle and increases the cardiac output (CO) (35%) and the arterial systemic pressure (Pas) (25%). With RVAD, a decrement of inferior vena cava pressure (Pvci) (39%) was observed with 34% increment of CO, but an increment of the single ventricle external work (SVEW). With the BIVAD, an increment of Pas (29%) and CO (37%) was observed. In the case of diastolic dysfunction, the LVAD increases CO (42%) and the RVAD decreases the Pvci, while both increase the SVEW. In the case of pulmonary vascular resistance increment, the highest CO (50%) and Pas (28%) increment is obtained with an RVAD with the highest decrement of Pvci (53%) and an increment of the SVEW but with the lowest VAD power consumption. The use of numerical models could be helpful in this innovative

  15. Comprehensive simulation study on local and global development of auroral arcs and field-aligned potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tomohiko; Oya, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1992-10-01

    Extensive three-dimensional computer simulations of the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling are performed to study self-excitation of auroral arcs with special emphasis on 1) nonlinear evolution of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system, 2) controlling mechanisms of the auroral arc structure, 3) formation of a field-aligned electric potential structure in association with the development of the feedback instability, and 4) effects of the parallel potential generation on auroral arc development. It is reconfirmed that the feedback instability produces a longitudinally elongated, latitudinally striated structure where the upward field-aligned current and the ionospheric density are locally enhanced. The following important new features are revealed. 1) The global distribution of the striation structure is primarily governed by the magnetospheric convection pattern and the ionospheric density distribution. 2) There appears a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry in the auroral arc formation, even though the apparent geometrical relationship is symmetric. 3) The recombination effect plays a significant role in the global, as well as local, development of the auroral arc structure. The nonlinearity of recombination, in conjunction with the closure of an arc-associated local field-aligned current system, acts to destroy an old arc and creates a new arc in a different but adjacent position. 4) A V-shaped field aligned potential structure is created in association with an auroral arc. Rapid increase in the electron density and the local upward field-aligned current of an arc arises as a result of enhanced ionization by precipitating electrons accelerated by the parallel potential. 5) A drastic oscillatory behavior of appearance and disappearance of auroral arcs is obtained when the ionization effect is strong. The period is primarily given by the Alfven bounce time. (J.P.N.)

  16. Facial expressions and speech acts: experimental evidences on the role of the upper face as an illocutionary force indicating device in language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaneschi, Filippo; Passarelli, Marcello; Chiorri, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Language scientists have broadly addressed the problem of explaining how language users recognize the kind of speech act performed by a speaker uttering a sentence in a particular context. They have done so by investigating the role played by the illocutionary force indicating devices (IFIDs), i.e., all linguistic elements that indicate the illocutionary force of an utterance. The present work takes a first step in the direction of an experimental investigation of non-verbal IFIDs because it investigates the role played by facial expressions and, in particular, of upper-face action units (AUs) in the comprehension of three basic types of illocutionary force: assertions, questions, and orders. The results from a pilot experiment on production and two comprehension experiments showed that (1) certain upper-face AUs seem to constitute non-verbal signals that contribute to the understanding of the illocutionary force of questions and orders; (2) assertions are not expected to be marked by any upper-face AU; (3) some upper-face AUs can be associated, with different degrees of compatibility, with both questions and orders.

  17. Simulating charge transport to understand the spectral response of Swept Charge Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Sreekumar, P.; Narendranath, S.; Gow, J. P. D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Swept Charge Devices (SCD) are novel X-ray detectors optimized for improved spectral performance without any demand for active cooling. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft used an array of SCDs to map the global surface elemental abundances on the Moon using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The successful demonstration of SCDs in C1XS spurred an enhanced version of the spectrometer on Chandrayaan-2 using the next-generation SCD sensors. Aims: The objective of this paper is to demonstrate validation of a physical model developed to simulate X-ray photon interaction and charge transportation in a SCD. The model helps to understand and identify the origin of individual components that collectively contribute to the energy-dependent spectral response of the SCD. Furthermore, the model provides completeness to various calibration tasks, such as generating spectral matrices (RMFs - redistribution matrix files), estimating efficiency, optimizing event selection logic, and maximizing event recovery to improve photon-collection efficiency in SCDs. Methods: Charge generation and transportation in the SCD at different layers related to channel stops, field zones, and field-free zones due to photon interaction were computed using standard drift and diffusion equations. Charge collected in the buried channel due to photon interaction in different volumes of the detector was computed by assuming a Gaussian radial profile of the charge cloud. The collected charge was processed further to simulate both diagonal clocking read-out, which is a novel design exclusive for SCDs, and event selection logic to construct the energy spectrum. Results: We compare simulation results of the SCD CCD54 with measurements obtained during the ground calibration of C1XS and clearly demonstrate that our model reproduces all the major spectral features seen in calibration data. We also describe our understanding of interactions at

  18. Hemodynamic Effects of Ventricular Assist Device Implantation on Norwood, Glenn, and Fontan Circulation: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Molfetta, Arianna; Amodeo, Antonio; Gagliardi, Maria G; Trivella, Maria G; Fresiello, Libera; Filippelli, Sergio; Toscano, Alessandra; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The growing population of failing single-ventricle (SV) patients might benefit from ventricular assist device (VAD) support as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, the documented experience is limited to isolated case reports. Considering the complex and different physiopathology of Norwood, Glenn, and Fontan patients and the lack of established experience, the aim of this work is to realize and test a lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system able to simulate SV hemodynamics and VAD implantation effects to support clinical decision. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data of 30 SV patients (10 Norwood, 10 Glenn, and 10 Fontan) were retrospectively collected and used to simulate patients' baseline. Then, the effects of VAD implantation were simulated. Simulation results suggest that the implantation of VAD: (i) increases the cardiac output and the mean arterial systemic pressure in all the three palliation conditions (Norwood 77.2 and 19.7%, Glenn 38.6 and 32.2%, and Fontan 17.2 and 14.2%); (ii) decreases the SV external work (Norwood 55%, Glenn 35.6%, and Fontan 41%); (iii) decreases the pressure pulsatility index (Norwood 65.2%, Glenn 81.3%, and Fontan 64.8%); (iv) increases the pulmonary arterial pressure in particular in the Norwood circulation (Norwood 39.7%, Glenn 12.1% and Fontan 3%); and (v) decreases the atrial pressure (Norwood 2%, Glenn 10.6%, and Fontan 8.6%). Finally, the VAD work is lower in the Norwood circulation (30.4 mL·mm Hg) in comparison with Fontan (40.3 mL·mm Hg) and to Glenn (64.5 mL·mm Hg) circulations. The use of VAD in SV physiology could be helpful to bridge patients to heart transplantations by increasing the CO and unloading the SV with a decrement of the atrial pressure and the SV external work. The regulation of the pulmonary flow is challenging because the Pap is increased by the presence of VAD. The hemodynamic changes are different in the different SV palliation step. The use of numerical models

  19. A comprehensive study of charge trapping in organic field-effect devices with promising semiconductors and different contact metals by displacement current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisoyi, Sibani; Tiwari, Shree Prakash; Rödel, Reinhold; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Kang, Myeong Jin; Takimiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A systematic and comprehensive study on the charge-carrier injection and trapping behavior was performed using displacement current measurements in long-channel capacitors based on four promising small-molecule organic semiconductors (pentacene, DNTT, C 10 -DNTT and DPh-DNTT). In thin-film transistors, these semiconductors showed charge-carrier mobilities ranging from 1.0 to 7.8 cm 2 V −1 s −1 . The number of charges injected into and extracted from the semiconductor and the density of charges trapped in the device during each measurement were calculated from the displacement current characteristics and it was found that the density of trapped charges is very similar in all devices and of the order 10 12 cm −2 , despite the fact that the four semiconductors show significantly different charge-carrier mobilities. The choice of the contact metal (Au, Ag, Cu, Pd) was also found to have no significant effect on the trapping behavior. (paper)

  20. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. → Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. → We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. → With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  1. Possibility of simulation experiments for fast particle physics in the large helical device (LHD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.N.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Itoh, K.

    1995-01-01

    The confinement of fusion produced or high energy particles is one of the most important issues to be studied in the helical confinement system. A preliminary study has been carried out on the possibility of developing techniques for simulation experiments for the study of high energy particle physics in the Large Helical Device (LHD) project. Candidate methods have been considered as follows: (a) a high energy (∼ 3.5 MeV) He 0 beam injection method; (b) a medium energy (∼ 200 keV) H 0 beam injection method; (c) a method involving high energy tail production by an ICRF wave and/or a method of reaction rate enhancement by an ICRF wave; and (d) a method involving the combination of neutral beam injection and ICRF wave. Various features of each method have been considered. Although the high energy He 0 beam injection method has some advantages, the technique for production of this beam is extremely difficult because of the difficulties of the production of both negative helium and ground state neutral helium by neutralization. It is pointed out, on the other hand, that a wide range of simulation experiments for fast particle physics may be carried out even by the medium energy beam method, because the typical orbit deviation (e.g. equivalent super-banana size in a classical sense) can be largely controlled by controlling the magnetic field configuration in the case of a helical system, for example by shifting the magnetic axis. This is one of the unique features of a helical system in contrast to an axisymmetric system. (author). 12 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  2. A system automatic study for the spent fuel rod cutting and simulated fuel pellet extraction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J. H.; Yun, J. S.; Hong, D. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Park, K. Y.

    2001-01-01

    A fuel pellet extraction device of the spent fuel rods is described. The device consists of a cutting device of the spent fuel rods and the decladding device of the fuel pellets. The cutting device is to cut a spent fuel rod to n optimal size for fast decladding operation. To design the device, the fuel rod properties are investigated including the dimension and material of fuel rod tubes and pellets. Also, various methods of existing cutting method are investigated. The design concepts accommodate remote operability for the Hot-Cell(radioactive ) area operation. Also, the modularization of the device structure is considered for the easy maintenance. The decladding device is to extract the fuel pellet from the rod cut. To design this device, the existing method is investigated including the chemical and mechanical decladding methods. From the view point of fuel recovery and feasibility of implementation. it is concluded that the chemical decladding method is not appropriate due to the mass production of radioactive liquid wastes, in spite of its high fuel recovery characteristics. Hence, in this paper, the mechanical decladding method is adopted and the device is designed so as to be applicable to various lengths of rod-cuts. As like the cutting device,the concepts of remote operability and maintainability is considered. Both devices are fabricated and the performance is investigated through a series of experiments. From the experimental result, the optimal operational condition of the devices is established

  3. On the design of a (H)EV steerable warning device using acoustic beam forming and advanced numerical acoustic simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Genechten, B.; Vansant, K.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation-based design methodology used in the eVADER project for the development of targeted acoustic warning devices for increased detectability of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (HEVs) while, at the same time, reducing urban noise pollution. A key component of this system

  4. External chest compressions using a mechanical feedback device : cross-over simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorning, M; Derwall, M; Brokmann, J C; Rörtgen, D; Bergrath, S; Pflipsen, J; Beuerlein, S; Rossaint, R; Beckers, S K

    2011-08-01

    .82/min; 95% confidence interval 95% CI: 98.1-101.2/min) reached the correct range for compression rate and 29/40 (72.5%; 44.0±4.95 mm; 95% CI: 42.4-45.6 mm) the correct compression depth using the assisting device. Afterwards they conducted classic ECC without the device and deteriorated significantly: correct compression rate was achieved by 12/40 (30%, p≤0.0001; 110.6±11.0/min (95% CI: 107.1-114.1/min), while 25/40 (62.5%; 44.5±5.63 mm; 95% CI: 42.6-46.3 mm) met the correct compression depth. Group 2 performed poorer in ECC without assistance and 5/41 (12.2%; 104.5±21.35/min; 95% CI: 97.8-111.3/min) reached the correct rate whereas 21/41 (51.2%; 39.6±7.61 mm; 95% CI: 37.2-42.0 mm) compressed to the appropriate depth. Using the device there was a significant improvement in the second evaluation with 34/41 (82.9%, p≤0.0001; 101.7±4.68/min; 95% CI: 100.2-103.2/min) reaching the correct rate and 36/41 (87.8%, p≤0.0001; 43.9±4.16 mm; 95% CI: 42.6-45.2 mm) the correct depth. The tested device is easy to use after instruction of less than 3 min and improves ECC performance of healthcare professionals in simulated cardiac arrest with respect to compression depth as well as compression rate.

  5. Surface Defects in Sheet Metal Forming: a Simulative Laboratory Device and Comparison with FE Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Sandrine; Le Port, Alban; Manach, Pierre-Yves

    2011-08-01

    Surface defects are small concave imperfections that can develop during forming on outer convex panels of automotive parts like doors. They occur during springback steps, after drawing in the vicinity of bending over a curved line and flanging/hemming in the vicinity of the upper corner of a door. They can alter significantly the final quality of the automobile and it is of primary importance to deal with them as early as possible in the design of the forming tools. The aim of this work is to reproduce at the laboratory scale such a defect, in the case of the flanging along a curved edge, made of two orthogonal straight part of length 50 mm and joint by a curved line. A dedicated device has been designed and steel samples were tested. Each sample was measured initially (after laser cutting) and after flanging, with a 3D measuring machine. 2D profiles were extracted and the curvature was calculated. Surface defects were defined between points where the curvature sign changed. Isovalues of surface defect depth could then be plotted, thus displaying also the spatial geometry on the part surface. An experimental database has been created on the influence of process parameters like the flanging height and the flanging radius. Numerical simulations have been performed with the finite element code Abaqus to predict the occurrence of such surface defects and to analyze stress and strain distribution within the defect area.

  6. Numerical simulation of a device with two spin crossover complexes: application for temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Jorge; Eddine Allal, Salah; Dahoo, Pierre Richard; Garcia, Yann

    2017-12-01

    The spin-crossover (SCO) phenomenon is related to the ability of a transition metal to change its spin state vs. a given perturbation. For an iron(II) SCO complexes the reversible changes involve the diamagnetic low-spin (S = 0) and the paramagnetic high-spin (HS S = 2) states [1,2,3]. In this contribution we simulate the HS Fraction (nHS) for different set values of temperature and pressure for a device using two SCO complexes with weak elastic interactions. We improve the calculation given by Linares et al. [4], taking also into account different volume (VHS, VLS) changes of the SCO. We perform all the calculation in the frame work of an Ising-like model solved in the mean-field approximation. The two SCO show in the case of “weak elastic interactions”, gradual spin transitions such that both temperature and pressure values can be obtained from the optical observation in the light of calculations discussed in this article.

  7. Numerical simulation of current-free double layers created in a helicon plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sathyanarayan; Singh, Nagendra

    2012-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations reveal that when radially confined source plasma with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions expands into diverging magnetic field B, a current-free double layer (CFDL) embedded in a conical density structure forms, as experimentally measured in the Australian helicon plasma device (HPD). The magnetized electrons follow the diverging B while the unmagnetized ions tend to flow directly downstream of the source, resulting in a radial electric field (E⊥) structure, which couples the ion and electron flows. Ions are transversely (radially) accelerated by E⊥ on the high potential side of the double layer in the CFDL. The accelerated ions are trapped near the conical surface, where E⊥ reverses direction. The potential structure of the CFDL is U-shaped and the plasma density is enhanced on the conical surface. The plasma density is severely depleted downstream of the parallel potential drop (φ||o) in the CFDL; the density depletion and the potential drop are related by quasi-neutrality condition, including the divergence in the magnetic field and in the plasma flow in the conical structure. The potential and density structures, the CFDL spatial size, its electric field strengths and the electron and ion velocities and energy distributions in the CFDL are found to be in good agreements with those measured in the Australian experiment. The applicability of our results to measured axial potential profiles in magnetic nozzle experiments in HPDs is discussed.

  8. Semi-automatic characterization and simulation of VCSEL devices for high speed VSR communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellevrault, S.; Toffano, Z.; Destrez, A.; Pez, M.; Quentel, F.

    2006-04-01

    Very short range (VSR) high bit rate optical fiber communications are an emerging market dedicated to local area networks, digital displays or board to board interconnects within real time calculators. In this technology, a very fast way to exchange data with high noise immunity and low-cost is needed. Optical multimode graded index fibers are used here because they have electrical noise immunity and are easier to handle than monomode fibers. 850 nm VCSEL are used in VSR communications because of their low cost, direct on-wafer tests, and the possibility of manufacturing VCSEL arrays very easily compared to classical optical transceivers using edge-emitting laser diodes. Although much research has been carried out in temperature modeling on VCSEL emitters, few studies have been devoted to characterizations over a very broad range of temperatures. Nowadays, VCSEL VSR communications tend to be used in severe environments such as space, avionics and military equipments. Therefore, a simple way to characterize VCSEL emitters over a broad range of temperature is required. In this paper, we propose a complete characterization of the emitter part of 2.5 Gb/s opto-electrical transceiver modules operating from -40°C to +120°C using 850 nm VCSELs. Our method uses simple and semi-automatic measurements of a given set of chosen device parameters in order to make fast and efficient simulations.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation study of ICRF minority heating in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Okada, H.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation code is developed for ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating in helical systems, which takes into account finite beta effects, complicated orbits of high energetic particles, Coulomb collisions and interactions between particles and the applied waves. The code is used to investigate ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The configuration of the magnetic fields changes significantly due to finite beta effects in the LHD. The resonance layer position is found to be crucial to the heating efficiency as the plasma beta increases. When the strength of the resonance magnetic field is set to the value at the magnetic axis, a higher heat efficiency is obtained and no clear difference of the heat efficiency due to finite beta effects is found in the high ICRF wave power region. However, the radial profile of the power transferred to majority ions and electrons from minority ions changes because of the deformation of the trapped particle due to the finite beta effects. The heat efficiency is improved if the radial electric field, E r , is positive (E r is directed radially outward) and it is also improved by supplying 3 He minority ions rather than proton minority ions. (author). 26 refs, 11 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Simulated human eye retina adaptive optics imaging system based on a liquid crystal on silicon device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Baoguang; Cao Zhaoliang; Mu Quanquan; Hu Lifa; Li Chao; Xuan Li

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain a clear image of the retina of model eye, an adaptive optics system used to correct the wave-front error is introduced in this paper. The spatial light modulator that we use here is a liquid crystal on a silicon device instead of a conversional deformable mirror. A paper with carbon granule is used to simulate the retina of human eye. The pupil size of the model eye is adjustable (3-7 mm). A Shack–Hartman wave-front sensor is used to detect the wave-front aberration. With this construction, a value of peak-to-valley is achieved to be 0.086 λ, where λ is wavelength. The modulation transfer functions before and after corrections are compared. And the resolution of this system after correction (691p/m) is very close to the dirraction limit resolution. The carbon granule on the white paper which has a size of 4.7 μm is seen clearly. The size of the retina cell is between 4 and 10 mu;m. So this system has an ability to image the human eye's retina. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  11. The design and simulation of new downhole vibration device about acoustic oil recovery technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Hou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available More and more oilfields are using acoustic technology to enhance oil recovery. In order to know the mechanism of acoustic oil recovery technology, the sound radiator of a new downhole vibration device is modeled and analyzed. Based on the theoretical background, this paper firstly analyzes the acoustic mechanism for the oil reservoir and then makes a acoustic response analysis on the sound radiator model for frequency and time-domain investigation by using professional acoustic simulation software–LMS Virtual.lab Acoustics, finally calculates the acoustic transmission loss in the downhole oil reservoir. The research reveals that firstly, acoustic waves have influences on the oil & water fluidity in the oil reservoir, the oil pressure gradient and the interfacial tension of capillary; secondly, the acoustic radiation power and sound pressure of field point attain a peak on the natural frequency of the sound radiator; thirdly, with the acoustic impact, the sound pressure of oil reservoir would fluctuate so as to improve the oil recovery ratio; the last but not the least one is both the sound pressure of oil reservoir point and the transmission loss of rock have a positive correlation with the vibration frequency. Therefore, it is of great importance for the research of vibration frequency and structure optimization of sound radiator.

  12. Computational Flow Dynamic Simulation of Micro Flow Field Characteristics Drainage Device Used in the Process of Oil-Water Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangya Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous crude oil often contains large amounts of produced water and heavy sediment, which seriously threats the safety of crude oil storage and transportation. Therefore, the proper design of crude oil tank drainage device is prerequisite for efficient purification of aqueous crude oil. In this work, the composition and physicochemical properties of crude oil samples were tested under the actual conditions encountered. Based on these data, an appropriate crude oil tank drainage device was developed using the principle of floating ball and multiphase flow. In addition, the flow field characteristics in the device were simulated and the contours and streamtraces of velocity magnitude at different nine moments were obtained. Meanwhile, the improvement of flow field characteristics after the addition of grids in crude oil tank drainage device was validated. These findings provide insights into the development of effective selection methods and serve as important references for oil-water separation process.

  13. Modeling and simulation of thermoelectric device working as a heat pump and an electric generator under Mediterranean climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Nimr, Moh'd A.; Tashtoush, Bourhan M.; Jaradat, Ahmad A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a small thermoelectric device used primarily as a heat pump and secondarily as an electricity generator when space heating and cooling are not required and incident solar radiation is sufficient. As a power generator, the thermoelectric device is integrated with an evacuated solar collector to utilize solar power. Performance of the thermoelectric device as a heat pump and as an electric generator is simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK. The purpose of this study is to estimate the energy savings from using the thermoelectric device in its electricity generation mode. The potential of energy saving because of this electricity generation mode function, has been examined in three different cases. These cases represent the operation of the dual mode thermoelectric system in typical home, school and office buildings in the Mediterranean region. In addition, the effects of different parameters, such as the solar radiation and ambient conditions, on the device performance were investigated for both modes as well as parameters related to the device itself. Furthermore, hours of operation were estimated and the economic feasibility of the device was evaluated. Results of this study include performance curves of the thermoelectric device in both modes as well as the estimation of the payback period for Mediterranean regions. - Highlights: • A thermoelectric device in dual mode integrated with an evacuated tube is studied. • The device is used as a heat pump and as an electricity generator. • Performance curves describing the behavior of the system have been resulted. • Energy saving by the system are calculated and presented for a period of one year. • Economic analysis of the system has been included.

  14. Design of a non-linear power take-off simulator for model testing of rotating wave energy devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M.F.P.; Henriques, J.C.C.; Lopes, Miguel C.; Gato, L.M.C. [IDMEC - Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Dente Antonio [CIE3 - Center for Innovation in Electrical and Energy Engineering, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-07-01

    Eddy current brakes provide a versatile way of simulating the power take-off system (PTO) in the model testing of wave energy converters at small scale. These are based on the principle that a conductive material moving perpendicularly to a magnetic field generates a braking force proportional to its velocity. This was applied in the design of the PTO simulator of a bottom-hinged flap wave energy converter model, at 1/16 scale. The efforts put into the accurate dynamic simulation of the device led to the development of a controllable PTO simulator, which can be applied to other small scale rotating wave energy device models. A special power source was built to provide the required controllable current intensity to feed the magnetic field generating coils. Different non-linear damping PTO characteristic curves can be simulated by basing the current control on real-time velocity measurement. The calibration of the system was done by connecting the device to a constant rotating speed motor and measuring the resistent torque produced by the PTO with a torquemeter for different values of current intensity through the coils.

  15. A comprehensive review on the methodologies to simulate the nuclear fuel bundle for the thermal hydraulic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnoi, A.K.; Chandraker, D.K.; Pal, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.

    2011-01-01

    The designer of a nuclear reactor system has to ensure its safety during normal operation as well as accidental conditions. This requires, among other things, a proper understanding of the various thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor core. In a nuclear reactor core the fuel elements are the heat source and highly loaded components of the reactor system. Therefore their behaviour under normal and accidental conditions must be extensively investigated. Data generation for Critical heat flux (CHF) in full scale bundle and parallel channel instability studies with at least two full size channels are required in order to evaluate the thermal margin and stability margin of the reactor. The complex nature of these phenomena calls for exhaustive experimental investigations. Fuel Rod Cluster Simulator (FRCS) is a very important component required for the experimental investigation of the thermal hydraulic behaviour of reactor fuel elements under normal and accidental conditions. This paper brings out a comprehensive review of the FRCS elaborating the challenges and important design aspects of the FRCS. Some of the main features and analysis results on the performance of the developed FRCS with respect to the actual nuclear fuel bundle will be presented in the paper. (author)

  16. The Effects of Phonological Short-Term Memory and Speech Perception on Spoken Sentence Comprehension in Children: Simulating Deficits in an Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Meaghan C.; Penney, Sarah B.; Robertson, Erin K.

    2017-01-01

    The roles of phonological short-term memory (pSTM) and speech perception in spoken sentence comprehension were examined in an experimental design. Deficits in pSTM and speech perception were simulated through task demands while typically-developing children (N = 71) completed a sentence-picture matching task. Children performed the control,…

  17. Simulation study of a high power density rectenna array for biomedical implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Yoon, Hargsoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    2016-04-01

    The integration of wireless power transmission devices using microwaves into the biomedical field is close to a practical reality. Implanted biomedical devices need a long lasting power source or continuous power supply. Recent development of high efficiency rectenna technology enables continuous power supply to these implanted devices. Due to the size limit of most of medical devices, it is imperative to minimize the rectenna as well. The research reported in this paper reviews the effects of close packing the rectenna elements which show the potential of directly empowering the implanted devices, especially within a confined area. The rectenna array is tested in the X band frequency range.

  18. The LEAP™ Gesture Interface Device and Take-Home Laparoscopic Simulators: A Study of Construct and Concurrent Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Roland W; Brown, Fraser S; Brennan, Paul M; Hennessey, Iain A M; Hughes, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    To assess the potential of the LEAP™ infrared motion tracking device to map laparoscopic instrument movement in a simulated environment. Simulator training is optimized when augmented by objective performance feedback. We explore the potential LEAP has to provide this in a way compatible with affordable take-home simulators. LEAP and the previously validated InsTrac visual tracking tool mapped expert and novice performances of a standardized simulated laparoscopic task. Ability to distinguish between the 2 groups (construct validity) and correlation between techniques (concurrent validity) were the primary outcome measures. Forty-three expert and 38 novice performances demonstrated significant differences in LEAP-derived metrics for instrument path distance (P device is able to track the movement of hands using instruments in a laparoscopic box simulator. Construct validity is demonstrated by its ability to distinguish novice from expert performances. Only time and instrument path distance demonstrated concurrent validity with an existing tracking method however. A number of limitations to the tracking method used by LEAP have been identified. These need to be addressed before it can be considered an alternative to visual tracking for the delivery of objective performance metrics in take-home laparoscopic simulators. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Storing live embryonic and adult human cartilage grafts for transplantation using a joint simulating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I; Robinson, D; Cohen, N; Nevo, Z

    2000-11-01

    Cartilage transplantation as a means to replace damaged articular surfaces is of interest. A major obstacle is the long-term preservation of cartilage grafts. The commonly used technique of freezing the grafts inevitably leads to cellular death. The current study compares the technique to an innovative approach using a pulsed-pressure perfusion system termed a joint simulating device (JSD), intended to simulate intra-articular mechanical forces. Human articular cartilage explants were harvested from both embryonic epiphyseal tissue and femoral heads of elderly women (over 70 years of age) undergoing a partial joint replacement (hemi-arthroplasty) and were divided in two groups: half of the samples were incubated in the JSD while the remaining half were grown in static culture within tissue culture plates. After 10 days all samples were evaluated for: (a) cell vitality as assessed by image analysis and XTT assay; (b) biosynthetic activity as expressed by radioactive sulfate incorporation into glycosaminoglycans (GAG's); and (c) proteoglycan content as assessed by alcian blue staining intensity. A 10-fold increase in sulfate incorporation in samples held in the JSD compared to the static culture group was observed in embryonic cartilage. In adult cartilage culture in the JSD elevated sulfate incorporation by threefold as compared to static culture. Central necrosis was observed in specimens grown in the static culture plates, while it did not occur in the samples held in the JSD. Cell vitality as assessed by XTT assay was significantly better in the JSD group as compared to static culture. The difference was more pronounced in the embryonic specimens as compared to adult cartilage. The specimens cultured within the JSD retained proteoglycans significantly better than those cultured in static culture. Maintenance of cartilage specimens in a JSD was highly effective in keeping the vitality of cartilage explants in vitro over a 10-day period. A possible future

  20. Computational simulation of biomolecules transport with multi-physics near microchannel surface for development of biomolecules-detection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuma; Shimizu, Tetsuhide; Yang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics in nano/micro scale is demanded in order to optimize the design of microfluidics device for the biomolecules detection with high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis. This paper aimed to investigate the effectivity of the computational simulation using the numerical model of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics near a microchannel surface on the development of biomolecules-detection devices. The biomolecules transport with fluid drag force, electric double layer (EDL) force, and van der Waals force was modeled by Newtonian Equation of motion. The model validity was verified in the influence of ion strength and flow velocity on biomolecules distribution near the surface compared with experimental results of previous studies. The influence of acting forces on its distribution near the surface was investigated by the simulation. The trend of its distribution to ion strength and flow velocity was agreement with the experimental result by the combination of all acting forces. Furthermore, EDL force dominantly influenced its distribution near its surface compared with fluid drag force except for the case of high velocity and low ion strength. The knowledges from the simulation might be useful for the design of biomolecules-detection devices and the simulation can be expected to be applied on its development as the design tool for high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis in the future.

  1. Power flow modeling of Back-to-Back STATCOM: Comprehensive simulation studies including PV curves and PQ circles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Mete Vural

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Power flow study in a power network embedded with FACTS device requires effort in program coding. Moreover, Newton-Raphson method should be modified by embedding injected power components into the algorithm. In this study, we have proposed a method for modeling of one of the newest FACTS concepts in power flow study without program coding or modification of existing Newton-Raphson algorithm. Real and reactive power injections for each voltage source converter of Back-to-Back Static Synchronous Compensator (BtB-STATCOM are PI regulated to their desired steady-state values. With this respect, reactive power injection of each voltage source converter as well as real power transfer among them can be assigned as control constraint. Operating losses are also taken into account in the proposed modeling approach. Furthermore, proposed model can be easily modified for the modeling of conventional STATCOM having only one voltage source converter or two STATCOMs operating independently. The proposed modeling approach is verified in PSCAD through a number of simulation scenarios in BtB-STATCOM and STATCOM embedded power systems, namely 1-Machine 4-Bus system and 3-Machine 7-Bus system. PV curves of local buses compensated by BtB-STATCOM and STATCOM are presented and compared. Steady-state performance of BtB-STATCOM and STATCOM is also compared in power flow handling.

