WorldWideScience

Sample records for compounds so-called microbial

  1. Relationship between selected indoor volatile organic compounds, so-called microbial VOC, and the prevalence of mucous membrane symptoms in single family homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Atsuko; Kawai, Toshio; Eitaki, Yoko; Kanazawa, Ayako; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Nakayama, Kunio; Shibata, Eiji; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Takigawa, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Chikara, Hisao; Saijo, Yasuaki; Kishi, Reiko

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms are known to produce a range of volatile organic compounds, so-called microbial VOC (MVOC). Chamber studies where humans were exposed to MVOC addressed the acute effects of objective and/or subjective signs of mucosal irritation. However, the effect of MVOC on inhabitants due to household exposure is still unclear. The purpose of this epidemiological study was to measure indoor MVOC levels in single family homes and to evaluate the relationship between exposure to them and sick building syndrome (SBS). All inhabitants of the dwellings were given a self-administered questionnaire with standardized questions to assess their symptoms. Air samples were collected and the concentrations of eight selected compounds in indoor air were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry - selective ion monitoring mode (GC/MS-SIM). The most frequently detected MVOC was 1-pentanol at a detection rate of 78.6% and geometric mean of 0.60 μg/m 3 . Among 620 participants, 120 (19.4%) reported one or more mucous symptoms; irritation of the eyes, nose, airway, or coughing every week (weekly symptoms), and 30 (4.8%) reported that the symptoms were home-related (home-related symptoms). Weekly symptoms were not associated with any of MVOC, whereas significant associations between home-related mucous symptoms and 1-octen-3-ol (per log 10 -unit: odds ratio (OR) 5.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1 to 14.8) and 2-pentanol (per log 10 -unit: OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.0 to 4.9) were obtained after adjustment for gender, age, and smoking. Associations between home-related symptoms and 1-octen-3-ol remained after mutual adjustment. However, concentrations of the selected compounds in indoors were lower than the estimated safety level in animal studies. Thus, the statistically significant association between 1-octen-3-ol may be due to a direct effect of the compounds or the associations may be being associated with other offending compounds. Additional studies are needed to evaluate

  2. A study of so-called hypochondriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Scheele, C; Nordgren, L; Kempi, V; Hetta, J; Hallborg, A

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with unexplained somatic complaints were subjected to a thorough somatic examination. Only when the examination proved negative was the patient entered into the study. The patients were clinically appraised according to criteria given in DSM-III. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) was diagnosed in 12, somatization disorder (SD) in 8, and hypochondriasis in 4 patients. Seventeen of the 24 patients agreed to participate in biochemical investigations including a TRH load, a dexamethasone test, and a determination of the monoamine metabolites 5-HIAA and HVA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A normal TSH increase and a normal suppression of cortisol were registered. The HVA values correlated significantly with the 5-HIAA values as well as with the alexithymia scores. Concerning alexithymia and maturity level, no difference as to social class was found. The patients filled in a Zung depression chart. The Zung scale and the 5-HIAA values were both inconsistent with depressive illness. In so-called hypochondriasis a long-term relationship, including selected somatic and biochemical examinations and thorough information, was crucial in abating the patient's distrust and thus the need for health care.

  3. Thoughts on the so-called 'radius-capitellum axis'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, H.; Mueller, H.A.; Wagner, H.; Baetz, W.; Mainz Univ.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied 438 patients radiologically in order to observe the so-called 'radius-capitellum axis'. In about a quarter of people with normal elbows the axis passes lateral to the middle portion of the capitellum, so that even when there is marked deviation, there is no certainty that the humero-radial joint is abnormal. Deviation of the axis can be caused by changes in the shape of the capitellum or of the radius, or by distension of the capsule of the elbow joint, or by various changes in muscular pull. (orig.) [de

  4. Thoughts on the so-called radius-capitellum axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H; Mueller, H A; Wagner, H; Baetz, W

    1982-02-01

    We have studied 438 patients radiologically in order to observe the so-called 'radius-capitellum axis'. In about a quarter of people with normal elbows the axis passes lateral to the middle portion of the capitellum, so that even when there is marked deviation, there is no certainty that the humero-radial joint is abnormal. Deviation of the axis can be caused by changes in the shape of the capitellum or of the radius, or by distension of the capsule of the elbow joint, or by various changes in muscular pull.

  5. [Once again the so-called Testament of Hippocrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideras, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This study is dealing with the so-called Testament of Hippocrates, a short ethic about the doctor's background, knowledge, character, appearance and behaviour towards the patient. Along with the three well-known Greek manuscripts the author is looking at two other by now unknown codices, so that the two Greek versions are accompanied by a third and larger version. After a careful consideration of the relations between the different versions he is discussing all readings of the codices explaining the terms within the background of the history of medicine. At the end he is presenting a reconstruction of the Greek original together with a German translation.

  6. Explaining the so-called 'price premium' in oil markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, A.; Ortiz, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the information content of several variables on the so-called ''oil price premium over fundamentals''. We define this premium as the difference between the market oil price and the estimated price consistent with the OECD's relative industry stock level. By using Granger causality tests and extended regressions we test the systematic ability of a broad set of variables to explain the premium. We find that speculation in the oil market - measured by non-commercial long positions - can improve the traditional model, reducing the premium significantly during some parts of the sample. (author)

  7. Investigation of CT picture in so-called loose shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Shigehito; Sakamaki, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Akira; Moriishi, Takeji; Takada, Keiichi.

    1985-01-01

    CT picture of the shoulder joint was analyzed in 124 shoulders (114 patients). A line perpendicular to a given line between the precornu of acetabular tegmen (A) and the postcornu of acetabular tegmen (B) was drawn and the intersection where the line and the caput humeri meet (C) was obtained. The angle of CAB was defined as the backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen. The angular aperture was 26.2 0 +-1.9 in 16 so-called loose shoulders, 17.3 0 +-1.0 in 28 loose shoulders restricted to the inward rotation, and 12.2 0 +-0.4 in 80 normal shoulders, showing a distinct correlation between the angular aperture and the degree of loose shoulder. An increased backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen was considered greatly attributable to the forward glenohumeral movement resulting from malformation of the acetabular tegmen and flaccidity of the joint. Glenoid osteotomy was thus performed in 9 patients, 6 of whom underwent CT scanning before and after osteotomy. Coronal and transverse CT images of the shoulder joint disclosed a noticeable improvement of the glenohumeral alignment. The angular aperture shown on CT seems to be of major importance not only in the diagnosis of so-called loose shoulder but also in surgical choice. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Emotional distance to so-called difficult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Jette Joost

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2011 Emotional distance to so-called difficult patients Purpose: To explore nurses' relationships with patients they regard as being difficult. How do nurses feel about such patients and relate to them, and what are the consequences for nurse and patient? Design and methods....... Patients' case records were studied and four meetings with the staff were arranged to discuss the findings. Data collection lasted 18 months in all. Findings: Three strategies were identified: persuasion, avoidance (emotional distance), and compromise. Interestingly, in the relationship with a particular...... patient, the avoidance strategy did not necessarily represent the terminal stage, since a nurse could revert to the compromise strategy. Some of the nurses experienced painful emotions regarding these interactions. Conclusions: The avoidance strategy (emotional distance) resulted in important social...

  9. Microbial growth on C1 compounds: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.L.; Hanson, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains individual papers prepared for the 4th International Symposium on Microbial Growth on One Carbon Compounds. Individual reports were abstracted and indexed for EDB. Topics presented were in the areas of the physiology and biochemistry of autotraps, physiology and biochemistry of methylotrophs and methanotrops, physiology and biochemistry of methanogens, genetics of microbes that use C 1 compounds, taxonomy and ecology of microbes tht grow on C 1 compounds, applied aspects of microbes that grow on C 1 compounds, and new directions in C 1 metabolism. (DT)

  10. A critical review of so-called cold sterilization in the field of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordy, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contamination of raw materials with microorganisms is a potential hazard to human health, especially if these materials are kept for a certain time under conditions that enhance microbial multiplication. Since the goods in question are by no means cheap bulk materials, but are highly ranked substances, the method of germ reduction by heat treatment is not suitable, and various so-called cold sterilizations have to be used (chemical, irradiation). The article examines the value of these, and in particular how they are assessed. Until the sixties, it was mainly the microbicidal effect of these treatments that was judged; today, the emphasis is on the assessment of the secondary reactions of the agents with the treated commodity and in particular their residual toxicity. In the case of chemical treatments, toxicity is determined directly by application of overdoses. It should be stressed that this is not comparable with the indirect assessment of the toxicity of gamma irradiation, by feeding irradiated goods. Of the available chemosterilants, formaldehyde has great disadvantages in spite of its high volatility, because of its high protein factor and its delayed vaporization from surfaces, due to polymerization. Propylene oxide is less active, requiring higher concentrations, which in turn results in increased residues. Therefore, the agent of choice is still ethylene oxide, since it diffuses quickly and is highly reactive; selection of genetically resistant microorganisms is therefore not possible, as opposed to the case of gamma radiation

  11. Non-microbial sources of microbial volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunok; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf

    2016-07-01

    The question regarding the true sources of the purported microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) remains unanswered. To identify microbial, as well as non-microbial sources of 28 compounds, which are commonly accepted as microbial VOCs (i.e. primary outcome of interest is Σ 28 VOCs). In a cross-sectional investigation of 390 homes, six building inspectors assessed water/mold damage, took air and dust samples, and measured environmental conditions (i.e., absolute humidity (AH, g/m(3)), temperature (°C), ventilation rate (ACH)). The air sample was analyzed for volatile organic compounds (μg/m(3)) and; dust samples were analyzed for total viable fungal concentration (CFU/g) and six phthalates (mg/g dust). Four benchmark variables of the underlying sources were defined as highest quartile categories of: 1) the total concentration of 17 propylene glycol and propylene glycol ethers (Σ17 PGEs) in the air sample; 2) 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol monoisobutyrate (TMPD-MIB) in the air sample; 3) semi-quantitative mold index; and 4) total fungal load (CFU/g). Within severely damp homes, co-occurrence of the highest quartile concentration of either Σ17 PGEs or TMPD-MIB were respectively associated with a significantly higher median concentration of Σ 28 VOCs (8.05 and 13.38μg/m(3), respectively) compared to the reference homes (4.30 and 4.86μg/m(3), respectively, both Ps ≤0.002). Furthermore, the homes within the highest quartile range for Σ fungal load as well as AH were associated with a significantly increased median Σ 28 VOCs compared to the reference group (8.74 vs. 4.32μg/m(3), P=0.001). Within the final model of multiple indoor sources on Σ 28 VOCs, one natural log-unit increase in summed concentration of Σ17 PGEs, plus TMPD-MIB (Σ 17 PGEs + TMPD-MIB) was associated with 1.8-times (95% CI, 1.3-2.5), greater likelihood of having a highest quartile of Σ 28 VOCs, after adjusting for absolute humidity, history of repainting at least one room

  12. Studies about behavior of microbial degradation of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Makiko

    2003-02-01

    Some of TRU waste include organic compounds, thus these organic compounds might be nutrients for microbial growth at disposal site. This disposal system might be exposed to high alkali condition by cement compounds as engineering barrier material. In the former experimental studies, it has been supposed that microbial exist under pH = 12 and the microbial activity acclimated to high alkali condition are able to degrade asphalt under anaerobic condition. Microbes are called extremophile that exist in cruel habitat as high alkali or reductive condition. We know less information about the activity of extremophile, though any recent studies reveal them. In this study, the first investigation is metabolic pathway as microbial activity, the second is microbial degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, and the third is microbial activity under high alkali. Microbial metabolic pathway consist of two systems that fulfill their function each other. One system is to generate energy for microbial activities and the other is to convert substances for syntheses of organisms' structure materials. As these systems are based on redox reaction between substances, it is made chart of the microbial activity region using pH, Eh, and depth as parameter, There is much report that microbe is able to degrade aromatic compounds under aerobic or molecular O 2 utilizing condition. For degradation of aromatic compounds in anaerobic condition, supplying electron acceptor is required. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia has important role, too. Alcalophile has individual transporting system depending Na + and acidic compounds contained in cell wall. Generating energy is key for survival and growth under high alkali condition. Co-metabolism and microbial consortia are effective for microbial degradation of aromatic compounds under high alkali and reductive condition, and utilizable electron acceptor and degradable organic compounds are required for keeping microbial activity and

  13. Microbial degradation of furanic compounds : Biochemistry, genetics, and impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierckx, N.; Koopman, F.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.; De Winde, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial metabolism of furanic compounds, especially furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), is rapidly gaining interest in the scientific community. This interest can largely be attributed to the occurrence of toxic furanic aldehydes in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. However, these compounds

  14. Descriptions of new Genera and species of the so-called Glyphipterygidae Sensu Meyrick, 1913 (Lepidoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diakonoff, A.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of a revision of the so-called family Glyphipterygidae sensu Meyrick, 1913, for the series "Microlepidoptera Palaearctica", several new taxa came to light. In order to facilitate the edition of the revision and to publish these new taxa without further delay, they are being described

  15. Clinical features of so-called eosinophilic rhinosinusitis. With a view to screening for eosinophilic rhinosinusitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Yasunori; Ishitoya, Junichi; Kimura, Machiko; Hirose, Shouji; Takahashi, Masahiro; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    The concept of so-called eosinophilic sinusitis has recently come to be understood, but since the definition and the diagnostic criteria for this intractable form of sinusitis are unclear, we reviewed the clinical features of 104 patients (16 with eosinophilic sinusitis and 88 with non-eosionphilic sinusitis) who underwent endonasal sinus surgery in our department. So-called eosinophilic sinusitis was usually accompanied by severe bronchial asthma, and the characteristic clinical findings of so-called eosinophilic sinusitis were an increase in peripheral blood eosinophil count, a paranasal sinus shadow in computed tomograms (CT score), and a high ethmoid sinus/maxillary sinus score ratio (E/M ratio) in our study. We determined the cutoff value to review sensitivity, specificity and correct diagnosis rate in screening for eosinophilic sinusitis. When we judged using three cutoff values, a peripheral blood eosinophil count≥500/μ1, CT score≥13 and E/M ratio≥1, a sensitivity of 69%, specificity of 97% and correct diagnosis rate of 81%. On the other hand, when we judged using two cutoff value, peripheral blood eosinophil count≥500/μ1 and E/M ratio≥1, sensitivity of 75%, specificity of 94% and correct diagnosis rate of 88%. Because all three studies can be performed in outpatient clinics, we concluded that they are useful as a method of screening for so-called eosinophilic sinusitis without the need for histological examinations for eosinophil infiltration of nasal polyps in biopsy specimens. (author)

  16. Uptake of 201Thallium in a so-called brown tumour of hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, M.; Verhaaren, H.; Schelstraete, K.; Schauteet, H.; Craen, M.

    1987-01-01

    When performing a 201 Tl-sup(99m)Tc subtraction scan of the parathyroids in a patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism, a marked accumulation of 201 Tl was observed in a so-called brown tumour of the mandible. The 201 Tl uptake can probably be explained by the rich vascularity and the high cellularity of the lesion. (Author)

  17. Constructivism, the so-called semantic learning theories, and situated cognition versus the psychological learning theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Juan José; Rodríguez Moneo, María

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, the perspective of situated cognition, which gave rise both to the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning and has probably become the most representative standpoint of constructivism, is examined. We consider the claim of situated cognition to provide alternative explanations of the learning phenomenon to those of psychology and, especially, to those of the symbolic perspective, currently predominant in cognitive psychology. The level of analysis of situated cognition (i.e., global interactive systems) is considered an inappropriate approach to the problem of learning. From our analysis, it is concluded that the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning which originated in situated cognition can hardly be considered alternatives to the psychological learning theories, and they are unlikely to add anything of interest to the learning theory or to contribute to the improvement of our knowledge about the learning phenomenon.

  18. Piso-triquetral osteoarthritis and the so-called secondary pisiform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1988-01-01

    After scapho-trapezial osteoarthritis, piso-triquetral is the next most common. Some of the various changes of the piso-triquetral osteoarthritis are also to be seen in the dorso-volar view. The so-called secondary pisiform is not a congenital variant but develops with increasing frequency in older age as one of the features of the osteoarthritic reactions. (orig.) [de

  19. A case of esophageal so-called carcinosarcoma, which proliferated after radiochemotherapy against squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shozo; Kurosaka, Yoshiyuki; Funaki, Kohziro; Michiwa, Yoshio; Takegawa, Shigeru; Kiriyama, Masato; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Kojima, Yasuhiko

    2007-01-01

    A 89-year-old woman undergoing fibroptic esophagoscopy elsewhere for dysphagia was found to have an esophageal tumor and was referred to our hospital. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a type 1 esophageal tumor about 3 cm in diameter in the lower thoracic esophagus pathologically diagnosed as moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma from the biopsy specimen. CT and MRI showed metastasis in the right lymph node of cardia. Although we advised an esophagectomy, she did not agree to it due to her high age, so we treated her with radiochemotherapy. She underwent radiotherapy (54 Gy) and chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (FU)) concurrently. It was effective and the tumor almost disappeared and the biopsy specimen showed few viable cells. After 12 months, the tumor recurred and the pathological diagnosis was so-called carcinosarcoma. She died 14 months after treatment and pathological autopsy showed the tumor of the esophagus to be so-called carcinosarcoma, but metastasized tissue consisted of squamous cell carcinoma and did not have a sarcoma component. We concluded that metaplastic change of squamous carcinoma cells into spindle cells, occurred due to radiochemotherapy and the tumor recurred as so-called carcinosarcoma. (author)

  20. [Technical information: The 'so called' Camille Bernard lower lip reconstruction: An eponymous confusion clarified].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marck, K W; Martin, D

    2017-12-01

    The use of eponyms honours those who have contributed to the development of medicine and facilitates communication between colleagues. Eponyms are based on historical knowledge to know who was the first to use a given technique. In the previous century, two different operative procedures have been attached to the 'so called' Bernard lower lip reconstruction. This historical literature on lip reconstruction with a focus on the years 1853-1855 elucidates the roles of Bernard, Saeman, Desgranges and Burow, and gives suggestions for eponyms that do justice to the innovating surgeons Bernard, Burow and Desgranges. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Optimizing of verification photographs by using the so-called tangential field technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proske, H.; Merte, H.; Kratz, H.

    1991-01-01

    When irradiating under high voltage condition, verification photographs prove to be difficult to take if the Gantry position is not aligned to 0deg respectively 180deg, since the patient is being irradiated diagonally. Under these conditions it is extremely difficult to align the X-ray-cartridge vertically to the central beam of the therapeutic radiation. This results in, amongst others, misprojections, so that definite dimensions of portrayed organ structures become practical impossible to determine. This paper describes how we have solved these problems on our high voltage units (tele-gamma cobalt unit and linear-accelerator). By using simple accessories, determination of dimensions of organ structures, as shown on the verification photographs, are made possible. We illustrate our method by using the so-called tangential fields technique when irradiating mamma carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  2. REVIEW PAPER-MARINE MICROBIAL BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyani. P*, Hemalatha. K. P. J

    2016-01-01

    Oceans have borne most of the biological activities on our planet. A number of biologically active compounds with varying degrees of action, such as anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-microtubule, anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, photo protective, as well as antibiotic and antifouling properties, have been isolated to date from marine sources. The marine environment also represents a largely unexplored source for isolation of new microbes (bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, microalgae-cyanobacteria and...

  3. Optimized microbial cells for production of melatonin and other compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are recombinant microbial host cells comprising biosynthetic pathways and their use in producing oxidation products and downstream products, e.g., melatonin and related compounds, as well as enzyme variants, nucleic acids, vectors and methods useful for preparing and using...

  4. A case of basal cell epitheliomas developed on chronic radiodermatitis (so-called roentgen-skin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Takaya; Yasuhara, Minoru

    1980-01-01

    A woman 63 years old had received an unknown amount of roentgen rediation from a physician for spondylitis tuberculosa of the thoracic vertebrae fifty years ago. About five years ago two small brownish black tumors appeared on her back and gradually increased. Within the past month ulcer and bleeding in these tumors. The Patient presented a chronic radiodermatitis (so-called roentgen-skin) of the interscapular space. In addition, two tumors were present in the upper and lower parts of the roentgen-skin. The upper tumor revealed adenoid basal cell epithelioma and the lower tumor was pigmented solid basal cell epithelioma. A view on the development of basal cell epitheliomas on the roentgen-skin was assumed as follows: When epidermal and adnexal cells suffer from a certain damage by X-ray, especially soft X-ray, these cells may become modulated cells which have the same functions as adult immature pluripotential cells. From these modulated cells, basal cell epitheliomas may develop. (author)

  5. [Patient education and the use of the so called complementary or alternative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, P

    2005-01-01

    Modern cultural trends are inclined to recognise to all human beings an always more ample right to become involved directly in choices affecting them. This even when health is concerned thus requiring expertise not always accessible to all. Informed consent to often gets reduced to a mere formality, having a mostly defensive purpose for the physician. Patients' education is becoming an ever more pressing issue in order to safeguard decision rights and the effective knowledge of the implications of every decision simultaneously. Patients' education has serious ethical implications which can't be eluded nor referred outside as happens when we let mass media inform on the advantages and disadvantages of various therapies. One of the major fields were this misinformed choice right is expressed is the so called complementary and alternative medicine. Nowadays physicians have to get back their therapeutical leadership once again, with renewed responsibility and through education as well. Information as such is a necessary and not sufficient condition. A sheer education involving the physician in a deeper as well as in an extended therapeutical alliance is needed. The challenge of taking care involves the whole human being: his/her sick body, his/her wounded feelings as well as intelligence which has to understand what is happening clearly.

  6. Later Echoes of the So-called Kniazheskii Izbornik in Old Slavic Literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissava Miltenova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a proposition in palaeoslavistics that the reconstructed prototype of the Izbornik of 1076 is a composition designated as the Kniazheskii Izbornik, which originated from the time of the Bulgarian Tsar Peter (927–969. This article presents an overview of the contents of three manuscripts, which are copies of texts in the so-called Kniazheskii Izbornik: No. 162 from the collection of the Moscow Theological Academy, from the 15th century, Russian origin; No. 189 from the collection of the Hilandar Monastery and which is composed of two parts: Part 1 from the beginning of the 17th century, probably written by a copyist from Moldavia, and Part 2 from 1684, Russian in origin; and No. 280 (333 from the collection of St. Synod of the Romanian Orthodox Church, 15th–16th century, Moldavian in origin. There are suggestions for primary sources of these manuscripts, and the article considers the paths by which texts identical to the Kniazheskii Izbornik found their way into miscellanies in the Late Middle Ages. The three miscellanies under discussion are important witnesses of the paraenetic literature in the earliest period of the Slavia Orthodoxa, which integrated homilies of John Chrysostom, question and answers, interpretations of the Scripture, wise sayings, narration, and apophthegmata from the Paterikon and fragments of the Kniazheskii Izbornik.

  7. Studies on so-called redistribution phenomenon of cerebral blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between so-called redistribution phenomenon and metabolism or viability of the brain tissue, a new quantitative triple-radionuclide autoradiography was developed, whereby making it possible to compare both late images and reditribution of IMP with cerebral metabolism in experimentally induced unilateral ischemic brain tissue of rats. Iodine-123 IMP and I-125 IMP were used as tracers for early and late imaging, and H-3 amino acid mixture or H-3 H-2 deoxyglucose as a tracer for protein synthesis or glucose metabolism imaging. There was no significant relationship between redistribution index and protein synthesis or glucose metabolism. Protein synthesis was remarkably decreased in the affected hemisphere regardless of redistribution index values. Although the redistribution indices showed a gentle peak at approximately 34 μ mol/100 g/ min of glucose metabolism, there was no obvious relationship between either late images or redistribution index images and glucose metabolism images. Redistribution indices showed a maximum value at approximately 40 to 50 ml/100 g/min of cerebral blood flow. Reverse redistribution was observed with 160 ml/100 g/min or more of flow. Thin layer chromatographic findings were similar in the affected and non-affected resions, suggesting redistribution of a lipophilic IMP metabolite of p-iodoamphetamine in the affected region. In vitro autoradiography revealed no significant reduction in binding ability of IMP to the affected ischemic cortex. In a computer simulation study for brain activity curve, brain activity at 150 min was found to be almost constant at more than 25 ml/100 g/min of flow. IMP redistribution was unlikely to reflect directly either brain metabolism or function, and both blood flow partition coefficient and blood flow values were independently responsible for cerebral kinetics of IMP. (N.K.)

  8. Microbial degradation of water-insoluble organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of solubilization on biodegradation of water-insoluble organic compounds was investigated. The effect of particle size on solubilization and degradation of 4-chlorobiphenyl (4-CB) and naphthalene by a microbial mixture was determined. The concentration of soluble compound was determined using gas-liquid chromatography. The rates of solubilization were inversely related to particle size for both compounds. The rates of mineralization of 14 C-labeled palmitic acid, octadecane, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), and Sevin (1-naphthyl N-methylcarbamate) by microbial mixtures were determined by trapping the 14 CO 2 formed, and those rates were compared to solubilization rates determined by periodically filtering sterile MS amended with one of the compounds. Mineralization and colonization of the surface of 10 μg palmitic acid per 10 ml MS by Pseudomonas pseudoflava was determined by trapping 14 CO 2 and epifluorescence microscopy. Mineralization began before colonization and was initially exponential, but the rate then declined. The rate of mineralization at the end of the exponential phase approximated the rate of solubilization. The surface was completely covered about the time mineralization stopped. Unbound cells grew exponentially before colonization was detected; however, colonization of the surface was complete after the number of free cells stopped increasing. The data suggest that soluble palmitic acid is utilized before the insoluble phase but colonization is important in the mineralization of palmitic acid when solubilization becomes rate limiting

  9. [Nicotinamidase and the so-called pyrazinamidase in mycobacteria; the simultaneous occurrence of both activites (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnok, I; Pechmann, H; Krallmann-Wenzel, U; Röhrscheidt, E; Tarnok, Z

    1979-07-01

    Nicotin- and the so-called pyrazinamidase (in the following: "pyrazinamidase") have been found in strains of four mycobacteria species, M. fortuitum, M. gastri, M. bovis and M. microti. These findings are in contradiction to those summarized in Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology (1974). The reason for the discrepancies is that the original method (Bönicke, 1961) for amidase determination has not taken the following aspects into consideration: a) The inducibility of the nicotin- and "pyrazinamidase" (example: M. fortuitum); b) The temperature sensitivity of these enzymes (M. gastri); c) The light sensitivity of nicotinamidase (in photochromogenic M. gastri strains); d) The optimal substrate concentration which must be at least 4 mM instead of 0,8 mm. The following consequences can be drawn for the taxonomy and biochemistry of the tested organisms: e) The species status of M. gastri should be annuled. The main difference between M. gastri and M. kansasii consists only of the non-agglutinability of M. gastri by anti-M. kansasii serum. "Pyrazinamidase" and also nitrate reductase (Tarnok et al., in press) are positive in strains of both species; f) M. bovis possesses nicotin- and "pyrazinamidase" as M. tuberculosis too. Thus, these two species are more closely related than suggested earlier; g) Till now, no Mycobacterium has been found showing nicotinamidase without "pyrazinamidase" activity (or vice versa). It seems to be very probable that nicotinamidase, an enzyme of low substrate specificity, is able to hydrolyze several compounds with a nicotinamide-like structure such as pyrazinamide. Thus, we suggest the annulment of the term pyrazinamidase or the employment of quotation marks ("pyrazinamidase") to show the fictitious value of this designation.

  10. Immense essence of excellence: marine microbial bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-10-15

    Oceans have borne most of the biological activities on our planet. A number of biologically active compounds with varying degrees of action, such as anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-microtubule, anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, photo protective, as well as antibiotic and antifouling properties, have been isolated to date from marine sources. The marine environment also represents a largely unexplored source for isolation of new microbes (bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, microalgae-cyanobacteria and diatoms) that are potent producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. Extensive research has been done to unveil the bioactive potential of marine microbes (free living and symbiotic) and the results are amazingly diverse and productive. Some of these bioactive secondary metabolites of microbial origin with strong antibacterial and antifungal activities are being intensely used as antibiotics and may be effective against infectious diseases such as HIV, conditions of multiple bacterial infections (penicillin, cephalosporines, streptomycin, and vancomycin) or neuropsychiatric sequelae. Research is also being conducted on the general aspects of biophysical and biochemical properties, chemical structures and biotechnological applications of the bioactive substances derived from marine microorganisms, and their potential use as cosmeceuticals and nutraceuticals. This review is an attempt to consolidate the latest studies and critical research in this field, and to showcase the immense competence of marine microbial flora as bioactive metabolite producers. In addition, the present review addresses some effective and novel approaches of procuring marine microbial compounds utilizing the latest screening strategies of drug discovery.

  11. Immense Essence of Excellence: Marine Microbial Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Bhatnagar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Oceans have borne most of the biological activities on our planet. A number of biologically active compounds with varying degrees of action, such as anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-microtubule, anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, photo protective, as well as antibiotic and antifouling properties, have been isolated to date from marine sources. The marine environment also represents a largely unexplored source for isolation of new microbes (bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, microalgae-cyanobacteria and diatoms that are potent producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. Extensive research has been done to unveil the bioactive potential of marine microbes (free living and symbiotic and the results are amazingly diverse and productive. Some of these bioactive secondary metabolites of microbial origin with strong antibacterial and antifungal activities are being intensely used as antibiotics and may be effective against infectious diseases such as HIV, conditions of multiple bacterial infections (penicillin, cephalosporines, streptomycin, and vancomycin or neuropsychiatric sequelae. Research is also being conducted on the general aspects of biophysical and biochemical properties, chemical structures and biotechnological applications of the bioactive substances derived from marine microorganisms, and their potential use as cosmeceuticals and nutraceuticals. This review is an attempt to consolidate the latest studies and critical research in this field, and to showcase the immense competence of marine microbial flora as bioactive metabolite producers. In addition, the present review addresses some effective and novel approaches of procuring marine microbial compounds utilizing the latest screening strategies of drug discovery.

  12. Control of malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds using microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaktasang, Numfon; Min, Hyeong-Sik; Kang, Christina; Kim, Han S

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to control malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from domestic wastewaters. The electricity production demonstrated a distinct pattern of a two-step increase during 170 h of system run: the first maximum current density was 118.6 ± 7.2 mA m⁻² followed by a rebound of current density increase, reaching the second maximum of 176.8 ± 9.4 mA m⁻². The behaviors of the redox potential and the sulfate level in the anode compartment indicated that the microbial production of hydrogen sulfide compounds was suppressed in the first stage, and the hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from the system were removed effectively as a result of their electrochemical oxidation, which contributed to the additional electricity production in the second stage. This was also directly supported by sulfur deposits formed on the anode surface, which was confirmed by analyses on those solids using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as an elemental analyzer. To this end, the overall reduction efficiencies for HS⁻ and H₂S(g) were as high as 67.5 and 96.4 %, respectively. The correlations among current density, redox potential, and sulfate level supported the idea that the electricity signal generated in the MFC can be utilized as a potential indicator of malodor control for the domestic wastewater system.

  13. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Chlorochromate Compounds Polluting the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, O.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Eight soil and sludge samples which have been polluted with petroleum wastes for more than 41 years were used for isolation of adapted indigenous microbial communities able to mineralize the chloro aromatic compounds [3-chlorobenzoic acid (3-CBA), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,6-dichlorophenol indole phenol (2,6-DCPP) and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB)] and use them as a sole carbon and energy sources. From these communities, the most promising bacterial strain MAM-24 which has the ability to degrade the four chosen aromatic compounds was isolated and identified by comparative sequence analysis for its 16S-rRNA coding genes and it was identified as Bacillus mucilaginosus HQ 013329. Degradation percentage was quantified by HPLC. Degradation products were identified by GC-MS analysis which revealed that the isolated strain and its mutant dechlorinated the four chloro aromatic compounds in the first step forming acetophenone which is considered as the corner stone of the intermediate compounds

  14. Producing and Branding Gender in Comics: My So-Called Secret Identity and the Ambivalence of an Alternative Address

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Bethan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract As media consumption grows increasingly niche and distribution extends further away from old network and print models, media producers continue to hone their marketing toward ever more specific audiences. Yet, while fan-centred franchises and crowdfunding projects have garnered some scholarly attention, there has been less discussion of the ways that gender, race, and sexuality intersect with media production and marketing. This paper analyses the crowdfunded comic My So-Called Secre...

  15. Resistance and Resilience of Soil Microbial Communities Exposed to Petroleum-Derived Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrzynski, Jakub Jan

    Functioning of soil microbial communities is generally considered resilient to disturbance, including chemical stress. Activities of soil microbial communities are often sustained in polluted environments due to exceptional plasticity of microbial communities and functional redundancy. Pollution......-induced community tolerance (PICT) often develops following chemical stress. Nonetheless, environmental pollution may severely disturb functioning of soil microbial communities, thereby threatening provision of important ecosystem services provided by microorganisms. Pollution with petroleum and petroleum......-derived compounds (PDCs) is a significant environmental problem on a global scale. Research addressing interactions between microorganisms and PDC pollution is dominated by studies of biodegradation, with less emphasis on microbial ecotoxicology. Soil microbial communities are generally considered highly resilient...

  16. Serious Complication of Percutaneous Angioplasty with Stent Implantation in so Called "Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency" in Multiple Sclerosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Doležal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report female patient, age 51, with clinically definitive multiple sclerosis (CDMS since 1998, who underwent two PTA procedures with stent implantation for CCSVI in 2010. Expanded disability status scale (EDSS worsened since the procedure from 4.5 to 6. Total number of three stents was implanted (two of them in the right internal jugular vein. In six month time, in 2011, patient was referred for independent examination by computer tomography (CT phlebography for right-sided neck pain. Dislocation of stents on the right side and thrombosis of left sided stent was found. Conservative approach was used so far. Our short report is showing possible complications of PTA and stenting in jugular veins in so called CCSVI and bringing information about neurological state (EDSS worsening in a subject. Continuation of stent migration in the future is probable, possibly resulting in pulmonary embolism with fatal risk for the patient. We strongly ask for restriction of PTA procedure in so called CCSVI, which concept was not proven to be relevant to MS.

  17. SFPM opinion on the so-called 'transit' in vivo dosimetry in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Lucie; Dupuis, Pauline; Marchesi, Vincent; Boutry, Christine; Francois, Pascal; Crespin, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Written to the demand of the ASN to the SFPM (the French professional body in medical physics), this report states the opinion of these professionals regarding the use of the so-called 'transit' dosimetry for the control of the in vivo dose received during radiotherapy. After an overview of the use of in vivo dosimetry in medical practices, the authors outline the main benefits and drawbacks of point conventional detectors used for this dosimetry. They propose an overview of the state-of-the-art in transit in vivo dosimetry by briefly describing the different developed methodologies: the prediction-based methodology and the rear projection methodology. They also propose a literature review on transit in vivo dosimetry. Based on expert experience and on this review they give lists of technical benefits and drawbacks of techniques of in vivo dosimetry by EPID transit imagery. They finally indicate some commercially available technical solutions to transit in vivo dosimetry

  18. An enigmatic graffito from the sun temple of Nyuserre and the meaning of the so-called “slaughterhouse”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Nuzzolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the presence of a “slaughterhouse” in the sun temple of Nyuserre has been taken for granted as the result of the investigation conducted by Ludwig Borchardt in Abu Ghurab in 1898–1901. However, several pieces of archaeological and textual evidence, including the documents from the Abusir papyri, which are contemporary with the sun temples, challenge this reconstruction. An important element in this discussion may probably come from the correct reading and interpretation of a hieratic inscription found inside the so-called “slaughterhouse” and later on completely forgotten. To this inscription, and the important institutions mentioned therein, we shall pay attention in this article.

