WorldWideScience

Sample records for comprehensive aerosol spray

  1. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    Aerosols are important climactically. Their specific emissions are key to reducing the uncertainty in global climate models. Marine aerosols make up the largest source of primary aerosols to the Earth's atmosphere. Uncertainty in marine aerosol mass and number flux lies in separating primary emis...... with decreasing temperature. Unique surface images of bubble size distributions allow the investigation of temperature, bubble size, and particle production......Aerosols are important climactically. Their specific emissions are key to reducing the uncertainty in global climate models. Marine aerosols make up the largest source of primary aerosols to the Earth's atmosphere. Uncertainty in marine aerosol mass and number flux lies in separating primary...... entrainment may account for the large discrepancy in energy input for the two systems. In the third study, the temperature dependence of sea spray aerosol production is probed with the use of a highly stable temperature controlled plunging jet. Similar to previous studies, particle production increases...

  2. A sea spray aerosol flux parameterization encapsulating wave state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovadnevaite, J.; Manders, A.; De Leeuw, G.; Ceburnis, D.; Monahan, C.; Partanen, A.I.; Korhonen, H.; O'Dowd, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    A new sea spray source function (SSSF), termed Oceanflux Sea Spray Aerosol or OSSA, was derived based on in-situ sea spray aerosol measurements along with meteorological/physical parameters. Submicron sea spray aerosol fluxes derived from particle number concentration measurements at the Mace Head

  3. A simplified model of aerosol removal by containment sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Burson, S.B. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution)

    1993-06-01

    Spray systems in nuclear reactor containments are described. The scrubbing of aerosols from containment atmospheres by spray droplets is discussed. Uncertainties are identified in the prediction of spray performance when the sprays are used as a means for decontaminating containment atmospheres. A mechanistic model based on current knowledge of the physical phenomena involved in spray performance is developed. With this model, a quantitative uncertainty analysis of spray performance is conducted using a Monte Carlo method to sample 20 uncertain quantities related to phenomena of spray droplet behavior as well as the initial and boundary conditions expected to be associated with severe reactor accidents. Results of the uncertainty analysis are used to construct simplified expressions for spray decontamination coefficients. Two variables that affect aerosol capture by water droplets are not treated as uncertain; they are (1) [open quote]Q[close quote], spray water flux into the containment, and (2) [open quote]H[close quote], the total fall distance of spray droplets. The choice of values of these variables is left to the user since they are plant and accident specific. Also, they can usually be ascertained with some degree of certainty. The spray decontamination coefficients are found to be sufficiently dependent on the extent of decontamination that the fraction of the initial aerosol remaining in the atmosphere, m[sub f], is explicitly treated in the simplified expressions. The simplified expressions for the spray decontamination coefficient are given. Parametric values for these expressions are found for median, 10 percentile, and 90 percentile values in the uncertainty distribution for the spray decontamination coefficient. Examples are given to illustrate the utility of the simplified expressions to predict spray decontamination of an aerosol-laden atmosphere.

  4. Measurements of Hygroscopicity- and Size-Resolved Sea Spray Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.; Royalty, T. M.; Reed, R. E.; Petters, M.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a central role in many environmental processes by influencing the Earth's radiative balance, tropospheric chemistry, clouds, biogeochemical cycles, and visibility as well as adversely impacting human health. Based on their origin, atmospheric aerosols can be defined as anthropogenic or natural. Recent studies have shown that a large fraction of uncertainty in the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols is related to uncertainty in natural—background—aerosols. Marine aerosols are of particular interest due to the abundance of oceans covering the Earth's surface. Despite their importance, limited information is currently available for size- and composition-resolved marine aerosol emission fluxes. Our group has designed and built an instrument for measuring the size- and hygroscopicity-resolved sea spray aerosol fluxes. The instrument was first deployed during spring 2015 at the end of the 560 m pier of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, NC. Measurements include 200 nm-sized diameter growth factor (hygroscopicity) distributions, sea spray particle flux measurements, and total sub-micron sized aerosol concentration. Ancillary ocean data includes salinity, pH, sea surface temperature, dissolved oxygen content, and relative fluorescence (proxy for [Chl-a]). Hygroscopicity distribution measurements show two broad peaks, one indicative of organics and sulfates and another suggestive of sea salt. The fraction of 200 nm-sized salt particles having hygroscopicity similar to that of sea-spray aerosol contributes up to ~24% of the distribution on days with high-speed onshore winds and up to ~3% on calm days with winds blowing from the continent. However, the total concentration of sea-spray-like particles originating from offshore versus onshore winds was relatively similar. Changes in the relative contribution of sea-salt to number concentration were caused by a concomitant changes in total aerosol concentration

  5. Experiments on aerosol removal by high-pressure water spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corno, Ada del, E-mail: delcorno@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Morandi, Sonia, E-mail: morandi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Parozzi, Flavio, E-mail: parozzi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.araneo@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy); CNR-IENI, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Casella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco2.casella@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Experimental research to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols if applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. • Cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration in the range 2–90 mg/m{sup 3}. • Carried out in a chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls equipped with a high pressure water spray with single nozzle. • Respect to low-pressure sprays, removal efficiency turned out significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure sprays system. - Abstract: An experimental research was managed in the framework of the PASSAM European Project to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols when applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. The campaign was carried out in a purposely built facility composed by a scrubbing chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls to permit the complete view of the aerosol removal process, where the aerosol was injected to form a cloud of specific particle concentration. The chamber was equipped with a high pressure water spray system with a single nozzle placed on its top. The test matrix consisted in the combination of water pressure injections, in the range 50–130 bar, on a cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration ranging between 2 and 99 mg/m{sup 3}. The spray was kept running for 2 min and the efficiency of the removal was evaluated, along the test time, using an optical particle sizer. With respect to low-pressure sprays, the removal efficiency turned out much more significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure spray system. The highest removal rate was

  6. Production of sea spray aerosol in the surf zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Neele, F.P.; Hill, M.K.; Smith, M.H.; Vignati, E.

    2000-01-01

    quantitative source function for sea spray aerosol produced by waves breaking in the surf zone was determined from data collected with optical particle counters at both sides of the surf zone at two locations on the Californian coast. Three optical particle counters were used to measure profiles at

  7. Design, characterization, and aerosolization of organic solution advanced spray-dried moxifloxacin and ofloxacin dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) microparticulate/nanoparticulate powders for pulmonary inhalation aerosol delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jinghua; Vogt, Frederick G; Li, Xiaojian; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop respirable antibiotics moxifloxacin (MOXI) hydrochloride and ofloxacin (OFLX) microparticles and nanoparticles, and multifunctional antibiotics particles with or without lung surfactant 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) for targeted dry powder inhalation delivery as a pulmonary nanomedicine. Particles were rationally designed and produced by advanced spray-drying particle engineering from an organic solution in closed mode (no water) from dilute solution. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that these particles had both optimal particle morphology and surface morphology, and the particle size distributions were suitable for pulmonary delivery. Comprehensive and systematic physicochemical characterization and in vitro aerosol dispersion performance revealed significant differences between these two fluoroquinolone antibiotics following spray drying as drug aerosols and as cospray-dried antibiotic drug: DPPC aerosols. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and confocal Raman microspectroscopy were employed to probe composition and interactions in the solid state. Spray-dried MOXI was rendered noncrystalline (amorphous) following organic solution advanced spray drying. This was in contrast to spray-dried OFLX, which retained partial crystallinity, as did OFLX:DPPC powders at certain compositions. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using inertial impaction with a dry powder inhaler device approved for human use. The present study demonstrates that the use of DPPC offers improved aerosol delivery of MOXI as cospray-dried microparticulate/nanoparticulate powders, whereas residual partial crystallinity influenced aerosol dispersion of OFLX and most of the compositions of OFLX:DPPC inhalation powders. PMID:24092972

  8. 7 CFR 305.9 - Aerosol spray for aircraft treatment schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aerosol spray for aircraft treatment schedule. 305.9... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Chemical Treatments § 305.9 Aerosol spray for aircraft treatment schedule. (a) Military aircraft. Aerosol disinfection of U.S. military...

  9. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  10. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  11. Eddy Covariance Measurements of the Sea-Spray Aerosol Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, I. M.; Norris, S. J.; Yelland, M. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Prytherch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Historically, almost all estimates of the sea-spray aerosol source flux have been inferred through various indirect methods. Direct estimates via eddy covariance have been attempted by only a handful of studies, most of which measured only the total number flux, or achieved rather coarse size segregation. Applying eddy covariance to the measurement of sea-spray fluxes is challenging: most instrumentation must be located in a laboratory space requiring long sample lines to an inlet collocated with a sonic anemometer; however, larger particles are easily lost to the walls of the sample line. Marine particle concentrations are generally low, requiring a high sample volume to achieve adequate statistics. The highly hygroscopic nature of sea salt means particles change size rapidly with fluctuations in relative humidity; this introduces an apparent bias in flux measurements if particles are sized at ambient humidity. The Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) was developed specifically to make high rate measurements of aerosol size distributions for use in eddy covariance measurements, and the instrument and data processing and analysis techniques have been refined over the course of several projects. Here we will review some of the issues and limitations related to making eddy covariance measurements of the sea spray source flux over the open ocean, summarise some key results from the last decade, and present new results from a 3-year long ship-based measurement campaign as part of the WAGES project. Finally we will consider requirements for future progress.

  12. Flame spray pyrolysis synthesis and aerosol deposition of nanoparticle films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoli, Antonio; Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of nanoparticle films by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) synthesis and deposition on temperature‐controlled substrates (323–723 K) was investigated for several application‐relevant conditions. An exemplary SnO2 nanoparticle aerosol was generated by FSP and its properties (e.g., particle...... size distribution), and deposition dynamics were studied in details aiming to a simple correlation between process settings and film growth rate. At high precursor concentrations (0.05–0.5·mol/L), typically used for FSP synthesis, the nanoparticles agglomerated rapidly in the aerosol leading to large...... (>100 nm) fractal‐like structures with low diffusivity. As a result, thermophoresis was confirmed as the dominant nanoparticle deposition mechanism down to small (≈40 K) temperature differences (ΔT) between the aerosol and the substrate surface. For moderate‐high ΔT (>120 K), thermal equilibrium...

  13. Design, characterization, and aerosol dispersion performance modeling of advanced spray-dried microparticulate/nanoparticulate mannitol powders for targeted pulmonary delivery as dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose was to design and characterize inhalable microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders of mannitol with essential particle properties for targeted dry powder delivery for cystic fibrosis mucolytic treatment by dilute organic solution spray drying, and, in addition, to tailor and correlate aerosol dispersion performance delivered as dry powder inhalers based on spray-drying conditions and solid-state physicochemical properties. Organic solution advanced spray drying from dilute solution followed by comprehensive solid-state physicochemical characterization and in vitro dry powder aerosolization were used. The particle size distribution of the spray-dried (SD) powders was narrow, unimodal, and in the range of ∼500 nm to 2.0 μm. The particles possessed spherical particle morphology, relatively smooth surface morphology, low water content and vapor sorption (crystallization occurred at exposure above 65% relative humidity), and retention of crystallinity by polymorphic interconversion. The emitted dose, fine particle fraction (FPF), and respirable fraction (RF) were all relatively high. The mass median aerodynamic diameters were below 4 μm for all SD mannitol aerosols. The in vitro aerosol deposition stage patterns could be tailored based on spray-drying pump rate. Positive linear correlation was observed between both FPF and RF values with spray-drying pump rates. The interplay between various spray-drying conditions, particle physicochemical properties, and aerosol dispersion performance was observed and examined, which enabled tailoring and modeling of high aerosol deposition patterns.

  14. Design, Characterization, and Aerosol Dispersion Performance Modeling of Advanced Spray-Dried Microparticulate/Nanoparticulate Mannitol Powders for Targeted Pulmonary Delivery as Dry Powder Inhalers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G.; Hayes, Don

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The purpose was to design and characterize inhalable microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders of mannitol with essential particle properties for targeted dry powder delivery for cystic fibrosis mucolytic treatment by dilute organic solution spray drying, and, in addition, to tailor and correlate aerosol dispersion performance delivered as dry powder inhalers based on spray-drying conditions and solid-state physicochemical properties. Methods: Organic solution advanced spray drying from dilute solution followed by comprehensive solid-state physicochemical characterization and in vitro dry powder aerosolization were used. Results: The particle size distribution of the spray-dried (SD) powders was narrow, unimodal, and in the range of ∼500 nm to 2.0 μm. The particles possessed spherical particle morphology, relatively smooth surface morphology, low water content and vapor sorption (crystallization occurred at exposure above 65% relative humidity), and retention of crystallinity by polymorphic interconversion. The emitted dose, fine particle fraction (FPF), and respirable fraction (RF) were all relatively high. The mass median aerodynamic diameters were below 4 μm for all SD mannitol aerosols. Conclusion: The in vitro aerosol deposition stage patterns could be tailored based on spray-drying pump rate. Positive linear correlation was observed between both FPF and RF values with spray-drying pump rates. The interplay between various spray-drying conditions, particle physicochemical properties, and aerosol dispersion performance was observed and examined, which enabled tailoring and modeling of high aerosol deposition patterns. PMID:24502451

  15. Sea spray aerosol production from waves breaking in the surf zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de

    1999-01-01

    Sea spray aerosol is a product of wave breaking. A very strong source of this aerosol is the surf zone. In this sense, measurements in the surf zone can be suitable for the assessment of the contributions of the various spray production mechanisms to the total concentrations. At present, a

  16. Online characterization of nano-aerosols released by commercial spray products using SMPS–ICPMS coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losert, Sabrina; Hess, Adrian [Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry (Switzerland); Ilari, Gabriele [Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Electron Microscopy Center (Switzerland); Goetz, Natalie von, E-mail: natalie.von.goetz@chem.ethz.ch; Hungerbuehler, Konrad [ETH Zürich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Nanoparticle-containing sprays are a critical class of consumer products, since human exposure may occur by inhalation of nanoparticles (NP) in the generated aerosols. In this work, the suspension and the released aerosol of six different commercially available consumer spray products were analyzed. Next to a broad spectrum of analytical methods for the characterization of the suspension, a standardized setup for the analysis of aerosol has been used. In addition, a new online coupling technique (SMPS–ICPMS) for the simultaneous analysis of particle size and elemental composition of aerosol particles has been applied. Results obtained with this new method were confirmed by other well-established techniques. Comparison of particles in the original suspensions and in the generated aerosol showed that during spraying single particles of size less than 20 nm had been formed, even though in none of the suspensions particles of size less than 280 nm were present (Aerosol size range scanned: 7–300 nm). Both pump sprays and propellant gas sprays were analyzed and both released particles in the nm size range. Also, both water-based and organic solvent-based sprays released NP. However, a trend was observed that spraying an aqueous suspension contained in a pump spray dispenser after drying resulted in bigger agglomerates than spraying organic suspensions in propellant gas dispensers.

  17. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  18. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  19. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  20. Theophylline Cocrystals Prepared by Spray Drying: Physicochemical Properties and Aerosolization Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alhalaweh, Amjad; Kaialy, Waseem; Buckton, Graham; Gill, Hardyal; Nokhodchi, Ali; Velaga, Sitaram P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize theophylline (THF) cocrystals prepared by spray drying in terms of the physicochemical properties and inhalation performance when aerosolized from a dry powder inhaler...

  1. [Ethyl chloride aerosol spray for local anesthesia before arterial puncture: randomized placebo-controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Peña, Sendoa; Fernández-Aedo, Irrintzi; Vallejo-De la Hoz, Gorka

    2017-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of an ethyl chloride aerosol spray to a placebo spray applied in the emergency department to the skin to reduce pain from arterial puncture for blood gas analysis. Single-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial in an emergency department of Hospital de Basurto in Bilbao, Spain. We included 126 patients for whom arterial blood gas analysis had been ordered. They were randomly assigned to receive application of the experimental ethyl chloride spray (n=66) or a placebo aerosol spray of a solution of alcohol in water (n=60). The assigned spray was applied just before arterial puncture. The main outcome variable was pain intensity reported on an 11-point numeric rating scale. The median (interquartile range) pain level was 2 (1-5) in the experimental arm and 2 (1-4.5) in the placebo arm (P=.72). Topical application of an ethyl chloride spray did not reduce pain caused by arterial puncture.

  2. What Can We Learn From Laboratory Studies of Inorganic Sea Spray Aerosol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, M. E.; Zieger, P.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Grythe, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Rosati, B.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 we have been operating a temperature-controlled plunging-jet sea spray aerosol chamber at Stockholm University using inorganic artificial seawater. Using size-resolved measurements of the foam bubbles responsible for the aerosol production we were able to show that it is changes to these foam bubbles which drive the observed changes in aerosol production and size distribution as water temperature changes (Salter et al., 2014). Further, by combining size-resolved measurements of aerosol production as a function of water temperature with measurements of air entrainment by the plunging-jet we have developed a temperature-dependent sea spray source function for deployment in large-scale models (Salter et al., 2015). We have also studied the hygroscopicity, morphology, and chemical composition of the inorganic sea spray aerosol produced in the chamber. The sea spray aerosol generated from artificial seawater exhibited lower hygroscopic growth than both pure NaCl and output from the E-AIM aerosol thermodynamics model when all relevant inorganic ions in the sea salt were included. Results from sensitivity tests using a large-scale earth system model suggest that the lower hygroscopicity observed in our laboratory measurements has important implications for calculations of the radiative balance of the Earth. In addition, size-dependent chemical fractionation of several inorganic ions was observed relative to the artificial seawater with potentially important implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Each of these studies suggest that there is still much to be learned from rigorous experiments using inorganic seawater proxies. Salter et al., (2014), On the seawater temperature dependence of the sea spray aerosol generated by a continuous plunging jet. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 9052-9072, doi: 10.1002/2013JD021376 Salter et al., (2015), An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature. Atmos

  3. The Chemical Composition and Mixing State of Sea Spray Aerosol and Organic Aerosol in the Winter-Spring Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpes, R.; Bondy, A. L.; Bonanno, D.; Moffet, R.; Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Ault, A. P.; Pratt, K.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic region is undergoing rapid transformations and loss of sea ice due to climate change. With increased sea ice fracturing resulting in greater open ocean surface, winter emissions of sea spray aerosol (SSA) are expected to be increasing. Additionally, during the winter-spring transition, Arctic haze contributes to the Arctic aerosol budget. The magnitude of aerosol climate effects depends on the aerosol composition and mixing state (distribution of chemical species within and between particles). However, few studies of aerosol chemistry have been conducted in the winter Arctic, despite it being a time when aerosol impacts on clouds are expected to be significant. To study aerosol composition and mixing state in the winter Arctic, atmospheric particles were collected near Barrow, Alaska in January and February 2014 for off-line individual particle chemical analysis. SSA was the most prevalent particle type observed. Sulfate and nitrate were observed to be internally mixed with SSA and organic aerosol. Greater than 98% of observed SSA particles contained organic content, with 15-35% organic volume fraction on average for individual particles. The SSA organic compounds consisted of carbohydrates, lipids, and fatty acids found in the seawater surface microlayer. SSA was determined to be emitted from open leads, while transported sulfate and nitrate contributed to aging of SSA and organic aerosol. Determining the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the winter Arctic will further the understanding of how individual aerosol particles impact climate through radiative effects and cloud formation.

  4. Quantitative assessment of surf-produced sea spray aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, F.P.; De Leeuw, G.; Jansen, M.; Stive, M.J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The first results are presented from a quantitative model describing the aerosol production in the surf zone. A comparison is made with aerosol produced in the surf zone as measured during EOPACE experiments in La Jolla and Monterey. The surf aerosol production was derived from aerosol concentration

  5. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  6. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried microparticulate/nanoparticulate antibiotic dry powders of tobramycin and azithromycin for pulmonary inhalation aerosol delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2014-02-14

    The purpose of this study was to systematically design pure antibiotic drug dry powder inhalers (DPIs) for targeted antibiotic pulmonary delivery in the treatment of pulmonary infections and comprehensively correlate the physicochemical properties in the solid-state and spray-drying conditions effects on aerosol dispersion performance as dry powder inhalers (DPIs). The two rationally chosen model antibiotic drugs, tobramycin (TOB) and azithromycin (AZI), represent two different antibiotic drug classes of aminoglycosides and macrolides, respectively. The particle size distributions were narrow, unimodal, and in the microparticulate/nanoparticulate size range. The SD particles possessed relatively spherical particle morphology, smooth surface morphology, low residual water content, and the absence of long-range molecular order. The emitted dose (ED%), fine particle fraction (FPF%) and respirable fraction (RF%) were all excellent. The MMAD values were in the inhalable range (MMAD values for SD AZI powders in contrast to SD TOB powders. Positive linear correlations were observed between the aerosol dispersion performance parameter of FPF with increasing spray-drying pump rates and also with the difference between thermal parameters expressed as Tg-To (i.e. the difference between the glass transition temperature and outlet temperature) for SD AZI powders. The aerosol dispersion performance for SD TOB appeared to be influenced by its high water vapor sorption behavior (hygroscopicity) and pump rates or To. Aerosol dispersion performance of SD powders were distinct for both antibiotic drug aerosol systems and also between different pump rates for each system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Wind speed dependent size-resolved parameterization for the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For oceans to be a significant source of primary organic aerosol (POA, sea spray aerosol (SSA must be highly enriched with organics relative to the bulk seawater. We propose that organic enrichment at the air-sea interface, chemical composition of seawater, and the aerosol size are three main parameters controlling the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol (OMSSA. To test this hypothesis, we developed a new marine POA emission function based on a conceptual relationship between the organic enrichment at the air-sea interface and surface wind speed. The resulting parameterization is explored using aerosol chemical composition and surface wind speed from Atlantic and Pacific coastal stations, and satellite-derived ocean concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon. Of all the parameters examined, a multi-variable logistic regression revealed that the combination of 10 m wind speed and surface chlorophyll-a concentration ([Chl-a] are the most consistent predictors of OMSSA. This relationship, combined with the published aerosol size dependence of OMSSA, resulted in a new parameterization for the organic mass fraction of SSA. Global emissions of marine POA are investigated here by applying this newly-developed relationship to existing sea spray emission functions, satellite-derived [Chl-a], and modeled 10 m winds. Analysis of model simulations shows that global annual submicron marine organic emission associated with sea spray is estimated to be from 2.8 to 5.6 Tg C yr−1. This study provides additional evidence that marine primary organic aerosols are a globally significant source of organics in the atmosphere.

  8. Global Scale Emission and Distribution of Sea Spray Aerosol: Sea-Salt and Organic Enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    VIGNATI Elisabetta; M. C. Facchini; Rinaldi, Matteo; Scannell, Claire; Ceburnis, D; Sciare, J.; Kanakidou, M.; Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; DENTENER Franciscus; O'DOWD Colin

    2009-01-01

    The chemical composition of marine aerosols as a function of their size is an important parameter for the evaluation of their impact on the global climate system. In this work we model fine particle organic matter emitted by sea spray processes and its influence on the aerosol chemical properties at the global scale using the off-line global Chemistry-Transport Model TM5. TM5 is coupled to a microphysical aerosol dynamics model providing size resolved information on particle masses and number...

  9. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; Laskin, A.; Wang, B.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3-) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3- is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3- and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas-aerosol phase partitioning.

  10. New trends in the kitchen: propellants assessment of edible food aerosol sprays used on food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Augsburger, M

    2014-01-01

    New products available for food creations include a wide variety of "supposed" food grade aerosol sprays. However, the gas propellants used cannot be considered as safe. The different legislations available did not rule any maximum residue limits, even though these compounds have some limits when used for other food purposes. This study shows a preliminary monitoring of propane, butane and dimethyl ether residues, in cakes and chocolate after spraying, when these gases are used as propellants in food aerosol sprays. Release kinetics of propane, butane and dimethyl ether were measured over one day with sprayed food, left at room temperature or in the fridge after spraying. The alkanes and dimethyl ether analyses were performed by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/thermal conductivity detection, using monodeuterated propane and butane generated in situ as internal standards. According to the obtained results and regardingthe extrapolations of the maximum residue limits existing for these substances, different delays should be respected according to the storage conditions and the gas propellant to consume safely the sprayed food. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Model for the Transport of Sea-Spray Aerosols in the Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzola, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Demoisson, A.

    2015-05-01

    We study the dynamics of sea-spray particles in the coastal region of La Reunion Island on the basis of numerical simulations using the transport aerosol model MACMod (Marine Aerosol Concentration Model) and a survey of the aerosol size distributions measured at four locations at two different heights in the north-west part of the island. This allows evaluation of the performance of our model in case of pure marine air masses with implementation of accurate boundary conditions. First of all, an estimate of the aerosol concentration at 10-m height at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain is obtained using a revisited version of the MEDEX (Mediterranean Extinction) model. Estimates of the vertical profile of aerosol concentrations are then provided using aerosol data obtained at two different heights at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain. A parametrization of the vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations for maritime environment is proposed. The results are then compared to the vertical profiles of 0.532 m aerosol particle extinction coefficient obtained from lidar data provided by the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and also to the data provided by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This allows validation of the complete vertical profiles in the mixed layer and shows the validity of satellite data for determination of the vertical profiles. Two kinds of simulation were made: one without a particle advection flux at the upwind boundary of the numerical domain, whereas the second simulation was made with a particle advection flux. In the first case, the influence of the distance to the shoreline on the local sea-spray dynamics is investigated. In the second set of simulation, the particles issued from the local production in the surf zone near the shoreline are mixed with aerosols advected from the remote ocean. A good agreement between the model calculations using our boundary conditions and the data was found. The

  12. Sea spray aerosol fluxes in the Baltic Sea region: Comparison of the WAM model with measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Kosecki, Szymon; Petelski, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    Sea spray aerosol flux is an important element of sub-regional climate modeling. The majority of works related to this topic concentrate on open ocean research rather than on smaller, inland seas, e.g., the Baltic Sea. The Baltic Sea is one of the largest brackish inland seas by area, where major inflows of oceanic waters are rare. Furthermore, surface waves in the Baltic Sea have a relatively shorter lifespan in comparison with oceanic waves. Therefore, emission of sea spray aerosol may differ greatly from what is known from oceanic research and should be investigated. This article presents a comparison of sea spray aerosol measurements carried out on-board the s/y Oceania research ship with data calculated in accordance to the WAM model. The measurements were conducted in the southern region of the Baltic Sea during four scientific cruises. The gradient method was used to determinate aerosol fluxes. The fluxes were calculated for particles of diameter in range of 0.5-47 μm. The correlation between wind speed measured and simulated has a good agreement (correlation in range of 0.8). The comparison encompasses three different sea spray generation models. First, function proposed by Massel (2006) which is based only on wave parameters, such as significant wave height and peak frequency. Second, Callaghan (2013) which is based on Gong (2003) model (wind speed relation), and a thorough experimental analysis of whitecaps. Third, Petelski et al. (2014) which is based on in-situ gradient measurements with the function dependent on wind speed. The two first models which based on whitecaps analysis are insufficient. Moreover, the research shows strong relation between aerosol emission and wind speed history.

  13. The Impact of Marine Enzymatic Activity on Sea Spray Aerosol Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, O. S.; Michaud, J. M.; Sauer, J. S.; Lee, C.; Förster, J. D.; Pöhlker, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Prather, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    The composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) and the relationship between its organic fraction and biological ocean conditions is not well understood, resulting in considerable disagreement in the literature linking biological markers to SSA chemical composition. Recent work suggests that enzymatic activity in seawater may play a key role in dictating aerosol composition by changing the organic pool from which SSA is formed. Here we investigate the role of enzymatic activity on SSA spatial chemical composition, aerosol phase and morphological microstructure. In these experiments, SSA was generated using a novel mini-Marine Aerosol Reference Tank system. SSA collected onto substrates was generated from artificial salt water that had been doped with either 1) unsaturated triglycerides or 2) diatom cellular lysate, both followed by lipase. Results from analysis including morphological studies via atomic force microscopy, and chemical composition investigations both under dry and RH conditions via STXM-NEXAFS are presented.

  14. Sea-spray aerosol particles generated in the surf zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Kusmierczyk‐Michulec, J.T.; Francius, M.J.; Tedeschi, G.; Piazzola,J.; Merritt, D.L.; Fontana, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the properties of aerosol particles generated over the surf zone, two experiments were held at the pier of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), La Jolla CA, and at the pier of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF) in Duck NC. On both sites concentrations of

  15. Sea spray aerosol flux estimation based on long-term variation of wave statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Myrhaug

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This note provides estimates of the mean sea spray aerosol flux based on long-term wave statistics using the whitecap method based on the limiting steepness and threshold vertical acceleration criteria. The aim is to present a procedure demonstrating how global wave statistics can be used to give estimates of the long-term aerosol flux. These estimates are obtained by using bivariate distributions of significant wave height and characteristic wave period, representing open ocean deep water waves in the Northern North Sea and the North Atlantic.

  16. Production Mechanisms, Number Concentration, Size Distribution. Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Petters, Markus; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bates. Tim; O'Dowd, Colin; Reid, Jeff; Lewis, Ernie R.; Gantt, Brett; Anguelova, Magdalena D.; Bhave, Prakash V.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Over forty scientists from six countries convened in Raleigh, NC on June 4-6 2012 to review the status and prospects of sea spray aerosol research. Participants were researchers from the oceanography and atmospheric science communities, including academia, private industry, and government agencies. The recommendations from the working groups are summarized in a science prioritization matrix that is meant to prioritize the research agenda and identify areas of investigation by the magnitude of their impact on proposed science questions. Str

  17. Heterogeneous Reactivity of Nitric Acid with Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol: Large Differences Observed between and within Individual Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Andrew P; Guasco, Timothy L; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Ryder, Olivia S; Trueblood, Jonathan V; Collins, Douglas B; Ruppel, Matthew J; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2014-08-07

    Current climate and atmospheric chemistry models assume that all sea spray particles react as if they are pure NaCl. However, recent studies of sea spray aerosol particles have shown that distinct particle types exist (including sea salt, organic carbon, and biological particles) as well as mixtures of these and, within each particle type, there is a range of single-particle chemical compositions. Because of these differences, individual particles should display a range of reactivities with trace atmospheric gases. Herein, to address this, we study the composition of individual sea spray aerosol particles after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid. As expected, a replacement reaction of chloride with nitrate is observed; however, there is a large range of reactivities spanning from no reaction to complete reaction between and within individual sea spray aerosol particles. These data clearly support the need for laboratory studies of individual, environmentally relevant particles to improve our fundamental understanding as to the properties that determine reactivity.

  18. Nanosilver conductive lines made by spray coating and aerosol jet printing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzeminski, Jakub; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Dybowska-Sarapuk, Lucja; Lepak, Sandra; Jakubowska, Malgorzata

    2017-08-01

    Printing electronics even though the printing techniques are known for a long time, are gaining in importance. The possibility of making the electronic circuits on flexible, big-area substrates with efficient and cheap technology make it attractive for the electronic industry. Spray coating, as a one of printing methods, additionally provide the chance to print on the non-flat, complicated shaped substrates. Despite the spray coating is mostly used to print a big pads, it is reachable to spray the separate conductive lines both as a quickly-produced prototype and as a fully manufactured circuit. Our work presents the directly printed lines with spray coating technique. For the printing process self-made ink was used. We tested three different approaches to line formation and compare them in the terms of line edge, resistivity and thickness. Line profiles provide the information about the roughness and the line size. In the end we showed the aerosol jet printed meander to give an overview of this similar to spray coating but more sophisticated technique.

  19. Aerosolization Characteristics of Dry Powder Inhaler Formulations for the Excipient Enhanced Growth (EEG) Application: Effect of Spray Drying Process Conditions on Aerosol Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Longest, P. Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a spray dried submicrometer powder formulation suitable for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application. Combination particles were prepared using the Buchi Nano spray dryer B-90. A number of spray drying and formulation variables were investigated with the aims of producing dry powder formulations that were readily dispersed upon aerosolization and maximizing the fraction of submicrometer particles. Albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine, and poloxamer 188 were selected as a model drug, hygroscopic excipient, dispersibility enhancer and surfactant, respectively. Formulations were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and aerosol performance following aerosolization using an Aerolizer® dry powder inhaler (DPI). In vitro drug deposition was studied using a realistic mouth-throat (MT) model. Based on the in vitro aerosolization results, the best performing submicrometer powder formulation consisted of albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine and poloxamer 188 in a ratio of 30:48:20:2, containing 0.5% solids in a water:ethanol (80:20% v/v) solution which was spray dried at 70 °C. The submicrometer particle fraction (FPF1μm/ED) of this final formulation was 28.3% with more than 80% of the capsule contents being emitted during aerosolization. This formulation also showed 4.1% MT deposition. The developed combination formulation delivered a powder aerosol developed for the EEG application with high dispersion efficiency and low MT deposition from a convenient DPI device platform. PMID:23313343

  20. Aerosolization characteristics of dry powder inhaler formulations for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application: effect of spray drying process conditions on aerosol performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael

    2013-02-25

    The aim of this study was to develop a spray dried submicrometer powder formulation suitable for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application. Combination particles were prepared using the Buchi Nano spray dryer B-90. A number of spray drying and formulation variables were investigated with the aims of producing dry powder formulations that were readily dispersed upon aerosolization and maximizing the fraction of submicrometer particles. Albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine, and poloxamer 188 were selected as a model drug, hygroscopic excipient, dispersibility enhancer and surfactant, respectively. Formulations were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and aerosol performance following aerosolization using an Aerolizer dry powder inhaler (DPI). In vitro drug deposition was studied using a realistic mouth-throat (MT) model. Based on the in vitro aerosolization results, the best performing submicrometer powder formulation consisted of albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine and poloxamer 188 in a ratio of 30:48:20:2, containing 0.5% solids in a water:ethanol (80:20%, v/v) solution which was spray dried at 70 °C. The submicrometer particle fraction (FPF(1 μm/ED)) of this final formulation was 28.3% with more than 80% of the capsule contents being emitted during aerosolization. This formulation also showed 4.1% MT deposition. The developed combination formulation delivered a powder aerosol developed for the EEG application with high dispersion efficiency and low MT deposition from a convenient DPI device platform. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of Organic Anionic Surfactants in Fine and Coarse Fractions of Freshly Emitted Sea Spray Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Richard E.; Laskina, Olga; Jayarathne, Thilina; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Lin, Peng; Sultana, Camile M.; Lee, Christopher; Moore, Kathryn A.; Cappa, Christopher; Bertram, Timothy; Prather, Kimberly; Grassian, Vicki H.; Stone, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    The inclusion of organic compounds in freshly emitted sea spray aerosol (SSA) has been shown to be size-dependent, with an increasing organic fraction in smaller particles. Defining the molecular composition of sea spray aerosol has proven challenging, due to the mix of continental and background particles even in remote marine environments. Here we have used electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry in negative ion mode to identify organic compounds in nascent sea spray collected throughout a 25-day mesocosm experiment. Over 280 organic compounds from ten major homologous series were identified. These compounds were operationally defined as molecules containing a hydrophobic alkyl chain with a hydrophilic head group making them surface active. The most abundant class of molecules detected were saturated (C8–C24) and unsaturated (C12–C22) fatty acids. Fatty acid derivatives (including saturated oxo-fatty acids (C5–C18) and saturated hydroxy-fatty acids (C5–C18) were also identified. Interestingly, anthropogenic influences on SSA from the seawater were observed in the form of sulfate (C2–C7, C12–C17) and sulfonate (C16–C22) species. During the mesocosm, the distributions of molecules within each homologous series were observed to respond to variations among the levels of phytoplankton and bacteria in the seawater, indicating an important role of biological processes in determining the composition of SSA.

  2. Effects of generation time on spray aerosol transport and deposition in models of the mouth-throat geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael; Das Choudhuri, Suparna

    2009-06-01

    For most newly developed spray aerosol inhalers, the generation time is a potentially important variable that can be fully controlled. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of spray aerosol generation time on transport and deposition in a standard induction port (IP) and more realistic mouth-throat (MT) geometry. Capillary aerosol generation (CAG) was selected as a representative system in which spray momentum was expected to significantly impact deposition. Sectional and total depositions in the IP and MT geometries were assessed at a constant CAG flow rate of 25 mg/sec for aerosol generation times of 1, 2, and 4 sec using both in vitro experiments and a previously developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Both the in vitro and numerical results indicated that extending the generation time of the spray aerosol, delivered at a constant mass flow rate, significantly reduced deposition in the IP and more realistic MT geometry. Specifically, increasing the generation time of the CAG system from 1 to 4 sec reduced the deposition fraction in the IP and MT geometries by approximately 60 and 33%, respectively. Furthermore, the CFD predictions of deposition fraction were found to be in good agreement with the in vitro results for all times considered in both the IP and MT geometries. The numerical results indicated that the reduction in deposition fraction over time was associated with temporal dissipation of what was termed the spray aerosol "burst effect." Based on these results, increasing the spray aerosol generation time, at a constant mass flow rate, may be an effective strategy for reducing deposition in the standard IP and in more realistic MT geometries.

  3. Effect of ethanol as a co-solvent on the aerosol performance and stability of spray-dried lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Shuying; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    In the spray drying process, organic solvents can be added to facilitate drying, accommodate certain functional excipients, and modify the final particle characteristics. In this study, lysozyme was used as a model pharmaceutical protein to study the effect of ethanol as a co...... the spray drying process. The enzymatic activities of the spray-dried lysozyme showed no significant impact of ethanol; however, the lysozyme enzymatic activity was ca. 25% lower compared to the starting material. In conclusion, the addition of ethanol as a co-solvent in the spray drying feed for lysozyme......-solvent on the stability and aerosol performance of spray-dried protein. Lysozyme was dissolved in solutions with various ratios of ethanol and water, and subsequently spray-dried. A change from spherical particles into wrinkled and folded particles was observed upon increasing the ratio of ethanol in the feed...

  4. A Campaign Study of Sea Spray Aerosol Properties in the Bay of Aarhus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynh; Rasmussen, Berit; Kristensen, Kasper; Sloth Nielsen, Lærke; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    The oceans of the world are a dominant source of atmospheric aerosol. Together with mineral dust, sea spray aerosols (SSA) constitute the largest mass flux of particulate matter in the atmosphere (Andreae and Rosenfeld, 2008). Due to their effects on the global radiative budget - both directly as scatterers and absorbers of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), SSA are considered an important component of the climate system. The sea-surface microlayer (SML) is an ultra-thin boundary layer between the ocean and the atmosphere. The high concentration of surface-active organic compounds in the SML, compared to that of the underlying water column, creates rigid film-like layer over the surface of the ocean. The SML is believed to play an important role in the formation and composition of SSA. However, current knowledge on the SML and its impacts on SSA remain limited. To characterize the SML of natural seawater and examine its impacts on aerosol properties, a field campaign was conducted in the bay of Aarhus, Denmark, during spring 2015. Bulk seawater was collected 1-2 times every week along with selective sampling of the SML. Characterization of the sea water and SML included a wide range of measurements, including surface tension, water activity, dissolved organic matter, and chemical composition analysis by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-Q-TOFMS). SSA was generated from sampled sea water by diffusion of air bubbles through a 10L seawater sample situated in a sea spray tank. Particle number concentration and CCN measurements were conducted along with measurements of the organic share in the aerosol phase as indicated by volatility measurements. To investigate the effect of the SML, spiking of the seawater samples with additional SML was performed and measurements repeated for comparison. Preliminary results show that the SML samples

  5. Mathematical Model for Determinating the Efficiency of Separation of Aerosols in Dry and Sprayed Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptev, A. G.; Iskhakov, A. R.

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent fl ow of aerosols in a cylindrical channel has been investigated. Differential equations of transfer of dispersed particles have been considered, and a two-dimensional equation with a mass source has been solved. Different numerical experiments have been conducted on the basis of the model proposed. Air with water droplets was used as a gas-liquid mixture in the calculations. The influence of the spraying of the channel, the fl ow velocity, the diameter of dispersed particles, and the water concentration on the separation efficiency of an aerosol have been studied. Agreement with experimental data has been shown. A mathematical model has been developed that can be used in designing gas-cleaning apparatuses for enterprises of various industries.

  6. Size-resolved characterization of the polysaccharidic and proteinaceous components of sea spray aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Josephine Y.; Radway, JoAnn C.; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Bothe, Dylan W.; Wilson, Theodore W.; Vaillancourt, Robert D.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Coffman, Derek J.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic polymers released by phytoplankton and bacteria abiologically self-assemble in surface ocean waters into nano-to micro-sized gels containing polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and other components. These gels concentrate in the sea surface microlayer (SML), where they can potentially contribute to sea spray aerosol (SSA). Sea spray is a major source of atmospheric aerosol mass over much of the earth's surface, and knowledge of its properties (including the amount and nature of the organic content), size distributions and fluxes are fundamental for determining its role in atmospheric chemistry and climate. Using a cascade impactor, we collected size-fractionated aerosol particles from ambient air and from freshly generated Sea Sweep SSA in the western North Atlantic Ocean together with biological and chemical characterization of subsurface and SML waters. Spectrophotometric methods were applied to quantify the polysaccharide-containing transparent exopolymer (TEP) and protein-containing Coomassie stainable material (CSM) in these particles and waters. This study demonstrates that both TEP and CSM in surface ocean waters are aerosolized with sea spray with the greatest total TEP associated with particles 5 000 nm. The higher concentrations of TEP and CSM in particles >5 000 nm most likely reflects collection of microorganism cells and/or fragments. The greater concentration of CSM in larger size particles may also reflect greater stability of proteinaceous gels compared to polysaccharide-rich gels in surface waters and the SML. Both TEP and CSM were measured in the ambient marine air sample with concentrations of 2.1 ± 0.16 μg xanthan gum equivalents (XG eq.) m-3 and 14 ± 1.0 μg bovine serum albumin equivalents (BSA eq.) m-3. TEP in Sea Sweep SSA averaged 4.7 ± 3.1 μg XG eq. m-3 and CSM 8.6 ± 7.3 μg BSA eq. m-3. This work shows the transport of marine biogenic material across the air-sea interface through primary particle emission and the

  7. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be under-pinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble-mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Bubble bursting is sensitive to the physico-chemical properties of seawater. For a sample of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into the composition of the aerosol particles produced. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an intercomparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging-waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than those produced by sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic-enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 μm dry diameter range. Interestingly, chemical differences between the methods only emerged when the particles were chemically analyzed at the single-particle level as a function of size; averaging the elemental composition of all particles across all sizes masked the differences between the SSA samples. When dried, SSA generated by the sintered glass filters had the highest fraction of particles with spherical morphology compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles produced when the particle contains relatively little organic carbon. In addition to an intercomparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method on SSA composition was under-taken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous

  8. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schmitt-Kopplin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR. Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported

  9. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported laterally with

  10. Sea Spray Aerosol Structure and Composition Using Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joseph P; Collins, Douglas B; Michaud, Jennifer M; Axson, Jessica L; Sultana, Camile M; Moser, Trevor; Dommer, Abigail C; Conner, Jack; Grassian, Vicki H; Stokes, M Dale; Deane, Grant B; Evans, James E; Burkart, Michael D; Prather, Kimberly A; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-01-27

    The composition and surface properties of atmospheric aerosol particles largely control their impact on climate by affecting their ability to uptake water, react heterogeneously, and nucleate ice in clouds. However, in the vacuum of a conventional electron microscope, the native surface and internal structure often undergo physicochemical rearrangement resulting in surfaces that are quite different from their atmospheric configurations. Herein, we report the development of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy where laboratory generated sea spray aerosol particles are flash frozen in their native state with iterative and controlled thermal and/or pressure exposures and then probed by electron microscopy. This unique approach allows for the detection of not only mixed salts, but also soft materials including whole hydrated bacteria, diatoms, virus particles, marine vesicles, as well as gel networks within hydrated salt droplets-all of which will have distinct biological, chemical, and physical processes. We anticipate this method will open up a new avenue of analysis for aerosol particles, not only for ocean-derived aerosols, but for those produced from other sources where there is interest in the transfer of organic or biological species from the biosphere to the atmosphere.

  11. Evaluation of a polyherbal topical aerosol spray as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis in dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Ramasamy Selvam; Ganapa Sureshbabu; Marimuthu Saravanakumar; D'Souza Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the polyherbal topical aerosol spray Wisprec and reg; Advanced (M/S. Natural Remedies Private Limited, India) as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis in dairy cows. A total of 41 dairy cows suffering from clinical mastitis were selected, and Wisprec and reg; Advanced was sprayed on mastitis affected quarters of udder two times a day along with a parenteral antibiotic till complete recovery. The rectal temperature, pain on palpation of udder, sw...

  12. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of spray-dried and jet-milled microparticles containing bosentan hydrate for dry powder inhalation aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hong-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Eun-Seok; Park, Chun-Woong

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to prepare bosentan hydrate (BST) microparticles as dry powder inhalations (DPIs) via spray drying and jet milling under various parameters, to comprehensively characterize the physicochemical properties of the BST hydrate microparticles, and to evaluate the aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs. The BST microparticles were successfully prepared for DPIs by spray drying from feeding solution concentrations of 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/v) and by jet milling at grinding pressures of 2, 3, and 4 MPa. The physicochemical properties of the spray-dried (SD) and jet-milled (JM) microparticles were determined via scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering particle size analysis, Karl Fischer titration, surface analysis, pycnometry, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and drug dissolution behavior were evaluated using an Anderson cascade impactor and a Franz diffusion cell, respectively. The JM microparticles exhibited an irregular corrugated surface and a crystalline solid state, while the SD microparticles were spherical with a smooth surface and an amorphous solid state. Thus, the in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs were considerably different due to the differences in the physicochemical properties of the SD and JM microparticles. In particular, the highest grinding pressures under jet milling exhibited excellent aerosol dispersion performance with statistically higher values of 56.8%±2.0% of respirable fraction and 33.8%±2.3% of fine particle fraction and lower mass median aerodynamic diameter of 5.0±0.3 μm than the others (Pphysicochemical properties that determine the dissolution kinetics of the SD and JM microparticles, which were well fitted into the Higuchi and zero-order models, respectively.

  13. Evaluation of Melaleuca cajuputi (Family: Myrtaceae) Essential Oil in Aerosol Spray Cans against Dengue Vectors in Low Cost Housing Flats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, A; Sulaiman, S; Omar, B; Mat Ali, R

    2012-01-01

    Melaleuca cajuputi essential oil in aerosol spray was evaluated against the dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus at low cost housing flats in Section 10, Setapak, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. ESSENTIAL OIL IN AEROSOL VIZ: 5% and 10% of concentrations were sprayed for 5 seconds each towards hung mosquitoes in 5 cylindrical net cages. Aerosol weights were recorded before and after spraying to determine discharge rates. Knockdown and mortality number were observed and compared to MS standard aerosol which contain 0.07% prallethrin and 0.05% d-phenothrin as positive control and aerosol contain 40% kerosene and 60% LPG was used as negative control. High knockdown and mortality was observed in both species of mosquitoes towards MS standard aerosol. There was a significant difference (P< 0.05) of mortality and knockdown between 5% and 10% of essential oil aerosol and 5% and 10% essential oil between MS standard. For 5% essential oil, mean percentage (%) of knockdown and mortality of Ae. aegypti displayed slightly higher compared to Ae. albopictus. Spraying with 5% M. cajuputi essential oil aerosol indicated a knockdown of Ae. aegypti 5.60±1.18 and mortality of 22.90±4.22 while Ae. albopictus showed 4.60±0.89 knockdown and 20.00±2.85 mortality. The 10% essential oil concentration gave 23.60±1.68 knockdown and 48.05±0.37 mortality for Ae. aegypti. Ae. albopictus gave 23.00±3.16 knockdown and 44.20 ± 2.10 mortality respectively. Extracts of essential oils does possessed an adulticidal effects and could be considered and utilized for future dengue vectors control.

  14. Defect-induced magnetism in undoped and Mn-doped wide band gapzinc oxide grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motaung, DE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a systemic study on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of the un-doped and Mn doped ZnO thin films grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis at different deposition times. XRD profilinghas shown that the structures of the prepared...

  15. Physico-Chemical Properties, Aerosolization and Dissolution of Co-Spray Dried Azithromycin Particles with L-Leucine for Inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Sharad; Nie, Haichen; Xu, Rongkun; Guo, Rui; Cavallaro, Alex; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2018-01-08

    Inhalation therapy is popular to treat lower respiratory tract infections. Azithromycin is effective against some bacteria that cause respiratory tract infections; but it has poor water solubility that may limit its efficacy when administrated as inhalation therapy. In this study, dry powder inhaler formulations were developed by co-spray drying azithromycin with L-leucine with a purpose to improve dissolution. The produced powder formulations were characterized regarding particle size, morphology, surface composition and in-vitro aerosolization performance. Effects of L-leucine on the solubility and in-vitro dissolution of azithromycin were also evaluated. The spray dried azithromycin alone formulation exhibited a satisfactory aerosol performance with a fine particle fraction (FPF) of 62.5 ± 4.1%. Addition of L-leucine in the formulation resulted in no significant change in particle morphology and FPF, which can be attributed to enrichment of azithromycin on the surfaces of composite particles. Importantly, compared with the spray-dried amorphous azithromycin alone powder, the co-spray dried powder formulations of azithromycin and L-leucine demonstrated a substantially enhanced in-vitro dissolution rate. Such enhanced dissolution of azithromycin could be attributed to the formation of composite system and the acidic microenvironment around azithromycin molecules created by the dissolution of acidic L-leucine in the co-spray dried powder. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic data showed intermolecular interactions between azithromycin and L-leucine in the co-spray dried formulations. We developed the dry powder formulations with satisfactory aerosol performance and enhanced dissolution for a poorly water soluble weak base, azithromycin, by co-spray drying with an amino acid, L-leucine.

  16. Effects of NO(y) aging on the dehydration dynamics of model sea spray aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Ephraim; Heylman, Kevin D; Gibson, Amanda K; Ashwell, Adam P; Rossi, Sean R

    2013-05-23

    The reactions of NO(y) species in the atmosphere with sea spray aerosol replace halogen anions with nitrate. These experiments show the effect of increasing the nitrate content of model sea spray aerosol particles on the morphology changes and the phase transitions driven by changes in relative humidity (RH). The components of the model particles include H2O, Na+, Mg2+, Cl-, NO3-, and SO4(2-). Tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) measurements yield the water content and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of these particles, and probe molecule spectroscopic measurements reveal subsequent phase transitions and partially characterize the salt composition on the surface of dry particles. The results show three effects of increasing the nitrate composition: decreasing the EFH (46 to 29%), production of a metastable aqueous layer on the surface of effloresced particles, and decreasing the sulfate content near the surface of dry particles. For the mixtures studied here, the initial crystallization event forms a core of NaCl. For particles that contain a substantial metastable aqueous layer following efflorescence, probe molecule spectroscopy shows a second crystallization at a lower RH. This subsequent phase transition is likely the formation of Na2SO4. Homogeneous nucleation theory (HNT) using a semiempirical formulation predicts the ERH of all mixtures within 2.0% RH, with a mean absolute deviation of 1.0%. The calculations suggest that structures associated with highly concentrated or supersaturated magnesium ions strongly affect the interfacial tension between the NaCl crystal nucleus and the droplet from which it forms.