  2. SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, N; Tian, Z; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package gPMC has been previously developed and high computational efficiency was achieved. This abstract reports our recent improvements on this package in terms of accuracy, functionality, and code portability. Methods: In the latest version of gPMC, nuclear interaction cross section database was updated to include data from TOPAS/Geant4. Inelastic interaction model, particularly the proton scattering angle distribution, was updated to improve overall simulation accuracy. Calculation of dose averaged LET (LETd) was implemented. gPMC was ported onto an OpenCL environment to enable portability across different computing devices (GPUs from different vendors and CPUs). We also performed comprehensive tests of the code accuracy. Dose from electro-magnetic (EM) interaction channel, primary and secondary proton doses and fluences were scored and compared with those computed by TOPAS. Results: In a homogeneous water phantom with 100 and 200 MeV beams, mean dose differences in EM channel computed by gPMC and by TOPAS were 0.28% and 0.65% of the corresponding maximum dose, respectively. With the Geant4 nuclear interaction cross section data, mean difference of primary proton dose was 0.84% for the 200 MeV case and 0.78% for the 100 MeV case. After updating inelastic interaction model, maximum difference of secondary proton fluence and dose were 0.08% and 0.5% for the 200 MeV beam, and 0.04% and 0.2% for the 100 MeV beam. In a test case with a 150MeV proton beam, the mean difference between LETd computed by gPMC and TOPAS was 0.96% within the proton range. With the OpenCL implementation, gPMC is executable on AMD and Nvidia GPUs, as well as on Intel CPU in single or multiple threads. Results on different platforms agreed within statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: Several improvements have been implemented in the latest version of gPMC, which enhanced its accuracy, functionality, and code portability

  3. SU-E-T-673: Recent Developments and Comprehensive Validations of a GPU-Based Proton Monte Carlo Simulation Package, GPMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, N; Tian, Z; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation package gPMC has been previously developed and high computational efficiency was achieved. This abstract reports our recent improvements on this package in terms of accuracy, functionality, and code portability. Methods: In the latest version of gPMC, nuclear interaction cross section database was updated to include data from TOPAS/Geant4. Inelastic interaction model, particularly the proton scattering angle distribution, was updated to improve overall simulation accuracy. Calculation of dose averaged LET (LETd) was implemented. gPMC was ported onto an OpenCL environment to enable portability across different computing devices (GPUs from different vendors and CPUs). We also performed comprehensive tests of the code accuracy. Dose from electro-magnetic (EM) interaction channel, primary and secondary proton doses and fluences were scored and compared with those computed by TOPAS. Results: In a homogeneous water phantom with 100 and 200 MeV beams, mean dose differences in EM channel computed by gPMC and by TOPAS were 0.28% and 0.65% of the corresponding maximum dose, respectively. With the Geant4 nuclear interaction cross section data, mean difference of primary proton dose was 0.84% for the 200 MeV case and 0.78% for the 100 MeV case. After updating inelastic interaction model, maximum difference of secondary proton fluence and dose were 0.08% and 0.5% for the 200 MeV beam, and 0.04% and 0.2% for the 100 MeV beam. In a test case with a 150MeV proton beam, the mean difference between LETd computed by gPMC and TOPAS was 0.96% within the proton range. With the OpenCL implementation, gPMC is executable on AMD and Nvidia GPUs, as well as on Intel CPU in single or multiple threads. Results on different platforms agreed within statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: Several improvements have been implemented in the latest version of gPMC, which enhanced its accuracy, functionality, and code portability.

  4. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Kevin B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, Otis R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benjamin, Russ [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, William H [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    -of-burial until it reached a value of one at a DOB between 15m and 20m. These simulations confirm the expected result that the variation of coupling to the ground, or the air, change s much more rapidly with emplacement location for a high-energy-density (i.e., nuclear-like) explosive source than it does for relatively low - energy - density chemical explosive sources. The Energy Partitioning, Energy Coupling (EPEC) platform at LLNL utilizes laser energy from one quad (i.e. 4-laser beams) of the 192 - beam NIF Laser bank to deliver ~10kJ of energy to 1mg of silver in a hohlraum creating an effective small-explosive ‘source’ with an energy density comparable to those in low-yield nuclear devices. Such experiments have the potential to provide direct experimental confirmation of the simulation results obtained in this study, at a physical scale (and time-scale) which is a factor of 1000 smaller than the spatial- or temporal-scales typically encountered when dealing with nuclear explosions.

  5. Coherent tools for physics-based simulation and characterization of noise in semiconductor devices oriented to nonlinear microwave circuit CAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riah, Zoheir; Sommet, Raphael; Nallatamby, Jean C.; Prigent, Michel; Obregon, Juan

    2004-05-01

    We present in this paper a set of coherent tools for noise characterization and physics-based analysis of noise in semiconductor devices. This noise toolbox relies on a low frequency noise measurement setup with special high current capabilities thanks to an accurate and original calibration. It relies also on a simulation tool based on the drift diffusion equations and the linear perturbation theory, associated with the Green's function technique. This physics-based noise simulator has been implemented successfully in the Scilab environment and is specifically dedicated to HBTs. Some results are given and compared to those existing in the literature.

  6. Simulation study of HEMT structures with HfO2 cap layer for mitigating inverse piezoelectric effect related device failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Nagulapally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Inverse Piezoelectric Effect (IPE is thought to contribute to possible device failure of GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs. Here we focus on a simulation study to probe the possible mitigation of the IPE by reducing the internal electric fields and related elastic energy through the use of high-k materials. Inclusion of a HfO2 “cap layer” above the AlGaN barrier particularly with a partial mesa structure is shown to have potential advantages. Simulations reveal even greater reductions in the internal electric fields by using “field plates” in concert with high-k oxides.

  7. Design and simulation of printed spiral coil used in wireless power transmission systems for implant medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Fang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Printed Spiral Coil (PSC) is a coil antenna for near-field wireless power transmission to the next generation implant medical devices. PSC for implant medical device should be power efficient and low electromagnetic radiation to human tissues. We utilized a physical model of printed spiral coil and applied our algorithm to design PSC operating at 13.56 MHz. Numerical and electromagnetic simulation of power transfer efficiency of PSC in air medium is 77.5% and 71.1%, respectively. The simulation results show that the printed spiral coil which is optimized for air will keep 15.2% power transfer efficiency in human subcutaneous tissues. In addition, the Specific Absorption Ratio (SAR) for this coil antenna in subcutaneous at 13.56 MHz is below 1.6 W/Kg, which suggests this coil is implantable safe based on IEEE C95.1 safety guideline.

  8. 2-D simulation and analysis of temperature effects on electrical parameters degradation of power RF LDMOS device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaid, M.A.; Ketata, K.; Gares, M.; Marcon, J.; Mourgues, K.; Masmoudi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of temperature effects on power RF Laterally Diffused (LD) MOS performances, which can modify and degrade transistor physical and electrical behaviour. In this work, the temperature influence on device electrical characteristics is discussed with regard to physical limits for device operation. A developed 2-D structure was implemented and simulated using the physical simulator Silvaco-Atlas to explain the observed data and offer insight into the physical origin of LDMOS temperature behaviour. The temperature dependence of most important electrical parameters such as channel current I ds , threshold voltage V th and inter-electrodes capacitances (C ds , C gs ) is investigated. The temperature effects on mobility, electron concentration, electric field, current flow lines and Fermi level are taken into account. Finally, initial failure analysis is discussed

  9. 2-D simulation and analysis of temperature effects on electrical parameters degradation of power RF LDMOS device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belaid, M.A. [LEMI, University of Rouen, IUT Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France)]. E-mail: Mohamed-ali.belaid@univ-rouen.fr; Ketata, K. [LEMI, University of Rouen, IUT Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France); Gares, M. [LEMI, University of Rouen, IUT Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France); Marcon, J. [LEMI, University of Rouen, IUT Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France); Mourgues, K. [LEMI, University of Rouen, IUT Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France); Masmoudi, M. [LEMI, University of Rouen, IUT Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan (France)

    2006-12-15

    This paper presents a synthesis of temperature effects on power RF Laterally Diffused (LD) MOS performances, which can modify and degrade transistor physical and electrical behaviour. In this work, the temperature influence on device electrical characteristics is discussed with regard to physical limits for device operation. A developed 2-D structure was implemented and simulated using the physical simulator Silvaco-Atlas to explain the observed data and offer insight into the physical origin of LDMOS temperature behaviour. The temperature dependence of most important electrical parameters such as channel current I {sub ds}, threshold voltage V {sub th} and inter-electrodes capacitances (C {sub ds}, C {sub gs}) is investigated. The temperature effects on mobility, electron concentration, electric field, current flow lines and Fermi level are taken into account. Finally, initial failure analysis is discussed.

  10. NIMROD simulations and physics assessment of possible designs for a next generation Steady Inductive Helicity Injection HIT device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, James; Morgan, Kyle; Grubb, Isaac; Jarboe, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus - Steady Inductive 3 (HIT-SI3) experiment forms and maintains spheromaks via Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) using discrete injectors that inject magnetic helicity via a non-axisymmetric perturbation and drive toroidally symmetric current. Newer designs for larger SIHI-driven spheromaks incorporate a set of injectors connected to a single external manifold to allow more freedom for the toroidal structure of the applied perturbation. Simulations have been carried out using the NIMROD code to assess the effectiveness of various imposed mode structures and injector schema in driving current via Imposed Dynamo Current Drive (IDCD). The results are presented here for varying flux conserver shapes on a device approximately 1.5 times larger than the current HIT-SI3 experiment. The imposed mode structures and spectra of simulated spheromaks are analyzed in order to examine magnetic structure and stability and determine an optimal regime for IDCD sustainment in a large device. The development of scaling laws for manifold operation is also presented, and simulation results are analyzed and assessed as part of the development path for the large scale device.

  11. Conceptual design and simulation investigation of an electronic cooling device powered by hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Guozhen; Zhang, Yanchao; Cai, Ling; Su, Shanhe; Chen, Jincan

    2015-01-01

    Most electronic cooling devices are powered by an external bias applied between the cold and the hot reservoirs. Here we propose a new concept of electronic cooling, in which cooling is achieved by using a reservoir of hot electrons as the power source. The cooling device incorporates two energy filters with the Lorentzian transmission function to respectively select low- and high-energy electrons for transport. Based on the proposed model, we analyze the performances of the device varying with the resonant levels and half widths of two energy filters and establish the optimal configuration of the cooling device. It is believed that such a novel device may be practically used in some nano-energy fields. - Highlights: • A new electronic cooling device powered by hot electrons is proposed. • Two energy filters are employed to select the electrons for transport. • The effects of the resonant levels and half widths of two filters are discussed. • The maximum cooling power and coefficient of performance are calculated. • The optimal configuration of the cooling device is determined.

  12. Study on the photoresponse of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O and zinc oxynitride semiconductor devices by the extraction of sub-gap-state distribution and device simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Park, Jozeph; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2015-07-22

    Persistent photoconduction (PPC) is a phenomenon that limits the application of oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) in optical sensor-embedded displays. In the present work, a study on zinc oxynitride (ZnON) semiconductor TFTs based on the combination of experimental results and device simulation is presented. Devices incorporating ZnON semiconductors exhibit negligible PPC effects compared with amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs, and the difference between the two types of materials are examined by monochromatic photonic C-V spectroscopy (MPCVS). The latter method allows the estimation of the density of subgap states in the semiconductor, which may account for the different behavior of ZnON and IGZO materials with respect to illumination and the associated PPC. In the case of a-IGZO TFTs, the oxygen flow rate during the sputter deposition of a-IGZO is found to influence the amount of PPC. Small oxygen flow rates result in pronounced PPC, and large densities of valence band tail (VBT) states are observed in the corresponding devices. This implies a dependence of PPC on the amount of oxygen vacancies (VO). On the other hand, ZnON has a smaller bandgap than a-IGZO and contains a smaller density of VBT states over the entire range of its bandgap energy. Here, the concept of activation energy window (AEW) is introduced to explain the occurrence of PPC effects by photoinduced electron doping, which is likely to be associated with the formation of peroxides in the semiconductor. The analytical methodology presented in this report accounts well for the reduction of PPC in ZnON TFTs, and provides a quantitative tool for the systematic development of phototransistors for optical sensor-embedded interactive displays.

  13. Role of Boundary Conditions in Monte Carlo Simulation of MEMS Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Robert P.; Hash, David B.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    A study is made of the issues surrounding prediction of microchannel flows using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. This investigation includes the introduction and use of new inflow and outflow boundary conditions suitable for subsonic flows. A series of test simulations for a moderate-size microchannel indicates that a high degree of grid under-resolution in the streamwise direction may be tolerated without loss of accuracy. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of physically correct boundary conditions, as well as possibilities for reducing the time associated with the transient phase of a simulation. These results imply that simulations of longer ducts may be more feasible than previously envisioned.

  14. Comprehensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Comprehensive Care Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Comprehensive Care Understand the importance of comprehensive MS care ... In this article A complex disease requires a comprehensive approach Today multiple sclerosis (MS) is not a ...

  15. Comparing three CPR feedback devices and standard BLS in a single rescuer scenario: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapletal, Bernhard; Greif, Robert; Stumpf, Dominik; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Frantal, Sophie; Haugk, Moritz; Ruetzler, Kurt; Schlimp, Christoph; Fischer, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    Efficiently performed basic life support (BLS) after cardiac arrest is proven to be effective. However, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is strenuous and rescuers' performance declines rapidly over time. Audio-visual feedback devices reporting CPR quality may prevent this decline. We aimed to investigate the effect of various CPR feedback devices on CPR quality. In this open, prospective, randomised, controlled trial we compared three CPR feedback devices (PocketCPR, CPRmeter, iPhone app PocketCPR) with standard BLS without feedback in a simulated scenario. 240 trained medical students performed single rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8min. Effective compression (compressions with correct depth, pressure point and sufficient decompression) as well as compression rate, flow time fraction and ventilation parameters were compared between the four groups. Study participants using the PocketCPR performed 17±19% effective compressions compared to 32±28% with CPRmeter, 25±27% with the iPhone app PocketCPR, and 35±30% applying standard BLS (PocketCPR vs. CPRmeter p=0.007, PocketCPR vs. standard BLS p=0.001, others: ns). PocketCPR and CPRmeter prevented a decline in effective compression over time, but overall performance in the PocketCPR group was considerably inferior to standard BLS. Compression depth and rate were within the range recommended in the guidelines in all groups. While we found differences between the investigated CPR feedback devices, overall BLS quality was suboptimal in all groups. Surprisingly, effective compression was not improved by any CPR feedback device compared to standard BLS. All feedback devices caused substantial delay in starting CPR, which may worsen outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biotribological evaluation of artificial disc arthroplasty devices: influence of loading and kinematic patterns during in vitro wear simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, James J.; Garcia, Rolando; Basson, Janet; Schwiesau, Jens; Fritz, Bernhard; Blömer, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Wear simulation is an essential pre-clinical method to predict the mid- and long-term clinical wear behavior of newly introduced devices for total disc arthroplasty. The main requirement of a suitable method for spinal wear simulation has to be the ability to distinguish between design concepts and allow for a direct comparison of predicate devices. The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of loading and kinematic patterns based on two different protocols for spinal wear simulation (ISO/FDIS 18192-1 (2006) and ASTM F2423-05). In vitro wear simulation was performed with six activ® L lumbar artificial disc devices (Aesculap Tuttlingen, Germany). The applied kinematic pattern of movement was multidirectional for ISO (elliptic track) and unidirectional with a curvilinear shape for ASTM. Testing was done for 10 million cycles in the ISO loading mode and afterwards with the same specimens for 5 million cycles according to the ASTM protocol with a customized six-station servohydraulic spinal wear simulator (EndoLab Thansau, Germany). Gravimetrical and geometrical wear assessment, a slide track analysis correlated to an optical surface characterization, and an estimation of particle size and morphology were performed. The gravimetric wear rate for the first 10 million cycles was ISOinitial = 2.7 ± 0.3 mg/million cycles. During the ASTM test period (10–15 million cycles) a gravimetric wear rate of 0.14 ± 0.06 mg/million cycles was estimated. The wear rates between the ISO and ASTM driven simulations differ substantially (approximately 20-fold) and statistical analysis demonstrates a significant difference (p < 0.001) between the test groups. The main explanation of divergency between ISO and ASTM driven wear simulations is the multidirectional pattern of movement described in the ISO document resulting in a cross-shear stress on the polyethylene material. Due to previous retrieval observations, it seems to be very unlikely that a lumbar

  17. Detached-Eddy Simulation of a Fluidic Device for a Prediction of Pressure Loss Characteristics in a Low Flow Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Gyu; Lee, Suk Ho; Kim, Han Gon

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Power Reactor 1400(APR1400) adopts a passive flow controller in Safety Injection Tanks (SITs) as one of Advanced Design Features (ADFs). This device, called a 'Fluidic Device (FD)', controls the flow rate of safety injection water in a passive manner. A flow control mechanism varies the flow resistance in the vortex chamber corresponding to the SIT water level hence the flow rate can be adjusted by the specific flow resistance in a specific flow regime. A full-scale test was performed and the test results met the design requirement of APR1400. To enhance the performance of the FD more effectively, a series of CFD analysis were implemented and remedy of design modification was proposed on the basis of a series of CFD analysis. The results of CFD analysis showed that total discharge time of the fluidic device is to be increased by enhancing the K-factor in consequence of changing the control nozzle angle. However, a tendency of a pressure loss was under-estimated as a limitation of turbulence models such as Reynolds Averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) models compared to the experimental data. This paper shows that pressure loss characteristics of the FD can be predicted using a Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) turbulence model, which can provide valuable flow characteristics far exceeding RANS simulations

  18. Centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight in subjects with cardiac implanted devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Rebecca S; Reyes, David P; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2015-04-01

    Future commercial spaceflight participants (SFPs) with conditions requiring personal medical devices represent a unique challenge. The behavior under stress of cardiac implanted devices (CIDs) such as pacemakers is of special concern. No known data currently exist on how such devices may react to the stresses of spaceflight. We examined the responses of two volunteer subjects with CIDs to G forces in a centrifuge to evaluate how similar potential commercial SFPs might tolerate the forces of spaceflight. Two subjects, 75- and 79-yr-old men with histories of atrial fibrillation and implanted dual-lead, rate-responsive pacemakers, underwent seven centrifuge runs over 2 d. Day 1 consisted of two +Gz runs (peak = +3.5 Gz, run 2) and two +Gx runs (peak = +6.0 Gx, run 4). Day 2 consisted of three runs approximating suborbital spaceflight profiles (combined +Gx/+Gz). Data collected included blood pressures, electrocardiograms, pulse oximetry, neurovestibular exams, and postrun questionnaires regarding motion sickness, disorientation, greyout, and other symptoms. Despite both subjects' significant medical histories, neither had abnormal physiological responses. Post-spin analysis demonstrated no lead displacement, damage, or malfunction of either CID. Potential risks to SFPs with CIDs include increased arrhythmogenesis, lead displacement, and device damage. There are no known prior studies of individuals with CIDs exposed to accelerations anticipated during the dynamic phases of suborbital spaceflight. These cases demonstrate that even individuals with significant medical histories and implanted devices can tolerate the acceleration exposures of commercial spaceflight. Further investigation will determine which personal medical devices present significant risks during suborbital flight and beyond.

  19. Measuring irradiated lung and heart area in breast tangential fields using a simulator-based computerized tomography device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, Raj; Fowler, Allan; Hunt, Peter

    1995-01-15

    Purpose: To illustrate the use of a simulator based computerized tomography system (SIMCT) in the simulation and planning of tangential breast fields. Methods and Materials: Forty-five consecutive patients underwent treatment planning using a radiotherapy simulator with computerized tomography attachment. One to three scans were obtained for each patient, calculations were made on the central axis scan. Due to the wide aperture of this system all patients were able to be scanned in the desired treatment position with arm abducted 90 deg. . Using available software tools the area of lung and/or heart included within the tangential fields was calculated. The greatest perpendicular distance (GPD) from the chest wall to posterior field edge was also measured. Results: The mean GPD for the group was 25.40 mm with 71% of patients having GPDs of {<=} 30 mm. The mean area of irradiated lung was 1780 sq mm which represented 18.0% of the total ipsilateral lung area seen in the central axis. Seven of the patients with left sided tumors had an average 1314 sq mm heart irradiated in the central axis. This represented 11.9% of total heart area in these patients. Conclusion: Measurements of irradiated lung and heart area can be easily and accurately made using a SIMCT device. Such measurements may help identify those patients potentially at risk for lung or heart toxicity as a consequence of their treatment. A major advantage of this device is the ability to scan patients in the actual treatment position.

  20. Measuring irradiated lung and heart area in breast tangential fields using a simulator-based computerized tomography device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, Raj; Fowler, Allan; Hunt, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the use of a simulator based computerized tomography system (SIMCT) in the simulation and planning of tangential breast fields. Methods and Materials: Forty-five consecutive patients underwent treatment planning using a radiotherapy simulator with computerized tomography attachment. One to three scans were obtained for each patient, calculations were made on the central axis scan. Due to the wide aperture of this system all patients were able to be scanned in the desired treatment position with arm abducted 90 deg. . Using available software tools the area of lung and/or heart included within the tangential fields was calculated. The greatest perpendicular distance (GPD) from the chest wall to posterior field edge was also measured. Results: The mean GPD for the group was 25.40 mm with 71% of patients having GPDs of ≤ 30 mm. The mean area of irradiated lung was 1780 sq mm which represented 18.0% of the total ipsilateral lung area seen in the central axis. Seven of the patients with left sided tumors had an average 1314 sq mm heart irradiated in the central axis. This represented 11.9% of total heart area in these patients. Conclusion: Measurements of irradiated lung and heart area can be easily and accurately made using a SIMCT device. Such measurements may help identify those patients potentially at risk for lung or heart toxicity as a consequence of their treatment. A major advantage of this device is the ability to scan patients in the actual treatment position

  1. A variance-reduced electrothermal Monte Carlo method for semiconductor device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscato, Orazio; Di Stefano, Vincenza [Univ. degli Studi di Catania (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica; Wagner, Wolfgang [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    This paper is concerned with electron transport and heat generation in semiconductor devices. An improved version of the electrothermal Monte Carlo method is presented. This modification has better approximation properties due to reduced statistical fluctuations. The corresponding transport equations are provided and results of numerical experiments are presented.

  2. The development of a ballistic method for simulating fragments from buried explosive devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt-Deutekom, M.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    No standard scientific methodology currently exists to assess the performance of personal protection equipment (PPE) against secondary debris, such as soil, grit and stones, ejected when a buried improvised explosive device (IED) detonates. Different test methods are used for this evaluation. The

  3. The Effects of Phonological Short-Term Memory and Speech Perception on Spoken Sentence Comprehension in Children: Simulating Deficits in an Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Meaghan C; Penney, Sarah B; Robertson, Erin K

    2017-10-01

    The roles of phonological short-term memory (pSTM) and speech perception in spoken sentence comprehension were examined in an experimental design. Deficits in pSTM and speech perception were simulated through task demands while typically-developing children (N [Formula: see text] 71) completed a sentence-picture matching task. Children performed the control, simulated pSTM deficit, simulated speech perception deficit, or simulated double deficit condition. On long sentences, the double deficit group had lower scores than the control and speech perception deficit groups, and the pSTM deficit group had lower scores than the control group and marginally lower scores than the speech perception deficit group. The pSTM and speech perception groups performed similarly to groups with real deficits in these areas, who completed the control condition. Overall, scores were lowest on noncanonical long sentences. Results show pSTM has a greater effect than speech perception on sentence comprehension, at least in the tasks employed here.

  4. Lung assist devices influence cardio-energetic parameters: Numerical simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lazzari, C; Quatember, B; Recheis, W; Mayr, M; Demertzis, S; Allasia, G; De Rossi, A; Cavoretto, R; Venturino, E; Genuini, I

    2015-08-01

    We aim at an analysis of the effects mechanical ventilators (MVs) and thoracic artificial lungs (TALs) will have on the cardiovascular system, especially on important quantities, such as left and right ventricular external work (EW), pressure-volume area (PVA) and cardiac mechanical efficiency (CME). Our analyses are based on simulation studies which were carried out by using our CARDIOSIM(©) software simulator. At first, we carried out simulation studies of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) without a thoracic artificial lung (TAL). Subsequently, we conducted simulation studies of patients who had been provided with a TAL, but did not undergo MV. We aimed at describing the patient's physiological characteristics and their variations with time, such as EW, PVA, CME, cardiac output (CO) and mean pulmonary arterial/venous pressure (PAP/PVP). We were starting with a simulation run under well-defined initial conditions which was followed by simulation runs for a wide range of mean intrathoracic pressure settings. Our simulations of MV without TAL showed that for mean intrathoracic pressure settings from negative (-4 mmHg) to positive (+5 mmHg) values, the left and right ventricular EW and PVA, right ventricular CME and CO decreased, whereas left ventricular CME and the PAP increased. The simulation studies of patients with a TAL, comprised all the usual TAL arrangements, viz. configurations "in series" and in parallel with the natural lung and, moreover, hybrid configurations. The main objective of the simulation studies was, as before, the assessment of the hemodynamic response to the application of a TAL. We could for instance show that, in case of an "in series" configuration, a reduction (an increase) in left (right) ventricular EW and PVA values occurred, whereas the best performance in terms of CO can be achieved in the case of an in parallel configuration.

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Single-Phase Closed-Loop Thermo-Siphon in LORELEI Test Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitelman, D.; Shenha, H.; Gonnier, Ch.; Tarabelli, D.; Sasson, A.; Weiss, Y.; Katz, M.

    2014-01-01

    The LORELEI experimental setup in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is dedicated for the study of fuel during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The main objective of the LORELEI(2) (Light-Water One-Rod Equipment for LOCA Experimental Investigation) is to study the thermal-mechanical behavior of fuel during such an accident and to produce a short half-life fission products source term. In order to study those phenomena, the fuel sample will experience a transient neutron flux field, which in turn will generate a Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR) and determine the temperature of the fuel and its cladding, simulating the behavior of the fuel and the cladding during a LOCA accident. In order to reproduce a LOCA-type transient sequence, the experimental test device will be located on a displacement device. The displacement device moves the test device in the flux field in order to generate a representing LHGR in the fuel or temperature of its cladding. The LOCA-type transient sequence has four major features: „h An adiabatic heating of the fuel up to the ballooning and burst occurrence. „h High temperature plateau which will promote clad oxidation. „h Passive precooling by thermal inertia. „h Water re-flooding and quenching. The challenge in the thermo-hydraulic design of the LORELEI test section is in defining a one closed water capsule design that can operate as a thermo-siphon at re-irradiation phase and also can reproduce all LOCA-type transient sequence phases. This design should be validated and verified to fill all safety and regulation requirements. This work aims to investigate fluid flow behavior of a single-phase thermo-siphon in the LORELEI test device, as part of the conceptual design and optimization study. The complexity of the flow field in the LORELEI test device, as a closed-loop thermo-siphon, is due to the opposing forces in the device - buoyancy forces and natural convection flow generated (mainly) by the fuel power in the hot channel

  6. Energy performance of a micro-cogeneration device during transient and steady-state operation: Experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, Antonio; Sibilio, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Micro-cogeneration is a well-established technology and its deployment has been considered by the European Community as one of the most effective measure to save primary energy and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As a consequence, the estimation of the potential impact of micro-cogeneration devices is necessary to design policy and to energetically, ecologically and economically rank these systems among other potential energy saving and CO 2 -reducing measures. Even if transient behaviour can be very important when the engine is frequently started and stopped and allowed to cool-down in between, for the sake of simplicity mainly static and simplified methods are used for assessing the performance of cogeneration devices, completely neglecting the dynamic response of the units themselves. In the first part of this paper a series of experiments is illustrated and discussed in detail in order to highlight and compare the transient and stationary operation of a natural gas fuelled reciprocating internal combustion engine based cogeneration unit with 6.0 kW as nominal electric output and 11.7 kW as nominal thermal output. The measured performance of the cogeneration device is also compared with the performance of the system calculated on the basis of the efficiency values suggested by the manufacturer in order to highlight and quantify the discrepancy between the two approaches in evaluating the unit operation. Finally the experimental data are also compared with those predicted by a simulation model developed within IEA/ECBCS Annex 42 and experimentally calibrated by the authors in order to assess the model reliability for studying and predicting the performance of the system under different operating scenarios. -- Highlights: ► Transient operation of a cogeneration system has been experimentally investigated. ► Steady-state operation of a cogeneration device has been experimentally evaluated. ► Measured data have been compared with those predicted by a

  7. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Definitions and Abbreviations for Flight Simulation Training Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures, navigation aids, maps, and visual modeling detail sufficient to enable completion of an Airline..., catering, or cargo trucks; pedestrians) presented to pose a potential conflict with the simulated aircraft... Airline Transport Association. ICAOInternational Civil Aviation Organization. IGEIn ground effect...