  19. On the so-called membrane coating granules in keratinized lichen planus lesions of the buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labban, N G; Wood, R D

    1982-11-01

    Serial sections of the so-called membrane-coating granules have been examined in keratinized oral epithelium of lichen planus lesions. As with 'granules' apparent in non-keratinized epithelium, it is found they do not represent specialized intra-cytoplasmic organelles, but are the result of sectioning at different areas, levels and planes through the plasma membrane of interdigitating cell processes. Such 'granules' appear mostly in the superficial, but not deep, part of the cytoplasm of the upper prickle cells. This is considered to be due to topographic differences between the upper and under surfaces of these cells and the presence of narrower intercellular spaces than those between deeper epithelial cells. Such arrangement often results in cell processes in sections appearing free in the superficial part of the cell below. The appearance of 'granules' arises when the plane of section is not at right angles to the two plasma membranes surrounding these processes.

  20. The so-called "Spanish model" - Tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Nick K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Methods Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. Results As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005 in 2006 and have increased since then. Conclusion The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy.

  1. The so-called "Spanish model" - Tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Methods Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. Results As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005) in 2006 and have increased since then. Conclusion The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy. PMID:22151884

  2. Clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) with and without antiphospholipid antibodies (the so-called 'seronegative APS').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Jose Luis; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Cuadrado, Maria Jose; Sanna, Giovanni; Ateka-Barrutia, Oier; Khamashta, Munther A

    2012-02-01

    Although the medical literature currently provides a growing number of isolated case reports of patients with clinically well-defined antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and persistently negative antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), there are no studies including a series of patients addressing the clinical features of this condition. The authors assessed clinical manifestations of APS in 154 patients: 87 patients with seropositive APS and 67 patients with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity persistently negative for aPL and presenting with at least two additional non-criteria manifestations of APS (the so-called 'seronegative APS', SN-APS). Patients were interviewed at the time of recruitment, and a retrospective file review was carried out. There were no significant differences in the frequency of thrombotic events or obstetric morbidity in patients with SN-APS versus patients with seropositive APS: deep vein thrombosis (31.4% vs 31.0%), pulmonary embolism (23.8% vs 28.7%), stroke (14.9% vs 17.2%), transient ischaemic attack (11.9% vs 10.3%), early spontaneous abortions (67.1% vs 52.1%), stillbirths (62.5% vs 59.4%), prematurity (28.1% vs 21.7%) or pre-eclampsia (28.1% vs 23.1%). Classic and SN-APS patients show similar clinical profiles. The results suggest that clinical management in patients with APS should not be based only on the presence of conventional aPL.

  3. The so-called "Pre-Levantine" phase and the chronology of the Levantine Rock Painting. A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo Saura, Miguel Ángel

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of the principles on which the so-called "prelevantine phase" is based and the discussion about the neolithic material culture parallels for levantine art allow its attribution to Epipaleolithic groups of hunters and gatherers. In the same way, the data on the process of transition between the Epipaleolithic and the Neolithic, and the relationship between the levantine style and the schematic rock painting seem to support a pre-neolithic chronology of the levantine art, related to non-producing ways of living.

    El rechazo de las bases en las que se sustenta la llamada "fase pre-levantina" y la discusión de los paralelos mobiliares neolíticos propuestos para el arte levantino dejan expedito el camino para su adscripción a los grupos de cazadores y recolectores epipaleolíticos. Asimismo, los datos con que contamos sobre el proceso de transición Epipaleolítico/Neolítico, y la relación entre el estilo levantino y la pintura rupestre esquemática parecen abogar también por una cronología pre-neolítica de lo levantino, asociado a unos modos de vida no productores.

  4. Origin of the color of Cv. rhapsody in blue rose and some other so-called "blue" roses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnet, Jean-François

    2003-08-13

    Flowers of the rose cultivar Rhapsody in Blue display unusual colors, changing as they age, from a vivid red-purple to a lighter and duller purple, which are based on tonalities corresponding to hue angles between 340 and 320 degrees in the CIELAB scale. Unexpectedly, the chemical basis of these colors is among the simplest, featuring cyanin (cyanidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside), the most frequent anthocyanin in flowers, as the sole pigment and quercetin kaempferol glycosides as copigments at a relatively low copigment/pigment ratio (about 3/1), which usually produces magenta or red shades in roses. This color shift to bluer shades is coupled with the progressive accumulation of cyanin into vacuolar anthocyanic inclusions (AVIs), the occurrence of which increases as the petals grow older. In addition to the normal lambda(max) of cyanin at approximately 545 nm, the transmission spectra of live petals and of epidermal cells exhibit a second lambda(max) in the 620-625 nm range, the relative importance increasing with the presence of AVIs. In petals of fully opened flowers, the only pigmented structures in the vacuoles of epidermal cells are AVIs; their intense and massive absorption in the 520-640 nm area produces a much darker and bluer color than measured for the vacuolar solution present at the very first opening stage. Cyanin is probably "trapped" into AVIs at higher concentrations than would be possible in a vacuolar solution and in quinonoidal form, appearing purple-blue because of additional absorption in the 580-630 nm area. Quite similar pigmentation features were found in very ancient rose cultivars (cv. L'Evêque or Bleu Magenta), also displaying this type of so-called "blue" color.

  5. Usefulness of K-Point Injection for the Nonspecific Neck Pain in So-Called K-Point Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Jae; Ahn, Myun Whan; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Lee, Sung Jun; Lee, Dong Yeol

    2016-12-01

    Shoichi Kokubun introduced his successful experience with local anesthetic injection at the occipital insertion of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in K-point syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term effectiveness of K-point injection and investigate factors affecting treatment results. K-point injection was performed in 58 patients with K-point syndrome at Yeungnam University Medical Center. The syndrome was associated with cervical whiplash injury in 10 patients and was of nonspecific origin in the rest. One milliliter of 2% lidocaine mixed with 1 milliliter of dexamethasone was injected in 50 patients and 2 milliliters of 1% lidocaine alone in the rest. Initially, the severity of local tenderness at the K-point and other tender points was examined and the degree of immediate pain relief effect was assessed within 1 hour after injection. Early effect within 1 month after the injection and current effect were evaluated in 27 patients using a modified Kim's questionnaire with regard to the duration of improvement, degree of improvement in pain and daily living activities, and satisfaction. Of the total 58 patients, 44 (75.8%) apparently had immediate pain relief after K-point injection. The only factor associated with successful immediate pain relief was the whiplash injury associated with traffic accident (TA). The early pain control effect was associated with the immediate effect. The current effect was associated with the early effect alone. Satisfaction with the K-point injection was related to early successful pain relief. K-point injection would be useful for early pain relief in nonspecific neck pain syndrome so called K-point syndrome, but not for current pain relief. Especially, it was very effective for early pain control in the whiplash injury associated with TA.

  6. Top-Down Prioritization of Salient Items May Produce the So-Called Stimulus-Driven Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Benoni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study proposes that top-down attentional prioritization of salient items may produce the so-called stimulus-driven capture. To test this proposal, the “expectation-based paradigm” was designed on the basis of a visual search task. In Experiment 1, a task-irrelevant singleton frame was presented at the same location in 70% of the trials. The target was either presented at chance level within the singleton location, or away from it. In line with the singleton capture phenomenon, participants were faster in identifying the target when it appeared in the singleton location compared to non-singleton locations. However, leaving out the singleton frame in 30% of the trials led to a similar effect; participants were faster in identifying the target when it appeared in the expected singleton location compared to expected non-singletons locations (a “quasi-capture” effect. These results suggest that the participants allocated their attention to the expected singleton location, rather than that the singleton itself captured attention. In Experiment 2, the same task-irrelevant color singleton was presented in a random position in 70% of the trials. This color frame was shown as a non-singleton in all of the 30% singleton-absent multicolored trials. A similar facilitation effect was obtained when the target appeared in the expected singleton color frame compared to other frames, in singleton-absent trials as in singleton-present trials. These results further support the idea that instances of singleton capture can be explained by top-down attentional shifts toward singleton items. Theoretical implications of these results are discussed. Mostly, the study calls to consider the possibility that all sources of attentional control may be represented by a continuous variable of top-down control, including the category of “physical salience.”

  7. Top-Down Prioritization of Salient Items May Produce the So-Called Stimulus-Driven Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoni, Hanna

    2018-01-01

    The current study proposes that top-down attentional prioritization of salient items may produce the so-called stimulus-driven capture. To test this proposal, the “expectation-based paradigm” was designed on the basis of a visual search task. In Experiment 1, a task-irrelevant singleton frame was presented at the same location in 70% of the trials. The target was either presented at chance level within the singleton location, or away from it. In line with the singleton capture phenomenon, participants were faster in identifying the target when it appeared in the singleton location compared to non-singleton locations. However, leaving out the singleton frame in 30% of the trials led to a similar effect; participants were faster in identifying the target when it appeared in the expected singleton location compared to expected non-singletons locations (a “quasi-capture” effect). These results suggest that the participants allocated their attention to the expected singleton location, rather than that the singleton itself captured attention. In Experiment 2, the same task-irrelevant color singleton was presented in a random position in 70% of the trials. This color frame was shown as a non-singleton in all of the 30% singleton-absent multicolored trials. A similar facilitation effect was obtained when the target appeared in the expected singleton color frame compared to other frames, in singleton-absent trials as in singleton-present trials. These results further support the idea that instances of singleton capture can be explained by top-down attentional shifts toward singleton items. Theoretical implications of these results are discussed. Mostly, the study calls to consider the possibility that all sources of attentional control may be represented by a continuous variable of top-down control, including the category of “physical salience.” PMID:29599731

  8. Microbial Diversity of a Heavily Polluted Microbial Mat and Its Community Changes following Degradation of Petroleum Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Raeid M. M.; Safi, Nimer M. D.; Köster, Jürgen; de Beer, Dirk; El-Nahhal, Yasser; Rullkötter, Jürgen; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2002-01-01

    We studied the microbial diversity of benthic cyanobacterial mats inhabiting a heavily polluted site in a coastal stream (Wadi Gaza) and monitored the microbial community response induced by exposure to and degradation of four model petroleum compounds in the laboratory. Phormidium- and Oscillatoria-like cyanobacterial morphotypes were dominant in the field. Bacteria belonging to different groups, mainly the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteriodes group, the γ and β subclasses of the class Proteobacteria, and the green nonsulfur bacteria, were also detected. In slurry experiments, these communities efficiently degraded phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene completely in 7 days both in the light and in the dark. n-Octadecane and pristane were degraded to 25 and 34% of their original levels, respectively, within 7 days, but there was no further degradation until 40 days. Both cyanobacterial and bacterial communities exhibited noticeable changes concomitant with degradation of the compounds. The populations enriched by exposure to petroleum compounds included a cyanobacterium affiliated phylogenetically with Halomicronema. Bacteria enriched both in the light and in the dark, but not bacteria enriched in any of the controls, belonged to the newly described Holophaga-Geothrix-Acidobacterium phylum. In addition, another bacterial population, found to be a member of green nonsulfur bacteria, was detected only in the bacteria treated in the light. All or some of the populations may play a significant role in metabolizing the petroleum compounds. We concluded that the microbial mats from Wadi Gaza are rich in microorganisms with high biodegradative potential. PMID:11916684

  9. Antiviral Activities and Putative Identification of Compounds in Microbial Extracts from the Hawaiian Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanan Lu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments are a rich source of significant bioactive compounds. The Hawaiian archipelago, located in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, hosts diverse microorganisms, including many endemic species. Thirty-eight microbial extracts from Hawaiian coastal waters were evaluated for their antiviral activity against four mammalian viruses including herpes simplex virus type one (HSV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, vaccinia virus and poliovirus type one (poliovirus-1 using in vitro cell culture assay. Nine of the 38 microbial crude extracts showed antiviral potencies and three of these nine microbial extracts exhibited significant activity against the enveloped viruses. A secosteroid, 5α(H,17α(H,(20R-beta-acetoxyergost-8(14-ene was putatively identified and confirmed to be the active compound in these marine microbial extracts. These results warrant future in-depth tests on the isolation of these active elements in order to explore and validate their antiviral potential as important therapeutic remedies.

  10. Sensory irritating potency of some microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) and a mixture of five MVOCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpi, A; Kasanen, J P; Alarie, Y; Kosma, V M; Pasanen, A L

    1999-01-01

    The authors investigated the ability/potencies of 3 microbial volatile organic compounds and a mixture of 5 microbial volatile organic compounds to cause eye and upper respiratory tract irritation (i.e., sensory irritation), with an animal bioassay. The authors estimated potencies by determining the concentration capable of decreasing the respiratory frequency of mice by 50% (i.e., the RD50 value). The RD50 values for 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanol, and 3-octanone were 182 mg/m3 (35 ppm), 1359 mg/m3 (256 ppm), and 17586 mg/m3 (3360 ppm), respectively. Recommended indoor air levels calculated from the individual RD50 values for 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanol, and 3-octanone were 100, 1000, and 13000 microg/m3, respectively-values considerably higher than the reported measured indoor air levels for these compounds. The RD50 value for a mixture of 5 microbial volatile organic compounds was also determined and found to be 3.6 times lower than estimated from the fractional concentrations and the respective RD50s of the individual components. The data support the conclusion that a variety of microbial volatile organic compounds may have some synergistic effects for the sensory irritation response, which constrains the interpretation and application of recommended indoor air levels of individual microbial volatile organic compounds. The results also showed that if a particular component of a mixture was much more potent than the other components, it may dominate the sensory irritation effect. With respect to irritation symptoms reported in moldy houses, the results of this study indicate that the contribution of microbial volatile organic compounds to these symptoms seems less than previously supposed.

  11. Influence of phenolic compounds on rumen microbial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitti, D.M.S.S.; Abdalla, A.L.; Silva Filho, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    An 'in vitro' experiment is carried out to examine the effect of tannic acid on rumen microbial activity, due to the toxicity of phenolic acids on many microrganisms. Rumen content is incubated with sodium bicarbonate, glucose and different quantities of tannic acid. 1 μCi of 32 p-labelled phosphate is added and after 6 hours the incorporated activity is measured. (M.A.C.) [pt

  12. A conceptual framework for an ecosystem services-based assessment of the so-called "emergency stabilization" measures following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sandra; Prats, Sergio; Ribeiro, Cristina; Verheijen, Frank; Fleskens, Luuk; Keizer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires have become a major environmental concern in many Southern European countries over the past few decades. This includes Portugal, where, on average, some 100 000 ha of rural lands are affected by wildfire every year. While policies, laws, plans and public expenditure in Portugal continue to be largely directed towards fire combat and, arguably, to a lesser extent fire prevention, there has only recently been increasing attention for post-fire land management. For example following frequent and several large wildfires during the summer of 2010, so-called emergency stabilization measures were implemented in 16 different burnt areas in northern and central Portugal, using funds of the EU Rural Development Plan in Portugal (PRODER). The measures that were implemented included mulching (i.e. application of a protective layer of organic material), seeding and the construction of log barriers. However, the effectiveness of the implemented measures has not been monitored or otherwise assessed in a systematic manner. In fact, until very recently none of the post-fire emergency stabilization measures contemplated under PRODER seem to have been studied in an exhaustive manner in Portugal, whether under laboratory or field conditions. Prats et al. (2012, 2013, 2014) tested two of these measures by field trials, i.e. hydro-mulching and forest residue mulching. The authors found both measures to be highly effective in terms of reducing overland flow and especially erosion. It remains a challenge, however, to assess the effectiveness of these and other measures in a broader context, not only beyond overland flow and sediment losses but also beyond the spatio-temporal scale that are typical for such field trials (plots and the first two years after fire). This challenge will be addressed in the Portuguese case study of the RECARE project. Nonetheless, the present study wants to be a first attempt at an ecosystem services-based assessment of mulching as a post

  13. Immense Essence of Excellence: Marine Microbial Bioactive Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ira Bhatnagar; Se-Kwon Kim

    2010-01-01

    Oceans have borne most of the biological activities on our planet. A number of biologically active compounds with varying degrees of action, such as anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-microtubule, anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, photo protective, as well as antibiotic and antifouling properties, have been isolated to date from marine sources. The marine environment also represents a largely unexplored source for isolation of new microbes (bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, microalgae-cyanobacteria and...

  14. Green tea yogurt: major phenolic compounds and microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirdivani, Shabboo; Baba, Ahmad Salihin Hj

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate fermentation of milk in the presence of green tea (Camellia sinensis) with respect to changes in antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds and the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Pasteurized full fat cow's milk and starter culture were incubated at 41 °C in the presence of two different types of green tea extracts. The yogurts formed were refrigerated (4 °C) for further analysis. The total phenolic content was highest (p yogurt (MGT) followed by steam-treated green tea (JGT) and plain yogurts. Four major compounds in MGTY and JGTY were detected. The highest concentration of major phenolic compounds in both samples was related to quercetin-rhamnosylgalactoside and quercetin-3-O-galactosyl-rhamnosyl-glucoside for MGTY and JGTY respectively during first 7 day of storage. Diphenyl picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power methods showed highest antioxidant capacity in MGTY, JGTY and PY. Streptococcus thermophillus and Lactobacillus spp. were highest in MGTY followed by JGTY and PY. This paper evaluates the implementation of green tea yogurt as a new product with functional properties and valuable component to promote the growth of beneficial yogurt bacteria and prevention of oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant activity of yogurt.

  15. Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1985-10-01

    A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  16. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  17. Microbial communities related to volatile organic compound emission in automobile air conditioning units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Nina; Burghartz, Melanie; Remus, Lars; Kaufholz, Anna-Lena; Nawrath, Thorben; Rohde, Manfred; Schulz, Stefan; Roselius, Louisa; Schaper, Jörg; Mamber, Oliver; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina

    2013-10-01

    During operation of mobile air conditioning (MAC) systems in automobiles, malodours can occur. We studied the microbial communities found on contaminated heat exchanger fins of 45 evaporators from car MAC systems which were operated in seven different regions of the world and identified corresponding volatile organic compounds. Collected biofilms were examined by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization. The detected bacteria were loosely attached to the metal surface. Further analyses of the bacteria using PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing of isolated 16S rRNA gene fragments identified highly divergent microbial communities with multiple members of the Alphaproteobacteriales, Methylobacteria were the prevalent bacteria. In addition, Sphingomonadales, Burkholderiales, Bacillales, Alcanivorax spp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. were found among many others depending on the location the evaporators were operated. Interestingly, typical pathogenic bacteria related to air conditioning systems including Legionella spp. were not found. In order to determine the nature of the chemical compounds produced by the bacteria, the volatile organic compounds were examined by closed loop stripping analysis and identified by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sulphur compounds, i.e. di-, tri- and multiple sulphides, acetylthiazole, aromatic compounds and diverse substituted pyrazines were detected. Mathematical clustering of the determined microbial community structures against their origin identified a European/American/Arabic cluster versus two mainly tropical Asian clusters. Interestingly, clustering of the determined volatiles against the origin of the corresponding MAC revealed a highly similar pattern. A close relationship of microbial community structure and resulting malodours to the climate and air quality at the location of MAC operation was concluded.

  18. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catal, Tunc [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Li, Kaichang [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Bermek, Hakan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-05-15

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains. (author)

  19. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Fan, Yanzhen; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains.

  20. Microbial Cell Factories for the Production of Terpenoid Flavor and Fragrance Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, Florence M; Drummond, Laura; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2018-03-14

    Terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds are of high interest to the aroma industry. Microbial production offers an alternative sustainable access to the desired terpenoids independent of natural sources. Genetically engineered microorganisms can be used to synthesize terpenoids from cheap and renewable resources. Due to its modular architecture, terpenoid biosynthesis is especially well suited for the microbial cell factory concept: a platform host engineered for a high flux toward the central C 5 prenyl diphosphate precursors enables the production of a broad range of target terpenoids just by varying the pathway modules converting the C 5 intermediates to the product of interest. In this review typical terpenoid flavor and fragrance compounds marketed or under development by biotech and aroma companies are given, and the specificities of the aroma market are discussed. The main part of this work focuses on key strategies and recent advances to engineer microbes to become efficient terpenoid producers.

  1. Conversion of sulfur compounds and microbial community in anaerobic treatment of fish and pork waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Yao, Xing-Zhi; Chen, Min; Ma, Ruo-Chan; Li, Hua-Jun; Wang, Chen; Ding, Shen-Hua

    2018-04-07

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are not only the main source of malodor in anaerobic treatment of organic waste, but also pose a threat to human health. In this study, VSCs production and microbial community was investigated during the anaerobic degradation of fish and pork waste. The results showed that after the operation of 245 days, 94.5% and 76.2% of sulfur compounds in the fish and pork waste was converted into VSCs. Among the detected VSCs including H 2 S, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, ethanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, methanethiol was the major component with the maximum concentration of 4.54% and 3.28% in the fish and pork waste, respectively. The conversion of sulfur compounds including total sulfur, SO 4 2- -S, S 2- , methionine and cysteine followed the first-order kinetics. Miseq sequencing analysis showed that Acinetobacter, Clostridium, Proteus, Thiobacillus, Hyphomicrobium and Pseudomonas were the main known sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms in the fish and pork waste. The C/N value had most significant influence on the microbial community in the fish and pork waste. A main conversion of sulfur compounds with CH 3 SH as the key intermediate was firstly hypothesized during the anaerobic degradation of fish and pork waste. These findings are helpful to understand the conversion of sulfur compounds and to develop techniques to control ordor pollution in the anaerobic treatment of organic waste. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Exposure to grain dust and microbial components in the Norwegian grain and compound feed industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstensen, Anne Straumfors; Heldal, Kari Kulvik; Wouters, Inge M; Skogstad, Marit; Ellingsen, Dag G; Eduard, Wijnand

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to extensively characterize grain workers' personal exposure during work in Norwegian grain elevators and compound feed mills, to identify differences in exposures between the workplaces and seasons, and to study the correlations between different microbial components. Samples of airborne dust (n = 166) were collected by full-shift personal sampling during work in 20 grain elevators and compound feed mills during one autumn season and two winter seasons. The personal exposure to grain dust, endotoxins, β-1→3-glucans, bacteria, and fungal spores was quantified. Correlations between dust and microbial components and differences between workplaces and seasons were investigated. Determinants of endotoxin and β-1→3-glucan exposure were evaluated by linear mixed-effect regression modeling. The workers were exposed to an overall geometric mean of 1.0mg m(-3) inhalable grain dust [geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 3.7], 628 endotoxin units m(-3) (GSD = 5.9), 7.4 µg m(-3) of β-1→3-glucan (GSD = 5.6), 21 × 10(4) bacteria m(-3) (GSD = 7.9) and 3.6 × 10(4) fungal spores m(-3) (GSD = 3.4). The grain dust exposure levels were similar across workplaces and seasons, but the microbial content of the grain dust varied substantially between workplaces. Exposure levels of all microbial components were significantly higher in grain elevators compared with all other workplaces. The grain dust exposure was significantly correlated (Pearson's r) with endotoxin (rp = 0.65), β-1→3-glucan (rp = 0.72), bacteria (rp = 0.44) and fungal spore (rp = 0.48) exposure, whereas the explained variances were strongly dependent on the workplace. Bacteria, grain dust, and workplace were important determinants for endotoxin exposure, whereas fungal spores, grain dust, and workplace were important determinants for β-1→3-glucan exposure. Although the workers were exposed to a relatively low mean dust level, the microbial exposure was high. Furthermore, the

  3. A novel aromatic oil compound inhibits microbial overgrowth on feet: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misner Bill D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Athlete's Foot (Tinea pedis is a form of ringworm associated with highly contagious yeast-fungi colonies, although they look like bacteria. Foot bacteria overgrowth produces a harmless pungent odor, however, uncontrolled proliferation of yeast-fungi produces small vesicles, fissures, scaling, and maceration with eroded areas between the toes and the plantar surface of the foot, resulting in intense itching, blisters, and cracking. Painful microbial foot infection may prevent athletic participation. Keeping the feet clean and dry with the toenails trimmed reduces the incidence of skin disease of the feet. Wearing sandals in locker and shower rooms prevents intimate contact with the infecting organisms and alleviates most foot-sensitive infections. Enclosing feet in socks and shoes generates a moisture-rich environment that stimulates overgrowth of pungent both aerobic bacteria and infectious yeast-fungi. Suppression of microbial growth may be accomplished by exposing the feet to air to enhance evaporation to reduce moistures' growth-stimulating effect and is often neglected. There is an association between yeast-fungi overgrowths and disabling foot infections. Potent agents virtually exterminate some microbial growth, but the inevitable presence of infection under the nails predicts future infection. Topical antibiotics present a potent approach with the ideal agent being one that removes moisture producing antibacterial-antifungal activity. Severe infection may require costly prescription drugs, salves, and repeated treatment. Methods A 63-y female volunteered to enclose feet in shoes and socks for 48 hours. Aerobic bacteria and yeast-fungi counts were determined by swab sample incubation technique (1 after 48-hours feet enclosure, (2 after washing feet, and (3 after 8-hours socks-shoes exposure to a aromatic oil powder-compound consisting of arrowroot, baking soda, basil oil, tea tree oil, sage oil, and clove oil. Conclusion

  4. A Novel Method for Analyzing Microbially Affiliated Volatile Organic Compounds in Soil Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhs, C. V.; McNeal, K. S.

    2010-12-01

    A concerted, international effort by citizens, governments, industries and educational systems is necessary to address the myriad environmental issues that face us today. The authors of this paper concentrate on soil environments and, specifically, the methods currently used to characterize them. The ability to efficiently and effectively monitor and characterize various soils is desired, allows for the study, supervision, and protection of natural and cultivated ecosystems, and may assist stakeholders in meeting governmentally-imposed environmental standards. This research addresses soil characterization by a comparison of four methods that emphasize a combination of microbial community and metabolic measures: BIOLOG, fatty acid methyl-ester analysis (FAME), descriptive physical and chemical analysis (moisture content, pH, carbon content, nutrient content, and grain size), and the novel soil-microbe volatile organic compound analysis (SMVOC) presented in this work. In order to achieve the method comparison, soils were collected from three climatic regions (Bahamas, Michigan, and Mississippi), with three samples taken from niche ecosystems found at each climatic region (a total of nine sites). Of interest to the authors is whether or not an investigation of microbial communities and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by microbial communities from nine separate soil ecosystems provides useful information about soil dynamics. In essence, is analysis of soil-derived VOCs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) an effective method for characterizing microbial communities and their metabolic activity of soils rapidly and accurately compared with the other three traditional characterization methods? Preliminary results suggest that VOCs in each of these locales differ with changes in soil types, soil moisture, and bacterial community. Each niche site shows distinct patterns in both VOCs and BIOLOG readings. Results will be presented to show the

  5. Microbial colonization of biopolymeric thin films containing natural compounds and antibiotics fabricated by MAPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, PO Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Surdu, A.V.; Grumezescu, A.M.; Oprea, A.E.; Trusca, R.; Vasile, O. [Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Polizu Street No. 1–7, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Dorcioman, G.; Visan, A.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, PO Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mihaiescu, D. [Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Organic Chemistry, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 1–7 Polizu Street, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Enculescu, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics, PO Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chifiriuc, M.C. [Microbiology Immunology Department, Faculty of Biology, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest—ICUB, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest, 77206 Bucharest (Romania); Boehm, R.D.; Narayan, R.J. [Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chrisey, D.B. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • We deposited thin composite quercetin/polyvinylpyrrolidone/antibiotic films with close resemblance to the starting/drop-cast composition by MAPLE. • Quercetin flavonoid shows an anti-biofilm activity comparable to that of the tested large-spectrum antibiotics (norfloxacin or cefuroxime), especially in case of 72 h biofilms. • These results could account for the possible use of quercetin as an alternative to antibiotics to combat the mature biofilms developed on different substrates. • MAPLE may be used to produce implantable medical devices that provide a relatively long term in vitro stability and resistance to the growth of microorganisms. - Abstract: Although a great number of antibiotics are currently available, they are often rendered ineffective by the ability of microbial strains to develop genetic resistance and to grow in biofilms. Since many antimicrobial agents poorly penetrate biofilms, biofilm-associated infections often require high concentrations of antimicrobial agents for effective treatment. Among the various strategies that may be used to inhibit microbial biofilms, one strategy that has generated significant interest involves the use of bioactive surfaces that are resistant to microbial colonization. In this respect, we used matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) involving a pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) to obtain thin composite biopolymeric films containing natural (flavonoid) or synthetic (antibiotic) compounds as bioactive substances. Chemical composition and film structures were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Films morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antimicrobial assay of the microbial biofilms formed on these films was assessed by the viable cell counts method. The flavonoid-containing thin films showed increased resistance to microbial colonization

  6. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Zhang, Xi-Chang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liu, Weiping [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  7. Microbial colonization of biopolymeric thin films containing natural compounds and antibiotics fabricated by MAPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, R.; Surdu, A.V.; Grumezescu, A.M.; Oprea, A.E.; Trusca, R.; Vasile, O.; Dorcioman, G.; Visan, A.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Enculescu, M.; Chifiriuc, M.C.; Boehm, R.D.; Narayan, R.J.; Chrisey, D.B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We deposited thin composite quercetin/polyvinylpyrrolidone/antibiotic films with close resemblance to the starting/drop-cast composition by MAPLE. • Quercetin flavonoid shows an anti-biofilm activity comparable to that of the tested large-spectrum antibiotics (norfloxacin or cefuroxime), especially in case of 72 h biofilms. • These results could account for the possible use of quercetin as an alternative to antibiotics to combat the mature biofilms developed on different substrates. • MAPLE may be used to produce implantable medical devices that provide a relatively long term in vitro stability and resistance to the growth of microorganisms. - Abstract: Although a great number of antibiotics are currently available, they are often rendered ineffective by the ability of microbial strains to develop genetic resistance and to grow in biofilms. Since many antimicrobial agents poorly penetrate biofilms, biofilm-associated infections often require high concentrations of antimicrobial agents for effective treatment. Among the various strategies that may be used to inhibit microbial biofilms, one strategy that has generated significant interest involves the use of bioactive surfaces that are resistant to microbial colonization. In this respect, we used matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) involving a pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) to obtain thin composite biopolymeric films containing natural (flavonoid) or synthetic (antibiotic) compounds as bioactive substances. Chemical composition and film structures were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Films morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antimicrobial assay of the microbial biofilms formed on these films was assessed by the viable cell counts method. The flavonoid-containing thin films showed increased resistance to microbial colonization

  8. In silico identification and construction of microbial gene clusters associated with biodegradation of xenobiotic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Garima; Kumari, Anjani; Pant, Aditya Bhushan; Srivastava, Prachi

    2018-01-01

    Chemical substances not showing any importance in existence of biological systems and causing serious health hazards may be designated as Xenobiotic compound. Elimination or degradation of these unwanted substances is a major issue of concern for current time research. Process of biodegradation is a very important aspect of current research as discussed in current manuscript. Current study focuses on the detailed mining of data for the construction of microbial consortia for wide range of xenobiotics compounds. Intensive literature search was done for the construction of this library. Desired data was retrieved from NCBI in fasta format. Data was analysed through homology approaches by using BLAST. This homology based searched enriched with a great vision that not only bacterial population but many other cheap and potential sources are available for different xenobiotic degradation. Though it was focused that bacterial population covers a major part of biodegradation which is near about 90.6% but algae and fungi are also showing promising future in degradation of some important xenobiotic compounds. Analysis of data reveals that Pseudomonas putida has potential for degrading maximum compounds. Establishment of correlation through cluster analysis signifies that Pseudomonas putida, Aspergillus niger and Skeletonema costatum can have combined traits that can be used in finding out actual evolutionary relationship between these species. These findings may also givea new outcome in terms of much cheaper and eco-friendly source in the area of biodegradation of specified xenobiotic compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Removal of radioactive material by so-called manganese-zeolite. [Mn-54, Fe-59, Co-60, Cs-137, Ru-complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, T; Ishiyama, T [Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan)

    1975-03-01

    Decontamination property of the so-called manganese-zeolite which was made from montmorillonite was studied by a column method. The following results were obtained: (1) /sup 54/Mn or /sup 59/Fe is removed completely. (2) /sup 60/Co or /sup 137/Cs is removed effectively. It is attributed to the adsorption on a broken-bond of quartz or feldsper. (3) Nitro nitrosylruthenium and (RuORu) nitrate are hardly removed, however, a little amount of nitrato nitrosylruthenium is removed. (4) Contact time of radioactive material with manganese-zeolite is the important factor for the removal of radioactive material. Each radioactive material was hardly removed at the contact time less than 20 min.

  10. Organizational changes and automation: By means of a customer-oriented policy the so-called 'island culture' disappears: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Automation offers great opportunities in the efforts of energy utilities in the Netherlands to reorganize towards more customer-oriented businesses. However, automation in itself is not enough. First, the organizational structure has to be changed considerably. Various energy utilities have already started on it. The restructuring principle is the same everywhere, but the way it is implemented differs widely. In this article attention is paid to different customer information systems. These systems can put an end to the so-called island culture within the energy utility organizations. The systems discussed are IRD of Systema and RIVA of SAP (both German software businesses), and two Dutch systems: Numis-2000 of Multihouse and KIS/400 of NUON Info-Systemen

  11. Microbial turnover and incorporation of organic compounds in oil sand mining reclamation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappé, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in the development of new soils and in the reclamation of disturbed landscapes. Especially in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils their ability to degrade organic matter and pollutants makes them essential to re-establish full ecosystem functionality. Microbes are also involved in the mobilization of nutrients for plant growth and in the production of greenhouse gases. Reclamation sites from oil sand mining activities in Alberta, Canada, contain residual bitumen as well as other hydrocarbons. So, these areas provide a great opportunity to study microbial degradation of residual contaminants from oil sand. To get an impression of degradation rates as well as metabolic pathways, incubation experiments were performed in the lab. We measured microbial turnover (catabolic metabolism) and incorporation (anabolic metabolism) rates of different common organic compounds in samples from differently treated reclamation sites - with plant cover and without plant cover. About 10 g of sample material was suspended in 10 mL of a solution that mimics the in-situ concentration of dissolved ions. Radioactively labelled 14C-acetate was added as a common substrate, whereas 14C-naphthenic acid was chosen to investigate the microbial community's capability to utilize a typical hydrocarbon pollutant in oil sand tailings as a nutrient source. To test for the influence of fertilizers on microbial activity, phosphate, nitrate and potassium were added to some samples in different combinations. Incubations were run over two different time periods (7 and 14 days). At the end of each incubation experiment, the amount of produced 14CO2, 14C incorporated into the cells and the remaining unreacted 14C in the slurry were measured. First results show that most of the added 14C-acetate is used for respiration as it is mostly released as 14CO2. In upper soil layers only about 3% of 14C is incorporated into cells, whereas in deeper horizons with lower cell abundances

  12. Development of a novel compound microbial agent for degradation of kitchen waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kaining; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Ying; Tang, Hao; Zhou, Chuanbin; Cao, Aixin; Zhao, Guozhu; Guo, Hui

    Large quantities of kitchen waste are produced in modern society and its disposal poses serious environmental and social problems. The aim of this study was to isolate degradative strains from kitchen waste and to develop a novel and effective microbial agent. One hundred and four strains were isolated from kitchen waste and the 84 dominant strains were used to inoculate protein-, starch-, fat- and cellulose-containing media for detecting their degradability. Twelve dominant strains of various species with high degradability (eight bacteria, one actinomycetes and three fungi) were selected to develop a compound microbial agent "YH" and five strains of these species including H7 (Brevibacterium epidermidis), A3 (Paenibacillus polymyxa), E3 (Aspergillus japonicus), F9 (Aspergillus versicolor) and A5 (Penicillium digitatum), were new for kitchen waste degradation. YH was compared with three commercial microbial agents-"Tiangeng" (TG), "Yilezai" (YLZ) and Effective Microorganisms (EM), by their effects on reduction, maturity and deodorization. The results showed that YH exerted the greatest efficacy on mass loss which decreased about 65.87% after 14 days. The agent inhibited NH 3 and H 2 S emissions significantly during composting process. The concentration of NH 3 decreased from 7.1 to 3.2ppm and that of H 2 S reduced from 0.7 to 0.2ppm. Moreover, E 4 /E 6 (Extinction value 460nm /Extinction value 665nm ) of YH decreased from 2.51 to 1.31, which meant YH had an obvious maturity effect. These results highlighted the potential application of YH in composting kitchen waste. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a novel compound microbial agent for degradation of kitchen waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaining Zhao

    Full Text Available Abstract Large quantities of kitchen waste are produced in modern society and its disposal poses serious environmental and social problems. The aim of this study was to isolate degradative strains from kitchen waste and to develop a novel and effective microbial agent. One hundred and four strains were isolated from kitchen waste and the 84 dominant strains were used to inoculate protein-, starch-, fat- and cellulose-containing media for detecting their degradability. Twelve dominant strains of various species with high degradability (eight bacteria, one actinomycetes and three fungi were selected to develop a compound microbial agent "YH" and five strains of these species including H7 (Brevibacterium epidermidis, A3 (Paenibacillus polymyxa, E3 (Aspergillus japonicus, F9 (Aspergillus versicolor and A5 (Penicillium digitatum, were new for kitchen waste degradation. YH was compared with three commercial microbial agents-"Tiangeng" (TG, "Yilezai" (YLZ and Effective Microorganisms (EM, by their effects on reduction, maturity and deodorization. The results showed that YH exerted the greatest efficacy on mass loss which decreased about 65.87% after 14 days. The agent inhibited NH3 and H2S emissions significantly during composting process. The concentration of NH3 decreased from 7.1 to 3.2 ppm and that of H2S reduced from 0.7 to 0.2 ppm. Moreover, E4/E6 (Extinction value460nm/Extinction value665nm of YH decreased from 2.51 to 1.31, which meant YH had an obvious maturity effect. These results highlighted the potential application of YH in composting kitchen waste.