  17. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of spray-dried and jet-milled microparticles containing bosentan hydrate for dry powder inhalation aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyo-Jung Lee,1 Ji-Hyun Kang,1 Hong-Goo Lee,1 Dong-Wook Kim,2 Yun-Seok Rhee,3 Ju-Young Kim,4 Eun-Seok Park,5 Chun-Woong Park1 1College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Cheongju University, Cheongju, 3College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 4College of Pharmacy, Woosuk University, Wanju-gun, 5School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Republic of Korea Abstract: The objectives of this study were to prepare bosentan hydrate (BST microparticles as dry powder inhalations (DPIs via spray drying and jet milling under various parameters, to comprehensively characterize the physicochemical properties of the BST hydrate microparticles, and to evaluate the aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs. The BST microparticles were successfully prepared for DPIs by spray drying from feeding solution concentrations of 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/v and by jet milling at grinding pressures of 2, 3, and 4 MPa. The physicochemical properties of the spray-dried (SD and jet-milled (JM microparticles were determined via scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering particle size analysis, Karl Fischer titration, surface analysis, pycnometry, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and drug dissolution behavior were evaluated using an Anderson cascade impactor and a Franz diffusion cell, respectively. The JM microparticles exhibited an irregular corrugated surface and a crystalline solid state, while the SD microparticles were spherical with a smooth surface and an amorphous solid state. Thus, the in vitro aerosol dispersion performance and dissolution behavior as DPIs were considerably different due to the differences in the physicochemical properties of the SD and JM microparticles. In

  18. Sea spray aerosol in the Great Barrier Reef and the presence of nonvolatile organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Marc; Cravigan, Luke; Miljevic, Branka; Vaattovaara, Petri; Deschaseaux, Elisabeth; Swan, Hilton; Jones, Graham; Ristovski, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles produced from the ocean surface in regions of biological activity can vary greatly in size, number and composition, and in their influence on cloud formation. Algal species such as phytoplankton can alter the SSA composition. Numerous studies have investigated nascent SSA properties, but all of these have focused on aerosol particles produced by seawater from noncoral related phytoplankton and in coastal regions. Bubble chamber experiments were performed with seawater samples taken from the reef flat around Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef during winter 2011. Here we show that the SSA from these samples was composed of an internal mixture of varying fractions of sea salt, semivolatile organics, as well as nonvolatile (below 550°C) organics. A relatively constant volume fraction of semivolatile organics of 10%-13% was observed, while nonvolatile organic volume fractions varied from 29% to 49% for 60 nm SSA. SSA organic fractions were estimated to reduce the activation ratios of SSA to cloud condensation nuclei by up to 14% when compared with artificial sea salt. Additionally, a sea-salt calibration was applied so that a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer could be used to quantify the contribution of sea salt to submicron SSA, which yielded organic volume fractions of 3%-6%. Overall, these results indicate a high fraction of organics associated with wintertime Aitken mode SSA generated from Great Barrier Reef seawater. Further work is required to fully distinguish any differences coral reefs have on SSA composition when compared to open oceans.

  19. Updating Sea Spray Aerosol Emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; Bash, J. O.; Kelly, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is updated to enhance fine mode SSA emissions, include sea surface temperature (SST) dependency, and revise surf zone emissions. Based on evaluation with several regional and national observational datasets in the continental U.S., the updated emissions generally improve surface concentrations predictions of primary aerosols composed of sea-salt and secondary aerosols affected by sea-salt chemistry in coastal and near-coastal sites. Specifically, the updated emissions lead to better predictions of the magnitude and coastal-to-inland gradient of sodium, chloride, and nitrate concentrations at Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) sites near Tampa, FL. Including SST-dependency to the SSA emission parameterization leads to increased sodium concentrations in the southeast U.S. and decreased concentrations along the Pacific coast and northeastern U.S., bringing predictions into closer agreement with observations at most Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) and Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sites. Model comparison with California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) observations will also be discussed, with particular focus on the South Coast Air Basin where clean marine air mixes with anthropogenic pollution in a complex environment. These SSA emission updates enable more realistic simulation of chemical processes in coastal environments, both in clean marine air masses and mixtures of clean marine and polluted conditions.

  20. A study on the sensing of NO(sub2) and O(sub2) utilizing ZnO films grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlongo, GH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses the preparation and characterization of ZnO nanostructured thin films obtained using aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition periods. Aiming at understanding the chemical composition, structural...

  1. Sea spray aerosol chemical composition: elemental and molecular mimics for laboratory studies of heterogeneous and multiphase reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Timothy H; Cochran, Richard E; Grassian, Vicki H; Stone, Elizabeth A

    2018-02-16

    Sea spray aerosol particles (SSA), formed through wave breaking at the ocean surface, contribute to natural aerosol particle concentrations in remote regions of Earth's atmosphere, and alter the direct and indirect effects of aerosol particles on Earth's radiation budget. In addition, sea spray aerosol serves as suspended surface area that can catalyze trace gas reactions. It has been shown repeatedly that sea spray aerosol is heavily enriched in organic material compared to the surface ocean. The selective enrichment of organic material complicates the selection of representative molecular mimics of SSA for laboratory or computational studies. In this review, we first provide a short introduction to SSA formation processes and discuss chemical transformations of SSA that occur in polluted coastal regions and remote pristine air. We then focus on existing literature of the chemical composition of nascent SSA generated in controlled laboratory experiments and field investigations. We combine the evidence on the chemical properties of nascent SSA with literature measurements of SSA water uptake to assess SSA molecular composition and liquid water content. Efforts to speciate SSA organic material into molecular classes and specific molecules have led to the identification of saccharides, alkanes, free fatty acids, anionic surfactants, dicarboxylic acids, amino acids, proteinaceous matter, and other large macromolecules. However to date, less than 25% of the organic mass of nascent SSA has been quantified at a molecular level. As discussed here, quantitative measurements of size resolved elemental ratios, combined with determinations of water uptake properties, provides unique insight on the concentration of ions within SSA as a function of particle size, pointing to a controlling role for relative humidity and the hygroscopicity of SSA organic material at small particle diameters.

  2. Easy Aerosol - Robust and non-robust circulation responses to aerosol radiative forcing in comprehensive atmosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Aiko; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, Bjorn; Boucher, Olivier; Medeiros, Brian; Pincus, Robert; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Lewinschal, Anna; Bellouin, Nicolas; Yang, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    A number of recent studies illustrated the potential of aerosols to change the large-scale atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns. It remains unclear, however, to what extent the proposed aerosol-induced changes reflect robust model behavior or are affected by uncertainties in the models' treatment of parametrized physical processes, such as those related to clouds. "Easy Aerosol", a model-intercomparison project organized within the Grand Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity of the World Climate Research Programme, addresses this question by subjecting a suite of comprehensive atmosphere general circulation models with prescribed sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) to the same set of idealized "easy" aerosol perturbations. This contribution discusses the aerosol perturbations as well as their impact on the model's precipitation and surface winds. The aerosol perturbations are designed based on a global aerosol climatology and mimic the gravest mode of the anthropogenic aerosol. Specifically, the meridional and zonal distributions of total aerosol optical depth are approximated by a superposition of Gaussian plumes; the vertical distribution is taken as constant within the lowest 1250m of the atmosphere followed by an exponential decay with height above. The aerosol both scatters and absorbs shortwave radiation, but in order to focus on direct radiative effects aerosol-cloud interactions are omitted. Each model contributes seven simulations. A clean control case with no aerosol-radiative effects at all is compared to six perturbed simulations with differing aerosol loading, zonal aerosol distributions, and SSTs. To estimate the role of natural variability, one of the models, MPI-ESM, contributes a 5-member ensemble for each simulation. If the observed SSTs from years 1979-2005 are prescribed, the aerosol leads to a local depression of precipitation at the Northern Hemisphere center of the aerosol and a northward shift of the

  3. Global modelling of direct and indirect effects of sea spray aerosol using a source function encapsulating wave state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-I. Partanen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed parameterizations for the sea spray aerosol source flux, encapsulating wave state, and its organic fraction were incorporated into the aerosol–climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to investigate the direct and indirect radiative effects of sea spray aerosol particles. Our simulated global sea salt emission of 805 Tg yr−1 (uncertainty range 378–1233 Tg yr−1 was much lower than typically found in previous studies. Modelled sea salt and sodium ion concentrations agreed relatively well with measurements in the smaller size ranges at Mace Head (annual normalized mean model bias −13% for particles with vacuum aerodynamic diameter Dva Da Da Da −2, in contrast to previous studies. This positive effect was ascribed to the tendency of sea salt aerosol to suppress both the in-cloud supersaturation and the formation of cloud condensation nuclei from sulfate. These effects can be accounted for only in models with sufficiently detailed aerosol microphysics and physics-based parameterizations of cloud activation. However, due to a strong negative direct effect, the simulated effective radiative forcing (total radiative effect was −0.2 W m−2. The simulated radiative effects of the primary marine organic emissions were small, with a direct effect of 0.03 W m−2 and an indirect effect of −0.07 W m−2.

  4. Molecular Diversity of Sea Spray Aerosol Particles: Impact of Ocean Biology on Particle Composition and Hygroscopicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Richard E.; Laskina, Olga; Trueblood, Jonathan; Estillore, Armando D.; Morris, Holly S.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Sultana, Camile M.; Lee, Christopher; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Dowling, Jackie; Qin, Zhen; Cappa, Christopher; Bertram, Timothy; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Stone, Elizabeth; Prather, Kimberly; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of sea spray aerosol (SSA) on climate depends on the size and chemical composition of individual particles that make-up the total SSA ensemble. While the organic fraction of SSA has been characterized from a bulk perspective, there remains a lack of understanding as to the composition of individual particles within the SSA ensemble. To better understand the molecular components within SSA particles and how SSA composition changes with ocean biology, simultaneous measurements of seawater and SSA were made during a month-long mesocosm experiment performed in an ocean-atmosphere facility. Herein, we deconvolute the composition of freshly emitted SSA devoid of anthropogenic and terrestrial influences by characterizing classes of organic compounds as well as specific molecules within individual SSA particles. Analysis of SSA particles show that the diversity of molecules within the organic fraction varies between two size fractions (submicron and supermicron) with contributions from fatty acids, monosaccharides, polysaccharides and siliceous material. Significant changes in the distribution of these compounds within individual particles are observed to coincide with the rise and fall of phytoplankton and bacterial populations within the seawater. Furthermore, water uptake is impacted as shown by hygroscopicity measurements of model systems composed of representative organic compounds. Thus, the how changes in the hygroscopic growth of SSA evolves with composition can be elucidated. Overall, this study provides an important connection between biological processes that control the composition of seawater and changes in single particle composition which will enhances our ability to predict the impact of SSA on climate.

  5. A physically based framework for modeling the organic fractionation of sea spray aerosol from bubble film Langmuir equilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely sensed chlorophyll a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC, a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semilabile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecules. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll a and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical

  6. Evaluation of a polyherbal topical aerosol spray as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Selvam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the polyherbal topical aerosol spray Wisprec and reg; Advanced (M/S. Natural Remedies Private Limited, India as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis in dairy cows. A total of 41 dairy cows suffering from clinical mastitis were selected, and Wisprec and reg; Advanced was sprayed on mastitis affected quarters of udder two times a day along with a parenteral antibiotic till complete recovery. The rectal temperature, pain on palpation of udder, swelling of udder, consistency of milk, recovery period and product satisfaction score were assessed to evaluate the efficacy of Wisprec and reg; Spray. Topical application of Wisprec and reg; Advanced Spray have shown a significant improvement (p<0.001 in alleviation of rectal temperature, pain on palpation of udder and swelling of udder, and the consistency of milk was restored to normal after 3 to 4 days of treatment. The results demonstrate that the Wisprec and reg; Advanced spray could be considered as an alternative to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs as a supportive therapy for clinical mastitis of dairy cows. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 285-290

  7. Linking variations in sea spray aerosol particle hygroscopicity to composition during two microcosm experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Forestieri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which water uptake influences the light scattering ability of marine sea spray aerosol (SSA particles depends critically on SSA chemical composition. The organic fraction of SSA can increase during phytoplankton blooms, decreasing the salt content and therefore the hygroscopicity of the particles. In this study, subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85 % relative humidity (GF(85 % of predominately submicron SSA particles were quantified during two induced phytoplankton blooms in marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs. One MART was illuminated with fluorescent lights and the other was illuminated with sunlight, referred to as the "indoor" and "outdoor" MARTs, respectively. Optically weighted GF(85 % values for SSA particles were derived from measurements of light scattering and particle size distributions. The mean optically weighted SSA diameters were 530 and 570 nm for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. The GF(85 % measurements were made concurrently with online particle composition measurements, including bulk composition (using an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer and single particle (using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer measurement, and a variety of water-composition measurements. During both microcosm experiments, the observed optically weighted GF(85 % values were depressed substantially relative to pure inorganic sea salt by 5 to 15 %. There was also a time lag between GF(85 % depression and the peak chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations by either 1 (indoor MART or 3-to-6 (outdoor MART days. The fraction of organic matter in the SSA particles generally increased after the Chl a peaked, also with a time lag, and ranged from about 0.25 to 0.5 by volume. The observed depression in the GF(85 % values (relative to pure sea salt is consistent with the large observed volume fractions of non-refractory organic matter (NR-OM comprising the SSA. The GF(85 % values

  8. Investigation of discharged aerosol nanoparticles during chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis for developing safety measures in the nano research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Еvgeny; Karunakaran, Gopalu; Godymchuk, Anna; Vera, Levina; Yudin, Andrey Grigorjevich; Gusev, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Denis

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the demands for the nanoparticles are increasing due to their tremendous applications in various fields. As a consequence, the discharge of nanoparticles into the atmosphere and environment is also increasing, posing a health threat and environmental damage in terms of pollution. Thus, an extensive research is essential to evaluate the discharge of these nanoparticles into the environment. Keeping this in mind, the present investigation aimed to analyze the discharge of aerosol nanoparticles that are synthesized in the laboratory via chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis methods. The results indicated that the chemical precipitation method discharges a higher concentration of nanoparticles in the work site when compared to the spray pyrolysis method. The aerosol concentration also varied with the different steps involved during the synthesis of nanoparticles. The average particle's concentration in air for chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis methods was around 1,037,476 and 883,421particles/cm3. In addition, the average total discharge of nanoparticles in the entire laboratory was also examined. A significant variation in the concentration of nanoparticles was noticed, during the processing of materials and the concentration of particles (14-723nm) exceeding the daily allowed concentration to about 70-170 times was observed over a period of 6 months. Thus, the results of the present study will be very useful in developing safety measures and would help in organizing the rules for people working in nanotechnology laboratories to minimize the hazardous effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comprehensive modeling study of ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosol based on real-time, online measurements of aerosol composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, P. J.; Griffiths, P. T.; Pope, F. D.; Reid, J. P.; Kalberer, M.

    2017-04-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols profoundly influences their atmospheric properties, but a detailed understanding of heterogeneous and in-particle reactivity is lacking. We present here a combined experimental and modeling study of the ozonolysis of oleic acid particles. An online mass spectrometry (MS) method, Extractive Electrospray Ionization (EESI), is used to follow the composition of the aerosol at a molecular level in real time; relative changes in the concentrations of both reactants and products are determined during aerosol aging. The results show evidence for multiple non-first-order reactions involving stabilized Criegee intermediates, including the formation of secondary ozonides and other oligomers. Offline liquid chromatography MS is used to confirm the online MS assignment of the monomeric and dimeric products. We explain the observed EESI-MS chemical composition changes, and chemical and physical data from previous studies, using a process-based aerosol chemistry simulation, the Pretty Good Aerosol Model (PG-AM). In particular, we extend previous studies of reactant loss by demonstrating success in reproducing the time dependence of product formation and the evolving particle size. This advance requires a comprehensive chemical scheme coupled to the partitioning of semivolatile products; relevant reaction and evaporation parameters have been refined using our new measurements in combination with PG-AM.

  10. Comprehensive airborne characterization of aerosol from a major bovine source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshian, A.; Murphy, S. M.; Hersey, S.; Gates, H.; Padro, L. T.; Nenes, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Jonsson, H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2008-09-01

    We report an extensive airborne characterization of aerosol downwind of a massive bovine source in the San Joaquin Valley (California) on two flights during July 2007. The Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter probed chemical composition, particle size distribution, mixing state, sub- and supersaturated water uptake behavior, light scattering properties, and the interrelationship between these parameters and meteorology. Total PM1.0 levels and concentrations of organics, nitrate, and ammonium were enhanced in the plume from the source as compared to the background aerosol. Organics dominated the plume aerosol mass (~56 64%), followed either by sulfate or nitrate, and then ammonium. Particulate amines were detected in the plume aerosol by a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) and via mass spectral markers in the Aerodyne C-ToF-AMS. Amines were found to be a significant atmospheric base even in the presence of ammonia; particulate amine concentrations are estimated as at least 14 23% of that of ammonium in the plume. Enhanced sub- and supersaturated water uptake and reduced refractive indices were coincident with lower organic mass fractions, higher nitrate mass fractions, and the detection of amines. The likelihood of suppressed droplet growth owing to kinetic limitations from hydrophobic organic material is explored. After removing effects associated with size distribution and mixing state, the normalized activated fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) increased as a function of the subsaturated hygroscopic growth factor, with the highest activated fractions being consistent with relatively lower organic mass fractions and higher nitrate mass fractions. Subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors for the organic fraction of the aerosol are estimated based on employing the Zdanovskii-Stokes Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule. Representative values for a parameterization treating particle water uptake in both the sub- and

  11. Comprehensive airborne characterization of aerosol from a major bovine source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jonsson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report an extensive airborne characterization of aerosol downwind of a massive bovine source in the San Joaquin Valley (California on two flights during July 2007. The Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS Twin Otter probed chemical composition, particle size distribution, mixing state, sub- and supersaturated water uptake behavior, light scattering properties, and the interrelationship between these parameters and meteorology. Total PM1.0 levels and concentrations of organics, nitrate, and ammonium were enhanced in the plume from the source as compared to the background aerosol. Organics dominated the plume aerosol mass (~56–64%, followed either by sulfate or nitrate, and then ammonium. Particulate amines were detected in the plume aerosol by a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS and via mass spectral markers in the Aerodyne C-ToF-AMS. Amines were found to be a significant atmospheric base even in the presence of ammonia; particulate amine concentrations are estimated as at least 14–23% of that of ammonium in the plume. Enhanced sub- and supersaturated water uptake and reduced refractive indices were coincident with lower organic mass fractions, higher nitrate mass fractions, and the detection of amines. The likelihood of suppressed droplet growth owing to kinetic limitations from hydrophobic organic material is explored. After removing effects associated with size distribution and mixing state, the normalized activated fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN increased as a function of the subsaturated hygroscopic growth factor, with the highest activated fractions being consistent with relatively lower organic mass fractions and higher nitrate mass fractions. Subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors for the organic fraction of the aerosol are estimated based on employing the Zdanovskii-Stokes Robinson (ZSR mixing rule. Representative values for a parameterization treating particle water

  12. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical

  13. L-Leucine as an excipient against moisture on in vitro aerosolization performances of highly hygroscopic spray-dried powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Sun, Siping; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Denman, John A; Gengenbach, Thomas; Tang, Patricia; Mao, Shirui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-05-01

    L-Leucine (LL) has been widely used to enhance the dispersion performance of powders for inhalation. LL can also protect powders against moisture, but this effect is much less studied. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LL could prevent moisture-induced deterioration in in vitro aerosolization performances of highly hygroscopic spray-dried powders. Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) was chosen as a model drug and different amounts of LL (2-40% w/w) were added to the formulation, with the aim to explore the relationship between powder dispersion, moisture protection and physicochemical properties of the powders. The powder formulations were prepared by spray drying of aqueous solutions containing known concentrations of DSCG and LL. The particle sizes were measured by laser diffraction. The physicochemical properties of fine particles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS). The surface morphology and chemistry of fine particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). In vitro aerosolization performances were evaluated by a next generation impactor (NGI) after the powders were stored at 60% or 75% relative humidity (RH), and 25°C for 24h. Spray-dried (SD) DSCG powders were amorphous and absorbed 30-45% (w/w) water at 70-80% RH, resulting in deterioration in the aerosolization performance of the powders. LL did not decrease the water uptake of DSCG powders, but it could significantly reduce the effect of moisture on aerosolization performances. This is due to enrichment of crystalline LL on the surface of the composite particles. The effect was directly related to the percentage of LL coverage on the surface of particles. Formulations having 61-73% (molar percent) of LL on the particle surface (which correspond to 10-20% (w

  14. Inside versus Outside: Ion Redistribution in Nitric Acid Reacted Sea Spray Aerosol Particles as Determined by Single Particle Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. P.; Guasco, T.; Ryder, O. S.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Collins, D. B.; Ruppel, M. J.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles were generated under real-world conditions using natural seawater and a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves or a marine aerosol reference tank (MART) that replicates those conditions. The SSA particles were exposed to nitric acid in situ in a flow tube and the well-known chloride displacement and nitrate formation reaction was observed. However, as discussed here, little is known about how this anion displacement reaction affects the distribution of cations and other chemical constituents within and phase state of individual SSA particles. Single particle analysis of individual SSA particles shows that cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) within individual particles undergo a spatial redistribution after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, along with a more concentrated layer of organic matter at the surface of the particle. These data suggest that specific ion and aerosol pH effects play an important role in aerosol particle structure in ways that have not been previously recognized. The ordering of organic coatings can impact trace gas uptake, and subsequently impact trace gas budgets of O3 and NOx.

  15. Investigation of the changes in aerosolization behavior between the jet-milled and spray-dried colistin powders through surface energy characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Teresa; Li, Jian; Mortonx, David A.V.; Zhou, Qi (Tony); Larson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface energy factors behind improved aerosolization performance of spray-dried colistin powder formulations compared to those produced by jet-milling. Inhalable colistin powder formulations were produced by jet-milling or spray-drying (with or without L-leucine). Scanning electron micrographs showed the jet-milled particles had irregularly angular shapes, while the spray-dried particles were more spherical. Significantly higher fine particle fractions (FPFs) were measured for the spray-dried (43.8-49.6%) vs. the jet-milled formulation (28.4 %) from a Rotahaler at 60L/min; albeit the size distribution of the jet-milled powder was smaller. Surprisingly, addition of L-leucine in the spray drying feed-solution gave no significant improvement in FPF. As measured by inverse gas chromatography, spray-dried formulations had significantly (pspray-dried formulation with or without L-leucine. Based upon our previous findings in the self-assembling behavior of colistin in aqueous solution and the surface energy data obtained here, we propose the self-assembly of colistin molecules during spray-drying, contributed significantly to the reduction of surface free energy and the superior aerosolization performance. PMID:26886330

  16. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B; Moore, Kathryn A; Ryder, Olivia S; Stokes, M Dale; Beall, Charlotte M; Collins, Douglas B; Santander, Mitchell V; Burrows, Susannah M; Sultana, Camille M; Prather, Kimberly A

    2017-07-03

    The oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles comprise sea salts and organic species in varying proportions. In addition to size, the overall composition of SSA particles determines how effectively they can form cloud droplets and ice crystals. Thus, understanding the factors controlling SSA composition is critical to predicting aerosol impacts on clouds and climate. It is often assumed that submicrometer SSAs are mainly formed by film drops produced from bursting bubble-cap films, which become enriched with hydrophobic organic species contained within the sea surface microlayer. In contrast, jet drops formed from the base of bursting bubbles are postulated to mainly produce larger supermicrometer particles from bulk seawater, which comprises largely salts and water-soluble organic species. However, here we demonstrate that jet drops produce up to 43% of total submicrometer SSA number concentrations, and that the fraction of SSA produced by jet drops can be modulated by marine biological activity. We show that the chemical composition, organic volume fraction, and ice nucleating ability of submicrometer particles from jet drops differ from those formed from film drops. Thus, the chemical composition of a substantial fraction of submicrometer particles will not be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer, a major assumption in previous studies. This finding has significant ramifications for understanding the factors controlling the mixing state of submicrometer SSA particles and must be taken into consideration when predicting SSA impacts on clouds and climate.

  17. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Stokes, M. Dale; Beall, Charlotte M.; Collins, Douglas B.; Santander, Mitchell V.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Sultana, Camille M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    The oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles comprise sea salts and organic species in varying proportions. In addition to size, the overall composition of SSA particles determines how effectively they can form cloud droplets and ice crystals. Thus, understanding the factors controlling SSA composition is critical to predicting aerosol impacts on clouds and climate. It is often assumed that submicrometer SSAs are mainly formed by film drops produced from bursting bubble-cap films, which become enriched with hydrophobic organic species contained within the sea surface microlayer. In contrast, jet drops formed from the base of bursting bubbles are postulated to mainly produce larger supermicrometer particles from bulk seawater, which comprises largely salts and water-soluble organic species. However, here we demonstrate that jet drops produce up to 43% of total submicrometer SSA number concentrations, and that the fraction of SSA produced by jet drops can be modulated by marine biological activity. We show that the chemical composition, organic volume fraction, and ice nucleating ability of submicrometer particles from jet drops differ from those formed from film drops. Thus, the chemical composition of a substantial fraction of submicrometer particles will not be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer, a major assumption in previous studies. This finding has significant ramifications for understanding the factors controlling the mixing state of submicrometer SSA particles and must be taken into consideration when predicting SSA impacts on clouds and climate.

  18. Orientation-dependent low field magnetic anomalies and room-temperature spintronic material – Mn doped ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, SS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High quality un-doped and Mn-doped ZnO films deposited by a simple aerosol spray pyrolysis technique for 20 and 30 min were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques...

  19. Heat, Mass and Aerosol Transfers in Spray Conditions for Containment Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcheron, Emmanuel; Lemaitre, Pascal; Nuboer, Amandine; Vendel, Jacques

    TOSQAN is an experimental program undertaken by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surété Nucleaire (IRSN) in order to perform thermal hydraulic containment studies. The TOSQAN facility is a large enclosure devoted to simulating typical accidental thermal hydraulic flow conditions in nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) containment. The TOSQAN facility, which is highly instrumented with non-intrusive optical diagnostics, is particularly adapted to nuclear safety CFD code validation. The present work is devoted to studying the interaction of a water spray injection used as a mitigation means in order to reduce the gas pressure and temperature in the containment, to produce gases mixing and washout of fission products. In order to have a better understanding of heat and mass transfers between spray droplets and the gas mixture, and to analyze mixing effects due to spray activation, we performed detailed characterization of the two-phase flow.

  20. A comprehensive numerical study of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in marine stratocumulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional large-eddy simulations (LES with detailed bin-resolved microphysics are performed to explore the diurnal variation of marine stratocumulus (MSc clouds under clean and polluted conditions. The sensitivity of the aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions to variation of sea surface temperature, free tropospheric humidity, large-scale divergence rate, and wind speed is assessed. The comprehensive set of simulations corroborates previous studies that (1 with moderate/heavy drizzle, an increase in aerosol leads to an increase in cloud thickness; and (2 with non/light drizzle, an increase in aerosol results in a thinner cloud, due to the pronounced effect on entrainment. It is shown that for higher SST, stronger large-scale divergence, drier free troposphere, or lower wind speed, the cloud thins and precipitation decreases. The sign and magnitude of the Twomey effect, droplet dispersion effect, cloud thickness effect, and cloud optical depth susceptibility to aerosol perturbations (i.e., change in cloud optical depth to change in aerosol number concentration are evaluated by LES experiments and compared with analytical formulations. The Twomey effect emerges as dominant in total cloud optical depth susceptibility to aerosol perturbations. The dispersion effect, that of aerosol perturbations on the cloud droplet size spectrum, is positive (i.e., increase in aerosol leads to spectral narrowing and accounts for 3% to 10% of the total cloud optical depth susceptibility at nighttime, with greater influence in heavier drizzling clouds. The cloud thickness effect is negative (i.e., increase in aerosol leads to thinner cloud for non/light drizzling cloud and positive for a moderate/heavy drizzling clouds; the cloud thickness effect contributes 5% to 22% of the nighttime total cloud susceptibility. Overall, the total cloud optical depth susceptibility ranges from ~0.28 to 0.53 at night; an increase in aerosol concentration enhances cloud

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE SPRAY DISPENSER TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM AEROSOL CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents the operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water, and...

  2. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Stokes, M. Dale; Beall, Charlotte M.; Collins, Douglas B.; Santander, Mitchell V.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Sultana, Camille M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-06-19

    Covering 71% of the Earth’s surface, oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. The size and composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) affect their ability to serve as cloud seeds and thus understanding the factors controlling their composition is critical to predicting their impact on clouds and climate. SSA particles have been shown to be an external mixture of particles with different compositions. Film and jet drop production mechanisms ultimately determine the individual particle compositions which are comprised of an array of salt/organic mixtures ranging from pure sea salt to nearly pure organic particles. It is often assumed that the majority of submicron SSA are formed by film drops produced from bursting hydrophobic organic-rich bubble film caps at the sea surface, and in contrast, jet drops are postulated to produce larger supermicron particles from underlying seawater comprised largely of salts and water soluble organic species. However, here we show that jet drops produced by bursting sub-100 m bubbles account for up to 40 % of all submicron particles. They have distinct chemical compositions, organic volume fractions and ice nucleating activities from submicron film drops. Thus a substantial fraction of submicron particles will not necessarily be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer as has been assumed in many studies. This finding has significant ramifications for the size-resolved mixing states of SSA particles which must be taken into consideration when accessing SSA impacts on clouds.

  3. Inland Sea Spray Aerosol Transport and Incomplete Chloride Depletion: Varying Degrees of Reactive Processing Observed during SOAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondy, Amy L. [Department; Wang, Bingbing [Environmental; Laskin, Alexander [Environmental; Craig, Rebecca L. [Department; Nhliziyo, Manelisi V. [Department; Bertman, Steven B. [Department; Pratt, Kerri A. [Department; Shepson, Paul B. [Departments; Ault, Andrew P. [Department; Department

    2017-08-08

    Multiphase reactions involving sea spray aerosol (SSA) impact trace gases budgets in coastal regions by acting as a reservoir for oxidized nitrogen and sulfur species, as well as a source of halogen gases (HCl, ClNO2, etc.). While most studies of multiphase reactions on SSA have focused on marine environments, far less is known about SSA transported inland. Herein, single particle measurements of SSA are reported at a site > 320 km from the Gulf of Mexico, with transport times of 7-68 h. Samples were collected during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in June-July 2013 near Centreville, Alabama. SSA was observed in 93% of 42 time periods analyzed. During two marine air mass periods, SSA represented significant number fractions of particles in the accumulation (0.2-1.0 μm, 11%) and coarse (1.0-10.0 μm, 35%) modes. Chloride content of SSA particles ranged from full to partial depletion, with 24% of SSA particles containing chloride (mole fraction of Cl/Na > 0.1, 90% chloride depletion). Both the frequent observation of SSA at an inland site and the range of chloride depletion observed, suggest that SSA may represent an underappreciated inland sink for NOx/SO2 and source of halogen gases.

  4. Ultrafine sea spray aerosol over the southeastern Pacific: open-ocean contributions to marine boundary layer CCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Blot

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of natural aerosol emissions over the ocean are needed to estimate the anthropogenic impact on the environment. In this study, we measured sea spray aerosol (SSA concentrations with diameters larger than 0.040 μm produced by open-ocean breaking waves over the SEP (southeastern Pacific. Robust statistics were established through repeated airborne flights over 1000 km along 20° S from the coastline of Chile to 85° W during VOCALS-REx (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land-Study Regional Experiment. Non-volatile SSA number concentrations were inferred using a thermally resolved technique constrained for clean conditions with an Ångström exponent below 0.5, black carbon mass concentration at values lower than 15 ng m−3 and organic aerosol concentration less than 0.02 μg m−3. We found that number concentrations of SSAs active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN for a supersaturation of 0.25% varied between 17 and 36 cm−3, but these did not increase with the increasing mean wind speed typically observed further offshore along 20° S. Concurrent increases in mean offshore precipitation rate in excess of about 1 mm d−1 indicate that scavenging of SSAs by precipitation exceeds increases in production at wind speeds above about 8 m s−1. This demonstrates the critical role of precipitation as a major sink of SSA over the remote ocean. Finally, we found that under clean conditions and for estimated stratus supersaturations between 0.20 and 0.43%, SSA represented about 20% of the total potential CCN along 20° S.

  5. Sea spray aerosol and wave energy dissipation in the surf zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francius, M.J.; Piazzola, J.; Forget, P.; Calve, O. le; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.

    2007-01-01

    Results from a quantitative model for the prediction of the sea-salt mass flux produced in the surf zone are presented in this paper. The model relates the surf zone sea salt mass flux to the amount of wave energy dissipated in the surf zone. In order to apply this aerosol emission model, a wave

  6. A Comprehensive Breath Plume Model for Disease Transmission via Expiratory Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, S. K.; Wexler, A. S.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2012-11-01

    The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime represents a longstanding unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at low humidity and temperature, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent experiments with guinea pigs suggest that transmission is indeed maximized at low humidity and temperature, a finding which has been widely interpreted in terms of airborne influenza virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects the effect of the airflow on the transmission probability. Here we provide a comprehensive model for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting ``Gaussian breath plume'' are calculated as functions of downstream position. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the guinea pig experiments, without invoking airborne virus survivability. Moreover, the results highlight the need for careful characterization of the airflow in airborne transmission experiments.

  7. Defect-induced magnetism in undoped and Mn-doped wide band gap zinc oxide grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaung, D. E.; Kortidis, I.; Papadaki, D.; Nkosi, S. S.; Mhlongo, G. H.; Wesley-Smith, J.; Malgas, G. F.; Mwakikunga, B. W.; Coetsee, E.; Swart, H. C.; Kiriakidis, G.; Ray, S. S.

    2014-08-01

    We present a systemic study on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of the un-doped and Mn doped ZnO thin films grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis at different deposition times. XRD profiling has shown that the structures of the prepared products are wurtzite without any evidence of second phases. Surface morphology analysis revealed that incorporation of Mn in the ZnO matrix results in the formation of "doughnut-like" structures while the corresponding un-doped ZnO showed permeable structures only at long deposition time. Optical results demonstrated that Mn-doped ZnO nanostructures exhibited both the characteristic orange Mn2+ ion-related emission at 595 nm and a shoulder around 667 nm, denoting that the Mn ions have successfully occupied lattice positions of Zn ions. The chemical composition and charge states of the Mn ions in the doped ZnO nanostructures analysed by the EDX and XPS, also confirmed that Mn2+ ions were successfully incorporated onto zinc sites in the ZnO host crystal. With the combination of defect analysis based on PL and XPS, the effect of defects on the nature and origin of ferromagnetism through EPR was investigated. These findings suggested that zinc and oxygen defects, especially zinc interstitials and singly ionized oxygen vacancies, play a crucial role in mediating ferromagnetism in the undoped ZnO.

  8. Linking hygroscopicity and the surface microstructure of model inorganic salts, simple and complex carbohydrates, and authentic sea spray aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estillore, Armando D; Morris, Holly S; Or, Victor W; Lee, Hansol D; Alves, Michael R; Marciano, Meagan A; Laskina, Olga; Qin, Zhen; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2017-08-09

    Individual airborne sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles show diversity in their morphologies and water uptake properties that are highly dependent on the biological, chemical, and physical processes within the sea subsurface and the sea surface microlayer. In this study, hygroscopicity data for model systems of organic compounds of marine origin mixed with NaCl are compared to data for authentic SSA samples collected in an ocean-atmosphere facility providing insights into the SSA particle growth, phase transitions and interactions with water vapor in the atmosphere. In particular, we combine single particle morphology analyses using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with hygroscopic growth measurements in order to provide important insights into particle hygroscopicity and the surface microstructure. For model systems, a range of simple and complex carbohydrates were studied including glucose, maltose, sucrose, laminarin, sodium alginate, and lipopolysaccharides. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM). It is shown here that the E-AIM model describes well the deliquescence transition and hygroscopic growth at low mass ratios but not as well for high ratios, most likely due to a high organic volume fraction. AFM imaging reveals that the equilibrium morphology of these single-component organic particles is amorphous. When NaCl is mixed with the organics, the particles adopt a core-shell morphology with a cubic NaCl core and the organics forming a shell similar to what is observed for the authentic SSA samples. The observation of such core-shell morphologies is found to be highly dependent on the salt to organic ratio and varies depending on the nature and solubility of the organic component. Additionally, single particle organic volume fraction AFM analysis of NaCl : glucose and NaCl : laminarin mixtures shows that the ratio of salt to organics in solution does not correspond exactly for

  9. Nanoporous mannitol carrier prepared by non-organic solvent spray drying technique to enhance the aerosolization performance for dry powder inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tingting; Zhang, Xuejuan; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Ziyu; Liao, Qiuying; Xu, Jing; Huang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Jiwen; Wu, Chuan-yu; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2017-01-01

    An optimum carrier rugosity is essential to achieve a satisfying drug deposition efficiency for the carrier based dry powder inhalation (DPI). Therefore, a non-organic spray drying technique was firstly used to prepare nanoporous mannitol with small asperities to enhance the DPI aerosolization performance. Ammonium carbonate was used as a pore-forming agent since it decomposed with volatile during preparation. It was found that only the porous structure, and hence the specific surface area and carrier density were changed at different ammonium carbonate concentration. Furthermore, the carrier density was used as an indication of porosity to correlate with drug aerosolization. A good correlation between the carrier density and fine particle fraction (FPF) (r2 = 0.9579) was established, suggesting that the deposition efficiency increased with the decreased carrier density. Nanoporous mannitol with a mean pore size of about 6 nm exhibited 0.24-fold carrier density while 2.16-fold FPF value of the non-porous mannitol. The enhanced deposition efficiency was further confirmed from the pharmacokinetic studies since the nanoporous mannitol exhibited a significantly higher AUC0-8h value than the non-porous mannitol and commercial product Pulmicort. Therefore, surface modification by preparing nanoporous carrier through non-organic spray drying showed to be a facile approach to enhance the DPI aerosolization performance. PMID:28462948

  10. A comprehensive breath plume model for disease transmission via expiratory aerosols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan K Halloran

    Full Text Available The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime in temperate regions represents a longstanding, unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at lower humidities and temperatures, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent work with a guinea pig model by Lowen et al. indicated that humidity and temperature do modulate airborne influenza virus transmission, and several investigators have interpreted the observed humidity dependence in terms of airborne virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects two key observations: the effect of ambient temperature on the viral growth kinetics within the animals, and the strong influence of the background airflow on transmission. Here we provide a comprehensive theoretical framework for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting "Gaussian breath plume" are calculated as functions of position, humidity, and temperature. The overall transmission probability is modeled with a combination of the time-dependent viral concentration in the infected animal and the probability of droplet inhalation by the exposed animal downstream. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the results of Lowen et al., without invoking airborne virus survivability. The results also suggest that, at least for guinea pigs, variation in viral kinetics within the infected animals is the dominant factor explaining the increased transmission probability observed at lower temperatures.

  11. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.0.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The uploaded data consists of the BRACE Na aerosol observations paired with CMAQ model output, the updated model's parameterization of sea salt aerosol emission size...

  12. [The spectra of a laser-produced plasma source with CO2, O2 and CF4 liquid aerosol spray target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-Liang; Chen, Bo

    2008-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma (LPP) source with liquid aerosol spray target and nanosecond laser was developed, based on both soft X-ray radiation metrology and extreme ultraviolet projection lithography (EUVL). The LPP source is composed of a stainless steel solenoid valve whose temperature can be continuously controlled, a Nd : YAG laser with pulse width, working wavelength and pulse energy being 7 ns, 1.064 microm and 1J respectively, and a pulse generator which can synchronously control the valve and the laser. A standard General Valve Corporation series 99 stainless steel solenoid valve with copper gasket seals and a Kel-F poppet are used in order to minimize leakage and poppet deformation during high-pressure cryogenic operation. A close fitting copper cooling jacket surrounds the valve body. The jacket clamps a copper coolant carrying tube 3 mm in diameter, which is fed by an automatically pressurized liquid nitrogen-filled dewar. The valve temperature can be controlled between 77 and 473 K. For sufficiently high backing pressure and low temperature, the valve reservoir gas can undergo a gas-to-liquid phase transition. Upon valve pulsing, the liquid is ejected into a vacuum and breaks up into droplets, which is called liquid aerosol spray target. For the above-mentioned LPP source, firstly, by the use of Cowan program on the basis of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the authors computed the radiative transition wavelengths and probabilities in soft X-ray region for O4+, O5+, O6+, O7+, F5+, F6+ and F7+ ions which were correspondingly produced from the interaction of the 10(11)-10(12) W x cm(-2) power laser with liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray targets. Secondly, the authors measured the spectra of liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray target LPP sources in the 6-20 nm band for the 8 x 10(11) W x cm(-2) laser irradiance. The measured results were compared with the Cowan calculated results ones, and the radiative transition wavelength and probability for the

  13. Protection of hydrophobic amino acids against moisture-induced deterioration in the aerosolization performance of highly hygroscopic spray-dried powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaqi; Chan, Hak-Kim; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A

    2017-10-01

    Inhalable particles containing amorphous form of drugs or excipients may absorb atmospheric moisture, causing powder aggregation and recrystallization, adversely affecting powder dispersion and lung deposition. The present study aims to explore hydrophobic amino acids for protection against moisture in spray-dried amorphous powders, using disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) as a model drug. DSCG powders were produced by co-spray drying with isoleucine (Ile), valine (Val) and methionine (Met) in various concentrations (10, 20 and 40%w/w). Particle size distribution and morphology were measured by laser diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Physiochemical properties of the powders were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS). Particle surface chemistry was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). In vitro aerosolization performance was evaluated by a next generation impactor (NGI) after the powders were stored at 60% or 75% relative humidity (RH) for one month and three months. Ile, Val and Met significantly reduced the deleterious effect of moisture on aerosol performance, depending on the amount of amino acids in the formulation. Formulations containing 10% or 20% of Ile, Val and Met showed notable deterioration in aerosol performance, with fine particle fraction (FPF) reduced by 6-15% after one-month storage at both 60% and 75% RH. However, 40% Ile was able to maintain the aerosol performance of DSCG stored at 75% RH for one month, while the FPF dropped by 7.5% after three months of storage. In contrast, 40% Val or Met were able to maintain the aerosol performance at 60% RH storage but not at 75% RH. At 40%w/w ratio, these formulations had particle surface coverage of 94.5% (molar percent) of Ile, 87.1% of Val and 84.6% of Met, respectively, which may explain their

  14. A Comprehensive Review on Fluid Dynamics and Transport of Suspension/Liquid Droplets and Particles in High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF Thermal Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jadidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In thermal spraying processes, molten, semi-molten, or solid particles, which are sufficiently fast in a stream of gas, are deposited on a substrate. These particles can plastically deform while impacting on the substrate, which results in the formation of well-adhered and dense coatings. Clearly, particles in flight conditions, such as velocity, trajectory, temperature, and melting state, have enormous influence on the coating properties and should be well understood to control and improve the coating quality. The focus of this study is on the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF spraying and high velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS techniques, which are widely used in academia and industry to generate different types of coatings. Extensive numerical and experimental studies were carried out and are still in progress to estimate the particle in-flight behavior in thermal spray processes. In this review paper, the fundamental phenomena involved in the mentioned thermal spray techniques, such as shock diamonds, combustion, primary atomization, secondary atomization, etc., are discussed comprehensively. In addition, the basic aspects and emerging trends in simulation of thermal spray processes are reviewed. The numerical approaches such as Eulerian-Lagrangian and volume of fluid along with their advantages and disadvantages are explained in detail. Furthermore, this article provides a detailed review on simulation studies published to date.

  15. Probing Aerosol Mixing State and Composition via Direct Hygroscopicity Measurements of Highly-Representative, Laboratory-Generated Sea-Spray Aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Schill, Steven Robert

    2017-01-01

    Aerosol particles impact global climate in large part by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and seeding cloud formation events in the atmosphere, which alters the Earth’s albedo. The cloud formation ability of aerosol particles is determined by their water uptake tendencies, which is defined by their chemicophysical properties. Detailed composition information, such as the distribution of chemical components within the particles know as mixing state, is therefore essential for assessin...

  16. Effects of Relative Humidity and Spraying Medium on Ultraviolet (UV) Decontamination of Filters Loaded with Viral Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    severe acute respiratory syndrome ) have raised the level of public interest in biological aerosols and protection meth- ods that prevent their...water, electrolytes, mucus, and enzyme. AS (0.3% mucin from porcine stomach [M1778; Sigma-Aldrich] as a mucus simulant plus around 0.3% salts as...of MS2 and UV exposure susceptibility of MS2, augmented by stress imposed on MS2 by aerosolization under different loading RHs. The second

  17. Assessing the radiative forcing from sea-spray geoengineering using a composition-climate model with an aerosol microphysics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Ben; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Pringle, Kirsty; Gadian, Alan; West, Rosalind; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin; Dalvi, Mohit

    2013-04-01

    Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB) is one of several suggested solar radiation management geoengineering schemes proposed to counteract changes in climate resulting from anthropogenically increased greenhouse gas concentrations. Such changes include precipitation changes, increasing global average temperatures and an associated reduction in sea ice cover. In contrast to most previous climate model studies of MCB which quantify the climate impacts of imposed changes to the cloud droplet number concentration. In this work we explicitly resolve the injection of a size-resolved source of sea salt aerosol into the boundary layer. We use the UK Chemistry and Aerosol (UKCA) composition-climate model which is an extension of the UK Met Office Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM) and includes the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme coupled to a mechanistic cloud droplet activation module. In this study, we quantify the aerosol direct and 1st indirect forcings from MCB without applying the aerosol radiative effects to the atmosphere model, ensuring identical meteorology in the control and perturbation experiments, consistent with the IPCC defined forcing. We carry out several sensitivity runs seeding several different regions of persistent marine stratocumulus clouds with soluble sea salt aerosol of varying radius.

  18. Design, characterization, and aerosol dispersion performance modeling of advanced co-spray dried antibiotics with mannitol as respirable microparticles/nanoparticles for targeted pulmonary delivery as dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2014-09-01

    Dry powder inhalation aerosols of antibiotic drugs (a first-line aminoglycoside, tobramycin, and a first-line macrolide, azithromycin) and a sugar alcohol mucolytic agent (mannitol) as co-spray dried (co-SD) particles at various molar ratios of drug:mannitol were successfully produced by organic solution advanced co-spray drying from dilute solute concentration. These microparticulate/nanoparticulate aerosols consisting of various antibiotic drug:mannitol molar ratios were rationally designed with a narrow and unimodal primary particle size distribution, spherical particle shape, relatively smooth particle surface, and very low residual water content to minimize the interparticulate interactions and enhance in vitro aerosolization. These microparticulate/nanoparticulate inhalation powders were high-performing aerosols as reflected in the aerosol dispersion performance parameters of emitted dose, fine particle fraction (FPF), respirable fraction (RF), and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD). The glass transition temperature (Tg) values were significantly above room temperature, which indicated that the co-SD powders were all in the amorphous glassy state. The Tg values for co-SD tobramycin:mannitol powders were significantly lower than those for co-SD azithromycin:mannitol powders. The interplay between aerosol dispersion performance parameters and Tg was modeled where higher Tg values (i.e., more ordered glass) were correlated with higher values in FPF and RF and lower values in MMAD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. In situ laboratory sea spray production during the Marine Aerosol Production 2006 cruise on the northeastern Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hultin, K.A.H.; Nilsson, E.D.; Krejci, R.; Mrtensson, E.M.; Ehn, M.; Hagström, Å.; Leeuw, G. de

    2010-01-01

    Bubbles bursting from whitecaps are considered to be the most effective mechanism for particulate matter to be ejected into the atmosphere from the Earth's oceans. To realistically predict the climate effect of marine aerosols, global climate models require process-based understanding of particle

  20. Regional scale effects of the aerosol cloud interaction simulated with an online coupled comprehensive chemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bangert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We have extended the coupled mesoscale atmosphere and chemistry model COSMO-ART to account for the transformation of aerosol particles into cloud condensation nuclei and to quantify their interaction with warm cloud microphysics on the regional scale. The new model system aims to fill the gap between cloud resolving models and global scale models. It represents the very complex microscale aerosol and cloud physics as detailed as possible, whereas the continental domain size and efficient codes will allow for both studying weather and regional climate. The model system is applied in a first extended case study for Europe for a cloudy five day period in August 2005.

    The model results show that the mean cloud droplet number concentration of clouds is correlated with the structure of the terrain, and we present a terrain slope parameter TS to classify this dependency. We propose to use this relationship to parameterize the probability density function, PDF, of subgrid-scale cloud updraft velocity in the activation parameterizations of climate models.

    The simulations show that the presence of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and clouds are closely related spatially. We find high aerosol and CCN number concentrations in the vicinity of clouds at high altitudes. The nucleation of secondary particles is enhanced above the clouds. This is caused by an efficient formation of gaseous aerosol precursors above the cloud due to more available radiation, transport of gases in clean air above the cloud, and humid conditions. Therefore the treatment of complex photochemistry is crucial in atmospheric models to simulate the distribution of CCN.

    The mean cloud droplet number concentration and droplet diameter showed a close link to the change in the aerosol. To quantify the net impact of an aerosol change on the precipitation we calculated the precipitation susceptibility β for the whole model domain over a period of two days with

  1. Effect of the moisture content in aerosol on the spray performance of Stmerin ® D hydrofluoroalkane preparations (2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Saburo; Izumi, Takashi; Ito, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    The spray performance of the new Stmerin® D pressurized metered dose inhalers (MDIs), prescribed for asthma treatment, was previously reported to be sensitive to moisture content in the canister. In this formulation, active ingredients were suspended in hydrofluoroalkanes (HFA-134a and HFA-227). Here, we report on the critical moisture content of a new MDI formulation using HFA-227. We prepared MDIs with different moisture contents (107-331 ppm) and investigated the effect of moisture content on the fine particle dose (FPD). When the moisture content exceeded 280 ppm, FPD was reduced by 20%. The moisture content can be kept below this level by controlling moisture ingress with selected sealing gasket materials and by controlling the manufacturing conditions. The long-term stability and moisture penetration rate at 25°C and 60% relative humidity (RH) of the new HFA-227 formulation were tested over 36 months. Moisture content increased to approximately 210 ppm after 24 months and 230 ppm after 36 months storage; the drug content did not change over 24 months; FPD was slightly reduced by 24 months but still complied with the product specification. These results demonstrate that the critical moisture content of the Stmerin® D HFA-227 MDI formulation to meet required spray performance is between 280 and 330 ppm, and this formulation (at moisture level) is stable over 24 months.

  2. A novel micro-fluidic-jet-spray-dryer equipped with a micro-fluidic-aerosol-nozzle : equipment development and applications in making functional particles

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Duo

    2017-01-01

    Spray drying is a continuous operation that converts atomized liquid droplets into dry particles usually in a high temperature environment. The concept of spray drying was firstly reported over 150 years ago. Due to its scalable feeding capacity and simple mechanical device manipulation spray drying has become one of the most important powder manufacturing methods in both research laboratory and industry. The applications of spray drying technology has been expanded to an increasingly wide ra...