  8. Three-dimensional simulation of charge collection and multiple-bit upset in Si devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, P.E.; Sexton, F.W.; Winokur, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, three-dimensional numerical simulation is used to explore the basic charge-collection mechanisms in silicon n + /p diodes. For diodes on lightly-doped substrates ( 15 cm -3 ) struck by a 100-MeV Fe ion, the funneling effect is very strong and essentially all collection is by funnel-assisted drift. This drift collection may occur as late as several nanoseconds after the strike, later than is usually associated with drift collection. For moderately-doped substrates (∼1 x 10 16 cm -3 ) and epitaxial structures grown on heavily-doped substrates, the funnel effect is weaker and drift and diffusion are of more equal importance. For 5-MeV He (α-particle) strikes with low-density charge tracks, the charge-collection transient exhibits both drift and diffusion regimes regardless of the substrate doping. Simulations of diodes with passive external loads indicate that while the current response is altered considerably by the load, total collected charge is not greatly affected for the simple resistive loads studied. Three-dimensional mixed-mode simulation is performed to investigate charge-collection behavior and upset mechanisms in complete CMOS SRAM cells. Simulations of double SRAM cell structures indicate that only collection by diffusion from ''between-node'' strikes is capable of producing multiple-bit upsets in the simulated technology. Limitations of the simulations, specifically carrier-carrier scattering models and large concentration gradients, are also discussed

  9. Use of a line-pair resolution phantom for comprehensive quality assurance of electronic portal imaging devices based on fundamental imaging metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-01-01

    Image guided radiation therapy solutions based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) involve the extension of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) from their traditional role of weekly localization imaging and planar dose mapping to volumetric imaging for 3D setup and dose verification. To sustain the potential advantages of MVCT, EPIDs are required to provide improved levels of portal image quality. Therefore, it is vital that the performance of EPIDs in clinical use is maintained at an optimal level through regular and rigorous quality assurance (QA). Traditionally, portal imaging QA has been carried out by imaging calibrated line-pair and contrast resolution phantoms and obtaining arbitrarily defined QA indices that are usually dependent on imaging conditions and merely indicate relative trends in imaging performance. They are not adequately sensitive to all aspects of image quality unlike fundamental imaging metrics such as the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) that are widely used to characterize detector performance in radiographic imaging and would be ideal for QA purposes. However, due to the difficulty of performing conventional MTF measurements, they have not been used for routine clinical QA. The authors present a simple and quick QA methodology based on obtaining the MTF, NPS, and DQE of a megavoltage imager by imaging standard open fields and a bar-pattern QA phantom containing 2 mm thick tungsten line-pair bar resolution targets. Our bar-pattern based MTF measurement features a novel zero-frequency normalization scheme that eliminates normalization errors typically associated with traditional bar-pattern measurements at megavoltage x-ray energies. The bar-pattern QA phantom and open-field images are used in conjunction with an automated image analysis algorithm that quickly computes the MTF, NPS, and DQE of an EPID system. Our approach combines the fundamental advantages of

  10. A Randomized Control Trial of Cardiopulmonary Feedback Devices and Their Impact on Infant Chest Compression Quality: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Andrea L; Spalding, Carmen N; Landa, Katrina N; Myer, Brian R; Donald, Cure; Smith, Jason E; Platt, Gerald; King, Heather C

    2017-10-27

    In effort to improve chest compression quality among health care providers, numerous feedback devices have been developed. Few studies, however, have focused on the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation feedback devices for infants and children. This study evaluated the quality of chest compressions with standard team-leader coaching, a metronome (MetroTimer by ONYX Apps), and visual feedback (SkillGuide Cardiopulmonary Feedback Device) during simulated infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Seventy voluntary health care providers who had recently completed Pediatric Advanced Life Support or Basic Life Support courses were randomized to perform simulated infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation into 1 of 3 groups: team-leader coaching alone (control), coaching plus metronome, or coaching plus SkillGuide for 2 minutes continuously. Rate, depth, and frequency of complete recoil during cardiopulmonary resuscitation were recorded by the Laerdal SimPad device for each participant. American Heart Association-approved compression techniques were randomized to either 2-finger or encircling thumbs. The metronome was associated with more ideal compression rate than visual feedback or coaching alone (104/min vs 112/min and 113/min; P = 0.003, 0.019). Visual feedback was associated with more ideal depth than auditory (41 mm vs 38.9; P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in complete recoil between groups. Secondary outcomes of compression technique revealed a difference of 1 mm. Subgroup analysis of male versus female showed no difference in mean number of compressions (221.76 vs 219.79; P = 0.72), mean compression depth (40.47 vs 39.25; P = 0.09), or rate of complete release (70.27% vs 64.96%; P = 0.54). In the adult literature, feedback devices often show an increase in quality of chest compressions. Although more studies are needed, this study did not demonstrate a clinically significant improvement in chest compressions with the addition of a metronome or visual

  11. High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability testing device and leaching test of simulated high-level waste glass at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senoo, Muneaki; Banba, Tsunetaka; Tashiro, Shingo; Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio

    1979-11-01

    A High Pressure Soxhlet Type Leachability Testing Device (HIPSOL) was developed to evaluate long-period stability of high-level waste (HLW) solids. For simulated HLW solids, temperature dependency of the leachability was investigated at higher temperatures from 100 0 C to 300 0 C at 80 atm. Leachabilities of cesium and sodium at 295 0 C were 20 and 7 times higher than at 100 0 C, respectively. In the repository, the temperatures around solidified products may be hundred 0 C. It is essential to test them at such elevated temperatures. HIPSOL is also usable for accelerated test to evaluate long-period leaching behavior of HLW products. (author)

  12. Method and System for Physiologically Modulating Videogames and Simulations which Use Gesture and Body Image Sensing Control Input Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Stephens, Chad L. (Inventor); Habowski, Tyler (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Method for physiologically modulating videogames and simulations includes utilizing input from a motion-sensing video game system and input from a physiological signal acquisition device. The inputs from the physiological signal sensors are utilized to change the response of a user's avatar to inputs from the motion-sensing sensors. The motion-sensing system comprises a 3D sensor system having full-body 3D motion capture of a user's body. This arrangement encourages health-enhancing physiological self-regulation skills or therapeutic amplification of healthful physiological characteristics. The system provides increased motivation for users to utilize biofeedback as may be desired for treatment of various conditions.

  13. Estimation of Amount of Scattered Neutrons at Devices PFZ and GIT-12 by MCNP Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Šíla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our work is dedicated to pinch effect occurring during current discharge in deuterium plasma, and our results are connected with two devices – plasma focus PFZ, situated in the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, CTU, Prague, and Z-pinch GIT-12, which is situated in the Institute of High Current Electronics, Tomsk. During fusion reactions that proceed in plasma during discharge, neutrons are produced. We use neutrons as instrument for plasma diagnostics. Despite of the advantage that neutrons do not interact with electric and magnetic fields inside device, they are inevitably scattered by materials that are placed between their source and probe, and information about plasma from which they come from is distorted. For estimation of rate of neutron scattering we use MCNP code.

  14. Use of Silicon Carbide as Beam Intercepting Device Material: Tests, Issues and Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delonca, M; Gil Costa, M; Vacca, A

    2014-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) stands as one of the most promising ceramic material with respect to its thermal shock resistance and mechanical strengths. It has hence been considered as candidate material for the development of higher performance beam intercepting devices at CERN. Its brazing with a metal counterpart has been tested and characterized by means of microstructural and ultrasound techniques. Despite the positive results, its use has to be evaluated with care, due to the strong evidence in literature of large and permanent volumetric expansion, called swelling, under the effect of neutron and ion irradiation. This may cause premature and sudden failure, and can be mitigated to some extent by operating at high temperature. For this reason limited information is available for irradiation below 100°C, which is the typical temperature of interest for beam intercepting devices like dumps or collimators. This paper describes the brazing campaign carried out at CERN, the results, and the theoretical and numeric...

  15. The non-equilibrium Green's function method for nanoscale device simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pourfath, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    For modeling the transport of carriers in nanoscale devices, a Green-function formalism is the most accurate approach. Due to the complexity of the formalism, one should have a deep understanding of the underlying principles and use smart approximations and numerical methods for solving the kinetic equations at a reasonable computational time. In this book the required concepts from quantum and statistical mechanics and numerical methods for calculating Green functions are presented. The Green function is studied in detail for systems both under equilibrium and under nonequilibrium conditions. Because the formalism enables rigorous modeling of different scattering mechanisms in terms of self-energies, but an exact evaluation of self-energies for realistic systems is not possible, their approximation and inclusion in the quantum kinetic equations of the Green functions are elaborated. All the elements of the kinetic equations, which are the device Hamiltonian, contact self-energies, and scattering self-energie...

  16. Complex-envelope alternating-direction-implicit FDTD method for simulating active photonic devices with semiconductor/solid-state media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Ravi, Koustuban; Wang, Qian; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2012-06-15

    A complex-envelope (CE) alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach to treat light-matter interaction self-consistently with electromagnetic field evolution for efficient simulations of active photonic devices is presented for the first time (to our best knowledge). The active medium (AM) is modeled using an efficient multilevel system of carrier rate equations to yield the correct carrier distributions, suitable for modeling semiconductor/solid-state media accurately. To include the AM in the CE-ADI-FDTD method, a first-order differential system involving CE fields in the AM is first set up. The system matrix that includes AM parameters is then split into two time-dependent submatrices that are then used in an efficient ADI splitting formula. The proposed CE-ADI-FDTD approach with AM takes 22% of the time as the approach of the corresponding explicit FDTD, as validated by semiconductor microdisk laser simulations.

  17. Improvement in chest compression quality using a feedback device (CPRmeter): a simulation randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buléon, Clément; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Halbout, Laurent; Arrot, Xavier; De Facq Régent, Hélène; Chelarescu, Dan; Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac arrest survival depends on celerity and efficiency of life support action. Guidelines emphasized the chest compression (CC) quality and feedback devices are encouraged. The purpose is to study the impact of the CPRmeter feedback device on resuscitation performed by untrained rescuers. This is a prospective randomized crossover study on manikins (Resusci Anne). One hundred and forty four students inexperienced in cardiopulmonary resuscitation representing untrained rescuers were included. Participants performed 2 minutes of CC without interruption with (group G) or without (group B) feedback. Four months passed between the 2 crossover phases to avoid resilience effect. Data collected by the CPRmeter device were: CC rate, depth and release. Efficient CC rate ([simultaneous and correct CC rate, depth and release] primary outcome) (absolute difference [95% CI]) was significantly improved in group G (71%) compared to group B (26%; [45 {36-55}]; P 38 mm) was significantly improved in group G (85%) compared to group B (43%; [42 {33-52}]; P < .0001). Adequate CC rate (90-120/min) was significantly improved in group G (81%) compared to group B (56%; [25 {15-35}]; P < .0001). The average CC rate and depth in group G were significantly less dispersed around the mean compared to group B (test of variance P < .007; P < .015 respectively). The use of the CPRmeter significantly improved CC quality performed by students inexperienced in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. © 2013.

  18. Superior memory efficiency of quantum devices for the simulation of continuous-time stochastic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Thomas J.; Gu, Mile

    2018-03-01

    Continuous-time stochastic processes pervade everyday experience, and the simulation of models of these processes is of great utility. Classical models of systems operating in continuous-time must typically track an unbounded amount of information about past behaviour, even for relatively simple models, enforcing limits on precision due to the finite memory of the machine. However, quantum machines can require less information about the past than even their optimal classical counterparts to simulate the future of discrete-time processes, and we demonstrate that this advantage extends to the continuous-time regime. Moreover, we show that this reduction in the memory requirement can be unboundedly large, allowing for arbitrary precision even with a finite quantum memory. We provide a systematic method for finding superior quantum constructions, and a protocol for analogue simulation of continuous-time renewal processes with a quantum machine.

  19. Device simulation and optimization of laterally-contacted-unipolar-nuclear detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, E Y

    1999-01-01

    Unipolar gamma-ray detectors offer the possibility of enhanced energy resolution and detection sensitivity over the conventional planar detectors. However, these detectors are difficult to understand and to fabricate, due to their three-dimensional geometry and multiple electrodes. Computer simulation offers a powerful way to design and to optimize these detectors, by giving the internal electric fields, weighting potentials, and spatially resolved detector responses. Simulation and optimization of an unipolar gamma-ray detector called laterally-contacted-unipolar-nuclear detector (LUND) are shown. For 662 keV gamma-rays from a sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source, the simulation and optimization of LUND resulted in improvement in the energy resolution from 1.6% to 1.3% and improvement in the active detector volume from 4% to 38% of the total detector volume.

  20. Adding tactile realism to a virtual reality laparoscopic surgical simulator with a cost-effective human interface device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Ian W.; Potts, Stephen; McMenemy, Karen R.; Ferguson, R. S.

    2006-02-01

    The laparoscopic technique for performing abdominal surgery requires a very high degree of skill in the medical practitioner. Much interest has been focused on using computer graphics to provide simulators for training surgeons. Unfortunately, these tend to be complex and have a very high cost, which limits availability and restricts the length of time over which individuals can practice their skills. With computer game technology able to provide the graphics required for a surgical simulator, the cost does not have to be high. However, graphics alone cannot serve as a training simulator. Human interface hardware, the equivalent of the force feedback joystick for a flight simulator game, is required to complete the system. This paper presents a design for a very low cost device to address this vital issue. The design encompasses: the mechanical construction, the electronic interfaces and the software protocols to mimic a laparoscopic surgical set-up. Thus the surgeon has the capability of practicing two-handed procedures with the possibility of force feedback. The force feedback and collision detection algorithms allow surgeons to practice realistic operating theatre procedures with a good degree of authenticity.

  1. Simulation of synchrotron white-beam topographs. An algorithm for parallel processing: application to the study of piezoelectric devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epelboin, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for the integration of Takagi-Taupin equations taking into account the fact that X-ray diffraction is a parallel phenomenon. The diffraction equations show that the propagation of the waves is independent in each incidence plane. It is thus possible to compute in parallel the propagation of the waves in different planes. Two algorithms are presented: the first one for multiprocessor machines where the processors share a common memory, the second one for massively parallel computers. The program is written to achieve a high vectorization ratio and to make it as efficient as possible with modern superscalar and array processors. The simulation of the image of a defect has been divided into two independent parts. In the first one, one computes the derivatives of the deformation inside the crystal; in the second one, these results are used to simulate the image. This allows one rapidly to change the model for a defect, something that was not feasible in all previously written simulation programs since the computation of the deformation was part of the simulation. The study of stroboscopic images of the propagation of acoustic waves in piezoelectric devices is given as an example of the possibilities of this new program. (orig.)

  2. Design and simulation study of high frequency response for surface acoustic wave device by using CST software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, M. R.; Hashim, U.; Amin, Mohd Hasrul I. M.; Ayub, R. Mat; Hashim, M. N.; Adam, T.

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on the enhancement and improvement of the Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) device performance. Due to increased demand in the international market for biosensor product, the product must be emphasized in terms of quality. However, within the technological advances, demand for device with low cost, high efficiency and friendly-user preferred. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) device with the combination of pair electrode know as Interdigital Transducer (IDT) was fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate. The design of Interdigital Transducer (IDT) parameter is changes in several sizes and values for which it is able to provide greater efficiency in sensing sensitivity by using process simulation with CST STUDIO Suite software. In addition, Interdigital Transducer (IDT) parameters also changed to be created the products with a smaller size and easy to handle where it also reduces the cost of this product. Parameter values of an Interdigital Transducer (IDT) will be changed in the design is the total number of fingers pair, finger length, finger width and spacing, aperture and also the thickness of the Interdigital Transducer (IDT). From the result, the performance of the sensor is improved significantly after modification is done.

  3. The role of patient simulation and incident reporting in the development and evaluation of medical devices and the training of their users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, P; Rall, M; Østergaard, Doris

    2009-01-01

    incident report. Simulation can serve as a laboratory to analyse such cases and to create relevant and effective training scenarios based on such analyses. We will describe a methodological framework for analysing simulation scenarios in a way that allows discovering and discussing mismatches between...... conceptual models of the device design and mental models users hold about the device and its use. We further describe how incident reporting systems can be used as one source of data to conduct the necessary needs analyses - both for training and further needs for closer analysis of specific devices or some...

  4. Neutronic design of pulse operation simulating device for in-pile functional test of fusion blanket by MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu; Nakamichi, Masaru; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The pulse operation of a fusion reactor can be simulated in a fission reactor by controlling the neutron flux entering a test section by using a rotating 'hollow cylinder with window' made of hafnium. The rotating cylinder is installed between the test section and the fixed outer neutron absorber cylinder and is also made of hafnium with an opening in the direction to the core center. For gathering engineering data for the tritium breeding blanket such as characteristics of temperature change, tritium release and recovery, etc., it is desirable that the ratio of minimum to maximum thermal neutron fluxes is greater than 1:10. Design calculations were performed for the test assembly which considered local neutronic effects and the mechanical constraints of the device. From the results of these calculations, the ratio of minimum to maximum thermal neutron flux under irradiation would be about 1:10 using a pulse operation simulating device which has a thickness of 6.5 mm and a 150deg window angle for the rotating hollow cylinder and 5.0 mm in thickness of fixed neutron absorber. (author)

  5. Acoustofluidics: Theory and simulation of streaming and radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    fields, which are directly related to the acoustic radiation force on single particles and to the acoustic streaming of the liquid. For the radiation pressure effects, there is good agreement between theory and simulation, while the numeric results for the acoustic streaming effects are more problematic...

  6. Integration of soft tissue model and open haptic device for medical training simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasum, G. F.; Ramdhania, L. N.; Suprijanto; Widyotriatmo, A.

    2016-03-01

    Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) has been widely used to perform any surgical procedures nowadays. Currently, MIS has been applied in some cases in Indonesia. Needle insertion is one of simple MIS procedure that can be used for some purposes. Before the needle insertion technique used in the real situation, it essential to train this type of medical student skills. The research has developed an open platform of needle insertion simulator with haptic feedback that providing the medical student a realistic feel encountered during the actual procedures. There are three main steps in build the training simulator, which are configure hardware system, develop a program to create soft tissue model and the integration of hardware and software. For evaluating its performance, haptic simulator was tested by 24 volunteers on a scenario of soft tissue model. Each volunteer must insert the needle on simulator until rearch the target point with visual feedback that visualized on the monitor. From the result it can concluded that the soft tissue model can bring the sensation of touch through the perceived force feedback on haptic actuator by looking at the different force in accordance with different stiffness in each layer.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-12-22

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  9. Tensile strained Ge tunnel field-effect transistors: k · p material modeling and numerical device simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Kuo-Hsing; De Meyer, Kristin; Verhulst, Anne S.; Van de Put, Maarten; Soree, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Vandenberghe, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Group IV based tunnel field-effect transistors generally show lower on-current than III-V based devices because of the weaker phonon-assisted tunneling transitions in the group IV indirect bandgap materials. Direct tunneling in Ge, however, can be enhanced by strain engineering. In this work, we use a 30-band k · p method to calculate the band structure of biaxial tensile strained Ge and then extract the bandgaps and effective masses at Γ and L symmetry points in k-space, from which the parameters for the direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models are determined. While transitions from the heavy and light hole valence bands to the conduction band edge at the L point are always bridged by phonon scattering, we highlight a new finding that only the light-hole-like valence band is strongly coupling to the conduction band at the Γ point even in the presence of strain based on the 30-band k · p analysis. By utilizing a Technology Computer Aided Design simulator equipped with the calculated band-to-band tunneling BTBT models, the electrical characteristics of tensile strained Ge point and line tunneling devices are self-consistently computed considering multiple dynamic nonlocal tunnel paths. The influence of field-induced quantum confinement on the tunneling onset is included. Our simulation predicts that an on-current up to 160 (260) μA/μm can be achieved along with on/off ratio > 10 6 for V DD  = 0.5 V by the n-type (p-type) line tunneling device made of 2.5% biaxial tensile strained Ge

  10. Tensile strained Ge tunnel field-effect transistors: k · p material modeling and numerical device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Kuo-Hsing; De Meyer, Kristin [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Verhulst, Anne S. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Put, Maarten; Soree, Bart; Magnus, Wim [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics, Universiteit Antwerpen, 2000 Antwerpen (Belgium); Vandenberghe, William G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Group IV based tunnel field-effect transistors generally show lower on-current than III-V based devices because of the weaker phonon-assisted tunneling transitions in the group IV indirect bandgap materials. Direct tunneling in Ge, however, can be enhanced by strain engineering. In this work, we use a 30-band k · p method to calculate the band structure of biaxial tensile strained Ge and then extract the bandgaps and effective masses at Γ and L symmetry points in k-space, from which the parameters for the direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models are determined. While transitions from the heavy and light hole valence bands to the conduction band edge at the L point are always bridged by phonon scattering, we highlight a new finding that only the light-hole-like valence band is strongly coupling to the conduction band at the Γ point even in the presence of strain based on the 30-band k · p analysis. By utilizing a Technology Computer Aided Design simulator equipped with the calculated band-to-band tunneling BTBT models, the electrical characteristics of tensile strained Ge point and line tunneling devices are self-consistently computed considering multiple dynamic nonlocal tunnel paths. The influence of field-induced quantum confinement on the tunneling onset is included. Our simulation predicts that an on-current up to 160 (260) μA/μm can be achieved along with on/off ratio > 10{sup 6} for V{sub DD} = 0.5 V by the n-type (p-type) line tunneling device made of 2.5% biaxial tensile strained Ge.

  11. Field emission device driven by self-powered contact-electrification: Simulation and experimental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Jiang, Tao; Sun, Zhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    A self-powered field emission device (FED) driven by a single-electrode tribo-electric nanogenerator (TENG) is demonstrated. The mechanical motion works as both a power supply to drive the FED and a control unit to regulate the amount of emitted electrons. By using the Fowler-Nordheim equation and Kirchhoff laws, a theoretical model of this self-powered FED is proposed, and accordingly the real-time output characteristics of the device are systematically investigated. It is found that the motion distance of the TENG controls switch-on of the FED and determines the charge amount for emission, while the motion velocity regulates the amplitude of emission current. The minimum contact area for the TENG to generate field emission is about 9 cm2, which can be improved by optimizing FED structure and the tribo-materials of TENG. The demonstrated concept of this self-powered FED as well as the proposed physical analysis can serve as guidance for further applications of FED in such fields of self-powered electronics and soft electronics.

  12. Field emission device driven by self-powered contact-electrification: Simulation and experimental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiangyu, E-mail: chenxiangyu@binn.cas.cn, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Jiang, Tao [Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Sun, Zhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: chenxiangyu@binn.cas.cn, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2015-09-14

    A self-powered field emission device (FED) driven by a single-electrode tribo-electric nanogenerator (TENG) is demonstrated. The mechanical motion works as both a power supply to drive the FED and a control unit to regulate the amount of emitted electrons. By using the Fowler-Nordheim equation and Kirchhoff laws, a theoretical model of this self-powered FED is proposed, and accordingly the real-time output characteristics of the device are systematically investigated. It is found that the motion distance of the TENG controls switch-on of the FED and determines the charge amount for emission, while the motion velocity regulates the amplitude of emission current. The minimum contact area for the TENG to generate field emission is about 9 cm{sup 2}, which can be improved by optimizing FED structure and the tribo-materials of TENG. The demonstrated concept of this self-powered FED as well as the proposed physical analysis can serve as guidance for further applications of FED in such fields of self-powered electronics and soft electronics.

  13. VHDL-AMS Simulation Framework for Molecular-FET Device-to-Circuit Modeling and Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia Graziano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We concentrate on Molecular-FET as a device and present a new modular framework based on VHDL-AMS. We have implemented different Molecular-FET models within the framework. The framework allows comparison between the models in terms of the capability to calculate accurate I-V characteristics. It also provides the option to analyze the impact of Molecular-FET and its implementation in the circuit with the extension of its use in an architecture based on the crossbar configuration. This analysis evidences the effect of choices of technological parameters, the ability of models to capture the impact of physical quantities, and the importance of considering defects at circuit fabrication level. The comparison tackles the computational efforts of different models and techniques and discusses the trade-off between accuracy and performance as a function of the circuit analysis final requirements. We prove this methodology using three different models and test them on a 16-bit tree adder included in Pentium 4 that, to the best of our knowledge, is the biggest circuits based on molecular device ever designed and analyzed.

  14. Field emission device driven by self-powered contact-electrification: Simulation and experimental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Jiang, Tao; Sun, Zhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A self-powered field emission device (FED) driven by a single-electrode tribo-electric nanogenerator (TENG) is demonstrated. The mechanical motion works as both a power supply to drive the FED and a control unit to regulate the amount of emitted electrons. By using the Fowler-Nordheim equation and Kirchhoff laws, a theoretical model of this self-powered FED is proposed, and accordingly the real-time output characteristics of the device are systematically investigated. It is found that the motion distance of the TENG controls switch-on of the FED and determines the charge amount for emission, while the motion velocity regulates the amplitude of emission current. The minimum contact area for the TENG to generate field emission is about 9 cm 2 , which can be improved by optimizing FED structure and the tribo-materials of TENG. The demonstrated concept of this self-powered FED as well as the proposed physical analysis can serve as guidance for further applications of FED in such fields of self-powered electronics and soft electronics

  15. A comprehensive solution for simulating ultra-shallow junctions: From high dose/low energy implant to diffusion annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucard, F.; Roger, F.; Chakarov, I.; Zhuk, V.; Temkin, M.; Montagner, X.; Guichard, E.; Mathiot, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a global approach permitting accurate simulation of the process of ultra-shallow junctions. Physically based models of dopant implantation (BCA) and diffusion (including point and extended defects coupling) are integrated within a unique simulation tool. A useful set of the relevant parameters has been obtained through an original calibration methodology. It is shown that this approach provides an efficient tool for process modelling

  16. A comprehensive solution for simulating ultra-shallow junctions: From high dose/low energy implant to diffusion annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucard, F. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France)]. E-mail: Frederic.Boucard@silvaco.com; Roger, F. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Chakarov, I. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Zhuk, V. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Temkin, M. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Montagner, X. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Guichard, E. [Silvaco Data Systems, 55 Rue Blaise Pascal, F38330 Montbonnot (France); Mathiot, D. [InESS, CNRS and Universite Louis Pasteur, 23 Rue du Loess, F67037 Strasbourg (France)]. E-mail: Daniel.Mathiot@iness.c-strasbourg.fr

    2005-12-05

    This paper presents a global approach permitting accurate simulation of the process of ultra-shallow junctions. Physically based models of dopant implantation (BCA) and diffusion (including point and extended defects coupling) are integrated within a unique simulation tool. A useful set of the relevant parameters has been obtained through an original calibration methodology. It is shown that this approach provides an efficient tool for process modelling.

  17. A comprehensive approach for the simulation of the Urban Heat Island effect with the WRF/SLUCM modeling system: The case of Athens (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, Christos; Nenes, Athanasios; Giannaros, Theodore M.; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Melas, Dimitrios

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a comprehensive modeling approach for simulating the spatiotemporal distribution of urban air temperatures with a modeling system that includes the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Single-Layer Urban Canopy Model (SLUCM) with a modified treatment of the impervious surface temperature. The model was applied to simulate a 3-day summer heat wave event over the city of Athens, Greece. The simulation, using default SLUCM parameters, is capable of capturing the observed diurnal variation of urban temperatures and the Urban Heat Island (UHI) in the greater Athens Area (GAA), albeit with systematic biases that are prominent during nighttime hours. These biases are particularly evident over low-intensity residential areas, and they are associated with the surface and urban canopy properties representing the urban environment. A series of sensitivity simulations unravels the importance of the sub-grid urban fraction parameter, surface albedo, and street canyon geometry in the overall causation and development of the UHI effect. The sensitivities are then used to determine optimal values of the street canyon geometry, which reproduces the observed temperatures throughout the simulation domain. The optimal parameters, apart from considerably improving model performance (reductions in mean temperature bias from 0.30 °C to 1.58 °C), are also consistent with actual city building characteristics - which gives confidence that the model set-up is robust, and can be used to study the UHI in the GAA in the anticipated warmer conditions in the future.

  18. Simulation experiments concerning functioning tests of technical safety devices with process computers. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawickhorst, W.

    1976-12-01

    Computerized inspection techniques of engineered safety systems improve the diagnosis capability, relative to the presently used techniques, even if anticipated system disturbances can only be qualitatively predicted. To achieve this, the system to be inspected must be partitioned into small subsystems, which can be treated independently from each other. This report contains the formulation of a standardized inspection concept based on system decomposition. Its performance is discussed by means of simulation experiments. (orig.) [de

  19. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulation studies of open cylindrical radon monitoring device using CR-39 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur- E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Jamil, K.; Zakaullah, M.; Abu-Jarad, F.; Mujahid, S.A

    2003-07-01

    There are several methods of measuring radon concentrations but nuclear track detector cylindrical dosimeters are widely employed. In this investigation, the consequence of effective volumes of the dosimeters on the registration of alpha tracks in a CR-39 detector was studied. In a series of experiments an optimum radius for a CR-39-based open cylindrical radon dosimeter was found to be about 3 cm. Monte Carlo simulation techniques hav been employed to verify the experimental results. In this context, a computer code Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry (MOCSID) was developed. Monte Carlo simulation experiments gave the optimum radius of the dosimeters as 3.0 cm. The experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo design calculations. In addition to this, plate-out effects of radon progeny were also studied. It was observed that the contribution of radon progeny ({sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po) plated-out on the wall of the dosimeters increases with an increase of dosimeter radii and then decrease to 0 at a radius of about 3 cm if a point detector has been installed at the center of the dosimeter base. In the code MOCSID different types of random number generators were employed. The results of this research are very useful for designing an optimum size of radon dosimeters.

  20. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulation studies of open cylindrical radon monitoring device using CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur-; Jamil, K.; Zakaullah, M.; Abu-Jarad, F.; Mujahid, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    There are several methods of measuring radon concentrations but nuclear track detector cylindrical dosimeters are widely employed. In this investigation, the consequence of effective volumes of the dosimeters on the registration of alpha tracks in a CR-39 detector was studied. In a series of experiments an optimum radius for a CR-39-based open cylindrical radon dosimeter was found to be about 3 cm. Monte Carlo simulation techniques hav been employed to verify the experimental results. In this context, a computer code Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry (MOCSID) was developed. Monte Carlo simulation experiments gave the optimum radius of the dosimeters as 3.0 cm. The experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo design calculations. In addition to this, plate-out effects of radon progeny were also studied. It was observed that the contribution of radon progeny ( 218 Po and 214 Po) plated-out on the wall of the dosimeters increases with an increase of dosimeter radii and then decrease to 0 at a radius of about 3 cm if a point detector has been installed at the center of the dosimeter base. In the code MOCSID different types of random number generators were employed. The results of this research are very useful for designing an optimum size of radon dosimeters

  1. 3-D simulation of soot formation in a direct-injection diesel engine based on a comprehensive chemical mechanism and method of moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bei-Jing; Dang, Shuai; Song, Ya-Na; Gong, Jing-Song

    2012-02-01

    Here, we propose both a comprehensive chemical mechanism and a reduced mechanism for a three-dimensional combustion simulation, describing the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in a direct-injection diesel engine. A soot model based on the reduced mechanism and a method of moments is also presented. The turbulent diffusion flame and PAH formation in the diesel engine were modelled using the reduced mechanism based on the detailed mechanism using a fixed wall temperature as a boundary condition. The spatial distribution of PAH concentrations and the characteristic parameters for soot formation in the engine cylinder were obtained by coupling a detailed chemical kinetic model with the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model. Comparison of the simulated results with limited experimental data shows that the chemical mechanisms and soot model are realistic and correctly describe the basic physics of diesel combustion but require further development to improve their accuracy.