  14. Use of natural compounds to improve the microbial stability of Amaranth-based homemade fresh pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nobile, M A; Di Benedetto, N; Suriano, N; Conte, A; Lamacchia, C; Corbo, M R; Sinigaglia, M

    2009-04-01

    A study on the use of natural antimicrobial compounds to improve the microbiological stability of refrigerated amaranth-based homemade fresh pasta is presented in this work. In particular, the antimicrobial activity of thymol, lemon extract, chitosan and grapefruit seed extract (GFSE) has been tested against mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria, total coliforms, Staphylococcus spp., yeasts and moulds. A sensory analysis on both fresh and cooked pasta was also run. Results suggest that chitosan and GFSE strongly increase the microbial acceptability limit of the investigated spoilage microorganisms, being the former the most effective. Thymol efficiently reduces the growth of mesophilic bacteria, psychrotrophic bacteria and Staphylococcus spp., whereas it does not affect, substantially, the growth cycle of total coliforms. Lemon extract is the less effective in preventing microbial growth. In fact, it is able to delay only total mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacterial evolution. From a sensorial point of view no significant differences were recorded between the control samples and all the types of loaded amaranth-based pasta.

  15. Variation in the pattern of omissions and substitutions of grammatical morphemes in the spontaneous speech of so-called agrammatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, G; Silveri, M C; Romani, C; Caramazza, A

    1989-04-01

    We describe the patterns of omissions (and substitutions) of freestanding grammatical morphemes and the patterns of substitutions of bound grammatical morphemes in 20 so-called agrammatic patients. Extreme variation was observed in the patterns of omissions and substitutions of grammatical morphemes, both in terms of the distribution of errors for different grammatical morphemes as well as in terms of the distribution of omissions versus substitutions. Results are discussed in the context of current debates concerning the possibility of a theoretically motivated distinction between the clinical categories of agrammatism and paragrammatism and, more generally, concerning the theoretical usefulness of any clinical category. The conclusion is reached that the observed heterogeneity in the production of grammatical morphemes among putatively agrammatic patients renders the clinical category of agrammatism, and by extension all other clinical categories from the classical classification scheme (e.g., Broca's aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia, and so forth) to more recent classificatory attempts (e.g., surface dyslexia, deep dysgraphia, and so forth), theoretically useless.

  16. Becker muscular dystrophy-like myopathy regarded as so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy" in a pig: a case report and its diagnostic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Aihara, Naoyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Kousaka, Shinichi; Nagafuchi, Tsuneyuki; Ochiai, Mariko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Asai, Tetsuo; Oishi, Koji

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of human Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)-like myopathy that was characterized by the declined stainability of dystrophin at sarcolemma in a pig and the immunostaining for dystrophin on the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The present case was found in a meat inspection center. The pig looked appeared healthy at the ante-mortem inspection. Muscular abnormalities were detected after carcass dressing as pale, discolored skeletal muscles with prominent fat infiltrations and considered so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy". Microscopic examination revealed following characteristics: diffused fat infiltration into the skeletal muscle and degeneration and regeneration of the remaining skeletal muscle fibers. Any lesions that were suspected of neurogenic atrophy, traumatic muscular degeneration, glycogen storage disease or other porcine muscular disorders were not observed. The immunostaining for dystrophin was conducted and confirmed to be applicable on FFPE porcine muscular tissues and revealed diminished stainability of dystrophin at the sarcolemma in the present case. Based on the histological observations and immunostaining results, the present case was diagnosed with BMD-like myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormality in a pig. Although the genetic properties were not clear, the present BMD-like myopathy implied the occurrence of dystrophinopathy in pigs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural case of myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormalities in a pig.

  17. [Study of androgen receptor and phosphoglycerate kinase gene polymorphism in major cellular components of the so-called pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng-jie; Zhang, Xiu-wei; Zhang, Yong-xing; Dai, Shun-dong; Wang, En-hua

    2006-05-01

    To study the clonality of polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells in the so-called pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH). 17 female surgically resected PSH were found. The polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells of the 17 PSH cases were microdissected from routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Genomic DNA was extracted, pretreated through incubation with methylation-sensitive restrictive endonuclease HhaI or HpaII, and amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction for X chromosome-linked androgen receptor (AR) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) genes. The length polymorphism of AR gene was demonstrated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The PGK gene products were treated with Bst XI and resolved on agarose gel. Amongst the 17 female cases of PSH, 15 samples were successfully amplified for AR and PGK genes. The rates of polymorphism were 53% (8/15) and 27% (4/15) for AR and PGK genes respectively. Polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells of 10 cases which were suitable for clonality study, showed the same loss of alleles (clonality ratio = 0) or unbalanced methylation pattern (clonality ratio < 0.25). The polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells in PSH demonstrate patterns of monoclonal proliferation, indicating that both represent true neoplastic cells.

  18. Solving "Smart City" Transport Problems by Designing Carpooling Gamification Schemes with Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of the So-Called "Mordor of Warsaw".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Robert; Pałka, Piotr; Turek, Agnieszka

    2018-01-06

    To reduce energy consumption and improve residents' quality of life, "smart cities" should use not only modern technologies, but also the social innovations of the "Internet of Things" (IoT) era. This article attempts to solve transport problems in a smart city's office district by utilizing gamification that incentivizes the carpooling system. The goal of the devised system is to significantly reduce the number of cars, and, consequently, to alleviate traffic jams, as well as to curb pollution and energy consumption. A representative sample of the statistical population of people working in one of the biggest office hubs in Poland (the so-called "Mordor of Warsaw") was surveyed. The collected data were processed using spatial data mining methods, and the results were a set of parameters for the multi-agent system. This approach made it possible to run a series of simulations on a set of 100,000 agents and to select an effective gamification methodology that supports the carpooling process. The implementation of the proposed solutions (a "serious game" variation of urban games) would help to reduce the number of cars by several dozen percent, significantly reduce energy consumption, eliminate traffic jams, and increase the activity of the smart city residents.

  19. Characteristics of boys with the so-called true undescended testis diagnosed at the third postnatal month--a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Stelios; Urbán, Robert; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2015-07-01

    Undescended testis (cryptorchidism) is a common congenital abnormality of male genital organs diagnosed at birth followed with frequent postnatal descensus. However, the so-called isolated true undescended testis (ITUT) diagnosed at the third postnatal month seems to be an independent defect-entity, and this hypothesis was planned to confirm or reject in the study. The evaluation of birth outcomes and maternal socio-demographic data of cases with ITUT in the population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry. There was a higher rate of preterm birth and particularly of low birthweight in 2052 cases with ITUT compared to 24,814 population male controls without any defects. The rate of twins was not higher in cases with older mothers, higher birth order and lower socio-economic status. The comparison of data of boys with undescended testis diagnosed at birth found in the previous study and with ITUT in this study confirmed our hypothesis. Undescended testis can be differentiated into two subgroups: boys with frequent postnatal descensus mainly after preterm delivery and boys with ITUT without postnatal testis descensus with frequent intrauterine growth restriction, older mothers with higher birth order and low socio-economic status.

  20. Work Tasks as Determinants of Grain Dust and Microbial Exposure in the Norwegian Grain and Compound Feed Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straumfors, Anne; Heldal, Kari Kulvik; Wouters, Inge M; Eduard, Wijnand

    OBJECTIVES: The grain and compound feed industry entails inevitable risks of exposure to grain dust and its microbial content. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate task-dependent exposure differences in order to create knowledge basis for awareness and exposure reducing measures

  1. Production of a High Efficiency Microbial Flocculant by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 Using Compound Organic Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Jiao

    2010-11-01

    The production of a high efficiency microbial flocculant (MBF) by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 using compound organic wastewater was investigated. To cut down the cost of the MBF production, several nutritive organic wastewaters were selected to replace glucose and peptone as the carbon source and the nitrogen source in the optimized medium of strain TJ-1, respectively. The compound wastewater of the milk candy and the soybean milk was found to be good carbon source and nitrogen source for this strain to produce MBF. The cost-effective culture medium consists of (per liter): 800 mL wastewater of milk candy, 200 mL wastewater of soybean milk, 0.3 g MgSO4ṡ7 H2O, 5 g K2HPO4, 2 g and KH2PO4, pH 7.0. The economic cost for the MBF production can be cut down over a half by using the developed culture medium. Furthermore, the utilization of the two wastewaters in the preparation of culture medium of strain TJ-1 can not only save their big treatment cost, but also realize their resource reuse.

  2. Synthesis of microbial nitrogen compounds in the rumen and their digestion in the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.H.; Salter, D.N.; McAllan, A.B.; Williams, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Pathways and efficiency of NPN utilization were studied after introducing isonitrogenous feeds containing urea labelled with 15 N with or without groundnut protein into the rumen of the young steer. The 15 N abundance in rumen ammonia decreased from 1 h after the dose whereas that in suspended bacteria (only a small part of the total population but regarded, with reservation, as representative) increased to a peak value at 3-5 h. Patterns of incorporation into different nitrogen constituents of the bacteria indicated that part of the 15 N first moved rapidly into a labile pool, which included amide nitrogen, and then moved from this pool into other amino acids. Different amino acids were labelled to different extents (lowest for proline and arginine, highest for aspartic acid and alanine), presumably as different amounts of pre-formed amino acids were used in protein synthesis. Differences largely disappeared when the diet with urea as the only nitrogen source was given. Estimates of microbial 15 N recovery at the duodenum confirmed earlier findings that overall incorporation was least when the latter diet was given, and no improvement was seen when the urea was given in three doses over 4 h instead of in a single dose. Lactosyl, like glucosyl, ureide was degraded fairly slowly in the rumen and is being studied as a possible NPN source likely to yield simultaneous ammonia and energy for microbial growth. Studies on the origin and composition of nitrogen compounds entering the duodenum showed that the RNA of rumen bacteria (labelled with 32 P) contributed 82-109% of the RNA entering the duodenum of the steer. It was also shown that protecting dietary casein with formaldehyde reduced its degradability in the rumen to such an extent that a deficiency of fermentable nitrogen in that organ ensued. In other experiments with two calves receiving flaked maize and hay, net digestibility of nitrogen compounds between duodenum and ileum was about 60%. True digestibility

  3. Physico-chemical parameters, bioactive compounds and microbial quality of thermo-sonicated carrot juice during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Héctor E; Garnica-Romo, Ma Guadalupe; Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela; Pokhrel, Prashant Raj; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V

    2015-04-01

    Thermosonication has been successfully tested in food for microbial inactivation; however, changes in bioactive compounds and shelf-life of treated products have not been thoroughly investigated. Carrot juice was thermo-sonicated (24 kHz, 120 μm amplitude) at 50 °C, 54 °C and 58 °C for 10 min (acoustic power 2204.40, 2155.72, 2181.68 mW/mL, respectively). Quality parameters and microbial growth were evaluated after processing and during storage at 4 °C. Control and sonicated treatments at 50 °C and 54 °C had 10, 12 and 14 d of shelf-life, respectively. Samples sonicated at 58 °C had the best quality; microbial growth remained low at around 3-log for mesophiles, 4.5-log for yeasts and molds and 2-log for enterobacteria after 20 d of storage. Furthermore, thermo-sonicated juice at 58 °C retained >98% of carotenoids and 100% of ascorbic acid. Phenolic compounds increased in all stored, treated juices. Thermo-sonication is therefore a promising technology for preserving the quality of carrot juice by minimising the physicochemical changes during storage, retarding microbial growth and retaining the bioactive compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial communities and bioactive compounds in marine sponges of the family irciniidae-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoim, Cristiane C P; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-09-30

    Marine sponges harbour complex microbial communities of ecological and biotechnological importance. Here, we propose the application of the widespread sponge family Irciniidae as an appropriate model in microbiology and biochemistry research. Half a gram of one Irciniidae specimen hosts hundreds of bacterial species-the vast majority of which are difficult to cultivate-and dozens of fungal and archaeal species. The structure of these symbiont assemblages is shaped by the sponge host and is highly stable over space and time. Two types of quorum-sensing molecules have been detected in these animals, hinting at microbe-microbe and host-microbe signalling being important processes governing the dynamics of the Irciniidae holobiont. Irciniids are vulnerable to disease outbreaks, and concerns have emerged about their conservation in a changing climate. They are nevertheless amenable to mariculture and laboratory maintenance, being attractive targets for metabolite harvesting and experimental biology endeavours. Several bioactive terpenoids and polyketides have been retrieved from Irciniidae sponges, but the actual producer (host or symbiont) of these compounds has rarely been clarified. To tackle this, and further pertinent questions concerning the functioning, resilience and physiology of these organisms, truly multi-layered approaches integrating cutting-edge microbiology, biochemistry, genetics and zoology research are needed.

  5. Microbial Communities and Bioactive Compounds in Marine Sponges of the Family Irciniidae—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane C. P. Hardoim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges harbour complex microbial communities of ecological and biotechnological importance. Here, we propose the application of the widespread sponge family Irciniidae as an appropriate model in microbiology and biochemistry research. Half a gram of one Irciniidae specimen hosts hundreds of bacterial species—the vast majority of which are difficult to cultivate—and dozens of fungal and archaeal species. The structure of these symbiont assemblages is shaped by the sponge host and is highly stable over space and time. Two types of quorum-sensing molecules have been detected in these animals, hinting at microbe-microbe and host-microbe signalling being important processes governing the dynamics of the Irciniidae holobiont. Irciniids are vulnerable to disease outbreaks, and concerns have emerged about their conservation in a changing climate. They are nevertheless amenable to mariculture and laboratory maintenance, being attractive targets for metabolite harvesting and experimental biology endeavours. Several bioactive terpenoids and polyketides have been retrieved from Irciniidae sponges, but the actual producer (host or symbiont of these compounds has rarely been clarified. To tackle this, and further pertinent questions concerning the functioning, resilience and physiology of these organisms, truly multi-layered approaches integrating cutting-edge microbiology, biochemistry, genetics and zoology research are needed.

  6. Enzymatic studies on phosphorus availability from phosphate compounds by microbial activities using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Seer, A.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    the present study aimed to evaluate to evaluate the of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizae(VAM) as microbiological mean to convert the sparingly soluble P into available from utilized by plant through excretion of acid and alkaline phosphatase. rock phosphate as natural and a cheap source of P- fertilizer was applied in the present study. To trace the effect of microbial activity and phosphatase enzymes on phosphate availability from its compounds , set of experiments were conducted either in the lab. or green house. The obtained results could be summarized as following:- 1- phosphate solubilizing bacteria(PSB) w isolated from samples of fertile soil, 16 colonies showed positive reaction were chosen .2- bacteria , which exhibited high phosphate clearing zone (PCZ) selected to detect their efficiencies for dissolving rock phospate and select the effective one (most potent) on the basis of highest production of phosphatase and phosphorus solubilization.3- identification of the most potent (pseudomonas aeruginosa) 4- effective environmental and nutritional factors on phosphatase production by pseudomonas aeruginosa were discussed.green-house experiment: inoculation of wheat (triticum aestivum cv.sakha 8) with either PSB and /or VAM with or without rock-P fertilization was under taken. dual inoculation with psb (pseudomonas aeruginosa) and VAM improved the dry matter yield and N and P uptake by wheat as compared to other treatments. application of psb as well as VAM increased the availability of rock phosphate to be utilized by wheat

  7. Microbial volatile organic compounds in moldy interiors: a long-term climate chamber study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchardt, Sven; Strube, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    The present study simulated large-scale indoor mold damage in order to test the efficiency of air sampling for the detection of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). To do this, a wallpaper damaged by condensation was stored in a climate chamber (representing a hypothetical test room of 40 m(3) volume) and was inoculated with 14 typical indoor fungal strains. The chamber ventilation conditions were adjusted to common values found in moldy homes, and the mold growth was allowed to continue to higher than average values. The MVOC content of the chamber air was analyzed daily for a period of 105 days using coupled gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This procedure guarantees MVOC profiling without external factors such as outdoor air, building materials, furniture, and occupants. However, only nine MVOCs could be detected during the sampling period, which indicates that the very low concentrated MVOCs are hardly accessible, even under these favorable conditions. Furthermore, most of the MVOCs that were detected cannot be considered as reliable indicators of mold growth in indoor environments. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Microbial production of volatile sulphur compounds in the large intestine of pigs fed two different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, H V; Jensen, B B; Finster, K; Spence, C; Whitehead, T R; Cotta, M A; Canibe, N

    2012-07-01

      To investigate the production of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) in the segments of the large intestine of pigs and to assess the impact of diet on this production.   Pigs were fed two diets based on either wheat and barley (STD) or wheat and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS). Net production of VSC and potential sulphate reduction rate (SRR) (sulphate saturated) along the large intestine were determined by means of in vitro incubations. The net production rate of hydrogen sulphide and potential SRR increased from caecum towards distal colon and were significantly higher in the STD group. Conversely, the net methanethiol production rate was significantly higher in the DDGS group, while no difference was observed for dimethyl sulphide. The number of sulphate-reducing bacteria and total bacteria were determined by quantitative PCR and showed a significant increase along the large intestine, whereas no diet-related differences were observed.   VSC net production varies widely throughout the large intestine of pigs and the microbial processes involved in this production can be affected by diet.   This first report on intestinal production of all VSC shows both spatial and dietary effects, which are relevant to both bowel disease- and odour mitigation research. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. If only Derrida missed that flight... About the assessment of the "academic achievements" of the so-called "American Anthropology" by Belgrade Structural-semiotic School of Folklore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account recent critiques of "underdevelopment", "positivism", "methodological backwardness" and other failings attributed to socalled "American Anthropology" by some of the authors from the Belgrade Structural-semiotic School of Anthropology of Folklore, I analyse the context in which colleagues and students may be tempted to explain common sense political connection between polyphone ethnography, neo-romanticism and nationalism as counter-intuitive history of the discipline. I already pointed that the important transformative differences in the attitudes towards structuralism between European anthropologists, especially Belgrade Structural-semiotic School of Anthropology of Folklore and so called "American Anthropology", are the consequence of a pure coincidence – the fact that French structuralism and French poststructuralism were launched simultaneously at the American interdisciplinary intellectual scene ("Theory" at the same conference. This ironic concurrence would not be much more than one entertaining episode for students, historians of anthropology and historians of ideas, if there were no attempts (more and more frequent and increasingly fluently articulated to compare different intellectual traditions as they were elements of the same unilineal evolution of the discipline. Belgrade Structural-semiotic School (further called only SS and especially its spiritus movens and most prominent representative Prof. Kovačević started in recent years to criticise some "American Anthropology" measuring its academic "achievement" (the author’s term in comparative perspective and taking as an analytical unit uncritically generalized traditions marked with a single term of "postmodern anthropology" on the one hand, and "anthropology" on the other. Belgrade SS School did develop globally original, although badly promoted and never fully used, battery for the synchronic analysis of the folklore phenomena, but this was done only after

  10. Anti-microbial and anti-biofilm compounds from Indonesian medicinal plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pratiwi, Sylvia U.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms causing elevated resistance to both most anti-microbial drugs and the host defense systems, which often results in persistent and difficult-to-treat infections. The discovery of anti-infective agents which are active against planktonic and biofilm microorganisms are therefore

  11. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF NITROGEN, OXYGEN AND SULFUR HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS: STUDIES WITH AQUIFER SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for anaerobic biodegradation of 12 heterocyclic model compounds was studied. Nine of the model compounds were biotransformed in aquifer slurries under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. The nitrogen and oxygen heterocyclic compounds were more susceptible t...

  12. Evaluation of some microbial agents, natural and chemical compounds for controlling tomato leaf miner, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Ghany Nesreen M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solanaceous plants have a great economic impact in Egypt. These groups of plants include potatoes, tomatoes and eggplants. The new invasive pest of tomatoes, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick causes the greatest crop losses which can range from 60 to 100%. After its detection in Egypt during the last half of 2009, it spread quickly to all provinces in the country. We aiming to propose a sustainable control program for this devastating pest. In this research we tested three groups of control agents. The first was microbial and natural, the second - plant extracts and the third - chemical insecticides. Our results showed that the impact of T. absoluta can be greatly reduced by the use of sustainable control measures represented by different insecticide groups. Bioassay experiments showed that this devastating pest can be controlled with some compounds that give high mortality rates. Of these compounds, spinosad and Beauveria bassiana, microbial control agents, followed by azadirachtin, gave the best results in controlling T. absoluta. Of the chemical insecticides, lambda-cyhalotrin was the most effective, followed by lufenuron and profenofos. In conclusion we encourage farmers to use microbial and natural control measures in combating the tomato leafminer, T. absoluta, in Integrated Pest Mangement (IPM programs.

  13. Changes in the Structure of the Microbial Community Associated with Nannochloropsis salina following Treatments with Antibiotics and Bioactive Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Haifeng; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B.; Lane, Todd W.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Yu, Eizadora T.

    2016-01-01

    Open microalgae cultures host a myriad of bacteria, creating a complex system of interacting species that influence algal growth and health. Many algal microbiota studies have been conducted to determine the relative importance of bacterial taxa to algal culture health and physiological states, but these studies have not characterized the interspecies relationships in the microbial communities. We subjected Nanochroloropsis salina cultures to multiple chemical treatments (antibiotics and quorum sensing compounds) and obtained dense time-series data on changes to the microbial community using 16S gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing (21,029,577 reads for 23 samples) to measure microbial taxa-taxa abundance correlations. Short-term treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially larger shifts in the microbiota structure compared to changes observed following treatment with signaling compounds and glucose. We also calculated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) associations and generated OTU correlation networks to provide an overview of possible bacterial OTU interactions. This analysis identified five major cohesive modules of microbiota with similar co-abundance profiles across different chemical treatments. The Eigengenes of OTU modules were examined for correlation with different external treatment factors. This correlation-based analysis revealed that culture age (time) and treatment types have primary effects on forming network modules and shaping the community structure. Additional network analysis detected Alteromonadeles and Alphaproteobacteria as having the highest centrality, suggesting these species are “keystone” OTUs in the microbial community. Furthermore, we illustrated that the chemical tropodithietic acid, which is secreted by several species in the Alphaproteobacteria taxon, is able to drastically change the structure of the microbiota within 3 h. Taken together, these results provide valuable insights into the structure of the microbiota

  14. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B. V.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M. S.; Krumins, V.; Kish, A. L.; Garland, J. L.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis,1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste

  15. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Bælum, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    subsampling of the clay till cores. The study demonstrates that an integrated approach combining chemical analysis, molecular microbial tools and compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) was required in order to document biotic and abiotic degradations in the clay till system. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.......The degradation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in clay till was investigated at a contaminated site (Vadsby, Denmark) by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. Over decades of contamination, bioactive zones with degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1...

  16. Study on the synergic effect of natural compounds on the microbial quality decay of packed fish hamburger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, M R; Speranza, B; Filippone, A; Granatiero, S; Conte, A; Sinigaglia, M; Del Nobile, M A

    2008-10-31

    The effectiveness of natural compounds in slowing down the microbial quality decay of refrigerated fish hamburger is addressed in this study. In particular, the control of the microbiological spoilage by combined use of three antimicrobials, and the determination of their optimal composition to extend the fish hamburger Microbiological Stability Limit (MAL) are the main objectives of this work. Thymol, grapefruit seed extract (GFSE) and lemon extract were tested for monitoring the cell growth of the main fish spoilage microorganisms (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Photobacterium phosphoreum and Shewanella putrefaciens), inoculated in fish hamburgers, and the growth of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria. A Central Composite Design (CCD) was developed to highlight a possible synergic effect of the above natural compounds. Results showed an increase in the MAL value for hamburgers mixed with the antimicrobial compounds, compared to the control sample. The optimal antimicrobial compound composition, which corresponds to the maximal MAL value determined in this study, is: 110 mgL(-1) of thymol, 100 mgL(-1) of GFSE and 120 mgL(-1) of lemon extract. The presence of the natural compounds delay the sensorial quality decay without compromising the flavor of the fish hamburgers.

  17. Pathological aspects of so called "hilar cholangiocarcinoma".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano-Megías, Víctor M; Ibarrola-de Andrés, Carolina; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2013-07-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) arising from the large intrahepatic bile ducts and extrahepatic hilar bile ducts share clinicopathological features and have been called hilar and perihilar CC as a group. However, "hilar and perihilar CC" are also used to refer exclusively to the intrahepatic hilar type CC or, more commonly, the extrahepatic hilar CC. Grossly, a major distinction can be made between papillary and non-papillary tumors. Histologically, most hilar CCs are well to moderately differentiated conventional type (biliary) carcinomas. Immunohistochemically, CK7, CK20, CEA and MUC1 are normally expressed, being MUC2 positive in less than 50% of cases. Two main premalignant lesions are known: biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) and intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract (IPNB). IPNB includes the lesions previously named biliary papillomatosis and papillary carcinoma. A series of 29 resected hilar CC from our archives is reviewed. Most (82.8%) were conventional type adenocarcinomas, mostly well to moderately differentiated, although with a broad morphological spectrum; three cases exhibited a poorly differentiated cell component resembling signet ring cells. IPNB was observed in 5 (17.2%), four of them with an associated invasive carcinoma. A clear cell type carcinoma, an adenosquamous carcinoma and two gastric foveolar type carcinomas were observed.

  18. On so-called paradoxical monocular stereoscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.; van Doorn, Andrea J.; Kappers, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Human observers are apparently well able to judge properties of 'three-dimensional objects' on the basis of flat pictures such as photographs of physical objects. They obtain this 'pictorial relief' without much conscious effort and with little interference from the (flat) picture surface. Methods

  19. On so-called paradoxical monocular stereoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, J J; van Doorn, A J; Kappers, A M

    1994-01-01

    Human observers are apparently well able to judge properties of 'three-dimensional objects' on the basis of flat pictures such as photographs of physical objects. They obtain this 'pictorial relief' without much conscious effort and with little interference from the (flat) picture surface. Methods for 'magnifying' pictorial relief from single pictures include viewing instructions as well as a variety of monocular and binocular 'viewboxes'. Such devices are reputed to yield highly increased pictorial depth, though no methodologies for the objective verification of such claims exist. A binocular viewbox has been reconstructed and pictorial relief under monocular, 'synoptic', and natural binocular viewing is described. The results corroborate and go beyond early introspective reports and turn out to pose intriguing problems for modern research.

  20. The so-called 10-day rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The 10-day option aimed at restricting all radiography of potentially fertile women to the first third of the menstrual cycle was introduced in 1959 without any valid supporting evidence. No earlier or later experimental evidence has indicated that diagnostic radiography involving the early embryo might carry a measurable risk to the individual developing in utero. (author)

  1. Nitrogen metabolism and microbial production of dairy cows fed sugarcane and nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves,Geógenes da Silva; Pedreira,Marcio dos Santos; Pereira,Mara Lúcia Albuquerque; Santos,Dimas Oliveira; Souza,Dicastro Dias de; Porto Junior,Antonio Ferraz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dairy cow diets containing two different sources of urea on nitrogen metabolism and microbial synthesis. Eight crossbred cows were confined and distributed in two 4x4 Latin: FS - soybean meal (control), conventional urea (UC) 100%; ULL 44 UC = 56% / 44% ULL, ULL 88 UC = 12% / 88% ULL. Diets were offered to animals during 21 days with 14 days of adaptation. The N intake, retained nitrogen balance, nitrogen excretion in milk, urine, feces and ...

  2. Engineering Microbial Cells for the Biosynthesis of Natural Compounds of Pharmaceutical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Jeandet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbes constitute important platforms for the biosynthesis of numerous molecules of pharmaceutical interest such as antitumor, anticancer, antiviral, antihypertensive, antiparasitic, antioxidant, immunological agents, and antibiotics as well as hormones, belonging to various chemical families, for instance, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polyketides, amines, and proteins. Engineering microbial factories offers rich opportunities for the production of natural products that are too complex for cost-effective chemical synthesis and whose extraction from their originating plants needs the use of many solvents. Recent progresses that have been made since the millennium beginning with metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the biosynthesis of natural products of pharmaceutical significance will be reviewed.

  3. Do the organic sulfur compounds DMSP and DMS drive coral microbial associations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Willis, Bette L; Bourne, David G

    2010-03-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) are key compounds in the global sulfur cycle. Moreover, DMS is particularly important in climate regulation owing to its role in cloud formation. Reef building corals are major contributors to the production of these two compounds and also form diverse and complex associations with bacteria, which are known to play a crucial role in the degradation of DMSP and DMS. Here, we highlight an extensive overlap between bacterial species implicated in DMSP/DMS degradation and those associated with corals, leading to the hypothesis that these two compounds play a major role in structuring coral-associated bacterial communities, with important consequences for coral health and the resilience of coral reefs. We also explore the publically available metagenome databases and show that genes implicated in DMSP metabolism are abundant in the viral component of coral-reef-derived metagenomes, indicating that viruses can act as a reservoir for such genes.

  4. Microbial transformation of ginsenoside Rb1 to compound K by Lactobacillus paralimentarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Lin-Hu; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Li, Guan Hao; Choi, Kwang-Tea; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the major ginsenoside Rb1 was transformed into the more pharmacologically active minor compound K by food grade Lactobacillus paralimentarius LH4, which was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The enzymatic reaction was analyzed by TLC, HPLC, and NMR. Using the cell-free enzyme of Lactobacillus paralimentarius LH4 at optimal conditions for 30 °C at pH 6.0, 1.0 mg ml(-1) ginsenoside Rb1 was transformed into 0.52 mg ml(-1) compound K within 72 h, with a corresponding molar conversion yield of 88 %. The cell-free enzyme hydrolyzed the two glucose moieties attached to the C-3 position and the outer glucose moiety attached to the C-20 position of the ginsenoside Rb1. The cell-free enzyme hydrolyzed the ginsenoside Rb1 along the following pathway: ginsenoside Rb1 → gypenoside XVII and ginsenoside Rd → ginsenoside F2 → compound K. Our results indicate that Lactobacillus paralimentarius LH4 has the potential to be applied for the preparation of compound K in the food industry.

  5. Interaction of Human Enteric Viruses with Microbial Compounds: Implication for Virus Persistence and Disinfection Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Prunelle; Meseguer, Alba; Lucas, Françoise; Moulin, Laurent; Wurtzer, Sébastien

    2017-12-05

    Although the interaction between phages and bacteria has already been well described, it only recently emerged that human viruses also interact with bacteria in the mammalian gut. We studied whether this interaction could occur in tap water and thus confer enteric viruses protection against temperature and the classical disinfection treatments used in drinking water production. We demonstrated that the addition of lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan of bacterial origin to enterovirus provides thermal protection through stabilization of the viral capsid. This interaction plays a role when viruses are exposed to disinfection that targets the capsid, but less so when the virus genome is directly targeted. The interaction seems to be serotype-specific, suggesting that the capsid protein sequence could be important. The protection is linked to a direct association between viral particles and bacterial compounds as observed by microscopy. These results show that bacterial compounds present in the environment can affect virus inactivation.

  6. [On Atomic Nuclear Fusion Processes at Low-Temperatures. An Enhancement of the Probability of Transition through a Potential Barrier Due to the So-Called Barrier Anti-Zeno Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiot, V A

    2016-01-01

    It is known that in quantum mechanics the act of observing the experiment can affect the experimental findings in some cases. In particular, it happens under the so-called Zeno effect. In this work it is shown that in contrast to the "standard" Zeno-effect where the act of observing a process reduces the probability of its reality, an inverse situation when a particle transmits through a potential barrier (a so-called barrier anti-Zeno effect) can be observed, the observation of the particle essentially increases the probability of its transmission through the barrier. The possibility of using the barrier anti-Zeno effect is discussed to explain paradoxical results of experiments on "cold nuclear fusion" observed in various systems including biological ones. (According to the observers who performed the observations, the energy generation, which could not be explained by any chemical processes, as well as the change in the isotope and even element composition of the studied object may occur in these systems.