  3. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the identification of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from coniferous forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallio, M.; Jussila, M.; Rissanen, T.; Anttila, P.; Hartonen, K.; Reissell, A.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Adahchour, M.; Hyotylainen, T.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOF-MS) was applied in the identification of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from coniferous forest. The samples were collected at Hyytiälä, Finland, as part of the QUEST campaign, in

  4. Automated particulate sampler for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty verification (the DOE radionuclide aerosol sampler/analyzer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, S. M.; Miley, H. S.; Thompson, R. C.; Hubbard, C. W.

    1997-06-01

    The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was recently signed by President Clinton and is intended to eliminate all nuclear weapons testing. One way which the treaty seeks to accomplish this is by the establishment of the International Monitoring System. As stated in the latest Working Papers of the Draft CTBT, "The International Monitoring System shall comprise facilities for seismological monitoring, radionuclide monitoring including certified laboratories, hydroacoustic monitoring, infrasound monitoring, and respective means of communication, and shall be supported by the International Data Centre of the Technical Secretariat". Radionuclide monitoring consists of both radionuclides associated with particulates and relevant noble gases. This type of monitoring is quite valuable since indications of a nuclear test in the form of radioactive particulate or radioactive noble gases may be detected at great distances from the detonation site. The system presented here is concerned only with radioactive particulate monitoring and is described as an automated sampler/analyzer which has been developed for the Department of Energy (DoE) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  5. Design, physicochemical characterization, and optimization of organic solution advanced spray-dried inhalable dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine poly(ethylene glycol) (DPPE-PEG) microparticles and nanoparticles for targeted respiratory nanomedicine delivery as dry powder inhalation aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenach, Samantha A; Vogt, Frederick G; Anderson, Kimberly W; Hilt, J Zach; McGarry, Ronald C; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    Novel advanced spray-dried and co-spray-dried inhalable lung surfactant-mimic phospholipid and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)ylated lipopolymers as microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders of biodegradable biocompatible lipopolymers were rationally formulated via an organic solution advanced spray-drying process in closed mode using various phospholipid formulations and rationally chosen spray-drying pump rates. Ratios of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine PEG (DPPE-PEG) with varying PEG lengths were mixed in a dilute methanol solution. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the smooth, spherical particle morphology of the inhalable particles. The size of the particles was statistically analyzed using the scanning electron micrographs and SigmaScan® software and were determined to be 600 nm to 1.2 μm in diameter, which is optimal for deep-lung alveolar penetration. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) were performed to analyze solid-state transitions and long-range molecular order, respectively, and allowed for the confirmation of the presence of phospholipid bilayers in the solid state of the particles. The residual water content of the particles was very low, as quantified analytically via Karl Fischer titration. The composition of the particles was confirmed using attenuated total-reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and chemical imaging confirmed the chemical homogeneity of the particles. The dry powder aerosol dispersion properties were evaluated using the Next Generation Impactor™ (NGI™) coupled with the HandiHaler® dry powder inhaler device, where the mass median aerodynamic diameter from 2.6 to 4.3 μm with excellent aerosol dispersion performance, as exemplified by high values of emitted dose, fine particle fraction, and respirable fraction. Overall, it was determined that the pump rates defined in the

  6. Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbach, Carolyn

    1986-01-01

    Teaching comprehension skills requires teaching to intuition with activities such as presenting puzzling situations to introduce a topic, using art to elicit latent feelings, using imagery and improvisations to enhance visualization, and using music and dance to encourage nonverbal expressions. (DB)

  7. Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analysis of aerosol from tobacco heating product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savareear, Benjamin; Lizak, Radoslaw; Brokl, Michał; Wright, Chris; Liu, Chuan; Focant, Jean-Francois

    2017-10-20

    A method involving headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) was developed and optimised to elucidate the volatile composition of the particulate phase fraction of aerosol produced by tobacco heating products (THPs). Three SPME fiber types were studied in terms of extraction capacity and precision measurements. Divinylbenzene polydimethylsiloxane appeared as the most efficient coating for these measurements. A central composite design of experiment was utilised for the optimization of the extraction conditions. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of the headspace above THP aerosol condensate was carried out using optimised extraction conditions. Semi-quantitative analyses of detected constituents were performed by assuming that their relative response factors to the closest internal standard (itR) were equal to 1. Using deconvoluted mass spectral data (library similarity and reverse match >750) and linear retention indices (match window of ±15 index units), 205 peaks were assigned to individual compounds, 82 of which (including 43 substances previously reported to be present in tobacco) have not been reported previously in tobacco aerosol. The major volatile fraction of the headspace contained ketones, alcohols, aldehydes, alicyclic hydrocarbons alkenes, and alkanes. The method was further applied to compare the volatiles from the particulate phase of aerosol composition of THP with that of reference cigarette smoke and showed that the THP produced a less complex chemical mixture. This new method showed good efficiency and precision for the peak areas and peak numbers from the volatile fraction of aerosol particulate phase for both THP and reference cigarettes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fission product removal by containment spray - influence of the distance between the drops on the aerosol collection efficiency; Influence de la densite spatiale des gouttes d'aspersion sur l'efficacite de collecte des produits de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauchet, N

    2000-07-01

    This work is within the framework of the studies that are conducted at the IPSN concerning the loss of coolant in a nuclear reactor. During this kind of accident, a spray system in the reactor containment induces the scrubbing of fission products in the atmosphere, and allows the decrease of their concentration in the containment. Our objective is to study the influence of the distance between the drops of their aerosol collection efficiency. This is not taken into account in the existing models. We stimulate the various aerosol collection mechanisms with one free falling drop using computational fluid dynamics codes. The mechanisms are: deposition by brownian diffusion, impaction and interception of the particles by the drop, and collection of particles in the presence of steam condensation at the surface of the drop. These phenomena are studied for drops ranging in diameter from 100 to 700 micrometers, falling in a saturated air-steam mixture whose temperature varies between 20 and 140 degrees Celsius, and total pressure varies between 1 and 5 bars. We validate these models with results available in the literature and with experimental results CARAIDAS. Then we apply these models to the case of three aligned drops, which constitutes a case for which the proximity of the drops has a strong influence on the collection of aerosols. While varying the distance between the drop from 5 to 25 drop diameters, we can highlight the modification of the collection efficiency of each mechanism related to the disturbance of the velocity and concentration fields in the vicinity of the drops. We note that the strongest variations of efficiency observed are in the field of impaction, and that the steam condensation at the surface of the drops limits the decrease. (authors)

  9. Comprehensive chemical comparison of fuel composition and aerosol particles emitted from a ship diesel engine by gas chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry with improved data processing routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Christopher P; Schwemer, Theo; Sklorz, Martin; O'Connor, Peter B; Barrow, Mark P; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of petrochemical materials and particulate matter originating from combustion sources remains a challenging task for instrumental analytical techniques. A detailed chemical characterisation is essential for addressing health and environmental effects. Sophisticated instrumentation, such as mass spectrometry coupled with chromatographic separation, is capable of a comprehensive characterisation, but needs advanced data processing methods. In this study, we present an improved data processing routine for the mass chromatogram obtained from gas chromatography hyphenated to atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and ultra high resolution mass spectrometry. The focus of the investigation was the primary combustion aerosol samples, i.e. particulate matter extracts, as well as the corresponding fossil fuels fed to the engine. We demonstrate that utilisation of the entire transient and chromatographic information results in advantages including minimisation of ionisation artefacts and a reliable peak assignment. A comprehensive comparison of the aerosol and the feed fuel was performed by applying intensity weighted average values, compound class distribution and principle component analysis. Certain differences between the aerosol generated with the two feed fuels, diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil, as well as between the aerosol and the feed were revealed. For the aerosol from heavy fuel oil, oxidised species from the CHN and CHS class precursors of the feed were predominant, whereas the CHOx class is predominant in the combustion aerosol from light fuel oil. Furthermore, the complexity of the aerosol increases significantly compared to the feed and incorporating a higher chemical space. Coupling of atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation to gas chromatography was found to be a useful additional approach for characterisation of a combustion aerosol, especially with an automated utilisation of the information from the ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer

  10. Ship diesel emission aerosols: A comprehensive study on the chemical composition, the physical properties and the molecular biological and toxicological effects on human lung cells of aerosols from a ship diesel engine operated with heavy or light diesel fuel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Dietmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Paur, H.; Dilger, M.; Mülhopt, S.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Hirvonen, M.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Berube, K.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Karg, E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Lintelmann, J.; Sklorz, M.; Arteaga Salas, M.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Reda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Gröger, T.; Weiss, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties, transformation processes and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. This is performed by thorough comprehensive chemical and physical characterization of combustion aerosols (including application of advantageous on-line methods) and studying of biological effects on human lung cell-cultures. A new ALI air-liquid-interface (ALI) exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for the HICE-measurements. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized (e.g. proteomics). By using stable isotope labeling technologies (13C-Glucose/metabolomics; 2H-Lysine/SILAC-proteomics), high sensitivity and accuracy for detection of molecular-biological effects is achievable even at sub-toxic effect dose levels. Aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine (heavy/light fuel oil) have been investigated. The effect of wood combustion and ship diesel PM e.g. on the protein expression of ALI-exposed A549 cells was compared. Filtered aerosol is used as gas-reference for the isotope labeling based method (SILAC). Therefore the effects of wood combustion- and shipping diesel-PM can be directly compared. Ship diesel aerosol causes a broader distribution in the observed fold changes (log2), i.e. more proteins are significantly up-/down-regulated in case of shipping diesel PM-exposure. This corresponds to a stronger biological reaction if compared to wood combustion-PM exposure. The chemical analysis results on wood combustion- and ship diesel-PM depict more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)/oxidized-PAH but less of some transition metals (V, Fe) in the wood combustion case. Interestingly, alkylated PAH are considerably more abundant in shipping PM, suggesting that PAH/Oxy-PAH may be less relevant for

  11. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  12. An evaluation of the respiratory health status of automotive spray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    f exposure, spray-paint 'bounce-back' phenomenon, and lealthy worker' effect may be more important. ('Bounce .ack' refers to the phenomenon whereby some of the mist. 'om the spray-gun, after striking the surface being. 'ainted, is deflected back into the operator's breathing. _one in the form of fine droplets or aerosols.) ...

  13. Aerosol transport in the coastal environment and effects on extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Leeuw, G. de; Berkowicz, R.

    1998-01-01

    The aerosol in the coastal environment consists of a complicated mixture of anthropogenic and rural aerosol generated over land, and sea spray aerosol. Also, particles are generate dover sea by physical and chemical processes and the chemical composition may change due to condensation/evaporation of

  14. Microplasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ""This unique book on development of microplasma sprayed HAp coating has been organized in a very compact yet comprehensive manner. This book also highlights the horizons of future research that invites the attention of global community, particularly those in bio-medical materials and bio-medical engineering field. This book will surely act as a very useful reference material for both graduate/post-graduate students and researchers in the field of biomedical, orthopedic and manufacturing engineering and research. I truly believ that this is the first ever effort which covers almost all the

  15. Spray combustion stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pak-Yan; Jeng, S. M.; Litchford, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    The central purpose of this project is the improvement of liquid-fueled rocket motor design technology in order to assist the establishment of economical commercial access to space through the development of engines with enhanced performance and reliability. Specific research effort in the project is focused on spray physics and associated combustion instability phenomena. Results garnered from this work will contribute to the development of new computational tools for design of stable liquid propellant rocket engines. The specific objectives of the research effort include identifying and evaluating physical submodels which pertain to spray combustion stability with the idea of enhancing or refining existing submodels with a more comprehensive approach. In particular, any refinements to the spray combustion physical submodels which are achieved during the project will be channeled back to Rocketdyne for incorporation in their ARICC liquid rocket combustor code as second generation improvements. Also, as the ARICC code forms the basis or future CFD development, some effort is devoted to an evaluation of the code's capability for modeling oscillating pressure waves within the combustor.

  16. Nicotine Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine nasal spray is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine nasal spray should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavior change techniques. Nicotine nasal spray is in a class of medications ...

  17. Novel Applications of Remote Sensing for Improved Quantification of Sea Spray Source Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, M. D.; Bettenhausen, M. H.; Johnston, W. F.; Gaiser, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    By producing bubbles, sea spray and marine aerosols, whitecaps are involved in the planetary heat budget, air-sea gas exchange, atmospheric marine boundary layer visibility, tropical cyclone intensification, and aerosol radiative forcing of climate. In addition, whitecaps affect geophysical retrievals of ocean surface wind vector, salinity, and ocean color. Better measurements and parameterizations of the whitecap fraction would improve the evaluation of these processes. The sea spray source function currently used in climate models is based on the relation between whitecap fraction W and wind speed U. However, parameterization W(U) does not capture adequately the high spatial and temporal variability of the oceanic whitecaps caused by water temperature, atmospheric stability, wave age, and wind history. Developing a predictive relationship capable of estimating W over the range of conditions encountered globally requires that the dependence of W on these additional factors be understood and modeled. The existing database of W compiled from photographs, while valuable in gaining knowledge, represents only a limited range of conditions. Satellite remote sensing of whitecap fraction opens the possibility to improve the modeling of its variability, hence the quantification of the sea spray source function. Using satellite based estimates, we have assembled a database of W and additional meteorological and environmental factors with global coverage and a much greater range of variability. This extensive database allows comprehensive analysis of W variability. This knowledge provides basis for improvement of existing or development of new models for W which more fully account for effects of additional factors. A systematic research program is underway at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to retrieve W from existing satellite-borne microwave instruments. Building on initial feasibility study, NRL now has the capability of obtaining W globally with an improved algorithm

  18. Virus -induced plankton dynamic and sea spray oragnics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Maria Cristina; O'Dowd, Colin; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The processes that link phytoplankton biomass and productivity to the organic matter enrichment in sea spray aerosol are far from being understood and modelling predictions remain highly uncertain at the moment. While some studies have asserted that the enrichment of OM in sea spray aerosol is independent on marine productivity, others, on the contrary, have shown significant correlation with phytoplankton biomass and productivity (Chl-a retrieved by satellites). Here we show that viral infection of prokaryotes and phytoplankton, by inducing the release of large quantities of surfaceactive organic matter (cell debris, exudates and other colloidal gel-forming material), in part due to cell lysis and plankton defence reactions, and in part from rapid virus multiplication, triggers the organic matter (OM) enrichment in the sea-spray particles during blooms. We show that virus-induced bloom dynamics may explain the contrasting results present in literature on the link between primary productivity and OM sea spray enrichment.

  19. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  20. Fixed automated spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  1. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of fentanyl nasal spray out. Remove the protective cap from the bottle tip. Hold the bottle so that the nozzle ... after using fentanyl nasal spray. Replace the protective cap on the bottle and put the bottle back in the child- ...

  2. Naloxone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naloxone nasal spray is used along with emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects of a known or suspected opiate (narcotic) overdose. Naloxone nasal spray is in a class of medications ...

  3. Organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  4. Preliminary investigation tests of novel antifungal topical aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Monali Kapadia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spray formulation can minimize pain and irritation experience during the application of conventional dosage forms. Econazole Nitrate is an active ingredient of the aerosol concentrate to be used for twice-daily application because of its long durability in the superficial layers of the fungal infected skin. The aim of this study is preliminary investigation of Econazole Nitrate spray by varying the concentrations of different constituents of the spray. The ratios of Propylene glycol (PG and isopropyl myristate (IPM were selected as independent variables in 2 2 full factorial designs, keeping the concentration of solvent, co-solvent and propellant LPG constant. Aerosol also contained Ethanol as solvent and Isopropyl alcohol as co-solvent. All ingredients of the aerosol were packaged in an aluminum container fitted with continuous-spray valves. Physical properties evaluated for the Econazole Nitrate spray included delivery rate, delivery amount, pressure, minimum fill, leakage, flammability, spray patterns, particle image and plume angle. Glass containers were used to study incompatibility between concentrate and propellant due to the ease of visible inspection. Isopropyl myristate at lower concentrate showed turbidity, while at high concentration it met the requirements for aerosol and produced Econazole Nitrate spray with expected characteristics.

  5. Towards the regulation of aerosol emissions by their potential health impact: Assessing adverse effects of aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine emissions by combining comprehensive data on the chemical composition and their toxicological effects on human lung cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Streibel, T.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Rheda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Czech, H.; Tiita, P.; Jalava, P.; Kasurinen, S.; Schwemer, T.; Yli-Prilä, P.; Tissari, J.; Lamberg, H.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ship engine emissions are important regarding lung and cardiovascular diseases in coastal regions worldwide. Bio mass burning is made responsible for adverse health effects in many cities and rural regions. The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. Typical lung cell responses to combustion aerosols include inflammation and apoptosis, but a molecular link with the specific chemical composition in particular of ship emissions has not been established. Through an air-liquid interface exposure system (ALI), we exposed human lung cells at-site to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on common heavy fuel oil (HFO) and cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF) as well as to emissions of wood combustion compliances. A special field deployable ALI-exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for this study. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling to characterise the cellular responses. The HFO ship emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds (transition metals, organic toxicants) and particle masses. The cellular responses included inflammation and oxidative stress. Surprisingly, the DF ship emissions, which predominantly contain rather "pure" carbonaceous soot and much less known toxicants, induced significantly broader biological effects, affecting essential cellular pathways (e.g., mitochondrial function and intracellular transport). Therefore the use of distillate fuels for shipping (this is the current emission reduction strategy of the IMO) appears insufficient for diminishing health effects. The study suggests rather reducing the particle emissions

  6. Method of spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burminskiy, E.P.; Karpenko, V.M.; Remizov, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    In the proposed method for spraying fluid or gas, expansion of the regulation range is achieved because regulation of the supply of the sprayer is done by changing the ratio of consumption of its streams. The device for realizing the method contains outer and inner annular collectors for supply of the sprayer with corresponding outlet nozzles, and also annular fuel slits. The streams of spraying agent flowing from the group of nozzles freely penetrate each other and form two streams. One of the streams in the form of a converging cone is directed to the central zone of the spray (S) and the other in the form of a diverging cone into the peripheral zone. With regulation of the ratio of flow of the sprayer, the spray is expanded or constricted. Thus, the proposed method makes it possible in broad limits to regulate the form of the spray and to guarantee high quality of spraying with any angle of opening of the spray.

  7. Results and code predictions for ABCOVE (aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation) aerosol code validation: Test AB6 with two aerosol species. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilliard, R K; McCormack, J C; Muhlestein, L D

    1984-12-01

    A program for aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation (ABCOVE) has been developed in accordance with the LMFBR Safety Program Plan. The ABCOVE program is a cooperative effort between the USDOE, the USNRC, and their contractor organizations currently involved in aerosol code development, testing or application. The second large-scale test in the ABCOVE program, AB6, was performed in the 850-m/sup 3/ CSTF vessel with a two-species test aerosol. The test conditions simulated the release of a fission product aerosol, NaI, in the presence of a sodium spray fire. Five organizations made pretest predictions of aerosol behavior using seven computer codes. Three of the codes (QUICKM, MAEROS and CONTAIN) were discrete, multiple species codes, while four (HAA-3, HAA-4, HAARM-3 and SOFIA) were log-normal codes which assume uniform coagglomeration of different aerosol species. Detailed test results are presented and compared with the code predictions for seven key aerosol behavior parameters.

  8. Fine Sprays for Disinfection within Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Nasr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Problems exist worldwide with Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI's. The Spray Research Group (SRG have been working with relevant industries in developing a product which can provide a delivery system for treatment chemicals for surfaces, including the design and testing of a novel Spill-Return Atomiser (SRA for this purpose. A comprehensive description of this atomiser has already been given. This paper reports on a new application of this atomiser and discusses the problem of spray coating for disinfection that has been considered very little in previous work. The related spray coating performance tests in developing the product are thus provided. The experimental work includes determining the required spray duration and the coverage area produced by different sprays, including the analysis of the effects of atomiser positions, configurations, and the required number of atomisers. Comparison is made with the efficacy of an ultrasonic gas atomiser that is currently used for this purpose. The investigation has found that the utilisation of fine sprays (10μm>D32>25μm at high liquid pressure (<12MPa and low flow rates (<0.3 l/min is suitable for surface disinfection in healthcare applications (i.e. MRSA, VRSA etc.

  9. Aerosol absorption and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stier

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006 significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the short-wave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiative forcing clear-sky from −0.79 to −0.53 W m−2 (33% and all-sky from −0.47 to −0.13 W m−2 (72%. Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19 W m−2 (36% clear-sky and of 0.12 W m−2 (92% all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05 W

  10. A New Study of Sea Spray Optical Properties from Multi-Sensor Spaceborne Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K. W.; Meskhidze, N.; Josset, D.; Gasso, S.

    2014-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite sensor require the assumption of an extinction-to-backscatter ratio, also known as the lidar ratio. This paper evaluates a new method to calculate lidar ratio of sea spray aerosol using two independent sources: the AOD from Synergized Optical Depth of Aerosols (SODA) and the integrated attenuated backscatter from CALIOP. The method applied in this study allows particulate lidar ratio to be calculated for individual CALIOP retrievals of single aerosol layer columns over the ocean. Analyses are carried out using CALIOP level 2, 5km sea spray aerosol layer products and collocated SODA nighttime data from December 2007 to December 2009. The global mean lidar ratio for sea spray aerosols was found to be 26 sr, roughly 30 higher than the one prescribed by CALIOP. Data analysis also showed considerable spatiotemporal variability in calculated lidar ratio over different parts of the remote oceans. The calculated aerosol lidar ratios are shown to be inversely related to the mean ocean surface wind speed: increase in ocean surface wind speed (U10) from 0 to 15 ms-1 reduces the mean lidar ratios for sea spray particles from 32 sr (for 0 U10 4 ms-1) to 22 sr (for U10 15 ms-1). Such changes in the lidar ratio are expected to have a corresponding effect on sea spray AOD. The outcomes of this study are relevant for future improvements of the SODA and CALIOP operational product and could lead to more accurate retrievals of sea spray AOD.

  11. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia: AEROSOL AND MONSOON CLIMATE INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhanqing [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Lau, W. K. -M. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Ramanathan, V. [Department of Atmospheric and Climate Sciences, University of California, San Diego California USA; Wu, G. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Ding, Y. [National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing China; Manoj, M. G. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Liu, J. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Qian, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Li, J. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Zhou, T. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Fan, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Rosenfeld, D. [Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem Israel; Ming, Y. [Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory, NOAA, Princeton New Jersey USA; Wang, Y. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Huang, J. [College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou China; Wang, B. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Hawaii USA; School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing China; Xu, X. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Lee, S. -S. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Cribb, M. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Zhang, F. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Yang, X. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Zhao, C. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Takemura, T. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Wang, K. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Xia, X. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Yin, Y. [School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing China; Zhang, H. [National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing China; Guo, J. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Zhai, P. M. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Sugimoto, N. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba Japan; Babu, S. S. [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram India; Brasseur, G. P. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-11-15

    Asian monsoons and aerosols have been studied extensively which are intertwined in influencing the climate of Asia. This paper provides a comprehensive review of ample studies on Asian aerosol, monsoon and their interactions. The region is the primary source of aerosol emissions of varies species, influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes. On continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulation. The atmospheric thermodynamic state may also be altered by the aerosol serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of numerous monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from biomass burning, and biogenic aerosols from vegetation are considered integral components of an intrinsic aerosol-monsoon climate system, subject to external forcings of global warming, anthropogenic aerosols, and land use and change. Future research on aerosol-monsoon interactions calls for an integrated approach and international collaborations based on long-term sustained observations, process measurements, and improved models, as well as using observations to constrain model simulations and projections.

  12. The "Deep Blue" Aerosol Project at NASA GSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Andrew; Hsu, N. C.; Lee, J.; Bettenhausen, C.; Carletta, N.; Chen, S.; Esmaili, R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols such as mineral dust, wildfire smoke, sea spray, and volcanic ash are of interest for a variety of reasons including public health, climate change, hazard avoidance, and more. Deep Blue is a project which uses satellite observations of the Earth from sensors such as SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS to monitor the global aerosol burden. This talk will cover some basics about aerosols and the principles of aerosol remote sensing, as well as discussing specific results and future directions for the Deep Blue project.

  13. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  14. The Two‐Column Aerosol Project: Phase I—Overview and impact of elevated aerosol layers on aerosol optical depth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berg, Larry K; Fast, Jerome D; Barnard, James C; Burton, Sharon P; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A; Flynn, Connor J; Hair, Johnathan W; Hostetler, Chris A; Hubbe, John; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I; Kluzek, Celine D; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, Kathleen; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail; Rogers, Ray R; Russell, Philip B; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Arthur J; Segal‐Rosenheimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R; Tomlinson, Jason M; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline M; Volkamer, Rainer; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M

    2016-01-01

    The Two‐Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including...

  15. Mixed phase Pt-Ru catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell anode by flame aerosol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Bischoff, H.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2005-01-01

    A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst......Ru1/Vulcan carbon. The kinetics of methanol oxidation on the mixed phase catalyst was also explored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. (c) 2005 The Electrochemical Society....

  16. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  17. Photodiode array to charged aerosol detector response ratio enables comprehensive quantitative monitoring of basic drugs in blood by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viinamäki, Jenni; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2015-03-20

    Quantitative screening for a broad range of drugs in blood is regularly required to assess drug abuse and poisoning within analytical toxicology. Mass spectrometry-based procedures suffer from the large amount of work required to maintain quantitative calibration in extensive multi-compound methods. In this study, a quantitative drug screening method for blood samples was developed based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with two consecutive detectors: a photodiode array detector and a corona charged aerosol detector (UHPLC-DAD-CAD). The 2.1 mm × 150 mm UHPLC column contained a high-strength silica C18 bonded phase material with a particle size of 1.8 μm, and the mobile phase consisted of methanol/0.1% trifluoroacetic acid in gradient mode. Identification was based on retention time, UV spectrum and the response ratio from the two detectors. Using historic calibration over a one-month period, the median precision (RSD) of retention times was 0.04% and the median accuracy (bias) of quantification 6.75%. The median precision of the detector response ratio over two orders of magnitude was 12%. The applicable linear ranges were generally 0.05-5 mg L(-1). The method was validated for 161 compounds, including antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines, opioid analgesics, and adrenergic beta blocking drugs, among others. The main novelty of the method was the proven utility of the response ratio of DAD to CAD, which provided the additional identification efficiency required. Unlike with mass spectrometry, the high stability of identification and quantification allowed the use of facile historic calibration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical Models for Viscoelastic Liquid Atomization Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Qian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomization spray of non-Newtonian liquid plays a pivotal role in various engineering applications, especially for the energy utilization. To operate spray systems efficiently and well understand the effects of liquid rheological properties on the whole spray process, a comprehensive model using Euler-Lagrangian approaches was established to simulate the evolution of the atomization spray for viscoelastic liquid. Based on the Oldroyd model, the viscoelastic linear dispersion relation was introduced into the primary atomization; an extended viscoelastic version of Taylor analogy breakup (TAB model was proposed; and the coalescence criteria was modified by rheological parameters, such as the relaxation time, the retardation time and the zero shear viscosity. The predicted results are validated with experimental data varying air-liquid mass flow ratio (ALR. Then, numerical calculations are conducted to investigate the characteristics of viscoelastic liquid atomization process. Results showed that the evolutionary trend of droplet mean diameter, Weber number and Ohnesorge number of viscoelastic liquids along with axial direction were qualitatively similar to that of Newtonian liquid. However, the mean size of polymer solution increased more gently than that of water at the downstream of the spray, which was beneficial to stable control of the desirable size in the applications. As concerned the effects of liquid physical properties, the surface tension played an important role in the primary atomization, which indicated the benefit of selecting the solvents with lower surface tension for finer atomization effects, while, for the evolution of atomization spray, larger relaxation time and zero shear viscosity increased droplet Sauter mean diameter (SMD significantly. The zero shear viscosity was effective throughout the jet region, while the effect of relaxation time became weaken at the downstream of the spray field.

  19. Optical manipulation of aerosol particle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J. P.; Haddrell, A. E.; Walker, J. S.; Power, R.; Bones, D. L.; Davies, J. F.

    2011-10-01

    Aerosols play a crucial role in many areas of science, ranging from atmospheric chemistry and physics, to drug delivery to the lungs, combustion science and spray drying. The development of new methods to characterise the properties and dynamics of aerosol particles is of crucial importance if the complex role that particles play is to be more fully understood. Optical tweezers provide a valuable new tool to address fundamental questions in aerosol science. Single or multiple particles 1-15 μm in diameter can be manipulated over indefinite timescales using optical tweezing. Linear and non-linear Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies can be used to probe a particle's composition and size. In this paper we will report on the latest developments in the use of holographic optical trapping (HOT) to study aerosols. Although widely used to trap and manipulate arrays of particles in the condensed phase, the application of HOT to aerosols is still in its infancy. We will explore the opportunities provided by the formation of complex optical landscapes for controlling aerosol flow, for comparing the properties of multiple particles, for performing the first ever digital microfluidic operations in the aerosol phase and for examining interparticle interactions that can lead to coalescence/coagulation. Although aerosol coagulation is the primary process driving the evolution of particle size distributions, it remains very poorly understood. Using HOT, we can resolve the time-dependent motion of trapped particles and the light scattering from particles during the coalescence process.

  20. Formation of Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films Using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis: The Importance of the Water Content in the Aerosol Solution and the Substrate Temperature for Enhancing Electrical Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Maldonado

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Indium doped zinc oxide [ZnO:In] thin films have been deposited at 430°C on soda-lime glass substrates by the chemical spray technique, starting from zinc acetate and indium acetate. Pulverization of the solution was done by ultrasonic excitation. The variations in the electrical, structural, optical, and morphological characteristics of ZnO:In thin films, as a function of both the water content in the starting solution and the substrate temperature, were studied. The electrical resistivity of ZnO:In thin films is not significantly affected with the increase in the water content, up to 200 mL/L; further increase in water content causes an increase in the resistivity of the films. All films show a polycrystalline character, fitting well with the hexagonal ZnO wurtzite-type structure. No preferential growth in samples deposited with the lowest water content was observed, whereas an increase in water content gave rise to a (002 growth. The surface morphology of the films shows a consistency with structure results, as non-geometrical shaped round grains were observed in the case of films deposited with the lowest water content, whereas hexagonal slices, with a wide size distribution were observed in the other cases. In addition, films deposited with the highest water content show a narrow size distribution.

  1. Fentanyl Sublingual Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentanyl sublingual spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  2. Calcitonin Salmon Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bottle and turn to tighten. Then take the plastic cover off of the top of the spray unit. ... room temperature in an upright position. Replace the plastic cover to keep the nozzle clean. Opened calcitonin salmon ...

  3. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gently blow his or her nose. Remove the bottle cap and gently shake the bottle. Hold the pump ... on the applicator to remove it from the bottle. Soak the cap and spray nozzle in warm water for a ...

  4. Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

  5. Development of an aerosol decontamination factor evaluation method using an aerosol spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai, Taizo, E-mail: t-kanai@criepi.denken.or.jp; Furuya, Masahiro, E-mail: furuya@criepi.denken.or.jp; Arai, Takahiro, E-mail: t-arai@criepi.denken.or.jp; Nishi, Yoshihisa, E-mail: y-nishi@criepi.denken.or.jp

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Aerosol DF of each diameter is evaluable by using optical scattering method. • Outlet aerosol concentration shows exponential decay by the submergence. • This decay constant depends on the aerosol diameter. • Aerosol DF at water scrubber is described by simple equation. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the release of fission products into containment and an increase in containment pressure are assumed to be possible. When the containment is damaged by excess pressure or temperature, radioactive materials are released. Pressure suppression pools, containment spray systems and a filtered containment venting system (FCVS) reduce containment pressure and reduce the radioactive release into the environment. These devices remove radioactive materials via various mechanisms. Pressure suppression pools remove radioactive materials by pool scrubbing. Spray systems remove radioactive materials by droplet−aerosol interaction. FCVS, which is installed in the exhaust system, comprises multi-scrubbers (venturi-scrubber, pool scrubbing, static mixer, metal−fiber filter and molecular sieve). For the particulate radioactive materials, its size affects the removal performance and a number of studies have been performed on the removal effect of radioactive materials. This study has developed a new means of evaluating aerosol removal efficiency. The aerosol number density of each effective diameter (light scattering equivalent diameter) is measured using an optical method, while the decontamination factor (DF) of each effective diameter is evaluated by the inlet outlet number density ratio. While the applicable scope is limited to several conditions (geometry of test section: inner diameter 500 mm × height 8.0 m, nozzle shape and air-water ambient pressure conditions), this study has developed a numerical model which defines aerosol DF as a function of aerosol diameter (d) and submergences (x).

  6. Formation of indium-doped zinc oxide thin films using chemical spray techniques: The importance of acetic acid content in the aerosol solution and the substrate temperature for enhancing electrical transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, L. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Division de Estudios Disciplinares, Universidad Iberoamericana, Av. Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma 880, Santa Fe 012100, D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Valenzuela, A. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Zironi, E.P. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, D.F. (Mexico); Canetas-Ortega, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, D.F. (Mexico); Terrones, M. [Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. seccion, San Luis Potosi 78216 (Mexico) and Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Division de Estudios Disciplinares, Universidad Iberoamericana, Av. Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma 880, Santa Fe 012100, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: mterrones@ipicyt.edu.mx; Maldonado, A. [Depto. de Ing. Electrica, CINVESTAV IPN, SEES, Ap. Postal 14740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2006-05-01

    Indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) thin films were grown on glass substrates using the chemical spray technique. The effects of the acetic acid content in the starting solution (c {sub AA}), as well as the substrate temperature (T {sub S}), were studied. Our results demonstrate that when c {sub AA} is extremely low, the resistivity values of the zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films become relatively high (in the order of 4 x 10{sup -2} {omega} cm). When the c {sub AA} is increased at a fixed temperature, the resistivity of the films decreases, reaching values as low as 4 x 10{sup -3} {omega} cm for thin films deposited at 525 deg. C. The electron mobility could also increase to a maximum value of 10.5 cm{sup 2}/(V s) for films deposited at 500 deg. C. We also observed an enhancement in the electrical transport properties of the films by varying T {sub S}; the lowest resistivity values occurred in films deposited at T {sub S} between 475 and 525 deg. C. In addition, the relative intensity of the diffraction peaks associated with the crystallographic planes is strongly affected by the c {sub AA} concentration. X-ray diffraction studies reveal the polycrystalline nature of the films exhibiting a hexagonal wurtzite type, with a preferential orientation of the film depending on the acetic acid concentration. Film morphology was also affected by varying c {sub AA}, as grains with distinct geometrical shapes were observed. Finally, the optical transmittance of all these films was found to be higher than 85%.

  7. Development, production and evaluation of aerosol climate data records from European satellite observations (Aerosol_cci)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popp, Thomas; De Leeuw, Gerrit; Bingen, Christine; Brühl, Christoph; Capelle, Virginie; Chedin, Alain; Clarisse, Lieven; Dubovik, Oleg; Grainger, Roy; Griesfeller, Jan; Heckel, Andreas; Kinne, Stefan; Klüser, Lars; Kosmale, Miriam; Kolmonen, Pekka; Lelli, Luca; Litvinov, Pavel; Mei, Linlu; North, Peter; Pinnock, Simon; Povey, Adam; Robert, Charles; Schulz, Michael; Sogacheva, Larisa; Stebel, Kerstin; Zweers, Deborah Stein; Thomas, Gareth; Tilstra, Lieuwe Gijsbert; Vandenbussche, Sophie; Veefkind, J.P.; Vountas, Marco; Xue, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Producing a global and comprehensive description of atmospheric aerosols requires integration of ground-based, airborne, satellite and model datasets. Due to its complexity, aerosol monitoring requires the use of several data records with complementary information content. This paper describes

  8. Principle considerations for the risk assessment of sprayed consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiling, W; Bascompta, M; Carthew, P; Catalano, G; Corea, N; D'Haese, A; Jackson, P; Kromidas, L; Meurice, P; Rothe, H; Singal, M

    2014-05-16

    In recent years, the official regulation of chemicals and chemical products has been intensified. Explicitly for spray products enhanced requirements to assess the consumers'/professionals' exposure to such product type have been introduced. In this regard the Aerosol-Dispensers-Directive (75/324/EEC) with obligation for marketing aerosol dispensers, and the Cosmetic-Products-Regulation (1223/2009/EC) which obliges the insurance of a safety assessment, have to be mentioned. Both enactments, similar to the REACH regulation (1907/2006/EC), require a robust chemical safety assessment. From such assessment, appropriate risk management measures may be identified to adequately control the risk of these chemicals/products to human health and the environment when used. Currently, the above-mentioned regulations lack the guidance on which data are needed for preparing a proper hazard analysis and safety assessment of spray products. Mandatory in the process of inhalation risk and safety assessment is the determination and quantification of the actual exposure to the spray product and more specifically, its ingredients. In this respect the current article, prepared by the European Aerosol Federation (FEA, Brussels) task force "Inhalation Toxicology", intends to introduce toxicological principles and the state of the art in currently available exposure models adapted for typical application scenarios. This review on current methodologies is intended to guide safety assessors to better estimate inhalation exposure by using the most relevant data. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of primary organic sea spray emissions on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Westervelt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work estimates the primary marine organic aerosol global emission source and its impact on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations by implementing an organic sea spray source function into a series of global aerosol simulations. The source function assumes that a fraction of the sea spray emissions, depending on the local chlorophyll concentration, is organic matter in place of sea salt. Effect on CCN concentrations (at 0.2% supersaturation is modeled using the Two-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS microphysics algorithm coupled to the GISS II-prime general circulation model. The presence of organics affects CCN activity in competing ways: by reducing the amount of solute available in the particle and decreasing surface tension of CCN. To model surfactant effects, surface tension depression data from seawater samples taken near the Georgia coast were applied as a function of carbon concentrations. A global marine organic aerosol emission rate of 17.7 Tg C yr−1 is estimated from the simulations. Marine organics exert a localized influence on CCN(0.2% concentrations, decreasing regional concentrations by no more than 5% and by less than 0.5% over most of the globe, assuming direct replacement of sea salt aerosol with organic aerosol. The decrease in CCN concentrations results from the fact that the decrease in particle solute concentration outweighs the organic surfactant effects. The low sensitivity of CCN(0.2% to the marine organic emissions is likely due to the small compositional changes: the mass fraction of OA in accumulation mode aerosol increases by only ~15% in a biologically active region of the Southern Ocean. To test the sensitivity to uncertainty in the sea spray emissions process, we relax the assumption that sea spray aerosol number and mass remain fixed and instead can add to sea spray emissions rather than replace existing sea salt. In these simulations, we find that marine organic aerosol can increase CCN by

  10. Heat stress exposure of aerial spray pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribetz, B; Richter, E D; Krasna, M; Gordon, M

    1980-01-01

    Heat stress (WBGT index) in the cockpits of agricultural spray pilots, and its physiological and subjective effects, were measured for 9 pilots flying in hot weather for a large Israeli aerial spray company. There was concern that heat exposure may be one of the factors involved in a recent increase in the fatal and non-fatal crash rate among Israeli spray pilots. WBGT index calculations were based on sequential cockpit wet bulb, dry bulb, and globe temperatures read when aircraft landed. The WBGT was always above 25 degrees C and exceeded 26.7 degrees C in 70% of observations. In pilots, a daily weight loss of 0.6-1.2% of total body weight was usual, as were rectal temperature increases of 0.5 degrees C. Daily water intakes ranged from less than 100 ml to 2000 ml per workshift. Questionnaires indicated that 42 of 45 pilots said they would drink more fluids if they were provided between flights by ground crews. An unresolved problem was whether conventional threshold standards for heat exposure were set at levels that may produce insidious impairments in pilot psychomotor performance. Cockpit air cooling is suggested as a measure for preventing heat stress in hot climates. However, appropriate filter technologies would be needed to prevent pesticide exposures during flight. Engineering and other measures to prevent heat stress and dehydration should rank high as part of a comprehensive program to protect the health and performance levels of agricultural spray pilots.

  11. Liquid spray experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Gary; McHugh, John

    When waves on the ocean surface interact with a solid object, the result is often a complex pattern of spray. The solid object may be a coastal barrier such as a breakwater, or a ship or drilling rig. Another spray-related case is the presence of large industrial tanks of liquid, and often dangerous liquids, that exist around the world. Tens of thousands of such tanks are rapidly becoming obsolete. Recent experience has shown that when such tanks burst, the resulting spray may shoot several hundreds of meters from the tank. These tanks often have a wall or dam (barrier) surrounding them in an attempt to contain any leakage, catastrophic or otherwise. When the tank bursts it is akin to the dam-break problem. A wall of water rushes forth and impinges on the barrier creating spray. Previous experiments (McHugh and Watt, 1998) considered the related configuration of a solitary wave impinging on a vertical wall. The present experiments more closely model the bursting tank case, and treat the effect of the distance between the tank and barrier. Results show that there is a sweet spot where height and horizontal distance of spray droplets are maximized. This ideal distance between tank and barrier is constant when scaled by the initial tank depth.

  12. Spray boom for selectively spraying a herbicidal composition onto dicots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a method and spray boom for discriminating cereal crop (monocot) and weeds (dicots). The spray boom includes means for digitally recording an image of a selected area to be treated by a nozzle on the spray boom, whereby a plant material is identified based on a segmentation proc...

  13. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  14. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Lau, W. K.-M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wu, G.; Ding, Y.; Manoj, M. G.; Liu, J.; Qian, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, T.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ming, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, J.; Wang, B.; Xu, X.; Lee, S.-S.; Cribb, M.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Zhao, C.; Takemura, T.; Wang, K.; Xia, X.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, H.; Guo, J.; Zhai, P. M.; Sugimoto, N.; Babu, S. S.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing severity of droughts/floods and worsening air quality from increasing aerosols in Asia monsoon regions are the two gravest threats facing over 60% of the world population living in Asian monsoon regions. These dual threats have fueled a large body of research in the last decade on the roles of aerosols in impacting Asian monsoon weather and climate. This paper provides a comprehensive review of studies on Asian aerosols, monsoons, and their interactions. The Asian monsoon region is a primary source of emissions of diverse species of aerosols from both anthropogenic and natural origins. The distributions of aerosol loading are strongly influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes, which are, in turn, modulated by aerosol effects. On a continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulations. The atmospheric thermodynamic state, which determines the formation of clouds, convection, and precipitation, may also be altered by aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Absorbing aerosols such as black carbon and desert dust in Asian monsoon regions may also induce dynamical feedback processes, leading to a strengthening of the early monsoon and affecting the subsequent evolution of the monsoon. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of different monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from

  15. Dihydroergotamine Injection and Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    DHE-45® Injection ... to use the nasal spray or administer the injection correctly. After that, you may spray or inject ... home.If you are using the solution for injection, you should never reuse syringes. Dispose of syringes ...

  16. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the applicator to remove it from the bottle. Wash the dust cap and applicator in cold water and rinse them in cold water, let them dry at room temperature, and then put them back on the bottle.If the spray tip is clogged, wash it ...

  17. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the applicator to remove it from the bottle. Wash the dust cap and applicator in cold water and rinse them in cold water, let them dry at room temperature, and then put them back on the bottle.If the spray tip is clogged, wash it ...

  18. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the applicator to remove it from the bottle. Wash the dust cap and applicator in warm water and rinse them in cold water, let them dry at room temperature, and then put them back on the bottle.If the spray tip is clogged, wash it ...

  19. Electrohydrodynamic spraying (EHDS) of conductive liquids and mass transfer in EHDS distillation columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximuk, E.P. [Institute of Applied Pysics, Kishinev (Russian Federation); Vogelpohl, A. [Mass Transfer Lab., Clausthal Univ. of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    A physicomathematical model for electrohydrodynamic spraying (EHDS) of a conductive liquid and the mass transfer in a parallel plate electrode system of an EHDS distillation column is presented. The influence of the electric field on the formation and general characteristics of the finely dispersed aerosol flow of the conductive liquid in EHDS distillation columns has been determined from the model. (orig.)

  20. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  1. Flame spraying of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M. [Protech Laboratory Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kirk, S.M. [3M Co., St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs.

  2. Characterization of sprays for thermo-stabilized pneumatic nebulizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochowiak, M; Doligalski, M; Broniarz-Press, L; Matuszak, M; Gościniak, A

    2016-03-31

    The research presents the nebulizer spray chamber temperature controller responsible for controlling temperature of aerosol produced as a result of nebulizing process. The motivation to make an attempt to improve modern pneumatic devices was the shortage of this kind of apparatuses on the market allowing the production of thermos aerosol. A designed temperature controlling system for pneumatic nebulizers aims at increasing and stabilizing temperature of produced aerosols and increasing aerosol therapy safety. The system is intended for producing aerosol in the process of pneumatic nebulization with the temperature similar to that of the human body. Experiments that were carried out confirmed good performance of the device. It was proved that with the increase of temperature the amount of big droplets fall and the entire spectrum of the droplet diameter moves towards smaller droplet diameter values. Reduction of liquid viscosity related to the increase of temperature leads to the reduction of droplet diameter and, as a result, the reduction of the Sauter mean diameter value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical modelling of fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, C.

    1999-06-01

    The way the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber is one of the most important parameters for the power output and the generation of emissions in the combustion of liquid fuels. The interaction between the turbulent gas flow field and the liquid fuel droplets, the vaporisation of them and the mixing of the gaseous fuel with the ambient air that are vital parameters in the combustion process. The use of numerical calculations is an important tool to better understand these complex interacting phenomena. This thesis reports on the numerical modelling of fuel sprays in non-reacting cases using an own developed spray module. The spray module uses the stochastic parcel method to represent the spray. The module was made in such manner that it could by coupled with different gas flow solver. Results obtained from four different gas flow solvers are presented in the thesis, including the use of two different kinds of turbulence models. In the first part the spray module is coupled with a k-{eta} based 2-D cylindrical gas flow solver. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed on the spray and gas flow solver parameters, such as grid size dependence and sensitivity to initial values of k-{eta}. The results of the spray module were also compared to results from other spray codes, e.g. the well known KIVA code. In the second part of this thesis the spray was injected into a turbulent and fully developed crossflow studied. The spray module was attached to a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) based flow solvers enabling the study of the complex structures and time dependent phenomena involved in spray in crossflows. It was found that the spray performs an oscillatory motion and that the Strouhal number in the wake was about 0.1. Different spray breakup models were evaluated by comparing with experimental results 66 refs, 56 figs

  4. Kelvin spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Gillig, Kent J; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2013-11-21

    A novel self-powered dual spray ionization source has been developed for applications in mass spectrometry. This new source does not use any power supply and produces both positive and negative ions simultaneously. The idea behind this ionization source comes from the Kelvin water dropper. The source employs one or two syringes, two pneumatic sprays operated over a range of flow rates (0.15-15 μL min(-1)) and gas pressures (0-150 psi), and two double layered metal screens for ion formation. A variable electrostatic potential from 0 to 4 kV can be produced depending on solvent and gas flow rates that allow gentle ionization of compounds. There are several parameters that affect the performance during ionization of molecules including the flow rate of solvent, gas pressure, solvent acidity, position of spray and metal screens with respect to each other and distance between metal screens and the counter electrode. This ionization method has been successfully applied to solutions of peptides, proteins and non-covalent complexes. In comparison with ESI, the charge number of the most populated state is lower than that from ESI. It indicates that this is a softer ionization technique and it produces more protein ions with folded structures. The unique features of Kelvin spray ionization (KeSI) are that the method is self-powered and ionization occurs at very low potentials by providing very low internal energy to the ions. This advantage can be used for the ionization of very fragile molecules and investigation of non-covalent interactions.

  5. Combustion Characteristics of Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    regarded by implication or otherwise, or in any way licensing the holder or any other person or corporation, or conveying any rights or permission to...00 _’N 1. TI TLE inctuat Security CZaaafication5 Combustion Characteristics of Sprays 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sohrab, Siavash H. 13& TYPE OF REPORT...to ?!HF of rich butane/air 3unsen flames. .lso, the rotacion speed and :he oerodic temDeracure fluc:uations of rotacfng ?HF are examined. :’!naily

  6. Biogeochemical Recycling on Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, R.; Stewart, B.; Khaing, H.; Tatro, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    Trace elements are recycled on sea-salt particles that are produced and later re-deposited in the surface ocean. This recycling process involves aluminum, iron, and other elements commonly associated with mineral dust. Non-crustal Al can amount to as much as ~ 30% of the total aerosol Al at Bermuda, but this occurs only during a few months of the year when the dust concentrations and deposition rates are low. Simple model calculations suggest that ~15 to 20% of the total Al dry deposition during December and January can be attributed to recycled sea salt, but when dust concentrations are higher, recycling accounts for only ~ 1% of the Al dry deposition. Non-crustal/non-sea salt (NC/NSS) sources account for > 70% of the aerosol Sb, Se, V, and Zn, but differences in the dry deposition velocities for particles of different sizes are such that the amount of Sb and Se recycled on sea spray approaches or exceeds their new inputs to the open ocean from dust and the NC/NSS sources. More recently, recycling on aerosol particles has been found to occur in other environments, including the deserts in the southwestern USA. In this case, the recycling of radionuclides released during nuclear weapons tests many years ago occurs via the resuspension of contaminated soil particles. Studies conducted near Carlsbad, NM have shown that the temporal variability in ^{239,240}Pu and ^{241}Am activities tracks that of Al, a mineral dust indictor, in aerosol samples. Analyses of soil samples from various sites have shown that plutonium is released from the particles by chemical procedures developed for removing iron oxides from mineral particles; this implies that the dust/plutonium relationship is mediated by iron oxides.

  7. Fundamental studies of spray combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S.C.; Libby, P.A.; Williams, F.A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Our research on spray combustion involves both experiment and theory and addresses the characteristics of individual droplets and of sprays in a variety of flows: laminar and turbulent, opposed and impinging. Currently our focus concerns water and fuel sprays in two stage laminar flames, i.e., flames arising, for example from a stream of fuel and oxidizer flowing opposite to an air stream carrying a water spray. Our interest in these flames is motivated by the goals of reducing pollutant emissions and extending the range of stable spray combustion. There remains considerable research to be carried out in order to achieve these goals. Thus far our research on the characteristics of sprays in turbulent flows has been limited to nonreacting jets impinging on a plate but this work will be extended to opposed flows with and without a flame. In the following we discuss details of these studies and our plans for future work.

  8. Study on collection efficiency of fission products by spray: Experimental device and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducret, D.; Roblot, D.; Vendel, J. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Billarand, Y. [ECCO Pharmacie et Chimie, Neuilly (France)

    1997-08-01

    Consequences of an hypothetical overheating reactor accident in nuclear power plants can be limited by spraying cold water drops into containment building. The spray reduces the pressure and the temperature levels by condensation of steam and leads to the washout of fission products (aerosols and gaseous iodine). The present study includes a large program devoted to the evaluation of realistic washout rates. An experimental device (named CARAIDAS) was designed and built in order to determine the collection efficiency of aerosols and iodine absorption by drops with representative conditions of post-accident atmosphere. This experimental device is presented in the paper and more particularly: (1) the experimental enclosure in which representative thermodynamic conditions can be achieved, (2) the monosized drops generator, the drops diameter measurement and the drops collector, (3) the cesium iodide aerosols generator and the aerosols measurements. Modelling of steam condensation on drops aerosols collection and iodine absorption are described. First experimental and code results on drops and aerosols behaviour are compared. 8 refs., 18 figs.