  2. Application of the reduction of scale range in a Lorentz boosted frame to the numerical simulation of particle acceleration devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.; Fawley, W.M.; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that the ratio of longest to shortest space and time scales of a system of two or more components crossing at relativistic velocities is not invariant under Lorentz transformation. This implies the existence of a frame of reference minimizing an aggregate measure of the ratio of space and time scales. It was demonstrated that this translated into a reduction by orders of magnitude in computer simulation run times, using methods based on first principles (e.g., Particle-In-Cell), for particle acceleration devices and for problems such as: free electron laser, laser-plasma accelerator, and particle beams interacting with electron clouds. Since then, speed-ups ranging from 75 to more than four orders of magnitude have been reported for the simulation of either scaled or reduced models of the above-cited problems. In it was shown that to achieve full benefits of the calculation in a boosted frame, some of the standard numerical techniques needed to be revised. The theory behind the speed-up of numerical simulation in a boosted frame, latest developments of numerical methods, and example applications with new opportunities that they offer are all presented

  3. Turbocharged molecular discovery of OLED emitters: from high-throughput quantum simulation to highly efficient TADF devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Aguilera-Iparraguirre, Jorge; Hirzel, Timothy D.; Ha, Dong-Gwang; Einzinger, Markus; Wu, Tony; Baldo, Marc A.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán.

    2016-09-01

    Discovering new OLED emitters requires many experiments to synthesize candidates and test performance in devices. Large scale computer simulation can greatly speed this search process but the problem remains challenging enough that brute force application of massive computing power is not enough to successfully identify novel structures. We report a successful High Throughput Virtual Screening study that leveraged a range of methods to optimize the search process. The generation of candidate structures was constrained to contain combinatorial explosion. Simulations were tuned to the specific problem and calibrated with experimental results. Experimentalists and theorists actively collaborated such that experimental feedback was regularly utilized to update and shape the computational search. Supervised machine learning methods prioritized candidate structures prior to quantum chemistry simulation to prevent wasting compute on likely poor performers. With this combination of techniques, each multiplying the strength of the search, this effort managed to navigate an area of molecular space and identify hundreds of promising OLED candidate structures. An experimentally validated selection of this set shows emitters with external quantum efficiencies as high as 22%.

  4. Volume-of-fluid simulations in microfluidic T-junction devices: Influence of viscosity ratio on droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2017-03-01

    We used volume-of-fluid (VOF) method to perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of droplet formation of Newtonian fluids in microfluidic T-junction devices. To evaluate the performance of the VOF method we examined the regimes of drop formation and determined droplet size as a function of system parameters. Comparison of the simulation results with four sets of experimental data from the literature showed good agreement, validating the VOF method. Motivated by the lack of adequate studies investigating the influence of viscosity ratio (λ) on the generated droplet size, we mapped the dependence of drop volume on capillary number (0.001 1. In addition, we find that at a given capillary number, the size of droplets does not vary appreciably when λ 1. We develop an analytical model for predicting the droplet size that includes a viscosity-dependent breakup time for the dispersed phase. This improved model successfully predicts the effects of the viscosity ratio observed in simulations. Results from this study are useful for the design of lab-on-chip technologies and manufacture of microfluidic emulsions, where there is a need to know how system parameters influence the droplet size.

  5. Toward a comprehensive hybrid physical-virtual reality simulator of peripheral anesthesia with ultrasound and neurostimulator guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samosky, Joseph T; Allen, Pete; Boronyak, Steve; Branstetter, Barton; Hein, Steven; Juhas, Mark; Nelson, Douglas A; Orebaugh, Steven; Pinto, Rohan; Smelko, Adam; Thompson, Mitch; Weaver, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a simulator of peripheral nerve block utilizing a mixed-reality approach: the combination of a physical model, an MRI-derived virtual model, mechatronics and spatial tracking. Our design uses tangible (physical) interfaces to simulate surface anatomy, haptic feedback during needle insertion, mechatronic display of muscle twitch corresponding to the specific nerve stimulated, and visual and haptic feedback for the injection syringe. The twitch response is calculated incorporating the sensed output of a real neurostimulator. The virtual model is isomorphic with the physical model and is derived from segmented MRI data. This model provides the subsurface anatomy and, combined with electromagnetic tracking of a sham ultrasound probe and a standard nerve block needle, supports simulated ultrasound display and measurement of needle location and proximity to nerves and vessels. The needle tracking and virtual model also support objective performance metrics of needle targeting technique.

  6. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M.; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user’s daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs). PMID:26848664

  7. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Miguel Pires

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user’s daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs.

  8. SU-F-T-496: An Investigation of Two Novel Devices for Testing Linac Clearance During CT Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, A; Massingill, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work’s objective is to determine the efficacy of two newly patented devices termed the Mor-O rings, Mark1 and Mark2, developed to predict collisions between the patient and a linac at the time of CT simulation. Methods: Mark1: A ring with an inner radius equal to the distance between the isocenter and the nearest portion of a linac head(diso) was made. This is mounted to a stand that allows vertical repositioning. The ring is placed around the patient on the CT table and aligned with isocenter. The patient is moved through the ring. If the ring touches the patient, a collision is predicted. To test this device, predicted collisions were marked on a phantom. The phantom was then repositioned on the linac table where the collisions were verified. Mark2: An arc with the radius diso was created with a re-locatable half-linac head wire-frame. The Mark2 is positioned in the same way as the Mark1 but can additionally mimic couch and gantry angulations. The Mark2 was tested with a volunteer using multiple couch, gantry and isocenter positions. The volunteer was then repositioned on the linac table to verify the angles of collisions. Results: Mark1: One isocenter out of ten showed negative clearance (0.9mm) on the linac table. All other collisions were predicted with 1 to 36mm of additional clearance. Mark2: All collisions were prevented with an additional 1.3 to 14.8 degrees of clearance. Conclusion: The Mark1 prototype is able to predict all collisions when no couch angulation is used. This device takes less than a minute to setup and is simple to use. The Mark2, when testing beam geometries used for noncoplanar SBRT, was able to prevent all collisions with 1.3 to 14.8 degrees additional clearance. Improvements in construction for both devices could increase accuracy and usability. Andrew Morrow owns Morrow Physics, LLC and Brian Massingill owns Spur Physics, LLC. We are both listed on the patent for the devices investigated in this work (patent 9220922

  9. Numerical simulation and analysis for the baking out system of the HT-7U super-conducting tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuntao

    2004-01-01

    It can provide an ultrahigh vacuum location for the plasma operation. In order to improve its vacuum degree and attain a high quality operation environment for plasma, it is very important to proceed 250 degree C baking out to clear the wall before the plasma operation. The paper firstly gives two kinds of structures for the baking of the vacuum vessel, in which one is the baking by electricity and another is baking by the nitrogen gas. Secondly based on the numerical simulation and analysis, some results have been attained such as the baking power, temperature field distribution and thermal stress for the vacuum vessel, which can provide some valuable theory basis for the engineering design and optimization of the baking system of the HT-7U vacuum vessel or other similar super-conducting tokamak devices

  10. Simulations of induced-charge electro-osmosis in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Yuxing

    2005-03-01

    Theories of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena generally assume a uniform, neutral bulk electroylte in contact with a polarizable thin double layer near a metal or dielectric surface, which acts as a "capacitor skin". Induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) is the general effect of nonlinear electro-osmotic slip, when an applied electric field acts on its own induced (diffuse) double-layer charge. In most theoretical and experimental work, ICEO has been studied in very simple geometries, such as colloidal spheres and planar, periodic micro-electrode arrays. Here we use finite-element simulations to predict how more complicated geometries of polarizable surfaces and/or electrodes yield flow profiles with subtle dependence on the amplitude and frequency of the applied voltage. We also consider how the simple model equations break down, due to surface conduction, bulk diffusion, and concentration polarization, for large applied voltages (as in most experiments).

  11. Spatial Heterogeneity of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Its Temporal Course on Arable Land: Combining Field Measurements, Remote Sensing and Simulation in a Comprehensive Data Analysis Approach (CDAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, Wolfgang; Montzka, Carsten; Fiener, Peter; Wilken, Florian; Stadler, Anja; Waldhoff, Guido; Schneider, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of leaf area to ground area (leaf area index, LAI) is an important state variable in ecosystem studies since it influences fluxes of matter and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. As a basis for generating temporally continuous and spatially distributed datasets of LAI, the current study contributes an analysis of its spatial variability and spatial structure. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere fluxes of water, carbon and energy are nonlinearly related to LAI. Therefore, its spatial heterogeneity, i.e., the combination of spatial variability and structure, has an effect on simulations of these fluxes. To assess LAI spatial heterogeneity, we apply a Comprehensive Data Analysis Approach that combines data from remote sensing (5 m resolution) and simulation (150 m resolution) with field measurements and a detailed land use map. Test area is the arable land in the fertile loess plain of the Rur catchment on the Germany-Belgium-Netherlands border. LAI from remote sensing and simulation compares well with field measurements. Based on the simulation results, we describe characteristic crop-specific temporal patterns of LAI spatial variability. By means of these patterns, we explain the complex multimodal frequency distributions of LAI in the remote sensing data. In the test area, variability between agricultural fields is higher than within fields. Therefore, spatial resolutions less than the 5 m of the remote sensing scenes are sufficient to infer LAI spatial variability. Frequency distributions from the simulation agree better with the multimodal distributions from remote sensing than normal distributions do. The spatial structure of LAI in the test area is dominated by a short distance referring to field sizes. Longer distances that refer to soil and weather can only be derived from remote sensing data. Therefore, simulations alone are not sufficient to characterize LAI spatial structure. It can be concluded that a comprehensive picture of LAI spatial

  12. Predictive capability of average Stokes polarimetry for simulation of phase multilevel elements onto LCoS devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Francisco J; Márquez, Andrés; Gallego, Sergi; Ortuño, Manuel; Francés, Jorge; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2015-02-20

    Parallel-aligned (PA) liquid-crystal on silicon (LCoS) microdisplays are especially appealing in a wide range of spatial light modulation applications since they enable phase-only operation. Recently we proposed a novel polarimetric method, based on Stokes polarimetry, enabling the characterization of their linear retardance and the magnitude of their associated phase fluctuations or flicker, exhibited by many LCoS devices. In this work we apply the calibrated values obtained with this technique to show their capability to predict the performance of spatially varying phase multilevel elements displayed onto the PA-LCoS device. Specifically we address a series of multilevel phase blazed gratings. We analyze both their average diffraction efficiency ("static" analysis) and its associated time fluctuation ("dynamic" analysis). Two different electrical configuration files with different degrees of flicker are applied in order to evaluate the actual influence of flicker on the expected performance of the diffractive optical elements addressed. We obtain a good agreement between simulation and experiment, thus demonstrating the predictive capability of the calibration provided by the average Stokes polarimetric technique. Additionally, it is obtained that for electrical configurations with less than 30° amplitude for the flicker retardance, they may not influence the performance of the blazed gratings. In general, we demonstrate that the influence of flicker greatly diminishes when the number of quantization levels in the optical element increases.

  13. Development of total maximum daily loads for bacteria impaired watershed using the comprehensive hydrology and water quality simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang M; Brannan, Kevin M; Zeckoski, Rebecca W; Benham, Brian L

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop bacteria total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for the Hardware River watershed in the Commonwealth of Virginia, USA. The TMDL program is an integrated watershed management approach required by the Clean Water Act. The TMDLs were developed to meet Virginia's water quality standard for bacteria at the time, which stated that the calendar-month geometric mean concentration of Escherichia coli should not exceed 126 cfu/100 mL, and that no single sample should exceed a concentration of 235 cfu/100 mL. The bacteria impairment TMDLs were developed using the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF). The hydrology and water quality components of HSPF were calibrated and validated using data from the Hardware River watershed to ensure that the model adequately simulated runoff and bacteria concentrations. The calibrated and validated HSPF model was used to estimate the contributions from the various bacteria sources in the Hardware River watershed to the in-stream concentration. Bacteria loads were estimated through an extensive source characterization process. Simulation results for existing conditions indicated that the majority of the bacteria came from livestock and wildlife direct deposits and pervious lands. Different source reduction scenarios were evaluated to identify scenarios that meet both the geometric mean and single sample maximum E. coli criteria with zero violations. The resulting scenarios required extreme and impractical reductions from livestock and wildlife sources. Results from studies similar to this across Virginia partially contributed to a reconsideration of the standard's applicability to TMDL development.

  14. Fuel cell powered vehicles using supercapacitors-device characteristics, control strategies, and simulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, H.; Burke, A.F. [Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The fuel cell powered vehicle is one of the most attractive candidates for the future due to its high efficiency and capability to use hydrogen as the fuel. However, its relatively poor dynamic response, high cost and limited life time have impeded its widespread adoption. With the emergence of large supercapacitors (also know as ultracapacitors, UCs) with high power density and the shift to hybridisation in the vehicle technology, fuel cell/supercapacitor hybrid fuel cell vehicles are gaining more attention. Fuel cells in conjunction with supercapacitors can create high power with fast dynamic response, which makes it well suitable for automotive applications. Hybrid fuel cell vehicles with different powertrain configurations have been evaluated based on simulations performed at the Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California-Davis. The following powertrain configurations have been considered: (a)Direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) without energy storage (b)FCVs with supercapacitors directly connected in parallel with fuel cells (c)FCVs with supercapacitors coupled in parallel with fuel cells through a DC/DC converter (d)FCVs with fuel cells connected to supercapacitors via a DC/DC converter. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  16. Exercise physiology with a left ventricular assist device: Analysis of heart-pump interaction with a computational simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresiello, Libera; Rademakers, Frank; Claus, Piet; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Meyns, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Patients with a Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) are hemodynamically stable but show an impaired exercise capacity. Aim of this work is to identify and to describe the limiting factors of exercise physiology with a VAD. We searched for data concerning exercise in heart failure condition and after VAD implantation from the literature. Data were analyzed by using a cardiorespiratory simulator that worked as a collector of inputs coming from different papers. As a preliminary step the simulator was used to reproduce the evolution of hemodynamics from rest to peak exercise (ergometer cycling) in heart failure condition. Results evidence an increase of cardiac output of +2.8 l/min and a heart rate increase to 67% of the expected value. Then, we simulated the effect of a continuous-flow VAD at both rest and exercise. Total cardiac output increases of +3.0 l/min (+0.9 l/min due to the VAD and +2.1 l/min to the native ventricle). Since the left ventricle works in a non-linear portion of the diastolic stiffness line, we observed a consistent increase of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (from 14 to 20 mmHg) for a relatively small increase of end-diastolic volume (from 182 to 189 cm3). We finally increased VAD speed during exercise to the maximum possible value and we observed a reduction of wedge pressure (-4.5 mmHg), a slight improvement of cardiac output (8.0 l/min) and a complete unloading of the native ventricle. The VAD can assure a proper hemodynamics at rest, but provides an insufficient unloading of the left ventricle and does not prevent wedge pressure from rising during exercise. Neither the VAD provides major benefits during exercise in terms of total cardiac output, which increases to a similar extend to an unassisted heart failure condition. VAD speed modulation can contribute to better unload the ventricle but the maximal flow reachable with the current devices is below the cardiac output observed in a healthy heart.

  17. Precision measurements in the weak interaction framework: development of realistic simulations for the LPCTrap device installed at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    This work belongs to the effort presently deployed to measure the angular correlation parameter a_β_ν in three nuclear beta decays ("6He"+, "3"5Ar"+ and "1"9Ne"+). The V-A structure of the weak interaction implies that a_β_ν = +1 for a pure Fermi transition and a_β_ν = -1/3 for a pure Gamow-Teller transition. A thorough measurement of this parameter to check any deviation from these values may lead to the discovery of possible exotic currents. Furthermore, the measurement of a_β_ν in mirror transitions allows the extraction of V_u_d, the first element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. The LPCTrap apparatus, installed at GANIL, is designed to ready a continuous ion beam for injection in a dedicated Paul trap. This latter device allows to have a quasi-punctual source from which the decay products are detected in coincidence. It is from the study of the recoil ion time-of-flight (TOF) distribution that a_β_ν is withdrawn and, since 2010, the associated Shake-Off (SO) probabilities. This study requires the complete simulation of the LPCTrap experiments. The major part of this work is dedicated to such simulations, especially to the modeling of the trapped ion cloud dynamic. The Clouda program, which takes advantage of graphics processing unit (GPU), was developed in this context and its full characterization is presented here. Three important aspects are addressed: the electromagnetic trapping field, the realistic collisions between the ions and the buffer gas atoms and the space charge effect. The present work shows the importance of these simulations to increase the control of the systematic errors on a_β_ν. (author) [fr

  18. CHROMOSPHERE TO 1 au SIMULATION OF THE 2011 MARCH 7th EVENT: A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION PROPAGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Manchester, W. B.; Holst, B. van der; Sokolov, I.; Tóth, G.; Gombosi, T. I. [Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Vourlidas, A. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Koning, C. A. de, E-mail: jinmeng@lmsal.com, E-mail: chipm@umich.edu, E-mail: angelos.vourlidas@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: curt.a.dekoning@noaa.gov [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We perform and analyze the results of a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfvén Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R {sub ⊙}. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfvén-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfvén-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson-Low analytical flux rope model and follow its evolution for days, in which time it propagates beyond STEREO A . A detailed comparison study is performed using remote as well as in situ observations. Although the flux rope structure is not compared directly due to lack of relevant ejecta observation at 1 au in this event, our results show that the new model can reproduce many of the observed features near the Sun (e.g., CME-driven extreme ultraviolet [EUV] waves, deflection of the flux rope from the coronal hole, “double-front” in the white light images) and in the heliosphere (e.g., shock propagation direction, shock properties at STEREO A ).

  19. SU-E-I-20: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Test of Second Generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT Simulator Based On AAPM TG-66 Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D [Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM radiation therapy committee task group No. 66 (TG-66) published a report which described a general approach to CT simulator QA. The report outlines the testing procedures and specifications for the evaluation of patient dose, radiation safety, electromechanical components, and image quality for a CT simulator. The purpose of this study is to thoroughly evaluate the performance of a second generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT simulator with 90 cm bore size (Toshiba, Nasu, JP) based on the TG-66 criteria. The testing procedures and results from this study provide baselines for a routine QA program. Methods: Different measurements and analysis were performed including CTDIvol measurements, alignment and orientation of gantry lasers, orientation of the tabletop with respect to the imaging plane, table movement and indexing accuracy, Scanogram location accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, field uniformity, CT number accuracy, mA linearity and mA reproducibility using a number of different phantoms and measuring devices, such as CTDI phantom, ACR image quality phantom, TG-66 laser QA phantom, pencil ion chamber (Fluke Victoreen) and electrometer (RTI Solidose 400). Results: The CTDI measurements were within 20% of the console displayed values. The alignment and orientation for both gantry laser and tabletop, as well as the table movement and indexing and scanogram location accuracy were within 2mm as specified in TG66. The spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, field uniformity and CT number accuracy were all within ACR’s recommended limits. The mA linearity and reproducibility were both well below the TG66 threshold. Conclusion: The 90 cm bore size second generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT simulator that comes with 70 cm true FOV can consistently meet various clinical needs. The results demonstrated that this simulator complies with the TG-66 protocol in all aspects including electromechanical component

  20. The freshwater balance of polar regions in transient simulations from 1500 to 2100 AD using a comprehensive coupled climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, Flavio; Raible, Christoph C.; Hofer, Dominik; Stocker, Thomas F. [University of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15

    The ocean and sea ice in both polar regions are important reservoirs of freshwater within the climate system. While the response of these reservoirs to future climate change has been studied intensively, the sensitivity of the polar freshwater balance to natural forcing variations during preindustrial times has received less attention. Using an ensemble of transient simulations from 1500 to 2100 AD we put present-day and future states of the polar freshwater balance in the context of low frequency variability of the past five centuries. This is done by focusing on different multi-decadal periods of characteristic external forcing. In the Arctic, freshwater is shifted from the ocean to sea ice during the Maunder Minimum while the total amount of freshwater within the Arctic domain remains unchanged. In contrast, the subsequent Dalton Minimum does not leave an imprint on the slow-reacting reservoirs of the ocean and sea ice, but triggers a drop in the import of freshwater through the atmosphere. During the twentieth and twenty-first century the build-up of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean leads to a strengthening of the liquid export. The Arctic freshwater balance is shifted towards being a large source of freshwater to the North Atlantic ocean. The Antarctic freshwater cycle, on the other hand, appears to be insensitive to preindustrial variations in external forcing. In line with the rising temperature during the industrial era the freshwater budget becomes increasingly unbalanced and strengthens the high latitude's Southern Ocean as a source of liquid freshwater to lower latitude oceans. (orig.)

  1. Simulation study of 14-nm-gate III-V trigate field effect transistor devices with In1−xGaxAs channel capping layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hao Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study characteristics of 14-nm-gate InGaAs-based trigate MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor devices with a channel capping layer. The impacts of thickness and gallium (Ga concentration of the channel capping layer on the device characteristic are firstly simulated and optimized by using three-dimensional quantum-mechanically corrected device simulation. Devices with In1−xGaxAs/In0.53Ga0.47As channels have the large driving current owing to small energy band gap and low alloy scattering at the channel surface. By simultaneously considering various physical and switching properties, a 4-nm-thick In0.68Ga0.32As channel capping layer can be adopted for advanced applications. Under the optimized channel parameters, we further examine the effects of channel fin angle and the work-function fluctuation (WKF resulting from nano-sized metal grains of NiSi gate on the characteristic degradation and variability. To maintain the device characteristics and achieve the minimal variation induced by WKF, the physical findings of this study indicate a critical channel fin angle of 85o is needed for the device with an averaged grain size of NiSi below 4x4 nm2.

  2. Simulation-based design of a steerable acoustic warning device to increase (H)EV detectability while reducing urban noise pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Genechten, B.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation-based design methodology used in the eVADER project for the development of targeted acoustic warning devices for increased detectability of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (HEVs) while, at the same time, reducing urban noise pollution compared to conventional

  3. Numerical flow simulation methods and additive manufacturing methods for the development of a flow optimised design of a novel point-of-care diagnostic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dethloff Manuel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For the development of a novel, user-friendly and low cost point-of-care diagnostic device for the detection of disease specific biomarker a flow optimised design of the test system has to be investigated. The resulting test system is characterised by a reduced execution period, a reduction of execution steps and an integrated waste management. Based on previous results, the current study focused on the design implementation of the fluidic requirements, e. g. tightness, inside the test device. With the help of fluid flow simulations (CFD – computational fluid dynamics the flow behaviour inside the test device was analysed for different designs and arrangements. Prototypes generated from additive manufacturing technologies (PolyJet modeling are used for validating the simulation results and further experimental tests.

  4. Response of beryllium to severe thermal shocks -simulation of disruption and vertical displacement events in future thermonuclear devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Roedig, M.; Schuster, A. [Association Euratom-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Merola, M.; Qian, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium will play an important role for plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices such as ITER. In particular for the first wall beryllium will be used with an armor thickness of several millimeters. However, during plasma instabilities they will experience severe thermal shocks. Here plasma disruptions with deposited energy densities of several ten MJm{sup -2} are the most essential damaging mechanism. However, a signifant fraction of the incident energy will be absorbed by a dense cloud of ablation vapor, hence reducing the effective energy density at the beryllium surface to values in the order of 10 MJm{sup -2}. To investigate the material response to all these plasma instabilities thermal shock tests on small scale test coupons (disruption effects) and on actively cooled divertor modules (VDEs) have been performed in the electron beam test facility JUDITH at ITER relevant surface heat loads. These tests have been performed on different bulk beryllium grades and on plasma sprayed coatings; the influence of pulse duration, power density, and temperature effects has been investigated experimentally. Detailed in-situ diagnostics (for beam characterization, optical pyrometry etc.) and post mortem analyses (profilometry, metallography, optical and electron microscopy) have been applied to quantify the resulting material damage. 1D- and 2D models have developed to verify the experimental results obtained in the electron beam simulation experiments. (J.P.N.)

  5. An Updated Comprehensive Risk Analysis for Radioisotopes Identified of High Risk to National Security in the Event of a Radiological Dispersion Device Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alexandra R.

    An updated global survey of radioisotope production and distribution was completed and subjected to a revised "down-selection methodology" to determine those radioisotopes that should be classified as potential national security risks based on availability and key physical characteristics that could be exploited in a hypothetical radiological dispersion device. The potential at-risk radioisotopes then were used in a modeling software suite known as Turbo FRMAC, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, to characterize plausible contamination maps known as Protective Action Guideline Zone Maps. This software also was used to calculate the whole body dose equivalent for exposed individuals based on various dispersion parameters and scenarios. Derived Response Levels then were determined for each radioisotope using: 1) target doses to members of the public provided by the U.S. EPA, and 2) occupational dose limits provided by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The limiting Derived Response Level for each radioisotope also was determined.

  6. Invited Article: Acousto-optic finite-difference frequency-domain algorithm for first-principles simulations of on-chip acousto-optic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a finite-difference frequency-domain algorithm for coupled acousto-optic simulations. First-principles acousto-optic simulation in time domain has been challenging due to the fact that the acoustic and optical frequencies differ by many orders of magnitude. We bypass this difficulty by formulating the interactions between the optical and acoustic waves rigorously as a system of coupled nonlinear equations in frequency domain. This approach is particularly suited for on-chip devices that are based on a variety of acousto-optic interactions such as the stimulated Brillouin scattering. We validate our algorithm by simulating a stimulated Brillouin scattering process in a suspended waveguide structure and find excellent agreement with coupled-mode theory. We further provide an example of a simulation for a compact on-chip resonator device that greatly enhances the effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering. Our algorithm should facilitate the design of nanophotonic on-chip devices for the harnessing of photon-phonon interactions.

  7. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, Narcisse

    2015-06-15

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  8. MO-FG-202-04: Gantry-Resolved Linac QA for VMAT: A Comprehensive and Efficient System Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwan, B J [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Barnes, M; Greer, P B [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); O’Connor, D J [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Keall, P J [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To automate gantry-resolved linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: A QA system for VMAT was developed that uses an EPID, frame-grabber assembly and in-house developed image processing software. The system relies solely on the analysis of EPID image frames acquired without the presence of a phantom. Images were acquired at 8.41 frames per second using a frame grabber and ancillary acquisition computer. Each image frame was tagged with a gantry angle from the linac’s on-board gantry angle encoder. Arc-dynamic QA plans were designed to assess the performance of each individual linac component during VMAT. By analysing each image frame acquired during the QA deliveries the following eight machine performance characteristics were measured as a function of gantry angle: MLC positional accuracy, MLC speed constancy, MLC acceleration constancy, MLC-gantry synchronisation, beam profile constancy, dose rate constancy, gantry speed constancy, dose-gantry angle synchronisation and mechanical sag. All tests were performed on a Varian iX linear accelerator equipped with a 120 leaf Millennium MLC and an aS1000 EPID (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Results: Machine performance parameters were measured as a function of gantry angle using EPID imaging and compared to machine log files and the treatment plan. Data acquisition is currently underway at 3 centres, incorporating 7 treatment units, at 2 weekly measurement intervals. Conclusion: The proposed system can be applied for streamlined linac QA and commissioning for VMAT. The set of test plans developed can be used to assess the performance of each individual components of the treatment machine during VMAT deliveries as a function of gantry angle. The methodology does not require the setup of any additional phantom or measurement equipment and the analysis is fully automated to allow for

  9. MO-FG-202-04: Gantry-Resolved Linac QA for VMAT: A Comprehensive and Efficient System Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwan, B J; Barnes, M; Greer, P B; Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E; O’Connor, D J; Keall, P J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To automate gantry-resolved linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: A QA system for VMAT was developed that uses an EPID, frame-grabber assembly and in-house developed image processing software. The system relies solely on the analysis of EPID image frames acquired without the presence of a phantom. Images were acquired at 8.41 frames per second using a frame grabber and ancillary acquisition computer. Each image frame was tagged with a gantry angle from the linac’s on-board gantry angle encoder. Arc-dynamic QA plans were designed to assess the performance of each individual linac component during VMAT. By analysing each image frame acquired during the QA deliveries the following eight machine performance characteristics were measured as a function of gantry angle: MLC positional accuracy, MLC speed constancy, MLC acceleration constancy, MLC-gantry synchronisation, beam profile constancy, dose rate constancy, gantry speed constancy, dose-gantry angle synchronisation and mechanical sag. All tests were performed on a Varian iX linear accelerator equipped with a 120 leaf Millennium MLC and an aS1000 EPID (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Results: Machine performance parameters were measured as a function of gantry angle using EPID imaging and compared to machine log files and the treatment plan. Data acquisition is currently underway at 3 centres, incorporating 7 treatment units, at 2 weekly measurement intervals. Conclusion: The proposed system can be applied for streamlined linac QA and commissioning for VMAT. The set of test plans developed can be used to assess the performance of each individual components of the treatment machine during VMAT deliveries as a function of gantry angle. The methodology does not require the setup of any additional phantom or measurement equipment and the analysis is fully automated to allow for

  10. Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Pearton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices provides comprehensive coverage of reliability procedures and approaches for electron and photonic devices. These include lasers and high speed electronics used in cell phones, satellites, data transmission systems and displays. Lifetime predictions for compound semiconductor devices are notoriously inaccurate due to the absence of standard protocols. Manufacturers have relied on extrapolation back to room temperature of accelerated testing at elevated temperature. This technique fails for scaled, high current density devices. Device failure is driven by electric field or current mechanisms or low activation energy processes that are masked by other mechanisms at high temperature. The Handbook addresses reliability engineering for III-V devices, including materials and electrical characterization, reliability testing, and electronic characterization. These are used to develop new simulation technologies for device operation and ...