  7. Microscale validation of 4-aminoantipyrine test method for quantifying phenolic compounds in microbial culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justiz Mendoza, Ibrahin; Aguilera Rodriguez, Isabel; Perez Portuondo, Irasema

    2014-01-01

    Validation of test methods microscale is currently of great importance due to the economic and environmental advantages possessed, which constitutes a prerequisite for the performance of services and quality assurance of the results to provide customer. This paper addresses the microscale validation of 4-aminoantipyrine spectrophotometric method for the quantification of phenolic compounds in culture medium. Parameters linearity, precision, regression, accuracy, detection limits, quantification limits and robustness were evaluated, addition to the comparison test with no standardized method for determining polyphenols (Folin Ciocalteu). The results showed that both methods are feasible for determining phenols

  8. Characterization of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating synthetic wastewater containing pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Stuckey, David C; Liu, Yu; Tan, Soon Keat; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the behaviour and characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMP) in two anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs): MBRcontrol and MBRpharma, for treating municipal wastewater. Both protein and polysaccharides measured exhibited higher concentrations in the MBRpharma than the MBRcontrol. Molecular weight (MW) distribution analysis revealed that the presence of pharmaceuticals enhanced the accumulation of SMPs with macro- (13,091 kDa and 1587 kDa) and intermediate-MW (189 kDa) compounds in the anoxic MBRpharma, while a substantial decrease was observed in both MBR effluents. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence contours indicated that the exposure to pharmaceuticals seemed to stimulate the production of aromatic proteins containing tyrosine (10.1-32.6%) and tryptophan (14.7-43.1%), compared to MBRcontrol (9.9-29.1% for tyrosine; 11.8-42.5% for tryptophan). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed aromatics, long-chain alkanes and esters were the predominant SMPs in the MBRs. More peaks were present in the aerobic MBRpharma (196) than anoxic MBRpharma (133). The SMPs identified exhibited both biodegradability and recalcitrance in the MBR treatment processes. Only 8 compounds in the MBRpharma were the same as in the MBRcontrol. Alkanes were the most dominant SMPs (51%) in the MBRcontrol, while aromatics were dominant (40%) in the MBRpharma. A significant decrease in aromatics (from 16 to 7) in the MBRpharma permeate was observed, compared to the aerobic MBRpharma. Approximately 21% of compounds in the aerobic MBRcontrol were rejected by membrane filtration, while this increased to 28% in the MBRpharma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Work Tasks as Determinants of Grain Dust and Microbial Exposure in the Norwegian Grain and Compound Feed Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumfors, Anne; Heldal, Kari Kulvik; Wouters, Inge M; Eduard, Wijnand

    2015-07-01

    The grain and compound feed industry entails inevitable risks of exposure to grain dust and its microbial content. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate task-dependent exposure differences in order to create knowledge basis for awareness and exposure reducing measures in the Norwegian grain and compound feed industry. A total of 166 samples of airborne dust were collected by full-shift personal sampling during work in 20 grain elevators and compound feed mills during one autumn season and two winter seasons. The personal exposure to grain dust, endotoxins, β-1→3-glucans, bacteria, and fungal spores was quantified and used as individual outcomes in mixed models with worker nested in company as random effect and different departments and tasks as fixed effects. The exposure levels were highest in grain elevator departments. Exposure to endotoxins was particularly high. Tasks that represented the highest and lowest exposures varied depending on the bioaerosol component. The most important determinants for elevated dust exposure were cleaning and process controlling. Cleaning increased the dust exposure level by a factor of 2.44 of the reference, from 0.65 to 1.58mg m(-3), whereas process controlling increased the dust exposure level by a factor of 2.97, from 0.65 to 1.93mg m(-3). Process controlling was associated with significantly less grain dust exposure in compound feed mills and the combined grain elevators and compound feed mills, than in grain elevators. The exposure was reduced by a factor of 0.18 and 0.22, from 1.93 to 0.34mg m(-3) and to 0.42mg m(-3), respectively, compared with the grain elevators. Inspection/maintenance, cleaning, and grain rotation and emptying were determinants of higher exposure to both endotoxin and β-1→3-glucans. Seed winnowing was in addition a strong determinant for endotoxin, whereas mixing of animal feed implied higher β-1→3-glucan exposure. Cleaning was the only task that contributed significantly to

  10. RobOKoD: microbial strain design for (over)production of target compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Natalie J; Millard, Pierre; Swainston, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable production of target compounds such as biofuels and high-value chemicals for pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and chemical industries is becoming an increasing priority given their current dependency upon diminishing petrochemical resources. Designing these strains is difficult, with current methods focusing primarily on knocking-out genes, dismissing other vital steps of strain design including the overexpression and dampening of genes. The design predictions from current methods also do not translate well-into successful strains in the laboratory. Here, we introduce RobOKoD (Robust, Overexpression, Knockout and Dampening), a method for predicting strain designs for overproduction of targets. The method uses flux variability analysis to profile each reaction within the system under differing production percentages of target-compound and biomass. Using these profiles, reactions are identified as potential knockout, overexpression, or dampening targets. The identified reactions are ranked according to their suitability, providing flexibility in strain design for users. The software was tested by designing a butanol-producing Escherichia coli strain, and was compared against the popular OptKnock and RobustKnock methods. RobOKoD shows favorable design predictions, when predictions from these methods are compared to a successful butanol-producing experimentally-validated strain. Overall RobOKoD provides users with rankings of predicted beneficial genetic interventions with which to support optimized strain design.

  11. Effect of garlic oil and four of its compounds on rumen microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, M; Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A; Carro, M D; Kamel, C

    2005-12-01

    Different concentrations (3, 30, 300, and 3000 mg/L of culture fluid) of garlic oil (GAR), diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DAD), allicin (ALL), and allyl mercaptan (ALM) were incubated for 24 h in diluted ruminal fluid with a 50:50 forage:concentrate diet (17.7% crude protein; 30.7% neutral detergent fiber) to evaluate their effects on rumen microbial fermentation. Garlic oil (30 and 300 mg/L), DAD (30 and 300 mg/L), and ALM (300 mg/L) resulted in lower molar proportion of acetate and higher proportions of propionate and butyrate. In contrast, at 300 mg/L, DAS only increased the proportion of butyrate, and ALL had no effects on volatile fatty acid proportions. In a dual-flow continuous culture of rumen fluid fed the same 50:50 forage:concentrate diet, addition of GAR (312 mg/L), DAD (31.2 and 312 mg/L), and ALM (31.2 and 312 mg/L) resulted in similar changes to those observed in batch culture, with the exception of the lack of effect of DAD on the proportion of propionate. In a third in vitro study, the potential of GAR (300 mg/L), DAD (300 mg/L), and ALM (300 mg/L) to decrease methane production was evaluated. Treatments GAR, DAD, and ALM resulted in a decrease in methane production of 73.6, 68.5, and 19.5%, respectively, compared with the control. These results confirm the ability of GAR, DAD, and ALM to decrease methane production, which may help to improve the efficiency of energy use in the rumen.

  12. Bioactive compounds produced by gut microbial tannase: implications for colorectal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix eLópez De Felipe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract have a profound influence on the transformation of food into metabolites which can impact human health. Gallic acid and pyrogallol are bioactive compounds displaying diverse biological properties, including carcinogenic inhibiting activities. However its concentration in fruits and vegetables is generally low. These metabolites can be also generated as final products of tannin metabolism by microbes endowed with tannase, which opens up the possibility of their anti-cancer potential being increased. Patients with colorectal cancer display an imbalanced gut microbiota respect to healthy population. The recent use of next generation sequencing technologies has greatly improved knowledge of the identity of bacterial species that colonize non-tumorous and tumorous tissues of colorectal cancer patients. This information provides a unique opportunity to shed light on the role played by gut microorganisms in the different stages of this disease. We here review the recently published gut microbiome associated to colorectal cancer patients and highlight tannase as an underlying gene function of bacterial species that selectively colonize tumorous tissues, but not adjacent non-malignant

  13. In situ stimulation vs. bioaugmentation: Can microbial inoculation of plant roots enhance biodegradation of organic compounds?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingsley, M.T.; Metting, F.B. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Seidler, R.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1993-06-01

    The use of plant roots and their associated rhizosphere bacteria for biocontainment and biorestoration offers several advantages for treating soil-dispersed contaminants and for application to large land areas. Plant roots function as effective delivery systems, since root growth transports bacteria vertically and laterally along the root in the soil column (see [ 1,2]). Movement of microbes along roots and downward in the soil column can be enhanced via irrigation [1-4]. For example, Ciafardini et al. [3] increased the nodulation and the final yield of soybeans during pod filling by including Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the irrigation water. Using rhizosphere microorganisms is advantageous for biodegradation of compounds that are degraded mainly by cometabolic processes, e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE). The energy source for bacterial growth and metabolism is supplied by the plant in the form of root exudates and other sloughed organic material. Plants are inexpensive, and by careful choice of species that possess either tap or fibrous root growth patterns, they can be used to influence mass transport of soil contaminants to the root surface via the transpiration stream [5]. Cropping of plants to remove heavy metals from contaminated soils has been proposed as a viable, low-cost, low-input treatment option [6]. The interest in use of plants as a remediation strategy has even reached the popular press [7], where the use of ragweed for the reclamation of sites contaminated with tetraethyl lead and other heavy metals was discussed.

  14. Evaluation of the reliability and durability of some chemical treatments proposed for consolidation of so called-marble decoration used in 19th century cemetery (Hosh Al Basha, Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dr.Amany Bakr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of so called-marble ornaments is a very important cultural heritage issue, since this kind of decoration was widely use for casing stone buildings during 19th and beginning of 20th centuries in Egypt. The wide variation of materials and techniques used for imitating natural marble is a really big challenge for conservators. Actually most of so called- marble decorations are subjected to several degradation agents which can lead to the loss of material cohesion mostly caused by alteration phenomena that often produce the detachment of large areas of imitated marble ornaments. Surface consolidation, directed to achieve cohesion and stability, is based on the use of materials with aggregating properties. This study started with characterization of the yellow veined imitated marble stucco used in Hosh Al Basha courtyard dating back to Mohammed Ali's family period (1805-1952 in Egypt. The imitated marble stucco consists of two main layers. The outer finishing layer, yellow paint veined with brown color, composed mainly of yellow zincite (ZnO. Gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O, halite (NaCl and calcite (CaCo3 were detected in this layer also. The mineral composition of the subsurface layer (prime layer shows the presence of gypsum (major mineral, zincite (ZnO, anhydrite (CaSO4 and halite (NaCl were also detected. Two products (Paraloid B-72 and SILRES® BS OH 100 were selected to evaluate their efficiency for consolidation treatments of imitated marble stucco. The selected products were tested under thermal ageing. Polarizing microscope (PLM, scanning electron microscopy with the energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR and colorimetric measurements were used in performing the study

  15. Microbial cycling of isoprene, the most abundantly produced biological volatile organic compound on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGenity, Terry J; Crombie, Andrew T; Murrell, J Colin

    2018-04-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly produced biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) on Earth, is highly reactive and can have diverse and often detrimental atmospheric effects, which impact on climate and health. Most isoprene is produced by terrestrial plants, but (micro)algal production is important in aquatic environments, and the relative bacterial contribution remains unknown. Soils are a sink for isoprene, and bacteria that can use isoprene as a carbon and energy source have been cultivated and also identified using cultivation-independent methods from soils, leaves and coastal/marine environments. Bacteria belonging to the Actinobacteria are most frequently isolated and identified, and Proteobacteria have also been shown to degrade isoprene. In the freshwater-sediment isolate, Rhodococcus strain AD45, initial oxidation of isoprene to 1,2-epoxy-isoprene is catalyzed by a multicomponent isoprene monooxygenase encoded by the genes isoABCDEF. The resultant epoxide is converted to a glutathione conjugate by a glutathione S-transferase encoded by isoI, and further degraded by enzymes encoded by isoGHJ. Genome sequence analysis of actinobacterial isolates belonging to the genera Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium and Gordonia has revealed that isoABCDEF and isoGHIJ are linked in an operon, either on a plasmid or the chromosome. In Rhodococcus strain AD45 both isoprene and epoxy-isoprene induce a high level of transcription of 22 contiguous genes, including isoABCDEF and isoGHIJ. Sequence analysis of the isoA gene, encoding the large subunit of the oxygenase component of isoprene monooxygenase, from isolates has facilitated the development of PCR primers that are proving valuable in investigating the ecology of uncultivated isoprene-degrading bacteria.

  16. Patterned ion exchange membranes for improved power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia; Geise, Geoffrey M.; Luo, Xi; Hou, Huijie; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Yujie; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells (MRCs) can be limited by the internal resistance of the reverse electrodialysis stack. Typical MRC stacks use non-conductive spacers that block ion transport by the so-called spacer shadow

  17. Characterization of Crew Refuse Returned from Shuttle Missions with Permanent Gas, Volatile Organic Compound, and Microbial Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M.; Krummins, V.; Kish, A.; Garland, J.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    In addition to the mass and energy costs associated with bioregenerative systems for advanced life support, the storage and processing of waste on spacecraft requires both atmospheric and biological management. Risks to crew health may arise from the presence of potential human pathogens in waste or from decay processes during waste storage and/or processing. This study reports on the permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses of crew refuse returned from shuttle missions STS-105, 109 and 110. The research objective is to characterize the biological stability of the waste stream, to assess the risks associated with its storage, and to provide baseline measures for the evaluation of waste processing technologies. Microbiological samples were collected from packaging material, food waste, bathroom waste, and bulk liquid collected from the volume F waste container. The number of culturable bacteria and total bacteria were determined by plating on R2A media and by Acridine Orange direct count, respectively. Samples of the trash were analyzed for the presence of fecal and total coliforms and other human-associated bacteria. Dry and ash weights were determined to estimate both water and organic content of the materials. The aerobic and anaerobic bio-stability of stored waste was determined by on-line monitoring of CO2 and by laboratory analysis of off-gas samples for hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA method TO15 with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors . This study establishes a baseline measure of waste composition, labile organics, and microbial load for this material.

  18. Solving “Smart City” Transport Problems by Designing Carpooling Gamification Schemes with Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of the So-Called “Mordor of Warsaw”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Olszewski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce energy consumption and improve residents’ quality of life, “smart cities” should use not only modern technologies, but also the social innovations of the “Internet of Things” (IoT era. This article attempts to solve transport problems in a smart city’s office district by utilizing gamification that incentivizes the carpooling system. The goal of the devised system is to significantly reduce the number of cars, and, consequently, to alleviate traffic jams, as well as to curb pollution and energy consumption. A representative sample of the statistical population of people working in one of the biggest office hubs in Poland (the so-called “Mordor of Warsaw” was surveyed. The collected data were processed using spatial data mining methods, and the results were a set of parameters for the multi-agent system. This approach made it possible to run a series of simulations on a set of 100,000 agents and to select an effective gamification methodology that supports the carpooling process. The implementation of the proposed solutions (a “serious game” variation of urban games would help to reduce the number of cars by several dozen percent, significantly reduce energy consumption, eliminate traffic jams, and increase the activity of the smart city residents.

  19. Solving “Smart City” Transport Problems by Designing Carpooling Gamification Schemes with Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of the So-Called “Mordor of Warsaw”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    To reduce energy consumption and improve residents’ quality of life, “smart cities” should use not only modern technologies, but also the social innovations of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) era. This article attempts to solve transport problems in a smart city’s office district by utilizing gamification that incentivizes the carpooling system. The goal of the devised system is to significantly reduce the number of cars, and, consequently, to alleviate traffic jams, as well as to curb pollution and energy consumption. A representative sample of the statistical population of people working in one of the biggest office hubs in Poland (the so-called “Mordor of Warsaw”) was surveyed. The collected data were processed using spatial data mining methods, and the results were a set of parameters for the multi-agent system. This approach made it possible to run a series of simulations on a set of 100,000 agents and to select an effective gamification methodology that supports the carpooling process. The implementation of the proposed solutions (a “serious game” variation of urban games) would help to reduce the number of cars by several dozen percent, significantly reduce energy consumption, eliminate traffic jams, and increase the activity of the smart city residents. PMID:29316643

  20. The Public Health Impact of the So-Called "Fluad Effect" on the 2014/2015 Influenza Vaccination Campaign in Italy: Ethical Implications for Health-Care Workers and Health Communication Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselli, Roberto; Martini, Mariano; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Watad, Abdulla

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza, causing complications, hospitalizations and deaths, generates a serious socio-economic burden, especially among elderly and high-risk subjects, as well as among adult individuals. Despite the availability and active free-of charge offer of influenza vaccines, vaccine coverage rates remain low and far from the target established by the Ministry of Health. Notwithstanding their effectiveness, vaccines are victims of prejudices and false myths, that contribute to the increasing phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy and loss of confidence. Media and, in particular, new media and information and communication technologies (ICTs) play a major role in disseminating health-related information. They are extremely promising devices for delivering health education and promoting disease prevention, including immunization. However, they can also have a negative impact on population's health attitudes and behaviors when channeling wrong, misleading information. During the 2014/2015 influenza vaccination campaign, the report of four deaths allegedly caused by administration of an adjuvanted influenza vaccine, Fluad - the so-called "Fluad case" - received an important media coverage, which contributed to the failure of the vaccination campaign, dramatically reducing the influenza vaccine uptake. In the extant literature, there is a dearth of information concerning the effect of the "Fluad case". The current study aims at quantifying the impact of the "Fluad effect" at the level of the Local Health Unit 3 (LHU3) ASL3 Genovese, Genoa, Italy. Ethical implications for health-care workers and health communication practitioners are also envisaged.

  1. Association between degradation of pharmaceuticals and endocrine-disrupting compounds and microbial communities along a treated wastewater effluent gradient in Lake Mead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Susanna M.; Sackett, Joshua D.; Rosen, Michael R.; Benotti, Mark J.; Trenholm, Rebecca A.; Vanderford, Brett J.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Moser, Duane P.

    2018-01-01

    The role of microbial communities in the degradation of trace organic contaminants in the environment is little understood. In this study, the biotransformation potential of 27 pharmaceuticals and endocrine-disrupting compounds was examined in parallel with a characterization of the native microbial community in water samples from four sites variously impacted by urban run-off and wastewater discharge in Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona, USA. Samples included relatively pristine Colorado River water at the upper end of the lake, nearly pure tertiary-treated municipal wastewater entering via the Las Vegas Wash, and waters of mixed influence (Las Vegas Bay and Boulder Basin), which represented a gradient of treated wastewater effluent impact. Microbial diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA gene censuses revealed the community at this site to be distinct from the less urban-impacted locations, although all sites were similar in overall diversity and richness. Similarly, Biolog EcoPlate assays demonstrated that the microbial community at Las Vegas Wash was the most metabolically versatile and active. Organic contaminants added as a mixture to laboratory microcosms were more rapidly and completely degraded in the most wastewater-impacted sites (Las Vegas Wash and Las Vegas Bay), with the majority exhibiting shorter half-lives than at the other sites or in a bacteriostatic control. Although the reasons for enhanced degradation capacity in the wastewater-impacted sites remain to be established, these data are consistent with the acclimatization of native microorganisms (either through changes in community structure or metabolic regulation) to effluent-derived trace contaminants. This study suggests that in urban, wastewater-impacted watersheds, prior exposure to organic contaminants fundamentally alters the structure and function of microbial communities, which in turn translates into greater potential for the natural attenuation of these compounds compared to more pristine

  2. Microbial adhesion in flow displacement systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    Flow displacement systems are superior to many other (static) systems for studying microbial adhesion to surfaces because mass transport and prevailing shear conditions can be adequately controlled and notoriously ill-defined slight rinsing steps to remove so-called "loosely adhering organisms" can

  3. Effect of Plants Containing Secondary Compounds with Palm Oil on Feed Intake, Digestibility, Microbial Protein Synthesis and Microbial Population in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Anantasook

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of rain tree pod meal with palm oil supplementation on feed intake, digestibility, microbial protein synthesis and microbial populations in dairy cows. Four, multiparous early-lactation Holstein-Friesian crossbred (75% lactating dairy cows with an initial body weight (BW of 405±40 kg and 36±8 DIM were randomly assigned to receive dietary treatments according to a 4×4 Latin square design. The four dietary treatments were un-supplementation (control, supplementation with rain tree pod meal (RPM at 60 g/kg, supplementation with palm oil (PO at 20 g/kg, and supplementation with RPM at 60 g/kg and PO at 20 g/kg (RPO, of total dry matter intake. The cows were offered concentrates, at a ratio of concentrate to milk production of 1:2, and chopped 30 g/kg of urea treated rice straw was fed ad libitum. The RPM contained condensed tannins and crude saponins at 88 and 141 g/kg of DM, respectively. It was found that supplementation with RPM and/or PO to dairy cows diets did not show negative effects on feed intake and ruminal pH and BUN at any times of sampling (p>0.05. However, RPM supplementation resulted in lower crude protein digestibility, NH3-N concentration and number of proteolytic bacteria. It resulted in greater allantoin absorption and microbial crude protein (p<0.05. In addition, dairy cows showed a higher efficiency of microbial N supply (EMNS in both RPM and RPO treatments. Moreover, NDF digestibility and cellulolytic bacteria numbers were highest in RPO supplementation (p<0.05 while, supplementation with RPM and/or PO decreased the protozoa population in dairy cows. Based on this study, supplementation with RPM and/or PO in diets could improve fiber digestibility, microbial protein synthesis in terms of quantity and efficiency and microbial populations in dairy cows.

  4. [Effectiveness and difficulty of education on nosocomial infection control for pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for students in the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-03-01

    It has been planned to give pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for fifth-grade students in the School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, to give them the clinical training needed to perform dental practice and clinical practicum for comprehensive patient care, namely inclusive clinical practice phase II. This study analyzed the educative efficiency of the class on nosocomial infection control (NIC) by comparing achievements pre- and post-test, and discussed appropriate education planning on the NIC for dental students. Sixty-two fifth-grade students in the 2007 academic year sat the pre- and post-tests; the mean score and standard deviation of these tests were 5.30 +/- 1.26 (n = 56) and 8.59 +/- 1.18 (n = 59), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between them (paired t-test, p < 0.01). Another finding was that students with high scores in the post-test did not necessarily achieve high ratings in the pre-test. It is suggested that the introduction of pre- and post-tests and the clarification of main points in the class as a theme of NIC could be a useful tool for increasing the comprehension of students on the theme. Since students at lower grades will attend clinical practice in the university hospital, it is thought that students should be given NIC training early in the clinical course, and the current curriculum should be improved to increase the opportunity for students to study this important issue.

  5. Microbial degradation of chlorinated compounds. Application of specialized bacteria in the treatment of contaminated soil and waste water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhuis, Roelof

    1992-01-01

    The development of (aerobic) treatment technologies for polluted environments and waste streams will require an understanding of the microbial potential and the ecophysiology of the most suitable organisms. Therefore, we have studied physiological pathways and some kinetic aspects of the

  6. A novel procedure to detect low molecular weight compounds released by alkaline ester cleavage from low maturity coals to assess its feedstock for deep microbial life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glombitza, Clemens; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Horsfield, Brian

    2009-01-01

    and South Island of New Zealand (NZ) were examined to assess the amount of bound LMW organic acids. Formate, acetate and oxalate were detected in significant amounts whereas the amounts of these compounds decrease with increasing maturity of the coal sample. This decrease of LMW organic acids mainly...... for the investigation of low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids linked to the kerogen matrix is presented. These LMW organic acids form a potential feedstock for deep microbial populations. Twelve coal samples of different maturity (vitrinite reflectance (R0) of 0.28–0.80%) from several coal mines on the North...... and generation rates of LMW organic acids indicate that the NZ coals investigated exhibit the potential to feed deep terrestrial microbial life with appropriate substrates over geological time spans....

  7. Impact of Microbial Composition of Cambodian Traditional Dried Starters (Dombea on Flavor Compounds of Rice Wine: Combining Amplicon Sequencing With HP-SPME-GCMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokny Ly

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dombae is a traditional ferment starter which has been used for starchy based wine production in Cambodia. However, the production technology of rice wine in Cambodia is not optimized. The current study aimed to investigate the microbiota associated in five ferment starters and the effect of a traditional fermentation process using a metagenomics sequencing analysis and HS-SPME-GCMS for the characterization of the aromatic profiles at the end of fermentation. Most of bacteria identified in this study were lactic acid bacteria including Weissella cibaria, Pediococcus sp. MMZ60A, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera were found to be abundant yeasts while the only amylolytic filamentous fungus was Rhizopus oryzae. A total of 25 aromatic compounds were detected and identified as esters, alcohols, acids, ketones and aldehydes. The alcohol group was dominant in each rice wine. Significant changes were observed at the level of microbial communities during fermentation, suggesting microbial succession for the assimilation of starch and subsequently assimilation of fermentation by-products leading to the production of flavor compounds. At this level, the presence of Weissella, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus genus was strongly correlated with most of the flavor compounds detected.

  8. Impact of Microbial Composition of Cambodian Traditional Dried Starters (Dombea) on Flavor Compounds of Rice Wine: Combining Amplicon Sequencing With HP-SPME-GCMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Sokny; Mith, Hasika; Tarayre, Cédric; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Delvigne, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Dombae is a traditional ferment starter which has been used for starchy based wine production in Cambodia. However, the production technology of rice wine in Cambodia is not optimized. The current study aimed to investigate the microbiota associated in five ferment starters and the effect of a traditional fermentation process using a metagenomics sequencing analysis and HS-SPME-GCMS for the characterization of the aromatic profiles at the end of fermentation. Most of bacteria identified in this study were lactic acid bacteria including Weissella cibaria, Pediococcus sp. MMZ60A, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera were found to be abundant yeasts while the only amylolytic filamentous fungus was Rhizopus oryzae. A total of 25 aromatic compounds were detected and identified as esters, alcohols, acids, ketones and aldehydes. The alcohol group was dominant in each rice wine. Significant changes were observed at the level of microbial communities during fermentation, suggesting microbial succession for the assimilation of starch and subsequently assimilation of fermentation by-products leading to the production of flavor compounds. At this level, the presence of Weissella, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus genus was strongly correlated with most of the flavor compounds detected. PMID:29867806

  9. The impact of yeast starter cultures on the microbial communities and volatile compounds in cocoa fermentation and the resulting sensory attributes of chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Nádia Nara; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Dias, Disney Ribeiro; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2016-02-01

    Theobroma cacao seeds are the main raw material for chocolate production. During their fermentation, a succession of microorganisms are responsible for the physicochemical changes occurring in the pulp and inside the beans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of yeast inoculation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA CA11, Pichia kluivery CCMA0237, and Hanseniaspora uvarum CCMA0236) on the profile of the volatile compounds and microbial communities in cocoa fermentation. The resulting chocolate was also evaluated by temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) analyses. The dominant microorganisms during spontaneous fermentation were S. cerevisiae, H. uvarum, H. guilliermondii, Lactobacillus fermentum, Pediococcus sp., and Acetobacter pasteurianus. Similarly, S. cerevisiae, P. kluyveri, Candida sp., Pediococcus sp., and A. pasteurianus were the predominant microorganisms assessed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) in inoculated fermentation. Sixty-seven volatile compounds were detected and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) at the end of fermentation and chocolates. The main group of volatile compound found after the inoculated and spontaneous fermentations was esters (41 and 39 %, respectively). In the chocolates, the main group was acids (73 and 44 % from the inoculated and spontaneous fermentations, respectively). The TDS analyses showed a dominance of bitter and cocoa attributes in both chocolates. However, in the inoculated chocolate, lingering fruity notes were more intense, while the chocolate produced by spontaneous fermentation was more astringent. Thus, the inoculation of yeast influenced the microbial profile, which likely affected the volatile compounds that affect sensory characteristics, resulting in chocolate with dominant bitter, cocoa, and fruity attributes.

  10. A yearly spraying of olive mill wastewater on agricultural soil over six successive years: impact of different application rates on olive production, phenolic compounds, phytotoxicity and microbial counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdich, Salwa; Jarboui, Raja; Rouina, Béchir Ben; Boukhris, Makki; Ammar, Emna

    2012-07-15

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) spraying effects onto olive-tree fields were investigated. Three OMW levels (50, 100 and 200 m(3)ha(-1)year(-1)) were applied over six successive years. Olive-crop yields, phenolic compounds progress, phytotoxicity and microbial counts were studied at different soil depths. Olive yield showed improvements with OMW level applied. Soil polyphenolic content increased progressively in relation to OMW levels in all the investigated layers. However, no significant difference was noted in lowest treatment rate compared to the control field. In the soil upper-layers (0-40 cm), five phenolic compounds were identified over six consecutive years of OMW-spraying. In all the soil-layers, the radish germination index exceeded 85%. However, tomato germination test values decreased with the applied OMW amount. For all treatments, microbial counts increased with OMW quantities and spraying frequency. Matrix correlation showed a strong relationship between soil polyphenol content and microorganisms, and a negative one to tomato germination index. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioremediation of PAH-contamined soils: Consequences on formation and degradation of polar-polycyclic aromatic compounds and microbial community abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Ouali, Salma; Cébron, Aurélie; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Colombano, Stéfan; Faure, Pierre

    2017-05-05

    A bioslurry batch experiment was carried out over five months on three polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) contaminated soils to study the PAC (PAH and polar-PAC) behavior during soil incubation and to evaluate the impact of PAC contamination on the abundance of microbial communities and functional PAH-degrading populations. Organic matter characteristics and reactivity, assessed through solvent extractable organic matter and PAC contents, and soil organic matter mineralization were monitored during 5 months. Total bacteria and fungi, and PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase genes were quantified. Results showed that PAHs and polar-PACs were degraded with different degradation dynamics. Differences in degradation rates were observed among the three soils depending on PAH distribution and availability. Overall, low molecular weight compounds were preferentially degraded. Degradation selectivity between isomers and structurally similar compounds was observed which could be used to check the efficiency of bioremediation processes. Bacterial communities were dominant over fungi and were most likely responsible for PAC degradation. Abundance of PAH-degrading bacteria increased during incubations, but their proportion in the bacterial communities tended to decrease. The accumulation of some oxygenated-PACs during the bioslurry experiment underlines the necessity to monitor these compounds during application of remediation treatment on PAH contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Incubation of Aquilaria subintegra with Microbial Culture Supernatants Enhances Production of Volatile Compounds and Improves Quality of Agarwood Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monggoot, Sakon; Kulsing, Chadin; Wong, Yong Foo; Pripdeevech, Patcharee

    2018-06-01

    Incubation with microbial culture supernatants improved essential oil yield from Aquilaria subintegra woodchips. The harvested woodchips were incubated with de man, rogosa and sharpe (MRS) agar, yeast mold (YM) agar medium and six different microbial culture supernatants obtained from Lactobacillus bulgaricus , L. acidophilus , Streptococcus thermophilus , Lactococcus lactis , Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae prior to hydrodistillation. Incubation with lactic acid bacteria supernatants provided higher yield of agarwood oil (0.45% w/w) than that obtained from yeast (0.25% w/w), agar media (0.23% w/w) and water (0.22% w/w). The composition of agarwood oil from all media and microbial supernatant incubations was investigated by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Overall, three major volatile profiles were obtained, which corresponded to water soaking (control), as well as, both YM and MRS media, lactic acid bacteria, and yeast supernatant incubations. Sesquiterpenes and their oxygenated derivatives were key components of agarwood oil. Fifty-two volatile components were tentatively identified in all samples. Beta-agarofuran, α-eudesmol, karanone, α-agarofuran and agarospirol were major components present in most of the incubated samples, while S. cerevisiae -incubated A. subintegra provided higher amount of phenyl acetaldehyde. Microbial culture supernatant incubation numerically provided the highest yield of agarwood oil compared to water soaking traditional method, possibly resulting from activity of extracellular enzymes produced by the microbes. Incubation of agarwood with lactic acid bacteria supernatant significantly enhanced oil yields without changing volatile profile/composition of agarwood essential oil, thus this is a promising method for future use.

  13. Microbial load and stability of some phyto chemical compounds of selected Sudanese medicinal plant materials as affected by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musa, H. A. A.; Ahmed, E. E. A.; Osman, G. A. M.; Ali, H. A.; Muller, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation treatment on seeds of pepper cress (lepidium sativum L), seeds of black mustard (brassica nigra L.Koch), leaves of lemon grass (cymbopogon citratus), and calyces of roselle (hibiscus sabdariffa L), pods of senna (cassia senna L) and pods prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica L.). The radiation processing was carried out at dose levels of 0, 5, 10. 15 kGy. The irradiated and control samples were analyzed for microbial load, tannins and total phenol content as well as DPPH scavenging activity. The results indicated that gamma radiation treatment significantly reduced microbial load and showed that the total microbial load decreased linearly with absorbed radiation dose. They, also, indicated maximum reduction in tannin content in lemon grass, prickly acacia and roselle. On the other hand, irradiation with 15 kGy increased the tannin and phenol contents in black mustard, pepper cress and senna and reduced the phenol content of roselle and prickly acacia. The results also revealed that gamma irradiation resulted in significant decrease of DPPH radical scavenging activity of the different studied methanolic extracts with exception of pepper cress seeds.(Author)

  14. Rapid evaluation technique to differentiate mushroom disease-related moulds by detecting microbial volatile organic compounds using HS-SPME-GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radványi, Dalma; Gere, Attila; Jókai, Zsuzsa; Fodor, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyse microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) of mushroom disease-related microorganisms. Mycogone perniciosa, Lecanicillum fungicola var. fungicola, and Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum species, which are typically harmful in mushroom cultivation, were examined, and Agaricus bisporus (bisporic button mushroom) was also examined as a control. For internal standard, a mixture of alkanes was used; these were introduced as the memory effect of primed septa in the vial seal. Several different marker compounds were found in each sample, which enabled us to distinguish the different moulds and the mushroom mycelium from each other. Monitoring of marker compounds enabled us to investigate the behaviour of moulds. The records of the temporal pattern changes were used to produce partial least squares regression (PLS-R) models that enabled determination of the exact time of contamination (the infection time of the media). Using these evaluation techniques, the presence of mushroom disease-related fungi can be easily detected and monitored via their emitted MVOCs.

  15. 16S rRNA targeted DGGE fingerprinting of microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzeneva, V.A.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Vliet, van W.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.

    2008-01-01

    The past decades have seen the staggering development of molecular microbial ecology as a discipline that uses the detection of so-called biomarkers to monitor microbial communities in environment samples. A variety of molecules can be used as biomarkers, including cell-wall components, proteins,

  16. Microbial Transformation of Bioactive Compounds and Production of ortho-Dihydroxyisoflavones and Glycitein from Natural Fermented Soybean Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhyun Roh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a great deal of remarkable interest in finding bioactive compounds from nutritional foods to replace synthetic compounds. In particular, ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein are of growing scientific interest owing to their attractive biological properties. In this study, 7,8-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone, 6,7-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone, 3',4'-ortho-dihydroxyisoflavone and 7,4'-dihydroxy-6-methoxyisoflavone were characterized using microorganism screened from soybean Doenjang. Three ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein were structurally elucidated by 1H-NMR and GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, bacterial strains from soybean Doenjang with the capacity of biotransformation were screened. The bacterial strain, identified as Bacillus subtilis Roh-1, was shown to convert daidzein into ortho-dihydroxyisoflavones and glycitein. Thus, this study has, for the first time, demonstrated that a bacterial strain had a substrate specificity for multiple modifications of the bioactive compounds.

  17. [Chromatographic mass spectrometric determination of low-molecular-weight aromatic compounds of microbial origin in the serum from patients with sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloborodova, N V; Arkhipova, A S; Beloborodov, D M; Boĭko, N B; Mel'ko, A I; Olenin, A Iu

    2006-02-01

    The investigation quantitatively determined the content of low-molecular-weight aromatic compounds of microbial origin in the sera of 34 individuals by chromatographic mass spectrometry. An "Agilent Technogies 6890N" gas chromatograph with a 5973 mass selective detector was applied; chromatographic separation of components was effected on an Hp-5MS quartz capillary column. Aromatic small molecules originating from microbes (SMOM) were determined in the sera of 7 patients with sepsis. The diagnosis of sepsis was documented by the presence of the systemic inflammation syndrome and by that of bacteriemia and/or artificial ventilation-associated pneumonia along with the level of procalcitonin of higher than 10 ng/ml. The levels of aromatic SMOM were compared in 10 healthy donors, 8 preoperative cardiosurgical patients, and 9 patients with different abnormalities without sepsis treated in an intensive care unit (ICU). Serum phenylacetic and 3-phenylpropionic acids were found to be prevalent in the healthy donors and postoperative cardiosurgical patients. In ICU patients with different complications without sepsis, more than half the compounds under study were undetectable, the others were found in very low concentrations, which may be accounted for by antibiotic therapy. At the same time, almost the whole spectrum of the test compounds (other than 3-phenylpropionic acid) with the highest concentrations of 3-phenyllactic, p-hydroxyphenylacetic, 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)lactic and 2-hydroxybutanic acids, was detectable in septic patients receiving a more intensive therapy. The differences were statistically significant (by the Mann-Whitney U-test; p < 0.05). By taking into account the potentially high biological activity of the test compounds, studies are to be continued in this area.