  9. Inflight Particle Behavior in the Vacuum Kinetic Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungkwon; Kwon, Hansol; Lee, Changhee

    2017-10-01

    The vacuum kinetic spray (VKS) process, also-called aerosol deposition, is a promising spray technology by which a thin or thick film can be fabricated at room temperature. Although a number of relevant studies have been performed, almost all have focused on the development of various applications, and unfortunately, the deposition mechanism has not yet been clarified. In this respect, the particle velocity in the flow field in VKS is investigated as a first stage of research into the VKS deposition mechanism. In this research, after a simulation prototype was derived based on the experimental results, the particle average and impact velocities were estimated. In addition, the change in particle velocities with gas flow rates, particle size, and working distance was analyzed based on simulation analyses and microstructural evidence. As a result, the gas flow rate, particle size, and working distance affect the particle impact velocity and further deposition behavior and film microstructure.

  10. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2012-09-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices

  11. Spray-formed tooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be de signed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  12. The Research of Pseudo Coatings Sprayed with Electric Arc Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Rodžianskas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents coatings obtained using two different stainless steel (AISI 316 and marine bronze (CuAl8 wires sprayed with electric arc spraying. Substrate: mild steel S235J2 (LST EN 10025: 2004. Arc spray equipment – “EuTronic Arc Spray 4” with an additional power source. The main task was to select optimal technological spraying process and obtain coatings which possess the best mechanical, physical, tribological properties that meet the requirements of the specific requirements in service coatings. The microhardness, elastic modulus, and morphology was examined. Dry friction wear was assessed in the mass loss of the coatings. The results of tribological coatings properties were assessed in determining the mass lost.

  13. Aerosol gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  14. Thermal Spray Coatings for Blast Furnace Tuyere Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A.; Sivakumar, G.; Prusty, D.; Shalini, J.; Dutta, M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The components in an integrated steel plant are invariably exposed to harsh working environments involving exposure to high temperatures, corrosive gases, and erosion/wear conditions. One such critical component in the blast furnace is the tuyere, which is prone to thermal damage by splashing of molten metal/slag, erosive damage by falling burden material, and corrosion from the ensuing gases. All the above, collectively or independently, accelerate tuyere failure, which presents a potential explosion hazard in a blast furnace. Recently, thermal spray coatings have emerged as an effective solution to mitigate such severe operational challenges. In the present work, five different coatings deposited using detonation spray and air plasma spray techniques were comprehensively characterized. Performance evaluation involving thermal cycling, hot corrosion, and erosion tests was also carried out. Based on the studies, a coating system was suggested for possible tuyere applications and found to yield substantial improvement in service life during actual field trials.

  15. Pseudoconvex and Disprisoning Homogeneous Sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Riego, L D

    1994-01-01

    The pseudoconvex and disprisoning conditions for geodesics of linear connections are extended to the solution curves of general homogeneous sprays. The main result is that pseudoconvexity and disprisonment are jointly stable in the fine topology on the space of all homogeneous sprays of any degree of homogeneity.

  16. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  17. An aerosol climatology for a rapidly growing arid region (southern Arizona): Major aerosol species and remotely sensed aerosol properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshian, Armin; Wonaschütz, Anna; Jarjour, Elias G; Hashimoto, Bryce I; Schichtel, Bret A; Betterton, Eric A

    2011-10-01

    This study reports a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle properties in relation to meteorological and back trajectory data in the southern Arizona region, which includes two of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States (Phoenix and Tucson). Multiple data sets (MODIS, AERONET, OMI/TOMS, MISR, GOCART, ground-based aerosol measurements) are used to examine monthly trends in aerosol composition, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and aerosol size. Fine soil, sulfate, and organics dominate PM2.5 mass in the region. Dust strongly influences the region between March and July owing to the dry and hot meteorological conditions and back trajectory patterns. Because monsoon precipitation begins typically in July, dust levels decrease, while AOD, sulfate, and organic aerosol reach their maximum levels because of summertime photochemistry and monsoon moisture. Evidence points to biogenic volatile organic compounds being a significant source of secondary organic aerosol in this region. Biomass burning also is shown to be a major contributor to the carbonaceous aerosol budget in the region, leading to enhanced organic and elemental carbon levels aloft at a sky-island site north of Tucson (Mt. Lemmon). Phoenix exhibits different monthly trends for aerosol components in comparison with the other sites owing to the strong influence of fossil carbon and anthropogenic dust. Trend analyses between 1988 and 2009 indicate that the strongest statistically significant trends are reductions in sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon, and increases in fine soil during the spring (March-May) at select sites. These results can be explained by population growth, land-use changes, and improved source controls.

  18. Wintertime Arctic Ocean sea water properties and primary marine aerosol concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sea spray aerosols are an important part of the climate system through their direct and indirect effects. Due to the diminishing sea ice, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing sea spray aerosol source areas. However, the influence of these changes on primary particle production is not known.

    In laboratory experiments we examined the influence of Arctic Ocean water temperature, salinity, and oxygen saturation on primary particle concentration characteristics. Sea water temperature was identified as the most important of these parameters. A strong decrease in sea spray aerosol production with increasing water temperature was observed for water temperatures between −1°C and 9°C. Aerosol number concentrations decreased from at least 1400 cm−3 to 350 cm−3. In general, the aerosol number size distribution exhibited a robust shape with one mode close to dry diameter Dp 0.2 μm with approximately 45% of particles at smaller sizes. Changes in sea water temperature did not result in pronounced change of the shape of the aerosol size distribution, only in the magnitude of the concentrations. Our experiments indicate that changes in aerosol emissions are most likely linked to changes of the physical properties of sea water at low temperatures. The observed strong dependence of sea spray aerosol concentrations on sea water temperature, with a large fraction of the emitted particles in the typical cloud condensation nuclei size range, provide strong arguments for a more careful consideration of this effect in climate models.

  19. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holzer-Popp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI project Aerosol_cci (2010–2013, algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1 a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2 a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3 a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008 of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun

  20. Ionic Surface Active Compounds in Atmospheric Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jariya Sukhapan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS is in the range of 6–170 pmol m-3(air. A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  1. Electrostatics of Pharmaceutical Aerosols for Pulmonary Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip Kwok, Philip Chi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a review on key research findings in the rapidly developing area of pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics. Solids and liquids can become charged without electric fields, the former by contact or friction and the latter by flowing or spraying. Therefore, charged particles and droplets carrying net charges are produced from pharmaceutical inhalers (e.g. dry powder inhalers, metered dose inhalers, and nebulisers) due to the mechanical processes involved in aerosolisation. The charging depends on many physicochemical factors, such as formulation composition, solid state properties, inhaler material and design, and relative humidity. In silico, in vitro, and limited in vivo studies have shown that electrostatic charges may potentially influence particle deposition in the airways. However, the evidence is not yet conclusive. Furthermore, there are currently no regulatory requirements on the characterisation and control of the electrostatic properties of inhaled formulations. Besides the need for further investigations on the relationship between physicochemical factors and charging characteristics of the aerosols, controlled and detailed in vivo studies are also required to confirm whether charges can affect particle deposition in the airways. Since pharmaceutical aerosol electrostatics is a relatively new research area, much remains to be explored. Thus there is certainly potential for development. New findings in the future may contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical aerosol formulations and respiratory drug delivery.

  2. Superiority of Spacer/Mask Topical Anesthetic Compared with Conventional Spray and Gargle Method for Fibreoptic Bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RC Balkissoon

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the safety and efficacy of a new spacer-oral nasal mask device with those of the standard needle nozzle spray method for the delivery of aerosolized lidocaine to the upper airway for pre-bronchoscopic anaesthesia in a tertiary care hospital.

  3. Quantitative microbial risk assessment for spray irrigation of dairy manure based on an empirical fate and transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Spray irrigation for land-applying livestock manure is increasing in the United States as farms become larger and economies of scale make manure irrigation affordable. However, human health risks from exposure to zoonotic pathogens aerosolized during manure irrigation are not well-unders...

  4. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  5. Effect of Pressurized Metered Dose Inhaler Spray Characteristics and Particle Size Distribution on Drug Delivery Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Morteza; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2017-10-01

    A key issue in pulmonary drug delivery is improvement of the delivery device for effective and targeted treatment. Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are the most popular aerosol therapy device for treating lung diseases. This article studies the effect of spray characteristics: injection velocity, spray cone angle, particle size distribution (PSD), and its mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) on drug delivery. An idealized oral airway geometry, extending from mouth to the main bronchus, was connected to a pMDI device. Inhalation flow rates of 15, 30, and 60 L/min were used and drug particle tracking was a one-way coupled Lagrangian model. The results showed that most particles deposited in the pharynx, where the airway has a reduced cross-sectional area. Particle deposition generally decreased with initial spray velocity and with increased spray cone angle for 30 and 60 L/min flow rates. However, for 15 L/min flow rate, the deposition increased slightly with an increase in the spray velocity and cone angle. The effect of spray cone angle was more significant than the initial spray velocity on particle deposition. When the MMAD of a PSD was reduced, the deposition efficiency also reduces, suggesting greater rates of particle entry into the lung. The deposition rate showed negligible change when the MMAD was more than 8 μm. Spray injection angle and velocity change the drug delivery efficacy; however, the efficiency shows more sensitivity to the injection angle. The 30 L/min airflow rate delivers spray particles to the lung more efficiently than 15 and 60 L/min airflow rate, and reducing MMAD can help increase drug delivery to the lung.

  6. Primary and Secondary Organic Marine Aerosol and Oceanic Biological Activity: Recent Results and New Perspectives for Future Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Rinaldi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important natural aerosol systems at the global level is marine aerosol that comprises both organic and inorganic components of primary and secondary origin. The present paper reviews some new results on primary and secondary organic marine aerosol, achieved during the EU project MAP (Marine Aerosol Production, comparing them with those reported in the recent literature. Marine aerosol samples collected at the coastal site of Mace Head, Ireland, show a chemical composition trend that is influenced by the oceanic biological activity cycle, in agreement with other observations. Laboratory experiments show that sea-spray aerosol from biologically active sea water can be highly enriched in organics, and the authors highlight the need for further studies on the atmospheric fate of such primary organics. With regard to the secondary fraction of organic aerosol, the average chemical composition and molecular tracer (methanesulfonic-acid, amines distribution could be successfully characterized by adopting a multitechnique analytical approach.

  7. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant application program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.

  8. New satellite project Aerosol-UA: Remote sensing of aerosols in the terrestrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, M.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.; Udodov, E.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earth's surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  9. Dry powder inhaler formulation of high-payload antibiotic nanoparticle complex intended for bronchiectasis therapy: Spray drying versus spray freeze drying preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Teo, Jeanette; Chew, Jia Wei; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2016-02-29

    Inhaled nano-antibiotics have recently emerged as the promising bronchiectasis treatment attributed to the higher and more localized antibiotic exposure generated compared to native antibiotics. Antibiotic nanoparticle complex (or nanoplex in short) prepared by self-assembly complexation with polysaccharides addresses the major drawbacks of existing nano-antibiotics by virtue of its high payload and cost-effective preparation. Herein we developed carrier-free dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations of ciprofloxacin nanoplex by spray drying (SD) and spray freeze drying (SFD). d-Mannitol and l-leucine were used as the drying adjuvant and aerosol dispersion enhancer, respectively. The DPI formulations were evaluated in vitro in terms of the (1) aerosolization efficiency, (2) aqueous reconstitution, (3) antibiotic release, and (4) antimicrobial activity against respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The SFD powders exhibited superior aerosolization efficiency to their SD counterparts in terms of emitted dose (92% versus 66%), fine particle fraction (29% versus 23%), and mass median aerodynamic diameter (3 μm versus 6 μm). The superior aerosolization efficiency of the SFD powders was attributed to their large and porous morphology and higher l-leucine content. While the SFD powders exhibited poorer aqueous reconstitution that might jeopardize their mucus penetrating ability, their antibiotic release profile and antimicrobial activity were not adversely affected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Aerosols and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How do Aerosols Influence Climate? Although making up only one part in a billion of the mass of the atmosphere, aerosols have the potential to significantly influ- ence the climate. The global impact of aerosol is assessed as the change imposed on planetary radiation measured in Wm-2, which alters the global temperature ...

  11. Aerosols and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aerosols and Climate · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Principal efforts in improving the understanding of Climate impact of aerosols - · Slide 8 · Observations of Aerosol – from space (Spatial variation) · AOD around Indian region from AVHRR · Dust absorption efficiency over Great Indian Desert from Satellite ...

  12. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  13. Model Stickiness in Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thomas

    The work presented in this thesis concerns wall deposits encountered in spray drying caused by products that exhibit so-called 'stickiness'. The thesis delves into the understanding of the phenomenon of sticky wall deposits in spray drying and proposes a simple criterion for use in industrial...... design of spray dryers. The experimental work centers around a new technique for measuring when, during drying, a particle becomes non-sticky based on a single droplet drying technique used to study drying kinetics. An acoustic levitator is used to dry a levitated droplet in conditions similar to those...... a droplet would encounter in a spray dryer. The droplet is recorded using a CCD-camera during drying and the subsequent stickiness test. After a user-specifed drying time a piston strikes the partially dried particle at a user-specifed velocity. After the impact the piston surface is inspected...

  14. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Champagne, V. K; Leyman, P.F; Helfritch, D. J

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory has developed a cold spray process to reclaim magnesium components that shows significant improvement over existing methods and is in the process of qualification for use on rotorcraft...

  15. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I - Overview and Impact of Elevated Aerosol Layers on Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere be tween and within two atmospheric columns; one fixed near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second moveable column over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed at the base of the Cape Cod column, and the ARM Aerial Facility was utilized for the summer and winter intensive observation periods. One important finding from TCAP is that four of six nearly cloud-free flight days had aerosol layers aloft in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2).These layer s contributed up to 60 of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. In addition, while there was a great deal of spatial and day-to-day variability in the aerosol chemical composition and optical properties, no systematic differences between the two columns were observed.

  16. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I - Overview and Impact of Elevated Aerosol Layers on Aerosol Optical Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, K.; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rogers, Ray; Russell, P.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Art; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-08

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which was conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique field study that was designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere at a number of altitudes, from near the surface to as high as 8 km, within two atmospheric columns; one located near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. TCAP included the yearlong deployment of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) that was located at the base of the Cape Cod column, as well as summer and winter aircraft intensive observation periods of the ARM Aerial Facility. One important finding from TCAP is the relatively common occurrence (on four of six nearly cloud-free flights) of elevated aerosol layers in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed in the column. Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning aerosol and nitrate compared to the aerosol found near the surface.

  17. Analysis of optical trap mediated aerosol coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, N. S.; Power, R.; Anand, S.; McGloin, D.; Almohamedi, A.; Downie, M.; Reid, J. P.; Hudson, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of optical tweezers for the analysis of aerosols is valuable for understanding the dynamics of atmospherically relevant particles. However to be able to make accurate measurements that can be directly tied to real-world phenomena it is important that we understand the influence of the optical trap on those processes. One process that is seemingly straightforward to study with these techniques is binary droplet coalescence, either using dual beam traps, or by particle collision with a single trapped droplet. This binary coalescence is also of interest in many other processes that make use of dense aerosol sprays such as spray drying and the use of inhalers for drug delivery in conditions such as asthma or hay fever. In this presentation we discuss the use of high speed (~5000 frames per second) video microscopy to track the dynamics of particles as they approach and interact with a trapped aqueous droplet and develop this analysis further by considering elastic light scattering from droplets as they undergo coalescence. We find that we are able to characterize the re-equilibration time of droplets of the same phase after they interact and that the trajectories taken by airborne particles influenced by an optical trap are often quite complex. We also examine the role of parameters such as the salt concentration of the aqueous solutions used and the influence of laser wavelength.

  18. OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Susannah M. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Gobrogge, Eric [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA; Fu, Li [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Link, Katie [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA; Elliott, Scott M. [Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modelling Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico USA; Wang, Hongfei [Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Walker, Rob [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA

    2016-08-10

    Here we show that the addition of chemical interactions of soluble polysaccharides with a surfactant monolayer improves agreement of modeled sea spray chemistry with observed marine aerosol chemistry. In particular, the fraction of hydroxyl functional groups in modeled sea spray organic matter is increased, improving agreement with FTIR observations of marine aerosol composition. The overall organic fraction of submicron sea spray also increases, allowing organic mass fractions in the range 0.5 – 0.7 for submicron sea spray particles over highly active phytoplankton blooms. We show results from Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) experiments that support the modeling approach, by demonstrating that soluble polysaccharides can strongly adsorb to a lipid monolayer via columbic interactions under appropriate conditions.

  19. The optical manipulation and characterisation of aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jonathan P.

    2008-08-01

    Aerosols play a crucial role in many areas of science, ranging from atmospheric chemistry and physics, to pharmaceutical aerosols and drug delivery to the lungs, to combustion science and spray drying. The development of new methods for characterising the properties and dynamics of aerosol particles is of crucial importance if the complex role that particles play is to be more fully understood. Optical tweezers provide a valuable new tool to address fundamental questions in aerosol science. Single or multiple particles 1-15 μm in diameter can be manipulated for indefinite timescales. Linear and non-linear Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies can be used to probe particle composition, phase, component mixing state, and size. In particular, size can be determined with nanometre accuracy, allowing accurate measurements of the thermodynamic properties of aerosols, the kinetics of particle transformation and of light absorption. Further, the simultaneous manipulation of multiple particles in parallel optical traps provides a method for performing comparative measurements on particles of different composition. We will present some latest work in which optical tweezers are used to characterise aerosol dynamics, demonstrating that optical tweezers can find application in studies of hygroscopicity, the mixing state of different chemical components, including the phase separation of immiscible phases, and the kinetics of chemical transformation.

  20. SPRAY CALCINATION REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1963-08-20

    A spray calcination reactor for calcining reprocessin- g waste solutions is described. Coaxial within the outer shell of the reactor is a shorter inner shell having heated walls and with open regions above and below. When the solution is sprayed into the irner shell droplets are entrained by a current of gas that moves downwardly within the inner shell and upwardly between it and the outer shell, and while thus being circulated the droplets are calcined to solids, whlch drop to the bottom without being deposited on the walls. (AEC) H03 H0233412 The average molecular weights of four diallyl phthalate polymer samples extruded from the experimental rheometer were redetermined using the vapor phase osmometer. An amine curing agent is required for obtaining suitable silver- filled epoxy-bonded conductive adhesives. When the curing agent was modified with a 47% polyurethane resin, its effectiveness was hampered. Neither silver nor nickel filler impart a high electrical conductivity to Adiprenebased adhesives. Silver filler was found to perform well in Dow-Corning A-4000 adhesive. Two cascaded hot-wire columns are being used to remove heavy gaseous impurities from methane. This purified gas is being enriched in the concentric tube unit to approximately 20% carbon-13. Studies to count low-level krypton-85 in xenon are continuing. The parameters of the counting technique are being determined. The bismuth isotopes produced in bismuth irradiated for polonium production are being determined. Preliminary data indicate the presence of bismuth207 and bismuth-210m. The light bismuth isotopes are probably produced by (n,xn) reactions bismuth-209. The separation of uranium-234 from plutonium-238 solutions was demonstrated. The bulk of the plutonium is removed by anion exchange, and the remainder is extracted from the uranium by solvent extraction techniques. About 99% of the plutonium can be removed in each thenoyltrifluoroacetone extraction. The viscosity, liquid density, and

  1. Properties of Spray Dried Food and Spray Drying Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Fumio

    The following conclusions are obtained, studying properties of spray dried food and drying characteristics. (a) Dried particles are similar to spray droplets in size distribution (y=2.5), and particle count distribution is arranged as (dn/dx = ae-bx). (b) The ratio of the particle diameters before and after drying is calculated with moisture before and after drying, and porosity is given as (εp = ww4). (c) The standard drying method is presented to evaluate accurately drying problems at a certain standard. (d) Equilibrium moisture at 20 up to 100°C are summarized in terms of adsorption potential. (e) It makes clear that calulation based on the theory of residence time and drying time represents well complex spray drying characteristics.

  2. Development of Aerosol Phospholipid Microparticles for the Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, Sarah; Wang, Zimeng; Gupta, Sweta K; Meenach, Samantha A

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an incurable cardiovascular disease characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries leading from the heart to the lungs. Over two million people in the USA are diagnosed with PAH annually and the typical survival rate is only 3 years after diagnosis. Current treatments are insufficient because of limited bioavailability, toxicity, and costs associated with approved therapeutics. Aerosol delivery of drugs is an attractive approach to treat respiratory diseases because it increases localized drug concentration while reducing systemic side effects. In this study, we developed phospholipid-based aerosol microparticles via spray drying consisting of the drug tacrolimus and the excipients dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol. The phospholipid-based spray-dried aerosol microparticles were shown to be smooth and spherical in size, ranging from 1 to 3 μm in diameter. The microparticles exhibited thermal stability and were amorphous after spray drying. Water content in the microparticles was under 10%, which will allow successful aerosol dispersion and long-term storage stability. In vitro aerosol dispersion showed that the microparticles could successfully deposit in the deep lung, as they exhibited favorable aerodynamic diameters and high fine particle fractions. In vitro dose-response analysis showed that TAC is nontoxic in the low concentrations that would be delivered to the lungs. Overall, this work shows that tacrolimus-loaded phospholipid-based microparticles can be successfully created with optimal physicochemical and toxicological characteristics.

  3. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a] and 10 m wind speed (U10, have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr−1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  4. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cester, R.; Chiosso, M.; Chirin, J.; Clay, R.; Dawson, B.; Fick, B.; Filipcic, A.; Garcia, B.; Grillo, A.; Horvat, M.; Iarlori, M.; Malek, M.; Matthews, J.; Matthews,; Melo, D.; Meyhandan, R.; Mostafa, M.; Mussa, R.; Prouza, M.; Raefert, B.; Rizi, V.

    2005-07-01

    For a ground based cosmic-ray observatory the atmosphere is an integral part of the detector. Air fluorescence detectors (FDs) are particularly sensitive to the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols, consisting mainly of clouds and dust, can strongly affect the propagation of fluorescence and Cherenkov light from cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers. The Pierre Auger Observatory has a comprehensive program to monitor the aerosols within the atmospheric volume of the detector. In this paper the aerosol parameters that affect FD reconstruction will be discussed. The aerosol monitoring systems that have been deployed at the Pierre Auger Observatory will be briefly described along with some measurements from these systems.

  5. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simpson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI. EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a a comprehensive database with a year of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol processes fron nano to global scale and their effects on climate and air quality. In addition a new Pan-European aerosol emissions inventory was developed and evaluated, a new cluster spectrometer was built and tested in the field and several new aerosol parameterizations and computations modules for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies.

  6. Imaging aerosol viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Francis; Athanasiadis, Thanos; Botchway, Stan; Davdison, Nicholas; Fitzgerald, Clare; Gallimore, Peter; Hosny, Neveen; Kalberer, Markus; Kuimova, Marina; Vysniauskas, Aurimas; Ward, Andy

    2017-04-01

    Organic aerosol particles play major roles in atmospheric chemistry, climate, and public health. Aerosol particle viscosity is important since it can determine the ability of chemical species such as oxidants, organics or water to diffuse into the particle bulk. Recent measurements indicate that OA may be present in highly viscous states; however, diffusion rates of small molecules such as water appear not to be limited by these high viscosities. We have developed a technique for measuring viscosity that allows for the imaging of aerosol viscosity in micron sized aerosols through use of fluorescence lifetime imaging of viscosity sensitive dyes which are also known as 'molecular rotors'. These rotors can be introduced into laboratory generated aerosol by adding minute quantities of the rotor to aerosol precursor prior to aerosolization. Real world aerosols can also be studied by doping them in situ with the rotors. The doping is achieved through generation of ultrafine aerosol particles that contain the rotors; the ultrafine aerosol particles deliver the rotors to the aerosol of interest via impaction and coagulation. This work has been conducted both on aerosols deposited on microscope coverslips and on particles that are levitated in their true aerosol phase through the use of a bespoke optical trap developed at the Central Laser Facility. The technique allows for the direct observation of kinetic barriers caused by high viscosity and low diffusivity in aerosol particles. The technique is non-destructive thereby allowing for multiple experiments to be carried out on the same sample. It can dynamically quantify and track viscosity changes during atmospherically relevant processes such oxidation and hygroscopic growth (1). This presentation will focus on the oxidation of aerosol particles composed of unsaturated and saturated organic species. It will discuss how the type of oxidant, oxidation rate and the composition of the oxidized products affect the time

  7. Particle In-Flight and Coating Properties of Fe-Based Feedstock Materials Sprayed with Modern Thermal Spray Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Kopp, Nils; Warda, Thomas; Petkovic, Ivica; Schaefer, Marcel; Landes, Klaus Dieter; Forster, Guenter; Zimmermann, Stephan; Marques, Jose-Luis; Kirner, Stefan; Kauffeldt, Marina; Schein, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    New developments in the field of thermal spraying systems (increased particle velocities, enhanced process stability) are leading to improved coatings. Innovations in the field of feedstock materials are supporting this trend. The combination of both has led to a renaissance of Fe-based feedstocks. Using modern APS or HVOF systems, it is now possible to compete with classical materials for wear and corrosion applications like Ni-basis or metal-matrix composites. This study intends to give an analysis of the in-flight particle and spray jet properties achievable with two different modern thermal spraying systems using Fe-based powders. The velocity fields are measured with the Laser Doppler Anemometry. Resulting coatings are analyzed and a correlation with the particle in-flight properties is given. The experiments are accompanied by computational fluid dynamics simulations of spray jet and particle velocities, leading to a comprehensive analysis of the achievable particle properties with state-of-the-art HVOF and APS systems.

  8. Enhancement of marine cloud albedo via controlled sea spray injections: a global model study of the influence of emission rates, microphysics and transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Modification of cloud albedo by controlled emission of sea spray particles into the atmosphere has been suggested as a possible geoengineering option to slow global warming. Previous global studies have imposed changes in cloud drop concentration in low level clouds to explore the radiative and climatic effects. Here, we use a global aerosol transport model to quantify how an imposed flux of sea spray particles affects the natural aerosol processes, the particle size distribution, and concentrations of cloud drops. We assume that the proposed fleet of vessels emits sea spray particles with a wind speed-dependent flux into four regions of persistent stratocumulus cloud off the western coasts of continents. The model results show that fractional changes in cloud drop number concentration (CDNC vary substantially between the four regions because of differences in wind speed (which affects the spray efficiency of the vessels, transport and particle deposition rates, and because of variations in aerosols from natural and anthropogenic sources. Using spray emission rates comparable to those implied by previous studies we find that the predicted CDNC changes are very small (maximum 20% and in one of the four regions even negative. The weak or negative effect is because the added particles suppress the in-cloud supersaturation and prevent existing aerosol particles from forming cloud drops. A scenario with five times higher emissions (considerably higher than previously assumed increases CDNC on average by 45–163%, but median concentrations are still below the 375 cm−3 assumed in previous studies. An inadvertent effect of the spray emissions is that sulphur dioxide concentrations are suppressed by 1–2% in the seeded regions and sulphuric acid vapour by 64–68% due to chemical reactions on the additional salt particles. The impact of this suppression on existing aerosol is negligible in the model, but should be investigated further in

  9. Spray casting project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

  10. Center for Cold Spray Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the only DoD facility capable of cold spray research and development, production, and field-repair. It features three stationary cold spray systems used for...

  11. Natural aerosols explain seasonal and spatial patterns of Southern Ocean cloud albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Daniel T; Burrows, Susannah M; Wood, Robert; Grosvenor, Daniel P; Elliott, Scott M; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Phillip J; Hartmann, Dennis L

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspended solid and liquid particles, act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties-ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path, and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration N d of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations affect not only cloud properties themselves but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. It is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed N d. Enhanced N d is spatially correlated with regions of high chlorophyll a, and the spatiotemporal variability in N d is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35(o) to 45(o)S) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45(o) to 55(o)S). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m(-2) over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

  12. Effects of spray adjuvants on spray droplet size from a rotary atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotary atomizers are used in a number of aerial applications, such as forest pest spraying and mosquito control sprays. These types of atomizers have a rotating cage at speeds of 2,000 to 10,000 rpm through which a spray is emitted and atomized. Many applicators routinely add spray adjuvants to ch...

  13. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  14. Diesel spray characterization; Dieselmoottorin polttoainesuihkujen ominaisuudet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Turunen, R.; Paloposki, T.; Rantanen, P.; Virolainen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Internal Combustion Engine Lab.

    1997-10-01

    Fuel injection of diesel engines will be studied using large-scale models of fuel injectors. The advantage of large-scale models is that the measurement of large-scale diesel sprays will be easier than the measurement of actual sprays. The objective is to study the break-up mechanism of diesel sprays and to measure drop size distributions in the inner part of the spray. The results will be used in the development of diesel engines and diesel fuels. (orig.)

  15. Aerosols Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovski, Igor

    2011-01-01

    This self-contained handbook and ready reference examines aerosol science and technology in depth, providing a detailed insight into this progressive field. As such, it covers fundamental concepts, experimental methods, and a wide variety of applications, ranging from aerosol filtration to biological aerosols, and from the synthesis of carbon nanotubes to aerosol reactors.Written by a host of internationally renowned experts in the field, this is an essential resource for chemists and engineers in the chemical and materials disciplines across multiple industries, as well as ideal supplementary

  16. A new method for spray deposit assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester M. Himel; Leland Vaughn; Raymond P. Miskus; Arthur D. Moore

    1965-01-01

    Solid fluorescent particles suspended in a spray liquid are distributed in direct proportion to the size of the spray droplets. Use of solid fluorescent particles is the basis of a new method for visual recognition of the size and number of droplets impinging on target and nontarget portions of sprayed areas.

  17. Albendazole Microparticles Prepared by Spray Drying Technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To enhance the dissolution of albendazole (ABZ) using spray-drying technique. Method: ABZ binary mixtures with Kollicoat IR® (KL) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in various drug to polymer ratios (1: 1, 1: 2 and 1; 4) were prepared by spray-drying. The spray-dried particles were characterized for particle shape, ...

  18. 14 CFR 23.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 23.239 Section 23.239 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Handling Characteristics § 23.239 Spray characteristics. Spray may not dangerously obscure the vision of...

  19. 14 CFR 29.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 29.239 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 29.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  20. 14 CFR 27.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 27.239 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 27.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  1. A comparison between spray drying and spray freeze drying for dry powder inhaler formulation of drug-loaded lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Kho, Katherine; Cheow, Wean Sin; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2012-03-15

    Lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles - polymeric nanoparticles enveloped by lipid layers - have emerged as a potent therapeutic nano-carrier alternative to liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles. Herein we perform comparative studies of employing spray drying (SD) and spray freeze drying (SFD) to produce inhalable dry-powder form of drug-loaded lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), lecithin, and levofloxacin are employed as the polymer, lipid, and drug models, respectively. The hybrid nanoparticles are transformed into micro-scale nanoparticle aggregates (or nano-aggregates) via SD and SFD, where the effects of (1) different excipients (i.e. mannitol, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and leucine), and (2) nanoparticle to excipient ratio on nano-aggregate characteristics (e.g. size, flowability, aqueous reconstitution, aerosolization efficiency) are examined. In both methods, PVA is found more effective than mannitol for aqueous reconstitution, whereas hydrophobic leucineis needed to achieve effective aerosolization as it reduces nano-aggregate agglomeration. Using PVA, both methods are equally capable of producing nano-aggregates having size, density, flowability, yield and reconstitutibility in the range ideal for inhaled delivery. Nevertheless, nano-aggregates produced by SFD are superior to SD in terms of their aerosolization efficiency manifested in the higher emitted dose and fine particle fraction with lower mass median aerodynamic diameter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Splash and spray by lorries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, J.P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Accidents caused by splash and spray are possibly underestimated in statistics, being classified, as they mostly are, as skidding accidents or rain and wet road accidents. In general, such a specific problem has a relatively low rate in accident statistics. The problem often arises in critical

  3. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, Charles [ZoomEssence, Inc., Hebron, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  4. Automated Spray Pothole Patching Truck

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The RA-300 patcher, manufactured by Rosco Manufacturing, Madison, S.D., is a fully automated spray patching road maintenance vehicle, which fills potholes and cracks on the road. A operator can control all patching functions with the control panel and joystick from the safety and comfort of the truck cab.

  5. Transdermal Spray in Hormone Delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    market for the delivery system and ongoing development of transdermal sprays for hormone delivery. Keywords: Transdermal, Delivery systems, ... delivery compared with gels, emulsions, patches, and subcutaneous implants. Among .... In a safety announcement, the US Food and. Drug Administration (FDA) warned that ...

  6. Phospholipid-based pyrazinamide spray-dried inhalable powders for treating tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eedara, Basanth Babu; Tucker, Ian G; Das, Shyamal C

    2016-06-15

    Sterilization of necrotic granulomas containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis is difficult by oral and parenteral drug delivery of antitubercular drugs. Pulmonary delivery of these drugs should increase the concentration of drug in the granulomas and, thereby, improve the sterilization. The current study aimed to develop spray-dried (SD) powders composed of pyrazinamide, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine N-(carbonyl-methoxy polyethylene glycol-2000) (DSPE-PEG2k) and l-leucine to improve drug delivery to the deeper lung. Pyrazinamide SD powders with varying amounts of DPPC (5, 15 and 25% w/w) were produced using a BUCHI B-290 Mini Spray-Dryer. The powders were characterized physicochemically and for their aerosol dispersion performance using a Next Generation Impactor (NGI). All the SD powders had a narrow particle size distribution (1.29-4.26μm) with low residual moisture (<2%). Solid state characterization confirmed that the α-polymorphic crystalline pyrazinamide transformed into the γ-polymorphic form during spray-drying. SD pyrazinamide (PDDL0) without excipients showed very poor aerosolization with a fine particle fraction (FPF%) of 8.5±1.0%. However, the SD powder with 25% w/w DPPC (PDDL3) exhibited the best aerosolization with a FPF of 73.2±4.0%. Incorporating high amounts of DPPC improved aerosolization of SD powders; however further evaluation of the developed inhalation powders is necessary to determine their therapeutic potential for treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of Spray-Based Decontamination Methods for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report The objective of this project was to assess the effectiveness of spray-based common decontamination methods for inactivating Bacillus (B.) atrophaeus (surrogate for B. anthracis) spores and bacteriophage MS2 (surrogate for foot and mouth disease virus [FMDV]) on selected test surfaces (with or without a model agricultural soil load). Relocation of viable viruses or spores from the contaminated coupon surfaces into aerosol or liquid fractions during the decontamination methods was investigated. This project was conducted to support jointly held missions of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Within the EPA, the project supports the mission of EPA’s Homeland Security Research Program (HSRP) by providing relevant information pertinent to the decontamination of contaminated areas resulting from a biological incident.

  8. Supercritical Saltwater Spray for Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukermans, A.; Cooper, G. F.; Foster, J.; Galbraith, L. K.; Johnston, D.; Ormond, B.; Wang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Solar Radiation Management (SRM), including both stratospheric sulfur aerosol delivery and MCB, has emerged as the leading contender for geoengineering. Field research in MCB would require a technique capable of producing 1017 salt nuclei/sec from a single source on a seagoing vessel. Spraying supercritical saltwater has emerged as a viable technology, at least for research purposes. Under optimum conditions a single 50-μm nozzle produces 1014 suitable nuclei/sec. Power consumption is high (1-2 MW), but 95% of the required energy is in the form of heat that can probably be obtained from wasted ship-engine heat. While its implementation is conceptually simple, the corrosive nature of supercritical saltwater makes the material requirements very demanding. Progress on this work is detailed.

  9. Sensitivity of aerosol direct radiative forcing to aerosol vertical profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ok Choi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol vertical profile significantly affects the aerosol direct radiative forcing at the TOA level. The degree to which the aerosol profile impacts the aerosol forcing depends on many factors such as presence of cloud, surface albedo and aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA. Using a radiation model, we show that for absorbing aerosols (with an SSA of 0.7–0.8 whether aerosols are located above cloud or below induces at least one order of magnitude larger changes of the aerosol forcing than how aerosols are vertically distributed in clear skies, above cloud or below cloud. To see if this finding also holds for the global average aerosol direct radiative effect, we use realistic AOD distribution by integrating MODIS, MISR and AERONET observations, SSA from AERONET and cloud data from various satellite observations. It is found that whether aerosols are above cloud or below controls about 70–80% of the effect of aerosol vertical profile on the global aerosol radiative effect. Aerosols below cloud contribute as much to the global aerosol radiative effect as aerosols above cloud.

  10. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft document presents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant sprays. This case study is organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which combines a ...

  11. Evaluation of spatio-temporal variability of Hamburg Aerosol Climatology against aerosol datasets from MODIS and CALIOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pappas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The new global aerosol climatology named HAC (Hamburg Aerosol Climatology is compared against MODIS (Collection 5, 2000–2007 and CALIOP (Level 2-version 3, 2006–2011 retrievals. The comparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD from HAC against MODIS shows larger HAC AOD values over regions with higher aerosol loads and smaller HAC AOD values than MODIS for regions with lower loads. The HAC data are found to be more reliable over land and for low AOD values. The largest differences between HAC and MODIS occur from March to August for the Northern Hemisphere and from September to February for the Southern Hemisphere. In addition, both the spectral variability and vertical distribution of the HAC AOD are examined at selected AERONET (1998–2007 sites, representative of main aerosol types (pollutants, sea salt, biomass and dust. Based on comparisons against spectral AOD values from AERONET, the mean absolute percentage error in HAC AOD data is 25% at ultraviolet wavelengths (400 nm, 6–12% at visible and 18% at near-infrared (1000 nm. For the same AERONET sites, the HAC AOD vertical distribution is compared against CALIOP space lidar data. On a daily average basis, HAD AOD is less by 9% in the lowest 3 km than CALIOP values, especially for sites with biomass burning smoke, desert dust and sea salt spray. Above the boundary layer, the HAC AOD vertical distribution is reliable.

  12. Determining Effective Spraying Periods to Control Malaria via Indoor Residual Spraying in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Smith?

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor residual spraying—spraying insecticide inside houses to kill mosquitoes—is an important method for controlling malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa. We propose a mathematical model for both regular and non-fixed spraying, using impulsive differential equations. First, we determine the stability properties of the nonimpulsive system. Next, we derive minimal effective spraying intervals and the degree of spraying effectiveness required to control mosquitoes when spraying occurs at regular intervals. If spraying is not fixed, then we determine the “next best” spraying times. We also consider the effects of climate change on the prevalence of mosquitoes. We show that both regular and nonfixed spraying will result in a significant reduction in the overall number of mosquitoes, as well as the number of malaria cases in humans. We thus recommend that the use of indoor spraying be re-examined for widespread application in malaria-endemic areas.

  13. [CFC gases in medicinal sprays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, P H; Svendsen, U G

    1989-03-20

    In 1987, approximately 1.18 million aerosol dispensers for medicinal use were sold in Denmark. These contained approximately 29 tons of completely halogenized CFC gases ("Freon") and the preparations were employed for the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. The possibilities of substitutes are discussed in this article. Preparations are already available which do not contain CFC. Producers of CFC are also attempting to develop new aerosol gases which do not damage the environment. Perhaps these will be found in medicinal preparations in the future.

  14. Preparation and in vivo absorption evaluation of spray dried powders containing salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinsuebpol C

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chutima Sinsuebpol, Jittima Chatchawalsaisin, Poj Kulvanich Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: The aim of the present study was to prepare inhalable co-spray dried powders of salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles (sCT-CS-NPs with mannitol and investigate pulmonary absorption in rats. Methods: The sCT-CS-NPs were prepared by the ionic gelation method using sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP as a cross-linking polyion. Inhalable dry powders were obtained by co-spray drying aqueous dispersion of sCT-CS-NPs and mannitol. sCT-CS-NPs co-spray dried powders were characterized with respect to morphology, particle size, powder density, aerodynamic diameter, protein integrity, in vitro release of sCT, and aerosolization. The plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration of sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders to the rats was also determined. Results: sCT-CS-NPs were able to be incorporated into mannitol forming inhalable microparticles by the spray drying process. The sCT-CS-NPs/mannitol ratios and spray drying process affected the properties of the microparticles obtained. The conformation of the secondary structures of sCTs was affected by both mannitol content and spray dry inlet temperature. The sCT-CS-NPs were recovered after reconstitution of spray dried powders in an aqueous medium. The sCT release profile from spray dried powders was similar to that from sCT-CS-NPs. In vitro inhalation parameters measured by the Andersen cascade impactor indicated sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders having promising aerodynamic properties for deposition in the deep lung. Determination of the plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration to rats revealed that the inhalable sCT-CS NPs spray dried powders provided higher protein absorption compared to native sCT powders. Conclusion: The sCT-CS-NPs with mannitol based spray dried powders were

  15. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L; O’Connor, Ewan J; Hogan, Robin J; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-01-01

    .... The need for improved long-term but comprehensive measurements at a marine low-cloud site motivated the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL; www.arm .gov/sites/amf/grw...

  16. Atmosphere aerosol satellite project Aerosol-UA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Syniavskyi, Ivan; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Degtyaryov, Oleksandr; Sosonkin, Mikhail; Mishchenko, Michael; Danylevsky, Vassyl; Ivanov, Yury; Oberemok, Yevgeny; Masley, Volodymyr; Rosenbush, Vera; Moskalev, Sergii

    2017-04-01

    The experiment Aerosol-UA is Ukrainian space mission aimed to the terrestrial atmospheric aerosol spatial distribution and microphysics investigations. The experiment concept is based on idea of Glory/APS mission of precise orbital measurements of polarization and intensity of the sunlight scattered by the atmosphere, aerosol and the surface the multichannel Scanning Polarimeter (ScanPol) with narrow field-of-view. ScanPol measurements will be accompanied by the wide-angle MultiSpectral Imager-Polarimeter (MSIP). The ScanPol is designed to measure Stokes parameters I, Q, U within the spectral range from the UV to the SWIR in a wide range of phase angles along satellite ground path. Expected ScanPol polarimetric accuracy is 0.15%. A high accuracy measurement of the degree of linear polarization is provided by on-board calibration of the ScanPol polarimeter. On-board calibration is performed for each scan of the mirror scanning system. A set of calibrators is viewed during the part of the scan range when the ScanPol polarimeter looks in the direction opposite to the Earth's surface. These reference assemblies provide calibration of the zero of the polarimetric scale (unpolarized reference assembly) and the scale factor for the polarimetric scale (polarized reference assembly). The zero of the radiometric scale is provided by the dark reference assembly.The spectral channels of the ScanPol are used to estimate the tropospheric aerosol absorption, the aerosol over the ocean and the land surface, the signals from cirrus clouds, stratospheric aerosols caused by major volcanic eruptions, and the contribution of the Earth's surface. The imager-polarimeter MSIP will collect 60°x60° field-of-view images on the state of the atmosphere and surface in the area, where the ScanPol polarimeter will measure, to retrieve aerosol optical depth and polarization properties of aerosol by registration of three Stokes parameters simultaneously in three spectral channels. The two more

  17. PHARMACEUTICAL AEROSOLS FOR THE TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumaila N Muhammad Hanif

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Historically, pharmaceutical aerosols have been employed for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but in the past decades their use has been expanded to treat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory diseases. Tuberculosis (TB is acquired after inhalation of aerosol droplets containing the bacilli from the cough of infected individuals. Even though TB affects other organs, the lungs are the primary site of infection, which makes the pulmonary route an ideal alternative route to administer vaccines or drug treatments. Optimization of formulations and delivery systems for anti-TB vaccines and drugs, as well as the proper selection of the animal model to evaluate those is of paramount importance if novel vaccines or drug treatments are to be successful. Pharmaceutical aerosols for patient use are generated from metered dose inhalers, nebulizers and dry powder inhalers. In addition to the advantages of providing more efficient delivery of the drug, low cost and portability, pharmaceutical dry powder aerosols are more stable than inhalable liquid dosage forms and do not require refrigeration. Methods to manufacture dry powders in respirable sizes include micronization, spray drying and other proprietary technologies. Inhalable dry powders are characterized in terms of their drug content, particle size and dispersibility to ensure deposition in the appropriate lung region and effective aerosolization from the device. These methods will be illustrated as they were applied for the manufacture and characterization of powders containing anti-tubercular agents and vaccines for pulmonary administration. The influence of formulation, selection of animal model, method of aerosol generation and administration on the efficacy demonstrated in a given study will be illustrated by the evaluation of pharmaceutical aerosols of anti-TB drugs and vaccines in guinea pigs by

  18. DARE : Dedicated Aerosols Retrieval Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smorenburg, K.; Courrèges-Lacoste, G.B.; Decae, R.; Court, A.J.; Leeuw, G. de; Visser, H.

    2004-01-01

    At present there is an increasing interest in remote sensing of aerosols from space because of the large impact of aerosols on climate, earth observation and health. TNO has performed a study aimed at improving aerosol characterisation using a space based instrument and state-of-the-art aerosol

  19. Mechanisms of drop formation in air-supported spray boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, S.; Sattelmayer, T.; Aigner, M.; Sakbani, K.

    1985-10-01

    In the course of further development of gas turbine combustion chambers, the fuel spraying was comprehensively investigated. The air-supported sprayer with liquid film in the nozzle (air blast nozzle) enables a reduction of the emission of noxious matter and shows a favourable operational behaviour. The basic mechanisms were investigated with the help of models and their possible transfer checked with test nozzles. The influences of the physical properties of the fuel, of the geometry and the operational parameter on the film formation and disintegration as well as the produced drop spectrum could be clarified in detail. (orig.).

  20. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  1. Description and evaluation of GMXe: a new aerosol submodel for global simulations (v1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Pringle

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new aerosol microphysics and gas aerosol partitioning submodel (Global Modal-aerosol eXtension, GMXe implemented within the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry model (EMAC, version 1.8. The submodel is computationally efficient and is suitable for medium to long term simulations with global and regional models. The aerosol size distribution is treated using 7 log-normal modes and has the same microphysical core as the M7 submodel (Vignati et al., 2004.

    The main developments in this work are: (i the extension of the aerosol emission routines and the M7 microphysics, so that an increased (and variable number of aerosol species can be treated (new species include sodium and chloride, and potentially magnesium, calcium, and potassium, (ii the coupling of the aerosol microphysics to a choice of treatments of gas/aerosol partitioning to allow the treatment of semi-volatile aerosol, and, (iii the implementation and evaluation of the developed submodel within the EMAC model of atmospheric chemistry.

    Simulated concentrations of black carbon, particulate organic matter, dust, sea spray, sulfate and ammonium aerosol are shown to be in good agreement with observations (for all species at least 40% of modeled values are within a factor of 2 of the observations. The distribution of nitrate aerosol is compared to observations in both clean and polluted regions. Concentrations in polluted continental regions are simulated quite well, but there is a general tendency to overestimate nitrate, particularly in coastal regions (geometric mean of modelled values/geometric mean of observed data ≈2. In all regions considered more than 40% of nitrate concentrations are within a factor of two of the observations. Marine nitrate concentrations are well captured with 96% of modeled values within a factor of 2 of the observations.

  2. Filter media properties of mineral fibres produced by plasma spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasauskas, Tadas; Matulevicius, Jonas; Kliucininkas, Linas; Krugly, Edvinas; Valincius, Vitas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the properties of fibrous gas filtration media produced from mineral zeolite. Fibres were generated by direct current plasma spray. The paper characterizes morphology, chemical composition, geometrical structure of elementary fibres, and thermal resistance, as well as the filtration properties of fibre media. The diameter of the produced elementary fibres ranged from 0.17 to 0.90 μm and the length ranged from 0.025 to 5.1 mm. The release of fibres from the media in the air stream was noticed, but it was minimized by hot-pressing the formed fibre mats. The fibres kept their properties up to the temperature of 956°C, while further increase in temperature resulted in the filter media becoming shrunk and brittle. The filtration efficiency of the prepared filter mats ranged from 95.34% to 99.99% for aerosol particles ranging in a size between 0.03 and 10.0 μm. Unprocessed fibre media showed the highest filtration efficiency when filtering aerosol particles smaller than 0.1 µm. Hot-pressed filters were characterized by the highest quality factor values, ranging from 0.021 to 0.064 Pa(-1) (average value 0.034 Pa(-1)).

  3. [Optimization of spraying dry technology of Biqiu ranules ethanol extract by Box-Behnken response surface method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-jun; Liu, Li-li; Hu, Jun-hua; Wu, Yun; Chao, En-xiang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    With inlet temperature, specific gravity, feeding speed as independent variables, the comprehensive evaluating indexes of content of schisandrin and arctiin as dependent variable, the experimental data were fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Based on establishing the mathematical relationship between the comprehensive evaluating indexes and respective variables, Box-Benhnken central composite test and response surface analysis method was employed to optimize the spray drying technology of Biqiu granules ethanol extract. The optimal drying parameter was as follows: the inlet temperature was 175 degrees C, the specific gravity was 1.10, feeding speed was 32 r x min(-1). Under these conditions, the comprehensive evaluating indexes of spraying dry processes was 92.68, which was close to the model prediction. The spraying dry technology of Biqiu granules ethanol extract optimized by response surface methodology was accurate and feasible, which provided theoretical experiment basis for the industrialization production.

  4. Surfactants and submicron sea spray generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellegri, K.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Yoon, Y.J.; Jennings, S.G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to elucidate the role of surfactants on the primary marine aerosol production of submicron marine aerosols. A synthetic surfactant SDS was used in conjunction with artificially generated seawater, and the resultant bubble-mediated aerosol produced was

  5. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  6. Preparation and in vivo absorption evaluation of spray dried powders containing salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsuebpol, Chutima; Chatchawalsaisin, Jittima; Kulvanich, Poj

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare inhalable co-spray dried powders of salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles (sCT-CS-NPs) with mannitol and investigate pulmonary absorption in rats. The sCT-CS-NPs were prepared by the ionic gelation method using sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a cross-linking polyion. Inhalable dry powders were obtained by co-spray drying aqueous dispersion of sCT-CS-NPs and mannitol. sCT-CS-NPs co-spray dried powders were characterized with respect to morphology, particle size, powder density, aerodynamic diameter, protein integrity, in vitro release of sCT, and aerosolization. The plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration of sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders to the rats was also determined. sCT-CS-NPs were able to be incorporated into mannitol forming inhalable microparticles by the spray drying process. The sCT-CS-NPs/mannitol ratios and spray drying process affected the properties of the microparticles obtained. The conformation of the secondary structures of sCTs was affected by both mannitol content and spray dry inlet temperature. The sCT-CS-NPs were recovered after reconstitution of spray dried powders in an aqueous medium. The sCT release profile from spray dried powders was similar to that from sCT-CS-NPs. In vitro inhalation parameters measured by the Andersen cascade impactor indicated sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders having promising aerodynamic properties for deposition in the deep lung. Determination of the plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration to rats revealed that the inhalable sCT-CS NPs spray dried powders provided higher protein absorption compared to native sCT powders. The sCT-CS-NPs with mannitol based spray dried powders were prepared to have appropriate aerodynamic properties for pulmonary delivery. The developed system was able to deliver sCT via a pulmonary route into the systemic circulation.