  11. A comprehensive computing initiative for MFE. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Crotinger, J.A.; Baldwin, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors propose that a national initiative by launched to develop a comprehensive simulation facility for MFE. The facility would consist of physics codes developed by the national MFE community tightly but flexibly coupled through a programmable shell, enabling effectively simultaneous solution of the models in the various codes. The world ''facility'' is chosen to convey the notion that this is where one would go to conduct numerical experiments, using a full set of modules to describe an entire device, a coupled subset to describe particular aspects of a device, or a combination of the facility's modules plus the user's own physics

  12. Simulation study of HEMT structures with HfO{sub 2} cap layer for mitigating inverse piezoelectric effect related device failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagulapally, Deepthi; Joshi, Ravi P., E-mail: rjoshi@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0246 (United States); Pradhan, Aswini [Department of Engineering and Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Inverse Piezoelectric Effect (IPE) is thought to contribute to possible device failure of GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). Here we focus on a simulation study to probe the possible mitigation of the IPE by reducing the internal electric fields and related elastic energy through the use of high-k materials. Inclusion of a HfO{sub 2} “cap layer” above the AlGaN barrier particularly with a partial mesa structure is shown to have potential advantages. Simulations reveal even greater reductions in the internal electric fields by using “field plates” in concert with high-k oxides.

  13. Calibration and validation of a model for simulating thermal and electric performance of an internal combustion engine-based micro-cogeneration device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.; Sibilio, S.

    2012-01-01

    The growing worldwide demand for more efficient and less polluting forms of energy production has led to a renewed interest in the use of micro-cogeneration technologies in the residential. Among the others technologies, internal combustion engine-based micro-cogeneration devices are a market-ready technology gaining an increasing appeal thanks to their high efficiency, fuel flexibility, low emissions, low noise and vibration. In order to explore and assess the feasibility of using internal combustion engine-based cogeneration systems in the residential sector, an accurate and practical simulation model that can be used to conduct sensitivity and what-if analyses is needed. A residential cogeneration device model has been developed within IEA/ECBCS Annex 42 and implemented into a number of building simulation programs. This model is potentially able to accurately predict the thermal and electrical outputs of the residential cogeneration devices, but it relies almost entirely on empirical data because the model specification uses experimental measurements contained within a performance map to represent the device specific performance characteristics coupled with thermally massive elements to characterize the device's dynamic thermal performance. At the Built Environment Control Laboratory of Seconda Università degli studi di Napoli, an AISIN SEIKI micro-cogeneration device based on natural gas fuelled reciprocating internal combustion engine is available. This unit has been intensively tested in order to calibrate and validate the Annex 42 model. This paper shows in detail the series of experiments conducted for the calibration activity and examines the validity of this model by contrasting simulation predictions to measurements derived by operating the system in electric load following control strategy. The statistical comparison was made both for the whole database and the segregated data by system mode operation. The good agreement found in the predictions of

  14. Self-reported difficulty and preferences of wheeled mobility device users for simulated low-floor bus boarding, interior circulation and disembarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Clive; Paquet, Victor L; Lenker, James A; Steinfeld, Edward

    2017-11-13

    Low ridership of public transit buses among wheeled mobility device users suggests the need to identify vehicle design conditions that are either particularly accommodating or challenging. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of low-floor bus interior seating configuration and passenger load on wheeled mobility device user-reported difficulty, overall acceptability and design preference. Forty-eight wheeled mobility users evaluated three interior design layouts at two levels of passenger load (high vs. low) after simulating boarding and disembarking tasks on a static full-scale low-floor bus mockup. User self-reports of task difficulty, acceptability and design preference were analyzed across the different test conditions. Ramp ascent was the most difficult task for manual wheelchair users relative to other tasks. The most difficult tasks for users of power wheelchairs and scooters were related to interior circulation, including moving to the securement area, entry and positioning in the securement area and exiting the securement area. Boarding and disembarking at the rear doorway was significantly more acceptable and preferred compared to the layouts with front doorways. Understanding transit usability barriers, perceptions and preferences among wheeled mobility users is an important consideration for clinicians who recommend mobility-related device interventions to those who use public transportation. Implications for Rehabilitation In order to maximize community participation opportunities for wheeled mobility users, clinicians should consider potential public transit barriers during the processes of wheelchair device selection and skills training. Usability barriers experienced by wheeled mobility device users on transit vehicles differ by mobility device type and vehicle configurations. Full-scale environment simulations are an effective means of identifying usability barriers and design needs in people with mobility impairments and may

  15. Adaptation of the model of tunneling in a metal/CaF{sub 2}/Si(111) system for use in industrial simulators of MIS devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vexler, M. I., E-mail: shulekin@mail.ioffe.ru; Illarionov, Yu. Yu.; Tyaginov, S. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Grasser, T. [Institute for Microelectronics, TU Vienna (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    An approach toward simplification of the model of the tunneling transport of electrons through a thin layer of crystalline calcium fluoride into a silicon (111) substrate with subsequent implementation in simulators of semiconductor devices is suggested. The validity of the approach is proven by comparing the results of modeling using simplified formulas with the results of precise calculations and experimental data. The approach can be applied to calculations of tunneling currents in structures with any crystalline insulators on Si (111)

  16. Organic Field-Effect Transistors: A 3D Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the Current Characteristics in Micrometer-Sized Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan

    2017-01-16

    The electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are usually characterized by applying models initially developed for inorganic-based devices, which often implies the use of approximations that might be inappropriate for organic semiconductors. These approximations have brought limitations to the understanding of the device physics associated with organic materials. A strategy to overcome this issue is to establish straightforward connections between the macroscopic current characteristics and microscopic charge transport in OFETs. Here, a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that goes beyond both the conventional assumption of zero channel thickness and the gradual channel approximation to simulate carrier transport and current. Using parallel computing and a new algorithm that significantly improves the evaluation of electric potential within the device, this methodology allows the simulation of micrometer-sized OFETs. The current characteristics of representative OFET devices are well reproduced, which provides insight into the validity of the gradual channel approximation in the case of OFETs, the impact of the channel thickness, and the nature of microscopic charge transport.

  17. Organic Field-Effect Transistors: A 3D Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the Current Characteristics in Micrometer-Sized Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Haoyuan; Li, Yuan; Li, Hong; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    The electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are usually characterized by applying models initially developed for inorganic-based devices, which often implies the use of approximations that might be inappropriate for organic semiconductors. These approximations have brought limitations to the understanding of the device physics associated with organic materials. A strategy to overcome this issue is to establish straightforward connections between the macroscopic current characteristics and microscopic charge transport in OFETs. Here, a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that goes beyond both the conventional assumption of zero channel thickness and the gradual channel approximation to simulate carrier transport and current. Using parallel computing and a new algorithm that significantly improves the evaluation of electric potential within the device, this methodology allows the simulation of micrometer-sized OFETs. The current characteristics of representative OFET devices are well reproduced, which provides insight into the validity of the gradual channel approximation in the case of OFETs, the impact of the channel thickness, and the nature of microscopic charge transport.

  18. Transfer of training from a Full-Flight Simulator vs. a high level flight training device with a dynamic seat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    This paper summarizes the most recent study conducted by the Federal Administration Administration/Volpe Center Flight Simulator Fidelity Requirements Program. For many smaller airlines, access to qualified simulators is limited due to the availabili...

  19. [Randomised study of the relationship between the use of CPRmeter® device and the quality of chest compressions in a simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Buey, J A; Calvo-Marcos, D; Marcos-Camina, R M

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the use of CPRmeter(®) during the resuscitation manoeuvres, is related to a higher quality of external cardiac massage, as recommended by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). To compare the quality obtained without the use or this, and whether there are differences related to anthropometric, demographic, professional and/or occupational factors. Experimental, open trial performed with life support simulators in a stratified random sample of 88 health workers randomly distributed between groups A (without indications of the device) and B (with them). The homogeneity of their confounding variables was compared, as well as the compressions depth and compressions rate, the proportion of completed release, and distribution of the quality massage variable (according to criteria ILCOR) between the groups. The qualitative variables were analysed with the chi-square test, and quantitative variables with the Student t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test and the association between the variable quality massage variable, and use of the device with the odds ratio. Group A: mean depth 42.1mm (standard deviation 10.1), mean rate 121.3/min (21.6), percentage of complete release 71.2% (36.9). Group B: 51.2mm (5.9) 111.9/min (6.4), 92.9% (10.1) respectively. Odds ratio for quality massage regarding the use of the device was 5.170 (95% CI; 2.060-12.977). The use of CPRmeter(®) device in simulated resuscitations is related to a higher quality of cardiac massage, improving the approach to the ILCOR recommendations, regardless of the characteristics of the participants. They were 83.8% more likely to achieve a quality massage using the device than without it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical simulation of lead devices for seismic isolation and vibration control on their damping characteristics. Development of lead material model under cyclic large deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Akihiro; Yabana, Shuichi; Borst, Rene de

    2004-01-01

    In order to predict the mechanical properties of lead devices for seismic isolation and vibration control, especially damping behavior under cyclic loading using numerical simulation, cyclic shear loading tests and uniaxial tensile loading tests were performed, and a new material model was proposed with the use of the both test results. Until now, it has been difficult to evaluate mechanical properties of lead material under cyclic loading by uniaxial tensile loading test because local deformations appeared with the small tensile strain. Our shear cyclic loading tests for lead material enabled practical evaluation of its mechanical properties under cyclic large strain which makes it difficult to apply uniaxial test. The proposed material model was implemented into a finite element program, and it was applied to numerical simulation of mechanical properties of lead dampers and rubber bearings with a lead plug. The numerical simulations and the corresponding laboratory loading tests showed good agreement, which proved the applicability of the proposed model. (author)

  1. InfiniBand-based real-time simulation of HVDC, STATCOM and SVC devices with commercial-off-the-shelf PCs and FPGAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, C.; Abourida, S.; Belanger, J.; Lapointe, V. [OPAL-RT Technologies Inc., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Details of a real-time simulator for large power networks using commercial-off-the-shelf products and an RT-LAB platform were presented. The simulator was designed to realistically simulate bipolar high voltage DC (HVDC) networks transmission systems and to meet large grid simulation challenges. The system was also designed to cope with complex power grid design and validation tests as well as to interface with modern power electronic controllers and protection systems. The platform used Pentium, Xeon or Opteron based PCs and InfiniBand communication fabric for fast inter-PC communications. The real-time PC ran under well-known operating systems while the main control interface used Simulink software. Grid circuits were designed using an SPS interface using an ARTEMIS plug-in. Various model performances were reported. The results of several simulations suggested that InfiniBand communication was slower than shared-memory communication, while STATCOM timing was difficult to compare with the Opteron benchmarks. Results also suggested that XEON CPUs were slower than Opteron counterparts. Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing was also performed with a prototype controller and with a real production controller. It was concluded that a communication time of 5 microseconds was obtained across the 2 PCs. The paper also discussed recent advances in HIL simulation and programming devices. 10 refs., 15 figs.

  2. Dispositivo analítico para compreensão da leitura de diferentes tipos textuais: exemplos referentes à Física Analytical device for reading comprehension of different kinds of texts: examples about Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José P. M. de Almeida

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, articulamos noções que possibilitam a organização de um dispositivo analítico para compreensão de leituras de diferentes tipos de produção. Tecemos considerações sobre essas noções, apoiadas teoricamente na vertente da análise do discurso iniciada por Michel Pêcheux, utilizando, principalmente, publicações realizadas no Brasil por Eni Orlandi. Com o intuito de evidenciar que não se lê da mesma maneira um livro didático, um texto de divulgação científica ou um original de cientista, apresentamos exemplos referentes à Ciência, especificamente à Física. Argumentamos que essas leituras mobilizam diferentes interdiscursos, mesmo que sejam realizadas por um mesmo indivíduo, pois supõem diferentes imaginários.In this paper, we articulate notions that enable the organization of an analytical device for reading comprehension of different types of productions. Our considerations about these notions are based on discourse analysis from Michael Pêcheux through Eni P. Orlandi publications in Brazil. We present examples about Science, particularly Physics, in order to show that coursebooks, scientific popularization or scientists' original publications are not read in the same way. Even if the readings are performed by the same individual, we argue that these readings mobilize different interdiscourses asthey assume different imaginary.

  3. Absorbed doses by a technician, with and without (simulating) use of protection devices, in bone scintigraphy examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Lopes Filho, F. de; Antonio Filho, J.; Colaco, W.; Silveira, S.V. da

    1992-01-01

    The relation between the whole-body dose and the dose localized in body pants of a technician work in nuclear medicine was investigated by dosimetric films and thermoluminescent dosemeters. The investigation was made with and without a suitable protection devices. The results were discussed by a radiological protection view. (C.G.C.)

  4. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Christopher W; Saffary, Roya; Feliz, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1 min and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)

  5. Facilitating Integration of Electron Beam Lithography Devices with Interactive Videodisc, Computer-Based Simulation and Job Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Der Linn, Robert Christopher

    A needs assessment of the Grumman E-Beam Systems Group identified the requirement for additional skill mastery for the engineers who assemble, integrate, and maintain devices used to manufacture integrated circuits. Further analysis of the tasks involved led to the decision to develop interactive videodisc, computer-based job aids to enable…

  6. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Christopher W; Saffary, Roya; Feliz, Eddy [Department of Anesthesiology Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1 min and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)

  7. Output power fluctuations due to different weights of macro particles used in particle-in-cell simulations of Cerenkov devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Rong; Li, Yongdong; Liu, Chunliang; Wang, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    The output power fluctuations caused by weights of macro particles used in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a backward wave oscillator and a travelling wave tube are statistically analyzed. It is found that the velocities of electrons passed a specific slow-wave structure form a specific electron velocity distribution. The electron velocity distribution obtained in PIC simulation with a relative small weight of macro particles is considered as an initial distribution. By analyzing this initial distribution with a statistical method, the estimations of the output power fluctuations caused by different weights of macro particles are obtained. The statistical method is verified by comparing the estimations with the simulation results. The fluctuations become stronger with increasing weight of macro particles, which can also be determined reversely from estimations of the output power fluctuations. With the weights of macro particles optimized by the statistical method, the output power fluctuations in PIC simulations are relatively small and acceptable.

  8. Analysis And Simulation Of Low Profile Planar Inverted - F Antenna Design For WLAN Operation In Portable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaw Htet Lwin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a compact planar invertedF antenna PIFA design for WLAN operation in portable devices. The proposed design has size of 8 x 21 mm and provides peak directive gain of 5.78dBi with the peak return loss of -33.89dB and input impedance of 50.28amp8486. It covers a 10dB return loss bandwidth of 410MHz 2.37GHz 2.789GHz. Its VSWR varies from 1.96 to 1.93 within the antenna return loss bandwidth. As the dimension of the proposed antenna is very small the antenna is promising to be embedded within the different portable devices employing WiFi applications. This paper includes the return loss as a function of frequency with varying the different parameters VSWR input resistance radiation pattern and current distribution of the proposed antenna.

  9. Simulation of impurity transport in the peripheral plasma due to the emission of dust in long pulse discharges on the Large Helical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shoji

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Two different plasma termination processes by dust emission were observed in long pulse discharges in the Large Helical Device. One is a plasma termination caused by large amounts of carbon dust released from a lower divertor region. The other is termination caused by stainless steel (iron dust emission from the surface of a helical coil can. The effect of the dust emission on the sustainment of the long pulse discharges are investigated using a three-dimensional edge plasma transport code (EMC3-EIRENE coupled with a dust transport code (DUSTT. The simulation shows that the plasma is more influenced by the iron dust emission from the helical coil can than by the carbon dust emission from the divertor region. The simulation revealed that the plasma flow in divertor legs is quite effective for preventing dust from terminating the long pulse discharges.

  10. Optimization of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Device via a CPU-Efficient Semi-Analytical Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, I K; Zhang, X; Solovyov, V F; Chubar, O; Li, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in second generation (YBCO) high temperature superconducting wire could potentially enable the design of super high performance energy storage devices that combine the high energy density of chemical storage with the high power of superconducting magnetic storage. However, the high aspect ratio and considerable filament size of these wires requires the concomitant development of dedicated optimization methods that account for both the critical current density and ac losses in ...

  11. Return of neonatal CPAP resistance - the Medijet device family examined using in vitro flow simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Markus; Donaldsson, Snorri; Jonsson, Baldvin; Drevhammar, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Medijet nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) generators are a family of devices developed from the Benveniste valve. Previous studies have shown that the in vitro performance of the Medijet disposable generator was similar to the Neopuff resistor system. We hypothesised that resistance would be the main mechanism of CPAP generation in the Medijet disposable generator. The in vitro performance of the Medijet reusable and disposable systems, the Neopuff resistor system and the Benveniste and Infant Flow nonresistor systems were investigated using static and dynamic bench tests. Large differences in performance were found between the different systems. The disposable Medijet demonstrated high resistance, low pressure stability and high imposed work of breathing. The results also showed that encapsulating the Benveniste valve changed it into a resistor system. The main mechanism of CPAP generation for the disposable Medijet generator was resistance. The Medijet device family showed increasing resistance with each design generation. The high resistance of the Medijet disposable generator could be of great value when examining the clinical importance of pressure stability. Our results suggest that this device should be used cautiously in patients where pressure-stable CPAP is believed to be clinically important. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Short structured feedback training is equivalent to a mechanical feedback device in two-rescuer BLS: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavo, Noemi; Goliasch, Georg; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Stumpf, Dominik; Haugk, Moritz; Breckwoldt, Jan; Ruetzler, Kurt; Greif, Robert; Fischer, Henrik

    2016-05-13

    Resuscitation guidelines encourage the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) feedback devices implying better outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest. Whether effective continuous feedback could also be given verbally by a second rescuer ("human feedback") has not been investigated yet. We, therefore, compared the effect of human feedback to a CPR feedback device. In an open, prospective, randomised, controlled trial, we compared CPR performance of three groups of medical students in a two-rescuer scenario. Group "sCPR" was taught standard BLS without continuous feedback, serving as control. Group "mfCPR" was taught BLS with mechanical audio-visual feedback (HeartStart MRx with Q-CPR-Technology™). Group "hfCPR" was taught standard BLS with human feedback. Afterwards, 326 medical students performed two-rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 min. CPR quality parameters, such as "effective compression ratio" (ECR: compressions with correct hand position, depth and complete decompression multiplied by flow-time fraction), and other compression, ventilation and time-related parameters were assessed for all groups. ECR was comparable between the hfCPR and the mfCPR group (0.33 vs. 0.35, p = 0.435). The hfCPR group needed less time until starting chest compressions (2 vs. 8 s, p feedback or by using a mechanical audio-visual feedback device was similar. Further studies should investigate whether extended human feedback training could further increase CPR quality at comparable costs for training.

  13. Application of the Reduction of Scale Range in a Lorentz Boosted Frame to the Numerical Simulation of Particle Acceleration Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Fawley, W.M.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown (1) that it may be computationally advantageous to perform computer simulations in a boosted frame for a certain class of systems: particle beams interacting with electron clouds, free electron lasers, and laser-plasma accelerators. However, even if the computer model relies on a covariant set of equations, it was also pointed out that algorithmic difficulties related to discretization errors may have to be overcome in order to take full advantage of the potential speedup (2) . In this paper, we focus on the analysis of the complication of data input and output in a Lorentz boosted frame simulation, and describe the procedures that were implemented in the simulation code Warp(3). We present our most recent progress in the modeling of laser wakefield acceleration in a boosted frame, and describe briefly the potential benefits of calculating in a boosted frame for the modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation.

  14. Lower hybrid current drive: an overview of simulation models, benchmarking with experiment, and predictions for future devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Barbato, E.; Imbeaux, F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) simulation and modeling. We first discuss modules used for wave propagation, absorption, and current drive with particular emphasis placed on comparing exact numerical solutions of the Fokker Planck equation in 2-dimension with solution methods that employ 1-dimensional and adjoint approaches. We also survey model predictions for LHCD in past and present experiments showing detailed comparisons between simulated and observed current drive efficiencies and hard X-ray profiles. Finally we discuss several model predictions for lower hybrid current profile control in proposed next step reactor options. (authors)

  15. Blood flow in intracranial aneurysms treated with Pipeline embolization devices: computational simulation and verification with Doppler ultrasonography on phantom models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Chun On Tsang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation of flow-diverter treatment through Doppler ultrasonography measurements in patient-specific models of intracranial bifurcation and side-wall aneurysms. Methods: Computational and physical models of patient-specific bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms were constructed from computed tomography angiography with use of stereolithography, a three-dimensional printing technology. Flow dynamics parameters before and after flow-diverter treatment were measured with pulse-wave and color Doppler ultrasonography, and then compared with CFD simulations. Results: CFD simulations showed drastic flow reduction after flow-diverter treatment in both aneurysms. The mean volume flow rate decreased by 90% and 85% for the bifurcation aneurysm and the side-wall aneurysm, respectively. Velocity contour plots from computer simulations before and after flow diversion closely resembled the patterns obtained by color Doppler ultrasonography. Conclusion: The CFD estimation of flow reduction in aneurysms treated with a flow-diverting stent was verified by Doppler ultrasonography in patient-specific phantom models of bifurcation and side-wall aneurysms. The combination of CFD and ultrasonography may constitute a feasible and reliable technique in studying the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with flow-diverting stents.

  16. Simulation study of ballistic spin-MOSFET devices with ferromagnetic channels based on some Heusler and oxide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziosi, Patrizio; Neophytou, Neophytos

    2018-02-01

    Newly emerged materials from the family of Heuslers and complex oxides exhibit finite bandgaps and ferromagnetic behavior with Curie temperatures much higher than even room temperature. In this work, using the semiclassical top-of-the-barrier FET model, we explore the operation of a spin-MOSFET that utilizes such ferromagnetic semiconductors as channel materials, in addition to ferromagnetic source/drain contacts. Such a device could retain the spin polarization of injected electrons in the channel, the loss of which limits the operation of traditional spin transistors with non-ferromagnetic channels. We examine the operation of four material systems that are currently considered some of the most prominent known ferromagnetic semiconductors: three Heusler-type alloys (Mn2CoAl, CrVZrAl, and CoVZrAl) and one from the oxide family (NiFe2O4). We describe their band structures by using data from DFT (Density Functional Theory) calculations. We investigate under which conditions high spin polarization and significant ION/IOFF ratio, two essential requirements for the spin-MOSFET operation, are both achieved. We show that these particular Heusler channels, in their bulk form, do not have adequate bandgap to provide high ION/IOFF ratios and have small magnetoconductance compared to state-of-the-art devices. However, with confinement into ultra-narrow sizes down to a few nanometers, and by engineering their spin dependent contact resistances, they could prove promising channel materials for the realization of spin-MOSFET transistor devices that offer combined logic and memory functionalities. Although the main compounds of interest in this paper are Mn2CoAl, CrVZrAl, CoVZrAl, and NiFe2O4 alone, we expect that the insight we provide is relevant to other classes of such materials as well.

  17. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable p...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used....

  18. Effect of the simulated periodontal ligament on cast post-and-core removal using an ultrasonic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Brito-Junior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of simulated periodontal ligament (SPDL on custom cast dowel and core removal by ultrasonic vibration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-two human maxillary canines were included in resin cylinders with or without SPDL made from polyether impression material. In order to allow tensile testing, the roots included in resin cylinders with SPDL were fixed to cylinders with two stainless steel wires. Post-holes were prepared by standardizing the length at 8 mm and root canal impressions were made with self-cured resin acrylic. Cast dowel and core sets were fabricated and luted with Panavia F resin cement. Half of the samples were submitted to ultrasonic vibration before the tensile test. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (p<0.05. RESULTS: The ultrasonic vibration reduced the tensile strength of the samples directly included in resin cylinders. There was no difference between the values, whether or not ultrasonic vibration was used, when the PDL was simulated. However, the presence of SPDL affected the tensile strength values even when no ultrasonic vibration was applied. CONCLUSION: Simulation of PDL has an effect on both ultrasonic vibration and tensile testing.

  19. Numerically Simulated Impact of Gas Prandtl Number and Flow Model on Efficiency of the Machine-less Energetic Separation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Egorov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper regards the influence of one of similarity criteria – the Prandtl number of gas (Pr - on the efficiency of the machine-less energetic separation device (Leontiev pipe, using numerical modeling in ANSYS software. This device, equally as Rank-Hilsch and Hartman-Schprenger pipes, is designed to separate one gas flow into two flows with different temperatures. One flow (supersonic streams out of the pipe with a temperature higher than initial and the other (subsonic flows out with a temperature lower than initial. This direction of energetic separation is true if the Prandtl number is less than 1 that corresponds to gases.The Prandtl number affects the efficiency of running Leontiev pipe indirectly both through a temperature difference on which a temperature recovery factor has an impact and through a thermal conductivity coefficient that shows the impact of heat transfer intensity between gas and solid wall.The Prandtl number range in the course of research was from 0.1 to 0.7. The Prandtl number value equal to 0.7 corresponds to the air or pure gases (for example, inert argon gas. The Prandtl number equal to 0.2 corresponds to the mixtures of inert gases such as helium-xenon.The numerical modeling completed for the supersonic flow with Mach number 2.0 shows that efficiency of the machine-less energetic separation device has been increased approximately 2 times with the Prandtl number decreasing from 0.7 to 0.2. Moreover, for the counter-flow scheme this effect is a little higher due to its larger heat efficiency in comparison with the straight-flow one.Also, the research shows that the main problem for the further increase of the Leontiev pipe efficiency is a small value of thermal conductivity coefficient, which requires an intensification of the heat exchange, especially in the supersonic flow. It can be obtained, for example, by using a system of oblique shock waves in the supersonic channel.

  20. Improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a CPR feedback device and refresher simulations (CPR CARES Study): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Brown, Linda L; Duff, Jonathan P; Davidson, Jennifer; Overly, Frank; Tofil, Nancy M; Peterson, Dawn T; White, Marjorie L; Bhanji, Farhan; Bank, Ilana; Gottesman, Ronald; Adler, Mark; Zhong, John; Grant, Vincent; Grant, David J; Sudikoff, Stephanie N; Marohn, Kimberly; Charnovich, Alex; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Kessler, David O; Wong, Hubert; Robertson, Nicola; Lin, Yiqun; Doan, Quynh; Duval-Arnould, Jordan M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2015-02-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) affects hemodynamics, survival, and neurological outcomes following pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). Most health care professionals fail to perform CPR within established American Heart Association guidelines. To determine whether "just-in-time" (JIT) CPR training with visual feedback (VisF) before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA improves the quality of chest compressions (CCs) during simulated CPA. Prospective, randomized, 2 × 2 factorial-design trial with explicit methods (July 1, 2012, to April 15, 2014) at 10 International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research, & Education (INSPIRE) institutions running a standardized simulated CPA scenario, including 324 CPR-certified health care professionals assigned to 3-person resuscitation teams (108 teams). Each team was randomized to 1 of 4 permutations, including JIT training vs no JIT training before CPA and real-time VisF vs no real-time VisF during simulated CPA. The proportion of CCs with depth exceeding 50 mm, the proportion of CPR time with a CC rate of 100 to 120 per minute, and CC fraction (percentage CPR time) during simulated CPA. The quality of CPR was poor in the control group, with 12.7% (95% CI, 5.2%-20.1%) mean depth compliance and 27.1% (95% CI, 14.2%-40.1%) mean rate compliance. JIT training compared with no JIT training improved depth compliance by 19.9% (95% CI, 11.1%-28.7%; P 89.0%) in all groups. Combining both interventions showed the highest compliance with American Heart Association guidelines but was not significantly better than either intervention in isolation. The quality of CPR provided by health care professionals is poor. Using novel and practical technology, JIT training before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA, alone or in combination, improves compliance with American Heart Association guidelines for CPR that are associated with better outcomes. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02075450.

  1. Axisymmetric charge-conservative electromagnetic particle simulation algorithm on unstructured grids: Application to microwave vacuum electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Dong-Yeop; Omelchenko, Yuri A.; Moon, Haksu; Borges, Ben-Hur V.; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2017-10-01

    We present a charge-conservative electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) algorithm optimized for the analysis of vacuum electronic devices (VEDs) with cylindrical symmetry (axisymmetry). We exploit the axisymmetry present in the device geometry, fields, and sources to reduce the dimensionality of the problem from 3D to 2D. Further, we employ 'transformation optics' principles to map the original problem in polar coordinates with metric tensor diag (1 ,ρ2 , 1) to an equivalent problem on a Cartesian metric tensor diag (1 , 1 , 1) with an effective (artificial) inhomogeneous medium introduced. The resulting problem in the meridian (ρz) plane is discretized using an unstructured 2D mesh considering TEϕ-polarized fields. Electromagnetic field and source (node-based charges and edge-based currents) variables are expressed as differential forms of various degrees, and discretized using Whitney forms. Using leapfrog time integration, we obtain a mixed E - B finite-element time-domain scheme for the full-discrete Maxwell's equations. We achieve a local and explicit time update for the field equations by employing the sparse approximate inverse (SPAI) algorithm. Interpolating field values to particles' positions for solving Newton-Lorentz equations of motion is also done via Whitney forms. Particles are advanced using the Boris algorithm with relativistic correction. A recently introduced charge-conserving scatter scheme tailored for 2D unstructured grids is used in the scatter step. The algorithm is validated considering cylindrical cavity and space-charge-limited cylindrical diode problems. We use the algorithm to investigate the physical performance of VEDs designed to harness particle bunching effects arising from the coherent (resonance) Cerenkov electron beam interactions within micro-machined slow wave structures.

  2. Simulation and measurement of complete dye sensitised solar cells: including the influence of trapping, electrolyte, oxidised dyes and light intensity on steady state and transient device behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Piers R F; Anderson, Assaf Y; Durrant, James R; O'Regan, Brian C

    2011-04-07

    A numerical model of the dye sensitised solar cell (DSSC) is used to assess the importance of different loss pathways under various operational conditions. Based on our current understanding, the simulation describes the processes of injection, regeneration, recombination and transport of electrons, oxidised dye molecules and electrolyte within complete devices to give both time dependent and independent descriptions of performance. The results indicate that the flux of electrons lost from the nanocrystalline TiO(2) film is typically at least twice as large under conditions equivalent to 1 sun relative to dark conditions at matched TiO(2) charge concentration. This is in agreement with experimental observations (Barnes et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. [DOI: 10.1039/c0cp01855d]). The simulated difference in recombination flux is shown to be due to variation in the concentration profile of electron accepting species in the TiO(2) pores between light and dark conditions and to recombination to oxidised dyes in the light. The model is able to easily incorporate non-ideal behaviour of a cell such as the variation of open circuit potential with light intensity and non-first order recombination of conduction band electrons. The time dependent simulations, described by the multiple trapping model of electron transport and recombination, show good agreement with both small and large transient photocurrent and photovoltage measurements at open circuit, including photovoltage rise measurements. The simulation of photovoltage rise also suggests the possibility of assessing the interfacial resistance between the TiO(2) and substrate. When cells with a short diffusion length relative to film thickness were modelled, the simulated small perturbation photocurrent transients at short circuit (but not open circuit) yielded significantly higher effective diffusion coefficients than expected from the mean concentration of electrons and the electrolyte in the cell. This implies that

  3. An in-depth description of bipolar resistive switching in Cu/HfOx/Pt devices, a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, S.; Roldán, J. B.; García-Fernández, P.; Suñe, J.; Romero-Zaliz, R.; Jiménez-Molinos, F.; Long, S.; Gómez-Campos, F.; Liu, M.