  18. In vitro-in vivo study on the effects of plant compounds on rumen fermentation, microbial abundances and methane emissions in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, G; Abecia, L; Martín-García, A I; Ramos-Morales, E; Hervás, G; Molina-Alcaide, E; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R

    2013-12-01

    Two in vitro and one in vivo experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of a selection of plant compounds on rumen fermentation, microbial concentration and methane emissions in goats. Treatments were: control (no additive), carvacrol (CAR), cinnamaldehyde (CIN), eugenol (EUG), propyl propane thiosulfinate (PTS), propyl propane thiosulfonate (PTSO), diallyl disulfide (DDS), a mixture (40 : 60) of PTS and PTSO (PTS+PTSO), and bromochloromethane (BCM) as positive control with proven antimethanogenic effectiveness. Four doses (40, 80, 160 and 320 µl/l) of the different compounds were incubated in vitro for 24 h in diluted rumen fluid from goats using two diets differing in starch and protein source within the concentrate (Experiment 1).The total gas production was linearly decreased (Prumen content per day) and BCM (50, 100 and 160 mg/l rumen content per day) during the 9 days on methane emissions (Experiment 3). The addition of PTS and BCM resulted in linear reductions (33% and 64%, respectively, P≤ 0.002) of methane production per unit of dry matter intake, which were lower than the maximum inhibition observed in vitro (87% and 96%, respectively). We conclude that applying the same doses in vivo as in vitro resulted in a proportional lower extent of methane decrease, and that PTS at 200 mg/l rumen content per day has the potential to reduce methane emissions in goats. Whether the reduction in methane emission observed in vivo persists over longer periods of treatments and improves feed conversion efficiency requires further research.

  19. The identification and quantification of bioactive compounds from the aqueous extract of comfrey root by UHPLC-DAD-HESI-MS method and its microbial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Vesna Lj.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the qualitative, quantitative and microbial determination of the aqueous extract of comfrey root was done. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were done by the UHPLC-DAD-HESI-MS method. As major bioactive compounds, allantoin, rosmarinic acid and ellagic acid were identified and their quantification was also done. The obtained results showed a high content of allantoin, ellagic acid and rosmarinic acid (8.91, 7.4 and 12.8%, respectively which indicated that the comfrey root can be used as a source for the isolation of these three compounds. The results obtained by the determination of the antimicrobial activity showed that Escherichia coli ATCC8739 and Salmonela typhimirium ATCC6538 were most sensitive to the aqueous extract of comfrey root. The results showed that allantoin did not express the antimicrobial activity on all the investigated bacteria species, and based on this it can be concluded that allantoin is not responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the aqueous extract of comfrey root. [Projekat Ministrstva nauke Republike Srbije, br TR-34012

  20. The effect of antibrowning agents on inhibition of potato browning, volatile organic compound profile, and microbial inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosneaguta, Ruslan; Alvarez, Valente; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2012-11-01

    Burbank and Norkotah potato slices were dipped into 3% sodium acid sulfate (SAS), citric acid (CA), sodium erythorbate (SE), malic acid (MA), sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP), or a combination of SAS-CA-SE. Browning by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) obtained from potato extract with 0.04 to 0.016 g/mL of antibrowning solutions at pH 2.0 to 6.9 were measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The color of slices dipped in antibrowning solutions at pHs 2 to 7 and stored at 4 °C for 15 d was measured every 5 d by colorimeter. Headspace analysis of volatiles in raw and cooked potato samples was performed by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer (SIFT-MS) and soft independent modelling by class analogy (SIMCA) analysis of the calculated odor activity values (OAV) determined interclass distances. Microbial growth was measured at 15 d. At unadjusted pHs (1.1 to 7.1), the PPO browning of the control and samples with SAPP was not significantly different, SAS, CA, and MA produced some inhibition and SE and SAS-CA-SE prevented browning. At pH 5 to 7, only SE and SAS-CA-SE were effective browning inhibitors. Based on the color of potato slices, SE was the most effective at pH 2 to 7, but SAS was most effective at unadjusted pH. Cooking increased volatile levels in the treated potatoes and decreased differences between volatile profiles. Differences between cooked samples may not be noticeable by the consumer because volatiles with high discriminating powers have low OAVs. SAS, CA, and SAS-CA-SE treatments inhibited microbial growth but SAPP, control, and SE did not, most likely due to pH. Antibrowning agents inhibit polyphenol oxidase, increasing shelf life and consumer acceptability of processed raw potato products by preserving the color. Their effectiveness was shown to be mainly due to a pH effect, except SE, which was not pH dependent. MA, CA, and SAS-CA-SE are better acidulants for inhibition of color change as well as growth of spoilage bacteria, yeast, and mold than SAPP, the

  1. Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil: Impact on Microbial Biodegradation of Organic Compounds and Possible Improvement Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniran, Ademola O.; Balgobind, Adhika; Pillay, Balakrishna

    2013-01-01

    Co-contamination of the environment with toxic chlorinated organic and heavy metal pollutants is one of the major problems facing industrialized nations today. Heavy metals may inhibit biodegradation of chlorinated organics by interacting with enzymes directly involved in biodegradation or those involved in general metabolism. Predictions of metal toxicity effects on organic pollutant biodegradation in co-contaminated soil and water environments is difficult since heavy metals may be present in a variety of chemical and physical forms. Recent advances in bioremediation of co-contaminated environments have focussed on the use of metal-resistant bacteria (cell and gene bioaugmentation), treatment amendments, clay minerals and chelating agents to reduce bioavailable heavy metal concentrations. Phytoremediation has also shown promise as an emerging alternative clean-up technology for co-contaminated environments. However, despite various investigations, in both aerobic and anaerobic systems, demonstrating that metal toxicity hampers the biodegradation of the organic component, a paucity of information exists in this area of research. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the problems associated with the degradation of chlorinated organics in co-contaminated environments, owing to metal toxicity and shed light on possible improvement strategies for effective bioremediation of sites co-contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds and heavy metals. PMID:23676353

  2. Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil: Impact on Microbial Biodegradation of Organic Compounds and Possible Improvement Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishna Pillay

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Co-contamination of the environment with toxic chlorinated organic and heavy metal pollutants is one of the major problems facing industrialized nations today. Heavy metals may inhibit biodegradation of chlorinated organics by interacting with enzymes directly involved in biodegradation or those involved in general metabolism. Predictions of metal toxicity effects on organic pollutant biodegradation in co-contaminated soil and water environments is difficult since heavy metals may be present in a variety of chemical and physical forms. Recent advances in bioremediation of co-contaminated environments have focussed on the use of metal-resistant bacteria (cell and gene bioaugmentation, treatment amendments, clay minerals and chelating agents to reduce bioavailable heavy metal concentrations. Phytoremediation has also shown promise as an emerging alternative clean-up technology for co-contaminated environments. However, despite various investigations, in both aerobic and anaerobic systems, demonstrating that metal toxicity hampers the biodegradation of the organic component, a paucity of information exists in this area of research. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the problems associated with the degradation of chlorinated organics in co-contaminated environments, owing to metal toxicity and shed light on possible improvement strategies for effective bioremediation of sites co-contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds and heavy metals.

  3. Xeno-estrogenic compounds in precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.J.B.; Beeltje, H.; Delft, R.J. van

    2008-01-01

    The exposure to some chemicals can lead to hormone disrupting effects. Presently, much attention is focused on so-called xeno-estrogens, synthetic compounds that interact with hormone receptors causing a number of reactions that eventually lead to effects related to reproduction and development. The

  4. Methylobacterium genome sequences: a reference blueprint to investigate microbial metabolism of C1 compounds from natural and industrial sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Lee, Ming-Chun; Bringel, Françoise; Lajus, Aurélie; Zhou, Yang; Gourion, Benjamin; Barbe, Valérie; Chang, Jean; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Dossat, Carole; Gillett, Will; Gruffaz, Christelle; Haugen, Eric; Hourcade, Edith; Levy, Ruth; Mangenot, Sophie; Muller, Emilie; Nadalig, Thierry; Pagni, Marco; Penny, Christian; Peyraud, Rémi; Robinson, David G; Roche, David; Rouy, Zoé; Saenampechek, Channakhone; Salvignol, Grégory; Vallenet, David; Wu, Zaining; Marx, Christopher J; Vorholt, Julia A; Olson, Maynard V; Kaul, Rajinder; Weissenbach, Jean; Médigue, Claudine; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Methylotrophy describes the ability of organisms to grow on reduced organic compounds without carbon-carbon bonds. The genomes of two pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria of the Alpha-proteobacterial genus Methylobacterium, the reference species Methylobacterium extorquens strain AM1 and the dichloromethane-degrading strain DM4, were compared. The 6.88 Mb genome of strain AM1 comprises a 5.51 Mb chromosome, a 1.26 Mb megaplasmid and three plasmids, while the 6.12 Mb genome of strain DM4 features a 5.94 Mb chromosome and two plasmids. The chromosomes are highly syntenic and share a large majority of genes, while plasmids are mostly strain-specific, with the exception of a 130 kb region of the strain AM1 megaplasmid which is syntenic to a chromosomal region of strain DM4. Both genomes contain large sets of insertion elements, many of them strain-specific, suggesting an important potential for genomic plasticity. Most of the genomic determinants associated with methylotrophy are nearly identical, with two exceptions that illustrate the metabolic and genomic versatility of Methylobacterium. A 126 kb dichloromethane utilization (dcm) gene cluster is essential for the ability of strain DM4 to use DCM as the sole carbon and energy source for growth and is unique to strain DM4. The methylamine utilization (mau) gene cluster is only found in strain AM1, indicating that strain DM4 employs an alternative system for growth with methylamine. The dcm and mau clusters represent two of the chromosomal genomic islands (AM1: 28; DM4: 17) that were defined. The mau cluster is flanked by mobile elements, but the dcm cluster disrupts a gene annotated as chelatase and for which we propose the name "island integration determinant" (iid). These two genome sequences provide a platform for intra- and interspecies genomic comparisons in the genus Methylobacterium, and for investigations of the adaptive mechanisms which allow bacterial lineages to acquire methylotrophic

  5. Microbial electrosynthetic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Harold D.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Labelle, Edward V.

    2018-01-30

    Methods are provided for microbial electrosynthesis of H.sub.2 and organic compounds such as methane and acetate. Method of producing mature electrosynthetic microbial populations by continuous culture is also provided. Microbial populations produced in accordance with the embodiments as shown to efficiently synthesize H.sub.2, methane and acetate in the presence of CO.sub.2 and a voltage potential. The production of biodegradable and renewable plastics from electricity and carbon dioxide is also disclosed.

  6. Methylobacterium genome sequences: a reference blueprint to investigate microbial metabolism of C1 compounds from natural and industrial sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Vuilleumier

    Full Text Available Methylotrophy describes the ability of organisms to grow on reduced organic compounds without carbon-carbon bonds. The genomes of two pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria of the Alpha-proteobacterial genus Methylobacterium, the reference species Methylobacterium extorquens strain AM1 and the dichloromethane-degrading strain DM4, were compared.The 6.88 Mb genome of strain AM1 comprises a 5.51 Mb chromosome, a 1.26 Mb megaplasmid and three plasmids, while the 6.12 Mb genome of strain DM4 features a 5.94 Mb chromosome and two plasmids. The chromosomes are highly syntenic and share a large majority of genes, while plasmids are mostly strain-specific, with the exception of a 130 kb region of the strain AM1 megaplasmid which is syntenic to a chromosomal region of strain DM4. Both genomes contain large sets of insertion elements, many of them strain-specific, suggesting an important potential for genomic plasticity. Most of the genomic determinants associated with methylotrophy are nearly identical, with two exceptions that illustrate the metabolic and genomic versatility of Methylobacterium. A 126 kb dichloromethane utilization (dcm gene cluster is essential for the ability of strain DM4 to use DCM as the sole carbon and energy source for growth and is unique to strain DM4. The methylamine utilization (mau gene cluster is only found in strain AM1, indicating that strain DM4 employs an alternative system for growth with methylamine. The dcm and mau clusters represent two of the chromosomal genomic islands (AM1: 28; DM4: 17 that were defined. The mau cluster is flanked by mobile elements, but the dcm cluster disrupts a gene annotated as chelatase and for which we propose the name "island integration determinant" (iid.These two genome sequences provide a platform for intra- and interspecies genomic comparisons in the genus Methylobacterium, and for investigations of the adaptive mechanisms which allow bacterial lineages to acquire

  7. Bohemian so-called surgical early medieval knives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hošek, Jiří; Profantová, Naďa; Šilhová, Alena; Ottenwelter, Estelle

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 2007, č. 1 (2007), s. 932-937 ISSN 1335-1532. [Metallography 2007. Stará Lesná, 02.05.2007-04.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA800020603; GA ČR GA404/05/0232 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : knife * medieval * archaeometallurgy Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  8. A cause celebre : The so-called "ballpoint murder"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompen, JC; Meek, MF; van Andel, MV

    Transorbital intracranial injuries are uncommon but classic ophthalmologic traumas. This report describes a case of a woman who was found dead. Postmortem examination revealed a Bic(R) ballpoint which had penetrated her head through her right eye. Detective forces believed a murder to be the most

  9. Canonical quantization of so-called non-Lagrangian systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318-CEP, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Kupriyanov, V.G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318-CEP, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Physics Department, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-04-15

    We present an approach to the canonical quantization of systems with equations of motion that are historically called non-Lagrangian equations. Our viewpoint of this problem is the following: despite the fact that a set of differential equations cannot be directly identified with a set of Euler-Lagrange equations, one can reformulate such a set in an equivalent first-order form that can always be treated as the Euler-Lagrange equations of a certain action. We construct such an action explicitly. It turns out that in the general case the hamiltonization and canonical quantization of such an action are non-trivial problems, since the theory involves time-dependent constraints. We adopt the general approach of hamiltonization and canonical quantization for such theories as described in D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Quantization of Fields with Constraints (Springer, Berlin, 1990). to the case under consideration. There exists an ambiguity (that cannot be reduced to the addition of a total time derivative) in associating a Lagrange function with a given set of equations. We present a complete description of this ambiguity. The proposed scheme is applied to the quantization of a general quadratic theory. In addition, we consider the quantization of a damped oscillator and of a radiating point-like charge. (orig.)

  10. Canonical quantization of so-called non-Lagrangian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D.M.; Kupriyanov, V.G.

    2007-01-01

    We present an approach to the canonical quantization of systems with equations of motion that are historically called non-Lagrangian equations. Our viewpoint of this problem is the following: despite the fact that a set of differential equations cannot be directly identified with a set of Euler-Lagrange equations, one can reformulate such a set in an equivalent first-order form that can always be treated as the Euler-Lagrange equations of a certain action. We construct such an action explicitly. It turns out that in the general case the hamiltonization and canonical quantization of such an action are non-trivial problems, since the theory involves time-dependent constraints. We adopt the general approach of hamiltonization and canonical quantization for such theories as described in D.M. Gitman, I.V. Tyutin, Quantization of Fields with Constraints (Springer, Berlin, 1990). to the case under consideration. There exists an ambiguity (that cannot be reduced to the addition of a total time derivative) in associating a Lagrange function with a given set of equations. We present a complete description of this ambiguity. The proposed scheme is applied to the quantization of a general quadratic theory. In addition, we consider the quantization of a damped oscillator and of a radiating point-like charge. (orig.)

  11. On so called “paradoxical monocular stereoscopy”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Doorn, A.J. van; Kappers, A.M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Human observers are apparently well able to judge properties of 'three-dimensional objects' on the basis of flat pictures such as photographs of physical objects. They obtain this 'pictorial relief' without much conscious effort and with little interference from the (flat) picture surface. Methods

  12. Numerical modelling of so-called secondary ultrasonic echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberg, K.J.; Fellinger, P.; Hofmann, C.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of secondary ultrasonic echoes is discussed for a particularly simple testing situation. This discussion is based upon the intuitive visualization of elastic wave propagation as obtained with the numerical EFIT-Code (Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique). The resulting travel times for the econdary echoes contain well-defined limits as they originate from the simple model of grazing incidence plane longitudinal wave mode conversion. (orig.) [de

  13. On the so called rogue waves in nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Charles Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of a rogue water wave is still unknown. One popular conjecture is that the Peregrine wave solution of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS provides a mechanism. A Peregrine wave solution can be obtained by taking the infinite spatial period limit to the homoclinic solutions. In this article, from the perspective of the phase space structure of these homoclinic orbits in the infinite dimensional phase space where the NLS defines a dynamical system, we examine the observability of these homoclinic orbits (and their approximations. Our conclusion is that these approximate homoclinic orbits are the most observable solutions, and they should correspond to the most common deep ocean waves rather than the rare rogue waves. We also discuss other possibilities for the mechanism of a rogue wave: rough dependence on initial data or finite time blow up.

  14. What Plurals and Compounds Reveal about Constraints in Word Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaensch, Carol; Heyer, Vera; Gordon, Peter; Clahsen, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Morphological systems are constrained in how they interact with each other. One case that has been widely studied in the psycholinguistic literature is the avoidance of plurals inside compounds (e.g. *"rats eater" vs. "rat eater") in English and other languages, the so-called "plurals-in-compounds effect." Several…

  15. Mineralisation of low concentrations of organic compounds and microbial biomass in surface and vadose zone soils from the Swan Coastal Plain, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzmann, P. D.; Zappia, L. R.; Patterson, B. M.; Rayner, J.L.; Davis, G. B.

    1998-01-01

    Mineralisation rates for ring-labelled 14 C-atrazine, benzene, and toluene were determined for a number of Swan Coastal Plain soils which had not been previously in contact with these contaminants. Microbial biomass was estimated by phospholipid techniques in soil samples from the same sites. Mineralisation rates for the volatile aromatic hydrocarbons in the thin (up to 30 cm) surface soils (23.4-42.6 μmol/kg . day when fitted to zeroth-order rate kinetics) were appreciably faster than the mineralisation rates measured in soils collected from a depth of 1 m (0.11-3.0 μmol/kg per day). The pesticide atrazine was degraded slowly, with degradation rates in surface soils ranging from 1.22x10 -3 to 2.78x10 -4 μmol/kg . day, and those in soils at 1 m ranging from 5. 13x10 -4 to 3.1610 -4 μmol/kg per day. When mineralisation data were fitted to first-order kinetics then half-lives for atrazine mineralisation ranged from about 1 year in surface soils to 3.1-5.1 years in soils at 1 m. These rates were comparable to atrazine mineralisation rates measured in soils that had not been previously in contact with atrazine, as reported by others. The extent of mineralisation of the organic compounds v. time generally fitted better to zeroth-order kinetics than to first-order kinetics. Confidence in the determination of the mineralisation rate at slow rates of mineralisation was low (r 2 as low as 0.2 in plots of the extent of mineralisation v. time in zeroth-order and first-order plots for samples that showed slow mineralisation). Biomass, expressed as stationary phase Escherichia coli equivalents (SPEE), ranged from 1.4 x10 7 to 1x2x10 8 SPEE/g dry weight for surface soils, and from 8.6x10 5 to 7.3x10 6 SPEE/g dry weight for soils at 1 m. The phospholipids extracted from surface soils tended to contain higher proportions of unsaturated and hydroxy fatty acids than soils at 1 m, which contained higher relative concentrations of branched fatty acids, which is consistent with the

  16. Detection of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC) by means of ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS); Detektion leicht fluechtiger organischer Verbindungen mikrobiellen Ursprungs (MVOC) mittels Ionenmobilitaetsspektrometrie (IMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiebe, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    Traces of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) can indicate the growth of moulds in the indoor air. The application of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a very promising method for the detection of these MVOCs due to its high sensitivity. A mobile IMS device was tested to use this analytical-chemical method for in situ indoor air diagnostics. The first part of this work describes the test gas generation of 14 MVOCs in the laboratory. The test gases were produced by preparation of permeation procedures. Due to the MVOCs test gases IMS parameters like reduced mobility (K{sub 0}), relative drift time (t{sub rd}), the concentration dependency of MVOCs signals were determined and the limit of detection (LOD) was calculated. The LODs are in the range of 2 to 192 {mu}g m{sup -3} (1 to 51 ppb{sub V}). In the second part of this manuscript seven different mould species were cultivated on nutrient media and their MVOCs emissions were explored. It was found out, that the MVOCs emissions of moulds have a dependency of species and of their cultivation time. These results are confirmed by principal component analysis (PCA). The identification of these MVOCs was performed by test-related GC-MS analysis and approved these results. The MVOCs emissions were explored in the cultivation of mould mixtures on three different building materials. The IMS-results were interpreted chemo metrically by PCA. It was possible to find different emission patterns of cultivated moulds on building materials without an identification of the MVOCs inside the emission chamber. In 27 field trials of different indoor environments (rooms) the IMS was tested to detect MVOCs. In 59 % of the cases a positive correlation is determined between visible mould-infested rooms and the detected MVOCs by IMS. (orig.)

  17. ON THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF SPECIFIC AND NONSPECIFIC APPROACHES TO ORAL MICROBIAL ADHESION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUSSCHER, HJ; COWAN, MM; VANDERMEI, HC

    In this paper, it is suggested that specificity and non-specificity in (oral) microbial adhesion are different expressions for the same phenomena. It is argued that the same basic, physicochemical forces are responsible for so-called 'non-specific' and 'specific' binding and that from a

  18. Agricultural by-products with bioactive effects: A multivariate approach to evaluate microbial and physicochemical changes in a fresh pork sausage enriched with phenolic compounds from olive vegetation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasolato, Luca; Carraro, Lisa; Facco, Pierantonio; Cardazzo, Barbara; Balzan, Stefania; Taticchi, Agnese; Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Toschi, Tullia Gallina; Novelli, Enrico

    2016-07-02

    The use of phenolic compounds derived from agricultural by-products could be considered as an eco-friendly strategy for food preservation. In this study a purified phenol extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) was explored as a potential bioactive ingredient for meat products using Italian fresh sausage as food model. The research was developed in two steps: first, an in vitro delineation of the extract antimicrobial activities was performed, then, the PEOVW was tested in the food model to investigate the possible application in food manufacturing. The in vitro tests showed that PEOVW clearly inhibits the growth of food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. The major part of Gram-positive strains was inhibited at the low concentrations (0.375-3mg/mL). In the production of raw sausages, two concentrates of PEOVW (L1: 0.075% and L2: 0.15%) were used taking into account both organoleptic traits and the bactericidal effects. A multivariate statistical approach allowed the definition of the microbial and physicochemical changes of sausages during the shelf life (14days). In general, the inclusion of the L2 concentration reduced the growth of several microbial targets, especially Staphylococcus spp. and LABs (2log10CFU/g reduction), while the increasing the growth of yeasts was observed. The reduction of microbial growth could be involved in the reduced lipolysis of raw sausages supplemented with PEOVW as highlighted by the lower amount of diacylglycerols. Moisture and aw had a significant effect on the variability of microbiological features, while food matrix (the sausages' environment) can mask the effects of PEOVW on other targets (e.g. Pseudomonas). Moreover, the molecular identification of the main representative taxa collected during the experimentation allowed the evaluation of the effects of phenols on the selection of bacteria. Genetic data suggested a possible strain selection based on storage time and the addition of

  19. The neuro-endocrinological role of microbial glutamate and GABA signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Mazzoli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota provides the host with multiple functions (e.g., by contributing to food digestion, vitamin supplementation and defense against pathogenic strains and interacts with the host organism through both direct contact (e.g., through surface antigens and soluble molecules, which are produced by the microbial metabolism. The existence of the so-called gut-brain axis of bi-directional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system also supports a communication pathway between the gut microbiota and neural circuits of the host, including the central nervous system. An increasing body of evidence has shown that gut microbiota is able to modulate gut and brain functions, including the mood, cognitive functions and behavior of humans. Nonetheless, given the extreme complexity of this communication network, its comprehension is still at its early stage. The present contribution will attempt to provide a state-of-the art description of the mechanisms by which gut microbiota can affect the gut-brain axis and the multiple cellular and molecular communication circuits (i.e., neural, immune and humoral. In this context, special attention will be paid to the microbial strains that produce bioactive compounds and display ascertained or potential probiotic activity. Several neuroactive molecules (e.g., catecholamines, histamine, serotonin and trace amines, will be considered, with special focus on Glu and GABA circuits, receptors and signaling. From the basic science viewpoint, microbial endocrinology deals with those theories in which neurochemicals, produced by both multicellular organisms and prokaryotes (e.g., serotonin, GABA, glutamate, are considered as a common shared language that enables interkingdom communication. With regards to its application, research in this area opens the way toward the possibility of the future use of neuroactive molecule-producing probiotics as therapeutic agents for the treatment of

  20. The Neuro-endocrinological Role of Microbial Glutamate and GABA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota provides the host with multiple functions (e.g., by contributing to food digestion, vitamin supplementation, and defense against pathogenic strains) and interacts with the host organism through both direct contact (e.g., through surface antigens) and soluble molecules, which are produced by the microbial metabolism. The existence of the so-called gut-brain axis of bi-directional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system (CNS) also supports a communication pathway between the gut microbiota and neural circuits of the host, including the CNS. An increasing body of evidence has shown that gut microbiota is able to modulate gut and brain functions, including the mood, cognitive functions, and behavior of humans. Nonetheless, given the extreme complexity of this communication network, its comprehension is still at its early stage. The present contribution will attempt to provide a state-of-the art description of the mechanisms by which gut microbiota can affect the gut-brain axis and the multiple cellular and molecular communication circuits (i.e., neural, immune, and humoral). In this context, special attention will be paid to the microbial strains that produce bioactive compounds and display ascertained or potential probiotic activity. Several neuroactive molecules (e.g., catecholamines, histamine, serotonin, and trace amines) will be considered, with special focus on Glu and GABA circuits, receptors, and signaling. From the basic science viewpoint, "microbial endocrinology" deals with those theories in which neurochemicals, produced by both multicellular organisms and prokaryotes (e.g., serotonin, GABA, glutamate), are considered as a common shared language that enables interkingdom communication. With regards to its application, research in this area opens the way toward the possibility of the future use of neuroactive molecule-producing probiotics as therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurogastroenteric and

  1. Microbial electrosynthesis of biochemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajracharya, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) is an electricity-driven production of chemicals from low-value waste using microorganisms as biocatalysts. MES from CO2 comprises conversion of CO2 to multi-carbon compounds employing microbes at the cathode which use electricity as an energy source. This thesis

  2. Transformation of chlorpyrifos in integrated recirculating constructed wetlands (IRCWs) as revealed by compound-specific stable isotope (CSIA) and microbial community structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yang; Huang, Wenda; McBride, Murray B; Guo, Jingjing; Tao, Ran; Dai, Yunv

    2017-06-01

    Carbon isotope analysis and 454 pyrosequencing methods were used to investigate in situ biodegradation of chlorpyrifos during its transport through three model integrated recirculating constructed wetlands (IRCWs). Results show that plant and Fe-impregnated biochar promoted degradation of chlorpyrifos and its metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP). Carbon isotope ratios in the IRCWs shifted to -31.24±0.58‰ (IRCW1, plant free), -26.82±0.60‰ (IRCW2, with plant) and -24.76±0.94‰ (IRCW3, with plant and Fe-biochar). The enrichment factors (Ɛ bulk,c ) were determined as -0.69±0.06‰ (IRCW1), -0.91±0.07‰ (IRCW2) and -1.03±0.09‰ (IRCW3). Microbial community analysis showed that IRCW3 was dominated by members of Bacillus, which can utilize and degrade chlorpyrifos. These results reveal that plant and Fe-biochar can induce carbon isotope fractionation and have a positive impact on the chlorpyrifos degradation efficiency by influencing the development of beneficial microbial communities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Quantifying the Importance of the Rare Biosphere for Microbial Community Response to Organic Pollutants in a Freshwater Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanqi; Hatt, Janet K; Tsementzi, Despina; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Ruiz-Pérez, Carlos A; Weigand, Michael R; Kizer, Heidi; Maresca, Gina; Krishnan, Raj; Poretsky, Rachel; Spain, Jim C; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2017-04-15

    A single liter of water contains hundreds, if not thousands, of bacterial and archaeal species, each of which typically makes up a very small fraction of the total microbial community (biosphere." How often, and via what mechanisms, e.g., clonal amplification versus horizontal gene transfer, the rare taxa and genes contribute to microbial community response to environmental perturbations represent important unanswered questions toward better understanding the value and modeling of microbial diversity. We tested whether rare species frequently responded to changing environmental conditions by establishing 20-liter planktonic mesocosms with water from Lake Lanier (Georgia, USA) and perturbing them with organic compounds that are rarely detected in the lake, including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), and caffeine. The populations of the degraders of these compounds were initially below the detection limit of quantitative PCR (qPCR) or metagenomic sequencing methods, but they increased substantially in abundance after perturbation. Sequencing of several degraders (isolates) and time-series metagenomic data sets revealed distinct cooccurring alleles of degradation genes, frequently carried on transmissible plasmids, especially for the 2,4-D mesocosms, and distinct species dominating the post-enrichment microbial communities from each replicated mesocosm. This diversity of species and genes also underlies distinct degradation profiles among replicated mesocosms. Collectively, these results supported the hypothesis that the rare biosphere can serve as a genetic reservoir, which can be frequently missed by metagenomics but enables community response to changing environmental conditions caused by organic pollutants, and they provided insights into the size of the pool of rare genes and species. IMPORTANCE A single liter of water or gram of soil contains hundreds of low-abundance bacterial and archaeal species, the so called rare biosphere. The

  4. Middle infrared (wavelength range: 8 μm-14 μm) 2-dimensional spectroscopy (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7 kg, total cost: less than 10,000 USD) so-called hyperspectral camera for unmanned air vehicles like drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoru; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We developed the palm size (optical unit: 73[mm]×102[mm]×66[mm]) and light weight (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7[kg]) middle infrared (wavelength range: 8[μm]-14[μm]) 2-dimensional spectroscopy for UAV (Unmanned Air Vehicle) like drone. And we successfully demonstrated the flights with the developed hyperspectral camera mounted on the multi-copter so-called drone in 15/Sep./2015 at Kagawa prefecture in Japan. We had proposed 2 dimensional imaging type Fourier spectroscopy that was the near-common path temporal phase-shift interferometer. We install the variable phase shifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected imaging optical systems. The variable phase shifter was configured with a movable mirror and a fixed mirror. The movable mirror was actuated by the impact drive piezo-electric device (stroke: 4.5[mm], resolution: 0.01[μm], maker: Technohands Co.,Ltd., type:XDT50-45, price: around 1,000USD). We realized the wavefront division type and near common path interferometry that has strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. Without anti-mechanical vibration systems, the palm-size Fourier spectroscopy was realized. And we were able to utilize the small and low-cost middle infrared camera that was the micro borometer array (un-cooled VOxMicroborometer, pixel array: 336×256, pixel pitch: 17[μm], frame rate 60[Hz], maker: FLIR, type: Quark 336, price: around 5,000USD). And this apparatus was able to be operated by single board computer (Raspberry Pi.). Thus, total cost was less than 10,000 USD. We joined with KAMOME-PJ (Kanagawa Advanced MOdule for Material Evaluation Project) with DRONE FACTORY Corp., KUUSATSU Corp., Fuji Imvac Inc. And we successfully obtained the middle infrared spectroscopic imaging with multi-copter drone.

  5. Organometallic compounds in the environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Craig, P. J

    2003-01-01

    ... of Organometallic Species in the Environment 20 1.10 Stability of Organometallic Compounds in Biological Systems 1.11 G eneral Comments on the Toxicities of Organometallic Compounds 22 1.12 General Considerations on Environmental R eactivity of Organometallic Compounds 24 1.13 Microbial Biotransformation of Metals and M etalloids 25 1.13.1 Introduction 25 1...

  6. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  7. Hydration interactions and stability of soluble microbial products in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Ling; Wang, Long-Fei; Ye, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-10-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are organic compounds excreted by microorganisms in their metabolism and decay and the main constituents in effluent from biological wastewater treatment systems. They also have an important contribution to the dissolved organic matters in natural aqueous systems. So far the interactions between SMP colloids have not been well explored. In this work, the interactions between SMP colloids in water and salt solutions were studied by using a combination of static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectra, Zeta potential and acid-base titration techniques. The second osmotic virial coefficient had a larger value in a 750-mM salt solution than that in a 50-mM solution, indicating that repulsion between SMP colloids increased with an increase in salt concentration, which is contrary with the classic Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Such a repulsion was attributed to water structuring and enhanced by the accumulation of hydrophilic counter ions around SMP colloids and the formed hydration force. The repulsion and hydration effect led to the dispersing and deeper draining structure, accompanied by a decreased hydrodynamic radius and increased diffusion coefficient. This hydration force was related to so-called ion specific effect, and electrolyte sodium chloride had a more substantial effect on hydration force than KCl, CsCl, NaBr and NaI. Our results provide an experimental approach to explore the SMP structures, inter-colloid interactions and confirm the non-DLVO forces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction of Microbial and Abiotic Processes in Soil Leading to the (Bio)Conversion and Ultimate Attenuation of New Insensitive Munitions Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) NC Camp Butner soil (alternative abbreviation, soil is from North Carolina) NCBI National Center for Biotechnology ...knowledge and perspectives of bioelimination of xenobiotic compounds. Journal of Biotechnology 51, 287-295, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168...McKenzie, R. M. The synthesis of birnessite, cryptomelane, and some other oxides and hydroxides of manganese. Mineralogical Magazine 38, 493-502

  9. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D-alanine, L-alanine, and valine: application of diastereomer separation to delta15N and microbial peptidoglycan studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2009-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method to determine the compound-specific nitrogen isotope compositions of individual amino acid enantiomers using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A novel derivatization of amino acid diastereomers by optically active (R)-(-)-2-butanol or (S)-(+)-2-butanol offers two advantages for nitrogen isotope analysis. First, chromatographic chiral separation can be achieved without the use of chiral stationary-phase columns. Second, the elution order of these compounds on the chromatogram can be switched by a designated esterification reaction. We applied the method to the compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D- and L-alanine in a peptidoglycan derived from the cell walls of cultured bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus staphylolyticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Streptomyces sp.), natural whole bacterial cells (Bacillus subtilis var. natto), (pseudo)-peptidoglycan from archaea (Methanobacterium sp.), and cell wall from eukaryota (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We observed statistically significant differences in nitrogen isotopic compositions; e.g., delta15N ( per thousand vs air) in Staphylococcus staphylolyticus for d-alanine (19.2 +/- 0.5 per thousand, n = 4) and L-alanine (21.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand, n = 4) and in Bacillus subtilis for D-alanine (6.2 +/- 0.2 per thousand, n = 3) and L-alanine (8.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand, n = 3). These results suggest that enzymatic reaction pathways, including the alanine racemase reaction, produce a nitrogen isotopic difference in amino acid enantiomers, resulting in 15N-depleted D-alanine. This method is expected to facilitate compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acid stereoisomers.

  10. Microbial metabolomics with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, M.M.; Muilwijk, B.; Werf, M.J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method was set up suitable for the analysis of microbial metabolomes, consisting of an oximation and silylation derivatization reaction and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Microbial matrixes contain many compounds that potentially interfere with

  11. The Neuro-endocrinological Role of Microbial Glutamate and GABA Signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota provides the host with multiple functions (e.g., by contributing to food digestion, vitamin supplementation and defense against pathogenic strains) and interacts with the host organism through both direct contact (e.g., through surface antigens) and soluble molecules, which are produced by the microbial metabolism. The existence of the so-called gut-brain axis of bi-directional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system also supports a commu...

  12. Assessing microbial degradation of o-xylene at field-scale from the reduction in mass flow rate combined with compound-specific isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, A.; Steinbach, A.; Liedl, R.; Ptak, T.; Michaelis, W.; Teutsch, G.