  7. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  8. Marine Aerosols and Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah D; Thornton, Daniel C O

    2017-10-13

    The role of marine bioaerosols in cloud formation and climate is currently so uncertain that even the sign of the climate forcing is unclear. Marine aerosols form through direct emissions and through the conversion of gasphase emissions to aerosols in the atmosphere. The composition and size of aerosols determine how effective they are in catalyzing the formation of water droplets and ice crystals in clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles, respectively. Marine organic aerosols may be sourced both from recent regional phytoplankton blooms that add labile organic matter to the surface ocean and from long-term global processes, such as the upwelling of old refractory dissolved organic matter from the deep ocean. Understanding the formation of marine aerosols and their propensity to catalyze cloud formation processes are challenges that must be addressed given the major uncertainties associated with aerosols in climate models. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 is January 3, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  9. Spray drift reduction evaluations of spray nozzles using a standardized testing protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development and testing of drift reduction technologies has come to the forefront of application research in the past few years in the United States. Drift reduction technologies (DRTs) can be spray nozzles, sprayer modifications, spray delivery assistance, spray property modifiers (adjuvants),...

  10. Developing a generic model for spray drift in fruit crop spraying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holterman, H.J.; Zande, van de J.C.

    2014-01-01

    An empirical model has been developed for computing downwind deposits of spray drift after spray applications in fruit orchards. A database of downwind spray deposits from experiments during 20 years of field trials was used in regression analysis to show the relevant parameters: wind speed, wind

  11. Release of VOCs and particles during use of nanofilm spray products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Jensen, Keld A; Janfelt, Christian; Lauritsen, Frants R; Clausen, Per A; Wolkoff, Peder

    2009-10-15

    Here, we present emission data on VOCs and particles emitted during simulated use of four commercial nanofilm spray products (NFPs) used for making easy-to-clean or self-cleaning surfaces on floors, ceramic tiles, and windows. The aim was to characterize the emitted VOCs and to provide specific source strength data for VOCs and particles released to the airduring use of the products. Containers with NFP were mounted on a spray-stand inside a closed stainless steel chamber with no air exchange. NFPs were sprayed in amounts corresponding to 1 m2 surface toward a target plate at a distance of 35 cm. Released VOCs were measured by a combination of air sampling on Tenax TA adsorbent followed by thermal desorption GC/MS and GC/FID analysis and real time measurements using a miniature membrane inlet mass spectrometer. Particles were measured using a fast mobility particle sizer and an aerosol particle sizer. A number of VOCs were identified, including small alcohols, ketones and ethers, chlorinated acetones, a perfluorinated silane, limonene, and cyclic siloxanes. The number of generated particles was on the order of 3 x 10(8) to 2 x 10(10) particles/m3 per g sprayed NFP and were dominated by nanosize particles.

  12. Electrostatic charge characteristics of jet nebulized aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Philip Chi Lip; Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Kumon, Michiko; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2010-06-01

    Liquid droplets can be spontaneously charged in the absence of applied electric fields by spraying. It has been shown by computational simulation that charges may influence particle deposition in the airways. The electrostatic properties of jet nebulized aerosols and their potential effects on lung deposition have hardly been studied. A modified electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was employed to characterize the aerosol charges generated from jet nebulized commercial products. The charge and size measurements were conducted at 50% RH and 22 degrees C with a modified ELPI. Ventolin, Bricanyl, and Atrovent were nebulized using PARI LC Plus jet nebulizers coupled to a DeVilbiss Pulmo-Aide compressor. The aerosols were sampled in 30-sec durations. The drug deposits on the impactor stages were assayed chemically using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The charges of nebulized deionized water, isotonic saline, and the three commercial products diluted with saline were also measured to analyze the contributions of the major nebule ingredients on charging. No mass assays were performed on these runs. All three commercial nebules generated net negative charges. The magnitude of the charges reduced over the period of nebulization. Ventolin and Bricanyl yielded similar charge profiles. Highly variable charges were produced from deionized water. On the other hand, nebulized saline reproducibly generated net positive charges. Diluted commercial nebules showed charge polarity inversion. The charge profiles of diluted salbutamol and terbutaline solutions resembled those of saline, while the charges from diluted ipratropium solutions fluctuated near neutrality. The charge profiles were shown to be influenced by the concentration and physicochemical properties of the drugs, as well as the history of nebulization. The drugs may have unique isoelectric concentrations in saline at which the nebulized droplets would carry near-zero charges. According to results from

  13. A global off-line model of size-resolved aerosol microphysics: I. Model development and prediction of aerosol properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A GLObal Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP has been developed as an extension to the TOMCAT 3-D Eulerian off-line chemical transport model. GLOMAP simulates the evolution of the global aerosol size distribution using a sectional two-moment scheme and includes the processes of aerosol nucleation, condensation, growth, coagulation, wet and dry deposition and cloud processing. We describe the results of a global simulation of sulfuric acid and sea spray aerosol. The model captures features of the aerosol size distribution that are well established from observations in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere. Modelled condensation nuclei (CN>3nm vary between about 250–500 cm-3 in remote marine boundary layer regions and are generally in good agreement with observations. Modelled continental CN concentrations are lower than observed, which may be due to lack of some primary aerosol sources or the neglect of nucleation mechanisms other than binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid-water particles. Remote marine CN concentrations increase to around 2000–10 000 cm (at standard temperature and pressure in the upper troposphere, which agrees with typical observed vertical profiles. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at 0.2% supersaturation vary between about 1000 cm-3 in polluted regions and between 10 and 500 cm-3 in the remote marine boundary layer. New particle formation through sulfuric acid-water binary nucleation occurs predominantly in the upper troposphere, but the model results show that these particles contribute greatly to aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer. For this sulfur-sea salt system it is estimated that sea spray emissions account for only ~10% of CCN in the tropical marine boundary layer, but between 20 and 75% in the mid-latitude Southern Ocean. In a run with only natural sulfate and sea salt emissions the global mean surface CN concentration is more than 60% of that from a run with 1985 anthropogenic

  14. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: dominant contributions from biogenic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, was 21% non-sea-salt sulfate, 2% nitrate, 8% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea spray signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA profiles could be isolated: an amino acid/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass, a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%, a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 41%, a sea spray OA fraction (SS-OA, 7% and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%. The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (N : C ratio = 0.13, has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea spray aerosol was identified (SS-OA. However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not

  15. Broadband Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Visible Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quanfu; Bluvshtein, Nir; Segev, Lior; Flores, Michel; Rudich, Yinon; Washenfelder, Rebecca; Brown, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. Aerosol direct forcing remains one of the largest uncertainties in quantifying the role that aerosols play in the Earth's radiative budget. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross section and complex refractive indices, particularly in the blue and visible spectral range. There is also currently a large gap in our knowledge of how the optical properties evolve as a function of atmospheric aging in the visible spectrum. In this study, we constructed a new and novel laboratory instrument to measure aerosol extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a white light source. This broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy (BBCES) covers the 395-700 nm spectral region using a broadband light source and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device detector (CCD). We evaluated this BBCES by measuring extinction cross section for aerosols that are pure scattering, slightly absorbing and strongly absorbing atomized from standard materials. We also retrieved the refractive indices from the measured extinction cross sections. Secondary organic aerosols from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors were "aged" to differential time scales (1 to 10 days) in an Oxidation Flow Reactor (OFR) under the combined influence of OH, O3 and UV light. The new BBCES was used to online measure the extinction cross sections of the SOA. This talk will provide a comprehensive understanding of aerosol optical properties alerting during aging process in the 395 - 700 nm spectrum.

  16. Global atmospheric sulfur budget under volcanically quiescent conditions: Aerosol-chemistry-climate model predictions and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian-Xiong; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Rozanov, Eugene; Stenke, Andrea; Anet, Julien; Bingemer, Heinz; Peter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The global atmospheric sulfur budget and its emission dependence have been investigated using the coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate model SOCOL-AER. The aerosol module comprises gaseous and aqueous sulfur chemistry and comprehensive microphysics. The particle distribution is resolved by 40 size bins spanning radii from 0.39 nm to 3.2 μm, including size-dependent particle composition. Aerosol radiative properties required by the climate model are calculated online from the aerosol module. The model successfully reproduces main features of stratospheric aerosols under nonvolcanic conditions, including aerosol extinctions compared to Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) and Halogen Occultation Experiment, and size distributions compared to in situ measurements. The calculated stratospheric aerosol burden is 109 Gg of sulfur, matching the SAGE II-based estimate (112 Gg). In terms of fluxes through the tropopause, the stratospheric aerosol layer is due to about 43% primary tropospheric aerosol, 28% SO2, 23% carbonyl sulfide (OCS), 4% H2S, and 2% dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Turning off emissions of the short-lived species SO2, H2S, and DMS shows that OCS alone still establishes about 56% of the original stratospheric aerosol burden. Further sensitivity simulations reveal that anticipated increases in anthropogenic SO2 emissions in China and India have a larger influence on stratospheric aerosols than the same increase in Western Europe or the U.S., due to deep convection in the western Pacific region. However, even a doubling of Chinese and Indian emissions is predicted to increase the stratospheric background aerosol burden only by 9%. In contrast, small to moderate volcanic eruptions, such as that of Nabro in 2011, may easily double the stratospheric aerosol loading.

  17. Assessing the Dynamics of Organic Aerosols over the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Jérôme; Hassler, Christel; Ibelings, Bas; Berti, Nicolas; Bigorre, Sébastien; Djambazova, Violeta; Gascon-Diez, Elena; Giuliani, Grégory; Houlmann, Raphaël; Kiselev, Denis; de Laborie, Pierric; Le, Anh-Dao; Magouroux, Thibaud; Neri, Tristan; Palomino, Daniel; Pfändler, Stéfanie; Ray, Nicolas; Sousa, Gustavo; Staedler, Davide; Tettamanti, Federico; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Beniston, Martin

    2017-03-31

    The influence of aerosols on climate is highly dependent on the particle size distribution, concentration, and composition. In particular, the latter influences their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei, whereby they impact cloud coverage and precipitation. Here, we simultaneously measured the concentration of aerosols from sea spray over the North Atlantic on board the exhaust-free solar-powered vessel "PlanetSolar", and the sea surface physico-chemical parameters. We identified organic-bearing particles based on individual particle fluorescence spectra. Organic-bearing aerosols display specific spatio-temporal distributions as compared to total aerosols. We propose an empirical parameterization of the organic-bearing particle concentration, with a dependence on water salinity and sea-surface temperature only. We also show that a very rich mixture of organic aerosols is emitted from the sea surface. Such data will certainly contribute to providing further insight into the influence of aerosols on cloud formation, and be used as input for the improved modeling of aerosols and their role in global climate processes.

  18. Spray forming lead strip. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K.

    1996-04-10

    A cooperative research project was conducted between the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) to adapt the INEL spray forming process to produce near-net-shape lead alloy strip. The emphasis of the work was to spray form lead strip samples at INEL, using a variety of spray conditions, for characterization at JCI. An existing glove box apparatus was modified at INEL to spray form lead. The main spray forming components were housed inside the glove box. They included a spray nozzle, tundish (crucible), substrate assembly, gas heater and furnaces to heat the nozzle and tundish. To spray form metal strip, liquid metal was pressure-fed at a controlled rate through a series of circular orifices that span the width of the nozzle. There the metal contacted high velocity, high temperature inert gas (nitrogen) which atomized the molten material into fine droplets, entrained the droplets in a directed flow, and deposited them onto glass plates that were swept through the spray plume to form strip samples. In-flight convection cooling of the droplets followed by conduction and convection cooling at the substrate resulted in rapid solidification of the deposit. During operation, the inside of the glove box was purged with an inert gas to limit the effects of in-flight oxidation of the particles and spray-formed strips, as well as to protect personnel from exposure to airborne lead particulate. Remote controls were used to start/stop the spray and control the speed and position of the substrate. In addition, substrate samples were loaded into the substrate translator manually using the gloved side ports of the box. In this way, the glove box remained closed during a series of spray trials, and was opened only when loading the crucible with a lead charge or when removing lead strip samples for shipment to JCI.

  19. Spray Modelling for Multifuel Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    inside the swirl chamber. The first one is a constant temperature hot-wire anomometer (DISA 55M system) fitted with a platinum wire probe. The second...perature wire. The constant - temperature hot-wire anemometer type DISA 55M is employed using a platinum wire of 20 . in diameter to withstand mechanical...nozzle diameters. D max q dnSTD d D i/(q-p) .D.! min Dqp I (31) qp ma D dn Td D. min The mean diameter of spray droplets is used to describe the quality

  20. Urban aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activity measured during the MAPS-Seoul 2016 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N.; Park, M.; Yum, S. S.; Kim, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    While submicron aerosols in atmosphere and their effects on air quality and climate are a rising issue in atmospheric sciences, scientific understanding of them is still limited due to the lack of comprehensive observations. In particular, studies for hygroscopic properties of aerosols, closely related to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, are essential to aerosol-cloud-interaction study as aerosols can act as CCN, which crucially influence cloud microphysical and radiative properties. Urban aerosol properties were measured at Olympic Park in Seoul, a typical megacity with various anthropogenic sources, during the Megacity Air Pollution Studies (MAPS-Seoul 2016) campaign (9 May- 12 June 2016) for understanding diverse aspects of air quality problem in Korea. Physical properties of aerosols, including aerosol and CCN number concentration, aerosol size distribution and growth factor were measured by CPC, CCNC, SMPS and H-TDMA, respectively. Simultaneously, size-resolved chemical component of aerosol and water-soluble aerosol mass concentration were measured by AMS and PILS-IC. These measurement data are used for comprehensive analysis. A main focus will be on the relationship between overall properties of aerosols and their CCN activity in urban area. Results from MAPS-Seoul 2015 will also be used as reference for comparison with measurements in 2016 campaign. For example, aerosol number concentrations peaked at 0800, 1500 and 2000 LT due to traffic at rush hours and photochemical reaction in the afternoon. This is slightly different from the results of MAPS-Seoul 2015 campaign that showed two dominant peaks in the morning and afternoon.

  1. Physical metrology of aerosols; Metrologie physique des aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulaud, D.; Vendel, J. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    The various detection and measuring methods for aerosols are presented, and their selection is related to aerosol characteristics (size range, concentration or mass range), thermo-hydraulic conditions (carrier fluid temperature, pressure and flow rate) and to the measuring system conditions (measuring frequency, data collection speed, cost...). Methods based on aerosol dynamic properties (inertial, diffusional and electrical methods) and aerosol optical properties (localized and integral methods) are described and their performances and applications are compared

  2. PREPARATION OF ISONIAZID AS DRY POWDER FORMULATIONS FOR INHALATION BY PHYSICAL MIXING AND SPRAY DRYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOMCHAI SAWATDEE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to develop isoniazid as dry powder aerosol for delivery to the lower airways and to study the susceptibility of M. bovis and M. tuberculosis to the formulationsstudied. Isoniazid was formulated with trehalose, mannose and lactose by physical mixing and spray drying techniques. All formulations were evaluated for delivery efficiency and stability.Susceptibility tests of Mycobacterium species to the drug formulations were carried out. Isoniazid mixed with fine trehalose, micronised mannose or fine lactose produced the formulations whichgave fine particle fraction ( 0.05.

  3. Infrared camera evaluation of the cooling effect of triamcinolone acetonide aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkner, Rita V; Sohn, Andrew; Goldenberg, Kristin A; Lebwohl, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide spray is a topical corticosteroid indicated for the relief of inflammatory/pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses. There are clinical reports of an antipruritic, cooling sensation appreciated upon application. This study was designed to quantify the cryotherapeutic cooling effect of triamcinolone acetonide spray. Using an infrared video camera, skin surface temperature was evaluated for change upon application of the triamcinolone acetonide and two comparator ingredient components of triamcinolone acetonide: ethanol alcohol in a non-aerosolized spray and triamcinolone acetonide cream. This was an open-label, single center, comparator study. This study enrolled 20 subjects with a diagnosis of either an acute or chronic steroid-responsive dermatosis. Ten additional controls were also enrolled. Using an infrared video camera, skin surface temperature was evaluated for change upon application of the triamcinolone acetonide and two comparator ingredient components of triamcinolone acetonide:ethanol alcohol in a non-aerosolized spray and triamcinolone acetonide cream. Across every study cohort, the average change in skin surface temperature with triamcinolone acetonide (between 16-18°C; P<0.001 for all comparisons, Figures 1 and 2) was significantly greater than the change demonstrated by both the non-aerosolized spray (between 5-7°C) and the triamcinolone acetonide cream (between 5.0-6.5°C). The transient temperature change of nearly 20°C with triamcinolone acetonide is most likely attributable to the refrigerant properties of the isobutane propellant of this product. Similar to other common cryotherapy methods, triamcinolone acetonide can achieve very low skin surface temperatures, which may result in localized relief of pruritus.

  4. Advanced Nanoscale Coatings with Plasma Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atteridge, David

    2000-01-01

    .... A secondary research charter developed as this program proceeded was the assessment of the feasibility of using cored wire filled with WE-Co powder as a feed-stock for both plasma spray and twin-wire-arc spray (TWAS...

  5. New tools to optimise spray dryers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, M.; Straatsma, J.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Akkerman, C.; Jong, de P.

    2007-01-01

    Spray drying is an essential unit operation for the manufacture of many products with specific powder properties. It is characterised by atomisation of a solution or suspension into droplets, followed by subsequent drying of these droplets by evaporation of water or other solvents. Spray drying is

  6. Spray Deflector For Water-Jet Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Disk on water-jet-machining nozzle protects nozzle and parts behind it from erosion by deflected spray. Consists of stainless-steel backing with neoprene facing deflecting spray so it does not reach nut or other vital parts of water-jet apparatus.

  7. Summary of the Blackmo 88 spray experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Miller; W. E. Yendol; M. L. McManus; D. E. Anderson; K. Mierzejewski

    1991-01-01

    The Blackmo 88 spray trial experiment was conducted for two primary purposes: To quantify the effects of local micrometeorological processes, in and near the canopy, on the deposition patterns of aerially applied BT in a mature oak forest; To generate a data set containing simultaneous measurements of spray deposition and detailed micrometeorology, in a canopy of known...

  8. Combustion aerosols from potassium-containing fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balzer Nielsen, Lars

    1998-12-31

    The scope of the work presented in this thesis is the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the submicron range during combustion processes, in particular where biomass is used alone or co-fired with coal. An introduction to the formation processes of fly ash in general and submicron aerosol in particular during combustion is presented, along with some known problems related to combustion of biomass for power generation. The work falls in two parts. The first is the design of a laboratory setup for investigation of homogeneous nucleation and particle dynamics at high temperature. The central unit of the setup is a laminar flow aerosol condenser (LFAC), which essentially is a 173 cm long tubular furnace with an externally cooled wall. A mathematical model is presented which describes the formation and evolution of the aerosol in the LFAC, where the rate of formation of new nuclei is calculated using the so-called classical theory. The model includes mass and energy conservation equations and an expression for the description of particle growth by diffusion. The resulting set of nonlinear second-order partial differential equations are solved numerically using the method of orthogonal collocation. The model is implemented in the FORTRAN code MONAERO. The second part of this thesis describes a comprehensive investigation of submicron aerosol formation during co-firing of coal and straw carried out at a 380 MW{sub Th} pulverized coal unit at Studstrup Power Plant, Aarhus. Three types of coal are used, and total boiler load and straw input is varied systematically. Straw contains large amounts of potassium, which is released during combustion. Submicron aerosol is sampled between the two banks of the economizer at a flue gas temperature of 350 deg. C using a novel ejector probe. The aerosol is characterized using the SMPS system and a Berner-type low pressure impactor. The chemical composition of the particles collected in the impactor is determined using

  9. Reduced efficacy of marine cloud brightening geoengineering due to in-plume aerosol coagulation: parameterization and global implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships (marine cloud brightening has been proposed as a possible method to control anthropogenic global warming; however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to, amongst other factors, uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. A major assumption used in recent cloud- and climate-modeling studies is that all sea spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus these studies did not account for subgrid aerosol coagulation within the sea-spray plumes. We explore the evolution of these sea-salt plumes using a multi-shelled Gaussian plume model with size-resolved aerosol coagulation. We determine how the final number of particles depends on meteorological conditions, including wind speed and boundary-layer stability, as well as the emission rate and size distribution of aerosol emitted. Under previously proposed injection rates and typical marine conditions, we find that the number of aerosol particles is reduced by over 50%, but this reduction varies from under 10% to over 90% depending on the conditions. We provide a computationally efficient parameterization for cloud-resolving and global-scale models to account for subgrid-scale coagulation, and we implement this parameterization in a global-scale aerosol-climate model. While designed to address subgrid-scale coagulation of sea-salt particles, the parameterization is generally applicable for coagulation of subgrid-scale aerosol from point sources. We find that accounting for this subgrid-scale coagulation reduces cloud droplet number concentrations by 46% over emission regions, and reduces the global mean radiative flux perturbation from −1.5 W m−2 to −0.8 W m−2.

  10. Concentration Effects and Ion Properties Controlling the Fractionation of Halides in Sea Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, M. I.; Pillar, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    During the aerosolization process at the sea surface, halides are incorporated into aerosol droplets, where they may play an important role in tropospheric ozone chemistry. Although this process may significantly contribute to the formation of reactive gas phase molecular halogens, little is known about the environmental factors that control how halides selectively accumulate at the air-water interface. In this study, the production of sea spray aerosol is simulated using electrospray ionization (ESI) of 100 nM equimolar solutions of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO2, NaNO3, NaClO4, and NaIO4. The microdroplets generated are analyzed by mass spectrometry to study the comparative enrichment of anions (fX-) and their correlation with ion properties. Although no correlation exists between fX- and the limiting equivalent ionic conductivity, the correlation coefficient of the linear fit with the size of the anions, dehydration free-energy, and polarizability α, is larger for the reciprocal square of anion size. The same pure physical process is observed in H2O and D2O. The factor fX- does not change with pH (6.8-8.6), counterion (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) substitution effects, or solvent polarity changes in methanol- and ethanol-water mixtures (0 ≤ xwater ≤ 1). Polysorbate 20 surfactant is used to modify the structure of the interface. Despite the observed enrichment of I- on the air-water interface of equimolar solutions, our results of seawater mimic samples agree with a model in which the interfacial composition is increasingly enriched in I- layer due to concentration effects in sea spray aerosol formation. Experiments reporting the products for the ozonolysis of halides in microdroplets at typical ozone concentrations of ~ 50 ppbv display the formation or reactive halogen species that contribute to the destruction of ozone over the open ocean.

  11. Aerosol-type retrieval and uncertainty quantification from OMI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Anu; Kolmonen, Pekka; Laine, Marko; Tamminen, Johanna

    2017-11-01

    selection. The posterior probability distribution can provide a comprehensive characterisation of the uncertainty in this kind of problem for aerosol-type selection. As a result, the proposed method can account for the model error and also include the model selection uncertainty in the total uncertainty budget.

  12. Aerosol Optical Properties and Direct Radiative Effects over Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Central China is important for aerosols and climate because it is among the worst regions for air pollution in China. However, it is understudied due to a lag in establishing an atmospheric monitoring network. So we did a comprehensive analysis using multiple techniques to improve the understanding of aerosol optical properties and their radiative effect in this region. The results showed that high aerosol optical depth (AOD was generally found in the northern and central parts, whereas low values were observed in the southern and western parts. Most regions were predominantly loaded with small aerosol particles and a significant influence of long-distance transported dust was found in springtime. A strong and significantly decreasing trend was observed with a maximum decrease rate of −0.08 per year in the northern and western parts, related to the decreasing emission of aerosols and increasing rainfall. Aerosol optical properties and radiative effects were compared between an urban site, Wuhan, and a rural site, Dengfeng. The seasonal variations of AOD and Ångström exponent (AE are similar for Wuhan and Dengfeng, but both values are larger in Wuhan than in Dengfeng. A greater dominance of coarse-mode and absorbing aerosols was found over Dengfeng. Annual averaged aerosol radiative effect (ARE in shortwave spectrum (ARESW and its efficiency (REE are −48.01 W/m2 and −51.38 W/m2, respectively, in Wuhan, −40.02 W/m2 and −53.26 W/m2, respectively, in Dengfeng. The dependence of REE on aerosol absorptive and size properties was studied; the results showed that REE was strongly influenced by the aerosol absorptivity and size of fine-mode particles, but there was not a strong correlation between REE and AE. The percentage of ARE in visible spectrum (AREVIS in ARESW in Wuhan was 3% lower than in Dengfeng. The AREVIS percentage depended largely on aerosol particle size, but was less influenced by aerosol absorptivity.

  13. Aerosol deposition on plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    James B. Wedding; Roger W. Carlson; James J. Stukel; Fakhri A. Bazzaz

    1976-01-01

    An aerosol generator and wind tunnel system designed for use in aerosol deposition is described. Gross deposition on rough pubescent leaves was nearly 7 times greater than on smooth, waxy leaves. Results suggest that aerosol deposition, on a per unit area basis, for single horizontal streamlining leaves is similar to that for arrays of leaves under similar flow...

  14. Three-Dimensional Physical and Optical Characteristics of Aerosols over Central China from Long-Term CALIPSO and HYSPLIT Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols greatly influence global and regional atmospheric systems, and human life. However, a comprehensive understanding of the source regions and three-dimensional (3D characteristics of aerosol transport over central China is yet to be achieved. Thus, we investigate the 3D macroscopic, optical, physical, and transport properties of the aerosols over central China based on the March 2007 to February 2016 data obtained from the Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO mission and the hybrid single-particle Lagrangian integrated trajectory (HYSPLIT model. Our results showed that approximately 60% of the aerosols distributed over central China originated from local areas, whereas non-locally produced aerosols constituted approximately 40%. Anthropogenic aerosols constituted the majority of the aerosol pollutants (69% that mainly distributed less than 2.0 km above mean sea level. Natural aerosols, which are mainly composed of dust, accounted for 31% of the total aerosols, and usually existed at an altitude higher than that of anthropogenic aerosols. Aerosol particles distributed in the near surface were smaller and more spherical than those distributed above 2.0 km. Aerosol optical depth (AOD and the particulate depolarization ratio displayed decreasing trends, with a total decrease of 0.11 and 0.016 from March 2007 to February 2016, respectively. These phenomena indicate that during the study period, the extinction properties of aerosols decreased, and the degree of sphericity in aerosol particles increased. Moreover, the annual anthropogenic and natural AOD demonstrated decreasing trends, with a total decrease of 0.07 and 0.04, respectively. This study may benefit the evaluation of the effects of the 3D properties of aerosols on regional climates.

  15. Arctic Aerosols and Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ingeborg Elbæk

    2017-01-01

    Since the Industrial Revolution, the anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases has been increasing, leading to a rise in the global temperature. Particularly in the Arctic, climate change is having serious impact where the average temperature has increased almost twice as much as the global during...... aerosol contribution from wood combustion will not be sufficient. Arctic aerosols were investigated during several time periods with different instruments and time resolutions. Two years of weekly measurements of black carbon and sulfate at the Villum Research Station showed elevated concentrations during...

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of Antarctic marine aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Marco; Zanca, Nicola; Rinaldi, Matteo; Dall'osto, Manuel; Simo, Rafel; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Decesari, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Marine aerosol constitutes an important and not thoroughly investigated natural aerosol system. In particular, the poor knowledge of the physical-chemical properties of primary (sea-spray) and secondary particles, especially over biologically active seawaters, affects the current capability of modeling the effect of marine aerosol on climate (O'Dowd et al., 2004). In polar regions, surface seawater composition and its exchanges with the atmosphere is complicated also by the presence of sea-ice and of the variety of micro-organisms (viruses, prokaryotes and microalgae) living within it (Levasseur,2013). In the framework of the Spanish project PEGASO (Plankton-derived Emission of Gases and Aerosols in the Southern Ocean) submicron aerosol samples were collected during a 6 weeks long oceanographic cruise (2nd January 2015 - 11th February 2015) conducted in the regions of Antarctic Peninsula, South Orkney and South Georgia Islands, an area of the Southern Ocean characterized every summer by both large patches of productive waters (phytoplankton blooms) and sea-ice cover. The collected samples were analyzed by means of proton-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy with aim of organic compounds characterization in terms of functional groups and specific molecular tracers identification (Decesari et al., 2011). H-NMR spectral features resulted quite variable among the different samples both in terms of relative abundance of main functional groups and in terms of presence of specific compounds. In all the samples were found biogenic markers, like low-molecular-weight alkyl-amines and methanesulphonate (MSA), of secondary origin (formed by the condensation of vapors onto particles). Resonance signals of other aliphatic compounds of possible primary origin, like lipids, aminoacids (e.g. alanine) and sugars (e.g. sucrose) are present in variable concentrations in the samples. A hierarchical cluster analysis applied on the NMR spectra allowed to identify similarities

  17. GRIP LANGLEY AEROSOL RESEARCH GROUP EXPERIMENT (LARGE) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Langley Aerosol Research Group Experiment (LARGE) measures ultrafine aerosol number density, total and non-volatile aerosol number density, dry aerosol size...

  18. Development of Aerosol Measurement, Sampling and Generation Experimental Facilities under High Temperature and High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Chan; Jung, Woo Young; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Doo Yong [FNC TECH., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The pressure is key factor determining Knudsen number and it affects aerosol dynamics. Hence, it is important to design experimental facilities to simulate the aerosols transport phenomena and removal mechanisms in the high temperature and high pressure (HT/HP). In case of Nuclear Power Plant, during the Light Water Reactor (LWR) severe accident, core degradation results in the release of both vapors and aerosol particles which differ in composition depending on their source terms. Vapor and aerosols generated under severe accident enter the containment atmosphere and are distributed in the containment by atmospheric flow. Temperature and pressure in the containment increase until containment spray system, fan cooler system or FCVS initiates to extract heat and avoid pressurization. The main purpose of the experimental facility is to develop not only multi-purpose test loops applying for aerosol industry but also to evaluation performance of engineered safety system including containment filtered venting system. The main experiment will be carried out in this loop and provide representative behavior of the aerosols under HT/HP conditions. The aim of the research is to be able to 1) develop the aerosol generation, mixing, sampling and measurement system and conduct tests based on various aerosol concentration, thermal-hydraulic conditions including high temperature and pressure and type of carrier gases (air, nitrogen and steam), applicable to the thermal power plant, environmental industry, automobile exhaust gas, chemical plant, HVAC system including nuclear power plant, and 2) investigate aerosol behaviors and removal mechanisms under these conditions. The tests with the main carrier gas of air will be performed on PHASEⅠ, steam will be conducted on PHASEⅡ.

  19. On the impacts of phytoplankton-derived organic matter on the properties of the primary marine aerosol - Part 1: Source fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; Leeuw, G. de; McFiggans, G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of biogenic dissolved and colloidal organic matter on the production of submicron primary sea-spray aerosol was investigated via the simulation of bubble bursting in seawater enriched with phytoplankton-released organics. Seawater samples collected along a transect off the West African

  20. [Anti-infective aerosols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, P; Dequin, P F; Rivoire, B; Gagnadoux, F; Faurisson, F; Diot, E; Boissinot, E; Lemarié, E

    1999-06-01

    Anti-infectious agents such as pentamidine, antibiotics (mainly colistine and aminoglycosides) and amphotericin B can be administered by aerosol. This route of administration is not officially approved and it constitutes an empirical approach which has benefited from recent research which is summarized hereafter. The most fundamental question is related to the potentially deleterious effects of nebulization processes, especially ultrasound, on the anti infectious properties of the drugs. Colimycin, which was chosen as a reference because its polypeptide structure makes it unstable a priori, proved to be resistant to high frequency ultrasound, which is encouraging for other molecules such as aminoglycosides or betalactamins. The nebulizer characteristics have also to be taken into account. An aerosol can be produced from an amphotericin B suspension and from colistine using both an ultrasonic nebulizer and a jet nebulizer. Distinction between good and bad nebulizers does not depend upon the physical process involved to nebulize the drug, but on the intrinsic characteristics of the device and its performance with a known drug. The inhaled mass of an aerosol in the respirable range must be high and dosimetric nebulizers represent a significant progress. Finally, adminnistration of anti infectious aerosols requires a new pharmacological approach to monitor treatment and urinary assays are promising.

  1. AEROSOL DISSEMINATION ASSESSMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic performance requirements are given for a chamber assessment aerosol system to be designed, developed and fabricated for evaluating the...automated assessment system. These include light scattering particle counters and mathematical treatment of decay curves for analysis of size properties

  2. Modeling of droplet dynamic and thermal behaviour during spray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The two major stages in spray casting are spray atomization and spray deposition. The spray atomi- zation stage consists of the following aspects: Highly ener- getic gas jet or jets (supersonic velocity) impinge on a stream of molten metal leading to break up of the stream into small, irregular ligaments. The spherodization of.

  3. Transdermal Spray in Hormone Delivery | Algin-Yapar | Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examines advances in hormone delivery, particularly using transdermal spray. Transdermal gels, emulsions, patches, subcutaneous implants and sprays have been developed for transdermal hormone therapy in recent years. Transdermal sprays, in their general form of metered-dose transdermal spray, ...

  4. Numerical parametric studies of spray combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    A coupled numerical algorithm has been developed for studies of combustion instabilities in spray-driven liquid rocket engines. The model couples gas and liquid phase physics using the method of fractional steps. Also introduced is a novel, efficient methodology for accounting for spray formation through direct solution of liquid phase equations. Preliminary parametric studies show marked sensitivity of spray penetration and geometry to droplet diameter, considerations of liquid core, and acoustic interactions. Less sensitivity was shown to the combustion model type although more rigorous (multi-step) formulations may be needed for the differences to become apparent.

  5. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-02

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking.

  6. Improvement of Representation of the Cloud-Aerosol Interaction in Large-Scale Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khain, Alexander [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Phillips, Vaughan [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Pinsky, Mark [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Lynn, Barry [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-12-20

    The main achievements reached under the DOE award DE-SC0006788 are described. It is shown that the plan of the Project is completed. Unique results concerning cloud-aerosol interaction are obtained. It is shown that aerosols affect intensity of hurricanes. The effects of small aerosols on formation of ice in anvils of deep convective clouds are discovered, for the first time the mechanisms of drizzle formation are found and described quantitatively. Mechanisms of formation of warm rain are clarified and the dominating role of adiabatic processes and turbulence are stressed. Important results concerning the effects of sea spray on intensity of clouds and tropical cyclones are obtained. A novel methods of calculation of hail formation has been developed and implemented.

  7. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  8. Formulation of inhalable lipid-based salbutamol sulfate microparticles by spray drying technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daman, Zahra; Gilani, Kambiz; Rouholamini Najafabadi, Abdolhossein; Eftekhari, Hamid Reza; Barghi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-06-11

    The aim of this work was to develop dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations of salbutamol sulfate (SS) by the aid of solid lipid microparticles (SLmPs), composed of biocompatible phospholipids or cholesterol. The SLmPs were prepared by using two different solvent systems (ethanol and water-ethanol) and lipid carriers (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol) with/without L-leucine in the spray drying process. The spray-dried microparticles were physically-mixed with coarse lactose monohydrate in order to make our final DPI formulations and were investigated in terms of physical characteristics as well as in vitro drug release profile and aerosolization behavior. We observed significant differences in the sizes, morphologies, and in vitro pulmonary depositions between the formulations. In particular, the SS-containing SLmPs prepared with water-ethanol (30:70 v/v) solution of DPPC and L-leucine which had then been blended with coarse lactose (1:9 w/w) exhibited the highest emitted dose (87.9%) and fine particle fraction (42.7%) among the formulations. In vitro drug release study indicated that despite of having a significant initial burst release for both cholesterol and DPPC-based microparticles, the remained drug released more slowly than the pure drug. This study demonstrated the potential of using lipid carriers as well as L-leucine in DPI formulations of SS to improve its aerosolization behavior and retard the release profile of the drug.

  9. Eulerian modeling of a polydisperse evaporating spray under realistic internal-combustion-engine conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Emre, Oguz; Fox, Rodney; Massot, Marc; De Chaisemartin, Stéphane; Jay, Stéphane; Laurent, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    International audience; To assist industrial engine design processes, 3-D computational fluid dy- namics simulations are widely used, bringing a comprehension of the underlying physics unattainable from experiments. However, the multiphase flow description involving the liquid jet fuel injected into the chamber is still in its early stages of development. There is a pressing need for a spray model that is time efficient and accurately describes the cloud of fuel and droplet dynamics downstrea...

  10. Water Reclamation using Spray Drying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This purpose of this project is to develop a spray drying prototype to for the recovery and recycle of water from concentrated waste water recovery system brine....

  11. Optimization of cylinder liner plasma spraying mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhova, O. M.; Burmistrova, O. N.; Sirina, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    At present one of the most promising methods to remanufacture worn-out machine parts is plasma spraying. The paper describes the selection of the optimum plasma spraying technique to coat the worn-out wall surface of the diesel engine cylinder liners. All the data have been MathCad processed and the regression models equivalent to the algoristic-type model of plasma spraying have been developed. The experiments have resulted in achieving the optimization parameters, the mean value of which is presented in the paper. The given plasma spraying mode allows one not only to remanufacture the worn-out wall surface of the diesel engine cylinder liners but also to obtain the best coating properties.

  12. Properties of Plasma and HVOF Sprayed Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Żórawski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The work compares the properties of plasma and HVOF thermally sprayed coatings obtained by blending the NiCrBSi and Fe2O3 powders. The deposition was performed by means of the Plancer PN-120 and the Diamond Jet guns for plasma spraying and HVOF spraying respectively. The SEM (EDS method was employed to study the microstructure of the produced coatings. Although the blended powders differ in particle size, shape, and distribution, it is possible to obtain composite coatings with an NiCrBSi matrix containing iron oxides. Except for a different microstructure, plasma and HVOF coatings have a different phase composition, which was examined using the Bruker D-8 Advance diffractometer. Studies of the coatings wear and scuffing resistance showed that an optimal content of Fe2O3 is about 26 % for plasma sprayed coatings and 22.5 % for HVOF deposited coatings.

  13. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Creep failure of a spray drier

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, P

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available NDT, design calculations and metallurgical analysis were performed on specimens from a collapsed spray drier. Failure modes initially regarded as possible were: corrosion leading to reduced sections and loss of strength, fatigue and fracture...

  15. Water Reclamation using Spray Drying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a new spray drying technology for the recovery and recycle of water while stabilizing the solid wastes or residues as found in advanced life support...

  16. Skunk spray toxicosis: An odiferous tale

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charlotte Means

    2013-01-01

    ...) Although there are no reports of a cat developing methemoglobinemia from skunk spray, feline red blood cells are more sensitive to oxidative damage than are the red blood cells of other species...

  17. The physical and chemical characteristics of marine primary organic aerosol: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the physical characteristics and chemical composition of marine organic aerosols is needed for the quantification of their effects on solar radiation transfer and cloud processes. This review examines research pertinent to the chemical composition, size distribution, mixing state, emission mechanism, photochemical oxidation and climatic impact of marine primary organic aerosol (POA associated with sea-spray. Numerous measurements have shown that both the ambient mass concentration of marine POA and size-resolved organic mass fraction of sea-spray aerosol are related to surface ocean biological activity. Recent studies have also indicated that fine mode (smaller than 200 nm in diameter marine POA can have a size distribution independent from sea-salt, while coarse mode aerosols (larger than 1000 nm in diameter are more likely to be internally mixed with sea-salt. Modelling studies have estimated global submicron marine POA emission rates of ~10 ± 5 Tg yr−1, with a considerable fraction of these emissions occurring over regions most susceptible to aerosol perturbations. Climate studies have found that marine POA can cause large local increases in the cloud condensation nuclei concentration and have a non-negligible influence on model assessments of the anthropogenic aerosol forcing of climate. Despite these signs of climate-relevance, the source strength, chemical composition, mixing state, hygroscopicity, cloud droplet activation potential, atmospheric aging and removal of marine POA remain poorly quantified. Additional laboratory, field, and modelling studies focused on the chemistry, size distribution and mixing state of marine POA are needed to better understand and quantify their importance.

  18. Contributions of transported Prudhoe Bay oil field emissions to the aerosol population in Utqiaġvik, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsch, Matthew J.; Kirpes, Rachel M.; Kolesar, Katheryn R.; Barrett, Tate E.; China, Swarup; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Laskin, Alexander; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Tuch, Thomas; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-09-01

    Loss of sea ice is opening the Arctic to increasing development involving oil and gas extraction and shipping. Given the significant impacts of absorbing aerosol and secondary aerosol precursors emitted within the rapidly warming Arctic region, it is necessary to characterize local anthropogenic aerosol sources and compare to natural conditions. From August to September 2015 in Utqiaġvik (Barrow), AK, the chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles was measured by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (0.13-4 µm projected area diameter) and real-time single-particle mass spectrometry (0.2-1.5 µm vacuum aerodynamic diameter). During periods influenced by the Arctic Ocean (70 % of the study), our results show that fresh sea spray aerosol contributed ˜ 20 %, by number, of particles between 0.13 and 0.4 µm, 40-70 % between 0.4 and 1 µm, and 80-100 % between 1 and 4 µm particles. In contrast, for periods influenced by emissions from Prudhoe Bay (10 % of the study), the third largest oil field in North America, there was a strong influence from submicron (0.13-1 µm) combustion-derived particles (20-50 % organic carbon, by number; 5-10 % soot by number). While sea spray aerosol still comprised a large fraction of particles (90 % by number from 1 to 4 µm) detected under Prudhoe Bay influence, these particles were internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate indicative of aging processes during transport. In addition, the overall mode of the particle size number distribution shifted from 76 nm during Arctic Ocean influence to 27 nm during Prudhoe Bay influence, with particle concentrations increasing from 130 to 920 cm-3 due to transported particle emissions from the oil fields. The increased contributions of carbonaceous combustion products and partially aged sea spray aerosol should be considered in future Arctic atmospheric composition and climate simulations.

  19. New tools to optimise spray dryers

    OpenAIRE

    Verschueren, M.; Straatsma, J.; Schutyser, M. A. I.; Akkerman, C.; de Jong,

    2007-01-01

    Spray drying is an essential unit operation for the manufacture of many products with specific powder properties. It is characterised by atomisation of a solution or suspension into droplets, followed by subsequent drying of these droplets by evaporation of water or other solvents. Spray drying is used for the manufacture of many consumer and industrial products such as instant food products, laundry detergents, pharmaceuticals, ceramics and agrochemicals. The best known example of an instant...

  20. Tuning aerosol performance using the multibreath Orbital® dry powder inhaler device: controlling delivery parameters and aerosol performance via modification of puck orifice geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Young, Paul M; Ong, Hui Xin; Crapper, John; Flodin, Carina; Qiao, Erin Lin; Phillips, Gary; Traini, Daniela

    2015-07-01

    The current study presents a new approach to tackle high-dose lung delivery using a prototype multibreath Orbital® dry powder inhaler (DPI). One of the key device components is the "puck" (aerosol sample chamber) with precision-engineered outlet orifice(s) that control the dosing rate. The influence of puck orifice geometry and number of orifices on the performance of mannitol aerosols were studied. Pucks with different orifice configurations were filled with 400 mg of spray-dried mannitol and tested in the Orbital® DPI prototype. The emitted dose and overall aerodynamic performance across a number of "breaths" were studied using a multistage liquid impinger. The aerosol performances of the individual actuations were investigated using in-line laser diffraction. The emptying rate of all pucks was linear between 20% and 80% cumulative drug released (R(2) > 0.98), and the amount of formulation released per breath could be controlled such that the device was empty after 2 to 11 breath maneuvers. The puck-emptying rate linearly related to the orifice hole length (R(2) > 0.95). Mass median aerodynamic diameters of the emitted aerosol ranged from 4.03 to 4.62 μm and fine particle fraction (≤6.4 μm) were 50%-66%. Laser diffraction suggested that the aerosol performance and emptying rates were not dependent on breath number, showing consistent size distribution profiles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Effect of lidocaine spray in pain management during office-based endometrial sampling: A randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, H; Aksoy, U; Ozyurt, S; Acmaz, G; Babayigit, M A; Yücel, B; Aydin, T

    2016-01-01

    Office-based endometrial sampling is the most frequently performed gynaecological procedure. The procedure is usually associated with pain and discomfort. Several anaesthetic and analgesic techniques (e.g., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, paracervical block, misoprostol and topical anaesthetics) are used for pain management during endometrial sampling. There is no comprehensive study using lidocaine in spray form; we sought to investigate the analgesic efficacy of 10% lidocaine spray in patients undergoing office-based endometrial biopsy. We conducted a prospective, randomised (lidocaine spray (n = 60) and placebo (n = 60), respectively), double-blind study. The mean pain score during procedure was 3.51 ± 1.51 in the lidocaine spray group and 5.11 ± 1.66 in the placebo group. Lidocaine spray treatment significantly lowered the pain scores compared with placebo (p Lidocaine spray can be accepted as a non-invasive, easy to apply and more comfortable anaesthetic method for office-based endometrial sampling.

  2. Aerosol Emissions from Great Lakes Harmful Algal Blooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Nathaniel W. [Department; Olson, Nicole E. [Department; Panas, Mark [Department; Axson, Jessica L. [Department; Tirella, Peter S. [Department; Kirpes, Rachel M. [Department; Craig, Rebecca L. [Department; Gunsch, Matthew J. [Department; China, Swarup [William; Laskin, Alexander [William; Ault, Andrew P. [Department; Department; Pratt, Kerri A. [Department; Department

    2017-12-20

    In freshwater lakes, harmful algal blooms (HABs) of Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) produce toxins that impact human health. However, little is known about the chemical species present in lake spray aerosol (LSA) produced from wave-breaking in freshwater HABs. In this study, a laboratory LSA generator produced aerosols from freshwater samples collected from Lake Michigan and Lake Erie during HAB and non-bloom conditions. Particles were analyzed for size and chemical composition by single particle mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy, with three distinct types of LSA identified with varying levels of organic carbon and biological material associated with calcium salts. LSA autofluorescence increases with blue-green algae concentration, showing that organic molecules of biological origin are incorporated in LSA from HABs. The number fraction of LSA with biological mass spectral markers also increases with particle diameter (greater than 0.5 μm), showing that HABs have size-dependent impacts on aerosol composition. The highest number fraction of LSA enriched in organic carbon were observed in particles less than 0.5 μm in diameter. Understanding the transfer of organic and biogenic material from freshwater to the atmosphere via LSA particles is crucial for determining health and climate effects due to HABs.

  3. Combined control of morphology and polymorph in spray drying of mannitol for dry powder inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Feng; Liu, Jing J.; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xue Z.

    2017-06-01

    The morphology and polymorphism of mannitol particles were controlled during spray drying with the aim of improving the aerosolization properties of inhalable dry powders. The obtained microparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction and inhaler testing with a next generation impactor. Mannitol particles of varied α-mannitol content and surface roughness were prepared via spray drying by manipulating the concentration of NH4HCO3 in the feed solution. The bubbles produced by NH4HCO3 led to the formation of spheroid particles with a rough surface. Further, the fine particle fraction was increased by the rough surface of carriers and the high α-mannitol content. Inhalable dry powders with a 29.1 ± 2.4% fine particle fraction were obtained by spray-drying using 5% mannitol (w/v)/2% NH4HCO3 (w/v) as the feed solution, proving that this technique is an effective method to engineer particles for dry powder inhalation.

  4. Effects of storage conditions on the stability of spray dried, inhalable bacteriophage powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sharon S Y; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Gao, Fiona G; Carter, Elizabeth A; Carrigy, Nicholas B; Vehring, Reinhard; Finlay, Warren H; Morales, Sandra; Britton, Warwick J; Kutter, Elizabeth; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-04-15

    This study aimed to develop inhalable powders containing phages active against antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa for pulmonary delivery. A Pseudomonas phage, PEV2, was spray dried into powder matrices comprising of trehalose (0-80%), mannitol (0-80%) and l-leucine (20%). The resulting powders were stored at various relative humidity (RH) conditions (0, 22 and 60% RH) at 4°C. The phage stability and in vitro aerosol performance of the phage powders were examined at the time of production and after 1, 3 and 12 months storage. After spray drying, a total of 1.3 log titer reduction in phage was observed in the formulations containing 40%, 60% and 80% trehalose, whereas 2.4 and 5.1 log reductions were noted in the formulations containing 20% and no trehalose, respectively. No further reduction in titer occurred for powders stored at 0 and 22% RH even after 12 months, except the formulation containing no trehalose. The 60% RH storage condition had a destructive effect such that no viable phages were detected after 3 and 12 months. When aerosolised, the total lung doses for formulations containing 40%, 60% and 80% trehalose were similar (in the order of 10 5 pfu). The results demonstrated that spray drying is a suitable method to produce stable phage powders for pulmonary delivery. A powder matrix containing ≥40% trehalose provided good phage preservation and aerosol performances after storage at 0 and 22% RH at 4°C for 12 months. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aerosol characterization during project POLINAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, D.E.; Hopkins, A.R.; Paladino, J.D.; Whitefield, P.D. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Lab.; Lilenfeld, H.V. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-East, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of the aerosol/particulate characterization measurements of project POLINAT (POLlution from aircraft emissions In the North ATlantic flight corridor) are: to search for aerosol/particulate signatures of air traffic emissions in the region of the North Atlantic Flight Corridor; to search for the aerosol/particulate component of large scale enhancement (`corridor effects`) of air traffic related species in the North Atlantic region; to determine the effective emission indices for the aerosol/particulate component of engine exhaust in both the near and far field of aircraft exhaust plumes; to measure the dispersion and transformation of the aerosol/particulate component of aircraft emissions as a function of ambient condition; to characterize background levels of aerosol/particulate concentrations in the North Atlantic Region; and to determine effective emission indices for engine exhaust particulates for regimes beyond the jet phase of plume expansion. (author) 10 refs.

  6. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  7. Investigating organic aerosol loading in the remote marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lapina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol loading in the marine environment is investigated using aerosol composition measurements from several research ship campaigns (ICEALOT, MAP, RHaMBLe, VOCALS and OOMPH, observations of total AOD column from satellite (MODIS and ship-based instruments (Maritime Aerosol Network, MAN, and a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem. This work represents the most comprehensive evaluation of oceanic OM emission inventories to date, by employing aerosol composition measurements obtained from campaigns with wide spatial and temporal coverage. The model underestimates AOD over the remote ocean on average by 0.02 (21 %, compared to satellite observations, but provides an unbiased simulation of ground-based Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN observations. Comparison with cruise data demonstrates that the GEOS-Chem simulation of marine sulfate, with the mean observed values ranging between 0.22 μg m−3 and 1.34 μg m−3, is generally unbiased, however surface organic matter (OM concentrations, with the mean observed concentrations between 0.07 μg m−3 and 0.77 μg m−3, are underestimated by a factor of 2–5 for the standard model run. Addition of a sub-micron marine OM source of approximately 9 TgC yr−1 brings the model into agreement with the ship-based measurements, however this additional OM source does not explain the model underestimate of marine AOD. The model underestimate of marine AOD is therefore likely the result of a combination of satellite retrieval bias and a missing marine aerosol source (which exhibits a different spatial pattern than existing aerosol in the model.