    2018-04-01

    A simulation tool based on a 3D kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm has been employed to analyse bipolar conductive bridge RAMs fabricated with Cu/HfOx/Pt stacks. Resistive switching mechanisms are described accounting for the electric field and temperature distributions within the dielectric. The formation and destruction of conductive filaments (CFs) are analysed taking into consideration redox reactions and the joint action of metal ion thermal diffusion and electric field induced drift. Filamentary conduction is considered when different percolation paths are formed in addition to other conventional transport mechanisms in dielectrics. The simulator was tuned by using the experimental data for Cu/HfOx/Pt bipolar devices that were fabricated. Our simulation tool allows for the study of different experimental results, in particular, the current variations due to the electric field changes between the filament tip and the electrode in the High Resistance State. In addition, the density of metallic atoms within the CF can also be characterized along with the corresponding CF resistance description.

  4. Using Mobile Devices in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Black, Crystal; Merrill, Earlene B

    2015-01-01

    The use of mobile device technology in nursing education is growing. These devices are becoming more important in the health care environment with an advantage of providing a compendium of drug, nursing procedures and treatments, and disease information to nursing students. Senior baccalaureate nursing students traditionally are prohibited from medication administration during psychiatric-mental health clinical rotations, but they are required to participate in simulated medication discussions and administration experiences. The incorporation of this mobile device technology to augment clinical learning experiences has advantages including potential reduction of medication errors, and improved patient safety during students' clinical rotation. The purpose of this project is to explain how the mobile device (iPod Touch, 4th generation wireless media player) may be used to enhance and augment comprehensive nursing care in a psychiatric-mental health clinical setting. Thirty-four (34) baccalaureate senior nursing students enrolled in a clinical psychiatric-mental nursing course at a mid-Atlantic public university school of nursing were used. Each student was provided a loaner mobile device with appropriate software and the necessary training. Data were collected on the student's ability to simulate medication administration to a psychiatric-mental health client. Surveys were administered before distribution, at mid-point and at the end of two (2) seven week semesters.

  5. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  6. Simulation of erosion and deposition processes of many-component surface layers in fusion devices; Simulation von Erosion- und Depositionsprozessen mehrkomponentiger Oberflaechenschichten in Fusionsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, S.

    2007-02-15

    The present choice of first wall materials in ITER will unavoidably lead to the formation of mixed carbon, tungsten and beryllium layers. Predictive modelling of erosion processes, impurity transport and deposition processes is important. For this the 3D Monte-Carlo code ERO can be used. In this thesis ERO has been coupled to the existing Monte-Carlo code SDTrimSP to describe material mixing processes in wall components correctly. SDTrimSP describes the surface by calculating the transport of ions in solids. It keeps track of the depth dependent material concentration caused by the implantation of projectiles in the solid. The calculation of movements of the recoil atoms within the solid gives reflection coefficients and sputtering yields. Since SDTrimSP does not consider chemical processes a new method has been developed to implement chemical erosion of carbon by the impact of hydrogen projectiles. The new code ERO-SDTrimSP was compared to TEXTOR experiments which were carried out to study the formation of mixed surface layers. In these experiments methane CH4 was injected through drillings in graphite and tungsten spherical limiters into the plasma. A pronounced substrate dependence was observed. The deposition efficiency, i.e. the ratio of the locally deposited to the injected amount of carbon, was 4% for graphite and 0.3% for tungsten. The deposition-dominated area on the graphite limiter covers a five times larger area than on the tungsten limiter. Modelling of this experiment with ERO-SDTrimSP also showed a clear substrate dependence with 2% deposition efficiency for graphite and less than 0.5% for tungsten. An important result of the comparison between experiment and simulation was that the effective sticking of hydrocarbon radicals hitting the surface must be negligible. Furthermore, it was shown that local re-deposited carbon layers are 10 times more effectively eroded than ordinary graphite. Simulation of the impurity transport in the plasma was checked

  7. A preliminary simulation of the device arrangement analysis and the remote accessibility evaluation in a nuclear fuel cycle facility using a virtual engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. S.; Park, B. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.

    2010-10-01

    The ultimate goal of this study is to contribute to the conceptual design of a solution which was obtained from various simulations in an early design stage prior to constructing the pyro process facility. The other aim is to remove the problems of repairs that can happen in operation and maintenance tasks of process devices through and accessibility analysis of remote manipulation and equipment. This technology improves error detection by locating clashes and interferences early in the process. One of the best qualities of this technology is the reduction of time-to-design, an improved flexibility in design and production, and reliability. This system is still going to be studied for gathering technical specifications, managing of requirements, and assisting with the design and procurement of new equipment and tools. (Author)

  8. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow in a DC plasma-arc device for waste thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Jing; Li, Yaojian; Xu, Yongxiang; Sheng, Hongzhi

    2010-01-01

    In this work, Magnetic Fluid dynamics (MHD) model is used to stimulate the electromagnetic field, heat transfer and fluid flow in a DC non-transferred arc plasma torch. Through the coupled iterative computation about the electromagnetic equations described by magnetic vector potential format and the modified fluid dynamics equations, the electric potential, temperature and velocity distributions in the torch are obtained. The fluid-solid coupled computation method is applied to treat the electric current and heat transfer at the interface between the electrodes and fluid. The location of arc root attachment at the inside surface of anode and the arc voltage of the torch that we have predicted are very consistent with the corresponding experimental results. The calculated results of the torch are applied to the numerical simulation of the plasma jets under the laminar and turbulent condition. (author)

  9. Effect of battery longevity on costs and health outcomes associated with cardiac implantable electronic devices: a Markov model-based Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Jordana K; Lau, Edmund C; Patel, Jasmine D; Klenk, Juergen A; Greenspon, Arnold J

    2017-11-01

    The effects of device and patient characteristics on health and economic outcomes in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are unclear. Modeling can estimate costs and outcomes for patients with CIEDs under a variety of scenarios, varying battery longevity, comorbidities, and care settings. The objective of this analysis was to compare changes in patient outcomes and payer costs attributable to increases in battery life of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D). We developed a Monte Carlo Markov model simulation to follow patients through primary implant, postoperative maintenance, generator replacement, and revision states. Patients were simulated in 3-month increments for 15 years or until death. Key variables included Charlson Comorbidity Index, CIED type, legacy versus extended battery longevity, mortality rates (procedure and all-cause), infection and non-infectious complication rates, and care settings. Costs included procedure-related (facility and professional), maintenance, and infections and non-infectious complications, all derived from Medicare data (2004-2014, 5% sample). Outcomes included counts of battery replacements, revisions, infections and non-infectious complications, and discounted (3%) costs and life years. An increase in battery longevity in ICDs yielded reductions in numbers of revisions (by 23%), battery changes (by 44%), infections (by 23%), non-infectious complications (by 10%), and total costs per patient (by 9%). Analogous reductions for CRT-Ds were 23% (revisions), 32% (battery changes), 22% (infections), 8% (complications), and 10% (costs). Based on modeling results, as battery longevity increases, patients experience fewer adverse outcomes and healthcare costs are reduced. Understanding the magnitude of the cost benefit of extended battery life can inform budgeting and planning decisions by healthcare providers and insurers.

  10. Optimisation of the imaging and dosimetric characteristics of an electronic portal imaging device employing plastic scintillating fibres using Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, S J; McNamara, A L; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Kuncic, Z

    2014-11-21

    A Monte Carlo model of a novel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed using Geant4 and its performance for imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy has been characterised. The EPID geometry is based on a physical prototype under ongoing investigation and comprises an array of plastic scintillating fibres in place of the metal plate/phosphor screen in standard EPIDs. Geometrical and optical transport parameters were varied to investigate their impact on imaging and dosimetry performance. Detection efficiency was most sensitive to variations in fibre length, achieving a peak value of 36% at 50 mm using 400 keV x-rays for the lengths considered. Increases in efficiency for longer fibres were partially offset by reductions in sensitivity. Removing the extra-mural absorber surrounding individual fibres severely decreased the modulation transfer function (MTF), highlighting its importance in maximising spatial resolution. Field size response and relative dose profile simulations demonstrated a water-equivalent dose response and thus the prototype's suitability for dosimetry applications. Element-to-element mismatch between scintillating fibres and underlying photodiode pixels resulted in a reduced MTF for high spatial frequencies and quasi-periodic variations in dose profile response. This effect is eliminated when fibres are precisely matched to underlying pixels. Simulations strongly suggest that with further optimisation, this prototype EPID may be capable of simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  11. Effects of Compressibility on the Performance of a Wave-Energy Conversion Device with an Impulse Turbine Using a Numerical Simulation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Thakker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents work carried out to predict the behavior of a 0.6 m impulse turbine with fixed guide vanes as compared with that of a 0.6 hub-to-tip ratio turbine under real sea conditions. In order to predict the true performance of the actual oscillating water column (OWC, the numerical technique was fine-tuned by incorporating the compressibility effect. Water surface elevation versus time history was used as the input data for this purpose. The effect of compressibility inside the air chamber and the turbine's performance under unsteady and irregular flow conditions were analyzed numerically. Considering the quasi-steady assumptions, the unidirectional steady-flow experimental data was used to simulate the turbines characteristics under irregular unsteady flow conditions. The results showed that the performance of this type of turbine is quite stable and that the efficiency of the air chamber and the mean conversion efficiency are reduced by around 8% and 5%, respectively, as a result of the compressibility inside the air chamber. The mean efficiencies of the OWC device and the impulse turbine were predicted for 1 month, based on the Irish wave climate, and it was found that the total time period of wave data used is one of the important factors in the simulation technique.

  12. Designing and simulation smart multifunctional continuous logic device as a basic cell of advanced high-performance sensor systems with MIMO-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolskyy, Aleksandr I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a design and simulation of hardware realizations of smart multifunctional continuous logic devices (SMCLD) as advanced basic cells of the sensor systems with MIMO- structure for images processing and interconnection. The SMCLD realize function of two-valued, multi-valued and continuous logics with current inputs and current outputs. Such advanced basic cells realize function nonlinear time-pulse transformation, analog-to-digital converters and neural logic. We showed advantages of such elements. It's have a number of advantages: high speed and reliability, simplicity, small power consumption, high integration level. The conception of construction of SMCLD consists in the use of a current mirrors realized on 1.5μm technology CMOS transistors. Presence of 50÷70 transistors, 1 PD and 1 LED makes the offered circuits quite compact. The simulation results of NOT, MIN, MAX, equivalence (EQ), normalize summation, averaging and other functions, that implemented SMCLD, showed that the level of logical variables can change from 0.1μA to 10μA for low-power consumption variants. The SMCLD have low power consumption <1mW and processing time about 1÷11μS at supply voltage 2.4÷3.3V.

  13. Optimisation of the imaging and dosimetric characteristics of an electronic portal imaging device employing plastic scintillating fibres using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, S. J.; McNamara, A. L.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-11-01

    A Monte Carlo model of a novel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed using Geant4 and its performance for imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy has been characterised. The EPID geometry is based on a physical prototype under ongoing investigation and comprises an array of plastic scintillating fibres in place of the metal plate/phosphor screen in standard EPIDs. Geometrical and optical transport parameters were varied to investigate their impact on imaging and dosimetry performance. Detection efficiency was most sensitive to variations in fibre length, achieving a peak value of 36% at 50 mm using 400 keV x-rays for the lengths considered. Increases in efficiency for longer fibres were partially offset by reductions in sensitivity. Removing the extra-mural absorber surrounding individual fibres severely decreased the modulation transfer function (MTF), highlighting its importance in maximising spatial resolution. Field size response and relative dose profile simulations demonstrated a water-equivalent dose response and thus the prototype’s suitability for dosimetry applications. Element-to-element mismatch between scintillating fibres and underlying photodiode pixels resulted in a reduced MTF for high spatial frequencies and quasi-periodic variations in dose profile response. This effect is eliminated when fibres are precisely matched to underlying pixels. Simulations strongly suggest that with further optimisation, this prototype EPID may be capable of simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  14. Investigation of free level fluctuations in a simulated model of a sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactor using pulsating conductance monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, P.K.; Pandey, G.K.; Malathi, N.; Arun, A.D.; Ananthanarayanan, R.; Banerjee, I.; Sahoo, P.; Padmakumar, G.; Murali, N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An innovative approach for measurement of water level fluctuation is presented. ► Measurement was conducted with a PC based pulsating type level sensor. ► Deployed the technique in monitoring level fluctuation in PFBR simulated facility. ► The technique helped in validation of hot pool design of PFBR, India. - Abstract: A high resolution measurement technique for rapid and accurate monitoring of water level using an in-house built pulsating conductance monitoring device is presented. The technique has the capability of online monitoring of any sudden shift in water level in a reservoir which is subjected to rapid fluctuations due to any external factor. We have deployed this novel technique for real time monitoring of water level fluctuations in a specially designed ¼ scale model of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpakkam, India. The water level measurements in various locations of the simulated test facility were carried out in different experimental campaigns with and without inclusion of thermal baffles to it in specific operating conditions as required by the reactor designers. The amplitudes and the frequencies of fluctuations with required statistical parameters in hot water pool of the simulated model were evaluated from the online time versus water level plot in more convenient way using system software package. From experimental results it is computed that the maximum free level fluctuation in the hot pool of PFBR with baffle plates provided on the inner vessel is 30 mm which is considerably less than the value (∼82 mm) obtained without having any baffle plates. The present work provided useful information for assessment of appropriate design which would be adopted in the PFBR for safe operation of the reactor.

  15. A comprehensive study of MPI parallelism in three-dimensional discrete element method (DEM) simulation of complex-shaped granular particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Beichuan; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2018-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) DEM code for simulating complex-shaped granular particles is parallelized using message-passing interface (MPI). The concepts of link-block, ghost/border layer, and migration layer are put forward for design of the parallel algorithm, and theoretical scalability function of 3-D DEM scalability and memory usage is derived. Many performance-critical implementation details are managed optimally to achieve high performance and scalability, such as: minimizing communication overhead, maintaining dynamic load balance, handling particle migrations across block borders, transmitting C++ dynamic objects of particles between MPI processes efficiently, eliminating redundant contact information between adjacent MPI processes. The code executes on multiple US Department of Defense (DoD) supercomputers and tests up to 2048 compute nodes for simulating 10 million three-axis ellipsoidal particles. Performance analyses of the code including speedup, efficiency, scalability, and granularity across five orders of magnitude of simulation scale (number of particles) are provided, and they demonstrate high speedup and excellent scalability. It is also discovered that communication time is a decreasing function of the number of compute nodes in strong scaling measurements. The code's capability of simulating a large number of complex-shaped particles on modern supercomputers will be of value in both laboratory studies on micromechanical properties of granular materials and many realistic engineering applications involving granular materials.

  16. Effect of direct current sputtering power on the behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors under negative bias illumination stress: A combination of experimental analyses and device simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Jozeph; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Hyun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    The effect of direct current sputtering power of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) on the performance and stability of the corresponding thin-film transistor devices was studied. The field effect mobility increases as the IGZO sputter power increases, at the expense of device reliability under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS). Device simulation based on the extracted sub-gap density of states indicates that the field effect mobility is improved as a result of the number of acceptor-like states decreasing. The degradation by NBIS is suggested to be induced by the formation of peroxides in IGZO rather than charge trapping

  17. Effect of direct current sputtering power on the behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors under negative bias illumination stress: A combination of experimental analyses and device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jun Tae; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan, E-mail: khs3297@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jozeph [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byung Du [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Suk, E-mail: khs3297@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: drlife@kookmin.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-23

    The effect of direct current sputtering power of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) on the performance and stability of the corresponding thin-film transistor devices was studied. The field effect mobility increases as the IGZO sputter power increases, at the expense of device reliability under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS). Device simulation based on the extracted sub-gap density of states indicates that the field effect mobility is improved as a result of the number of acceptor-like states decreasing. The degradation by NBIS is suggested to be induced by the formation of peroxides in IGZO rather than charge trapping.

  18. Numerical Simulation of PAHs Formation and Effect of Operating Conditions in DI-Diesel Engines Based on a Comprehensive Chemical Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-Jing Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional numerical simulations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH formation in a Chaochai 6102bzl direct injection diesel engine are performed. n-Heptane is chosen as the fuel. A detailed mechanism, which includes 108 species and 572 elementary reactions that describe n-heptane oxidation and PAH formation, is proposed. A reduced kinetic mechanism, with only 86 reactions and 57 species, is developed and incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD software for the numerical simulations. Results show that PAHs, which were mostly deposited at the bottom of the diesel combustion chamber wall, first increased and then decreased with the increase in diesel crank angle. Furthermore, the diesel engine operating conditions (intake vortex intensity, intake air pressure, fuel injection advance angle, diesel load, and engine speed had a significant effect on PAH formation.

  19. A high-order particle-in-cell method for low density plasma flow and the simulation of gyrotron resonator devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Within this thesis a parallelized, transient, three-dimensional, high-order discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell solver is developed and used to simulate the resonant cavity of a gyrotron. The high-order discontinuous Galerkin approach - a Finite-Element type method - provides a fast and efficient algorithm to numerically solve Maxwell's equations used within this thesis. Besides its outstanding dissipation and dispersion properties, the discontinuous Galerkin approach easily allows for using unstructured grids, as required to simulate complex-shaped engineering devices. The discontinuous Galerkin approach approximates a wavelength with significantly less degrees of freedom compared to other methods, e.g. Finite Difference methods. Furthermore, the parallelization capabilities of the discontinuous Galerkin framework are excellent due to the very local dependencies between the elements. These properties are essential for the efficient numerical treatment of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with the Particle-in-Cell method. This system describes the self-consistent interaction of charged particles and the electromagnetic field. As central application within this thesis gyrotron resonators are simulated with the discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell method on high-performance-computers. The gyrotron is a high-power millimeter wave source, used for the electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetically confined fusion plasma, e.g. in the Wendelstein 7-X experimental fusion-reactor. Compared to state-of-the-art simulation tools used for the design of gyrotron resonators the Particle-in-Cell method does not use any significant physically simplifications w.r.t. the modelling of the particle-field-interaction, the geometry and the wave-spectrum. Hence, it is the method of choice for validation of current simulation tools being restricted by these simplifications. So far, the Particle-in-Cell method was restricted to be used for demonstration calculations only, because

  20. A high-order particle-in-cell method for low density plasma flow and the simulation of gyrotron resonator devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, Andreas

    2013-04-26

    Within this thesis a parallelized, transient, three-dimensional, high-order discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell solver is developed and used to simulate the resonant cavity of a gyrotron. The high-order discontinuous Galerkin approach - a Finite-Element type method - provides a fast and efficient algorithm to numerically solve Maxwell's equations used within this thesis. Besides its outstanding dissipation and dispersion properties, the discontinuous Galerkin approach easily allows for using unstructured grids, as required to simulate complex-shaped engineering devices. The discontinuous Galerkin approach approximates a wavelength with significantly less degrees of freedom compared to other methods, e.g. Finite Difference methods. Furthermore, the parallelization capabilities of the discontinuous Galerkin framework are excellent due to the very local dependencies between the elements. These properties are essential for the efficient numerical treatment of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with the Particle-in-Cell method. This system describes the self-consistent interaction of charged particles and the electromagnetic field. As central application within this thesis gyrotron resonators are simulated with the discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell method on high-performance-computers. The gyrotron is a high-power millimeter wave source, used for the electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetically confined fusion plasma, e.g. in the Wendelstein 7-X experimental fusion-reactor. Compared to state-of-the-art simulation tools used for the design of gyrotron resonators the Particle-in-Cell method does not use any significant physically simplifications w.r.t. the modelling of the particle-field-interaction, the geometry and the wave-spectrum. Hence, it is the method of choice for validation of current simulation tools being restricted by these simplifications. So far, the Particle-in-Cell method was restricted to be used for demonstration calculations only, because

  1. The potential impact of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes on trypsin: A Comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Noordadi

    Full Text Available In this study, we report a detailed experimental, binding free energy calculation and molecular dynamics (MD simulation investigation of the interactions of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-f-MWCNTs with porcine trypsin (pTry. The enzyme exhibits decreased thermostability at 330K in the presence of COOH-f-MWCNTs. Furthermore, the activity of pTry also decreases in the presence of COOH-f-MWCNTs. The restricted diffusion of the substrate to the active site of the enzyme was observed in the experiment. The MD simulation analysis suggested that this could be because of the blocking of the S1 pocket of pTry, which plays a vital role in the substrate selectivity. The intrinsic fluorescence of pTry is quenched with increase in the COOH-f-MWCNTs concentration. Circular dichroism (CD and UV-visible absorption spectroscopies indicate the ability of COOH-f-MWCNTs to experience conformational change in the native structure of the enzyme. The binding free energy calculations also show that electrostatics, π-cation, and π-π stacking interactions play important roles in the binding of the carboxylated CNTs with pTry. The MD simulation results demonstrated that the carboxylated CNTs adsorb to the enzyme stronger than the CNT without the-COOH groups. Our observations can provide an example of the nanoscale toxicity of COOH-f-MWCNTs for proteins, which is a critical issue for in vivo application of COOH-f-MWCNTs.

  2. Electronic devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, Gordon John

    1972-01-01

    Electronic Devices and Circuits, Volume 3 provides a comprehensive account on electronic devices and circuits and includes introductory network theory and physics. The physics of semiconductor devices is described, along with field effect transistors, small-signal equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, and integrated circuits. Linear and non-linear circuits as well as logic circuits are also considered. This volume is comprised of 12 chapters and begins with an analysis of the use of Laplace transforms for analysis of filter networks, followed by a discussion on the physical properties of

  3. Nanoelectronic device applications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, James E

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Device Applications Handbook gives a comprehensive snapshot of the state of the art in nanodevices for nanoelectronics applications. Combining breadth and depth, the book includes 68 chapters on topics that range from nano-scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices through recent developments in nano capacitors and AlGaAs/GaAs devices. The contributors are world-renowned experts from academia and industry from around the globe. The handbook explores current research into potentially disruptive technologies for a post-CMOS world.These include: Nanoscale advance

  4. Comprehensive ab initio calculation and simulation on the low-lying electronic states of TlX (X = F, Cl, Br, I, and At).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian

    2009-03-01

    The low-lying electronic states of TlX (X=F, Cl, Br, I, and At) are investigated using the configuration interaction based complete active space third-order perturbation theory [CASPT3(CI)] with spin-orbit coupling accounted for. The potential energy curves and the corresponding spectroscopic constants are reported. The results are grossly in good agreement with the available experimental data. The absorption spectra are simulated as well to reassign the experimental bands. The present results are also useful for guiding future experimental measurements.

  5. Electrical Contacts in Monolayer Arsenene Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyang; Ye, Meng; Weng, Mouyi; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Xiuying; Zhang, Han; Guo, Ying; Pan, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Junku; Pan, Feng; Lu, Jing

    2017-08-30

    Arsenene, arsenic analogue of graphene, as an emerging member of two-dimensional semiconductors (2DSCs), is quite promising in next-generation electronic and optoelectronic applications. The metal electrical contacts play a vital role in the charge transport and photoresponse processes of nanoscale 2DSC devices and even can mask the intrinsic properties of 2DSCs. Here, we present a first comprehensive study of the electrical contact properties of monolayer (ML) arsenene with different electrodes by using ab initio electronic calculations and quantum transport simulations. Schottky barrier is always formed with bulk metal contacts owing to the Fermi level pinning (pinning factor S = 0.33), with electron Schottky barrier height (SBH) of 0.12, 0.21, 0.25, 0.35, and 0.50 eV for Sc, Ti, Ag, Cu, and Au contacts and hole SBH of 0.75 and 0.78 eV for Pd and Pt contacts, respectively. However, by contact with 2D graphene, the Fermi level pinning effect can be reduced due to the suppression of metal-induced gap states. Remarkably, a barrier free hole injection is realized in ML arsenene device with graphene-Pt hybrid electrode, suggestive of a high device performance in such a ML arsenene device. Our study provides a theoretical foundation for the selection of favorable electrodes in future ML arsenene devices.

  6. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: formulas for simulating the dynamics of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves during the device operation in the self-heating regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, E A

    2014-01-01

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator we have developed a mathematical model, which allows one to simulate the temporal behaviour of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves in a situation when the device operates in the self-heating regime and is switched-on at different initial temperatures. (laser gyroscopes)

  7. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aeroynamic data book 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated data from wind tunnel tests conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of an advanced coannular exhaust nozzle for a future supersonic propulsion system are presented. Tests were conducted with two test configurations: (1) a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and (2) an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At takeoff conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less. Data are provided through test run 25.

  8. Simulators IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, B.T.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers on simulators with artificial intelligence, and the human decision making process; visuals for simulators: human factors, training, and psycho-physical impacts; the role of institutional structure on simulation projects; maintenance trainers for economic value and safety; biomedical simulators for understanding nature, for medical benefits, and the physiological effects of simulators; the mathematical models and numerical techniques that drive today's simulators; and the demography of simulators, with census papers identifying the population of real-time simulator training devices; nuclear reactors

  9. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation No. 52; Updated October 2017 Evaluation ... with serious emotional and behavioral problems need a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation. Comprehensive psychiatric evaluations usually require a ...

  10. Children's hypertext comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.C.J.; Segers, E.; Broek, P. van den

    2017-01-01

    The present chapter gives an overview of the literature on hypertext comprehension, children's hypertext comprehension and individual variation therein, ending with a perspective for future research. Hypertext comprehension requires the reader to make bridging inferences between the different parts

  11. Three-dimensional transient cooling simulations of a portable electronic device using PCM (phase change materials) in multi-fin heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Yue-Tzu

    2011-01-01

    Transient three-dimensional heat transfer numerical simulations were conducted to investigate a hybrid PCM (phase change materials) based multi-fin heat sink. Numerical computation was conducted with different amounts of fins (0 fin, 3 fins and 6 fins), various heating power level (2 W, 3 W and 4 W), different orientation tests (vertical/horizontal/slanted), and charge and discharge modes. Calculating time step (0.03 s, 0.05 s, and 0.07 s) size was discussed for transient accuracy as well. The theoretical model developed is validated by comparing numerical predictions with the available experimental data in the literature. The results showed that the transient surface temperatures are predicted with a maximum discrepancy within 10.2%. The operation temperature can be controlled well by the attendance of phase change material and the longer melting time can be conducted by using a multi-fin hybrid heat sink respectively. -- Highlights: → Electronic device cooling use phase change materials. → N-eicosane is adapted as phase change materials. → Present surface transient temperatures prediction error is within 10.2%. → Hybrid PCM-heat sink system provides stable operation temperature. → Orientation effects show independent on the phase change performance.

  12. Comparison of impact force attenuation by various combinations of hip protector and flooring material using a simplified fall-impact simulation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Tsushima, Eiki; Tsushima, Hitoshi

    2013-04-05

    Use of hip protectors and compliant flooring has been recommended for preventing hip fracture due to falls. We aimed to identify the factors attenuating forces in falls by comparing and analyzing the impact forces occurring with various combinations of hip protectors and flooring materials. We designed a simplified pendulum device to simulate the impact force at the hip during falling. The impact force was measured on pressure-sensitive recording film under combined conditions of two kinds of hip protector (hard or soft shell) and three kinds of floor material (concrete, wooden, or tatami matting). We then calculated the percentage force attenuation under each test condition compared with the use of a concrete floor and no hip protector. All the tests using tatami matting reduced the impact to below the average fracture threshold of elderly people (3472N). A combination of tatami and soft hip protector provided the best attenuation (72.5%). Multiple regression analyses showed that use of tatami matting and a soft hip protector had the biggest force-attenuation effect. The soft hip protector gave better percentage force attenuation than did the hard one. Use of tatami matting as a flooring material could be an effective strategy for helping prevent hip fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation on the Cyclic Response of Superelastic Shape Memory Alloy (SMA Slit Damper Devices Simulated by Quasi-Static Finite Element (FE Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wan Hu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA slit damper system as an alternative design approach for steel structures is intended to be evaluated with respect to inelastic behavior simulated by refined finite element (FE analyses. Although the steel slit dampers conventionally used for aseismic design are able to dissipate a considerable amount of energy generated by the plastic yielding of the base materials, large permanent deformation may occur in the entire structure. After strong seismic events, extra damage repair costs are required to restore the original configuration and to replace defective devices with new ones. Innovative slit dampers fabricated by superelastic SMAs that automatically recover their initial conditions only by the removal of stresses without heat treatment are introduced with a view toward mitigating the problem of permanent deformation. The cyclically tested FE models are calibrated to experimental results for the purpose of predicting accurate behavior. This study also focuses on the material constitutive model that is able to reproduce the inherent behavior of superelastic SMA materials by taking phase transformation between austenite and martensite into consideration. The responses of SMA slit dampers are compared to those of steel slit dampers. Axial stress and strain components are also investigated on the FE models under cyclic loading in an effort to validate the adequacy of FE modeling and then to compare between two slit damper systems. It can be shown that SMA slit dampers exhibit many structural advantages in terms of ultimate strength, moderate energy dissipation and recentering capability.