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, natural attenuation (NA) has evolved into a possible remediation alternative, especially in the case of BTEX spills. In order to be approved by the regulators, biodegradation needs to be demonstrated which requires efficient site investigation and monitoring tools. Three methods—the Integral Groundwater Investigation method, the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and a newly developed combination of both—were used in this work to quantify at field scale the biodegradation of o-xylene at a former gasworks site which is heavily contaminated with BTEX and PAHs. First, the Integral Groundwater Investigation method [Schwarz, R., Ptak, T., Holder, T., Teutsch, G., 1998. Groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites: a new investigation approach. In: Herbert, M. and Kovar, K. (Editors), GQ'98 Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection. IAHS Publication 250, pp. 68-71; COH 4 (2000) 170] was applied, which allows the determination of mass flow rates of o-xylene by integral pumping tests. Concentration time series obtained during pumping at two wells were used to calculate inversely contaminant mass flow rates at the two control planes that are defined by the diameter of the maximum isochrone. A reactive transport model was used within a Monte Carlo approach to identify biodegradation as the dominant process for reduction in the contaminant mass flow rate between the two consecutive control planes. Secondly, compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of o-xylene were performed on the basis of point-scale samples from the same two wells. The Rayleigh equation was used to quantify the degree of biodegradation that occurred between the wells. Thirdly, a combination of the Integral Groundwater Investigation method and the compound-specific isotope analysis was developed and applied. It comprises isotope measurements during the integral pumping tests and the evaluation of δ13C time series by an inversion algorithm to obtain spatially

  13. Microbial products II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pape, H; Rehm, H J [eds.

    1986-01-01

    The present volume deals mainly with compounds which have been detected as natural microbial products. Part 1 of this volume introduces the general aspects of the overproduction of metabolites and the concepts and genetics of secondary metabolism. Compounds such as nucleosides, nucleotides, coenzymes, vitamins and lipids are dealt with in part 2. Part 3 then is devoted to products and antibiotics with uses im medicine, veterinary medicine, plant protection and metabolites with antitumor activity. Several secondary metabolites have found uses in human and animal health care. With 244 figs., 109 tabs.

  14. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  15. Microbial transformation of xenobiotics for environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial transformation of xenobiotics for environmental bioremediation. ... anaerobic and reductive biotransformation by co-metabolic processes and an overview of ... of xenobiotic compounds in context to the modern day biotechnology.

  16. Microbial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Yu; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    A microbial biosensor is an analytical device that couples microorganisms with a transducer to enable rapid, accurate and sensitive detection of target analytes in fields as diverse as medicine, environmental monitoring, defense, food processing and safety. The earlier microbial biosensors used the respiratory and metabolic functions of the microorganisms to detect a substance that is either a substrate or an inhibitor of these processes. Recently, genetically engineered microorganisms based on fusing of the lux, gfp or lacZ gene reporters to an inducible gene promoter have been widely applied to assay toxicity and bioavailability. This paper reviews the recent trends in the development and application of microbial biosensors. Current advances and prospective future direction in developing microbial biosensor have also been discussed

  17. Burned after reading: the so-called list of Alexandrian librarians in P. Oxy. X 1241 Brûlée après lecture : la liste dite des Bibliothécaires d'Alexandrie dans le P.Oxy. X 1241 Burned after reading; la cosiddetta lista di bibliotecari alessandrini in P.Oxy. X 1241

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Murray

    2012-06-01

    être réexaminée, car il semble probable que nous ayons affaire à une œuvre littéraire manquée.This article calls into question the value and reliability of the contents of P.Oxy. X 1241, the so-called list of Alexandria Librarians. Rather than treating the list of grammarians at col. i.5-ii.30 by itself, as scholars have done ever since the papyrus was published, this paper considers the document in its entirety. This closer reading of P.Oxy. X 1241 demonstrates that there is clear thematic continuity between the list of grammarians and the military catalogues that follow which has never been observed before, precisely because the two parts have always been treated separately. Challenges to three crucial assumptions of the original editors, B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt emerge: (1 Is the list at col. i.5-ii.30 in fact a list of the heads of the Alexandrian library? (2 Is the work a copy or compilation of some earlier scholarly piece that dates back to the Hellenistic period, and not a product of a circa second century CE scholar/grammarian? (3 Do the contents of the papyrus reflect the work of a competent scholar/grammarian who was well enough informed about the chronology of the Ptolemaic period to produce an historically accurate account of the succession of individuals connected to the Ptolemaic court and the Alexandrian Library? While it is true to say that in its content and use of learned citations P.Oxy. X 1241 shares many similarities with Hellenistic and Imperial prose catalogues, the strategies of learned discourse deployed by the author in the military catalogue do not conform to the norms of reliable scholarly examples. Accordingly, the value of the text as documentary evidence of the history of the Alexandrian library needs to be reconsidered as it seems likely that we are dealing with a failed literary work.Questo articolo mette in dubbio il valore e l’attendibilità del contenuto di P.Oxy. X 1241, la cosiddetta lista dei bibliotecari

  18. Actual development of the conversion of energy sources of minor value in so-called bio coal. A comparison of pyrolysis process with the HTC process; Aktuelle Entwicklung bei der Konversion von minderwertigen Energietraegern in die so genannte Biokohle. Ein Vergleich von Pyrolyse- und HTC-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neudeck, Diana; Roedger, Jan-Markus [HAWK Hochschule fuer angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst, Goettingen (Germany); Loewen, Achim

    2012-07-01

    The conversion of biomass with low quality into biochar through pyrolysis or hydro-thermal carbonization is suitable to substitute lignite and hard coal as a fuel and thereby improve the carbon footprint of a firing plant: Additionally there is the possibility to apply biochar to fields. Carbon compounds, stabilized by the carbonization process, could simultaneously increase crop yields and sequester carbon for mid- and long term. This paper compares the two processes pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization regarding input-material, process-parameters, product-properties and possible applications for each product. The aim is to give an overview which process with given parameters leads to which final product and application. (orig.)

  19. Ecogenomics of microbial communities in bioremediation of chlorinated contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maphosa, F.; Lieten, S.; Dinkla, I.; Stams, A.J.M.; Fennel, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    Organohalide compounds such as chloroethenes, chloroethanes, and polychlorinated benzenes are among the most significant pollutants in the world. These compounds are often found in contamination plumes with other pollutants such as solvents, pesticides, and petroleum derivatives. Microbial

  20. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  1. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  2. Microbial platform for production of aromatic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Christine Alexandra Egaa; Olsen, Kresten Jon Kromphardt; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2017-01-01

    Polyketides form the basic building blocks of numerous natural products, which are in use in pharmaceuticals, food additives and other fine chemicals. Many of these polyketides possess very specific cyclic and aromatic conformations. The programmable platform we aim to create will be able...

  3. Microbial activity in district cooling nets; Mikrobiell Aktivitet i Fjaerrkylenaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Four district cooling nets with varying water quality have been investigated according to presence of microbially related problems. The aim has been to formulate recommendations regarding the water quality and regarding other procedures that might reduce the risk for biofilm formation and microbial corrosion. The method has consisted of using so called exposure containers, connected to each net. The water has been allowed to flow through the exposure containers where coupons of carbon steel have been exposed. The coupons have been withdrawn at different times, and analysed regarding the presence of biofilm and corrosion attack. Analyses have also been made regarding the amount of a number of different types of micro-organisms in the biofilm and in the district cooling water. The project has been divided in two phases. During the first phase of the project only two nets were investigated, one with municipal water and one with water of district heating quality, i.e. degassed and deionised. Biofilms could be seen on the coupons from both nets, even though the exposure time only had been 1.5 month. Considerable concentrations of micro-organisms were found in the biofilms and in the water for both nets, however much larger amounts for the net with municipal water. During the second phase of the project four nets were investigated, two with mainly municipal water and two with water of district heating quality. Here, on the other hand, it could be seen that the two nets with municipal water had micro-organisms of equivalent or lower concentrations compared to the two nets with water of district heating quality. One explanation to this is that the colouring substance pyranine is added to these two nets. Pyranine is added for the purpose of easily detecting a leakage but is at the same time a carbon compound, and as such a possible nutrient for the micro-organisms. This illustrates the importance of having the district cooling water as free from additives as possible. Other

  4. Towards the understanding of microbial metabolism in relation to microbial enhanced oil recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Bacillus licheniformis 421 was used as a model organism to understand the effects of microbial cell growth and metabolite production under anaerobic conditions in relation to microbial enhanced oil recovery. The bacterium was able to grow anaerobically on different carbon compounds...

  5. Empirical evidence that soil carbon formation from plant inputs is positively related to microbial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Bradford; Ashley D. Keiser; Christian A. Davies; Calley A. Mersmann; Michael S. Strickland

    2012-01-01

    Plant-carbon inputs to soils in the form of dissolved sugars, organic acids and amino acids fuel much of heterotrophic microbial activity belowground. Initial residence times of these compounds in the soil solution are on the order of hours, with microbial uptake a primary removal mechanism. Through microbial biosynthesis, the dissolved compounds become dominant...

  6. Microbial glycoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Adnan; Anonsen, Jan Haug

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based "-omics" technologies are important tools for global and detailed mapping of post-translational modifications. Protein glycosylation is an abundant and important post translational modification widespread throughout all domains of life. Characterization of glycoproteins...... and research in this area is rapidly accelerating. Here, we review recent developments in glycoproteomic technologies with a special focus on microbial protein glycosylation....

  7. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Luiz F.; Arruda, Maria F. C.; Vieira, Sergio R.; Campelo, Patrícia M. S.; Grégio, Ana M. T.; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called “green chemistry,” which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  8. Microbial xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids abundant in the human food supply. Lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin are major xanthophyll carotenoids in human plasma. The consumption of these xanthophylls is directly associated with reduction in the risk of cancers, cardiovascular disease, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract formation. Canthaxanthin and astaxanthin also have considerable importance in aquaculture for salmonid and crustacean pigmentation, and are of commercial interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. Chemical synthesis is a major source for the heavy demand of xanthophylls in the consumer market; however, microbial producers also have potential as commercial sources. In this review, we discuss the biosynthesis, commercial utility, and major microbial sources of xanthophylls. We also present a critical review of current research and technologies involved in promoting microbes as potential commercial sources for mass production.

  9. Microbial effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, V.J.

    1985-10-01

    The long term safety and integrity of radioactive waste disposal sites proposed for use by Ontario Hydro may be affected by the release of radioactive gases. Microbes mediate the primary pathways of waste degradation and hence an assessment of their potential to produce gaseous end products from the breakdown of low level waste was performed. Due to a number of unknown variables, assumptions were made regarding environmental and waste conditions that controlled microbial activity; however, it was concluded that 14 C and 3 H would be produced, albeit over a long time scale of about 1500 years for 14 C in the worst case situation

  10. I believe I am so called: reflections on a vocation in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2012-09-01

    This essay is concerned with the fulfillment of ordination commitments through a pastoral role in medical education and review of medical research with human subjects. Stylistically, it combines memoir with the genre known as "creative non-fiction." Its major issues have to do with the identity formation and transformation of the author, the function and ethics of institutional review boards, the teaching of medical ethics to medical students, and courses involved in the doctor-patient relationship and in palliative care intended to increase the sensitivity and self-awareness of physicians-in-becoming. This essay was presented in its initial form at the Annual Fellows Meeting of the Society for Values in Higher Education in 2010.

  11. Theoretical foundations of the so-called cross-reference structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    1999-01-01

    A discussion of the concept of "structure" related to the concept of "cross-reference". On the basis of the distribution structures a completely new way of viewing the lexicographical cross-references of all sorts is presented....

  12. Rhizophores in Rhizophora mangle L: an alternative interpretation of so-called ''aerial roots''

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Nanuza L. de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora mangle L., one of the most common mangrove species, has an aerial structure system that gives it stability in permanently swampy soils. In fact, these structures, known as "aerial roots" or "stilt roots", have proven to be peculiar branches with positive geotropism, which form a large number of roots when in contact with swampy soils. These organs have a sympodial branching system, wide pith, slightly thickened cortex, collateral vascular bundles, polyarch stele and endarch protoxylem, as in the stem, and a periderm produced by a phellogen at the apex similar to a root cap. They also have the same type of trichosclereid that occurs in the stem, with negative geotropism, unlike true Rhizophora roots, which do not form trichosclereids at all. On the other hand, these branches do not form leaves and in this respect they are similar to roots. These peculiar branches are rhizophores or special root-bearing branches, analogous to those found in Lepidodendrales and other Carboniferous tree ferns that grew in swampy soils.

  13. Nuclear power industry from the viewpoint of entropy so-called, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukaji, Rokuo

    1984-01-01

    In Japan, the nuclear power industry tends to be grouped, which is understandable because of its nature as the unification of various technology aspects. The grouped operation implies the state in order (low entropy). If this grouped operation (low entropy) is in a state of low economic value (high entropy), in order to raise the economic value (low entropy), the tendency will be to weaken the grouping (high entropy). For raising the low economic value (high entropy) to a higher state (low entropy), other energy or value must be consumed. In the problematic situation when the economic value is also high for manufacturing and construction enterprises (low entropy), the leadership by the electric power enterprises is strongly desired. (Mori, K.)

  14. What is the so-called optimum pH for denitrification in soil?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Miloslav; Jíšová, Linda; Hopkins, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 34, - (2002), s. 1227-1234 ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : pH * denitrifying enzyme activity * denitrification potential Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.902, year: 2002

  15. Urban problems in the civil town of Aquincum: the so-called „northern band”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Láng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract of PhD thesis submitted in 2013 to the Archaeology Doctoral Programme, Doctoral School of History, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest under the supervision of Dénes Gabler.

  16. Theory Wars: An Argument Against Arguments in the so-called Ludology/Narratology Debate

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Celia

    2005-01-01

    This paper attempts to offer an alternative to the agonistic debate presented by Gonzalo Frasca in "Ludologists Love Stories Too," in Level Up, DiGRA 2003 conference proceedings. While Frasca’s position is that the ludology/narratology debate is spurious and fraught with misunderstandings, his paper simultaneously succeeds in deepening the gap by further polarizing the alleged two sides of a debate that, in Frasca’s words, "never took place." Furthermore, the paper adds to the misunderstandin...

  17. Toxicity of so-called edible hijiki seaweed (Sargassum fusiforme) containing inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Katsuhiko; Konomi, Aki

    2012-07-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency and its counterparts in other countries have warned consumers not to eat hijiki (Sargassum fusiforme; synonym Hizikia fusiformis), a Sargasso seaweed, because it contains large amounts of inorganic arsenic. We investigated dietary exposure of hijiki in weaning male F344/N rats fed an AIN-93G diet supplemented with 3% (w/w) hijiki powder for 7 weeks, compared with those fed only an AIN-93G diet. Body weight, body temperature, blood and tissue arsenic concentrations, plasma biochemistry and hematological parameters were measured. We found that feeding rats a 3% hijiki diet led to a marked accumulation of arsenic in blood and tissues, and evoked a high body temperature and abnormal blood biochemistry including elevated plasma alkaline phosphatase activity and inorganic phosphorus, consistent with arsenic poisoning. These findings should prompt further investigations to identify the health hazards related to consumption of hijiki and related Sargassum species in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Kondratiev cycles and so-called long waves. The early research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThis paper recalls some early work of the Dutch pioneers of long-wave research which anticipated many of the contemporary debates. Various explanations which have been advanced for the existence of long waves are reviewed, and the applicability of long-wave theories in a number of

  19. [Regarding respiration and the so-called "animal heat." An historical sketch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, A

    2001-01-01

    According to Aristotle and Galen, the essential function of the respiration phenomenon was to cool the blood. Towards the middle of the XVI Century, Miguel Servet suggested, in his treatise Christianismi restitutio..., that the inspired air could have other functions besides cooling the blood. Later, Joseph Black thought that respiration was a combustion. In the light of the advances in chemistry achieved in the XVII Century, the English scientist Adair Crawford and the French chemist Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier conceived, in the second half of that century, the first general and quantitative theories on the origin of animal heat. Both these authors had the conviction that the "inflammable element", which will be called oxygen, was not formed in the pulmonary territory, but could be absorbed by the blood. Oxygen, foreseen by Mayow at the end of XVII Century, was discovered by Joseph Priestley in 1774. Lavoisier gave the name of oxygen to this gas and firmly established that the respiration phenomenon consists essentially in a process of combustion. The mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange, native of Turin, suggested that animal heat originates in all breathing tissues. This phenomenon was verified and described in detail by the biologist Lazzaro Spallanzani, professor at the University of Pavia. Dissemination, in the scientific world, of the new chemical nomenclature and of the respiratory theory, closely related to it, was based fundamentally on the works "Méthode de nomenclature chimique..." (1787) and "Traité élémentaire de chimie..." (1789). During the XIX Century, studies on the phenomenon of animal respiration continued and fundamental discoveries in this subject were attained, such as conversion of hemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin once oxygen had been fixed. Now it is possible to study the regulating mechanisms of the energetic metabolism of the myocardium in vivo, which allows decisive interventions in certain cardiopathies, such as in acute ischemic cardiopathy.

  20. Mitigated infection in so called aseptic loosening of the total endoprosthesis of the big joints

    OpenAIRE

    Koudela, Karel

    2008-01-01

    The theme of the work is infection in the aseptic loosening of total joint replacement of large joints. Thesis topic is very timely, since inflammatory complications accompanying large joint arthroplasty is one of the causes of failure of total joint replacement and subsequent revision surgery represents a major problem of health, social and economic. PhD thesis summarizes the known aspects of this issue.

  1. X-ray examinations for prediction of the so-called infantile scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, J.

    1980-01-01

    The present work contains a comparison of findings on 50 patients with progressive and resolving infantile scoliosis, as far as they are important for prognostication, with the investigations of Metha and other authors. These were the data obtained: 1. Among the 46 cases of 'resolving scoliosis' investigated, 93 per cent showed a difference of the rib-vertebra angles of below 20 degrees. 2. In the four patients with 'progressive scoliosis', a difference of the rib-vertebra angles below the 20-degree limit was seen which is said by Metha to be of unfavourable prognostication. 3. In all of the progressive cases, the rib head on the concave side was found to project into the shadow of the vertex vertebra, which is considered by Metha to be an unfavourable prognostical sign. However, the same position was also seen in 7 out of 46 resolving scolioses. The entire values collected from the 50 patients confirm the characteristics of the disease. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Carcinoma of the so-called empty breast and its relation to the Wolfe's parenchymal classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.; Eiter, H.; Taxer, F.

    1983-01-01

    Carcinoma in the ''empty breast'' in our experience is so common that we doubt Wolfe's conclusions in his classification of parenchymal patterns. Amongst patients over 60 years, almost 70% of carcinomas were situated in an ''empty'' parenchyma and they did not develop in a parechymal group above P1. Mammographically, the ''empty breast'' is the structureless fatty breast of older women after the menopause. Some authors believe that there is a lower incidence of carcinomas in this type of breast than in other types of parenchyma, such as those showing mastopathies. Our experience concerning carcinomas in involuted breasts is described. (orig.) [de

  3. ASSESSING THE SO CALLED MARKED INFLECTIONAL FEATURES OF NIGERIAN ENGLISH: A SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION THEORY ACCOUNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boluwaji Oshodi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are conflicting claims among scholars on whether the structural outputs of the types of English spoken in countries where English is used as a second language gives such speech forms the status of varieties of English. This study examined those morphological features considered to be marked features of the variety spoken in Nigeria according to Kirkpatrick (2011 and the variety spoken in Malaysia by considering the claims of the Missing Surface Inflection Hypothesis (MSIH a Second Language Acquisition theory which accounts for the cause of the variable use of such inflections among L2 learners. Results from oral and written composition tasks administered on selected undergraduate students of Nigerian and Malaysian universities revealed that what is regarded as morphological features are actually a deviation from the L2 target forms. According to the MSIH the variability in the use of such inflections is due to problems of lexical retrieval a psycholinguistic problem which manifests among L2 learners of English generally which results in wrong surface representations.

  4. ASSESSING THE SO CALLED MARKED INFLECTIONAL FEATURES OF NIGERIAN ENGLISH: A SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION THEORY ACCOUNT

    OpenAIRE

    Boluwaji Oshodi

    2014-01-01

    There are conflicting claims among scholars on whether the structural outputs of the types of English spoken in countries where English is used as a second language gives such speech forms the status of varieties of English. This study examined those morphological features considered to be marked features of the variety spoken in Nigeria according to Kirkpatrick (2011) and the variety spoken in Malaysia by considering the claims of the Missing Surface Inflection Hypothesis (MSIH) a Second Lan...

  5. Transient disappearance of cerebral infarcts on CT scan, the so-called fogging effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech Skriver, E.; Skyhoej Olsen, T.; Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen

    1981-01-01

    The fogging effect, whereby initially hypodense infarcts become isodense during the second and third week after the onset of stroke, was investigated in a prospective and consecutive series comprising 50 cases with completed stroke. CT scans were performed approximately 3 days, 10 days and 6 months after stroke. The fogging effect was found in 54% of cases. The hypodense areas reappeared on all scans at 6 months. Cerebral infarcts therefore may be overlooked or grossly underestimated if the scan is performed during the second and third week after stroke. (orig.)

  6. Hidden Dimensions in the So-Called Reality of a Mathematics Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersfeld, Heinrich

    1980-01-01

    Teaching and learning mathematics in classrooms is interpreted as human interaction in an institutionalized setting. Using theories and categories from different disciplines, a classroom episode is reanalyzed. Four hidden dimensions in the classroom process and thus deficient areas of research are identified. Consequences for teacher training are…

  7. Bilateral Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysms Mimicking So-called "Kissing Aneurysms": A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    山口, 竜一; 伊藤, 宣行; 前村, 栄治; 塩川, 芳昭; 齋藤, 勇; Ryuichi, YAMAGUCHI; Nobuyuki, ITO; Eiji, MAEMURA; Yoshiaki, SHIOKAWA; Isamu, SAITO; 公立阿伎留病院脳神経外科; 公立阿伎留病院脳神経外科; 公立阿伎留病院脳神経外科; 杏林大学医学部脳神経外科; 杏林大学医学部脳神経外科

    2003-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented disturbance of consciousness due to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A computed tomography (CT) on admission revealed diffuse thick SAH and intracerebral hematoma in the right frontal lobe. Conventional angiography and three-dimensional CT angiography showed symmetrical aneurysms located on the bilateral pericallosal arteries at bifurcation of the callosomarginal arteries. The operation was performed on the next day after onset of SAH. The aneurysms were clipped vi...

  8. [Diagnosis of depressive disorder and so-called exhaustion depression. Self-esteem--a central concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Friis, Johan

    2002-02-07

    Depressive disorders can be recognized by the loss of self-esteem; this contrasts with mourning and neurasthenic reactions, in which self-esteem remains intact. Just as depression can result from the gradual reduction and eventual loss of self-esteem, mourning and neurasthenic reactions can evolve into true depressive states. "Exhaustion depression", a new diagnostic category connected to "burnout" situations, should be applied only when criteria for depressive disorder are fulfilled, including loss of self-esteem. When these criteria are lacking we should refer only to an exhaustion state provoked by stress. Neurotic mechanisms may represent a special class of relevant stress factors, but are not seen in manifest neurasthenic reactions and exhaustion depression.

  9. Do Hospitals Owe A So-Called 'Non-Delegable' Duty of Care to their Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuermann, Christine

    2018-02-01

    It is not uncommon for the duty of care owed by a hospital to its patients to be described as 'non-delegable'. Use of this label suggests that a hospital may be held strictly liable to a patient for the wrongdoing of a third party beyond the circumstances in which vicarious liability might be imposed. To date, no higher court has used the label to impose such liability. Notwithstanding, it was assumed by Lord Sumption in Woodland v Swimming Teachers Association that the duty of care owed by a hospital to a patient could be so described when formulating his test for determining the existence of a 'non-delegable duty of care'. This article challenges that assumption and, in turn, the veracity of the test devised by Lord Sumption.

  10. [The so-called "chocolate cyst"--frequently misinterpreted as ovarian endometriosis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B; Schindler, A E

    1996-09-01

    Limitation of morphological diagnostic and possible misinterpretations are shown in a patient with anamnestic ovarian endometriosis. In cases of "chocolate cysts" it is necessary to differentiate between ovarian endometriosis and functional cysts. Hints for the existence of a functional cyst are an atypical past history or perioperative findings. Biochemical analysis of the cyst fluid may lead to a correct diagnosis.

  11. The So-Called “Islamic Terrorism”: A Tale of the Ambiguous Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Surya Atmaja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available "What does the term "terrorism" mean." Why does the term “terrorism” often identified as Islam? "If terrorism is an ism that affects "terror" that it generates, while Islam which literally means "peace", then the two terms certainly mismatch! Such question and statement show Muslims’ concern over frequent phenomena of "terrorism" using Islamic religious symbols. The research undertaken proved that there are three explanations. First, a close tripartite network connection between “terrorism experts” and the circles of power policy holders who are also supported by senior journalists in the international media influence. Second, a long tradition of Orientalist studies in the study of the Middle East region and the study of religion in the Arab culture. Figures such as Bernard Lewis, Noah Feldman, Raphael Patai and other Middle East experts often sit with other experts in the field of terrorism (the first factor and become main advisors and expert staff for the US government in the formulation of action to counter terror. It was the catalyst for the transmission of viewpoint which then decorated orientalist discourse of Islamic terrorism in the process of political policies. Third, a lot of Islamic terrorism discourse refers to the long tradition of cultural stereotypes and biased representations of the media that often portray Islam and Muslims as ‘the enemy’. The reason is that it reflects the perspective of socio-Western culture that fears and worries the other oriental parties which has been stereotyped since the imperial era. Many also argue that the dichotomy of the orientalist views are deliberately preserved as a form of new style imperialism

  12. Microbial life in geothermal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sand, W. [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany). Mikrobiologie

    2003-12-01

    Geothermal waters usually contain many salts, often in varying concentrations. Some of these salts, especially if they are oxidizable or reducible, may be subject to microbial conversion and/or (bio)precipitation. Microorganisms can oxidize, sometimes even under anoxic (absence of oxygen) conditions, reduced sulfur compounds, iron (II) ions, and manganese (II) ions, to mention just a few of the most important. On the other hand, partially or fully oxidized compounds can be reduced by microorganisms, for example sulfur compounds, iron (III) ions, manganese (IV) ions, nitrogen oxides such as nitrite and nitrate, and, finally, bicarbonate and carbonate ions. If organic compounds are present, these may also be oxidized or reduced. A multitude of these microorganisms are able to perform such a metabolism under aerobic or anoxic conditions. All these (bio)processes allow bacteria to grow and proliferate. The consequences include biocorrosion and biodeterioration. The growth requirements and the biodeterioration mechanisms will be discussed in this review. (author)

  13. Microbial biosurfactants with their high-value functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial world is a rich source for finding valuable industrial chemicals and ingredients. Specifically, many microbial metabolites are surface-active compounds that can be developed into bio-based surfactants, detergents, and emulsifiers. Techno-economic analyses for the production of bio-based ...

  14. Microbiology Meets Archaeology: Soil Microbial Communities Reveal Different Human Activities at Archaic Monte Iato (Sixth Century BC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, Rosa; Siles, José A; Cajthaml, Tomas; Öhlinger, Birgit; Kistler, Erich

    2017-05-01

    Microbial ecology has been recognized as useful in archaeological studies. At Archaic Monte Iato in Western Sicily, a native (indigenous) building was discovered. The objective of this study was the first examination of soil microbial communities related to this building. Soil samples were collected from archaeological layers at a ritual deposit (food waste disposal) in the main room and above the fireplace in the annex. Microbial soil characterization included abundance (cellular phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), viable bacterial counts), activity (physiological profiles, enzyme activities of viable bacteria), diversity, and community structure (bacterial and fungal Illumina amplicon sequencing, identification of viable bacteria). PLFA-derived microbial abundance was lower in soils from the fireplace than in soils from the deposit; the opposite was observed with culturable bacteria. Microbial communities in soils from the fireplace had a higher ability to metabolize carboxylic and acetic acids, while those in soils from the deposit metabolized preferentially carbohydrates. The lower deposit layer was characterized by higher total microbial and bacterial abundance and bacterial richness and by a different carbohydrate metabolization profile compared to the upper deposit layer. Microbial community structures in the fireplace were similar and could be distinguished from those in the two deposit layers, which had different microbial communities. Our data confirmed our hypothesis that human consumption habits left traces on microbiota in the archaeological evidence; therefore, microbiological residues as part of the so-called ecofacts are, like artifacts, key indicators of consumer behavior in the past.

  15. Microbial ecosystem constructed in water for successful organic hydroponics

    OpenAIRE

    Makoto Shinohara; Hiromi Ohmori; Yoichi Uehara

    2008-01-01

    Conventional hydroponics systems generally use only chemical fertilisers, not organic ones, since there are no microbial ecosystems present in such systems to mineralise organic compounds to inorganic nutrients. Addition of organic compounds to the hydroponic solution generally has phytotoxic effects and causes poor plant growth. We developed a novel hydroponic culture method using organic fertiliser. A microbial ecosystem was constructed in hydroponic solution by regulating the amounts of or...

  16. Microbial syntrophy: interaction for the common good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brandon E L; Henneberger, Ruth; Huber, Harald; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Classical definitions of syntrophy focus on a process, performed through metabolic interaction between dependent microbial partners, such as the degradation of complex organic compounds under anoxic conditions. However, examples from past and current scientific discoveries suggest that a new, simple but wider definition is necessary to cover all aspects of microbial syntrophy. We suggest the term 'obligately mutualistic metabolism', which still focuses on microbial metabolic cooperation but also includes an ecological aspect: the benefit for both partners. By the combined metabolic activity of microorganisms, endergonic reactions can become exergonic through the efficient removal of products and therefore enable a microbial community to survive with minimal energy resources. Here, we explain the principles of classical and non-classical syntrophy and illustrate the concepts with various examples. We present biochemical fundamentals that allow microorganism to survive under a range of environmental conditions and to drive important biogeochemical processes. Novel technologies have contributed to the understanding of syntrophic relationships in cultured and uncultured systems. Recent research highlights that obligately mutualistic metabolism is not limited to certain metabolic pathways nor to certain environments or microorganisms. This beneficial microbial interaction is not restricted to the transfer of reducing agents such as hydrogen or formate, but can also involve the exchange of organic, sulfurous- and nitrogenous compounds or the removal of toxic compounds. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial Resources and Enological Significance: Opportunities and Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Petruzzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the innovative trends in the wine sector, the continuous exploration of enological properties associated with wine microbial resources represents a cornerstone driver of quality improvement. Since the advent of starter cultures technology, the attention has been focused on intraspecific biodiversity within the primary species responsible for alcoholic fermentation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and, subsequently, for the so-called ‘malolactic fermentation’ (Oenococcus oeni. However, in the last decade, a relevant number of studies proposed the enological exploitation of an increasing number of species (e.g., non-Saccharomyces yeasts associated with spontaneous fermentation in wine. These new species/strains may provide technological solutions to specific problems and/or improve sensory characteristics, such as complexity, mouth-feel and flavors. This review offers an overview of the available information on the enological/protechnological significance of microbial resources associated with winemaking, summarizing the opportunities and the benefits associated with the enological exploitation of this microbial potential. We discuss proposed solutions to improve quality and safety of wines (e.g., alternative starter cultures, multistrains starter cultures and future perspectives.

  18. Microbial Resources and Enological Significance: Opportunities and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Capozzi, Vittorio; Berbegal, Carmen; Corbo, Maria R.; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Spano, Giuseppe; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2017-01-01

    Among the innovative trends in the wine sector, the continuous exploration of enological properties associated with wine microbial resources represents a cornerstone driver of quality improvement. Since the advent of starter cultures technology, the attention has been focused on intraspecific biodiversity within the primary species responsible for alcoholic fermentation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and, subsequently, for the so-called ‘malolactic fermentation’ (Oenococcus oeni). However, in the last decade, a relevant number of studies proposed the enological exploitation of an increasing number of species (e.g., non-Saccharomyces yeasts) associated with spontaneous fermentation in wine. These new species/strains may provide technological solutions to specific problems and/or improve sensory characteristics, such as complexity, mouth-feel and flavors. This review offers an overview of the available information on the enological/protechnological significance of microbial resources associated with winemaking, summarizing the opportunities and the benefits associated with the enological exploitation of this microbial potential. We discuss proposed solutions to improve quality and safety of wines (e.g., alternative starter cultures, multistrains starter cultures) and future perspectives. PMID:28642742

  19. Genome engineering for microbial natural product discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Si-Sun; Katsuyama, Yohei; Bai, Linquan; Deng, Zixin; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2018-03-03

    The discovery and development of microbial natural products (MNPs) have played pivotal roles in the fields of human medicine and its related biotechnology sectors over the past several decades. The post-genomic era has witnessed the development of microbial genome mining approaches to isolate previously unsuspected MNP biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) hidden in the genome, followed by various BGC awakening techniques to visualize compound production. Additional microbial genome engineering techniques have allowed higher MNP production titers, which could complement a traditional culture-based MNP chasing approach. Here, we describe recent developments in the MNP research paradigm, including microbial genome mining, NP BGC activation, and NP overproducing cell factory design. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Microbial micropatches within microbial hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Renee J.; Tobe, Shanan S.; Paterson, James S.; Seymour, Justin R.; Oliver, Rod L.; Mitchell, James G.

    2018-01-01

    The spatial distributions of organism abundance and diversity are often heterogeneous. This includes the sub-centimetre distributions of microbes, which have ‘hotspots’ of high abundance, and ‘coldspots’ of low abundance. Previously we showed that 300 μl abundance hotspots, coldspots and background regions were distinct at all taxonomic levels. Here we build on these results by showing taxonomic micropatches within these 300 μl microscale hotspots, coldspots and background regions at the 1 μl scale. This heterogeneity among 1 μl subsamples was driven by heightened abundance of specific genera. The micropatches were most pronounced within hotspots. Micropatches were dominated by Pseudomonas, Bacteroides, Parasporobacterium and Lachnospiraceae incertae sedis, with Pseudomonas and Bacteroides being responsible for a shift in the most dominant genera in individual hotspot subsamples, representing up to 80.6% and 47.3% average abundance, respectively. The presence of these micropatches implies the ability these groups have to create, establish themselves in, or exploit heterogeneous microenvironments. These genera are often particle-associated, from which we infer that these micropatches are evidence for sub-millimetre aggregates and the aquatic polymer matrix. These findings support the emerging paradigm that the microscale distributions of planktonic microbes are numerically and taxonomically heterogeneous at scales of millimetres and less. We show that microscale microbial hotspots have internal structure within which specific local nutrient exchanges and cellular interactions might occur. PMID:29787564

  1. Acute liver failure following recreational use of psychotropic "head shop" compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, S; Lambe, E; O'Dea, J

    2011-03-01

    The recreational use of the so-called "legal-highs" has been in both the medical and political arena over the last year as a result of the appearance of "head shops" in many towns in Ireland. These shops specialized in selling new psychotropic compounds that circumvented established drug legislation. Little is known about the potentially harmful effects of these substances but case reports suggest a plethora of harmful psychological and physical effects. Our case describes for the first time acute liver failure associated with the ingestion of two of these amphetamine type compounds.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  3. 11 Soil Microbial Biomass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    186–198. Insam H. (1990). Are the soil microbial biomass and basal respiration governed by the climatic regime? Soil. Biol. Biochem. 22: 525–532. Insam H. D. and Domsch K. H. (1989). Influence of microclimate on soil microbial biomass. Soil Biol. Biochem. 21: 211–21. Jenkinson D. S. (1988). Determination of microbial.

  4. Molecular microbial ecology manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; Bruijn, de F.J.; Head, I.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.