  8. Investigation of L-leucine in reducing the moisture-induced deterioration of spray-dried salbutamol sulfate power for inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Gengenbach, Thomas; Yu, Jiaqi; Gao, Ge Fiona; Tang, Patricia; Zhou, Qi Tony; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of L-leucine (LL) in preventing moisture-induced deterioration in the in vitro aerosolization performance of spray-dried (SD) salbutamol sulfate (SS). Increasing mass fraction of LL (5-80%) were co-spray dried with SS, and the physicochemical properties of the powders were characterized by laser diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and dynamic vapour sorption (DVS). Furthermore, the surface morphology and chemistry of fine particles was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The in vitro aerosolization performance of powders stored at different relative humidity (RH) was evaluated by a next generation impactor (NGI). The SD SS powders were moderately hygroscopic and amorphous, of which the uptake of moisture upon storage caused a drop in the aerosolization performance. The results showed that 40% (w/w) LL was sufficient to eliminate the effect of moisture on the aerosolization performance at 60% RH. The formulation containing 40% (w/w) LL also maximized the aerosolization performance of SD SS powders (stored in desiccator) with the emitted fraction being 90.0±1.8%, and the fine particle fraction based on the recovered dose (FPFrecovered) and emitted dose (FPFemitted) being 78.0±3.7% and 86.6±2.9%, respectively. The underlying mechanisms were that the crystalline LL increased the degree of particle surface corrugation, and reduced particle fusion and cohesiveness to facilitate dispersion. However, there is still a great challenge to prevent the moisture-induced deterioration in the aerosolization performance at 75% RH due to the recrystallization of SD SS. In conclusion, LL is a potential excipient for reducing moisture-induced deterioration in the aerosolization performance of SD amorphous powders, but still has drawbacks in preventing the recrystallization-induced deterioration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 ..mu..m were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO/sub 2/ laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m/sup 2//g at 1087 cm/sup -1/. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10/sup -8/ cm/sup -1/. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations.

  10. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-07-12

    The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

  11. Validations of GOES-R ABI Aerosol Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciren, P.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Liu, H.; Zhou, M.

    2009-12-01

    High temporal resolution observations from geostationary platform provide unique benefits for monitoring the development of air pollution event. Especially, observations of multi-visible channels in the future GOES-R ABI provide more capability for characterizing air quality. GOES-R ABI Air Quality products include Aerosol detection product and suspended matter/AOD product. The first one is to detect the presence of smoke/dust; the second one is to quantify the amount of particles in the air in terms of light attenuation, and consequently inferred concentration of particles. In this presentation, we focus on the demonstration of the performance of the developed products through a comprehensive validation process. In the current pre-launch stage, MODIS radiances at bands similar to those of ABI are used as proxy. As for the suspended matter/AOD product, truth data include observations from ground-based instruments at the AERONET stations, MODIS collection 5 aerosol products, and aerosol product from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation). For aerosol detection product, truth data include MODIS RGB images and CALIPO Vertical Feature Mask Products. Through comparisons with global observations from MODIS, point observations from AERONET, and narrow-track observations from CALIPSO, accuracy and precision (for AOD only) are evaluated for both products. In addition, a validation system which includes not only the evaluation with historical data, but also monitoring the products qualities with near-real time observations, is presented.

  12. Uncertainty in Predicting CCN Activity of Aged and Primary Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Yuying; Peng, Jianfei; Ren, Jingye; Collins, Don; Zhang, Renyi; Sun, Yele; Yang, Xin; Li, Zhanqing

    2017-11-01

    Understanding particle CCN activity in diverse atmospheres is crucial when evaluating aerosol indirect effects. Here aerosols measured at three sites in China were categorized as different types for attributing uncertainties in CCN prediction in terms of a comprehensive data set including size-resolved CCN activity, size-resolved hygroscopic growth factor, and chemical composition. We show that CCN activity for aged aerosols is unexpectedly underestimated 22% at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2% when using κ-Kohler theory with an assumption of an internal mixture with measured bulk composition that has typically resulted in an overestimate of the CCN activity in previous studies. We conclude that the underestimation stems from neglect of the effect of aging/coating on particle hygroscopicity, which is not considered properly in most current models. This effect enhanced the hygroscopicity parameter (κ) by between 11% (polluted conditions) and 30% (clean days), as indicated in diurnal cycles of κ based on measurements by different instruments. In the urban Beijing atmosphere heavily influenced by fresh emissions, the CCN activity was overestimated by 45% at S = 0.2%, likely because of inaccurate assumptions of particle mixing state and because of variability of chemical composition over the particle size range. For both fresh and aged aerosols, CCN prediction exhibits very limited sensitivity to κSOA, implying a critical role of other factors like mixing of aerosol components within and between particles in regulating CCN activity. Our findings could help improving CCN parameterization in climate models.

  13. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    “Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  14. Dry powder formulation of kanamycin with enhanced aerosolization efficiency for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Mohammad A M; Sinha, Shubhra; Tucker, Ian G; Doyle, Colin; Das, Shyamal C

    2017-08-07

    Kanamycin, an injectable agent, is currently used to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). Parenteral kanamycin causes high systemic toxicity which could be avoided by direct delivery to the lungs. This study focused on producing a highly aerosolizable dry-powder of hygroscopic kanamycin by spray-drying with l-leucine. Kanamycin powders were prepared with different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% w/w) of l-leucine using the Buchi B-290 Mini Spray-Dryer. In vitro aerosolization efficiency, particle size, morphology, crystallinity, surface composition, drug-excipient interaction and moisture content of the powders were characterized by a Next Generation Impactor (NGI), laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, XPS, ATR-FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis. The physicochemical and aerosolization stability of the powders were investigated after one-month storage at 25±2°C/15% RH and 25±2°C/75% RH. The cytotoxicity on Calu-3 and A549 cells of the kanamycin powders was evaluated by MTT assay. The spray-dried powder particles were in the inhalable size range (<6.1μm). The powders with l-leucine were wrinkled in shape, amorphous in nature and had low moisture content (<5.0%). Kanamycin with 5% (w/w) of l-leucine showed the best aerosolization efficiency of 73.0±2.5%. The powders remained stable during storage at 25±2°C/15% RH and tolerated by respiratory cell lines. l-leucine improved the aerosolization of kanamycin by surface modification, which may be helpful for the effective treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth conditions and environmental factors impact aerosolization but not virulence of Francisella tularensis infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth eFaith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In refining methodology to develop a mouse model for inhalation of Francisella tularensis, it was noted that both relative humidity and growth media impacted the aerosol concentration of the live vaccine strain (LVS of F. tularensis. A relative humidity of less than 55% had a negative impact on the spray factor, the ratio between the concentration of LVS in the aerosol and the nebulizer. The spray factor was significantly higher for LVS grown in brain heart infusion (BHI broth than LVS grown in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHb or Chamberlain’s Chemically Defined Medium (CCDM. The variability between aerosol exposures was also considerably less with BHI. LVS grown in BHI survived desiccation far longer than MHb-grown or CCDM-grown LVS (~70% at 20 minutes for BHI compared to <50% for MHb and CCDM. Removal of the capsule by hypertonic treatment impacted the spray factor for CCDM-grown LVS or MHb-grown LVS but not BHI-grown LVS, suggesting the choice of culture media altered the adherence of the capsule to the cell membrane. The choice of growth media did not impact the LD50 of LVS but the LD99 of BHI-grown LVS was 1 log lower than that for MHb-grown LVS or CCDM-grown LVS. Splenomegaly was prominent in mice that succumbed to MHb- and BHI-grown LVS but not CCDM-grown LVS. Environmental factors and growth conditions should be evaluated when developing new animal models for aerosol infection, particularly for vegetative bacterial pathogens.

  16. Influenza virus aerosols in human exhaled breath: particle size, culturability, and effect of surgical masks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald K Milton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The CDC recommends that healthcare settings provide influenza patients with facemasks as a means of reducing transmission to staff and other patients, and a recent report suggested that surgical masks can capture influenza virus in large droplet spray. However, there is minimal data on influenza virus aerosol shedding, the infectiousness of exhaled aerosols, and none on the impact of facemasks on viral aerosol shedding from patients with seasonal influenza. We collected samples of exhaled particles (one with and one without a facemask in two size fractions ("coarse">5 µm, "fine"≤5 µm from 37 volunteers within 5 days of seasonal influenza onset, measured viral copy number using quantitative RT-PCR, and tested the fine-particle fraction for culturable virus. Fine particles contained 8.8 (95% CI 4.1 to 19 fold more viral copies than did coarse particles. Surgical masks reduced viral copy numbers in the fine fraction by 2.8 fold (95% CI 1.5 to 5.2 and in the coarse fraction by 25 fold (95% CI 3.5 to 180. Overall, masks produced a 3.4 fold (95% CI 1.8 to 6.3 reduction in viral aerosol shedding. Correlations between nasopharyngeal swab and the aerosol fraction copy numbers were weak (r = 0.17, coarse; r = 0.29, fine fraction. Copy numbers in exhaled breath declined rapidly with day after onset of illness. Two subjects with the highest copy numbers gave culture positive fine particle samples. Surgical masks worn by patients reduce aerosols shedding of virus. The abundance of viral copies in fine particle aerosols and evidence for their infectiousness suggests an important role in seasonal influenza transmission. Monitoring exhaled virus aerosols will be important for validation of experimental transmission studies in humans.

  17. Experimental characterization of gasoline sprays under highly evaporating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Mahabat; Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmed; Khalid, Azfar; Lughmani, Waqas Akbar

    2017-12-01

    An experimental investigation of multistream gasoline sprays under highly evaporating conditions is carried out in this paper. Temperature increase of fuel and low engine pressure could lead to flash boiling. The spray shape is normally modified significantly under flash boiling conditions. The spray plumes expansion along with reduction in the axial momentum causes the jets to merge and creates a low-pressure area below the injector's nozzle. These effects initiate the collapse of spray cone and lead to the formation of a single jet plume or a big cluster like structure. The collapsing sprays reduces exposed surface and therefore they last longer and subsequently penetrate more. Spray plume momentum increase, jet plume reduction and spray target widening could delay or prevent the closure condition and limit the penetration (delayed formation of the cluster promotes evaporation). These spray characteristics are investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy, for five and six hole injectors, under various boundary conditions. Six hole injectors produce more collapsing sprays in comparison to five hole injector due to enhanced jet to jet interactions. The spray collapse tendency reduces with increase in injection pressure due high axial momentum of spray plumes. The spray evaporation rates of five hole injector are observed to be higher than six hole injectors. Larger spray cone angles of the six hole injectors promote less penetrating and less collapsing sprays.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF DIESEL SPRAY IMAGES USING A SHAPE PROCESSING METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Petit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In Diesel engines, a key element in achieving a clean and efficient combustion process is a proper fuel-air mixing, which is a consequence of the fuel spray development and fuel-air interaction inside the engine combustion chamber. The spray structure and behavior are classically described by the length (penetration and width (angle of the spray plume but these parameters do not give any clue on the geometrical injection center and on the spray symmetry. The purpose of this paper is to find out original tools to characterize the Diesel spray: the virtual spray origin is the geometrical injection center, which may (or may not coincide with the injector axis. Another interesting point is the description of the Diesel spray in terms of symmetry: the spray plume internal and external symmetry characterize the spray and the injector performance. Our approach is first to find out the virtual spray origin: after the image segmentation, the spray is coded with the Freeman code and with an original shape coding from which the moments are derived. The symmetry axes are then computed and the spray plumes are discarded (or not for the virtual spray origin computation, which is derived from a Voronoi diagram. The last step is the internal and external spray plume symmetry characterization thanks to correlation and mathematical distances.

  19. The effect of vehicles on spray drying of rifampicin inhalable microparticles: In vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Backgrond and the purpose of the study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of solvents used in the spray drying and the aerodynamic properties of the rifampicin microparticles and pulmonary absorption of the microparticles. Methods: Different mixtures of dichloromethane and water were used as solvents for spray drying of rifampicin microparticles. The water to dichloromethane ratios were 25:75, 50:50, 75:25, 80:20, 90:10 and 100:0.   The solutions were dried at inlet temperature of 70 °C. The powder properties of the samples were examined by laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, helium densitometer and infrared spectroscopy (IR. The aerosolization performance of these formulations was investigated using an Andersen cascade impactor. Pulmonary absorptions of formulations were examined by the in situ pulmonary absorption described by Enna and Schanker method. The plasma concentration time profiles of rifampicin were constructed 8 hours following the intravenous and the intrapulmonary administrations. The pharmacokinetics parameters, Cmax, Tmax, t1/2, AUC, mean residence time (MRT, Ka and Ke were determined for each formulations. Results and major conclusions: The Tmax values for the samples decreased by increase in the amount of water in the initial feed. The Tmax values for the spray dried samples from the different mixtures of   dichloromethane and water were 60(min and 30(min respectively. The solvent mixture as the spray drying vehicle played an important role in the in vitro and in vivo lung deposition. The type of spray drying vehicle showed significant effect on the aerodynamic behavior and pharmacokinetic parameters of the particles. The pulmonary absorption of drug revealed the possibility of achieving the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the antibiotics. The spray drying vehicle only affected absorption patterns of the formulations and it did not have any effect on the elimination rat of

  20. Dry Live Aerosol Anthrax Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In preparing the dry live aerosol anthrax vaccine the use of a spore culture of the STI-1 single vaccine strain and culturing of the latter on a...to 10 billion spores in 1 mm of wash. Dry live aerosol anthrax vaccine is suitable for aerosol immunization if the calculated aspiration dose, when...the viable spores in dry live aerosol anthrax vaccine, it is necessary to store it under deep vacuum (in the range of 100-150 microns) and at temperatures not exceeding +10 degrees.

  1. Aerosol Data Assimilation at GMAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Arlindo M.; Buchard, Virginie

    2017-01-01

    This presentation presents an overview of the aerosol data assimilation work performed at GMAO. The GMAO Forward Processing system and the biomass burning emissions from QFED are first presented. Then, the current assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), performed by means of the analysis splitting method is briefly described, followed by some results on the quality control of observations using a Neural Network trained using AERONET AOD. Some applications are shown such as the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991 using the MERRA-2 aerosol dataset. Finally preliminary results on the EnKF implementation for aerosol assimilation are presented.

  2. Topics in current aerosol research

    CERN Document Server

    Hidy, G M

    1971-01-01

    Topics in Current Aerosol Research deals with the fundamental aspects of aerosol science, with emphasis on experiment and theory describing highly dispersed aerosols (HDAs) as well as the dynamics of charged suspensions. Topics covered range from the basic properties of HDAs to their formation and methods of generation; sources of electric charges; interactions between fluid and aerosol particles; and one-dimensional motion of charged cloud of particles. This volume is comprised of 13 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic properties of HDAs, followed by a discussion on the form

  3. Multiple-Nozzle Spray Head Applies Foam Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1993-01-01

    Spray head equipped with four-nozzle turret mixes two reactive components of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foam insulating material and sprays reacting mixture onto surface to be insulated. If nozzle in use becomes clogged, fresh one automatically rotated into position, with minimal interruption of spraying process. Incorporates features recirculating and controlling pressures of reactive components to maintain quality of foam by ensuring proper blend at outset. Also used to spray protective coats on or in ships, aircraft, and pipelines. Sprays such reactive adhesives as epoxy/polyurethane mixtures. Components of spray contain solid-particle fillers for strength, fire retardance, toughness, resistance to abrasion, or radar absorption.

  4. An investigation of flow-limited field-injection electrostatic spraying (FFESS) and its applications to thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravindra Pratap

    Electrostatic spraying is the process of controlled disruption of a liquid surface due to excess surface charge density. The technique has found applications in a wide range of fields from agricultural sprays to fuel injectors to colloidal thrusters for space vehicle propulsion. Over the past 20 years, the technique has been intensely studied in material processing for synthesis of ceramic and metal powders, nanoparticles and thin films. The importance of the technique lies in its simple setup, high deposition efficiency, and ambient atmosphere operation. In conventional electrostatic spraying (CESS), one uses a conducting nozzle to charge the liquid, mostly by induction charging. CESS is therefore restricted to the single jet mode of spraying which occurs at low spray currents. It lacks stability and reproducibility in the high current, multiple jet regime, which can generate much finer sprays. In flow-limited field-injection electrostatic spraying (FFESS), one uses a field-injection electrode to stably and controllably inject higher currents into the liquid, a la Fowler-Nordheim, using an otherwise insulating nozzle. This way, it is possible to stably electrospray in the multiple jet mode. In addition to producing much finer sprays, the multi-jet mode atomizes liquids at higher rates, and spreads the spray over a wider region and more uniformly than single jet sprays, thus paving way for large-area uniform thin film deposition. A simple yet comprehensive theory is formulated to describe the multi jet formation. The theory, which is based on the energy minimization principle, takes into account, for the first time, the interactions between charged jets which leads to saturation in the number of jets at high spray currents. The possibility of using an array of nozzles to obtain uniform large-area high-throughput thin film deposition is also investigated. A large number of FFESS nozzles with alternating positive and negative polarities arranged in a periodic 2

  5. Atmo-metabolomics: a new measurement approach for investigating aerosol composition and ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Ubach, A.; Liu, Y.; Sardans, J.; Tfaily, M. M.; Kim, Y. M.; Bourrianne, E.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Penuelas, J.; Guenther, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosols play crucial roles in the processes controlling the composition of the atmosphere and the functioning of ecosystems. Gaining a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of aerosols is one of the major challenges for atmospheric and climate scientists and is beginning to be recognized as important for ecological research. Better comprehension of aerosol chemistry can potentially provide valuable information on atmospheric processes such as oxidation of organics and the production of cloud condensation nuclei as well as provide an approximation of the general status of an ecosystem through the measurement of certain stress biomarkers. In this study, we describe an efficient aerosol sampling method, the metabolite extraction and the analytical procedures for the chemical characterization of aerosols, namely, the atmo-metabolome. We used mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS), gas chromatography (GC-MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR-MS) to characterize the atmo-metabolome of two marked seasons; spring and summer. Our sampling and extraction methods demonstrated to be suitable for aerosol chemical characterization with any of the analytical platforms used in this study. The atmo-metabolome between spring and summer showed overall statistically differences. We identified several metabolites that can be attributed to pollen and other plant-related aerosols. Spring aerosols exhibit higher concentrations of metabolites linked to higher plant activity while summer samples had higher concentrations of metabolites that may reflect certain oxidative stresses in primary producers. Moreover, the elemental composition of aerosols showed clear different between seasons. Summer aerosols were generally higher in molecular weight and with higher O/C ratios, indicating higher oxidation levels and condensation of compounds relative to spring. Our method represents an advanced approach for characterizing the composition of

  6. Relay transport of aerosols to Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region by multi-scale atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Gen; Yan, Yan; He, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region experiences heavy aerosol pollution, which is found to have close relationships with the synoptic- and local-scale atmospheric circulations. However, how and to what extent these multi-scale circulations interplay to modulate aerosol transport have not been fully understood. To this end, this study comprehensively investigated the impacts of these circulations on aerosol transport in BTH by focusing on an episode occurred on 1 June 2013 through combining both observations and three-dimensional simulations. It was found that during this episode, the Bohai Sea acted as a transfer station, and the high-pressure system over the Yellow Sea and sea-breeze in BTH took turns to affect the transport of aerosols. In the morning, influenced by the high-pressure system, lots of aerosols emitted from Shandong and Jiangsu provinces were first transported to the Bohai Sea. After then, these aerosols were brought to the BTH region in the afternoon through the inland penetration of sea-breeze, significantly exacerbating the air quality in BTH. The inland penetration of sea-breeze could be identified by the sharp changes in ground-based observed temperature, humidity, and wind when the sea-breeze front (SBF) passed by. Combining observations with model outputs, the SBF was found to be able to advance inland more than ∼150 km till reaching Beijing. This study has important implications for better understanding the aerosol transport in BTH, and improving the forecast of such aerosol pollution.

  7. The summer aerosol in the central Arctic 1991–2008: did it change or not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Heintzenberg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the course of global warming dramatic changes are taking place in the Arctic and boreal environments. However, physical aerosol data in from the central summer Arctic taken over the course of 18 yr from 1991 to 2008 do not show systematic year-to-year changes, albeit substantial interannual variations. Besides the limited extent of the data several causes may be responsible for these findings. The processes controlling concentrations and particle size distribution of the aerosol over the central Arctic perennial pack ice area, north of 80°, may not have changed substantially during this time. Environmental changes are still mainly effective in the marginal ice zone, the ice-free waters and continental rims and have not propagated significantly into the central Arctic yet where they could affect the local aerosol and its sources. The analysis of meteorological conditions of the four expedition summers reveal substantial variations which we see as main causes of the measured variations in aerosol parameters. With combined lognormal fits of the hourly number size distributions of the four expeditions representative mode parameters for the summer aerosol in the central Arctic have been calculated. The combined aerosol statistics discussed in the present paper provide comprehensive physical data on the summer aerosol in the central Arctic. These data are the only surface aerosol information from this region.

  8. Clinicopathological effects of pepper (oleoresin capsicum) spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, M F; Tang, William Y M

    2015-12-01

    Pepper (oleoresin capsicum) spray is one of the most common riot-control measures used today. Although not lethal, exposure of pepper spray can cause injury to different organ systems. This review aimed to summarise the major clinicopathological effects of pepper spray in humans. MEDLINE, EMBASE database, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were used to search for terms associated with the clinicopathological effects of pepper spray in humans and those describing the pathophysiology of capsaicin. A phone interview with two individuals recently exposed to pepper spray was also conducted to establish clinical symptoms. Major key words used for the MEDLINE search were "pepper spray", "OC spray", "oleoresin capsicum"; and other key words as "riot control agents", "capsaicin", and "capsaicinoid". We then combined the key words "capsaicin" and "capsaicinoid" with the major key words to narrow down the number of articles. A search with other databases including EMBASE and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was also conducted with the above phrases to identify any additional related articles. All article searches were confined to human study. The bibliography of articles was screened for additional relevant studies including non-indexed reports, and information from these was also recorded. Non-English articles were included in the search. Fifteen articles were considered relevant. Oleoresin capsicum causes almost instantaneous irritative symptoms to the skin, eyes, and respiratory system. Dermatological effects include a burning sensation, erythema, and hyperalgesia. Ophthalmic effects involve blepharospasm, conjunctivitis, peri-orbital oedema, and corneal pathology. Following inhalation, a stinging or burning sensation can be felt in the nose with sore throat, chest tightness, or dyspnoea. The major pathophysiology is neurogenic inflammation caused by capsaicinoid in the pepper spray. There is no antidote for oleoresin capsicum. Treatment consists of

  9. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Spray-Formed Boron-Modified Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Kiminami, Claudio S.; Botta, Walter J.; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2017-04-01

    Spray-formed boron-modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are alloys developed to withstand severe wear conditions. The addition of boron to the conventional chemical composition of SMSS, combined with the solidification features promoted by the spray forming process, leads to a microstructure composed of low carbon martensitic matrix reinforced by an eutectic network of M2B-type borides, which considerably increases the wear resistance of the stainless steel. Although the presence of borides in the microstructure has a very beneficial effect on the wear properties of the alloy, their effect on the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel was not comprehensively evaluated. The present work presents a study of the effect of boron addition on the corrosion resistance of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS grades by means of electrochemical techniques. The borides fraction seems to have some influence on the repassivation kinetics of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS. It was shown that the Cr content of the martensitic matrix is the microstructural feature deciding the corrosion resistance of this sort of alloys. Therefore, if the Cr content in the alloy is increased to around 14 wt pct to compensate for the boron consumed by the borides formation, the corrosion resistance of the alloy is kept at the same level of the alloy without boron addition.

  10. Coalescence Sampling and Analysis of Aerosols using Aerosol Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bzdek, Bryan R; Reid, Jonathan P; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Walker, Jim S

    2017-02-21

    We present a first exploratory study to assess the use of aerosol optical tweezers as an instrument for sampling and detecting accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol. A subpicoliter aqueous aerosol droplet is captured in the optical trap and used as a sampling volume, accreting mass from a free-flowing aerosol generated by a medical nebulizer or atomizer. Real-time measurements of the initial stability in size, refractive index, and composition of the sampling droplet inferred from Raman spectroscopy confirm that these quantities can be measured with high accuracy and low noise. Typical standard deviations in size and refractive index of the sampling droplet over a period of 200 s are droplet as discrete coalescence events. With accumulation-mode aerosol, we show that fluxes as low as 0.068 pg s -1 can be detected over a 50 s period, equivalent to ∼3 pg of sampled material.

  11. Health Concerns about Spray Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposures to SPF's key ingredient, isocyanates and other SPF chemicals in vapors, aerosols, and dust created during and after installation, can cause: asthma, sensitization, lung damage, other respiratory and breathing problems, skin and eye irritation.

  12. AEROSOL VARIABILITY OBSERVED WITH RPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Altstädter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To observe the origin, vertical and horizontal distribution and variability of aerosol particles, and especially ultrafine particles recently formed, we plan to employ the remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS Carolo-P360 "ALADINA" of TU Braunschweig. The goal of the presented project is to investigate the vertical and horizontal distribution, transport and small-scale variability of aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer using RPAS. Two additional RPAS of type MASC of Tübingen University equipped with turbulence instrumentation add the opportunity to study the interaction of the aerosol concentration with turbulent transport and exchange processes of the surface and the atmosphere. The combination of different flight patterns of the three RPAS allows new insights in atmospheric boundary layer processes. Currently, the different aerosol sensors are miniaturized at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig and together with the TU Braunschweig adapted to fit into the RPAS. Moreover, an additional meteorological payload for measuring temperature, humidity and turbulence properties is constructed by Tübingen University. Two condensation particle counters determine the total aerosol number with a different lower detection threshold in order to investigate the horizontal and vertical aerosol variability and new particle formation (aerosol particles of some nm diameter. Further the aerosol size distribution in the range from about 0.300 to ~5 μm is given by an optical particle counter.

  13. Aerosol dynamics in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazaryan, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, a computational model was developed for the simulation of aerosol formation through nucleation, followed by condensation and evaporation and filtration by porous material. Understanding aerosol dynamics in porous media can help improving engineering models that are used in various

  14. Aerosol therapy in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Janssens (Hettie)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractInhalation of aerosolized drugs has become an established means for treatment of pulmonary diseases in the last fifiy years. The majoriry of aerosol therapy in childhood concerns inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators in the management of asthma. Administration of drugs via the

  15. Aerosol Variability Observed with Rpas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altstädter, B.; Lampert, A.; Scholtz, A.; Bange, J.; Platis, A.; Hermann, M.; Wehner, B.

    2013-08-01

    To observe the origin, vertical and horizontal distribution and variability of aerosol particles, and especially ultrafine particles recently formed, we plan to employ the remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS) Carolo-P360 "ALADINA" of TU Braunschweig. The goal of the presented project is to investigate the vertical and horizontal distribution, transport and small-scale variability of aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer using RPAS. Two additional RPAS of type MASC of Tübingen University equipped with turbulence instrumentation add the opportunity to study the interaction of the aerosol concentration with turbulent transport and exchange processes of the surface and the atmosphere. The combination of different flight patterns of the three RPAS allows new insights in atmospheric boundary layer processes. Currently, the different aerosol sensors are miniaturized at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig and together with the TU Braunschweig adapted to fit into the RPAS. Moreover, an additional meteorological payload for measuring temperature, humidity and turbulence properties is constructed by Tübingen University. Two condensation particle counters determine the total aerosol number with a different lower detection threshold in order to investigate the horizontal and vertical aerosol variability and new particle formation (aerosol particles of some nm diameter). Further the aerosol size distribution in the range from about 0.300 to ~5 μm is given by an optical particle counter.

  16. Aerosolization as novel sanitizer delivery system to reduce food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S-W; Gray, P M; Dougherty, R H; Kang, D-H

    2005-01-01

    As a preliminary experiment on new sanitizer delivery tools, the efficacy of aerosolized sanitizer on food-borne pathogens was investigated in larger model chamber system. Peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide were aerosolized in a model system against artificially inoculated target micro-organisms on laboratory media. Cultures of four different food-borne pathogens were inoculated and affixed onto three different heights (bottom, wall and ceiling), and three different orientations (face-down, vertical and face-down) inside a commercial semi-trailer cabinet (14.6 x 2.6 x 2.8 m). Sanitizer was aerosolized into 2 microm droplet size fog and treated for 1 h at ambient temperature. Populations of Bacillus cereus, Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella typhimurium were reduced by an average of 3.09, 7.69, 6.93 and 8.18 log units per plate respectively. Interestingly, L. innocua, Staph. aureus, and Salm. typhimurium showed statistically not different (P >/= 0.05) reduction patterns relative to height and orientation that were never expected in a spraying system. Aerosolized sanitizers diffuse like gaseous sanitizers. Aerosolization has great potential for use in commercial applications.

  17. The Climatology of Australian Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ross M.; Forgan, Bruce W.; Campbell, Susan K.

    2017-04-01

    Airborne particles or aerosols have long been recognised for their major contribution to uncertainty in climate change. In addition, aerosol amounts must be known for accurate atmospheric correction of remotely sensed images, and are required to accurately gauge the available solar resource. However, despite great advances in surface networks and satellite retrievals over recent years, long-term continental-scale aerosol data sets are lacking. Here we present an aerosol assessment over Australia based on combined sun photometer measurements from the Bureau of Meteorology Radiation Network and CSIRO/AeroSpan. The measurements are continental in coverage, comprising 22 stations, and generally decadal in timescale, totalling 207 station-years. Monthly climatologies are given at all stations. Spectral decomposition shows that the time series can be represented as a weighted sum of sinusoids with periods of 12, 6 and 4 months, corresponding to the annual cycle and its second and third harmonics. Their relative amplitudes and phase relationships lead to sawtooth-like waveforms sharply rising to an austral spring peak, with a slower decline often including a secondary peak during the summer. The amplitude and phase of these periodic components show significant regional change across the continent. Fits based on this harmonic analysis are used to separate the periodic and episodic components of the aerosol time series. An exploratory classification of the aerosol types is undertaken based on (a) the relative periodic amplitudes of the Ångström exponent and aerosol optical depth, (b) the relative amplitudes of the 6- and 4-month harmonic components of the aerosol optical depth, and (c) the ratio of episodic to periodic variation in aerosol optical depth. It is shown that Australian aerosol can be broadly grouped into three classes: tropical, arid and temperate. Statistically significant decadal trends are found at 4 of the 22 stations. Despite the apparently small

  18. Investigation of spray characteristics in a spray-guided DISI engine using PLIF and LDV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y.; Gashi, S.; Nouri, J. M.; Lockett, R. D.; Arcoumanis, C.

    2007-10-01

    The spray characteristics of a prototype piezo pintle-type injector are investigated in a single-cylinder optical direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine based on the spray-guided concept where mixture preparation is dominated by the spray dynamics. The high-pressure piezo electric injector has an annular nozzle providing a hollow cone spray. Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and 2-dimensional Mie scattering were used to study the spray structure and characteristics under different in-cylinder back pressures and to obtain cycle resolved measurements of the planar fuel distribution inside the cylinder. The obtained results give information about the extent of charge stratification, spray stability and fuel/air mixture formation process under operating conditions. PLIF results revealed that there is a rich mixture at the spark plug position for all these conditions, ensuring stable combustion over the entire engine operating range. In addition, LDV measurements were carried out in order to provide information on the in-cylinder flow field near the spark plug, and to assess its influence on the mixture formation process. LDV results showed that the influence of the flow field strength during the late compression injection on the liquid fuel spray structure is low. The tumble generated in the cylinder is transformed into turbulence at the end of the compression stroke, which aids fuel evaporation and vapour dispersion just before ignition.

  19. Investigation of spray characteristics in a spray-guided DISI engine using PLIF and LDV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Y; Gashi, S; Nouri, J M; Lockett, R D; Arcoumanis, C [Centre for Energy and the Environment, School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V OHB (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    The spray characteristics of a prototype piezo pintle-type injector are investigated in a single-cylinder optical direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine based on the spray-guided concept where mixture preparation is dominated by the spray dynamics. The high-pressure piezo electric injector has an annular nozzle providing a hollow cone spray. Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and 2-dimensional Mie scattering were used to study the spray structure and characteristics under different in-cylinder back pressures and to obtain cycle resolved measurements of the planar fuel distribution inside the cylinder. The obtained results give information about the extent of charge stratification, spray stability and fuel/air mixture formation process under operating conditions. PLIF results revealed that there is a rich mixture at the spark plug position for all these conditions, ensuring stable combustion over the entire engine operating range. In addition, LDV measurements were carried out in order to provide information on the in-cylinder flow field near the spark plug, and to assess its influence on the mixture formation process. LDV results showed that the influence of the flow field strength during the late compression injection on the liquid fuel spray structure is low. The tumble generated in the cylinder is transformed into turbulence at the end of the compression stroke, which aids fuel evaporation and vapour dispersion just before ignition.

  20. Density of Spray-Formed Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin M. McHugh; Volker Uhlenwinkel; Nils Ellendr

    2008-06-01

    Spray Forming is an advanced materials processing technology that transforms molten metal into a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a substrate. Depending on the application, the spray-formed material may be used in the as-deposited condition or it may undergo post-deposition processing. Regardless, the density of the as-deposited material is an important issue. Porosity is detrimental because it can significantly reduce strength, toughness, hardness and other properties. While it is not feasible to achieve fully-dense material in the as-deposited state, density greater than 99% of theoretical density is possible if the atomization and impact conditions are optimized. Thermal conditions at the deposit surface and droplet impact angle are key processing parameters that influence the density of the material. This paper examines the factors that contribute to porosity formation during spray forming and illustrates that very high as-deposited density is achieved by optimizing processing parameters.

  1. Pollutant Formation in Monodisperse Fuel Spray Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernansky, N. P.; Sarv, H.

    1983-01-01

    The combustion of liquid sprays represents an extremely important class of combustion processes. In the transition region, encompassing droplet sizes in the range of 25-80 micron diameter, the mixing and evaporation processes are both incomplete at the flame front and burning occurs in a combined diffusive and premixed fashion. Under these conditions, the relative importance of heterogeneous and homogeneous effects in dominating the combustion process is switched and gives rise to a number of interesting phenomena. NO (sub x) formation in monodisperse spray combustion was investigated with the following specific objectives: (1) to quantitatively determine the effect of droplet size, number density, etc. on NO sub x formation in monodisperse fuel spray combustion; and (2) to isolate the important physical and chemical phenomena in NO sub x formation in these combustion systems.

  2. Silver nasal sprays: misleading Internet marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaslin, Michael T; Rubin, Cory; Pribitkin, Edmund A

    2008-04-01

    Long-term use of silver-containing products is associated with a permanent bluish-gray discoloration of the skin known as argyria, but they remain widely available despite several measures by the FDA to regulate them. Several recent case reports have described the occurrence of argyria as a result of using these "natural" products. We used the five most common Internet search engines to find Web sites providing information on silver-containing nasal sprays. Of 49 Web sites analyzed, only 2 (4%) mentioned argyria as a possible complication, although 30 (61%) did caution against long-term use. Eight sites (16%) made specific claims about the health benefits of the product. All 49 sites (100%) provided direct or indirect links to buy silver-containing nasal sprays. We conclude that information about silver-containing nasal sprays on the Internet is misleading and inaccurate. Therefore, otolaryngologists should be aware of the misinformation their patients may be receiving about these products.

  3. Effect of Wall Impingement on Volumes of Diesel Sprays and their Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    高, 炅男; 樅山, 智裕; 新井, 雅隆

    2001-01-01

    Diesel spray impinged normally on a flat wall was investigated. Spray tip penetration and spray volumes of before and after impingement were measured on high speed photographs of the sprays which were injected by a single shot injection system into a high pressure chamber of cold state. The effects of the spray tip penetration, spray volume, entrainment mass and air-fuel ratio were discussed on the sprays of before and after impingement. The volume of the post-impingement spray was calculated...

  4. Validation and understanding of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol products (C5) using ground-based measurements from the handheld Sun photometer network in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanqing Li; Feng Niu; Kwon-Ho Lee; Jinyuan Xin; Wei Min Hao; Bryce L. Nordgren; Yuesi Wang; Pucai Wang

    2007-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently provides the most extensive aerosol retrievals on a global basis, but validation is limited to a small number of ground stations. This study presents a comprehensive evaluation of Collection 4 and 5 MODIS aerosol products using ground measurements from the Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). The...

  5. Micrometeorological measurements during the Blackmo 88 spray trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. E. Anderson; D. R. Miller; Y. S. Wang; W. E. Yendol; M. L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Instrumentation was arrayed on a 120 foot tower to detail the local atmospheric conditions during the Blackmo 88 spray experiment. Measurements were continuous for 30 minute periods encompassing each spray pass.

  6. Estimating the maritime component of aerosol optical depth and its dependency on surface wind speed using satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lehahn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Six years (2003–2008 of satellite measurements of aerosol parameters from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and surface wind speeds from Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I, are used to provide a comprehensive perspective on the link between surface wind speed and marine aerosol optical depth over tropical and subtropical oceanic regions. A systematic comparison between the satellite derived fields in these regions allows to: (i separate the relative contribution of wind-induced marine aerosol to the aerosol optical depth; (ii extract an empirical linear equation linking coarse marine aerosol optical depth and wind intensity; and (iii identify a time scale for correlating marine aerosol optical depth and surface wind speed. The contribution of wind induced marine aerosol to aerosol optical depth is found to be dominated by the coarse mode elements. When wind intensity exceeds 4 m/s, coarse marine aerosol optical depth is linearly correlated with the surface wind speed, with a remarkably consistent slope of 0.009±0.002 s/m. A detailed time scale analysis shows that the linear correlation between the fields is well kept within a 12 h time frame, while sharply decreasing when the time lag between measurements is longer. The background aerosol optical depth, associated with aerosols that are not produced in-situ through wind driven processes, can be used for estimating the contributions of terrestrial and biogenic marine aerosol to over-ocean satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth.

  7. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    be degraded or washed off by containment sprays and steam in the containment. Paint film ingredients were shown to chemically react with the aerosol particles. Pt and Pd surfaces were shown to only weakly physisorb the iodine oxide aerosols which reveals that these aerosols will have a minor effect on the catalytic functionality of the hydrogen recombiners during a severe nuclear accident. (Author)

  8. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, B.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.; Ghan, S. J.; Liu, X.; Easter, R.; Zaveri, R.

    2011-11-01

    and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to sea-salt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  9. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol - Part 1: Model improvements and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, B.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.; Ghan, S. J.; Liu, X.; Easter, R.; Zaveri, R.

    2011-07-01

    the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to sea-salt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  10. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI) – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of observat...

  11. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI)-integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H.K.; Baltensperger, U.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Facchini, M.C.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hov, Ø.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Pöschl, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Boers, R.; Boucher, O.; Leeuw, G. de; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Feichter, J.; Krejci, R.; Laj, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Lohmann, U.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, T.; Pilinis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Schulz, M.; Stohl, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Vignati, E.; Alves, C.; Amann, M.; Ammann, M.; Arabas, S.; Artaxo, P.; Baars, H.; Beddows, D.C.S.; Bergström, R.; Beukes, J.P.; Bilde, M.; Burkhart, J.F.; Canonaco, F.; Clegg, S.L.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; D'Anna, B.; Decesari, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Fischer, M.; Fjaeraa, A.M.; Fountoukis, C.; George, C.; Gomes, L.; Halloran, P.; Hamburger, T.; Harrison, R.M.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Hoose, C.; Hu, M.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hõrrak, U.; Iinuma, Y.; Iversen, T.; Josipovic, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kiss, G.; Klimont, Z.; Kolmonen, P.; Komppula, M.; Kristjánsson, J.-E.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Labonnote, L.; Lanz, V.A.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Rizzo, L.V.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H.E.; McMeeking, G.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Mirme, S.; Morgan, W.T.; Nemitz, E.; O'Donnell, D.; Panwar, T.S.; Pawlowska, H.; Petzold, A.; Pienaar, J.J.; Pio, C.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Prévôt, A.S.H.; Pryor, S.; Reddington, C.L.; Roberts, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Schwarz, J.; Seland, O.; Sellegri, K.; Shen, X.J.; Shiraiwa, M.; Siebert, H.; Sierau, B.; Simpson, D.; Sun, J.Y.; Topping, D.; Tunved, P.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vakkari, V.; Veefkind, J.P.; Visschedijk, A.; Vuollekoski, H.; Vuolo, R.; Wehner, B.; Wildt, J.; Woodward, S.; Worsnop, D.R.; Zadelhoff, G.J. van; Zardini, A.A.; Zhang, K.; Zyl, P.G. van; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of

  12. Deodorant spray: a newly identified cause of cold burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ulrich; Stirner, Karl-Heinz; Lauener, Roger; Ring, Johannes; Möhrenschlager, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Two patients encountered a first-degree cold burn after use of a deodorant spray. The spray-nozzle to skin-surface distance was approximately 5 cm, and the spraying lasted approximately 15 seconds. Under laboratory conditions, the deodorant in use was able to induce a decline in temperature of >60 degrees C. These 2 cases highlight a little-known potential for skin damage by deodorant sprays if used improperly.

  13. Cold spray technology: future of coating deposition processes

    OpenAIRE

    S.B.S. Kalsi; Harminder Singh; Sidhu, T.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cold spray (CS) belongs to a wide family of thermal spray technology with the difference that it is a solid state process in which spray particles are deposited via supersonic velocity impact at a temperature much below the melting point of the spray material. This paper briefly describes the various aspects of this rapidly emerging technology, with almost all the important parameters which affect the deposition behavior along with advantages and limitations; applications and history of emerg...

  14. Results from Effervescent Spray Atomization for MCB and a preliminary Proposal for Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukermans, A.; Cooper, G. F.; Foster, J. D.; Galbraith, L. K.; Jain, S.; Ormond, R.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the preliminary results of spraying saltwater using a variant of effervescent spray atomization (ESA), for the purpose of producing salt nuclei for Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB). ESA is a well known industrial method, where air and water are mixed, to produce a choked two phase flow in a nozzle. The choked flow leaves a pressure residue at the nozzle exit which produces very efficient atomization. The resulting measured salt aerosol appears to be smaller than what is expected from current ESA theories. As measured with standard and well calibrated standard aerosol instruments, the distribution of the salt nuclei has an approximately log normal distribution with mean diameter of 60-80 nm and a GSD close to 2. Measured by electrostatic precipitation of the aerosol on a Si wafer and SEM observation, the median diameter is almost 1.5-2x as large, and this discrepancy has to date not been fully resolved. While the observed median diameter is perhaps somewhat on the low side for efficient conversion in the clouds, this nuclei distribution should be useful for preliminary field experiments. Assuming this distribution, with very simple means, a single small nozzle 150 um in diameter produces 5.3 x1012 nuclei/sec. A few hundred nozzles would be sufficient to produce 1015 nuclei/sec, requiring a power of only 25 kW, although errors on the tail end of the distribution could easily double this figure. To lift the spray, we envision the nozzles easily integrated in standard snowmaking machines, which are estimated by their manufactures to lift the nuclei from 50-100 m in the air, requiring another 20 kW of power. In cooperation with and under the scientific guidance of the U. of Washington, we propose to develop a set of staggered MCB experimental tests in Central California, first on land, and subsequently over the ocean. While this method may not be the ultimate one desired for full deployment (If ever), its simplicity, low cost and ease of deployment would seem

  15. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, V. Faye [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ariya, Parisa A. (ed.) [McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    2014-09-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  16. DSMC multicomponent aerosol dynamics: Sampling algorithms and aerosol processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya

    The post-accident nuclear reactor primary and containment environments can be characterized by high temperatures and pressures, and fission products and nuclear aerosols. These aerosols evolve via natural transport processes as well as under the influence of engineered safety features. These aerosols can be hazardous and may pose risk to the public if released into the environment. Computations of their evolution, movement and distribution involve the study of various processes such as coagulation, deposition, condensation, etc., and are influenced by factors such as particle shape, charge, radioactivity and spatial inhomogeneity. These many factors make the numerical study of nuclear aerosol evolution computationally very complicated. The focus of this research is on the use of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to elucidate the role of various phenomena that influence the nuclear aerosol evolution. In this research, several aerosol processes such as coagulation, deposition, condensation, and source reinforcement are explored for a multi-component, aerosol dynamics problem in a spatially homogeneous medium. Among the various sampling algorithms explored the Metropolis sampling algorithm was found to be effective and fast. Several test problems and test cases are simulated using the DSMC technique. The DSMC results obtained are verified against the analytical and sectional results for appropriate test problems. Results show that the assumption of a single mean density is not appropriate due to the complicated effect of component densities on the aerosol processes. The methods developed and the insights gained will also be helpful in future research on the challenges associated with the description of fission product and aerosol releases.

  17. Storm Aerosol Environments and Aerosol Sources in Subtropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelada, M.; Salio, P. V.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have shown a strong interaction in the subtropical area of Southeastern South America (SESA) between deep moist convection and the presence of the South American low level jet (SALLJ), which advects humidity and heat from tropical latitudes creating ideal conditions in the environment for convective activity. Moreover, the SALLJ is considered an important mechanism for transport of gases and particulate matter emitted in tropical South America. Biomass burning season associated with deforestation and land clearing for agricultural use is observed in these regions principally from August to October. Past studies have shown, through modeling and in-situ measurements, an increase in optical depth and Angstrom exponent during SALLJ events. Evidence of an increase in aerosol loading during burning biomass season, along with favorable conditions for deep moist convection activity, supports the hypothesis of an indirect effect from aerosols in convective development in SESA. The objective of this work is to characterize aerosol environments in SESA associated with the presence of mesoscale convective system development. High aerosol concentration events during biomass burning season from 2002 to 2015 were detected using corrected aerosol optical depth (CAOD) with 10-km horizontal resolution from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aerosol Products. Environmental variables from NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) were examined to detect SALLJ events and deep moist convection development was observed through infrared channel from GOES. This combination of aerosol data and SALLJ presence determined a data-set for polluted and non-polluted environments. A remarkable correlation between higher values of CAOD in central Argentina and SALLJ was found. A case of study with evidence of SALLJ, high CAOD values and strong convection development was examined. A Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulation has been performed in order

  18. Contributions of transported Prudhoe Bay oil field emissions to the aerosol population in Utqiagvik, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsch, Matthew J.; Kirpes, Rachel M.; Kolesar, Katheryn R.; Barrett, Tate E.; China, Swarup; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Laskin, Alexander; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Tuch, Thomas; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-01-01

    Loss of sea ice is opening the Arctic to increasing development involving oil and gas extraction and shipping. Given the significant impacts of absorbing aerosol and secondary aerosol precursors emitted within the rapidly warming Arctic region, it is necessary to characterize local anthropogenic aerosol sources and compare to natural conditions. From August to September 2015 in Utqiagvik (Barrow), AK, the chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles was measured by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (0.13–4 µm projected area diameter) and real-time single-particle mass spectrometry (0.2–1.5 µm vacuum aerodynamic diameter). During periods influenced by the Arctic Ocean (70 % of the study), our results show that fresh sea spray aerosol contributed ~20 %, by number, of particles between 0.13 and 0.4 µm, 40–70 % between 0.4 and 1 µm, and 80–100 % between 1 and 4 µm particles. In contrast, for periods influenced by emissions from Prudhoe Bay (10 % of the study), the third largest oil field in North America, there was a strong influence from submicron (0.13–1 µm) combustion-derived particles (20–50 % organic carbon, by number; 5–10% soot by number). While sea spray aerosol still comprised a large fraction of particles (90 % by number from 1 to 4 µm) detected under Prudhoe Bay influence, these particles were internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate indicative of aging processes during transport. In addition, the overall mode of the particle size number distribution shifted from 76 nm during Arctic Ocean influence to 27 nm during Prudhoe Bay influence, with particle concentrations increasing from 130 to 920 cm-3 due to transported particle emissions from the oil fields. The increased contributions of carbonaceous combustion products and partially aged sea spray aerosol should be considered in future Arctic atmospheric composition and climate simulations.

  19. Radon and aerosol release from open-pit uranium mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, V.W.; Nielson, K.K.; Mauch, M.L.

    1982-08-01

    The quantity of /sup 222/Rn (hereafter called radon) released per unit of uranium produced from open pit mining has been determined. A secondary objective was to determine the nature and quantity of airborne particles resulting from mine operations. To accomplish these objectives, a comprehensive study of the release rates of radon and aerosol material to the atmosphere was made over a one-year period from April 1979 to May 1980 at the Morton Ranch Mine which was operated by United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) in partnership with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The mine is now operated for TVA by Silver King Mines. Morton Ranch Mine was one of five open pit uranium mines studied in central Wyoming. Corroborative measurements were made of radon flux and /sup 226/Ra (hereafter called radium) concentrations of various surfaces at three of the other mines in October 1980 and again at these three mines plus a fourth in April of 1981. Three of these mines are located in the Powder River Basin, about 80 kilometers east by northeast of Casper. One is located in the Shirley Basin, about 60 km south of Casper, and the remaining one is located in the Gas Hills, approximately 100 km west of Casper. The one-year intensive study included simultaneous measurement of several parameters: continuous measurement of atmospheric radon concentration near the ground at three locations, monthly 24-hour radon flux measurements from various surfaces, radium analyses of soil samples collected under each of the flux monitoring devices, monthly integrations of aerosols on dichotomous aerosol samplers, analysis of aerosol samplers for total dust loading, aerosol elemental and radiochemical composition, aerosol elemental composition by particle size, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, barometric pressure, and rainfall.

  20. Efficient Nose-to-Lung (N2L) Aerosol Delivery with a Dry Powder Inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, P Worth; Golshahi, Laleh; Behara, Srinivas R B; Tian, Geng; Farkas, Dale R; Hindle, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Delivering aerosols to the lungs through the nasal route has a number of advantages, but its use has been limited by high depositional loss in the extrathoracic airways. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nose-to-lung (N2L) delivery of excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation aerosols generated with a new inline dry powder inhaler (DPI). The device was also adapted to enable aerosol delivery to a patient simultaneously receiving respiratory support from high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. The inhaler delivered the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which was formulated as submicrometer combination particles containing a hygroscopic excipient prepared by spray-drying. Nose-to-lung delivery was assessed using in vitro and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods in an airway model that continued through the upper tracheobronchial region. The best performing device contained a 2.3 mm flow control orifice and a 3D rod array with a 3-4-3 rod pattern. Based on in vitro experiments, the emitted dose from the streamlined nasal cannula had a fine particle fraction <5 μm of 95.9% and mass median aerodynamic diameter of 1.4 μm, which was considered ideal for nose-to-lung EEG delivery. With the 2.3-343 device, condensational growth in the airways increased the aerosol size to 2.5-2.7 μm and extrathoracic deposition was <10%. CFD results closely matched the in vitro experiments and predicted that nasal deposition was <2%. The developed DPI produced high efficiency aerosolization with significant size increase of the aerosol within the airways that can be used to enable nose-to-lung delivery and aerosol administration during HFNC therapy.