  14. A randomised control trial of prompt and feedback devices and their impact on quality of chest compressions--a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Joyce; Davies, Robin; Gao, Fang; Perkins, Gavin D

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to compare the effect of three CPR prompt and feedback devices on quality of chest compressions amongst healthcare providers. A single blinded, randomised controlled trial compared a pressure sensor/metronome device (CPREzy), an accelerometer device (Phillips Q-CPR) and simple metronome on the quality of chest compressions on a manikin by trained rescuers. The primary outcome was compression depth. Secondary outcomes were compression rate, proportion of chest compressions with inadequate depth, incomplete release and user satisfaction. The pressure sensor device improved compression depth (37.24-43.64 mm, p=0.02), the accelerometer device decreased chest compression depth (37.38-33.19 mm, p=0.04) whilst the metronome had no effect (39.88 mm vs. 40.64 mm, p=0.802). Compression rate fell with all devices (pressure sensor device 114.68-98.84 min(-1), p=0.001, accelerometer 112.04-102.92 min(-1), p=0.072 and metronome 108.24 min(-1) vs. 99.36 min(-1), p=0.009). The pressure sensor feedback device reduced the proportion of compressions with inadequate depth (0.52 vs. 0.24, p=0.013) whilst the accelerometer device and metronome did not have a statistically significant effect. Incomplete release of compressions was common, but unaffected by the CPR feedback devices. Users preferred the accelerometer and metronome devices over the pressure sensor device. A post hoc study showed that de-activating the voice prompt on the accelerometer device prevented the deterioration in compression quality seen in the main study. CPR feedback devices vary in their ability to improve performance. In this study the pressure sensor device improved compression depth, whilst the accelerometer device reduced it and metronome had no effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Mobile Device App to Reduce Time to Drug Delivery and Medication Errors During Simulated Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Combescure, Christophe; Lacroix, Laurence; Haddad, Kevin; Sanchez, Oliver; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    During pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), vasoactive drug preparation for continuous infusion is both complex and time-consuming, placing children at higher risk than adults for medication errors. Following an evidence-based ergonomic-driven approach, we developed a mobile device app called Pediatric Accurate Medication in Emergency Situations (PedAMINES), intended to guide caregivers step-by-step from preparation to delivery of drugs requiring continuous infusion. The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of PedAMINES reduces drug preparation time (TDP) and time to delivery (TDD; primary outcome), as well as medication errors (secondary outcomes) when compared with conventional preparation methods. The study was a randomized controlled crossover trial with 2 parallel groups comparing PedAMINES with a conventional and internationally used drugs infusion rate table in the preparation of continuous drug infusion. We used a simulation-based pediatric CPR cardiac arrest scenario with a high-fidelity manikin in the shock room of a tertiary care pediatric emergency department. After epinephrine-induced return of spontaneous circulation, pediatric emergency nurses were first asked to prepare a continuous infusion of dopamine, using either PedAMINES (intervention group) or the infusion table (control group), and second, a continuous infusion of norepinephrine by crossing the procedure. The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds, in each allocation group, from the oral prescription by the physician to TDD by the nurse. TDD included TDP. The secondary outcome was the medication dosage error rate during the sequence from drug preparation to drug injection. A total of 20 nurses were randomized into 2 groups. During the first study period, mean TDP while using PedAMINES and conventional preparation methods was 128.1 s (95% CI 102-154) and 308.1 s (95% CI 216-400), respectively (180 s reduction, P=.002). Mean TDD was 214 s (95% CI 171-256) and

  16. SU-F-T-30: Comprehensive Dosimetric Characterization of the Novel Direction Modulation Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safigholi, H; Mashouf, S; Soliman, Abraam; Owrangi, A; Song, W Y [Deprtment of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Han, D [Deprtment of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dosimetric properties/distributions of the novel proposed direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator in combination with 192Ir HDR source, and compare against conventional tandem design, using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The proposed DMBT tandem applicator is designed for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, especially MRI, of cervical cancer. It has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm width, grooved along a 5.4-mm diameter nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cc, capable of generating directional dose profiles – leading to enhanced dose sculpting capacity through inverse planning. In-water dosimetric parameters for the DMBT and conventional tandems have been calculated for various radial distances away and around the tandems. For the DMBT tandem, the cumulative dose from the 192Ir source occupying 1) one and 2) all six holes in equal dwell times was calculated and normalized to match the dose rate of the open source (in conventional tandem) at 1 cm from the center. This is done to compare and contrast the characteristic dose distributions to that of the isotropic TG43-based 192Ir source. Results: All dose rates were normalized at 1-cm radius from the center of the applicators, containing source(s). The normalized dose rates at 0.5, 3.0, and 5.0-cm radiuses were then 388, 11.3, and 4.1% for conventional tandem, 657, 8.1, and 2.7% for DMBT tandem with the source in one hole at front entrance, and 436, 10.9, and 3.8% for DMBT tandem with the source in all six holes. For the DMBT tandem case with the source in one hole, the backside transmissions were 47, 2.4, and 0.9%, respectively. Conclusion: The DMBT tandem is able to generate closely similar dosimetric characteristics as that of the single-channel conventional tandem if needed (with the source occupying all six holes), at the same time, generate directional radiation profile(s) for favorably enabling 3D dose sculpting capability.

  17. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell

  18. How reading comprehension is embodied and why that matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur M. GLENBERG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Reading comprehension, much like comprehension of situations and comprehension of oral language, is embodied. In all cases, comprehension is the ability to take effective action on the basis ofaffordances related to the body, the physical world, and personal goals and cultural norms. In language contexts, action-based comprehension arises from simulating the linguistic content usingneural and bodily systems of perception, action, and emotion. Within this framework, a new approach to teaching reading comprehension is described: Teach children how to simulate while reading. TheMoved by Reading intervention teaches simulation in two stages. In the first stage, physical manipulation, children manipulate toys to simulate the content of what they are reading. After success in physically manipulating the toys, the children are taught to manipulate the toys in imagination. Research demonstrates that both physical and imagined manipulation leads to large gains in memory and comprehension.

  19. How reading comprehension is embodied and why that matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur M. Glenberg

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Reading comprehension, much like comprehension of situations and comprehension of oral language, is embodied. In all cases, comprehension is the ability to take effective action on the basis of affordances related to the body, the physical world, and personal goals and cultural norms. In language contexts, action-based comprehension arises from simulating the linguistic content using neural and bodily systems of perception, action, and emotion. Within this framework, a new approach to teaching reading comprehension is described: Teach children how to simulate while reading. The Moved by Reading intervention teaches simulation in two stages. In the first stage, physical manipulation, children manipulate toys to simulate the content of what they are reading. After success in physically manipulating the toys, the children are taught to manipulate the toys in imagination. Research demonstrates that both physical and imagined manipulation leads to large gains in memory and comprehension.

  20. Design of a Spoon Wheel Type Seed Metering Device and Simulation of Soybean Seeds By Discrete Element Method%勺轮式排种器设计与大豆种子离散元法排种仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁桂珍; 张涛; 刘月琴

    2017-01-01

    Seed metering device as a key component of the seeding machine, its working performance and reliability directly affect the overall quality of the seeding machine.Mechanical sowing machine has the advantages of simple structure, low cost, convenient maintenance.The wheel metering device as a mechanical metering device of a widely used seeding with regular shape and hardness seeds.In this paper,the Solidworks software is used to design a spoon wheel type seed metering device, and the discrete element method is used to simulate the seed sowing seeds of the seed metering device, and the working conditions of the seed metering device are obtained.Simulation results are obtained by the discrete element software: the whole working performance of the seed metering device was better when the wheel rotation speed was 10~13 r/min;the number of seeds in the seed room was 1800~2100.And appropriate vibration can improve the performance of the designed device.This paper provides a method for the design and optimization of the spoon wheel type seed metering device.%排种器作为播种机关键部件,其工作性能与可靠性直接影响播种机整体作业质量.机械式排种器具有结构简单、价格低廉、维修方便等优点,勺轮式排种器作为机械式排种器的一种,在硬度较大、较规则种子播种作业中得到广泛应用.为此,应用SolidWorks软件设计了一种勺轮式排种器,应用离散元软件对排种器排种大豆种子进行了计算机数值模拟,得到了排种器工作性能较好的工作参数.由离散元软件计算机数值模拟结果得到:勺轮组合转速为10~13r/min,排种器种子室内种子数量在1800~2100粒时,排种器整体工作性能较好;且适当的振动可提高本设计的排种器的工作性能.该研究为勺轮式排种器的设计与优化提供了一种方法.

  1. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Alexander; Windbacher, Thomas; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    For many decades CMOS devices have been successfully scaled down to achieve higher speed and increased performance of integrated circuits at lower cost. Today’s charge-based CMOS electronics encounters two major challenges: power dissipation and variability. Spintronics is a rapidly evolving research and development field, which offers a potential solution to these issues by introducing novel ‘more than Moore’ devices. Spin-based magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is already recognized as one of the most promising candidates for future universal memory. Magnetic tunnel junctions, the main elements of MRAM cells, can also be used to build logic-in-memory circuits with non-volatile storage elements on top of CMOS logic circuits, as well as versatile compact on-chip oscillators with low power consumption. We give an overview of CMOS-compatible spintronics applications. First, we present a brief introduction to the physical background considering such effects as magnetoresistance, spin-transfer torque (STT), spin Hall effect, and magnetoelectric effects. We continue with a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art spintronic devices for memory applications (STT-MRAM, domain wall-motion MRAM, and spin-orbit torque MRAM), oscillators (spin torque oscillators and spin Hall nano-oscillators), logic (logic-in-memory, all-spin logic, and buffered magnetic logic gate grid), sensors, and random number generators. Devices with different types of resistivity switching are analyzed and compared, with their advantages highlighted and challenges revealed. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices are demonstrated beginning with predictive simulations, proceeding to their experimental confirmation and realization, and finalized by the current status of application in modern integrated systems and circuits. We conclude the review with an outlook, where we share our vision on the future applications of the prospective devices in the area.

  2. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) - blood. In: ... Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: ...

  3. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  4. Analysis of volatile organic compounds released from the decay of surrogate human models simulating victims of collapsed buildings by thermal desorption-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, A; Zorba, E; Mikedi, K; McGregor, L; Spiliopoulou, C; Statheropoulos, M

    2015-07-09

    Field experiments were devised to mimic the entrapment conditions under the rubble of collapsed buildings aiming to investigate the evolution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the early dead body decomposition stage. Three pig carcasses were placed inside concrete tunnels of a search and rescue (SAR) operational field terrain for simulating the entrapment environment after a building collapse. The experimental campaign employed both laboratory and on-site analytical methods running in parallel. The current work focuses only on the results of the laboratory method using thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOF MS). The flow-modulated TD-GC×GC-TOF MS provided enhanced separation of the VOC profile and served as a reference method for the evaluation of the on-site analytical methods in the current experimental campaign. Bespoke software was used to deconvolve the VOC profile to extract as much information as possible into peak lists. In total, 288 unique VOCs were identified (i.e., not found in blank samples). The majority were aliphatics (172), aromatics (25) and nitrogen compounds (19), followed by ketones (17), esters (13), alcohols (12), aldehydes (11), sulfur (9), miscellaneous (8) and acid compounds (2). The TD-GC×GC-TOF MS proved to be a sensitive and powerful system for resolving the chemical puzzle of above-ground "scent of death". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of an interactive cardiopulmonary resuscitation assist device with an automated external defibrillator synchronised with a ventilator on the CPR performance of emergency medical service staff: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzschke, Rainer; Doehn, Christoph; Kersten, Jan F; Blanz, Julian; Kalwa, Tobias J; Scotti, Norman A; Kubitz, Jens C

    2017-04-04

    The present study evaluates whether the quality of advanced cardiac life support (ALS) is improved with an interactive prototype assist device. This device consists of an automated external defibrillator linked to a ventilator and provides synchronised visual and acoustic instructions for guidance through the ALS algorithm and assistance for face-mask ventilations. We compared the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality of emergency medical system (EMS) staff members using the study device or standard equipment in a mannequin simulation study with a prospective, controlled, randomised cross-over study design. Main outcome was the effect of the study device compared to the standard equipment and the effect of the number of prior ALS trainings of the EMS staff on the CPR quality. Data were analysed using analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) and binary logistic regression, accounting for the study design. In 106 simulations of 56 two-person rescuer teams, the mean hands-off time was 24.5% with study equipment and 23.5% with standard equipment (Difference 1.0% (95% CI: -0.4 to 2.5%); p = 0.156). With both types of equipment, the hands-off time decreased with an increasing cumulative number of previous CPR trainings (p = 0.042). The study equipment reduced the mean time until administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by 23 s (p = 0.003) and that of amiodarone by 17 s (p = 0.016). It also increased the mean number of changes in the person doing chest compressions (0.6 per simulation; p < 0.001) and decreased the mean number of chest compressions (2.8 per minute; p = 0.022) and the mean number of ventilations (1.8 per minute; p < 0.001). The chance of administering amiodarone at the appropriate time was higher, with an odds ratio of 4.15, with the use of the study equipment CPR.com compared to the standard equipment (p = 0.004). With an increasing number of prior CPR trainings, the time intervals in the ALS algorithm until the

  6. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  7. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  8. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  9. Medical devices regulations, standards and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishna, Seeram; Wang, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Medical Devices and Regulations: Standards and Practices will shed light on the importance of regulations and standards among all stakeholders, bioengineering designers, biomaterial scientists and researchers to enable development of future medical devices. Based on the authors' practical experience, this book provides a concise, practical guide on key issues and processes in developing new medical devices to meet international regulatory requirements and standards. Provides readers with a global perspective on medical device regulationsConcise and comprehensive information on how to desig

  10. A multiscale simulation technique for molecular electronics: design of a directed self-assembled molecular n-bit shift register memory device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas A; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Crossley, Maxwell J; Hush, Noel S; Silverbrook, Kia

    2013-12-20

    A general method useful in molecular electronics design is developed that integrates modelling on the nano-scale (using quantum-chemical software) and on the micro-scale (using finite-element methods). It is applied to the design of an n-bit shift register memory that could conceivably be built using accessible technologies. To achieve this, the entire complex structure of the device would be built to atomic precision using feedback-controlled lithography to provide atomic-level control of silicon devices, controlled wet-chemical synthesis of molecular insulating pillars above the silicon, and controlled wet-chemical self-assembly of modular molecular devices to these pillars that connect to external metal electrodes (leads). The shift register consists of n connected cells that read data from an input electrode, pass it sequentially between the cells under the control of two external clock electrodes, and deliver it finally to an output device. The proposed cells are trimeric oligoporphyrin units whose internal states are manipulated to provide functionality, covalently connected to other cells via dipeptide linkages. Signals from the clock electrodes are conveyed by oligoporphyrin molecular wires, and μ-oxo porphyrin insulating columns are used as the supporting pillars. The developed multiscale modelling technique is applied to determine the characteristics of this molecular device, with in particular utilization of the inverted region for molecular electron-transfer processes shown to facilitate latching and control using exceptionally low energy costs per logic operation compared to standard CMOS shift register technology.

  11. A multiscale simulation technique for molecular electronics: design of a directed self-assembled molecular n-bit shift register memory device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas A; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Crossley, Maxwell J; Hush, Noel S; Silverbrook, Kia

    2013-01-01

    A general method useful in molecular electronics design is developed that integrates modelling on the nano-scale (using quantum-chemical software) and on the micro-scale (using finite-element methods). It is applied to the design of an n-bit shift register memory that could conceivably be built using accessible technologies. To achieve this, the entire complex structure of the device would be built to atomic precision using feedback-controlled lithography to provide atomic-level control of silicon devices, controlled wet-chemical synthesis of molecular insulating pillars above the silicon, and controlled wet-chemical self-assembly of modular molecular devices to these pillars that connect to external metal electrodes (leads). The shift register consists of n connected cells that read data from an input electrode, pass it sequentially between the cells under the control of two external clock electrodes, and deliver it finally to an output device. The proposed cells are trimeric oligoporphyrin units whose internal states are manipulated to provide functionality, covalently connected to other cells via dipeptide linkages. Signals from the clock electrodes are conveyed by oligoporphyrin molecular wires, and μ-oxo porphyrin insulating columns are used as the supporting pillars. The developed multiscale modelling technique is applied to determine the characteristics of this molecular device, with in particular utilization of the inverted region for molecular electron-transfer processes shown to facilitate latching and control using exceptionally low energy costs per logic operation compared to standard CMOS shift register technology. (paper)

  12. A multiscale simulation technique for molecular electronics: design of a directed self-assembled molecular n-bit shift register memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas A.; Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Crossley, Maxwell J.; Hush, Noel S.; Silverbrook, Kia

    2013-12-01

    A general method useful in molecular electronics design is developed that integrates modelling on the nano-scale (using quantum-chemical software) and on the micro-scale (using finite-element methods). It is applied to the design of an n-bit shift register memory that could conceivably be built using accessible technologies. To achieve this, the entire complex structure of the device would be built to atomic precision using feedback-controlled lithography to provide atomic-level control of silicon devices, controlled wet-chemical synthesis of molecular insulating pillars above the silicon, and controlled wet-chemical self-assembly of modular molecular devices to these pillars that connect to external metal electrodes (leads). The shift register consists of n connected cells that read data from an input electrode, pass it sequentially between the cells under the control of two external clock electrodes, and deliver it finally to an output device. The proposed cells are trimeric oligoporphyrin units whose internal states are manipulated to provide functionality, covalently connected to other cells via dipeptide linkages. Signals from the clock electrodes are conveyed by oligoporphyrin molecular wires, and μ-oxo porphyrin insulating columns are used as the supporting pillars. The developed multiscale modelling technique is applied to determine the characteristics of this molecular device, with in particular utilization of the inverted region for molecular electron-transfer processes shown to facilitate latching and control using exceptionally low energy costs per logic operation compared to standard CMOS shift register technology.

  13. The medical physics of ventricular assist devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Houston G; Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Song Xinwei

    2005-01-01

    Millions of patients, from infants to adults, are diagnosed with congestive heart failure each year all over the world. A limited number of donor hearts available for these patients results in a tremendous demand for alternative, supplemental circulatory support in the form of artificial heart pumps or ventricular assist devices (VADs). The development procedure for such a device requires careful consideration of biophysical factors, such as biocompatibility, haemolysis, thrombosis, implantability, physiologic control feasibility and pump performance. Conventional pump design equations based on Newton's law and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are readily used for the initial design of VADs. In particular, CFD can be employed to predict the pressure-flow performance, hydraulic efficiencies, flow profile through the pump, stress levels and biophysical factors, such as possible blood cell damage. These computational flow simulations may involve comprehensive steady and transient flow analyses. The transient simulations involve time-varying boundary conditions and virtual modelling of the impeller rotation in the blood pumps. After prototype manufacture, laser flow measurements with sophisticated optics and mock circulatory flow loop testing assist with validation of pump design and identification of irregular flow patterns for optimization. Additionally, acute and chronic animal implants illustrate the blood pump's ability to support life physiologically. These extensive design techniques, coupled with fundamental principles of physics, ensure a reliable and effective VAD for thousands of heart failure patients each year

  14. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...

  15. Sealing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  16. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  17. Gauging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qurnell, F.D.; Patterson, C.B.

    1979-01-01

    A gauge supporting device for measuring say a square tube comprises a pair of rods or guides in tension between a pair of end members, the end members being spaced apart by a compression member or members. The tensioned guides provide planes of reference for measuring devices moved therealong on a carriage. The device is especially useful for making on site dimensional measurements of components, such as irradiated and therefore radioactive components, that cannot readily be transported to an inspection laboratory. (UK)

  18. Towards numerical simulation of components of thermoacoustic devices with commercial CFD software: implementation of impedance boundary conditions and application to four different studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bühler, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Thermoacoustic engines promise to be a cost effective and reliable alternative to traditional Stirling engines, as the function of the piston is fulfilled by an acoustic wave. For the design and development of thermoacoustic devices, the one-dimensional thermoacoustic equations are commonly used.

  19. Hybrid quantum-classical modeling of quantum dot devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, Markus; Mittnenzweig, Markus; Koprucki, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The design of electrically driven quantum dot devices for quantum optical applications asks for modeling approaches combining classical device physics with quantum mechanics. We connect the well-established fields of semiclassical semiconductor transport theory and the theory of open quantum systems to meet this requirement. By coupling the van Roosbroeck system with a quantum master equation in Lindblad form, we introduce a new hybrid quantum-classical modeling approach, which provides a comprehensive description of quantum dot devices on multiple scales: it enables the calculation of quantum optical figures of merit and the spatially resolved simulation of the current flow in realistic semiconductor device geometries in a unified way. We construct the interface between both theories in such a way, that the resulting hybrid system obeys the fundamental axioms of (non)equilibrium thermodynamics. We show that our approach guarantees the conservation of charge, consistency with the thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by numerical simulations of an electrically driven single-photon source based on a single quantum dot in the stationary and transient operation regime.

  20. Using Simulation as an Investigational Methodology to Explore the Impact of Technology on Team Communication and Patient Management: A Pilot Evaluation of the Effect of an Automated Compression Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittinger, Matthew; Brolliar, Sarah M; Grand, James A; Nichol, Graham; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2017-06-01

    This pilot study used a simulation-based platform to evaluate the effect of an automated mechanical chest compression device on team communication and patient management. Four-member emergency department interprofessional teams were randomly assigned to perform manual chest compressions (control, n = 6) or automated chest compressions (intervention, n = 6) during a simulated cardiac arrest with 2 phases: phase 1 baseline (ventricular tachycardia), followed by phase 2 (ventricular fibrillation). Patient management was coded using an Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support-based checklist. Team communication was categorized in the following 4 areas: (1) teamwork focus; (2) huddle events, defined as statements focused on re-establishing situation awareness, reinforcing existing plans, and assessing the need to adjust the plan; (3) clinical focus; and (4) profession of team member. Statements were aggregated for each team. At baseline, groups were similar with respect to total communication statements and patient management. During cardiac arrest, the total number of communication statements was greater in teams performing manual compressions (median, 152.3; interquartile range [IQR], 127.6-181.0) as compared with teams using an automated compression device (median, 105; IQR, 99.5-123.9). Huddle events were more frequent in teams performing automated chest compressions (median, 4.0; IQR, 3.1-4.3 vs. 2.0; IQR, 1.4-2.6). Teams randomized to the automated compression intervention had a delay to initial defibrillation (median, 208.3 seconds; IQR, 153.3-222.1 seconds) as compared with control teams (median, 63.2 seconds; IQR, 30.1-397.2 seconds). Use of an automated compression device may impact both team communication and patient management. Simulation-based assessments offer important insights into the effect of technology on healthcare teams.

  1. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  2. BRAKE DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, T.J.

    1959-03-10

    A brake device is described for utilization in connection with a control rod. The device comprises a pair of parallelogram link mechanisms, a control rod moveable rectilinearly therebetween in opposite directions, and shoes resiliently supported by the mechanism for frictional engagement with the control rod.

  3. PLASMA DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  4. Case in Language Comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, Markus; Lamers, Monique

    2012-01-01

    Research on human language comprehension has been heavily influenced by properties of the English language. Since case plays only a minor role in English, its role for language comprehension has only recently become a topic for extensive research on psycholinguistics. In the psycholinguistic

  5. Spectrum of Physics Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, W.; Godlewska, M.; Rosiek, R.; Wcislo, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured…

  6. Development of synchronized control method for shaking table with booster device. Verification of the capabilities based on both real facility and numerical simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajii, Shin-ichirou; Yasuda, Chiaki; Yamashita, Toshio; Abe, Hiroshi; Kanki, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    In the seismic design of nuclear power plant, it is recently considered to use probability method in a addition to certainty method. The former method is called Seismic Probability Safety Assessment (Seismic PSA). In case of seismic PSA for some components of a nuclear power plant using a shaking table, it is necessary for some limited conditions with high level of accelerations such as actual conditions. However, it might be difficult to achieve the test conditions that a current shaking table based on hydraulic power system is intended for the test facility. Therefore, we have been planning out a test method in which both a current and another shaking table called a booster device are applied. This paper describes the verification test of a synchronized control between a current shaking table and a booster device. (author)

  7. Proper target depth of an accelerometer-based feedback device during CPR performed on a hospital bed: a randomized simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Oh, Jaehoon; Kang, Hyunggoo; Lim, Taeho; Kim, Wonhee; Chee, Youngjoon; Song, Yeongtak; Ahn, Chiwon; Cho, Jun Hwi

    2015-10-01

    Feedback devices are used to improve chest compression (CC) quality related to survival rates in cardiac arrest. However, several studies have shown that feedback devices are not sufficiently reliable to ensure adequate CC depth on soft surfaces. Here, we determined the proper target depth of feedback (TDF) using an accelerometer during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hospital beds. In prospective randomized crossover study, 19 emergency physicians performed CCs for 2 minutes continuously on a manikin in 2 different beds with 3 TDFs (5, 6, and 7 cm). We measured CC depth, the proportion of accurate compression depths, CC rate, the proportion of incomplete chest decompressions, the velocity of CC (CC velocity), the proportion of time spent in CC relative to compression plus decompression (duty cycle), and the time spent in CC (CC time). Mean (SD) CC depths at TDF 5, 6, and 7 were 45.42 (5.79), 52.68 (4.18), and 58.47 (2.48) on one bed and 46.26 (4.49), 53.58 (3.15), and 58.74 (2.10) mm on the other bed (all P.05). The duty cycle differed significantly on only B2. The target depth of the real-time feedback device should be at least 6 cm but should not exceed 7 cm for optimal CC on patients on hospital beds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A framework for geometry acquisition, 3-D printing, simulation, and measurement of head-related transfer functions with a focus on hearing-assistive devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Stine; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    of a three-dimensional (3D) head model for acquisition of individual HRTFs. Two aspects were investigated; whether a 3D-printed model can replace measurements on a human listener and whether numerical simulations can replace acoustic measurements. For this purpose, HRTFs were acoustically measured for four...... human listeners and for a 3D printed head model of one of these listeners. Further, HRTFs were simulated by applying the finite element method to the 3D head model. The monaural spectral features and spectral distortions were very similar between re-measurements and between human and printed...... measurements, however larger deviations were observed between measurement and simulation. The binaural cues were in agreement among all HRTFs of the same listener, indicating that the 3D model is able to provide localization cues potentially accessible to HAD users. Hence, the pipeline of geometry acquisition...

  9. Computer simulation for the formation of the insulator layer of silicon-on-insulator devices by N sup + and O sup + Co-implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin Qing; Xie Xin Yun; Lin Chenglu; Liu Xiang Hua

    2002-01-01

    A buried sandwiched layer consisting of silicon dioxide (upper part), silicon oxynitride (medium part) and silicon nitride (lower part) is formed by N sup + and O sup + co-implantation in silicon wafers at a constant temperature of 550 degree C. The microstructure is performed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. To predict the quality of the buried sandwiched layer, the authors study the computer simulation for the formation of the SIMON (separated by implantation of oxygen and nitrogen) structure. The simulation program for SIMOX (separated by implantation of oxygen) is improved in order to be applied in O sup + and N sup + co-implantation on the basis of different formation mechanism between SIMOX and SIMNI (separated by implantation of nitrogen) structures. There is a good agreement between experiment and simulation results verifying the theoretical model and presumption in the program

  10. Cybersecurity for Connected Diabetes Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonoff, David C

    2015-04-16

    Diabetes devices are increasingly connected wirelessly to each other and to data-displaying reader devices. Threats to the accurate flow of information and commands may compromise the function of these devices and put their users at risk of health complications. Sound cybersecurity of connected diabetes devices is necessary to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data and commands. Diabetes devices can be hacked by unauthorized agents and also by patients themselves to extract data that are not automatically provided by product software. Unauthorized access to connected diabetes devices has been simulated and could happen in reality. A cybersecurity standard designed specifically for connected diabetes devices will improve the safety of these products and increase confidence of users that the products will be secure. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Sealing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  12. Quotient-Comprehension Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Cho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Quotients and comprehension are fundamental mathematical constructions that can be described via adjunctions in categorical logic. This paper reveals that quotients and comprehension are related to measurement, not only in quantum logic, but also in probabilistic and classical logic. This relation is presented by a long series of examples, some of them easy, and some also highly non-trivial (esp. for von Neumann algebras. We have not yet identified a unifying theory. Nevertheless, the paper contributes towards such a theory by introducing the new quotient-and-comprehension perspective on measurement instruments, and by describing the examples on which such a theory should be built.

  13. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  14. Ferroelectric devices

    CERN Document Server

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  15. Fusion Simulation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. (1). Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  16. Plasma Simulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a

  17. Comprehensive geriatric assessment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-14

    Sep 14, 2007 ... i.e. difficulty performing simple physical and mental tasks necessary for daily life. ... Definition. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a multidimensional .... The formation of a programme of therapy is decided on.

  18. Spectrum of physics comprehension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasiak, W; Godlewska, M; Rosiek, R; Wcislo, D

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured during a physics lecture on a prearranged scale of 1-10 with the use of a personal response system designed for the purpose of this experiment. Through the use of this tool, we obtained about 2000 computer records of students' declared comprehension of a 45 min lecture, which we named ‘the spectrum of comprehension’. In this paper, we present and analyse the correlation between students' declared comprehension of the content presented in the lecture and their final learning results. (paper)

  19. Ge1−xSix on Ge-based n-type metal–oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors by device simulation combined with high-order stress–piezoresistive relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Chun; Hsieh, Chia-Ping; Huang, Pei-Chen; Cheng, Sen-Wen; Liao, Ming-Han

    2016-01-01

    The considerably high carrier mobility of Ge makes Ge-based channels a promising candidate for enhancing the performance of next-generation devices. The n-type metal–oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (nMOSFET) is fabricated by introducing the epitaxial growth of high-quality Ge-rich Ge 1−x Si x alloys in source/drain (S/D) regions. However, the short channel effect is rarely considered in the performance analysis of Ge-based devices. In this study, the gate-width dependence of a 20 nm Ge-based nMOSFET on electron mobility is investigated. This investigation uses simulated fabrication procedures combined with the relationship of the interaction between stress components and piezoresistive coefficients at high-order terms. Ge 1−x Si x alloys, namely, Ge 0.96 Si 0.04 , Ge 0.93 Si 0.07 , and Ge 0.86 Si 0.14 , are individually tested and embedded into the S/D region of the proposed device layout and are used in the model of stress estimation. Moreover, a 1.0 GPa tensile contact etching stop layer (CESL) is induced to explore the effect of bi-axial stress on device geometry and subsequent mobility variation. Gate widths ranging from 30 nm to 4 μm are examined. Results show a significant change in stress when the width is < 300 nm. This phenomenon becomes notable when the Si in the Ge 1−x Si x alloy is increased. The stress contours of the Ge channel confirm the high stress components induced by the Ge 0.86 Si 0.14 stressor within the device channel. Furthermore, the stresses (S yy ) of the channel in the transverse direction become tensile when CESL is introduced. Furthermore, when pure S/D Ge 1−x Si x alloys are used, a maximum mobility gain of 28.6% occurs with an ~ 70 nm gate width. A 58.4% increase in mobility gain is obtained when a 1.0 GPa CESL is loaded. However, results indicate that gate width is extended to 200 nm at this point. - Highlights: • A 20 nm Ge-based n-channel metal–oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor is investigated

  20. Study and simulation of irradiated zirconium alloys fracture under type RIA accidental loading conditions; Comprehension et modelisation de la rupture d'alliages de zirconium irradies en conditions accidentelles de type RIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Saux, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    The thesis aims to study and simulate the mechanical behavior under Reactivity Initiated Accident loading conditions, of the Zircaloy 4 fuel claddings, irradiated or not. It also aims to characterize and simulate the behavior and the fracture under RIA loading conditions of hydrided Zircaloy 4 non irradiated. This study proposes an experimental approach and a simulation. (A.L.B.)