    2004-01-01

    The field of microbial ecology has been revolutionized in the past two decades by the introduction of molecular methods into the toolbox of the microbial ecologist. This molecular arsenal has helped to unveil the enormity of microbial diversity across the breadth of the earth's ecosystems, and has

  5. Microbial Rechargeable Battery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Sam D.; Mol, Annemerel R.; Sleutels, Tom H.J.A.; Heijne, Ter Annemiek; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems hold potential for both conversion of electricity into chemicals through microbial electrosynthesis (MES) and the provision of electrical power by oxidation of organics using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study provides a proof of concept for a microbial

  6. Childhood microbial keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah G Al Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Children with suspected microbial keratitis require comprehensive evaluation and management. Early recognition, identifying the predisposing factors and etiological microbial organisms, and instituting appropriate treatment measures have a crucial role in outcome. Ocular trauma was the leading cause of childhood microbial keratitis in our study.

  7. Microbial oxidation and reduction of inorganic sulphur compounds in relation to the development and control of microorganisms active in leaching operations. Part of a coordinated programme on bacterial leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuovinen, O.H.

    1977-01-01

    The project considers the use of Thiobacillus ferroxidans type bacteria for the leaching of metals from ores. The various ways by which Thiobacillus ferroxidans utilizes inorganic sulfur compounds for oxidation, energy, growth and synthesis of cellular material were studied. The report briefly describes the scope and background of the project, and a list of publications describing experimental methods and research materials used is given. Unpublished work commenced during the Research Contract includes three major projects: (1) Transition of Thiobacillus ferroxidans from heterotrophic growth on fucose to autotropic growth on ferrous-iron; (2) development of a method to determine the ATP-content of bacteria attached to ore particles; (3) microbiological and chemical interactions of inorganic sulfur compounds. These three projects are summarized briefly

  8. Microorganisms for efficient production of melatonin and related compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant microbial cells and methods for producing 5HTP, melatonin and related compounds using such cells are described. More specifically, the recombinant microbial cell may comprise exogenous genes encoding one or more of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase, a 5- hydroxy-L-tryptophan decarboxylyase...

  9. Organolanthanoid compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Up to little more than a decade ago organolanthanoid compounds were still a curiosity. Apart from the description of an isolated number of cyclopentadienyl and indenyl derivatives, very few significant contributions had been made to this interesting sector of organometallic chemistry. However, subsequent systematic studies using modern preparative and analytical techniques, together with X-ray single crystal structure determinations, enabled the isolation and characterization of a large number of very interesting homoleptic and heteroleptic compounds in which the lanthanoid is bound to hydrogen, to substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl groups, to allyl or alkynyl groups, or even to phosphorus ylides, trimethylsilyl, and carbonylmetal groups. These compounds, which are all extremely sensitive to oxygen and water, open up new possibilities in the field of catalysis and have great potential in organic synthesis - as recent studies with pentamethylcyclopentadienyl derivatives, organolanthanoid(II) compounds, and hexamethyllanthanoid complexes have already shown. (orig.) [de

  10. The microbial fate of carbon in high-latitude seas: Impact of the microbial loop on oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yager, P.L.

    1996-12-31

    This dissertation examines pelagic microbial processes in high-latitude seas, how they affect regional and global carbon cycling, and how they might respond to hypothesized changes in climate. Critical to these interests is the effect of cold temperature on bacterial activity. Also important is the extent to which marine biological processes in general impact the inorganic carbon cycle. The study area is the Northeast Water (NEW) Polynya, a seasonally-recurrent opening in the permanent ice situated over the northeastern Greenland continental shelf. This work was part of an international, multi-disciplinary research project studying carbon cycling in the coastal Arctic. The first chapter describes a simple model which links a complex marine food web to a simplified ocean and atmosphere. The second chapter investigates the inorganic carbon inventory of the summertime NEW Polynya surface waters to establish the effect of biological processes on the air-sea pCO{sub 2} gradient. The third and fourth chapters use a kinetic approach to examine microbial activities in the NEW Polynya as a function of temperature and dissolved organic substrate concentration, testing the so-called Pomeroy hypothesis that microbial activity is disproportionately reduced at low environmental temperatures owing to increased organic substrate requirements. Together, the suite of data collected on microbial activities, cell size, and grazing pressure suggest how unique survival strategies adopted by an active population of high-latitude bacteria may contribute to, rather than detract from, an efficient biological carbon pump.

  11. Microbial Metabolism in Serpentinite Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Kubo, M.; Hoehler, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is the process in which ultramafic rocks, characteristic of the upper mantle, react with water liberating mantle carbon and reducing power to potenially support chemosynthetic microbial communities. These communities may be important mediators of carbon and energy exchange between the deep Earth and the surface biosphere. Our work focuses on the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in Northern California where subsurface fluids are accessible through a series of wells. Preliminary analyses indicate that the highly basic fluids (pH 9-12) have low microbial diversity, but there is limited knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of these communties. Metagenomic data from similar serpentine environments [1] have identified Betaproteobacteria belonging to the order Burkholderiales and Gram-positive bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentine microbiome. In an effort to better characterize the microbial community, metabolism, and geochemistry at CROMO, fluids from two representative wells (N08B and CSWold) were sampled during recent field campaigns. Geochemical characterization of the fluids includes measurements of dissolved gases (H2, CO, CH4), dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, volatile fatty acids, and nutrients. The wells selected can be differentiated in that N08B had higher pH (10-11), lower dissolved oxygen, and cell counts ranging from 105-106 cells mL-1 of fluid, with an abundance of the betaproteobacterium Hydrogenophaga. In contrast, fluids from CSWold have slightly lower pH (9-9.5), DO, and conductivity, as well as higher TDN and TDP. CSWold fluid is also characterized for having lower cell counts (~103 cells mL-1) and an abundance of Dethiobacter, a taxon within the phylum Clostridiales. Microcosm experiments were conducted with the purpose of monitoring carbon fixation, methanotrophy and metabolism of small organic compounds, such as acetate and formate, while tracing changes in fluid

  12. Microbial Regulation in Gorgonian Corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura D. Mydlarz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gorgonian corals possess many novel natural products that could potentially mediate coral-bacterial interactions. Since many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS signals to facilitate colonization of host organisms, regulation of prokaryotic cell-to-cell communication may represent an important bacterial control mechanism. In the present study, we examined extracts of twelve species of Caribbean gorgonian corals, for mechanisms that regulate microbial colonization, such as antibacterial activity and QS regulatory activity. Ethanol extracts of gorgonians collected from Puerto Rico and the Florida Keys showed a range of both antibacterial and QS activities using a specific Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS reporter, sensitive to long chain AHLs and a short chain N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL biosensor, Chromobacterium violaceium. Overall, the gorgonian corals had higher antimicrobial activity against non-marine strains when compared to marine strains. Pseudopterogorgia americana, Pseusopterogorgia acerosa, and Pseudoplexuara flexuosa had the highest QS inhibitory effect. Interestingly, Pseudoplexuara porosa extracts stimulated QS activity with a striking 17-fold increase in signal. The stimulation of QS by P. porosa or other elements of the holobiont may encourage colonization or recruitment of specific microbial species. Overall, these results suggest the presence of novel stimulatory QS, inhibitory QS and bactericidal compounds in gorgonian corals. A better understanding of these compounds may reveal insight into coral-microbial ecology and whether a therapeutic potential exists.

  13. Pharmaceutical Compounds in Wastewater: Wetland Treatment as a Potential Solution

    OpenAIRE

    White, John R.; Belmont, Marco A.; Metcalfe, Chris D.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds are being released into the aquatic environment through wastewater discharge around the globe. While there is limited removal of these compounds within wastewater treatment plants, wetland treatment might prove to be an effective means to reduce the discharge of the compounds into the environment. Wetlands can promote removal of these pharmaceutical compounds through a number of mechanisms including photolysis, plant uptake, microbial degradation, and sorption to the ...

  14. Multipurpose Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  15. A great leap forward in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Satoshi; Oshiki, Mamoru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Toyofuku, Masanori; Yawata, Yutaka; Tashiro, Yosuke; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Ohkuma, Moriya; Hiraishi, Akira; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2010-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence-based molecular techniques emerged in the late 1980s, which completely changed our general view of microbial life. Coincidentally, the Japanese Society of Microbial Ecology (JSME) was founded, and its official journal "Microbes and Environments (M&E)" was launched, in 1985. Thus, the past 25 years have been an exciting and fruitful period for M&E readers and microbiologists as demonstrated by the numerous excellent papers published in M&E. In this minireview, recent progress made in microbial ecology and related fields is summarized, with a special emphasis on 8 landmark areas; the cultivation of uncultured microbes, in situ methods for the assessment of microorganisms and their activities, biofilms, plant microbiology, chemolithotrophic bacteria in early volcanic environments, symbionts of animals and their ecology, wastewater treatment microbiology, and the biodegradation of hazardous organic compounds.

  16. Polymer compound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    A Polymer compound comprising a polymer (a) that contains cyclic imidesgroups and a polymer (b) that contains monomer groups with a 2,4-diamino-1,3,5-triazine side group. According to the formula (see formula) whereby themole percentage ratio of the cyclic imides groups in the polymer compoundwith

  17. Mesoionic Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organic Chemistry. Kamatak University,. Dharwad. Her research interests are synthesis, reactions and synthetic utility of sydnones. She is currently working on electrochemical and insecticidal/antifungal activities for some of these compounds. Keywords. Aromaticity, mesoionic hetero- cycles, sydnones, tandem re- actions.

  18. Compound odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas have been extensively reported in the dental literature, and the term refers to tumors of odontogenic origin. Though the exact etiology is still unknown, the postulated causes include: local trauma, infection, inheritance and genetic mutation. The majority of the lesions are asymptomatic; however, may be accompanied with pain and swelling as secondary complaints in some cases. Here, we report a case of a compound odontome in a 14 year old patient.

  19. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, Alfons J M; de Bok, Frank A M; Plugge, Caroline M; van Eekert, Miriam H A; Dolfing, Jan; Schraa, Gosse

    2006-03-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory syntrophic consortia of proton-reducing acetogenic bacteria and hydrogen-consuming methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic microorganisms that use insoluble electron acceptors for growth, such as iron- and manganese-oxide as well as inert graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells, also transfer electrons exocellularly. Soluble compounds, like humic substances, quinones, phenazines and riboflavin, can function as exocellular electron mediators enhancing this type of anaerobic respiration. However, direct electron transfer by cell-cell contact is important as well. This review addresses the mechanisms of exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities. There are fundamental differences but also similarities between electron transfer to another microorganism or to an insoluble electron acceptor. The physical separation of the electron donor and electron acceptor metabolism allows energy conservation in compounds as methane and hydrogen or as electricity. Furthermore, this separation is essential in the donation or acceptance of electrons in some environmental technological processes, e.g. soil remediation, wastewater purification and corrosion.

  20. Understanding Mechanism of Photocatalytic Microbial Decontamination of Environmental Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabilal Regmi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Several photocatalytic nanoparticles are synthesized and studied for potential application for the degradation of organic and biological wastes. Although these materials degrade organic compounds by advance oxidation process, the exact mechanisms of microbial decontamination remains partially known. Understanding the real mechanisms of these materials for microbial cell death and growth inhibition helps to fabricate more efficient semiconductor photocatalyst for large-scale decontamination of environmental wastewater or industries and hospitals/biomedical labs generating highly pathogenic bacteria and toxic molecules containing liquid waste by designing a reactor. Recent studies on microbial decontamination by photocatalytic nanoparticles and their possible mechanisms of action is highlighted with examples in this mini review.

  1. Microbial-Catalyzed Biotransformation of Multifunctional Triterpenoids Derived from Phytonutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Tan, Huey Ling; Sultan, Sadia; Mohd Faridz, Muhammad Afifi Bin; Mohd Shah, Mohamad Azlan Bin; Nurfazilah, Sharifah; Hussain, Munawar

    2014-01-01

    Microbial-catalyzed biotransformations have considerable potential for the generation of an enormous variety of structurally diversified organic compounds, especially natural products with complex structures like triterpenoids. They offer efficient and economical ways to produce semi-synthetic analogues and novel lead molecules. Microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi could catalyze chemo-, regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations of diverse triterpenoid substrates that are extremely difficult to produce by chemical routes. During recent years, considerable research has been performed on the microbial transformation of bioactive triterpenoids, in order to obtain biologically active molecules with diverse structures features. This article reviews the microbial modifications of tetranortriterpenoids, tetracyclic triterpenoids and pentacyclic triterpenoids. PMID:25003642

  2. Microbial accumulation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Dong Faqin; Dai Qunwei

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of microbial accumulation of uranium and the effects of some factors (including pH, initial uranium concentration, pretreatment of bacteria, and so on) on microbial accumulation of uranium are discussed briefly. The research direction and application prospect are presented. (authors)

  3. MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A novel microbial fuel cell construction for the generation of electrical energy. The microbial fuel cell comprises: (i) an anode electrode, (ii) a cathode chamber, said cathode chamber comprising an in let through which an influent enters the cathode chamber, an outlet through which an effluent...

  4. Microbial control of pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, J C; Gadd, G M; Herbert, R A; Jones, C W; Watson-Craik, I A [eds.

    1992-01-01

    12 papers are presented on the microbial control of pollution. Topics covered include: bioremediation of oil spills; microbial control of heavy metal pollution; pollution control using microorganisms and magnetic separation; degradation of cyanide and nitriles; nitrogen removal from water and waste; and land reclamation and restoration.

  5. Genome-Based Microbial Taxonomy Coming of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Philip; Skarshewski, Adam; Parks, Donovan H

    2016-06-01

    Reconstructing the complete evolutionary history of extant life on our planet will be one of the most fundamental accomplishments of scientific endeavor, akin to the completion of the periodic table, which revolutionized chemistry. The road to this goal is via comparative genomics because genomes are our most comprehensive and objective evolutionary documents. The genomes of plant and animal species have been systematically targeted over the past decade to provide coverage of the tree of life. However, multicellular organisms only emerged in the last 550 million years of more than three billion years of biological evolution and thus comprise a small fraction of total biological diversity. The bulk of biodiversity, both past and present, is microbial. We have only scratched the surface in our understanding of the microbial world, as most microorganisms cannot be readily grown in the laboratory and remain unknown to science. Ground-breaking, culture-independent molecular techniques developed over the past 30 years have opened the door to this so-called microbial dark matter with an accelerating momentum driven by exponential increases in sequencing capacity. We are on the verge of obtaining representative genomes across all life for the first time. However, historical use of morphology, biochemical properties, behavioral traits, and single-marker genes to infer organismal relationships mean that the existing highly incomplete tree is riddled with taxonomic errors. Concerted efforts are now needed to synthesize and integrate the burgeoning genomic data resources into a coherent universal tree of life and genome-based taxonomy. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Halitosis: An oral microbial faction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Halitosis is a widespread condition and believed to affect one-quarter of the population around the world; also, most people have this condition from time to time. Breath malodour may be an important factor in social communication, and therefore may be the origin of concern not only for a possible health condition but also for frequent psychological alterations, leading to social and personal isolation. The most conspicuous malodorous compounds are termed volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs, with hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulphide accounting for roughly 90% of the VSCs. A number of oral bacteria, especially Gram-negative anaerobic species found in the subgingival plaque, produce a diverse array of malodorous compounds as byproducts of their metabolism, including VSCs and short-chain organic acids. Assessment and management of halitosis is of paramount importance in enhancing the overall health; moreover, dentists play a significant role in combating halitosis by reducing the oral microbial stack. Thus, the aim of the present review was to describe the aetiological factors, assessment tools, and therapeutic approaches related to halitosis.

  7. Modes of Action of Microbially-Produced Phytotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O.; Dayan, Franck E.

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most potent phytotoxins are synthesized by microbes. A few of these share molecular target sites with some synthetic herbicides, but many microbial toxins have unique target sites with potential for exploitation by the herbicide industry. Compounds from both non-pathogenic and pathogenic microbes are discussed. Microbial phytotoxins with modes of action the same as those of commercial herbicides and those with novel modes of action of action are covered. Examples of the compounds discussed are tentoxin, AAL-toxin, auscaulitoxin aglycone, hydantocidin, thaxtomin, and tabtoxin. PMID:22069756

  8. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  9. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  10. Metagenomic approaches to exploit the biotechnological potential of the microbial consortia of marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jonathan; Marchesi, Julian R; Dobson, Alan D W

    2007-05-01

    Natural products isolated from sponges are an important source of new biologically active compounds. However, the development of these compounds into drugs has been held back by the difficulties in achieving a sustainable supply of these often-complex molecules for pre-clinical and clinical development. Increasing evidence implicates microbial symbionts as the source of many of these biologically active compounds, but the vast majority of the sponge microbial community remain uncultured. Metagenomics offers a biotechnological solution to this supply problem. Metagenomes of sponge microbial communities have been shown to contain genes and gene clusters typical for the biosynthesis of biologically active natural products. Heterologous expression approaches have also led to the isolation of secondary metabolism gene clusters from uncultured microbial symbionts of marine invertebrates and from soil metagenomic libraries. Combining a metagenomic approach with heterologous expression holds much promise for the sustainable exploitation of the chemical diversity present in the sponge microbial community.

  11. Studies on coordination and addition compounds and anti microbial activity of some mixed ligand complexes of Au(III), Mo(II), Co(II) and Cd(II) with dibasic acid and heterocyclic amines and addition compounds of As(III) and Sb(III) halides with benzamide and acetophenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.; Sultana, C.; Saidul Islam, M.; Zakaria, C.M.

    2008-06-01

    Three new mixed ligand complexes of Au(III) and Mo(II) with dibasic acid e.g., homophthalic acid, oxalic acid and heterocylic amines e.g., quinonine, iso-quinonine, bipyridine, Phenylanaline and the two new addition compounds of As(III) and Sb(III) halides with N-donor ligands viz. benzamide and acetophenone and one complex [Cd(DPH)(IQ) 2 ], where IQ = Iso-quinoline and DPH = Deprotonated phthalic acid have been prepared according to the procedure in the literature. Their conventional physical and chemical analyses have been done. Their antibacterial studies against nine gram positive and five gram negative pathogenic bacteria and antifungal activities against eight plant and three human fungi have been evaluated. Kanamycin and Nystatin have been used as a standard for carrying out experiments of antibacterial and antifungal activities, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of these compounds, as antibiotic against two gram positive and two gram negative pathogenic bacteria, have also been carried out and in this case, Amoxacilin antibiotic has been used as a standard antibiotic. (author)

  12. A Status Report on the Global Research in Microbial Metabolic Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho

    2008-09-15

    Biotechnology industry is now a global 'Mega-Trend' and metabolic engineering technology has important role is this area. Therefore, many countries has made efforts in this field to produce top value added bio-products efficiently using microorganisms. It has been applied to increase the production of chemicals that are already produced by the host organism, to produce desired chemical substances from less expensive feedstock, and to generate products that are new to the host organism. Recent experimental advances, the so-called '-omics' technologies, mainly functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have enabled wholesale generation of new genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data. This report provides the insights of the integrated view of metabolism generated by metabolic engineering for biotechnological applications of microbial metabolic engineering.

  13. A Status Report on the Global Research in Microbial Metabolic Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho

    2008-09-01

    Biotechnology industry is now a global 'Mega-Trend' and metabolic engineering technology has important role is this area. Therefore, many countries has made efforts in this field to produce top value added bio-products efficiently using microorganisms. It has been applied to increase the production of chemicals that are already produced by the host organism, to produce desired chemical substances from less expensive feedstock, and to generate products that are new to the host organism. Recent experimental advances, the so-called '-omics' technologies, mainly functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have enabled wholesale generation of new genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data. This report provides the insights of the integrated view of metabolism generated by metabolic engineering for biotechnological applications of microbial metabolic engineering

  14. A Status Report on the Global Research in Microbial Metabolic Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho

    2008-09-15

    Biotechnology industry is now a global 'Mega-Trend' and metabolic engineering technology has important role is this area. Therefore, many countries has made efforts in this field to produce top value added bio-products efficiently using microorganisms. It has been applied to increase the production of chemicals that are already produced by the host organism, to produce desired chemical substances from less expensive feedstock, and to generate products that are new to the host organism. Recent experimental advances, the so-called '-omics' technologies, mainly functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have enabled wholesale generation of new genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data. This report provides the insights of the integrated view of metabolism generated by metabolic engineering for biotechnological applications of microbial metabolic engineering.

  15. NMR investigations of the melting behaviour of mesogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, S.; Grande, S.; Loesche, A.

    1977-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of mesogen compounds in the solid phase are recorded. Between 20 and 40 K and 4 and 12 K below the melting point they exhibit a very narrow central line with a structure caused by the chemical shift, which is superimposed to the broad structureless line normally expected from polycrystalline solid phases. It is concluded that it originates from ''quasi-liquid'' molecules whose intensity grows drastically with increasing temperature and involves a maximum of about 2.5% of the whole intensity of the spectrum. In the region close to the melting point appears another lineshape, the so-called ''super-Lorentzian'' line, whose intensity increases still stronger than that of the narrow line. It can be shown that it is due to the existence of mesomorphic clusters the directors of which are statistically distributed in the sample. The impurity dependence of these effects is investigated and an attempt is made to explain them. (author)

  16. Compound odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcelo Vargas Pinto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common types of odontogenic tumors, as they are considered more as a developmental anomaly (hamartoma than as a true neoplasia. The aim of the present study is to describe a clinical case of compound odontoma, analyzing its most commonsigns, its region of location, the decade of life and patient’s gender, disorders that may occur as well as the treatment proposed. In order to attain this objective, the method was description of the present clinical case and bibliographic revision, arriving at the result that the treatment for this type of lesion invariably is surgical removal (enucleation and curettage and the prognosis is excellent. The surgical result was followed up in the post-operative period by radiographic exam, and it was possible to conclude that there was complete cicatrization and tissue repair.

  17. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  18. Microbial export of lactic and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid : implications for industrial fermentation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maris, AJA; Konings, WN; Pronk, Jack T.; Dijken, J.P. van

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid are industrially relevant microbial products. This paper reviews the current knowledge on export of these compounds from microbial cells and presents a theoretical analysis of the bioenergetics of different export mechanisms. It is concluded that export can be

  19. Lipid recovery from a vegetable oil emulsion using microbial enrichment cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamis, J.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Jiang, Y.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many waste streams have a relatively high vegetable oil content, which is a potential resource that should be recovered. Microbial storage compound production for the recovery of lipids from lipid-water emulsions with open (unsterilized) microbial cultures was investigated in a sequencing

  20. Evolution of microbial pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiRita, Victor J; Seifert, H. Steven

    2006-01-01

    ... A. Hogan vvi ■ CONTENTS 8. Evolution of Pathogens in Soil Rachel Muir and Man-Wah Tan / 131 9. Experimental Models of Symbiotic Host-Microbial Relationships: Understanding the Underpinnings of ...

  1. Enhancement of metal bioremediation by use of microbial surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Pooja; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2004-01-01

    Metal pollution all around the globe, especially in the mining and plating areas of the world, has been found to have grave consequences. An excellent option for enhanced metal contaminated site bioremediation is the use of microbial products viz. microbial surfactants and extracellular polymers which would increase the efficiency of metal reducing/sequestering organisms for field bioremediation. Important here is the advantage of such compounds at metal and organic compound co-contaminated site since microorganisms have long been found to produce surface-active compounds when grown on hydrocarbons. Other options capable of proving efficient enhancers include exploiting the chemotactic potential and biofilm forming ability of the relevant microorganisms. Chemotaxis towards environmental pollutants has excellent potential to enhance the biodegradation of many contaminants and biofilm offers them a better survival niche even in the presence of high levels of toxic compounds

  2. [Indoor air pollution by polychlorinated biphenyl compounds in permanently elastic sealants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, U; Bork, M; Balfanz, E; Leidel, J

    1990-10-01

    A common cause for indoor pollution by polycholorinated biphenyls (PCB) are defective capacitors of luminous discharge lamps. This paper describes elastic sealing compounds as another source of PCB pollution in buildings. In several rooms of a large school building indoor concentrations of 1000 ng PCB/m3 and more were registered. The total PCB concentration in sealing compounds ranged between 124,000 and 327,000 ppm. Blood specimens drawn from the school's personnel did not show elevated PCB concentrations, but additional incorporation of PCB via the respiratory tract cannot be excluded. We do not presume that any impairment of the health has been caused by this pollutant, but we think that reduction of the PCB indoor concentrations would be advisable for prophylactic purposes. Attention should be given to so-called open PCB systems such as elastic sealing compounds. Although they have been prohibited 1978, there might be a widespread use in older buildings.

  3. Synthetic Electric Microbial Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-10

    domains and DNA-binding domains into a single protein for deregulation of down stream genes of have been favored [10]. Initially experiments with... Germany DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited.   Talk title: “Synthetic biology based microbial biosensors for the...toolbox” in Heidelberg, Germany Poster title: “Anaerobic whole cell microbial biosensors” Link: http://phdsymposium.embl.org/#home   September, 2014

  4. Antimicrobial compounds of porcine mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenkova, E. A.; Lukinova, E. A.; Fedulova, L. V.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate porcine oral cavity mucosa (OCM), nasal cavity mucosa (NCM), rectal mucosa (RM) and tongue mucosa (TM) as sources of antimicrobial compounds. Ultrafiltrates with MW >30 kDa, MW 5-30 kDa and MW 30 kDa, the zone of microbial growth inhibition was 7.5 mm, for the MW<5 kDa fraction, it was 7 mm, and for MW 5-30 kDa fraction, it was 4.5 mm. No significant differences were found in high molecular weight proteomic profile, while qualitative and quantitative differences were observed in the medium and low molecular weight areas, especially in OCM and NCM. HPLC showed 221 tissue-specific peptides in OCM, 156 in NCM, 225 in RM, but only 5 in TM. The results observed confirmed porcine mucous tissues as a good source of antimicrobial compounds, which could be an actual alternative for reduction of microbial spoilage of foods.

  5. Microbial bioinformatics 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallen, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    Microbial bioinformatics in 2020 will remain a vibrant, creative discipline, adding value to the ever-growing flood of new sequence data, while embracing novel technologies and fresh approaches. Databases and search strategies will struggle to cope and manual curation will not be sustainable during the scale-up to the million-microbial-genome era. Microbial taxonomy will have to adapt to a situation in which most microorganisms are discovered and characterised through the analysis of sequences. Genome sequencing will become a routine approach in clinical and research laboratories, with fresh demands for interpretable user-friendly outputs. The "internet of things" will penetrate healthcare systems, so that even a piece of hospital plumbing might have its own IP address that can be integrated with pathogen genome sequences. Microbiome mania will continue, but the tide will turn from molecular barcoding towards metagenomics. Crowd-sourced analyses will collide with cloud computing, but eternal vigilance will be the price of preventing the misinterpretation and overselling of microbial sequence data. Output from hand-held sequencers will be analysed on mobile devices. Open-source training materials will address the need for the development of a skilled labour force. As we boldly go into the third decade of the twenty-first century, microbial sequence space will remain the final frontier! © 2016 The Author. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Parâmetros ruminais, balanço de compostos nitrogenados e produção microbiana de vacas leiteiras alimentadas com soja e seus subprodutos Ruminal parameters, nitrogen compound balance and microbial production in dairy cows fed soybeans and their by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria de Vasconcelos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se analisar a variação do pH, da amônia ruminal e do balanço de compostos nitrogenados e a síntese de proteína microbiana de 12 vacas da raça Holandesa distribuídas em três quadrados latinos 4 × 4, alimentadas com dietas contendo soja em diferentes formas: farelo de soja (dieta controle, soja crua, soja tostada e farelo de soja + 5% de ureia, utilizando-se silagem de milho como volumoso. A síntese da proteína microbiana foi estimada utilizando-se os derivados de purina na urina e no leite. Amostras de sangue e amostras spot de urina foram coletadas aproximadamente quatro horas após a alimentação da manhã. Houve efeito das dietas sobre o volume urinário e a excreção de ureia na urina. O menor volume urinário (18,84 L foi observado com farelo de soja+ureia. As excreções de ureia na urina foram semelhantes entre a soja crua (532,98 mg/kgPV e a soja tostada (524,41 mg/kgPV e diferiram entre o farelo de soja (561,56 mg/kgPV e o farelo de soja+ureia (575,71 mg/kgPV. A forma de fornecimento da soja não teve efeito no balanço de nitrogênio e nas concentrações do nitrogênio ureico no plasma (NUP, mas teve efeito significativo no nitrogênio ureico no leite (NUL, cuja maior média foi obtida com a soja crua (15,66 mg/dL. As médias de alantoína na urina (416,45 mmol/dia e no leite (12,78 mmol/dia, dos derivados de purinas totais (468,30 mmol/dia, da síntese de proteína microbiana (287,33 g/dia e da eficiência da síntese microbiana (133,06, expressa em g de PB/kg de NDT consumido, não diferiram entre as dietas. As dietas testadas não afetaram o balanço de nitrogênio nem a produção microbiana, porém a inclusão de grãos de soja crus aumentou os teores de nitrogênio ureico no leite.The objective of this study was to assess the variation in the pH, ruminal ammonia, nitrogen compound balance (BN and microbial synthesis (Nmic of 12 Holstein cows distributed in three 4 × 4 Latin squares, fed diets containing

  7. Microbial diversity and their roles in the vinegar fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Feng, Feng; Luo, Li-Xin

    2015-06-01

    Vinegar is one of the oldest acetic acid-diluted solution products in the world. It is produced from any fermentable sugary substrate by various fermentation methods. The final vinegar products possess unique functions, which are endowed with many kinds of compounds formed in the fermentation process. The quality of vinegar is determined by many factors, especially by the raw materials and microbial diversity involved in vinegar fermentation. Given that metabolic products from the fermenting strains are directly related to the quality of the final products of vinegar, the microbial diversity and features of the dominant strains involved in different fermentation stages should be analyzed to improve the strains and stabilize fermentation. Moreover, although numerous microbiological studies have been conducted to examine the process of vinegar fermentation, knowledge about microbial diversity and their roles involved in fermentation is still fragmentary and not systematic enough. Therefore, in this review, the dominant microorganism species involved in the stages of alcoholic fermentation and acetic acid fermentation of dissimilar vinegars were summarized. We also summarized various physicochemical properties and crucial compounds in disparate types of vinegar. Furthermore, the merits and drawbacks of vital fermentation methods were generalized. Finally, we described in detail the relationships among microbial diversity, raw materials, fermentation methods, physicochemical properties, compounds, functionality, and final quality of vinegar. The integration of this information can provide us a detailed map about the microbial diversity and function involved in vinegar fermentation.

  8. New microbial resource: microbial diversity, function and dynamics in Chinese liquor starter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Yi, Zhuolin; Jin, Yanling; Zhao, Yonggui; He, Kaize; Liu, Dayu; Zhao, Dong; He, Hui; Luo, Huibo; Zhang, Wenxue; Fang, Yang; Zhao, Hai

    2017-11-06

    Traditional Chinese liquor (Baijiu) solid state fermentation technology has lasted for several thousand years. The microbial communities that enrich in liquor starter are important for fermentation. However, the microbial communities are still under-characterized. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing technology was applied to comprehensively analyze the microbial diversity, function and dynamics of two most-consumed liquor starters (Jiang- and Nong-flavor) during production. In total, 315 and 83 bacterial genera and 72 and 47 fungal genera were identified in Jiang- and Nong-flavor liquor starter, respectively. The relatively high diversity was observed when the temperature increased to 70 and 62 °C for Jiang- and Nong-flavor liquor starter, respectively. Some thermophilic fungi have already been isolated. Microbial communities that might contribute to ethanol fermentation, saccharification and flavor development were identified and shown to be core communities in correlation-based network analysis. The predictively functional profile of bacterial communities showed significant difference in energy, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and the degradation of aromatic compounds between the two kinds of liquor starters. Here we report these liquor starters as a new functionally microbial resource, which can be used for discovering thermophilic and aerobic enzymes and for food and feed preservation.

  9. Microbial transformation of sesquitepenoid ketone, (+) Nootkatone by Macrophomia phaseolina

    OpenAIRE

    Vajira P. Bulugahapitiya; Syed Ghulam Musharaff

    2009-01-01

    Microbial transformation is an effective tool for the structural modification of bioactive natural and synthetic compounds leading to synthesis of more potent derivatives. Its application in asymmetric synthesis is increasing due to its versatility and ease. This article presents biotransformation of sesquiterpenoid ketone, (+)-Nootkatone (1) by M. phaseolina, a plant pathogenic fungus. The transformation afforded four main compounds. They were determined to be 1:6 stereoisomeric mixture of 1...

  10. Engineering Microbial Chemical Factories to Produce Renewable ‘Biomonomers’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake eAdkins

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available By applying metabolic engineering tools and strategies to engineer synthetic enzyme pathways, the number and diversity of commodity and specialty chemicals that can be derived directly from renewable feedstocks is rapidly and continually expanding. This of course includes a number of monomer building-block chemicals that can be used to produce replacements to many conventional plastic materials. This review aims to highlight numerous recent and important advancements in the microbial production of these so-called ‘biomonomers’. Relative to naturally-occurring renewable bioplastics, biomonomers offer several important advantages, including improved control over the final polymer structure and purity, the ability to synthesize non-natural copolymers, and allowing products to be excreted from cells which ultimately streamlines downstream recovery and purification. To highlight these features, a handful of biomonomers have been selected as illustrative examples of recent works, including polyamide monomers, styrenic vinyls, hydroxyacids, and diols. Where appropriate, examples of their industrial penetration to date and end-product uses are also highlighted. Novel biomonomers such as these are ultimately paving the way towards new classes of renewable bioplastics that possess a broader diversity of properties than ever before possible.

  11. Engineering microbial chemical factories to produce renewable “biomonomers”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jake; Pugh, Shawn; McKenna, Rebekah; Nielsen, David R.

    2012-01-01

    By applying metabolic engineering tools and strategies to engineer synthetic enzyme pathways, the number and diversity of commodity and specialty chemicals that can be derived directly from renewable feedstocks is rapidly and continually expanding. This of course includes a number of monomer building-block chemicals that can be used to produce replacements to many conventional plastic materials. This review aims to highlight numerous recent and important advancements in the microbial production of these so-called “biomonomers.” Relative to naturally-occurring renewable bioplastics, biomonomers offer several important advantages, including improved control over the final polymer structure and purity, the ability to synthesize non-natural copolymers, and allowing products to be excreted from cells which ultimately streamlines downstream recovery and purification. To highlight these features, a handful of biomonomers have been selected as illustrative examples of recent works, including polyamide monomers, styrenic vinyls, hydroxyacids, and diols. Where appropriate, examples of their industrial penetration to date and end-product uses are also highlighted. Novel biomonomers such as these are ultimately paving the way toward new classes of renewable bioplastics that possess a broader diversity of properties than ever before possible. PMID:22969753

  12. Engineering microbial chemical factories to produce renewable "biomonomers".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jake; Pugh, Shawn; McKenna, Rebekah; Nielsen, David R

    2012-01-01

    By applying metabolic engineering tools and strategies to engineer synthetic enzyme pathways, the number and diversity of commodity and specialty chemicals that can be derived directly from renewable feedstocks is rapidly and continually expanding. This of course includes a number of monomer building-block chemicals that can be used to produce replacements to many conventional plastic materials. This review aims to highlight numerous recent and important advancements in the microbial production of these so-called "biomonomers." Relative to naturally-occurring renewable bioplastics, biomonomers offer several important advantages, including improved control over the final polymer structure and purity, the ability to synthesize non-natural copolymers, and allowing products to be excreted from cells which ultimately streamlines downstream recovery and purification. To highlight these features, a handful of biomonomers have been selected as illustrative examples of recent works, including polyamide monomers, styrenic vinyls, hydroxyacids, and diols. Where appropriate, examples of their industrial penetration to date and end-product uses are also highlighted. Novel biomonomers such as these are ultimately paving the way toward new classes of renewable bioplastics that possess a broader diversity of properties than ever before possible.