  1. A Grey-Box Model for Spray Drying Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Norbert; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Multi-stage spray drying is an important and widely used unit operation in the production of food powders. In this paper we develop and present a dynamic model of the complete drying process in a multi-stage spray dryer. The dryer is divided into three stages: The spray stage and two fluid bed...

  2. Spray irrigation of landfill leachate: estimating potential exposures to workers and bystanders using a modified air box model and generalised source term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Duncan; Pollard, Simon J T; Spence, Lynn; Smith, Richard; Gronow, Jan R

    2005-02-01

    Generalised source term data from UK leachates and a probabilistic exposure model (BPRISC(4)) were used to evaluate key routes of exposure from chemicals of concern during the spraying irrigation of landfill leachate. Risk estimates secured using a modified air box model are reported for a hypothetical worker exposed to selected chemicals within a generalised conceptual exposure model of spray irrigation. Consistent with pesticide spray exposure studies, the key risk driver is dermal exposure to the more toxic components of leachate. Changes in spray droplet diameter (0.02-0.2 cm) and in spray flow rate (50-1000 l/min) have little influence on dermal exposure, although the lesser routes of aerosol ingestion and inhalation are markedly affected. The risk estimates modelled using this conservative worst case exposure scenario are not of sufficient magnitude to warrant major concerns about chemical risks to workers or bystanders from this practice in the general sense. However, the modelling made use of generic concentration data for only a limited number of potential landfill leachate contaminants, such that individual practices may require assessment on the basis of their own merits.

  3. Evolution of aerosol and CCN properties on the Antarctic Peninsula and Southern Ocean during the spring and summer seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, C.; Roberts, G.; Grant, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean has been identified as one of the key regions that need aerosol measurements to improve our models of global climate change. The Portable AERosol Observing System (PAEROS) was deployed in an extended field campaign to measure CCN and aerosols in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean from October 2013 to mid-March 2014. PAEROS is a lightweight, man-portable instrument package developed at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography for the purpose of collecting autonomous measurements of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties in remote and challenging environments. The initial phase involved the PAEROS package sampling onboard the R/V Gould during the five-day transit of the Drake Passage between Punta Arenas, Chile and Palmer Station on the Antarctic Peninsula. Upon arrival at Palmer Station, PAEROS was transferred to land and installed on top of a hill about 500 m from the main buildings. For five months, aerosol and CCN number concentrations, size distributions, black carbon concentrations, solar fluxes, and meteorological parameters were continuously measured at Palmer Station. The experiment covered most of an austral spring and summer cycle, during which time the sea ice retreated and biological activity flourished along the Antarctic Peninsula. While crossing the Drake Passage, a distinct gradient in aerosol concentrations was observed with increasing distance from South America. At Palmer Station, the total aerosol concentrations showed a seasonal cycle with lowest concentration in air masses originating from the Antarctic continent and highest number concentrations coming from the ocean during the peak of biological activity. Chlorophyll concentrations are routinely measured at Palmer Station and showed peak activity in the month of January 2014. Total aerosol and CCN concentrations increased in late spring (November) as the sea ice recedes from Palmer Station, probably a result of being closer to sea spray and biological activity

  4. Development of spraying equipment for shearer loaders; Entwicklung von Beduesungseinrichtungen fuer Walzenlader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehning, H.D. [Deutsche Montan Technologie GmbH, Essen (Germany). Fachstelle fuer Staub- und Silikosebekaempfung; Renner, K.P.. [Bergamt Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Tebbe, W. [Deutsche Montan Technologie GmbH, Essen (Germany). Abteilung Gewinnung und Aufbereitung

    2005-05-12

    In recent years comprehensive developments have taken place in the field of spraying during coal-winning by cutting methods. Firstly, efforts were made to reduce the development of fine dust and, secondly, more stringent requirements were imposed on fire and explosion protection. With regard to the latter an explosion hazard must not exist at any time during operation of a shearer loader. This is ensured by immediate disconnection of the shearer loader when limit values are exceeded. In the control of dust and silicosis it is of crucial importance that the spraying systems are operated in the optimum pressure range. This is achieved by setting these optimum ranges during setting of the spray water parameters within the framework of specification of the disconnection values. Taking into account these two tasks of shearer loader spraying an acceptance procedure has been worked out for adjustment of the spray monitoring on the shearer loaders, which ensures that both protective aims are achieved according to the present state of the art. (orig.) [German] Im Bereich der Beduesung bei der schneidenden Gewinnung haben in den letzten Jahren umfangreiche Entwicklungen stattgefunden. Dabei wurde zum einen eine Reduzierung der Feinstaubentwicklung verfolgt und zum anderen stiegen die Anforderungen an den Brand- und Explosionsschutz. Bezueglich des Brand- und Explosionsschutzes darf zu keinem Zeitpunkt beim Betrieb eines Walzenladers eine Explosionsgefahr bestehen. Das wird durch das unverzuegliche Abschalten des Walzenladers bei Grenzwertverletzung sichergestellt. Bei der Staub- und Silikosebekaempfung ist es von entscheidender Bedeutung, dass die Beduesungssysteme im optimalen Druckbereich betrieben werden. Dies wird dadurch erreicht, dass bei der Einstellung der Beduesungswasserparameter im Rahmen der Festlegung der Abschaltwerte diese optimalen Bereiche eingestellt werden. Unter Beruecksichtigung dieser beiden Aufgaben der Walzenladerbeduesung ist eine Abnahmeverfahren

  5. The GRAPE aerosol retrieval algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol component of the Oxford-Rutherford Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC combined cloud and aerosol retrieval scheme is described and the theoretical performance of the algorithm is analysed. ORAC is an optimal estimation retrieval scheme for deriving cloud and aerosol properties from measurements made by imaging satellite radiometers and, when applied to cloud free radiances, provides estimates of aerosol optical depth at a wavelength of 550 nm, aerosol effective radius and surface reflectance at 550 nm. The aerosol retrieval component of ORAC has several incarnations – this paper addresses the version which operates in conjunction with the cloud retrieval component of ORAC (described by Watts et al., 1998, as applied in producing the Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE data-set.

    The algorithm is described in detail and its performance examined. This includes a discussion of errors resulting from the formulation of the forward model, sensitivity of the retrieval to the measurements and a priori constraints, and errors resulting from assumptions made about the atmospheric/surface state.

  6. Influence of nebulizer design and aerosol impact bead on analytical sensitivities of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Bosque, Jesus [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Chemistry, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Mermet, Jean Michel [Spectroscopy Forever, 01390 Tramoyes (France); Todoli, Jose Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Chemistry, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    The characteristics of the aerosols generated by pneumatic concentric nebulizers as well as sensitivities were studied in ICP-MS with a total of 26 nebulizers: 17 of the A-type, 6 of the C-type, and 3 of the K-type. Although of the same design, discrepancies in sensitivity were observed among the A1-30 type nebulizers. Free delivery rate, relation between the median of the volume drop size distribution, D{sub 50}, and the capillary i.d., effect of the nebulizer gas exit cross sectional area on D{sub 50}, energy transfer efficiency from the gas to the liquid stream and spatial homogeneity within the aerosol cones were studied. For a given nebulizer design, the gas exit cross-sectional area has shown to critically influence the aerosol characteristics. The aerosol generation mechanism has been explored and it has been concluded that, for A-type nebulizers the nebulization is more efficient than for C and K-type ones. The spray chamber design has also a marked effect on the results according to the particular nebulizer used. It has been observed that sample capillary was not perfectly centered with regard to the gas exit bore for several nebulizers. In order to minimize the problems associated with this bad alignment (i.e., different sensitivity depending on the nebulizer), spray chambers equipped with impact beads may be used, but to the detriment of the sensitivity.

  7. COUPLED ATOMIZATION AND SPRAY MODELLING IN THE SPRAY FORMING PROCESS USING OPENFOAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Rasmus; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Fritsching, Udo

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical model capable of simulating the atomization, break-up and in-flight spray phenomena in the spray forming process. The model is developed and implemented in the freeware code openFOAM. The focus is on studying the coupling effect of the melt break-up phenomena...... with the local gas and droplets flow fields. The work is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description, which is implemented in a full 3D representation. The gas is described by the incompressible RANS equations, whereas the movement of the droplets is modeled by a tracking approach, together with a full thermal...... model for droplet cooling and solidification. The model is tested and validated against results from literature and experiments. Subsequently, the model is used to simulate the complex flow fields in the spray forming process and the results are discussed. The presented model of the spray forming...

  8. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, A. R.; Gupta, P.; Zavodsky, B.; McGrath, K. M.

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America. However, we identify several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the new product can encounter significant uncertainties due to the inclusion of the geostationary AOD retrievals. The uncertainties associated with geostationary AOD retrievals are expected to be minimized after the successful launch of the next-generation advanced NOAA GOES-R and recently launched JMA Himawari satellites. Observations from these advanced satellites will ultimately provide an enhanced understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols over the Pacific.

  9. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols resolved via positive matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äijälä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Heikkinen, Liine; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is a complex mixture of various chemical species such as organic compounds, sulfates, nitrates, ammonia, chlorides, black carbon and sea salt. As aerosol chemical composition strongly influences aerosol climate effects (via cloud condensation nucleus activation, hygroscopic properties, aerosol optics, volatility and condensation) as well as health effects (toxicity, carcinogenicity, particle morphology), detailed understanding of atmospheric fine particle composition is widely beneficial for understanding these interactions. Unfortunately the comprehensive, detailed measurement of aerosol chemistry remains difficult due to the wide range of compounds present in the atmosphere as well as for the miniscule mass of the particles themselves compared to their carrier gas. Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Canagaratna et al., 2007) is an instrument often used for characterization of non-refractive aerosol types: the near-universal vaporization and ionisation technique allows for measurement of most atmospheric-relevant compounds (with the notable exception of refractory matter such as sea salt, black carbon, metals and crustal matter). The downside of the hard ionisation applied is extensive fragmentation of sample molecules. However, the apparent loss of information in fragmentation can be partly offset by applying advanced statistical methods to extract information from the fragmentation patterns. In aerosol mass spectrometry statistical analysis methods, such as positive matrix factorization (PMF; Paatero, 1999) are usually applied for aerosol organic component only, to keep the number of factors to be resolved manageable, to retain the inorganic components for solution validation via correlation analysis, and to avoid inorganic species dominating the factor model. However, this practice smears out the interactions between organic and inorganic chemical components, and hinders the understanding of the connections between primary and

  10. Metallization of Various Polymers by Cold Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hanqing; Chu, Xin; Vo, Phuong; Yue, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Previous results have shown that metallic coatings can be successfully cold sprayed onto polymeric substrates. This paper studies the cold sprayability of various metal powders on different polymeric substrates. Five different substrates were used, including carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polyethylenimine (PEI); mild steel was also used as a benchmark substrate. The CFRP used in this work has a thermosetting matrix, and the ABS, PEEK and PEI are all thermoplastic polymers, with different glass transition temperatures as well as a number of distinct mechanical properties. Three metal powders, tin, copper and iron, were cold sprayed with both a low-pressure system and a high-pressure system at various conditions. In general, cold spray on the thermoplastic polymers rendered more positive results than the thermosetting polymers, due to the local thermal softening mechanism in the thermoplastics. Thick copper coatings were successfully deposited on PEEK and PEI. Based on the results, a method is proposed to determine the feasibility and deposition window of cold spraying specific metal powder/polymeric substrate combinations.

  11. Indoor household residual spraying program performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Matabeleland South launched the malaria pre-elimination campaign in 2012 but provincial spraying coverage has failed to attain 95% target, with some districts still encountering malaria outbreaks. A study was conducted to evaluate program performance against achieving malaria pre-elimination. Methods: a ...

  12. Albendazole Microparticles Prepared by Spray Drying Technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spray-dried particles were characterized for particle shape, and dissolution rate as well as by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) and Fourier .... Thermal analysis. The DSC thermogram of pure ABZ (Fig. 2 A) shows an endothermic peak at 218 ºC with a shoulder at 198 oC due to drug melting [15], while KL exhibits a ...

  13. Comparative performance of single spray integrated pest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea is among of the most widely grown legume in Northern and South Western Nigeria. However, the yield of cowpea has stagnated in recent years, mainly due to pest and diseases. In order to combat insect ravaging cowpea plots and reduce yield, integrated pest management (One spray regime) technology which ...

  14. Anomalous properties of spray dried solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Hisham; Brocchini, Steve; Buckton, Graham

    2009-12-01

    The use of solid dispersions for oral dosage forms can increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs. Spray drying is one process that can be used to prepare solid dispersions. Spray dried solid dispersions of griseofulvin, poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylate] (PHPMA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were prepared from acetone and water. When methanol was substituted for water, the morphology, stability and dissolution properties of the solid dispersion changed dramatically. The glass transition temperature for the ternary solid dispersion (GF, PHPMA, and PVP) shifted from 83 degrees C (acetone/water) to 103 degrees C for the acetone/methanol system. These differences in the dispersions are thought to derive from conformational variations of the polymers in solution prior to spray drying. Both PHPMA and PVP formed globules in solution of a size range between 16 and 33 nm. The effect of drug and polymer concentration in solution (before spray drying) on the properties of the solid dispersion was studied. It was found that solid dispersions that were prepared using lower concentrations of drug and polymers in solutions resulted in the formation of particles that display a lower relaxation rate. This result supports the hypothesis that the polymer conformation may significantly change the properties of the solid dispersion. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  15. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  16. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  17. New atomization nozzle for spray drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deventer, H.C. van; Houben, R.J.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.

    2013-01-01

    A new atomization nozzle based on ink jet technology is introduced for spray drying. Application areas are the food and dairy industry, in the first instance, because in these industries the quality demands on the final powders are high with respect to heat load, powder shape, and size distribution.

  18. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  19. PAINT SPRAY BOOTH MODIFICATIONS FOR RECIRCULATION VENTILATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The control of emissions from spray painting operations has historically been cost prohibitive, due to the high exhaust flow rates coupled with low volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) Concentrations. Past studies, conducted by the U.S. EPA and U.S. ...

  20. Interface parameters of composite sprayed concrete linings in soft ground with spray-applied waterproofing

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jiang; Bloodworth, Alan G.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a spray-applied waterproofing membrane between the primary and secondary lining layers is important to the behaviour of a composite sprayed concrete lined (SCL) tunnel in soft ground. In order to confirm the feasibility of the composite shell lining concept, the structural adequacy of the concrete-membrane interfaces under the effects experienced in a typical tunnel needs to be investigated.\\ud This paper presents a series of laboratory tests on samples cut from composite spra...

  1. Preparation and characterization of microparticles of piroxicam by spray drying and spray chilling methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, M.; Kini, A.G.; Kulkarni, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Piroxicam, an anti-inflammatory drug, exhibits poor water solubility and flow properties, poor dissolution and poor wetting. Consequently, the aim of this study was to improve the dissolution of piroxicam. Microparticles containing piroxicam were produced by spray drying, using isopropyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 40:60 v/v as solvent system, and spray chilling technology by melting the drug and chilling it with a pneumatic nozzle to enhance dissolution rate. The prepared formulations ...

  2. Effect of spray drying and subsequent processing conditions on residual moisture content and physical/biochemical stability of protein inhalation powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maa, Y F; Nguyen, P A; Andya, J D; Dasovich, N; Sweeney, T D; Shire, S J; Hsu, C C

    1998-05-01

    To understand the effect of spray drying and powder processing environments on the residual moisture content and aerosol performance of inhalation protein powders. Also, the long-term effect of storage conditions on the powder's physical and biochemical stability was presented. Excipient-free as well as mannitol-formulated powders of a humanized monoclonal antibody (anti-IgE) and recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) were prepared using a Buchi 190 model spray dryer. Residual moisture content and moisture uptake behavior of the powder were measured using thermal gravimetric analysis and gravimetric moisture sorption isotherm, respectively. Protein aggregation, the primary degradation product observed upon storage, was determined by size-exclusion HPLC. Aerosol performance of the dry powders was evaluated after blending with lactose carriers using a multi-stage liquid impinger (MSLI). Spray-dried powders with a moisture level (approximately 3%) equivalent to the freeze-dried materials could only be achieved using high-temperature spray-drying conditions, which were not favorable to large-male manufacturing, or subsequent vacuum drying. These dry powders would equilibrate with the subsequent processing and storage environments regardless of the manufacturing condition. As long as the relative humidity of air during processing and storage was lower than 50%, powders maintained their aerosol performance (fine particle fraction). However, powders stored under drier conditions exhibited better long-term protein biochemical stability. Manufacturing, powder processing, and storage environments affected powder's residual moisture level in a reversible fashion. Therefore, the storage condition determined powder's overall stability, but residual moisture had a greater impact on protein chemical stability than on powder physical stability.

  3. Compressed gas domestic aerosol valve design using high viscous product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nourian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current universal consumer aerosol products using high viscous product such as cooking oil, antiperspirants, hair removal cream are primarily used LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas propellant which is unfriendly environmental. The advantages of the new innovative technology described in this paper are: i. No butane or other liquefied hydrocarbon gas is used as a propellant and it replaced with Compressed air, nitrogen or other safe gas propellant. ii. Customer acceptable spray quality and consistency during can lifetime iii. Conventional cans and filling technology There is only a feasible energy source which is inert gas (i.e. compressed air to replace VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds and greenhouse gases, which must be avoided, to improve atomisation by generating gas bubbles and turbulence inside the atomiser insert and the actuator. This research concentrates on using "bubbly flow" in the valve stem, with injection of compressed gas into the passing flow, thus also generating turbulence. The new valve designed in this investigation using inert gases has advantageous over conventional valve with butane propellant using high viscous product (> 400 Cp because, when the valving arrangement is fully open, there are negligible energy losses as fluid passes through the valve from the interior of the container to the actuator insert. The use of valving arrangement thus permits all pressure drops to be controlled, resulting in improved control of atomising efficiency and flow rate, whereas in conventional valves a significant pressure drops occurs through the valve which has a complex effect on the corresponding spray.

  4. Instrumentation for tropospheric aerosol characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Young, S.E.; Becker, C.H.; Coggiola, M.J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wollnik, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A new instrument has been developed that determines the abundance, size distribution, and chemical composition of tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols with diameters down to 0.2 {mu}m. In addition to aerosol characterization, the instrument also monitors the chemical composition of the ambient gas. More than 25.000 aerosol particle mass spectra were recorded during the NASA-sponsored Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) field program using NASA`s DC-8 research aircraft. (author) 7 refs.

  5. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venzie, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  6. A multi-model assessment of the impact of sea spray geoengineering on cloud droplet number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Pringle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificially increasing the albedo of marine boundary layer clouds by the mechanical emission of sea spray aerosol has been proposed as a geoengineering technique to slow the warming caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases. A previous global model study (Korhonen et al., 2010 found that only modest increases (< 20% and sometimes even decreases in cloud drop number (CDN concentrations would result from emission scenarios calculated using a windspeed dependent geoengineering flux parameterisation. Here we extend that work to examine the conditions under which decreases in CDN can occur, and use three independent global models to quantify maximum achievable CDN changes. We find that decreases in CDN can occur when at least three of the following conditions are met: the injected particle number is < 100 cm−3, the injected diameter is > 250–300 nm, the background aerosol loading is large (≥ 150 cm−3 and the in-cloud updraught velocity is low (< 0.2 m s−1. With lower background loadings and/or increased updraught velocity, significant increases in CDN can be achieved. None of the global models predict a decrease in CDN as a result of geoengineering, although there is considerable diversity in the calculated efficiency of geoengineering, which arises from the diversity in the simulated marine aerosol distributions. All three models show a small dependence of geoengineering efficiency on the injected particle size and the geometric standard deviation of the injected mode. However, the achievability of significant cloud drop enhancements is strongly dependent on the cloud updraught speed. With an updraught speed of 0.1 m s−1 a global mean CDN of 375 cm−3 (previously estimated to cancel the forcing caused by CO2 doubling is achievable in only about 50% of grid boxes which have > 50% cloud cover, irrespective of the amount of aerosol injected. But at stronger updraft speeds (0

  7. Release of airborne particles and Ag and Zn compounds from nanotechnology-enabled consumer sprays: Implications for inhalation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Leonardo; Han, Taewon T.; McGilvery, Catriona M.; Yang, Letao; Subramaniam, Prasad; Lee, Ki-Bum; Schwander, Stephan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.; Ryan, Mary; Porter, Alexandra E.; Smith, Rachel; Chung, Kian Fan; Lioy, Paul J.; Zhang, Junfeng; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2017-04-01

    The increasing prevalence and use of nanotechnology-enabled consumer products have increased potential consumer exposures to nanoparticles; however, there is still a lack of data characterizing such consumer exposure. The research reported here investigated near-field airborne exposures due to the use of 13 silver (Ag)-based and 5 zinc (Zn)-based consumer sprays. The products were sprayed into a specially designed glove box, and all products were applied with equal spraying duration and frequency. Size distribution and concentration of the released particles were assessed using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate the presence of metals in all investigated products. Spray liquids and airborne particles from select products were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). We found that all sprays produced airborne particles ranging in size from nano-sized particles (2.5 μm); however, there was a substantial variation in the released particle concentration depending on a product. The total aerosol mass concentration was dominated by the presence of coarse particles, and it ranged from ∼30 μg/m3 to ∼30,000 μg/m3. The TEM verified the presence of nanoparticles and their agglomerates in liquid and airborne states. The products were found to contain not only Ag and Zn compounds - as advertised on the product labeling - but also a variety of other metals including lithium, strontium, barium, lead, manganese and others. The results presented here can be used as input to model population exposures as well as form a basis for human health effects studies due to the use nanotechnology-enabled products.

  8. Research of Plasma Spraying Process on Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricija Kavaliauskaitė

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article examines plasma sprayed 95Ni-5Al coatings on alu-minum-magnesium (Mg ≈ 2,6‒3,6 % alloy substrate. Alumi-num-magnesium samples prior spraying were prepared with mechanical treatment (blasting with Al2O3. 95Ni-5Al coatings on aluminum-magnesium alloys were sprayed with different parameters of process and coating‘s thickness, porosity, micro-hardness and microstructure were evaluated. Also numerical simulations in electric and magnetic phenomena of plasma spray-ing were carried out.

  9. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  10. Low pressure cold spraying on materials with low erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikalov, V. S.; Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F.

    2017-10-01

    In present work, the erosion-adhesion transition was investigated during cold spraying of aluminum particles on brittle ceramic substrates. Cold spraying was carried out with aid of sonic nozzle, which use allows significantly reducing the gas stagnation pressure without the effect of flow separation inside the nozzle and, accordingly, reducing the velocity of the spraying particles. Two stagnation pressures were chosen. The coating tracks were sprayed at different air temperatures in nozzle pre-chamber under each of regimes. Single sprayed tracks were obtained and their profiles were investigated by optical profilometry.

  11. Guest Editorial Particle Sizing And Spray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigier, Norman; Stewart, Gerald

    1984-10-01

    The measurement of particle size and velocity in particle laden flows is a subject of interest in a variety of industrial applications. In combustion systems for electricity generation, industrial processes and heating, and transportation, where liquid and solid fuels are injected into air streams for burning in furnaces, boilers, and gas turbine and diesel engines, the initial size and velocity distributions of particles are determining factors in the overall combustion efficiency and the emission of pollutants and particulates. In the design of injectors and burners for the atomization of liquid fuels, a great deal of attention is being focused on developing instrumentation for the accurate measurement of size and velocity distributions in sprays as a function of space and time. Most recent advances in optical engineering techniques using lasers for particle measurement have focused on detailed spray characterization, where there is a major concern with spherical liquid droplets within the size range of 1 to 500 μm in diameter, with droplet velocities within the range of 1 to 100 m/s, and the requirement for making in situ measurements of moving particles by nonintrusive optical probes. The instruments being developed for spray analysis have much wider applications. These include measurement in particle laden flows encountered in a variety of industrial processes with solid particles in gas and liquid streams and liquid particles in gas streams. Sprays used in agriculture, drying, food processing, coating of materials, chemical processing, clean rooms, pharmaceuticals, plasma spraying, and icing wind tunnels are examples of systems for which information is being sought on particle and fluid dynamic interactions in which there is heat, mass, and momentum transfer in turbulent reacting flows.

  12. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhanu Mekibib

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire and Sudan, the 2013–2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses.

  13. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekibib, Berhanu; Ariën, Kevin K

    2016-05-23

    Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Sudan, the 2013-2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s) in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses.

  14. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robock, Alan [Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5–10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  15. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol optical thickness and chlorophyll concentration from multiwavelength measurement over East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chong; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Hashimoto, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    A flexible inversion algorithm is proposed for simultaneously retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and surface chlorophyll a (Chl) concentration from multiwavelength observation over the ocean. In this algorithm, forward radiation calculation is performed by an accurate coupled atmosphere-ocean model with a comprehensive bio-optical ocean module. Then, a full-physical nonlinear optimization approximation approach is used to retrieve AOT and Chl. For AOT retrieval, a global three-dimensional spectral radiation-transport aerosol model is used as the a priori constraint to increase the retrieval accuracy of aerosol. To investigate the algorithm's availability, the retrieval experiment is conducted using simulated radiance data to demonstrate that the relative errors in simultaneously determining AOT and Chl can be mostly controlled to within 10% using multiwavelength and angle covering in and out of sunglint. Furthermore, the inversion results are assessed using the actual satellite observation data obtained from Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI)/Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite GOSAT and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/Aqua instruments through comparison to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol and ocean color (OC) products over East China Sea. Both the retrieved AOT and Chl compare favorably to the reported AERONET values, particularly when using the CASE 2 ocean module in turbid water, even when the retrieval is performed in the presence of high aerosol loading and sunglint. Finally, the CAI and MODIS images are used to jointly retrieve the spatial distribution of AOT and Chl in comparison to the MODIS AOT and OC products.

  16. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  17. Arthroscopic Airbrush-Assisted Cell Spraying for Cartilage Repair: Design, Development, and Characterization of Custom-Made Arthroscopic Spray Nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Koen; Hendriks, Jan; Karperien, Marcel; Vonk, Lucienne A; Saris, Daniël B F

    2017-09-01

    Airbrush-assisted cell spraying would facilitate fully arthroscopic filling of cartilage defects, thereby providing a minimally invasive procedure for cartilage repair. This study provides the development and characterization of custom-made spray nozzles that could serve as a foundation for the development of a BioAirbrush, a platform technology for the arthroscopic application of (cell laden) hydrogels. Custom-made spray nozzles were designed and produced with 3D printing technology. A commercially available spraying system was used for comparison. Sprays were characterized based on spray angle, cone width, droplet size, velocity, and density. This was performed with conventional and high-speed imaging. Furthermore, cell survival of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells, as well as the chondrogenic capacity of chondrocytes after spraying were evaluated. Changing nozzle design from internal to external mixing significantly increased cell survival after spraying. Custom-made spray nozzles provide larger droplets compared to the current commercially available technology, potentially improving cell survival. Sufficient mixing of two gel components was confirmed for the custom-made nozzles. Overall, custom-made nozzles improved cell survival after spraying, without significantly affecting the chondrogenic capacity of the cells. This study provides a platform for the development of a BioAirbrush for spray-assisted cell implantations in arthroscopic cartilage repair procedures. Evaluation of the fundamental characteristics of a spray as well as a study of cell survival after spraying have further expanded the knowledge regarding cell spraying for cartilage repair. Nozzle design and air pressure characteristics are essential parameters to consider for the clinical implementation of spray-assisted cell implantations.

  18. Structure and extinction of laminar ethanol/air spray flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutheil, E. [Heidelberg Univ. (DE). Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Wissenschaftliches Rechnen (IWR)

    2001-07-01

    The paper presents the structure and extinction of both mono- and bidisperse ethanol/air spray flames in the counterflow configuration. A similarity transformation for monodisperse spray flames is extended to polydisperse spray flames, and the resulting one-dimensional formulation accesses the use of detailed chemical reaction mechanisms as well as detailed transport. For the ethanol/air system, 38 species and 337 elementary reactions are used. At high strain, the droplets cross the gas stagnation plane, reverse and return towards their injector. For this situation, the width of the chemical reaction zone of bidisperse and monodisperse sprays with the Sauter mean radius is almost the same. However, the droplet oscillation causes the spray flame of the bidisperse spray to strongly increase the total spray flame thickness. For the injection velocity of the spray studied here, the droplets returning to their injector hit the boundary of the computational domain as strain is increased whereas the monodisperse spray flame extinguishs at a considerably higher value of gas strain rate. Thus, the extinction behavior of the bidisperse spray flame is not represented by the monodisperse spray flame with the Sauter mean radius. The model is also suitable to predict pollutant formation. (orig.)

  19. Morphological, structural and electrochemical properties of lithium iron phosphates synthesized by Spray Pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, L.S. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and IAAB, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Meatza, I. de [Dpto. Energia, CIDETEC, Po Miramon 196, Parque Tecnologico de San Sebastian, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Martin, M.I., E-mail: imartin@ietcc.csic.e [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and IAAB, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Bengoechea, M. [Dpto. Energia, CIDETEC, Po Miramon 196, Parque Tecnologico de San Sebastian, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Cantero, I. [Dpto. I-D-i Nuevas Tecnologias, CEGASA, Artapadura, 11, 01013 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Rabanal, M.E., E-mail: mariaeugenia.rabanal@uc3m.e [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and IAAB, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-03-01

    In the field of materials for lithium ion batteries, the lithium iron phosphate LiFePO{sub 4} has been proven for use as a positive electrode due to its good resistance to thermal degradation and overcharge, safety and low cost. The use of nanostructured materials would improve its efficiency. This work shows the results of the synthesis of nanostructured materials with functional properties for lithium batteries through aerosol techniques. The Spray Pyrolysis method allows synthesizing nanostructured particles with spherical geometry, not agglomerates, with narrow distribution of particle size and homogeneous composition in respect to a precursor solution. Experimental techniques were focused on the morphological (SEM and TEM), structural (XRD and HRTEM-SAED), chemical (EDS) and electrochemical characterization.

  20. Spray characterization and droplet interactions study using particle dynamic analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurteri, C. U.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Arik, Engin B.

    1993-08-01

    Nozzles are utilized in atomizing liquids in many industrial and domestic applications. Examples include domestic and industrial heating units (furnaces and boilers), internal combustion engines, agricultural spraying, spray painting, etc. To improve atomizer design, it is necessary to obtain spray characteristics which include the simultaneous droplet size and velocity information. Also droplet interactions in the dense spray region affect the characteristics. Interacting spray configurations are also encountered in many industrial applications and lead to direct interactions among the droplets. The Particle Dynamic Analyzer which utilizes a combination of Laser Doppler Anemometry and Phase Doppler Interferometry to simultaneously measure droplet velocity and diameter was used to study (1) the spray characteristics of Delavan nozzles and (2) the interaction between two sprays. The results of the tests are discussed in this paper.

  1. Comparison on Piston Bowl Shape Effect to Diesel Spray Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapit, Azwan; Azahari Razali, Mohd; Nizam Mohammed, Akmal; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Sadikin, Azmahani Binti; Norrizam Mohmad Ja'at, Md; Khalid, Amir

    2017-08-01

    Piston bowl geometry plays an important role on the combustion characteristics of diesel engine. There are various design of piston bowl in which each utilize the shape geometry to obtaining the specific required combustion characteristics. This objective of this study is to compare the effect of certain piston bowl shapes, namely Toroidal and Flat Bottom to diesel spray development. Simulation were done using ANSYS FLUENT 16.1 software Computing Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The simulation was performed on different injection pressure of 40 MPa and 100 MPa, with the ambient temperature in the combustion chamber that holding the piston is at 500K and 900K. Results showed that if the pressure and ambient temperature increases, the spray body expand outward from the spray center axis with wider spray cone angle. In addition, the geometry shape of the piston bowl influences the spray velocity distribution and the spray propagation path, indirectly effect the spray area and mass fraction distribution.

  2. Aerosol Size Distributions In Auckland.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coulson, G.; Olivares, G.; Talbot, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-28 E-ISSN 1836-5876 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : aerosol size distribution * particle number concentration * roadside Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. Earth Observatory Aerosol Optical Depth

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tiny solid and liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere are called aerosols. Windblown dust, sea salts, volcanic ash, smoke from wildfires, and pollution from...

  4. Eulerian modeling of aerosol dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederix, E.M.A.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the feasibility and applicability of the Eulerian approach in the mathematical modeling of aerosol dynamics including droplet nucleation, condensation, drift, diffusion and deposition. Both the methodology as well as a number of illustrating applications are contained, establishing the

  5. Hygroscopic organic aerosols during BRAVO?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Douglas H; Kumar, Naresh; Hand, Jenny; Day, Derek; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Collett, Jeffrey; Lee, Taehyoung; Ashbaugh, Lowell

    2003-10-01

    The hygroscopic properties of the organic fraction of aerosols are poorly understood. The ability of organic aerosols to absorb water as a function of relative humidity (RH) was examined using data collected during the 1999 Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study (BRAVO). (On average, organics accounted for 22% of fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) mass). Hourly RH exceeded 80% only 3.5% of the time and averaged 44%. BRAVO aerosol chemical composition and dry particle size distributions were used to estimate PM2.5 light scattering (Bsp) at low and high ambient RH. Liquid water growth associated with inorganic species was sufficient to account for measured Bsp for RH between 70 and 95%.

  6. Aerosol Inlet Characterization Experiment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullard, Robert L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kuang, Chongai [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Uin, Janek [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Springston, Stephen R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerosol Observation System inlet stack was characterized for particle penetration efficiency from 10 nm to 20 μm in diameter using duplicate scanning mobility particle sizers (10 nm-450 nm), ultra-high-sensitivity aerosol spectrometers (60 nm-μm), and aerodynamic particle sizers (0.5 μm-20 μm). Results show good model-measurement agreement and unit transmission efficiency of aerosols from 10 nm to 4 μm in diameter. Large uncertainties in the measured transmission efficiency exist above 4 μm due to low ambient aerosol signal in that size range.

  7. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  8. A hydrodynamic mechanism of meteor ablation. The melt-spraying model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girin, Oleksandr G.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Hydrodynamic conditions are similar in a molten meteoroid and a liquid drop in a high-speed airflow. Despite the fact that the latter is well-studied, both experimentally and theoretically, hydrodynamic instability theory has not been applied to study the fragmentation of molten meteoroids. Aims: We aim to treat quasi-continuous spraying of meteoroid melt due to hydrodynamic instability as a possible mechanism of ablation. Our objectives are to calculate the time development of particle release, the released particle sizes and their distribution by sizes, as well as the meteoroid mass loss law. Methods: We have applied gradient instability theory to model the behaviour of the meteoroid melt layer and its interaction with the atmosphere. We have assumed a spherical meteoroid and that the meteoroid has a shallow entry angle, such that the density of the air stream interacting with the meteoroid is nearly constant. Results: High-frequency spraying of the molten meteoroid is numerically simulated. The intermediate and final size distributions of released particles are calculated, as well as the meteoroid mass loss law. Fast and slow meteoroids of iron and stone compositions are modelled, resulting in significant differences in the size distribution of melt particles sprayed from each meteoroid. Less viscous iron melt produces finer particles and a denser aerosol wake than a stony one does. Conclusions: Analysis of the critical conditions for the gradient instability mechanism shows that the dynamic pressure of the air-stream at heights up to 100 km is sufficient to overcome surface tension forces and pull out liquid particles from the meteoroid melt by means of unstable disturbances. Hence, the proposed melt-spraying model is able to explain quasi-continuous mode of meteoroid fragmentation at large heights and low dynamic pressures. A closed-form solution of the meteoroid ablation problem is obtained due to the melt-spraying model usage, at the meteoroid

  9. Modeling urban and regional aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing

    Aerosol particles in Earth's atmosphere have long been associated with adverse human health effects. They also play an important role in visibility reduction and global climate change. Atmospheric formation and removal of particles are governed by a number of complex dynamic processes which make the aerosol modeling a far more challenging task than the modeling of gas-phase species. Wexler et al. (1994) identified and analyzed the atmospheric aerosol processes that govern particulate mass concentrations and estimated the relative importance of each term using typical atmospheric conditions. In this thesis I start from the general dynamic equation resulted from their analysis and develop a working and optimized aerosol model that can be incorporated into a host Eulerian air quality model to simulate particulate pollution on an urban or a regional scale. Chapter 1 presents the background of the model and highlights the important issues that need to be addressed. Chapter 2 presents the mathematical representation of the aerosol model and introduces an acid equilibrium assumption, that is, when the aerosol particles are close to acid neutral the aerosol hydrogen ion concentration can be assumed to be in equilibrium with the gas-phase acidity. This assumption greatly reduced the CPU requirement of the aerosol model and hence enable us to complete the simulation of an particulate pollution episode in a reasonable time. In Chapter 3 the aerosol model IS incorporated into the Urban Airshed Model to predict the size and composition distribution of particulate matter (PM) during the June 24-25 1987 SCAQS episode. The predicted size distribution is compared to available SCAQS measurement data. In Chapter 4 the aerosol model is further optimized and incorporated into MCNC's Multiscale Air Quality Simulation Platform (MAQSIP) to investigate the particulate pollution in eastern United States using a July 9-13 1995 episode. A cloud model is modified for the sectional

  10. The MERRA-2 Aerosol Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, A.; Randles, C. A.; Buchard, V.; Darmenov, A.; Colarco, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    MERRA-2 is NASA's latest reanalysis for the satellite era (1980-present) using GEOS-5 earth system model. This project focuses on historical analyses of the hydrological cycle on a broad range of weather and climate time scales, and includes interactive aerosols for the entire period. MERRA-2 provides several improvements over its predecessor MERRA reanalysis, including: 1) modern satellite observing systems not available with MERRA, 2) reduction in discontinuities associated with a changing observing system, and 3) reduced biases and imbalances in the hydrologic cycle. As another step towards an integrated Earth System Analysis (IESA), MERRA-2 includes for the first time aerosols in a reanalysis, improves the representation of stratospheric ozone, and better characterizes cryospheric processes. In this talk we will present results relating to the introduction of aerosols in MERRA-2. The assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) in GEOS-5 involves very careful cloud screening and homogenization of the observing system by means of a Neural Net scheme that translates MODIS and AVHRR radiances into AERONET calibrated AOD. The system also assimilates MISR and AERONET AOD observations. For the EOS period (2000-present) GEOS-5 is driven by daily biomass burning emissions derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals using the so-called QFED emissions. Historical emissions are calibrated as to minimize discontinuities the EOS/pre-EOS boundaries. MERRA-2 aerosols are also driven by historical anthropogenic and volcanic emissions. We will present a summary of our efforts to validate the MERRA-2 aerosols. The GEOS-5 assimilated aerosol fields are first validated by comparison to independent in-situ measurements. In order to assess aerosol absorption on a global scale, we perform a detailed radiative transfer calculation to simulate the UV aerosol index, comparing our results to OMI measurements. By simulating aerosol-attenuated backscatter, we use CALIPSO measurements

  11. Aerosol deposition of (Cu,Ti) substituted bismuth vanadate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exner, Jörg, E-mail: Functional.Materials@Uni-Bayreuth.de [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Fuierer, Paul [Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Moos, Ralf [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-12-31

    Bismuth vanadate, Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 11}, and related compounds with various metal (Me) substitutions, Bi{sub 4}(Me{sub x}V{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 11−δ}, show some of the highest ionic conductivities among the known solid oxide electrolytes. Films of Cu and Ti substituted bismuth vanadate were prepared by an aerosol deposition method, a spray coating process also described as room temperature impact consolidation. Resultant films, several microns in thickness, were dense with good adhesion to the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and high temperature X-ray diffraction were used to monitor the effects of temperature on the structure and microstructure of the film. The particle size remained nano-scale while microstrain decreased rapidly up to 500 °C, above which coarsening and texturing increased rapidly. Impedance measurements of films deposited on inter-digital electrodes revealed an annealing effect on the ionic conductivity, with the conductivity exceeding that of a screen printed film, and approaching that of bulk ceramic. - Highlights: • Cu and Ti doped bismuth vanadate films were prepared by aerosol deposition (AD). • Dense 3–5 μm thick films were deposited on alumina, silicon and gold electrodes. • Annealing of the AD-layer increases the conductivity by 1.5 orders of magnitude. • Effect of temperature on structure and microstructure was investigated.

  12. Optical Properties of Biological Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    biologi al aerosols, i.e. aerosols omposed of biologi al sporesand other organi ompounds, presents unique diÆ ulties both on the experimental and on...thetheoreti al side. On the experimental side, we ite, as an example, the fa t that all organi materials,both spores and organi ompounds present a...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Universita di Messina Dipartimento di Fisica Della Materia e TEcnologie Fische Avanzate, Salita Sperone, 31

  13. Recent advances in understanding secondary organic aerosol: Implications for global climate forcing: Advances in Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Manish [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Cappa, Christopher D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis California USA; Fan, Jiwen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Goldstein, Allen H. [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley California USA; Guenther, Alex B. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California USA; Jimenez, Jose L. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder Colorado USA; Kuang, Chongai [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Laskin, Alexander [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Martin, Scot T. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts USA; Ng, Nga Lee [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Georgia USA; Petaja, Tuukka [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki Finland; Pierce, Jeffrey R. [Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins Colorado USA; Rasch, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Roldin, Pontus [Department of Physics, Lund University, Lund Sweden; Seinfeld, John H. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Shilling, John [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Smith, James N. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California USA; Thornton, Joel A. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle Washington USA; Volkamer, Rainer [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder Colorado USA; Wang, Jian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Worsnop, Douglas R. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica Massachusetts USA; Zaveri, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zelenyuk, Alla [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zhang, Qi [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis California USA

    2017-06-01

    Anthropogenic emissions and land-use changes have modified atmospheric aerosol concentrations and size distributions over time. Understanding pre-industrial conditions and changes in organic aerosol due to anthropogenic activities is important because these features 1) influence estimates of aerosol radiative forcing and 2) can confound estimates of the historical response of climate to increases in greenhouse gases (e.g. the ‘climate sensitivity’). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), formed in the atmosphere by oxidation of organic gases, represents a major fraction of global submicron-sized atmospheric organic aerosol. Over the past decade, significant advances in understanding SOA properties and formation mechanisms have occurred through a combination of laboratory and field measurements, yet current climate models typically do not comprehensively include all important SOA-relevant processes. Therefore, major gaps exist at present between current measurement-based knowledge on the one hand and model implementation of organic aerosols on the other. The critical review herein summarizes some of the important developments in understanding SOA formation that could potentially have large impacts on our understanding of aerosol radiative forcing and climate. We highlight the importance of some recently discovered processes and properties that influence the growth of SOA particles to sizes relevant for clouds and radiative forcing, including: formation of extremely low-volatility organics in the gas-phase; isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) multi-phase chemistry; particle-phase oligomerization; and physical properties such as viscosity. In addition, this review also highlights some of the important processes that involve interactions between natural biogenic emissions and anthropogenic emissions, such as the role of sulfate and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) on SOA formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds. Studies that relate the observed evolution of organic aerosol

  14. Devices and methods for generating an aerosol

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-03-03

    Aerosol generators and methods of generating aerosols are provided. The aerosol can be generated at a stagnation interface between a hot, wet stream and a cold, dry stream. The aerosol has the benefit that the properties of the aerosol can be precisely controlled. The stagnation interface can be generated, for example, by the opposed flow of the hot stream and the cold stream. The aerosol generator and the aerosol generation methods are capable of producing aerosols with precise particle sizes and a narrow size distribution. The properties of the aerosol can be controlled by controlling one or more of the stream temperatures, the saturation level of the hot stream, and the flow times of the streams.

  15. Towards a more desirable dry powder inhaler formulation: large spray-dried mannitol microspheres outperform small microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaialy, Waseem; Hussain, Tariq; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To investigate, for the first time, the performance of a dry powder inhaler (DPI, Aerolizer(®)) in the case of a model drug (i.e. albuterol sulphate) formulated with spray dried mannitol carrier particles with homogeneous shape and solid-state form but different sizes. Spray dried mannitol (SDM) particles were characterized in terms of size, surface area, morphology, water content, solid-state, density and electrostatic charge by a novel approach. DPI formulations composed of SDM and albuterol sulphate (AS) were prepared and evaluated in terms of drug content homogeneity and in vitro aerosolization performance. All SDM particles generated similar fine particle fractions of AS. Formulations consisting of larger SDM particles demonstrated better drug content homogeneity, reduced amounts of drug loss and reduced oropharyngeal deposition. Comparing different SDM products demonstrated that SDM powders with relatively poorer flowability, wider size distributions and higher charge density generated DPI formulations with poorer drug content homogeneity and deposited higher amount of drug on the inhaler, mouthpiece adaptor and throat. DPI formulation total desirability increased linearly with the mean diameter of SDM. Particle shape and solid-state form of mannitol could dominate over carrier size, bulk density, flowability and charge in terms of determining the aerosolization behaviour of AS formulated with mannitol carrier, at least within the experimental protocols applied in the present study.

  16. Simulation of a turbulent spray flame using coupled PDF gas phase and spray flamelet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Hai-Wen [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Gutheil, Eva [Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Wissenschaftliches Rechnen, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    A joint mixture fraction-enthalpy probability density function (PDF) is proposed for the simulation of turbulent spray flames. The PDF transport equation is deduced and modeled. The interaction-by-exchange-with-the-mean (IEM) model that has been developed for gas-phase flows is extended to describe molecular mixing in nonreactive and reactive spray flows. The joint PDF transport equation is solved by a hybrid finite-volume and Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. Standard spray and turbulence models are used to describe the gas phase and the liquid phase. A turbulent methanol/air spray flame is simulated using the present method. Detailed chemistry is implemented through the spray flamelet model. The precalculated spray flamelet library for methanol/air combustion comprises 23 species and 168 elementary reactions. Thus, the model is capable of predicting the formation of radicals and of pollutants. Different values for the model constant C{sub {phi}} in the IEM model are tested. The numerical results for the gas velocity, the gas temperature, and the mass fraction of methanol vapor are compared with experimental data in the literature. Good agreement with experiment is obtained when C{sub {phi}}=2.0. Marginal PDFs of mixture fraction, enthalpy, and gas temperature are presented. The computed PDFs of mixture fraction are compared with the presumed standard {beta} function and modified {beta} function. The results show that the standard {beta} function fails to reproduce bimodal shapes observed in transported PDF computation, while the modified {beta} function, fits the computed PDFs very well. Moreover, joint PDFs of mixture fraction and enthalpy are presented and analyzed. The enthalpy and mixture fraction are strongly correlated. The samples that deviate from the linear correlation are due to the energy consumption of local spray evaporation. (author)

  17. Free chlorine loss during spraying of membraneless acidic electrolyzed water and its antimicrobial effect on airborne bacteria from poultry house

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction. Spray-application of membraneless acidic electrolyzed water (MLAEW is a novel technique for disinfection in livestock houses. This study investigated the loss of free chlorine (FC – the major germicidal component in MLAEW over distance during spraying, as affected by air temperature and initial FC concentration. The anti-microbial effect of MLAEW on airborne bacteria from an aviary laying-hen house was examined. materials and methods. MLAEW was prepared at two FC concentrations: app. 15 and 60 mg L -1 , and sprayed at three air temperatures (18, 25, 32 °C. The original MLAEW solution and MLAEW aerosols collected at 0, 25, and 50 cm from the spray nozzle were analyzed for FC concentrations. Bacteria were immersed into these MLAEW samples and numerated for viable count after 0.5, 2 and 5-min treatments. results. MLAEW aerosols collected at 0 cm lost 11.7–13.2% FC, compared with the original MLAEW solution. This initial loss was affected neither by the initial FC concentration (P = 0.13 nor by air temperature (P = 0.57. The rate of FC loss during travelling was 0.79–0.87 % per cm of aerosol travel distance (% cm -1 at 18 °C, 1.08–1.15 % cm -1 at 25 °C, and 1.35–1.49% cm -1 at 32 °C. This travelling loss was affected by air temperature (P = 0.02, but not by initial FC concentration (P = 0.38. Bacteria were completely inactivated at 0.5 min when treated with MLAEW samples with FC > 16.8 mg L -1 , in 2 min when FC > 13.8 mg L -1 , and in 5 min when FC > 7.2 mg L -1 . conclusion. Airborne bacteria from aviary hen house can be effectively inactivated by MLAEW with adequate FC concentration and contact time. During spraying, the anti-microbial efficacy of MLAEW aerosols decreased over distance due to FC loss which exacerbated at higher air temperatures.