  1. Simulation and fabrication of a new novel 3D injectable biosensor for high throughput genomics and proteomics in a lab-on-a-chip device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Esfandyarpour, Hesaam; Harris, James S; Davis, Ronald W

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors are used for the detection of biochemical molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Traditional techniques, such as enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA), are sensitive but require several hours to yield a result and usually require the attachment of a fluorophore molecule to the target molecule. Micromachined biosensors that employ electrical detection are now being developed. Here we describe one such device, which is ultrasensitive, real-time, label free and localized. It is called the nanoneedle biosensor and shows promise to overcome some of the current limitations of biosensors. The key element of this device is a 10 nm wide annular gap at the end of the needle, which is the sensitive part of the sensor. The total diameter of the sensor is about 100 nm. Any change in the population of molecules in this gap results in a change of impedance across the gap. Single molecule detection should be possible because the sensory part of the sensor is in the range of bio-molecules of interest. To increase throughput we can flow the solution containing the target molecules over an array of such structures, each with its own integrated read-out circuitry to allow ‘real-time’ detection (i.e. several minutes) of label free molecules without sacrificing sensitivity. To fabricate the arrays we used electron beam lithography together with associated pattern transfer techniques. Preliminary measurements on individual needle structures in water are consistent with the design. Since the proposed sensor has a rigid nano-structure, this technology, once fully developed, could ultimately be used to directly monitor protein quantities within a single living cell, an application that would have significant utility for drug screening and studying various intracellular signaling pathways. (paper)

  2. Numerical simulation of Ge solar cells using D-AMPS-1D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Marcela, E-mail: barrera@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida General Paz 1499, San Martin 1650, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Rubinelli, Francisco [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (INTEC)-CONICET, Gueemes 3450, Santa Fe 3000 (Argentina); Rey-Stolle, Ignacio [Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avenida Complutense 30, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Pla, Juan [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida General Paz 1499, San Martin 1650, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    A solar cell is a solid state device that converts the energy of sunlight directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect. When light with photon energies greater than the band gap is absorbed by a semiconductor material, free electrons and free holes are generated by optical excitation in the material. The main characteristic of a photovoltaic device is the presence of internal electric field able to separate the free electrons and holes so they can pass out of the material to the external circuit before they recombine. Numerical simulation of photovoltaic devices plays a crucial role in their design, performance prediction, and comprehension of the fundamental phenomena ruling their operation. The electrical transport and the optical behavior of the solar cells discussed in this work were studied with the simulation code D-AMPS-1D. This software is an updated version of the one-dimensional (1D) simulation program Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Devices (AMPS) that was initially developed at The Penn State University, USA. Structures such as homojunctions, heterojunctions, multijunctions, etc., resulting from stacking layers of different materials can be studied by appropriately selecting characteristic parameters. In this work, examples of cells simulation made with D-AMPS-1D are shown. Particularly, results of Ge photovoltaic devices are presented. The role of the InGaP buffer on the device was studied. Moreover, a comparison of the simulated electrical parameters with experimental results was performed.

  3. Numerical simulation of Ge solar cells using D-AMPS-1D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Marcela; Rubinelli, Francisco; Rey-Stolle, Ignacio; Plá, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A solar cell is a solid state device that converts the energy of sunlight directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect. When light with photon energies greater than the band gap is absorbed by a semiconductor material, free electrons and free holes are generated by optical excitation in the material. The main characteristic of a photovoltaic device is the presence of internal electric field able to separate the free electrons and holes so they can pass out of the material to the external circuit before they recombine. Numerical simulation of photovoltaic devices plays a crucial role in their design, performance prediction, and comprehension of the fundamental phenomena ruling their operation. The electrical transport and the optical behavior of the solar cells discussed in this work were studied with the simulation code D-AMPS-1D. This software is an updated version of the one-dimensional (1D) simulation program Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Devices (AMPS) that was initially developed at The Penn State University, USA. Structures such as homojunctions, heterojunctions, multijunctions, etc., resulting from stacking layers of different materials can be studied by appropriately selecting characteristic parameters. In this work, examples of cells simulation made with D-AMPS-1D are shown. Particularly, results of Ge photovoltaic devices are presented. The role of the InGaP buffer on the device was studied. Moreover, a comparison of the simulated electrical parameters with experimental results was performed.

  4. Guide device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  5. Compressed optimization of device architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frees, Adam [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Gamble, John King [Microsoft Research, Redmond, WA (United States). Quantum Architectures and Computation Group; Ward, Daniel Robert [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Computing Research; Blume-Kohout, Robin J [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Computing Research; Eriksson, M. A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Friesen, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Coppersmith, Susan N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled researchers to control individual quantum mechanical objects with unprecedented accuracy, opening the door for both quantum and extreme- scale conventional computation applications. As these devices become more complex, designing for facility of control becomes a daunting and computationally infeasible task. Here, motivated by ideas from compressed sensing, we introduce a protocol for the Compressed Optimization of Device Architectures (CODA). It leads naturally to a metric for benchmarking and optimizing device designs, as well as an automatic device control protocol that reduces the operational complexity required to achieve a particular output. Because this protocol is both experimentally and computationally efficient, it is readily extensible to large systems. For this paper, we demonstrate both the bench- marking and device control protocol components of CODA through examples of realistic simulations of electrostatic quantum dot devices, which are currently being developed experimentally for quantum computation.

  6. Medical Device Recalls in Radiation Oncology: Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 2002-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael J.; Tringale, Kathryn; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marshall, Deborah C.; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Brown, Derek; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze all recalls involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s recall database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology device recalls to identify discipline-specific trends that may inform improvements in device safety. Methods and Materials: Recall data on RODs from 2002 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems). Outcomes included determined cause of recall, recall class (severity), quantity in commerce, time until recall termination (date FDA determines recall is complete), and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by Pearson χ"2 test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 502 ROD recalls and 9534 other class II device recalls during 2002 to 2015. Most recalls were for external beam devices (66.7%) and planning systems (22.9%), and recall events peaked in 2011. Radiation oncology devices differed significantly from other devices in all recall outcomes (P≤.04). Recall cause was commonly software related (49% vs 10% for other devices). Recall severity was more often moderate among RODs (97.6% vs 87.2%) instead of severe (0.2% vs 4.4%; P<.001). Time from 510(k) market approval to recall was shorter among RODs (P<.001) and progressively shortened over time. Radiation oncology devices had fewer recalled devices in commerce than other devices (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other class II devices, RODs experience recalls sooner after market approval and are trending sooner still. Most of these recalls were moderate in severity, and software issues are prevalent. Comprehensive analysis of recall data can identify areas for device improvement, such as better system design among RODs.

  7. Medical Device Recalls in Radiation Oncology: Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 2002-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Tringale, Kathryn; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marshall, Deborah C.; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Brown, Derek; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze all recalls involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s recall database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology device recalls to identify discipline-specific trends that may inform improvements in device safety. Methods and Materials: Recall data on RODs from 2002 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems). Outcomes included determined cause of recall, recall class (severity), quantity in commerce, time until recall termination (date FDA determines recall is complete), and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by Pearson χ{sup 2} test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 502 ROD recalls and 9534 other class II device recalls during 2002 to 2015. Most recalls were for external beam devices (66.7%) and planning systems (22.9%), and recall events peaked in 2011. Radiation oncology devices differed significantly from other devices in all recall outcomes (P≤.04). Recall cause was commonly software related (49% vs 10% for other devices). Recall severity was more often moderate among RODs (97.6% vs 87.2%) instead of severe (0.2% vs 4.4%; P<.001). Time from 510(k) market approval to recall was shorter among RODs (P<.001) and progressively shortened over time. Radiation oncology devices had fewer recalled devices in commerce than other devices (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other class II devices, RODs experience recalls sooner after market approval and are trending sooner still. Most of these recalls were moderate in severity, and software issues are prevalent. Comprehensive analysis of recall data can identify areas for device improvement, such as better system design among RODs.

  8. Smartwatch feedback device for high-quality chest compressions by a single rescuer during infant cardiac arrest: a randomized, controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juncheol; Song, Yeongtak; Oh, Jaehoon; Chee, Youngjoon; Ahn, Chiwon; Shin, Hyungoo; Kang, Hyunggoo; Lim, Tae Ho

    2018-02-12

    According to the guidelines, rescuers should provide chest compressions (CC) ∼1.5 inches (40 mm) for infants. Feedback devices could help rescuers perform CC with adequate rates (CCR) and depths (CCD). However, there is no CC feedback device for infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We suggest a smartwatch-based CC feedback application for infant CPR. We created a smartwatch-based CC feedback application. This application provides feedback on CCD and CCR by colour and text for infant CPR. To evaluate the application, 30 participants were divided randomly into two groups on the basis of whether CC was performed with or without the assistance of the smartwatch application. Both groups performed continuous CC-only CPR for 2 min on an infant mannequin placed on a firm table. We collected CC parameters from the mannequin, including the proportion of correct depth, CCR, CCD and the proportion of correct decompression depth. Demographics between the two groups were not significantly different. The median (interquartile range) proportion of correct depth was 99 (97-100) with feedback compared with 83 (58-97) without feedback (P=0.002). The CCR and proportion of correct decompression depth were not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.482 and 0.089). The CCD of the feedback group was significantly deeper than that of the control group [feedback vs. 41.2 (39.8-41.7) mm vs. 38.6 (36.1-39.6) mm; P=0.004]. Rescuers who receive feedback of CC parameters from a smartwatch could perform adequate CC during infant CPR.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  9. Medical Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Mahieu, H.F.; Geertsema, A.A.; Hermann, I.F.; van Horn, J.R.; Hummel, J. Marjan; van Loon, J.P.; Mihaylov, D.; van der Plaats, A.; Schraffordt Koops, H.; Schutte, H.K.; Veth, R.P.H.; de Vries, M.P.; Rakhorst, G.; Shi, Donglu

    2004-01-01

    The development of new medical devices is a very time-consuming and costly process. Besides the time between the initial idea and the time that manufacturing and testing of prototypes takes place, the time needed for the development of production facilities, production of test series, marketing,

  10. Electrochemical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  11. Assistive Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have a disability or injury, you may use a number of assistive devices. These are tools, products or types of equipment that help you perform tasks and activities. They may help you move around, see, communicate, eat, or get ...

  12. Detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  13. Virtual MIMO Beamforming and Device Pairing Enabled by Device-to-Device Communications for Multidevice Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonjin Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a multidevice network with asymmetric antenna configurations which supports not only communications between an access point and devices but also device-to-device (D2D communications for the Internet of things. For the network, we propose the transmit and receive beamforming with the channel state information (CSI for virtual multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO enabled by D2D receive cooperation. We analyze the sum rate achieved by a device pair in the proposed method and identify the strategies to improve the sum rate of the device pair. We next present a distributed algorithm and its equivalent algorithm for device pairing to maximize the throughput of the multidevice network. Simulation results confirm the advantages of the transmit CSI and D2D cooperation as well as the validity of the distributive algorithm.

  14. Analysis of Academic and Non-Academic Outcomes from a Bottom-up Comprehensive School Reform in the Absence of Student Level Data through Simulation Methods: A Mixed Methods Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergeld, Toni A.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the efficacy of a bottom-up comprehensive school reform (CSR) program by evaluating its impact on student achievement, attendance, and behavior outcomes through an explanatory mixed methods design. The CSR program (Gear Up) was implemented in an urban junior high school over the course of seven years allowing for…

  15. The impact of physicians' communication styles on evaluation of physicians and information processing: A randomized study with simulated video consultations on contraception with an intrauterine device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bientzle, Martina; Fissler, Tim; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed at examining the impact of different types of physicians' communication styles on people's subsequent evaluation of physician attributes as well as on their information processing, attitude and decision making. In a between-group experiment, 80 participants watched one of three videos in which a gynaecologist displayed a particular communication style in a consultation situation on contraception with an intrauterine device. We compared doctor-centred communication (DCC) vs patient-centred communication (PCC) vs patient-centred communication with need-orientation (PCC-N). In the PCC condition, participants perceived the physician to be more empathetic and more competent than in the DCC condition. In the DCC condition, participants showed less attitude change compared to the other conditions. In the PCC-N condition, the physician was perceived as more empathetic and more socially competent than in the other conditions. However, participants acquired less knowledge in the PCC-N condition. We conclude that appropriate application of particular communication styles depends on specific consultation goals. Our results suggest that patients' needs should be addressed if the main goal is to build a good relationship, whereas a traditional PCC style appears to be more effective in communicating factual information. © 2016 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cooling device in thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Tsutomu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent loss of cooling effect over the entire torus structure directly after accidental toubles in a cooling device of a thermonuclear device. Constitution: Coolant recycling means of a cooling device comprises two systems, which are alternately connected with in-flow pipeways and exit pipeways of adjacent modules. The modules are cooled by way of the in-flow pipeways and the exist pipeways connected to the respective modules by means of the coolant recycling means corresponding to the respective modules. So long as one of the coolant recycling means is kept operative, since every one other modules of the torus structure is still kept cooled, the heat generated from the module put therebetween, for which the coolant recycling is interrupted, is removed by means of heat conduction or radiation from the module for which the cooling is kept continued. No back-up emergency cooling system is required and it can provide high economic reliability. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rourke, Devin; Ahn, Sungmo; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Lagemaat, Jao van de; Kopidakis, Nikos; Park, Wounjhang

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  18. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rourke, Devin [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Ahn, Sungmo [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0425 (United States); Nardes, Alexandre M.; Lagemaat, Jao van de; Kopidakis, Nikos [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Park, Wounjhang, E-mail: won.park@colorado.edu [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0425 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  19. Comparison of High-Fidelity Simulation Versus Didactic Instruction as a Reinforcement Intervention in a Comprehensive Curriculum for Radiology Trainees in Learning Contrast Reaction Management: Does It Matter How We Refresh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Melissa; Curry, Nancy; Collins, Heather; Soma, LaShonda; Hill, Jeanne

    2015-10-01

    Simulation-based training has been shown to be a useful adjunct to standard didactic lecture in teaching residents appropriate management of adverse contrast reactions. In addition, it has been suggested that a biannual refresher is needed; however, the type of refresher education has not been assessed. This was a prospective study involving 31 radiology residents across all years in a university program. All residents underwent standard didactic lecture followed by high-fidelity simulation-based training. At approximately 6 months, residents were randomized into a didactic versus simulation group for a refresher. At approximately 9 months, all residents returned to the simulation center for performance testing. Knowledge and confidence assessments were obtained from all participants before and after each phase. Performance testing was obtained at each simulation session and scored based on predefined critical actions. There was significant improvement in knowledge (P didactic and simulation-based training. There was no statistical difference between the simulation and didactic groups in knowledge or confidence at any phase of the study. There was no significant difference in tested performance between the groups in either performance testing session. This study suggests that a curriculum consisting of an annual didactic lecture combined with simulation-based training followed by a didactic refresher at 6 months is an effective and efficient (both cost-effective and time-effective) method of educating radiology residents in the management of adverse contrast reactions. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of radiation on MOS structures and silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeunig, D.; Fahrner, W.

    1983-02-01

    A comprehensive view of radiation effects on MOS structures and silicon devices is given. In the introduction, the interaction of radiation with semiconductor material is presented. In the next section, the electrical degradation of semiconductor devices due to this interaction is discussed. The commonly used hardening techniques are shown. The last section deals with testing of radiation hardness of devices. (orig.) [de

  1. THE NATURE OF COMPREHENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLELAND, DONALD L.

    THE NATURE OF COMPREHENSION IS DEFINED AND CLARIFIED. THE LITERATURE IS SURVEYED TO SHOW THAT THE DEVELOPMENT OF CONCEPTS IS IMPORTANT IN INTELLECTUAL ACTIVITIES. IT IS POINTED OUT THAT CONCEPTS ARE BUILT FROM PERCEPTS, IMAGES, SENSATION, AND MEMORIES, AND THAT THE STEPS WHICH ARE EMPLOYED AS CONCEPTS ARE BUILT AND REFINED AND INCLUDE PERCEIVING,…

  2. Comprehension Strategy Gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Gayle

    2002-01-01

    Describes the idea of creating a glove for each of the comprehension strategies for use with different text structures. Notes that the gloves serve as a multisensory approach by providing visual clues through icons on each finger and the palm. Discusses three different gloves: the prereading glove, the narrative text structure glove, and the…

  3. Painless reading comprehension

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, EdD, Darolyn "Lyn"

    2016-01-01

    Reading comprehension gets easier as students learn what kind of reader they are, discover how to keep facts in their head, and much more. Bonus Online Component: includes additional games, including Beat the Clock, a line match game, and a word scramble.

  4. Comprehensive Environmental Management Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjeresen, D.L.; Roybal, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information about Los Alamos National Laboratory's Comprehensive Environmental Management Plan. The topics covered include: waste minimization, waste generation, environmental concerns, public relations of the laboratory, and how this plan will help to answer to the demands of the laboratory as their mission changes

  5. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service...

  6. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    Protrusions and recesses are formed to a vacuum vessel and toroidal magnetic coils, and they are engaged. Since the vacuum vessel is generally supported firmly by a rack or the like by support legs, the toroidal magnetic field coils can be certainly supported against tumbling force. Then, there can be attained strong supports for the toroidal magnetic field coils, in addition to support by wedges on the side of inboard and support by share panels on the side of outboard, capable of withstanding great electromagnetic forces which may occur in large-scaled next-generation devices. That is, toroidal magnetic field coils excellent from a view point of deformation and stress can be obtained, to provide a thermonuclear device of higher reliability. (N.H.)

  7. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosaki, Osamu; Masuda, Kenju.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide excellent electric properties and high reliability in a thermonuclear device by improving a current collecting board connected to a coil device. Constitution: A current collecting board element perforated with an opening for enserting a connecting terminal is sized to be inserted into a plating tank, and is surface treated in the plating tank. Only the current collecting board element preferably surface treated is picked up. A plurality of such current collecting board elements are connected and welded to form a large current collecting board. In this manner, the current collecting board having several m 2 to several ten order m 2 in area can be obtained as preferably surface treated at the connecting terminal hole. The current collecting board element can be determined in shape with the existing facility without increasing the size of a surface treating tank. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Yasuomi; Takahashi, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the plasma confining performances by bringing the irregular magnetic fields nearly to zero and decreasing the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields at every positions. Constitution: The winding direction of a plurality of coil elements, for instance, double pan cake coils of toroidal coils in a torus type or mirror type thermonuclear device are reversed to each other in their laminating direction, whereby the irregular magnetic fields due to the coil-stepped portions in each toroidal coils are brought nearly to zero. This enables to bring the average irregular magnetic fields as a whole in the thermonuclear device nearly to zero, as well as, decrease the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields in each positions. Thus, the plasma confining performances can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. "Distinvar" device

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The alignment of one of the accelerator magnets being checked by the AR Division survey group. A "distinvar" device, invented by the group, using calibrated invar wires stretched between the fixed survey pillar (on the left) and a fixed point on the magnet. In two days it is thus possible to measure the alignment of the 100 magnets with an accuracy better than 1/10.

  10. Latching device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, G. W. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A latching device is suited for use in establishing a substantially motionless connection between a stationary receiver and a movable latching mechanism. The latching mechanism includes a pivotally supported restraining hook continuously urged into a capturing relationship with the receiver, characterized by a spring-biased pawl having a plurality of aligned teeth. The teeth are seated in the surface of the throat of the hook and positionable into restraining engagement with a rigid restraining shoulder projected from the receiver.

  11. Two-dimensional optical simulation on a visible ray passing through inter-metal dielectric layers of CMOS image sensor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wan-Gyu; Kim, Jun-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jeen; Kim, Sang-Young; Hwang, Sung-Bo; Lee, Jeong-Gun

    2005-01-01

    Two-dimensional optical simulation has been performed for investigating light propagation through a micro lens and inter-metal dielectric (IMD) layers in an Al and Cu back-end of line (BEOL) onto a Si photodiode, and its effects on the wave power, as well as optical carriers generated by a visible ray in the silicon substrate area, i.e. photodiode of a CMOS image sensor pixel. The number of optically generated carriers in an Al-BEOL has been compared to a Cu-BEOL. It is shown that more optical carriers are generated in the Cu-BEOL for the red color because a higher permittivity dielectric material like SiC is used in the Cu-BEOL to prevent Cu from diffusing into the dielectric material, resulting in higher optical loss in the higher- permittivity dielectric layers. Thus, the optical power density arriving in the silicon substrate is higher in the Al-BEOL than in the Cu-BEOL when the wavelength is blue (470 nm) or green (550 nm) in the visible ray spectrum. In conclusion, the structure of a Cu-BEOL in a CMOS image sensor has to be optimized for generating more optical carriers through lower-permittivity IMD materials or by reducing the permittivity difference between SiC (or SiN) and IMD materials, without deteriorating the capability as a barrier to Cu diffusion.

  12. Simulations of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the C-2U Advanced Beam-Driven Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaokang; Petrov, Yuri; Ceccherini, Francesco; Koehn, Alf; Galeotti, Laura; Dettrick, Sean; Binderbauer, Michl

    2017-10-01

    Numerous efforts have been made at Tri-Alpha Energy (TAE) to theoretically explore the physics of microwave electron heating in field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. For the fixed 2D profiles of plasma density and temperature for both electrons and thermal ions and equilibrium field of the C-2U machine, simulations with GENRAY-C ray-tracing code have been conducted for the ratios of ω/ωci[D] in the range of 6 - 20. Launch angles and antenna radial and axial positions have been optimized in order to simultaneously achieve good wave penetration into the core of FRC plasmas and efficient power damping on electrons. It is found that in an optimal regime, single pass absorption efficiency is 100% and most of the power is deposited inside the separatrix of FRC plasmas, with power damping efficiency of about 72% on electrons and less than 19% on ions. Calculations have clearly demonstrated that substantial power absorption on electrons is mainly attributed to high beta enhancement of magnetic pumping; complete power damping occurs before Landau damping has a significant effect on power absorption.

  13. Simulations of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the C-2U Advanced Beam-Driven Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiaokang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous efforts have been made at Tri-Alpha Energy (TAE to theoretically explore the physics of microwave electron heating in field-reversed configuration (FRC plasmas. For the fixed 2D profiles of plasma density and temperature for both electrons and thermal ions and equilibrium field of the C-2U machine, simulations with GENRAY-C ray-tracing code have been conducted for the ratios of ω/ωci[D] in the range of 6 - 20. Launch angles and antenna radial and axial positions have been optimized in order to simultaneously achieve good wave penetration into the core of FRC plasmas and efficient power damping on electrons. It is found that in an optimal regime, single pass absorption efficiency is 100% and most of the power is deposited inside the separatrix of FRC plasmas, with power damping efficiency of about 72% on electrons and less than 19% on ions. Calculations have clearly demonstrated that substantial power absorption on electrons is mainly attributed to high beta enhancement of magnetic pumping; complete power damping occurs before Landau damping has a significant effect on power absorption.

  14. Biomedical devices and systems security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, David; Venkatasubramanian, Krishna K; Sokolsky, Oleg; Lee, Insup

    2011-01-01

    Medical devices have been changing in revolutionary ways in recent years. One is in their form-factor. Increasing miniaturization of medical devices has made them wearable, light-weight, and ubiquitous; they are available for continuous care and not restricted to clinical settings. Further, devices are increasingly becoming connected to external entities through both wired and wireless channels. These two developments have tremendous potential to make healthcare accessible to everyone and reduce costs. However, they also provide increased opportunity for technology savvy criminals to exploit them for fun and profit. Consequently, it is essential to consider medical device security issues. In this paper, we focused on the challenges involved in securing networked medical devices. We provide an overview of a generic networked medical device system model, a comprehensive attack and adversary model, and describe some of the challenges present in building security solutions to manage the attacks. Finally, we provide an overview of two areas of research that we believe will be crucial for making medical device system security solutions more viable in the long run: forensic data logging, and building security assurance cases.

  15. Cognitive Correlates of Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Phillips, Beth

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to understand cognitive foundations of oral language comprehension (i.e., listening comprehension), we examined how inhibitory control, theory of mind, and comprehension monitoring are uniquely related to listening comprehension over and above vocabulary and age. A total of 156 children in kindergarten and first grade from…

  16. Studies of switching structures in ferroelectric liquid crystal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabla, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    The fast, bistable electro-optic response of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) devices has made them prime candidates for use in display applications. However, before these applications can become widely commercially viable a number of key issues relating to the switching within these devices need to be addressed. One of these is related to the fact that while there has been much work done on modelling the switching process in FLC devices, with some moderate success, in the main these models have not accurately accounted for the physical processes taking place. In order to rectify this situation we present a simple, multi-variable approach which includes important physical phenomenon such as stressed states, partial and domain switching. Through using this model we learn more about the dynamic molecular profiles which may exist in devices, and use this as a springboard to undertake a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the molecular profiles of chevron structures under different types of addressing pulses and voltages. This entails modelling the dynamic profiles using a simple non flow reorientation theory and comparing these simulations directly with experimental data obtained through the use of two different optical characterisation techniques. Our findings show quite conclusively that for monopolar addressing within low and high voltage regimes and for low voltage bipolar pulses during the early stages of switching, the dynamic reorientation near the surfaces and central regions of the device lags the reorientation within the bulk. The reverse however being true for the high voltage bipolar addressing case. These results for chevron structures differ from previous theoretical predictions made by others using equations derived from the flow coupled chiral smectic C continuum theory. These flow coupled simulations however, refer to reorientation in bookshelf structures rather than the chevron type structures thought to exist in FLC devices. As

  17. Studies of switching structures in ferroelectric liquid crystal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabla, D.S

    1998-07-01

    The fast, bistable electro-optic response of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) devices has made them prime candidates for use in display applications. However, before these applications can become widely commercially viable a number of key issues relating to the switching within these devices need to be addressed. One of these is related to the fact that while there has been much work done on modelling the switching process in FLC devices, with some moderate success, in the main these models have not accurately accounted for the physical processes taking place. In order to rectify this situation we present a simple, multi-variable approach which includes important physical phenomenon such as stressed states, partial and domain switching. Through using this model we learn more about the dynamic molecular profiles which may exist in devices, and use this as a springboard to undertake a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the molecular profiles of chevron structures under different types of addressing pulses and voltages. This entails modelling the dynamic profiles using a simple non flow reorientation theory and comparing these simulations directly with experimental data obtained through the use of two different optical characterisation techniques. Our findings show quite conclusively that for monopolar addressing within low and high voltage regimes and for low voltage bipolar pulses during the early stages of switching, the dynamic reorientation near the surfaces and central regions of the device lags the reorientation within the bulk. The reverse however being true for the high voltage bipolar addressing case. These results for chevron structures differ from previous theoretical predictions made by others using equations derived from the flow coupled chiral smectic C continuum theory. These flow coupled simulations however, refer to reorientation in bookshelf structures rather than the chevron type structures thought to exist in FLC devices. As

  18. Standardization of splash device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, María; Peters, Piet

    2017-04-01

    The erosion is a complex process that has been studied extensively by numerous researchers, requiring a prolongued time effort and a large economic investment. To be effective, the measurements of erosion should be precise, controlled and replicable, and to assure efectiveness, measurement devices of erosion should be properly designed, constructed, well calibrated and also they should be operated by a trained person (Stroosnijder, 2005). Because researchers try to improve old devices, the equipment is constantly being redesigned, making the measurements not comparable and furthermore, producing a lack of available standarized device. The lack of standardization of erosion equipment is more obvious in the case of the local splash erosion, where the nature of the process makes very difficult to isolate its effects. In this article we compare the results obtained from five of the most common splash erosion devices (selected from more than 16 different currently types), under the same rain conditions, with the objective of facilitate the standardization of the method that will be more easy to build, minimizing the error. A set of six splash devices were setted in well known positions under simulated rain, to measured the differences, among devices and the accuracy of the data recovered after 10 minutes of rainfall simulation under different intensities (from 60 to 130 mm/h). The rainfall simulator of Wageningen was used, using sand as splash erosion source. Differences in the infiltration were also measured, and a calibration of sizes and speeds of the raindrops was done using the photography method (Hamidreza-Sadeghi et al., 2013). The splash devices selected for this study were unbounded splash devices (like the funnel, the cup (Fernandez-Raga et al., 2010) and the splash flume (Jomaa et al., 2010)), and bounded devices that allow the calculation of splash rate, (like the new cup (Scholten et al., 2011) and the Morgan tray). The behaviour of different splash devices

  19. Modeling reacting gases and aftertreatment devices for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depcik, Christopher David

    As more emphasis is placed worldwide on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, automobile manufacturers have to create more efficient engines. Simultaneously, legislative agencies want these engines to produce fewer problematic emissions such as nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. In response, newer combustion methods, like homogeneous charge compression ignition and fuel cells, are being researched alongside the old standard of efficiency, the compression ignition or diesel engine. These newer technologies present a number of benefits but still have significant challenges to overcome. As a result, renewed interest has risen in making diesel engines cleaner. The key to cleaning up the diesel engine is the placement of aftertreatment devices in the exhaust. These devices have shown great potential in reducing emission levels below regulatory levels while still allowing for increased fuel economy versus a gasoline engine. However, these devices are subject to many flow control issues. While experimental evaluation of these devices helps to understand these issues better, it is impossible to solve the problem through experimentation alone because of time and cost constraints. Because of this, accurate models are needed in conjunction with the experimental work. In this di