  18. Aqueous beclomethasone dipropionate nasal spray in the treatment of seasonal (ragweed) rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper, E F; Willms, D G; Guyatt, G H; Ferrie, P J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the provision of appropriate medication and comprehensive information before the ragweed pollen season enables patients to manage their hay fever successfully, achieving satisfactory symptom control and quality of life, to examine patient characteristics that may predict successful symptom management and to learn which factors patients consider when making treatment choices. DESIGN: Single-group prospective cohort management study. SUBJECTS: Ninety adults sensitive to ragweed pollen recruited from those who had participated in previous clinical studies and from those who responded to advertisements in the local media. INTERVENTION: Aqueous beclomethasone dipropionate nasal spray and comprehensive information about optimal therapy (starting before the ragweed pollen season and continued throughout at a dose of 400 micrograms/d) and how it may be used less intensively with an as-required regimen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptom control, patient satisfaction, quality of life and medication use. RESULTS: More than 80% of the patients reported very good symptom control and were very satisfied. In all, 62% chose to use less than the optimal daily dose. Patients who had less than optimal symptom control used significantly less of the nasal spray than those with very good control either because they wanted to keep medication use to a minimum or because they were unable to remember to take their medication. The only significant predictor of inadequate control was an acknowledged inability to remember to take medication. Symptoms and trust in the practitioner were the primary factors perceived by the patients to determine their treatment choices. CONCLUSION: When provided with aqueous beclomethasone dipropionate nasal spray and comprehensive information on the drug and dosing, most patients are successful in managing their hay fever. PMID:1525732

  19. Exposure data for personal care products: hairspray, spray perfume, liquid foundation, shampoo, body wash, and solid antiperspirant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loretz, Linda; Api, Anne Marie; Barraj, Leila; Burdick, Joel; Davis, De Ann; Dressler, William; Gilberti, Enrico; Jarrett, Gwendolyn; Mann, Steve; Laurie Pan, Y H; Re, Thomas; Renskers, Kevin; Scrafford, Carolyn; Vater, Sally

    2006-12-01

    Reliable exposure information for cosmetic and other personal care products and ingredients is needed in order to conduct safety assessments. Essential information includes both the amount of product applied, and the frequency of use. To obtain current data, studies to assess consumer use practices were undertaken. Six widely used personal care product types were included in the studies. Five of the products were cosmetics (spray perfume, hairspray, liquid foundation, shampoo, body wash) and one product was a cosmetic/over-the-counter drug product (solid antiperspirant). Three hundred and sixty women, ages 19-65 years, who regularly use the products of interest, were recruited at 10 different geographical locations within the US. The number of recruits was chosen to ensure a minimum of three hundred completed responses per product type. Subjects were provided with a new container of the brand of product they normally use and kept diaries and recorded detailed daily usage information over a two week period. Products were weighed at the start and completion of the study in order to determine the total amount of product used. Statistical analyses of the data were conducted to derive summary distributions of use patterns. The geometric mean and median usage per application, respectively, for the six product types were: spray perfume, 0.33 g and 0.23 g; hairspray, 2.58 g and 1.83 g (aerosol); 3.64 g and 2.66 g (pump); liquid foundation, 0.54 g and 0.36 g; shampoo, 11.76 g and 9.56 g; body wash, 11.3g and 9.5 g; and solid antiperspirant, 0.61 g and 0.45 g. The mean and median usage per day for the six product types were: spray perfume, 0.53 g and 0.34 g; hairspray, 3.57 g and 2.71 g (aerosol); 5.18 g and 3.74 g (pump); liquid foundation, 0.67 g and 0.45 g; shampoo, 12.80 g and 10.75 g; body wash, 14.5 g and 12.9 g; and solid antiperspirant, 0.79 g and 0.59 g. The mean number of applications per day for spray perfume, hairspray, liquid foundation, shampoo, body wash, and

  20. Flame spray pyrolysis: An enabling technology for nanoparticles design and fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Wey Yang; Amal, Rose; Mädler, Lutz

    2010-08-01

    Combustion of appropriate precursor sprays in a flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) process is a highly promising and versatile technique for the rapid and scalable synthesis of nanostuctural materials with engineered functionalities. The technique was initially derived from the fundamentals of the well-established vapour-fed flame aerosols reactors that was widely practised for the manufacturing of simple commodity powders such as pigmentary titania, fumed silica, alumina, and even optical fibers. In the last 10 years however, FSP knowledge and technology was developed substantially and a wide range of new and complex products have been synthesised, attracting major industries in a diverse field of applications. Key innovations in FSP reactor engineering and precursor chemistry have enabled flexible designs of nanostructured loosely-agglomerated powders and particulate films of pure or mixed oxides and even pure metals and alloys. Unique material morphologies such as core-shell structures and nanorods are possible using this essentially one step and continuous FSP process. Finally, research challenges are discussed and an outlook on the next generation of engineered combustion-made materials is given.

  1. Concentration Effects and Ion Properties Controlling the Fractionation of Halides during Aerosol Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Athalye, Richa R.; Rodriguez, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    During the aerosolization process at the sea surface, halides are incorporated into aerosol droplets, where they may play an important role in tropospheric ozone chemistry. Although this process may significantly contribute to the formation of reactive gas phase molecular halogens, little is known about the environmental factors that control how halides selectively accumulate at the air-water interface. In this study, the production of sea spray aerosol is simulated using electrospray ionization (ESI) of 100 nM equimolar solutions of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO2, NaNO3, NaClO4, and NaIO4. The microdroplets generated are analyzed by mass spectrometry to study the comparative enrichment of anions (f (Isub x-)) and their correlation with ion properties. Although no correlation exists between f (sub x-) and the limiting equivalent ionic conductivity, the correlation coefficient of the linear fit with the size of the anions R(sub x-), dehydration free-energy ?Gdehyd, and polarizability alpha, follows the order: (R(sub x-)(exp -2)) > (R(sub x-)(exp -1)) >(R(sub x-) > delta G(sub dehyd) > alpha. The same pure physical process is observed in H2O and D2O. The factor f (sub x-) does not change with pH (6.8-8.6), counterion (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) substitution effects, or solvent polarity changes in methanol - and ethanol-water mixtures (0 water interface of equimolar solutions, our results of seawater mimic samples agree with a model in which the interfacial composition is increasingly enriched in I- < Br- < Cl- over the oceanic boundary layer due to concentration effects in sea spray aerosol formation.

  2. Gas/Aerosol partitioning: a simplified method for global modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metzger, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is the development of a simplified method to routinely calculate gas/aerosol partitioning of multicomponent aerosols and aerosol associated water within global atmospheric chemistry and climate models. Atmospheric aerosols are usually multicomponent mixtures,

  3. Measurements and determination of the marine coarse aerosol fluxes in near marine boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Strzalkowska, Agata; Pakszys, Paulina; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    Studies of production and transport of aerosol over the sea are very important for many areas of knowledge. Marine aerosols emitted from the sea surface help to clean the boundary layer from other aerosol particles. The emitted droplets do not dry out in the highly humid surface layer air and because of their sizes most of them are deposited quickly at the sea surface. Therefore, marine aerosols have many features of rain i.e. the deposition in the marine boundary layer in high wind events is controlled not only by the "dry" processes but also by the "wet" scavenging. During a number of cruises conducted on board of r/v Oceania between 2008 and 2012 we collected much data which were further used to calculate sea salt source function over the Baltic Sea. Measurements were carried out using a gradient method. For this method we used a Laser Particle Counter (PMS model CSASP-100_HV) placed on one of the masts of the boat. Measurements were performed at five different levels above the sea level: 8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 meters. The vertical aerosol concentration gradient was obtained from a minimum of 4 measurement series. Thus each result consists of a 1 hour series with the average sampling time at each elevation equaling to 8 minutes. Based on the averaged vertical concentration, and using the Monin Obukhov theory, profiles of vertical sea spray fluxes in the near water layer were calculated. Using the results from those experiments the sea spray emission fluxes have been calculated for all particles of sizes at ranges from 0.5 μm to 8 μm, as well as for particles of sizes from fifteen channels of 0.5 μm width. Using these fluxes we calculated the Sea Salt Generation Function (SSGF) over the Baltic Sea. This function provides information on the emission of particles of different sizes, depending on environmental parameters. The emission of sea spray depends on the magnitude of energy lost by the wind waves in the process of their collapse. The support for this study

  4. Durum wheat seedlings in saline conditions: Salt spray versus root-zone salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Carmelina; Bottega, Stefania

    2016-02-01

    Salinity is an increasingly serious problem with a strong negative impact on plant productivity. Though many studies have been made on salt stress induced by high NaCl concentrations in the root-zone, few data concern the response of plants to saline aerosol, one of the main constraints in coastal areas. In order to study more in depth wheat salinity tolerance and to evaluate damage and antioxidant response induced by various modes of salt application, seedlings of Triticum turgidum ssp. durum, cv. Cappelli were treated for 2 and 7 days with salt in the root-zone (0, 50 and 200 mM NaCl) or with salt spray (400 mM NaCl + 0 or 200 mM NaCl in the root-zone). Seedlings accumulated Na+ in their leaves and therefore part of their ability to tolerate high salinity seems to be due to Na+ leaf tissue tolerance. Durum wheat, confirmed as a partially tolerant plant, shows a higher damage under airborne salinity, when both an increase in TBA-reactive material (indicative of lipid peroxidation) and a decrease in root growth were recorded. A different antioxidant response was activated, depending on the type of salt supply. Salt treatment induced a depletion of the reducing power of both ascorbate and glutathione while the highest contents of proline were detected under salt spray conditions. In the short term catalase and ascorbate peroxidase co-operated with glutathione peroxidase in the scavenging of hydrogen peroxide, in particular in salt spray-treated plants. From our data, the durum wheat cultivar Cappelli seems to be sensitive to airborne salinity.

  5. Are anthropogenic aerosols affecting rainfall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkermann, Wolfgang; Hacker, Jorg

    2013-04-01

    Modification of cloud microphysics by anthropogenic aerosols is well known since several decades. Whether the underlying processes leads to changes in precipitation is by far less confirmed. Several different factors affect the production of rain in a way that a causality between increasing aerosol load in the atmosphere and a change of annual rainfall is very difficult to confirm. What would be expected as an effect of additional cloud condensation nuclei is a shift in the spatial and temporal rainfall distribution towards a lower number of days with low rain intensity and more frequent or more vigorous single events. In fact such a shift has been observed in several locations worldwide and has been suggested to be caused by increasing aerosol load, however, without further specification of the nature and number of the aerosols involved. Measurements of aerosols which might be important for cloud properties are extremely sparse and no long term monitoring data sets are available up to now. The problem of missing long term aerosol data that could be compared to available long term meteorological data sets can possibly be resolved in certain areas where well characterized large anthropogenic aerosol sources were installed in otherwise pristine areas without significant changes in land use over several decades. We investigated aerosol sources and current aerosol number, size and spatial distributions with airborne measurements in the planetary boundary layer over two regions in Australia that are reported to suffer from extensive drought despite the fact that local to regional scale water vapor in the atmosphere is slowly and constantly increasing. Such an increase of the total water in the planetary boundary layer would imply also an increase in annual precipitation as observed in many other locations elsewhere. The observed decline of rainfall in these areas thus requires a local to regional scale physical process modifying cloud properties in a way that rain

  6. Preparation of theophylline inhalable microcomposite particles by wet milling and spray drying: The influence of mannitol as a co-milling agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamatari, Maria; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Bloxham, Mark; Taylor, Kevin M G; Buckton, Graham

    2016-11-30

    Inhalable theophylline particles with various amounts of mannitol were prepared by combining wet milling in isopropanol followed by spray drying. The effect of mannitol as a co-milling agent on the micromeritic properties, solid state and aerosol performance of the engineered particles was investigated. Crystal morphology modelling and geometric lattice matching calculations were employed to gain insight into the intermolecular interactions that may influence the mechanical properties of theophylline and mannitol. The addition of mannitol facilitated the size reduction of the needle-like crystals of theophylline and also their assembly in microcomposites by forming a porous structure of mannitol nanocrystals wherein theophylline particles are embedded. The microcomposites were found to be in the same crystalline state as the starting material(s) ensuring their long-term physical stability upon storage. Incorporation of mannitol resulted in microcomposite particles with smaller size, more spherical shape and increased porosity. The aerosol performance of the microcomposites was markedly enhanced compared to the spray-dried suspension of theophylline wet milled without mannitol. Overall, wet co-milling with mannitol in an organic solvent followed by spray drying may be used as a formulation approach for producing respirable particles of water-soluble drugs or drugs that are prone to crystal transformation in an aqueous environment (i.e. formation of hydrates). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R. A.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D. B.; Baidar, S.; Banta, R. M.; Barnard, J. C.; Beranek, J.; Berg, L. K.; Brechtel, F.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, J. F.; Cairns, B.; Cappa, C. D.; Chand, D.; China, S.; Comstock, J. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Easter, R. C.; Erickson, M. H.; Fast, J. D.; Floerchinger, C.; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, E.; Gaffney, J. S.; Gilles, M. K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, W. I.; Gyawali, M.; Hair, J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, S.; Hiranuma, N.; Hostetler, C.; Hubbe, J. M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, B. T.; Kassianov, E. I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, C.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, C.; Kubátová, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, A.; Laulainen, N.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mei, F.; Moffet, R. C.; Nelson, D.; Obland, M. D.; Oetjen, H.; Onasch, T. B.; Ortega, I.; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, M.; Prather, K. A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, R. R.; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, A.; Senff, C. J.; Senum, G.; Setyan, A.; Shilling, J. E.; Shrivastava, M.; Song, C.; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, K.; Tomlinson, J.; Volkamer, R.; Wallace, H. W.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X. -Y.; Zelenyuk, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites – one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area – were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and “aged” urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial findings from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of

  8. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

    2012-08-22

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of

  9. Global Distribution of Dust, Smoke, Volcanic Ash, and Pollutant Aerosols Seen from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jay R.; Hsu, Christina; Krotkov, Nickolay; Torres, Omar

    1998-01-01

    New technique for observing aerosols from space, using ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, have been developed during the past three years. The chief benefit from observing aerosols in the UV is that they are easily visible over both land and water. While there is presently more than one satellite that can observe aerosols in the UV, only Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) has a long-term record (since 1979) and adequate spatial resolutions (50 to 100 km) to observe the seasonal and interannual variations, and to locate some of the land sources of dust, smoke, volcanic ash and sulfate pollutants. The data has been assembled into daily images of the atmospheric aerosol loading in terms of optical depth and UV transmittance. For the major sources of aerosols, it is common for at least 50% of the total UV to be absorbed underneath aerosol plumes. This is particularly true for the spectacular smoke plumes originating from the recent Indonesian and Mexican fires, as well as under the huge African dust plumes. The sulfate pollutants are mostly present in the Northern Hemisphere and are associated with regions of high industrial activity. The location and seasonal dependence of these aerosol plumes over Europe and North America will be contrasted with the relatively clean Southern Hemisphere. Because of the success of this technique, it has formed the basis for a new generation of space-borne aerosol detection instruments. These new instruments combine the UV observations with the more traditional visible-wavelength data to obtain a more comprehensive characterization of aerosols that is possible with either UV or visible techniques by themselves.

  10. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cahill, J. F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, C. D.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Cziczo, D. J.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail Dmitrievic; hide

    2012-01-01

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climaterelated properties in freshly polluted and "aged" urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: (a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, (b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, (c) an overview of key observations and initial findings from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and (d) a roadmap of planned data

  11. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) - ... Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  12. Chemical properties and morphology of Marine Aerosol in the Mediterranean atmosphere: a mesocosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Sellegri, Karine; Charrière, Bruno; Sempéré, Richard; Mas, Sébastien; Marchand, Nicolas; George, Christian; Même, Aurèlie; R'mili, Badr; Delmont, Anne; Schwier, Allison; Rose, Clémence; Colomb, Aurèlie; Pey, Jorge; Langley Dewitt, Helen

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary Sea Salt Aerosol formed at the sea surface from background level of the aerosol. An alternative tool to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment is provided by the mesocosms, which represent an important link between field studies and laboratory experiments. The sea-air transfer of particles and gases was investigated in relation to water chemical composition and biological activity during a mesocosm experiment within the SAM project (Sources of marine Aerosol in the Mediterranean) at the Oceanographic and Marine Station STARESO in Western Corsica (May 2013). Three 2 m mesocosms were filled with screened (virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses. Both dissolved and gaseous VOCs were also analyzed. In addition, few liters of seawater from each mesocosm were daily and immediately collected and transferred to a bubble-bursting apparatus to simulate nascent sea spray aerosol. On-line chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction was performed by a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne). Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for molecular identification of the organic fraction.

  13. Pesticide aerosol characteristics in the vicinity of an agricultural vehicle cab during application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bémer, Denis; Fismes, Joelle; Subra, Isabelle; Blachère, Veronique; Protois, Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Pesticide spraying for crop protection leads to the formation of a mist of droplets, part of which is dispersed into the atmosphere. The characteristics of this aerosol, namely its particle size distribution and concentration, were measured during five campaigns involving cereal crop growing, wine grape culture, and orcharding. The measurement method incorporated a tracer product (fluorescein) with the treatment product; the pesticide aerosol concentration was then deduced from the tracer concentration. This method was validated by comparing the pesticide concentration determined by tracing with the concentration determined by direct measurement of the active substance of the pesticide. Concentration was measured using sampling filters, and particle size distribution was measured using cascade impactors. Instruments were mounted on an agricultural vehicle cab to optimize aerosol characterization, and then the cab's confinement efficiency was determined. Aerosols analyzed were fine, featuring mass median diameters between 4 microm and 15 microm; they are therefore highly dispersive. Their concentration is sufficiently high to justify operator protection by an efficient, filtered-air, pressurized cab, especially in wine grape culture and orcharding, which are the sectors where the highest pesticide transfers have been observed.

  14. An iterative correction approach used to retrieve the refractive index of squid pigment aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinneen, Sean R.; Deravi, Leila F.; Greenslade, Margaret E.

    2018-03-01

    Pigments localized within cephalopod chromatophores are important for dermal coloration. When isolated and used as materials outside of the animal, the pigments can be processed as aerosols, illustrating a potential application for spray-on-coatings. The optical features of the pigment aerosols are difficult to analyze and require a method to correct for the particle charging and solvent effects accumulated during the aerosolizing process. We describe a method to account for these effects using an innovative iterative approach tied to retrieved refractive index (RI) values. RI retrievals were obtained via the best fit between the corrected, experimentally observed extinction efficiencies compared to those calculated by Mie theory for a specific RI at selected sizes. In addition to these retrievals, the impact of solvent on the particles’ optical properties was also examined via the Maxwell–Garnett mixing rule. Ultimately, we obtained a pigment RI with a real portion (n) of 1.66 (±0.05) representing a lower limit and an imaginary portion (k) of 0.13 (±0.08)i representing an upper limit for the generated aerosols. Combined, this approach advances techniques used to retrieve RI values that benefits both atmospheric chemistry and bio-inspired materials.

  15. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Bradley K; Hoffmann, W Clint

    2016-09-16

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected.

  16. Study of Multi-Function Micro-Plasma Spraying Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liuying; Wang, Hangong; Hua, Shaochun; Cao, Xiaoping

    2007-02-01

    A multi-functional micro-arc plasma spraying system was developed according to aerodynamics and plasma spray theory. The soft switch IGBT (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) invert technique, micro-computer control technique, convergent-divergent nozzle structure and axial powder feeding techniques have been adopted in the design of the micro-arc plasma spraying system. It is not only characterized by a small volume, a light weight, highly accurate control, high deposition efficiency and high reliability, but also has multi-functions in plasma spraying, welding and quenching. The experimental results showed that the system can produce a supersonic flame at a low power, spray Al2O3 particles at an average speed up to 430 m/s, and make nanostructured AT13 coatings with an average bonding strength of 42.7 MPa. Compared to conventional 9M plasma spraying with a higher power, the coatings with almost the same properties as those by conventional plasma spray can be deposited by multi-functional micro-arc plasma spraying with a lower power plasma arc due to an improved power supply design, spray gun structure and powder feeding method. Moreover, this system is suitable for working with thin parts and undertaking on site repairs, and as a result, the application of plasma spraying will be greatly extended.

  17. Method and apparatus for spraying molten materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.; Nelson, G.L.; Lee, Y.M.

    1996-06-25

    A metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments. 12 figs.

  18. Sulphuric acid as a weed spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslander, A.

    1927-06-01

    Field mustard (Brassica Arvensis) and oats (Avena Sativa) were grown in pot cultures in a greenhouse. Soil moisture was kept at 15, 30, and 45 per cent of the moisture-holding capacity of the soil. The plants were sprayed with solutions of iron sulfate varying in strength from 5 to 15 per cent and with solutions of sulfuric acid varying in strength from 1 to 2 per cent. Sprayed plants were exposed to three conditions of relative humidity: 30, 60, and 100 per cent. Iron sulfate was more effective as a herbicide under conditions of high humidity. Sulfuric acid was more effective under conditions of low humidity. Iron sulfate is more effective at lower temperatures, while sulfuric acid is more effective at higher temperatures.

  19. Pharmaceutical Particle Engineering via Spray Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This review covers recent developments in the area of particle engineering via spray drying. The last decade has seen a shift from empirical formulation efforts to an engineering approach based on a better understanding of particle formation in the spray drying process. Microparticles with nanoscale substructures can now be designed and their functionality has contributed significantly to stability and efficacy of the particulate dosage form. The review provides concepts and a theoretical framework for particle design calculations. It reviews experimental research into parameters that influence particle formation. A classification based on dimensionless numbers is presented that can be used to estimate how excipient properties in combination with process parameters influence the morphology of the engineered particles. A wide range of pharmaceutical application examples—low density particles, composite particles, microencapsulation, and glass stabilization—is discussed, with specific emphasis on the underlying particle formation mechanisms and design concepts. PMID:18040761

  20. Gas entrainment by one single French PWR spray, SARNET-2 spray benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malet, J., E-mail: jeanne.malet@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Saclay (France); Mimouni, S., E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr [Electricité de France, EDF MF2E, Chatou (France); Manzini, G., E-mail: giovanni.manzini@rse-web.it [RSE, Milano (Italy); Xiao, J., E-mail: jianjun.xiao@kit.edu [IKET, KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Vyskocil, L., E-mail: vyl@ujv.cz [UJV Rez (Czech Republic); Siccama, N.B., E-mail: siccama@nrg.eu [NRG, Safety and Power (Netherlands); Huhtanen, R., E-mail: risto.huhtanen@vtt.fi [VTT, PO Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents a benchmark performed in the frame of the SARNET-2 EU project. • It concerns momentum transfer between a PWR spray and the surrounding gas. • The entrained gas velocities can vary up to 100% from one code to another. • Simplified boundary conditions for sprays are generally used by the code users. • It is shown how these simplified conditions impact the gas entrainment. - Abstract: This paper presents a benchmark performed in the frame of the SARNET-2 EU project, dealing with momentum transfer between a real-scale PWR spray and the surrounding gas. It presents a description of the IRSN tests on the CALIST facility, the participating codes (8 contributions), code-experiment and code-to-code comparisons. It is found that droplet velocities are almost well calculated one meter below the spray nozzle, even if the spread of the spray is not recovered and the values of the entrained gas velocity vary up to 100% from one code to another. Concerning sensitivity analysis, several ‘simplifications’ have been made by the contributors, especially based on the boundary conditions applied at the location where droplets are injected. It is shown here that such simplifications influence droplet and entrained gas characteristics. The next step will be to translate these conclusions in terms of variables representative of interesting parameters for nuclear safety.

  1. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  2. Aerosols physical properties at Hada Al Sham, western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihavainen, H.; Alghamdi, M. A.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Hussein, T.; Aaltonen, V.; Abdelmaksoud, A. S.; Al-Jeelani, H.; Almazroui, M.; Almehmadi, F. M.; Al Zawad, F. M.; Hakala, J.; Khoder, M.; Neitola, K.; Petäjä, T.; Shabbaj, I. I.; Hämeri, K.

    2016-06-01

    This is the first time to clearly derive the comprehensive physical properties of aerosols at a rural background area in Saudi Arabia. Aerosol measurements station was established at a rural background area in the Western Saudi Arabia to study the aerosol properties. This study gives overview of the aerosol physical properties (PM10, PM2.5, black carbon and total number concentration) over the measurement period from November 2012 to February 2015. The average PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were 95 ± 78 μg m-3 (mean ± STD, at ambient conditions) and 33 ± 68 μg m-3 (at ambient conditions), respectively. As expected PM10 concentration was dominated by coarse mode particles (PM10-PM2.5), most probably desert dust. Especially from February to June the coarse mode concentrations were high because of dust storm season. Aerosol mass concentrations had clear diurnal cycle. Lower values were observed around noon. This behavior is caused by wind direction and speed, during night time very calm easterly winds are dominating whereas during daytime the stronger westerly winds are dominating (sea breeze). During the day time the boundary layer is evolving, causing enhanced mixing and dilution leading to lower concentration. PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were comparable to values measured at close by city of Jeddah. Black carbon concentration was about 2% and 6% of PM10 and PM2.5 mass, respectively. Total number concentration was dominated by frequent new particle formation and particle growth events. The typical diurnal cycle in particle total number concentration was clearly different from PM10 and PM2.5.

  3. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  4. Rugged Preheaters For Vacuum Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, William H.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Sander, Lewis D.; Power, Christopher A.; Sander, Heather L.; Nguyen, Dalton D.

    1994-01-01

    Electric preheater units built to ensure large workpieces to be coated with metals by vacuum plasma spraying heated uniformly to requisite high temperatures by time plasma torch arrives. Units similar to electrical-resistance ribbon heaters in toasters and in some small portable electric "space" heaters. Nichrome resistance-heating ribbons wrapped around ceramic insulating spools on rings and on plates. Round workpiece placed in middle of ring preheater. Plate preheaters stacked as needed near workpiece.

  5. AERONET - Aerosol Climatology From Megalopolis Aerosol Source Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Dubovik, O.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Artaxo, P.; Leyva, A.; Lu, D.; Sano, I.; Singh, R. P.; Quel, E.; Tanre, D.; Zibordi, G.

    2002-05-01

    AERONET is a globally distributed network of ~170 identical sun and sky scanning spectral radiometers expanded by federation with collaborating investigators that contribute to the AERONET public domain data-base. We will detail the current distribution and plans for expanded collaboration. Recent products available through the project database are important for assessment of human health as well as climate forcing issues. We will illustrate a summary of aerosol optical properties measured in Indian, East Asian, North American, South American and European megalopolis source regions. We will present monthly mean fine and coarse particle aerosol optical depth, particle size distributions and single scattering albedos. Each region represents a population in excess of 10 million inhabitants within a 200 km radius of the observation site that dictate the anthropogenic aerosol sources contributing to significantly diverse aerosol properties as a function of economic development and seasonally dependent meteorological processes. The diversity of the measured optical properties of urban aerosols illustrates the need for long-term regional monitoring that contribute to comparative assessments for health and climate change investigations.

  6. Ground-based aerosol climatology of China: aerosol optical depths from the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network 2002-2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Che, H; Zhang, X.-Y; Xia, X; Goloub, P; Holben, B; Zhao, H; Wang, Y; Zhang, X.-C; Wang, H; Blarel, L; Damiri, B; Zhang, R; Deng, X; Ma, Y; Wang, T; Geng, F; Qi, B; Zhu, J; Yu, J; Chen, Q; Shi, G

    2015-01-01

      Long-term measurements of aerosol optical depths (AODs) at 440 nm and Ångström exponents (AE) between 440 and 870 nm made for CARSNET were compiled into a climatology of aerosol optical properties for China...

  7. Sunburn Protection by Sunscreen Sprays at Beach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ou-Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of sunscreen is evaluated by SPF values, which are quantitatively determined in laboratories on the backs of human subjects according to a standardized procedure. However, SPF cannot be directly translated to sunburn protection under real-life situations because actual efficacy depends on various factors related to human behaviors and environmental conditions. This study clinically evaluated the efficacy of two sunscreen sprays (SPF 30 and SPF 70 under natural sunlight exposure on healthy subjects at the beach. Methods: Twenty subjects were divided into two cells for the two sunscreen sprays (SPF 70 and SPF 30 in a single-center, actual usage test. The primary endpoint of the study was sunburn protection on the dorsal arms and the secondary endpoint was protection on the face and neck. Subjects stayed at the beach for 4 h after application of the sunscreens with normal beach activities. Subjects’ behavior at the beach, the amounts of sunscreen applied and reapplied, and environmental conditions were all recorded. Results: There was no significant sunburn for a majority of the subjects in either cell. However, neither sunscreen completely blocked the sunburn, especially the face/neck area. We found that the SPF 70 sunscreen was more effective than the SPF 30 sunscreen. Conclusion: Modern sunscreen sprays, applied liberally, are effective in providing sunburn protection for the body in a beach setting.

  8. High Speed Imaging of Diesel Fuel Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ja'kira; Bittle, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    Fuel sprays primarily serve as methods for fuel distribution, fuel/air mixing, and atomization. In this research, a constant pressure flow rig vessel is being tested at various pressures and temperatures using n-heptane. The experiment requires two imaging techniques: color Schlieren and Mie-scatter. Schlieren captures density gradients in a spray which includes both liquid and vapor phases while Mie-scatter is only sensitive to the liquid phase of the fuel spray. Essentially, studies are mainly focused on extracting the liquid boundary from the Schlieren to possibly eliminate the need for acquiring the Mie-Scatter technique. Four test conditions (combination of low and high pressure and temperatures) are used in the application to attempt to find the liquid boundary independent of the Mie-scatter technique. In this pursuit the following methods were used: a color threshold, a value threshold, and the time variation in color. All methods provided some indication of the liquid region but none were able to capture the full liquid boundary as obtained by the Mie-scatter results. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  9. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment for Spray Irrigation of Dairy Manure Based on an Empirical Fate and Transport Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tucker R; Spencer, Susan K; Stokdyk, Joel P; Kieke, Burney A; Larson, Rebecca A; Firnstahl, Aaron D; Rule, Ana M; Borchardt, Mark A

    2017-08-16

    Spray irrigation for land-applying livestock manure is increasing in the United States as farms become larger and economies of scale make manure irrigation affordable. Human health risks from exposure to zoonotic pathogens aerosolized during manure irrigation are not well understood. We aimed to a) estimate human health risks due to aerosolized zoonotic pathogens downwind of spray-irrigated dairy manure; and b) determine which factors (e.g., distance, weather conditions) have the greatest influence on risk estimates. We sampled downwind air concentrations of manure-borne fecal indicators and zoonotic pathogens during 21 full-scale dairy manure irrigation events at three farms. We fit these data to hierarchical empirical models and used model outputs in a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate risk [probability of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI)] for individuals exposed to spray-irrigated dairy manure containing Campylobacter jejuni, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), or Salmonella spp. Median risk estimates from Monte Carlo simulations ranged from 10-5 to 10-2 and decreased with distance from the source. Risk estimates for Salmonella or EHEC-related AGI were most sensitive to the assumed level of pathogen prevalence in dairy manure, while risk estimates for C. jejuni were not sensitive to any single variable. Airborne microbe concentrations were negatively associated with distance and positively associated with wind speed, both of which were retained in models as a significant predictor more often than relative humidity, solar irradiation, or temperature. Our model-based estimates suggest that reducing pathogen prevalence and concentration in source manure would reduce the risk of AGI from exposure to manure irrigation, and that increasing the distance from irrigated manure (i.e., setbacks) and limiting irrigation to times of low wind speed may also reduce risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP283.

  10. Quantitative microbial risk assessment for spray irrigation of dairy manure based on an empirical fate and transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tucker R; Spencer, Susan K.; Stokdyk, Joel; Kieke, Burney A; Larson, Rebecca A; Firnstahl, Aaron; Rule, Ana M; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spray irrigation for land-applying livestock manure is increasing in the United States as farms become larger and economies of scale make manure irrigation affordable. Human health risks from exposure to zoonotic pathogens aerosolized during manure irrigation are not well understood. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to a) estimate human health risks due to aerosolized zoonotic pathogens downwind of spray-irrigated dairy manure; and b) determine which factors (e.g., distance, weather conditions) have the greatest influence on risk estimates. METHODS: We sampled downwind air concentrations of manure-borne fecal indicators and zoonotic pathogens during 21 full-scale dairy manure irri- gation events at three farms. We fit these data to hierarchical empirical models and used model outputs in a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to estimate risk [probability of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI)] for individuals exposed to spray-irrigated dairy manure containing Campylobacter jejuni, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), or Salmonella spp. RESULTS: Median risk estimates from Monte Carlo simulations ranged from 10−5 to 10−2 and decreased with distance from the source. Risk estimates for Salmonella or EHEC-related AGI were most sensitive to the assumed level of pathogen prevalence in dairy manure, while risk estimates for C. jejuni were not sensitive to any single variable. Airborne microbe concentrations were negatively associated with distance and positively associated with wind speed, both of which were retained in models as a significant predictor more often than relative humidity, solar irradiation, or temperature. CONCLUSIONS: Our model-based estimates suggest that reducing pathogen prevalence and concentration in source manure would reduce the risk of AGI from exposure to manure irrigation, and that increasing the distance from irrigated manure (i.e., setbacks) and limiting irrigation to times of low wind speed may also reduce risk.

  11. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles cloud formation and potential

  12. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll-a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C showed higher values (from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios tended to increase with increasing local wind speeds, indicating that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray contribute significantly to the marine organic

  13. Classifying aerosol type using in situ surface spectral aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Lauren; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick; Jefferson, Anne; Sharma, Sangeeta; Kim, Jeong Eun; Sherman, James P.; Sorribas, Mar; Kalapov, Ivo; Arsov, Todor; Angelov, Christo; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Labuschagne, Casper; Kim, Sang-Woo; Hoffer, András; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chia, Hao-Ping; Bergin, Michael; Sun, Junying; Liu, Peng; Wu, Hao

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of aerosol size and composition is important for determining radiative forcing effects of aerosols, identifying aerosol sources and improving aerosol satellite retrieval algorithms. The ability to extrapolate aerosol size and composition, or type, from intensive aerosol optical properties can help expand the current knowledge of spatiotemporal variability in aerosol type globally, particularly where chemical composition measurements do not exist concurrently with optical property measurements. This study uses medians of the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE), absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from 24 stations within the NOAA/ESRL Federated Aerosol Monitoring Network to infer aerosol type using previously published aerosol classification schemes.Three methods are implemented to obtain a best estimate of dominant aerosol type at each station using aerosol optical properties. The first method plots station medians into an AAE vs. SAE plot space, so that a unique combination of intensive properties corresponds with an aerosol type. The second typing method expands on the first by introducing a multivariate cluster analysis, which aims to group stations with similar optical characteristics and thus similar dominant aerosol type. The third and final classification method pairs 3-day backward air mass trajectories with median aerosol optical properties to explore the relationship between trajectory origin (proxy for likely aerosol type) and aerosol intensive parameters, while allowing for multiple dominant aerosol types at each station.The three aerosol classification methods have some common, and thus robust, results. In general, estimating dominant aerosol type using optical properties is best suited for site locations with a stable and homogenous aerosol population, particularly continental polluted (carbonaceous aerosol), marine polluted (carbonaceous aerosol mixed with sea salt) and continental dust/biomass sites

  14. Classifying aerosol type using in situ surface spectral aerosol optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Schmeisser

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of aerosol size and composition is important for determining radiative forcing effects of aerosols, identifying aerosol sources and improving aerosol satellite retrieval algorithms. The ability to extrapolate aerosol size and composition, or type, from intensive aerosol optical properties can help expand the current knowledge of spatiotemporal variability in aerosol type globally, particularly where chemical composition measurements do not exist concurrently with optical property measurements. This study uses medians of the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE, absorption Ångström exponent (AAE and single scattering albedo (SSA from 24 stations within the NOAA/ESRL Federated Aerosol Monitoring Network to infer aerosol type using previously published aerosol classification schemes.Three methods are implemented to obtain a best estimate of dominant aerosol type at each station using aerosol optical properties. The first method plots station medians into an AAE vs. SAE plot space, so that a unique combination of intensive properties corresponds with an aerosol type. The second typing method expands on the first by introducing a multivariate cluster analysis, which aims to group stations with similar optical characteristics and thus similar dominant aerosol type. The third and final classification method pairs 3-day backward air mass trajectories with median aerosol optical properties to explore the relationship between trajectory origin (proxy for likely aerosol type and aerosol intensive parameters, while allowing for multiple dominant aerosol types at each station.The three aerosol classification methods have some common, and thus robust, results. In general, estimating dominant aerosol type using optical properties is best suited for site locations with a stable and homogenous aerosol population, particularly continental polluted (carbonaceous aerosol, marine polluted (carbonaceous aerosol mixed with sea salt and continental dust

  15. Investigating primary marine aerosol properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Stephanie Michelle; Butcher, Andrew Charles; Rosenørn, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Sea spray particles ejected as a result of bubbles bursting from artificial seawater containing salt and organic matter in a stainless steel tank were sampled for size distribution, morphology, and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. Bubbles were generated either by aeration through a diff...

  16. Aerosol optical properties and radiative effects over Manora Peak in the Himalayan foothills: seasonal variability and role of transported aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A K; Ram, K; Singh, Sachchidanand; Kumar, Sanjeev; Tiwari, S

    2015-01-01

    The higher altitude regions of Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau are influenced by the dust and black carbon (BC) aerosols from the emissions and long-range transport from the adjoining areas. In this study, we present impacts of advection of polluted air masses of natural and anthropogenic emissions, on aerosol optical and radiative properties at Manora Peak (~2000 m amsl) in central Himalaya over a period of more than two years (February 2006-May 2008). We used the most updated and comprehensive data of chemical and optical properties available in one of the most climatically sensitive region, the Himalaya, to estimate atmospheric radiative forcing and heating rate. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) was found to vary from 0.04 to 0.45 with significantly higher values in summer mainly due to an increase in mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols due to transport. In contrast, single scattering albedo (SSA) varied from 0.74 to 0.88 with relatively lower values during summer, suggesting an increase in absorbing BC and mineral dust aerosols. As a result, a large positive atmospheric radiative forcing (about 28 ± 5 Wm(-2)) and high values of corresponding heating rate (0.80 ± 0.14 Kday(-1)) has been found during summer. During the entire observation period, radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere varied from -2 to +14 Wm(-2) and from -3 to -50 Wm(-2) at the surface whereas atmospheric forcing was in the range of 3 to 65 Wm(-2) resulting in a heating rate of 0.1-1.8 Kday(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ternary ceramic thermal spraying powder and method of manufacturing thermal sprayed coating using said powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogli, Evelina; Sherman, Andrew J.; Glasgow, Curtis P.

    2018-02-06

    The invention describes a method for producing ternary and binary ceramic powders and their thermal spraying capable of manufacturing thermal sprayed coatings with superior properties. Powder contain at least 30% by weight ternary ceramic, at least 20% by weight binary molybdenum borides, at least one of the binary borides of Cr, Fe, Ni, W and Co and a maximum of 10% by weight of nano and submicro-sized boron nitride. The primary crystal phase of the manufactured thermal sprayed coatings from these powders is a ternary ceramic, while the secondary phases are binary ceramics. The coatings have extremely high resistance against corrosion of molten metal, extremely thermal shock resistance and superior tribological properties at low and at high temperatures.

  18. Characterization of flame-sprayed and plasma-sprayed pure metallic and alloyed coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanova, I. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Dept. of Solid State Phys.; Forcey, K.S. [CEC, Joint Research Centre, Ispra Site, 21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Gergov, B. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Dept. of Solid State Phys.; Bojinov, V. [Department of Inorganic Chemical Technology, The University of Sofia, Blvd. J. Bouchier 1, 1126 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-05-01

    The composition, structure and properties of thermally sprayed coatings were investigated by a number of methods, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The Vickers hardness and porosity were also investigated. The coatings were plasma-sprayed pure molybdenum, and flame-sprayed copper and nickel alloys. It was found that the alloyed coatings had a different chemical composition than the powders they had been produced from. In addition, all the coatings exhibited a fibre texture which complicated the X-ray method for estimation of residual stresses. However, for the pure molybdenum coating, it was possible to evaluate this parameter, taking into account the effects of the measured porosity and crystallographical anisotropy on the Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio. ((orig.))

  19. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Lin, J.; Ni, R.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RFof aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissionsper unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size.South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions,its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency.The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is loweredbyasmall per capita GDP.Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The resulting

  20. Performance aspects of de Laval spray-forming nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    Spray forming is a multiphase fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is directed onto a suitably shaped substrate or pattern to produce a coherent, near-net-shape deposit The technology can simplify materials processing where simultaneously improving product quality. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials using de Laval nozzles. Here we briefly describe the flow field characterization and atomization behavior of liquid metals in linear de Laval nozzles, and illustrate their versatility by summarizing results from three spray-forming programs. In one program, low-carbon steel strip >0.75 mm was produced. In another program, polymer membranes [approximately] 5 [mu]m thick were spray formed. Finally, recent results in spray forming molds, dies, and related tooling for rapid prototyping are described.

  1. Performance aspects of de Laval spray-forming nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1993-05-01

    Spray forming is a multiphase fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is directed onto a suitably shaped substrate or pattern to produce a coherent, near-net-shape deposit The technology can simplify materials processing where simultaneously improving product quality. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials using de Laval nozzles. Here we briefly describe the flow field characterization and atomization behavior of liquid metals in linear de Laval nozzles, and illustrate their versatility by summarizing results from three spray-forming programs. In one program, low-carbon steel strip >0.75 mm was produced. In another program, polymer membranes {approximately} 5 {mu}m thick were spray formed. Finally, recent results in spray forming molds, dies, and related tooling for rapid prototyping are described.

  2. Aerosol Emission during Human Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Sima; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    The traditional emphasis for airborne disease transmission has been on coughing and sneezing, which are dramatic expiratory events that yield easily visible droplets. Recent research suggests that normal speech can release even larger quantities of aerosols that are too small to see with the naked eye, but are nonetheless large enough to carry a variety of pathogens (e.g., influenza A). This observation raises an important question: what types of speech emit the most aerosols? Here we show that the concentration of aerosols emitted during healthy human speech is positively correlated with both the amplitude (loudness) and fundamental frequency (pitch) of the vocalization. Experimental measurements with an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) indicate that speaking in a loud voice (95 decibels) yields up to fifty times more aerosols than in a quiet voice (75 decibels), and that sounds associated with certain phonemes (e.g., [a] or [o]) release more aerosols than others. We interpret these results in terms of the egressive airflow rate associated with each phoneme and the corresponding fundamental frequency, which is known to vary significantly with gender and age. The results suggest that individual speech patterns could affect the probability of airborne disease transmission.

  3. CATS Aerosol Typing and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Matt; Yorks, John; Scott, Stan; Palm, Stephen; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Nowottnick, Ed; Selmer, Patrick; Kupchock, Andrew; Midzak, Natalie; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS), launched in January of 2015, is a lidar remote sensing instrument that will provide range-resolved profile measurements of atmospheric aerosols and clouds from the International Space Station (ISS). CATS is intended to operate on-orbit for at least six months, and up to three years. Status of CATS Level 2 and Plans for the Future:Version. 1. Aerosol Typing (ongoing): Mode 1: L1B data released later this summer; L2 data released shortly after; Identify algorithm biases (ex. striping, FOV (field of view) biases). Mode 2: Processed Released Currently working on correcting algorithm issues. Version 2 Aerosol Typing (Fall, 2016): Implementation of version 1 modifications Integrate GEOS-5 aerosols for typing guidance for non spherical aerosols. Version 3 Aerosol Typing (2017): Implementation of 1-D Var Assimilation into GEOS-5 Dynamic lidar ratio that will evolve in conjunction with simulated aerosol mixtures.

  4. Miniature Sensor for Aerosol Mass Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project seeks to develop a miniature sensor for mass measurement of size-classified aerosols. A cascade impactor will be used to classify aerosol sample...

  5. Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) measures particle mass loading and chemical composition in real time for non-refractory sub-micron aerosol particles. The ACSM is designed for long-term unattended deployment and routine monitoring applications.

  6. MISR Aerosol Climatology Product V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MISR Aerosol Climatology Product is 1) the microphysical and scattering characteristics of pure aerosol upon which routine retrievals are based; 2) mixtures of pure...

  7. Efficient spray-coated colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2014-11-10

    (Figure Presented). A colloidal quantum dot solar cell is fabricated by spray-coating under ambient conditions. By developing a room-temperature spray-coating technique and implementing a fully automated process with near monolayer control - an approach termed as sprayLD - an electronic defect is eliminated resulting in solar cell performance and statistical distribution superior to prior batch-processed methods along with a hero performance of 8.1%.

  8. High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L Bravo...ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L...Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) L Bravo, CB Ivey, D

  9. Treatment of Rhinitis Sicca Anterior with Ectoine Containing Nasal Spray

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Sonnemann; Olaf Scherner; Nina Werkhäuser

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The safety and efficacy of ectoine nasal spray and ectoine nasal spray with dexpanthenol in the treatment of rhinitis sicca were evaluated in two studies. Design and Methods. Two noninterventional observational studies were performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a nasal spray containing ectoine (study 1) and ectoine/dexpanthenol (study 2) over a period of two weeks including comparable numbers of patients suffering from rhinitis sicca anterior. Patients and physicians we...

  10. Origins of atmospheric aerosols. Basic concepts on aerosol main physical properties; L`aerosol atmospherique: ses origines quelques notions sur les principales proprietes physiques des aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renoux, A. [Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France). Laboratoire de Physique des aerosols et de transferts des contaminations

    1996-12-31

    Natural and anthropogenic sources of atmospheric aerosols are reviewed and indications of their concentrations and granulometry are given. Calculation of the lifetime of an atmospheric aerosol of a certain size is presented and the various modes of aerosol granulometry and their relations with photochemical and physico-chemical processes in the atmosphere are discussed. The main physical, electrical and optical properties of aerosols are also presented: diffusion coefficient, dynamic mobility and relaxation time, Stokes number, limit rate of fall, electrical mobility, optical diffraction

  11. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  12. Polymer coating of carrier excipients modify aerosol performance of adhered drugs used in dry powder inhalation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Daniela; Scalia, Santo; Adi, Handoko; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Young, Paul M

    2012-11-15

    The potential of excipient coating to enhance aerosol performance of micronized drugs in carrier excipient-drug blends, used in dry powder inhalers, was investigated. Both EC (ethyl cellulose) and PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) were used as coating agents. Carriers were prepared via sieve fractioning followed by spray drying, with and without polymer additive. Each uncoated and coated carrier salbutamol sulphate (SS) blended systems were evaluated for particle size, morphology, drug carrier adhesion and aerosolisation performance, after blending and storage for 24h. All carrier-based systems prepared had similar particle sizes and morphologies. The surface chemistries of the carriers were significantly different, as was drug-carrier adhesion and aerosolisation performance. Particle adhesion between SS and aerosol performance (fine particle fraction; FPF) followed the rank: PVP coated>un-coated>EC coated lactose. This rank order could be attributed to the surface energy measured by contact goniometry and related to the chemistry of lactose and each polymer. Storage did not significantly affect aerosol performance, however a rank increase in mean FPF value was observed for uncoated and EC coated lactose. Finally, the net electrostatic charge across the aerosol cloud indicated that the EC coated lactose transferred less charge to SS particles. The performance of each carrier system could be attributed to the carrier surface chemistry and, in general, by careful selection of the coating polymer, drug-carrier adhesion, electrostatic charge and aerosol performance could be controlled. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality characteristic of spray-drying egg white powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuang; Zhao, Songning; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Yiding; Liu, Jingbo; Xu, Menglei

    2013-10-01

    Spray drying is a useful method for developing egg process and utilization. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects on spray drying condition of egg white. The optimized conditions were spraying flow 22 mL/min, feeding temperature 39.8 °C and inlet-air temperature 178.2 °C. Results of sulfydryl (SH) groups measurement indicated conformation structure have changed resulting in protein molecule occur S-S crosslinking phenomenon when heating. It led to free SH content decreased during spray drying process. There was almost no change of differential scanning calorimetry between fresh egg white and spray-drying egg white powder (EWP). For a given protein, the apparent SH reactivity is in turn influenced by the physico-chemical characteristics of the reactant. The phenomenon illustrated the thermal denaturation of these proteins was unrelated to their free SH contents. Color measurement was used to study browning level. EWP in optimized conditions revealed insignificant brown stain. Swelling capacity and scanning electron micrograph both proved well quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP. Results suggested spray drying under the optimized conditions present suitable and alternative method for egg processing industrial implementation. Egg food industrialization needs new drying method to extend shelf-life. The purpose of the study was to provide optimal process of healthy and nutritional instant spray-drying EWP and study quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP.

  14. A numerical analysis of flat fan aerial crop spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik Fesal, Siti Natasha; Fawzi, Mas; Omar, Zamri

    2017-09-01

    Spray drift mitigation, in the agriculture aerial spraying literature, and spray quality in the application of plant protection products, still continues as two critical components in evaluating shareholder value. A study on off-target drift and ground deposit onto a 250 m strip were simulated through series of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations. The drift patterns for evaporating droplets were released from a constant aircraft velocity at 30 m/s (60 mph) carrying 20 m swath width spray boom with 12 fan-type nozzles at released height from the ground ranging from 3.7 m to 4.7 m. Droplet trajectories are calculated from the given airspeed with a Lagrangian model for particle dispersion excluding any wind effect perturbation. The proposed CFD’s model predictions agreed well with cited literatures for a wide range of atmospheric stability values. The results revealed that there is considerable increased in spray drift and droplets trajectories with the increased in spray released height. It suggested that a combination of low aircraft spray released height with low airspeed is essential to improve spray quality and maximizing uniform deposition on the target area are significant in minimizing spray drift risks.

  15. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  16. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...

  17. Aerosol processes relevant for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugh, Aan de J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Particulate matter (or aerosols) are particles suspended in the atmosphere. Aerosols are believed to be the most important pollutant associated with increased human mortality and morbidity. Therefore, it is important to investigate the relationship between sources of aerosols (such as industry) and

  18. DARE: a dedicated aerosols retrieval instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Court, A.J.; Smorenburg, K.; Courrèges-Lacoste, G.B.; Visser, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Decae, R.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of aerosols is a largely unresolved problem. A dedicated instrument aimed at aerosols would be able to reduce the large uncertainties connected to this kind of remote sensing. TNO is performing a study of a space based instrument for aerosol measurements, together with the

  19. [Ergometric double-blind study, Isoket-spray versus placebo-spray, in patients with coronary heart disease (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, H; Ludwig, B; Torabizadeh, A

    1980-08-31

    In a double-blind study 40 patients with coronary heart disease, who all complained of typical exertion-dependent angina pectoris symptoms and showed ECG changes after work in conformity with a myocardiac hypoxia, were examined in ergometric exertion tests before as well as immediately and 60 minutes after a single dose of 3.75 mg of Isoket-spray or Placebo-spray respectively. The Isoket-spray group was compared with the placebo group, furthermore, within the Isoket-spray group, the original ergometry (without medication) and the subsequent ergometries. The ST-depression, the time until reattainment of the original electrocardiographical situation after cessation of exertion and the subjective complaints showed highly significant improvements after use of the Isoket-spray in both repeated ergometries. Rapid and long-term relief after application of Isoket-spray were thus impressively shown in this double-blind study.

  20. Multi-Decadal Variation of Aerosols: Sources, Transport, and Climate Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Bian, Huisheng; Streets, David

    2008-01-01

    We present a global model study of multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their climate effects using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to longterm data records. We focus on a 27-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2006, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. We will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, which involves a time-varying, comprehensive global emission dataset that we put together in our previous investigations and will be improved/extended in this project. This global emission dataset includes emissions of aerosols and their precursors from fuel combustion, biomass burning, volcanic eruptions, and other sources from 1980 to the present. Using the model and satellite data, we will analyze (1) the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources, (2) the intercontinental source-receptor relationships controlled by emission, transport pathway, and climate variability.

  1. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hamburger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm−3 stp. Ultra-fine particles as indicators for nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  2. Development and application of a dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler for HDI-derived total reactive isocyanate group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, R J; Poovey, H G

    1999-01-01

    A dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler was developed for measurement of HDI (1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate)-derived total reactive isocyanate group (TRIG). The sampler consisted of an impactor or cyclone inlet, followed by an annular diffusional denuder, and a glass-fiber filter backup. The denuder walls and backup filter were each coated with 20 mg tributylphosphate and 1 mg MAMA reagent (9-N-methylamino-methylanthracene). After collection, MAMA-derivatized isocyanates were desorbed from the sampler and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with dual-wavelength ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence detection. Test atmospheres of HDI vapor and of HDI/HDI-biuret aerosols were generated in the laboratory and sampled with the optimized dichotomous sampler. Vapor phase HDI was completely collected by the diffusional denuder. When a mixture of HDI-biuret and HDI (approximately 30 ppb) was nebulized and collected with the dichotomous sampler, approximately 78% of the HDI was in the vapor phase, whereas about 22% was associated with the aerosol fraction. The dichotomous sampler was then used to measure vapor and condensed phase TRIG in a paint spray booth during application of a polyurethane paint. Measured levels of TRIG during the spraying operation averaged 391 +/- 154 micrograms