  13. Second case of chronic granulocytic leukemia with karyotypic evolution at acute crisis, occurring in so-called Nishiyama district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, E; Tomonaga, Yu; Nishino, K; Matsunaga, M; Sadamori, N [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-09-01

    The whole process of a second case of chronic granulocytic leukemia in Nishiyama district where a very small amount of radiation existed for a long time was reported together with data measured by a human counter and the results of chromosomal analysis. No significantly high K or /sup 137/Cs values were measured by a human counter immediately after the onset. Chromosomal division aberration and chromosomal aberration, which seemed to be induced by radiation, also were not observed. However, granulocytic leukemia was diagnosed after chromosomal analysis of peripheral blood revealed Ph/sup 1/ chromosomes, white cell count increased, juvenile cells appeared, and basophil cells increased. Clinical features of typical chronic granulocytic leukemia in the exposed were observed during the chronic stage (7 years). In the acute stage, abnormal clones were discovered in all 16 chromosomes analyzed. Much karyotypic evolution identical to that in persons directly exposed to the A-bomb was also observed.

  14. Self-reported hard physical work combined with heavy smoking or overweight may result in so-called Modic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendix Tom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the MRI finding of "Modic changes" has been identified as pathologic spinal condition that probably reflects a vertebral inflammatory process (VIP, which coincides with spinal pain in most. We hypothesized that heavy smoking in combination with macro- or repeated microtrauma could lead to VIP. The objectives were to investigate if combinations of self-reported heavy smoking, hard physical work, and overweight would be more strongly linked with VIP than with other spinal conditions, such as degenerated discs and non-specific low back pain (LBP. Methods Secondary analysis was made of a data base pertaining to a population-based cross-sectional study. A population-generated cohort of 412 40-yr old Danes provided questionnaire information on smoking, weight, height, type of work, and LBP. MRI was used to determine the presence/absence of disc degeneration and of VIP. Associations were tested between three explanatory variables (type of work, smoking, and body mass index and four outcome variables (LBP in the past year, more persistent LBP in the past year, disc degeneration, and VIP. Associations with these four outcome variables were studied for each single explanatory variable and for combinations of two at a time, and, finally, in a multivariable analysis including all three explanatory variables. Results There were no significant associations between the single explanatory variables and the two pain variables or with disc degeneration. However, VIP was found in 15% of non-smokers vs. 26% of heavy smokers. Similarly, VIP was noted in 11% of those in sedentary jobs vs. 31% of those with hard physical work. Further, the prevalence of VIP in those, who neither smoked heavily nor had a hard physical job was 13%, 25% in those who either smoked heavily or had a hard physical job, and 41% in those who both smoked heavily and worked hard. The odds ratio was 4.9 (1.6–13.0 for those who were both heavy smokers and had a hard physical job as compared to those who were classified as "neither". Similar but weaker findings were noted for the combination of overweight and hard physical work but not for the combination of smoking and overweight. Conclusion Hard physical work in combination with either heavy smoking or overweight is strongly associated with VIP. If this finding can be reproduced in other studies, it may have consequences in relation to both primary and secondary prevention of LBP, because blue collar workers, who are most likely to experience the consequences of LBP, also are those who are most likely to smoke.

  15. [Methods of the multivariate statistical analysis of so-called polyetiological diseases using the example of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshits, A M

    1979-01-01

    General characteristics of the multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) is given. Methodical premises and criteria for the selection of an adequate MSA method applicable to pathoanatomic investigations of the epidemiology of multicausal diseases are presented. The experience of using MSA with computors and standard computing programs in studies of coronary arteries aterosclerosis on the materials of 2060 autopsies is described. The combined use of 4 MSA methods: sequential, correlational, regressional, and discriminant permitted to quantitate the contribution of each of the 8 examined risk factors in the development of aterosclerosis. The most important factors were found to be the age, arterial hypertension, and heredity. Occupational hypodynamia and increased fatness were more important in men, whereas diabetes melitus--in women. The registration of this combination of risk factors by MSA methods provides for more reliable prognosis of the likelihood of coronary heart disease with a fatal outcome than prognosis of the degree of coronary aterosclerosis.

  16. Self-reported hard physical work combined with heavy smoking or overweight may result in so-called Modic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Kjaer, Per; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    % of non-smokers vs. 26% of heavy smokers. Similarly, VIP was noted in 11% of those in sedentary jobs vs. 31% of those with hard physical work. Further, the prevalence of VIP in those, who neither smoked heavily nor had a hard physical job was 13%, 25% in those who either smoked heavily or had a hard...... could lead to VIP. The objectives were to investigate if combinations of self-reported heavy smoking, hard physical work, and overweight would be more strongly linked with VIP than with other spinal conditions, such as degenerated discs and non-specific low back pain (LBP). METHODS: Secondary analysis...... physical job, and 41% in those who both smoked heavily and worked hard. The odds ratio was 4.9 (1.6-13.0) for those who were both heavy smokers and had a hard physical job as compared to those who were classified as "neither". Similar but weaker findings were noted for the combination of overweight...

  17. Self-reported hard physical work combined with heavy smoking or overweight may result in so-called Modic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Kjaer, Per; Bendix, Tom; Manniche, Claus

    2008-01-14

    Recently, the MRI finding of "Modic changes" has been identified as pathologic spinal condition that probably reflects a vertebral inflammatory process (VIP), which coincides with spinal pain in most. We hypothesized that heavy smoking in combination with macro- or repeated microtrauma could lead to VIP. The objectives were to investigate if combinations of self-reported heavy smoking, hard physical work, and overweight would be more strongly linked with VIP than with other spinal conditions, such as degenerated discs and non-specific low back pain (LBP). Secondary analysis was made of a data base pertaining to a population-based cross-sectional study. A population-generated cohort of 412 40-yr old Danes provided questionnaire information on smoking, weight, height, type of work, and LBP. MRI was used to determine the presence/absence of disc degeneration and of VIP. Associations were tested between three explanatory variables (type of work, smoking, and body mass index) and four outcome variables (LBP in the past year, more persistent LBP in the past year, disc degeneration, and VIP). Associations with these four outcome variables were studied for each single explanatory variable and for combinations of two at a time, and, finally, in a multivariable analysis including all three explanatory variables. There were no significant associations between the single explanatory variables and the two pain variables or with disc degeneration. However, VIP was found in 15% of non-smokers vs. 26% of heavy smokers. Similarly, VIP was noted in 11% of those in sedentary jobs vs. 31% of those with hard physical work. Further, the prevalence of VIP in those, who neither smoked heavily nor had a hard physical job was 13%, 25% in those who either smoked heavily or had a hard physical job, and 41% in those who both smoked heavily and worked hard. The odds ratio was 4.9 (1.6-13.0) for those who were both heavy smokers and had a hard physical job as compared to those who were classified as "neither". Similar but weaker findings were noted for the combination of overweight and hard physical work but not for the combination of smoking and overweight. Hard physical work in combination with either heavy smoking or overweight is strongly associated with VIP. If this finding can be reproduced in other studies, it may have consequences in relation to both primary and secondary prevention of LBP, because blue collar workers, who are most likely to experience the consequences of LBP, also are those who are most likely to smoke.

  18. Unseen WEIRD Assumptions: The So-Called Language Gap Discourse and Ideologies of Language, Childhood, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Susan D.

    2017-01-01

    Claiming to rely on "science," many well-intentioned "experts" offer advice on how to "close the gap"--word gap, language gap, achievement gap--between disadvantaged and advantaged children. Based on both research and personal experience, this advice promises magic solutions to apparently complex and intractable…

  19. The anterior glenohumeral joint capsule: macroscopic and MRI anatomy of the fasciculus obliquus or so-called ligamentum glenohumerale spirale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merila, M.; Eller, A.; Haviko, T. [Department of Orthopaedics, Clinic of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, University of Tartu, Puusepa 8, 51014, Tartu (Estonia); Leibecke, T.; Gehl, H.B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Busch, L.C. [Institute of Anatomy, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Russlies, M. [Clinic of Orthopaedics, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Luebeck (Germany); Kolts, I. [Institute of Anatomy, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, Biomedicum, 50411, Tartu (Estonia)

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the macroscopic and MRI anatomy of the fasciculus obliquus, otherwise known as the ligamentum glenohumerale spirale or spiral GHL of the anterior shoulder joint capsule. Conventional and MR arthrography (1.5-T device Somatom Symphony, Siemens with shoulder coil) images in standard planes were compared with gross anatomic dissection findings in six fresh shoulder specimens from three cadavers. The MR imaging protocol included T1, PD and DESS 3D WI sequences. The macroscopically recognisable band - the spiral GHL - was identified by anatomic dissection and MRI in all the specimens. It was best visualised by MR arthrography on axial and oblique sagittal planes (T1; PD WI) and appeared as a low signal intensity stripe within the superficial layer of the anterior joint capsule. The absence of the variable middle glenohumeral ligament did not influence the anatomic properties and the MR imaging of the spiral GHL. Diagnostic visualisation of the normal anatomic structures is a prerequisite to distinguish between normal and pathologic conditions. Anatomy of the spiral GHL can be used by radiologists for more detailed interpretation of the anterior shoulder joint capsule ligaments on MR images. (orig.)

  20. Mesial temporal lobe morphology in intractable pediatric epilepsy: so-called hippocampal malrotation, associated findings, and relevance to presurgical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, James L; Awwad, Reem; Greiner, Hansel M; Vannest, Jennifer J; Miles, Lili; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Diagnostic criteria for hippocampal malrotation (HIMAL) on brain MRI typically include a rounded hippocampus, vertical collateral sulcus, and architectural blurring. Relationship to epileptogenesis remains speculative, and usefulness for surgical guidance is unknown. The study was performed to determine the prevalence of hippocampal rotational anomalies in a cohort of pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy undergoing evaluation for surgery and to determine the significance of this finding in the context of surgical planning. METHODS Forty-eight surgically treated children with intractable epilepsy were compared with matched healthy subjects; reviewers were blinded to surgical side. Each temporal lobe was evaluated for rounded hippocampus, blurring, vertical collateral sulcus, wide choroidal fissure, enlarged temporal horn, low fornix, hippocampal signal, and findings of hippocampal sclerosis. A mesial temporal lobe (MTL) score was calculated by summing the number of features, and the collateral sulcus angle (CSA) was measured in each temporal lobe. Surgical side, pathological diagnosis, and imaging findings elsewhere in the brain were tabulated. Presence of HIMAL, associated imaging features, and MTL score were compared between sides, between epilepsy and control groups, in relationship to side of surgery, and in relationship to postoperative outcome. RESULTS Only 3 epilepsy patients (6.2%) and no controls exhibited all 3 features of HIMAL (p = 0.12). Eight of 48 (16.7%) epilepsy versus 2 of 48 (4.6%) control subjects had both a rounded hippocampus and vertical collateral sulcus (suggesting HIMAL) (p = 0.045). In control and epilepsy subjects, most findings were more prevalent on the left, and the left CSA was more vertical (p Epilepsy subjects had higher MTL scores (z = -2.95, p = 0.002) and more acute CSAs (p = 0.04) than controls. Only lateralizing raw MTL score had a significant association with surgical side (p = 0.03, OR 7.33); however, this was not significant when hippocampal sclerosis cases were excluded. HIMAL findings were more prevalent and MTL scores were higher in patients with resections involving the temporal lobes. On group analysis, HIMAL findings did not predict eventual surgical side and did not predict outcome, although the numbers are small. In 4 patients the abnormally rotated hippocampus was resected and showed hippocampal sclerosis and/or dysplastic changes on histopathology. All of these patients had a good outcome after surgery. CONCLUSIONS While increased in prevalence in children with intractable epilepsy, imaging findings of HIMAL did not have preoperative lateralizing utility in this group. Findings of HIMAL (including round hippocampus, architectural blurring, and vertical collateral sulcus) did not predict outcome after surgery, although the small number of patients with these findings limits evaluation. In the small number of patients in which the malrotated hippocampus was removed, outcome was good. Further research is needed to continue to define this association in children with intractable epilepsy, focusing on a temporal lobe cohort.

  1. How do young people from so called “rough area” perceive the society where they are evolving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Belgacem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available What young people see from the society they are evolving in gives us a clue about and an understanding of the reasons why they sometimes become violent. Young people are revolted because they feel like a lot of things are unfair; they miss “moral values” and “points of reference”, as if nothing made “sense” anymore. Then, consumersociety leads some young people into confusing reality with fictional fact and ultimately creates envy and jealousy. With the evolution of society and the fact that traditional rites “disappear”, young people are faced with the only rite that still exists to “jump” from childhood to grow-up world: school. But those who are not going to school will have to find and search for other “ rites of passage ” and we think that this is a major risk for young people, because this is where they could be “separated” from the society. Having to deal with this evolution, young people have some problems finding people they can identify themselves with.

  2. Evidence of multiple paternity and cooperative parental care in the so called monogamous silver arowana Osteoglossum bicirrhosum (Osteoglossiformes: Osteoglossidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Tovar Verba

    Full Text Available Monogamy is rare in fishes and is usually associated with elaborate parental care. When parental care is present in fishes, it is usually the male that is responsible, and it is believed that there is a relationship between the high energetic investment and the certainty of paternity (except in the case of sneaker males. Osteoglossum bicirrhosum is considered a monogamous fish, and has particular behavioral traits that permit the study of mating systems and parental care, such as male mouthbrooding. We investigated the genetic relationships of males with the broods found in their oral cavities in Osteoglossum samples collected in a natural environment in the lower Purus river basin, Amazonas, Brazil. Fourteen broods were analyzed for parentage (268 young and 14 adult males using eight microsatellite loci. The results indicate that eleven broods show a monogamous system. In one brood, however, approximately 50% of the young were genetically compatible with being offspring of another male, and in another two broods, none of the subsampled young were compatible with the genotypes of the brooding male. The result of this first brood may be explained by the extra-parental contribution of a sneaker male, whereas cooperative parental care may explain the result in the other two broods.

  3. [Sudden cardiac arrest in Italian sports facilities in 2015: epidemiological implications of the so-called "Balduzzi decree"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Susana, Angela; Spadotto, Veronica; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Corrado, Domenico

    2016-11-01

    Under the Italian Law "Legge Balduzzi", which was issued after the sudden cardiac death of professional athletes Pier Mario Morosini and Vigor Bovolenta in 2012, the presence of an automated external defibrillator (AED) and personnel trained to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation must be available in every Italian sports facility from 2016. In 2015 the national and local press reported 123 cases of sudden cardiac arrests (SCA) occurring in Italian sport facilities, corresponding to an estimated ≈0.2-0.4% of all SCA and to ≈0.6-1.2% of SCA in public places. The majority of SCA victims were males (93%) and >35 years old (88%, median age 50 years). On the basis of the report of the event on the press, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation was 62% when an AED was used before emergency medical system arrival versus 9% when no bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation or AED use by lay rescuers was mentioned. These data demonstrated that the Law has the potential to increase the survival to SCA in athletes; however, limiting the obligation of the presence of an AED only to sports facilities is not enough to decrease significantly the incidence of SCA in the general population.

  4. Our experience with the so-called pull-through technique combined with liposuction for management of gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracaglia, Roberto; Fortunato, Regina; Gentileschi, Stefano; Seccia, Antonio; Farallo, Eugenio

    2004-07-01

    Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of male breast, common in adolescents and adults. To treat this deformity, we have been carrying out liposuction through small cutaneous incisions placed in the axilla and on the sternum. If necessary, we performed a surgical excision of glandular tissue through a periareolar incision. From 1995, we started to perform surgical excision of glandular tissue, if necessary, through the small incisions made for liposuction, thus avoiding the periareolar scars. We describe our experience with this technique, which we believe excellent for the correction of glandular and fatty glandular gynecomastia, obtaining excellent esthetic results and minimal local scarring.

  5. Specific amplification of bacterial DNA by optimized so-called universal bacterial primers in samples rich of plant DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn-In, Samart; Bassitta, Rupert; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann; Hölzel, Christina S

    2015-06-01

    Universal primers targeting the bacterial 16S-rRNA-gene allow quantification of the total bacterial load in variable sample types by qPCR. However, many universal primer pairs also amplify DNA of plants or even of archaea and other eukaryotic cells. By using these primers, the total bacterial load might be misevaluated, whenever samples contain high amounts of non-target DNA. Thus, this study aimed to provide primer pairs which are suitable for quantification and identification of bacterial DNA in samples such as feed, spices and sample material from digesters. For 42 primers, mismatches to the sequence of chloroplasts and mitochondria of plants were evaluated. Six primer pairs were further analyzed with regard to the question whether they anneal to DNA of archaea, animal tissue and fungi. Subsequently they were tested with sample matrix such as plants, feed, feces, soil and environmental samples. To this purpose, the target DNA in the samples was quantified by qPCR. The PCR products of plant and feed samples were further processed for the Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism method followed by sequence analysis. The sequencing results revealed that primer pair 335F/769R amplified only bacterial DNA in samples such as plants and animal feed, in which the DNA of plants prevailed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Objective assessment of disorders of visual perception following unilateral vestibular loss. Studies of the so-called Dandy symptom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, W; Werner, F; Kauffmann, G

    1991-02-01

    Visual ability and compensatory eye movements during defined vertical oscillation were investigated in 20 patients with unilateral lesions of labyrinthine function and in 20 normal subjects. Oscillation frequencies were performed at the rate of 1 to 1.5 Hz with an amplitude of 5 cm, comparative to head locomotions of a running person. In synchronism with this, the visual function was tested with Landolt rings. Patients complaining of subjective visual disturbance during walking and running, also presented a measurable blur of vision under test conditions. In addition, eye movements were recorded and classified into three types. However, these eye movements showed no relation to gaze function. Our results suggest that the otolith-ocular reflex may participate in adjusting the vertical eye position during vertical stimulations at low frequencies. The effect of visual disturbances in patients with labyrinthine lesions is explained by the "efference-copy" initially described by von Holst. The efference-copy is responsible for the neutralisation of provoked retinal perceptions.

  7. Completion of cathode strip chamber (CSC) installation on the so-called YE+2 wheel of CMS on March 2005.

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee

    2005-01-01

    The pictures have been taken in the CMS construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France), called SX5, in March 2005 and show the status of cathode strip chamber (CSC) assembly on the yoke disk YE+2. The chambers are labelled ME+3 and their installation has been completed on March 16th, 2005.

  8. Current results of an arachnological survey of some sandstone rock sites in Bohemia (so-called "rock cities"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Růžička, Vlastimil

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available The spider fauna of the Adrspach-Teplice rockswas investigated. Some records on spider fauna of other nine sandstone rock areas are included. The phenomenon of "rock cities" manifests itself in three aspects: (1 In the bottom parts are microclimatically cold spaces, frequently hosting northern ot mountain species of invertebrates, which here have an azonal occurence. (2 the sun exposed tops of rocks can host thermophilous species. (3 Some species are limited to the surface of rocks and boulders. These are referred to as lithophilous or lithobiont species.

  9. Microbial production strategies and applications of lycopene and other terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are a large class of compounds that have far-reaching applications and economic value, particularly those most commonly found in plants; however, the extraction and synthesis of these compounds is often expensive and technically challenging. Recent advances in microbial metabolic engineering comprise a breakthrough that may enable the efficient, cost-effective production of these limited natural resources. Via the engineering of safe, industrial microorganisms that encode product-specific enzymes, and even entire metabolic pathways of interest, microbial-derived semisynthetic terpenoids may soon replace plant-derived terpenoids as the primary source of these valuable compounds. Indeed, the recent metabolic engineering of an Escherichia coli strain that produces the precursor to lycopene, a commercially and medically important compound, with higher yields than those in tomato plants serves as a successful example. Here, we review the recent developments in the metabolic engineering of microbes for the production of certain terpenoid compounds, particularly lycopene, which has been increasingly used in pharmaceuticals, nutritional supplements, and cosmetics. Furthermore, we summarize the metabolic engineering strategies used to achieve successful microbial production of some similar compounds. Based on this overview, there is a reason to believe that metabolic engineering comprises an optimal approach for increasing the production of lycopene and other terpenoids.

  10. Bioprocesses for the Removal of Volatile Sulfur Compounds from Gas Streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.H.; bosch, van den P.L.M.; Leerdam, van R.C.; Graaff, de C.M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the biological removal of sulphur compounds from gas streams. First, an overview is given of the toxicity of sulphur compounds to animals and humans whereafter biological and industrial formation routes for (organic) sulphur compounds are given. Microbial degradation routes of

  11. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  12. In situ acetate separation in microbial electrosynthesis from CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajracharya, Suman; Burg, van den Bart; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Wever, De Heleen; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Pant, Deepak; Strik, David P.B.T.B.

    2017-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to multi-carbon organic compounds particularly acetate has been achieved in microbial electrosynthesis (MES) using the reducing equivalents produced at the electrically polarized cathode. MES based on CO2 reduction

  13. Selection of culturable environmental microbial strains for cellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental pollution by organic compounds is a global problem. Biological treatment methods are used to restore polluted environments. Microbial immobilization on abiotic surfaces is a recent strategy to improve the efficiency of these processes. In this technique, cell adhesion is a fundamental step for subsequent ...

  14. Evaluation of Pharmaceutical and Microbial Qualities of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical tests were carried out to assess the class of compounds present in the formulations and the microbial quality of the products was also evaluated. Results: The results show that twelve (57.1%) of the products had their manufacturing and expiry dates stated, nine (42.9%) products have been registered by ...

  15. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: "Omic" Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the "Omic" technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. "Omic" technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current "Omic" tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems.

  16. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  17. Microbial production of value-added nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Guleria, Sanjay; Koffas, Mattheos Ag; Yan, Yajun

    2016-02-01

    Nutraceuticals are important natural bioactive compounds that confer health-promoting and medical benefits to humans. Globally growing demands for value-added nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of human diseases have rendered nutraceuticals a multi-billion dollar market. However, supply limitations and extraction difficulties from natural sources such as plants, animals or fungi, restrict the large-scale use of nutraceuticals. Metabolic engineering via microbial production platforms has been advanced as an eco-friendly alternative approach for production of value-added nutraceuticals from simple carbon sources. Microbial platforms like the most widely used Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered as versatile cell factories for production of diverse and complex value-added chemicals such as phytochemicals, prebiotics, polysaccaharides and poly amino acids. This review highlights the recent progresses in biological production of value-added nutraceuticals via metabolic engineering approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioactive natural products from novel microbial sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challinor, Victoria L; Bode, Helge B

    2015-09-01

    Despite the importance of microbial natural products for human health, only a few bacterial genera have been mined for the new natural products needed to overcome the urgent threat of antibiotic resistance. This is surprising, given that genome sequencing projects have revealed that the capability to produce natural products is not a rare feature among bacteria. Even the bacteria occurring in the human microbiome produce potent antibiotics, and thus potentially are an untapped resource for novel compounds, potentially with new activities. This review highlights examples of bacteria that should be considered new sources of natural products, including anaerobes, pathogens, and symbionts of humans, insects, and nematodes. Exploitation of these producer strains, combined with advances in modern natural product research methodology, has the potential to open the way for a new golden age of microbial therapeutics. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Isotopically modified compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter the nomenclature of isotopically modified compounds in Slovak language is described. This chapter consists of following parts: (1) Isotopically substituted compounds; (2) Specifically isotopically labelled compounds; (3) Selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (4) Non-selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (5) Isotopically deficient compounds.

  20. Eficiência microbiana, fluxo de compostos nitrogenados no abomaso, amônia e pH ruminais, em bovinos recebendo dietas contendo feno de capim-tifton 85 de diferentes idades de rebrota Microbial efficiency, abomasal nitrogen compounds flow, ruminal ammonia and ruminal pH in cattle fed diets containing tifton 85 bermudagrass hays at different regrowth ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Guimarães Ribeiro

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se a eficiência de síntese microbiana, o fluxo de compostos nitrogenados no abomaso, o balanço de compostos nitrogenados, a taxa de passagem da digesta ruminal, a concentração de amônia e o pH ruminais, em bovinos recebendo rações contendo feno de capim-tifton 85 de diferentes idades de rebrota. Utilizaram-se quatro animais zebu, com peso médio de 340 kg, fistulados no rúmen e abomaso, distribuídos em um delineamento em quadrado latino 4 x 4. Todas as rações continham 60% de volumoso e 40% de concentrado. O volumoso foi constituído de feno de capim-tifton 85 de 28, 35, 42 e 56 dias de idade e o concentrado continha fubá de milho e mistura mineral. Os microorganismos ruminais foram quantificados utilizando-se as bases purinas como indicador. O pH e N-amoniacal foram mensurados, no fluido ruminal, antes e 2; 4 e 6 horas após o fornecimento da ração. A taxa de passagem foi determinada pelo modelo unicompartimental, utilizando-se o óxido crômico como indicador. As eficiências de síntese microbiana não foram influenciadas pela idade do feno na ração, apresentando valores médios de 31,32 g Nbact/kg MODR; 30,74 g Nbact/kg CHODR; 337,4 g MSbact/kg CHODR; e 12,5 g PBbact/100 g NDT. Estimaram-se máximos fluxos de compostos nitrogenados totais, amoniacais e não-amoniacais, de 119,0; 9,76; e 109,6 g/dia, com a inclusão de feno com 39,7; 37,6; e 39,9 dias de idade, respectivamente, e fluxo de compostos nitrogenados bacterianos de 80,54 g/dia, em média. O balanço de nitrogênio, a taxa de passagem, as concentrações de amônia e o pH ruminais também não foram influenciados pela idade do feno na ração, encontrando-se valores de 30,67 g/dia; 3,2%/h; 9,7 mg/100mL (máximo às 1,38h e 6,08 (mínimo às 6,64h, respectivamente.The microbial efficiency synthesis, the abomasum nitrogen compounds flow, the nitrogen compounds balance, the passage rate of ruminal digest, the ruminal ammonia concentration and ruminal pH in

  1. Microbial conversion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, P. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Bioconversion and Sustainable Development

    2006-07-01

    Microbes are a biomass and an valuable resource. This presentation discussed microbial conversion technologies along with background information on microbial cells, their characteristics and microbial diversity. Untapped opportunities for microbial conversion were identified. Metagenomic and genome mining approaches were also discussed, as they can provide access to uncultivated or unculturable microorganisms in communal populations and are an unlimited resource for biocatalysts, novel genes and metabolites. Genome mining was seen as an economical approach. The presentation also emphasized that the development of microbial biorefineries would require significant insights into the relevant microorganisms and that biocatalysts were the ultimate in sustainability. In addition, the presentation discussed the natural fibres initiative for biochemicals and biomaterials. Anticipated outputs were identified and work in progress of a new enzyme-retting cocktail to provide diversity and/or consistency in fibre characteristics for various applications were also presented. It was concluded that it is necessary to leverage understanding of biological processes to produce bioproducts in a clean and sustainable manner. tabs., figs.

  2. The biodiversity of microbial cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven L; Lamb, David C; Jackson, Colin J; Warrilow, Andrew G; Kelly, Diane E

    2003-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of genes and proteins are well known for their involvement in pharmacology and toxicology, but also increasingly for their importance and diversity in microbes. The extent of diversity has only recently become apparent with the emergence of data from whole genome sequencing projects and the coming years will reveal even more information on the diversity in microbial eukaryotes. This review seeks to describe the historical development of these studies and to highlight the importance of the genes and proteins. CYPs are deeply involved in the development of strategies for deterrence and attraction as well as detoxification. As such, there is intense interest in pathways of secondary metabolism that include CYPs in oxidative tailoring of antibiotics, sometimes influencing potency as bioactive compounds. Further to this is interest in CYPs in metabolism of xenobiotics for use as carbon sources for microbial growth and as biotransformation agents or in bioremediation. CYPs are also current and potential drug targets; compounds inhibiting CYP are antifungal and anti-protozoan agents, and potentially similar compounds may be useful against some bacterial diseases such as tuberculosis. Of note is the diversity of CYP requirements within an organism, ranging from Escherichia coli that has no CYPs as in many bacteria, to Mycobacterium smegmatis that has 40 representing 1% of coding genes. The basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium surprised all when it was found to contain a hundred or more CYPs. The functional genomic investigation of these orphan CYPs is a major challenge for the future.

  3. Relationships for the impact sensitivities of energetic C-nitro compounds based on bond dissociation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinshan

    2010-02-18

    The ZPE-corrected C-NO(2) bond dissociation energies (BDEs(ZPE)) of a series of model C-nitro compounds and 26 energetic C-nitro compounds have been calculated using density functional theory methods. Computed results show that for C-nitro compounds the UB3LYP calculated BDE(ZPE) is less than the UB3P86 using the 6-31G** basis set, and the UB3P86 BDE(ZPE) changes slightly with the basis set varying from 6-31G** to 6-31++G**. For the series of model C-nitro compounds with different chemical skeletons, it is drawn from NBO analysis that the order of BDE(ZPE) is not only in line with that of the NAO bond order but also with that of the energy gap between C-NO(2) bonding and antibonding orbitals. It is found that for the energetic C-nitro compounds whose drop energies (Es(dr)) are below 24.5 J a good linear correlation exists between E(dr) and BDE(ZPE), implying that these compounds ignite through the C-NO(2) dissociation mechanism. After excluding the so-called trinitrotoluene mechanism compounds, a polynomial correlation of ln(E(dr)) with the BDE(ZPE) calculated at density functional theory levels has been established successfully for the 18 C-NO(2) dissociation energetic C-nitro compounds.

  4. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during...

  5. A fungal metallo-beta-lactamase necessary for biotransformation of maize phytoprotectant compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenobiotic compounds such as phytochemicals, microbial metabolites, and agrochemicals can impact the diversity and frequency of fungal species occurring in agricultural environments. Resistance to xenobiotics may allow plant pathogenic fungi to dominate the overall fungal community, with potential ...

  6. Extremely Randomized Machine Learning Methods for Compound Activity Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech M. Czarnecki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Speed, a relatively low requirement for computational resources and high effectiveness of the evaluation of the bioactivity of compounds have caused a rapid growth of interest in the application of machine learning methods to virtual screening tasks. However, due to the growth of the amount of data also in cheminformatics and related fields, the aim of research has shifted not only towards the development of algorithms of high predictive power but also towards the simplification of previously existing methods to obtain results more quickly. In the study, we tested two approaches belonging to the group of so-called ‘extremely randomized methods’—Extreme Entropy Machine and Extremely Randomized Trees—for their ability to properly identify compounds that have activity towards particular protein targets. These methods were compared with their ‘non-extreme’ competitors, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Random Forest. The extreme approaches were not only found out to improve the efficiency of the classification of bioactive compounds, but they were also proved to be less computationally complex, requiring fewer steps to perform an optimization procedure.

  7. Molecular ecology of microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H.; Cretoiu, M.S.; Stal, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep

  8. Structure and properties of intermetallic ternary rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    The so called material science is an always growing field in modern research. For the development of new materials not only the experimental characterization but also theoretical calculation of the electronic structure plays an important role. A class of compounds that has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years is known as REME compounds. These compounds are often referred to with RE designating rare earth, actinide or an element from group 1-4, M representing a late transition metal from groups 8-12, and E belonging to groups 13-15. There are more than 2000 compounds with 1:1:1 stoichiometry belonging to this class of compounds and they offer a broad variety of different structure types. Although many REME compounds are know to exist, mainly only structure and magnetism has been determined for these compounds. In particular, in the field of electronic and transport properties relatively few efforts have been made. The main focus in this study is on compounds crystallizing in MgAgAs and LiGaGe structure. Both structures can only be found among 18 valence electron compounds. The f electrons are localized and therefor not count as valence electrons. A special focus here was also on the magnetoresistance effects and spintronic properties found among the REME compounds. An examination of the following compounds was made: GdAuE (E=In,Cd,Mg), GdPdSb, GdNiSb, REAuSn (RE=Gd,Er,Tm) and RENiBi (RE=Pr,Sm,Gd-Tm,Lu). The experimental results were compared with theoretic band structure calculations. The first half metallic ferromagnet with LiGaGe structure (GdPdSb) was found. All semiconducting REME compounds with MgAgAs structure show giant magnetoresistance (GMR) at low temperatures. The GMR is related to a metal-insulator transition, and the value of the GMR depends on the value of the spin-orbit coupling. Inhomogeneous DyNiBi samples show a small positive MR at low temperature that depends on the amount of metallic impurities. At higher fields the samples show a

  9. Structure and properties of intermetallic ternary rare earth compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, Frederick

    2008-12-17

    The so called material science is an always growing field in modern research. For the development of new materials not only the experimental characterization but also theoretical calculation of the electronic structure plays an important role. A class of compounds that has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years is known as REME compounds. These compounds are often referred to with RE designating rare earth, actinide or an element from group 1-4, M representing a late transition metal from groups 8-12, and E belonging to groups 13-15. There are more than 2000 compounds with 1:1:1 stoichiometry belonging to this class of compounds and they offer a broad variety of different structure types. Although many REME compounds are know to exist, mainly only structure and magnetism has been determined for these compounds. In particular, in the field of electronic and transport properties relatively few efforts have been made. The main focus in this study is on compounds crystallizing in MgAgAs and LiGaGe structure. Both structures can only be found among 18 valence electron compounds. The f electrons are localized and therefor not count as valence electrons. A special focus here was also on the magnetoresistance effects and spintronic properties found among the REME compounds. An examination of the following compounds was made: GdAuE (E=In,Cd,Mg), GdPdSb, GdNiSb, REAuSn (RE=Gd,Er,Tm) and RENiBi (RE=Pr,Sm,Gd-Tm,Lu). The experimental results were compared with theoretic band structure calculations. The first half metallic ferromagnet with LiGaGe structure (GdPdSb) was found. All semiconducting REME compounds with MgAgAs structure show giant magnetoresistance (GMR) at low temperatures. The GMR is related to a metal-insulator transition, and the value of the GMR depends on the value of the spin-orbit coupling. Inhomogeneous DyNiBi samples show a small positive MR at low temperature that depends on the amount of metallic impurities. At higher fields the samples show a

  10. Anaerobic microbial dehalogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The natural production and anthropogenic release of halogenated hydrocarbons into the environment has been the likely driving force for the evolution of an unexpectedly high microbial capacity to dehalogenate different classes of xenobiotic haloorganics. This contribution provides an update on the

  11. Diazotrophic microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Stal, L.J.; Seckbach, J.; Oren, A.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial mats have been the focus of scientific research for a few decades. These small-scale ecosystems are examples of versatile benthic communities of microorganisms, usually dominated by phototrophic bacteria (e.g., Krumbein et al., 1977; Jørgensen et al., 1983). They develop as vertically

  12. Microbial Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Merry [American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, DC (United States); Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  13. Dissolved nitrogen transformations and microbial community structure in the organic layer of forest soils in Olkiluoto in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potila, H.; Sarjala, T.; Aro, L.

    2007-02-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles in the ecosystem are strongly coupled. Biomass, structure and activity of the bacterial and fungal community are the key factors influencing C and N cycles. Changes in the function of soil microbial community can be a signal of plant responses to environmental changes. Dissolved N compounds, microbial biomass, microbial activity, fungal community structure and functional diversity of microbial communities were measured in September 2006 from five monitoring plots on Olkiluoto to assess information about soil microbial community structure and activity. High within and between variation in the studied plots were detected. However, in this study the values and their variation in the level of N mineralisation, dissolved N compounds, fungal biomass and microbial community structure in the studied plots were within a normal range in comparison with other published data of similar forest types in Finland. (orig.)

  14. Chemistry of green encapsulating molding compounds at interfaces with other materials in electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scandurra, A.; Zafarana, R.; Tenya, Y.; Pignataro, S

    2004-07-31

    The interface chemistry between encapsulating epoxy phenolic molding compound (EMC) containing phosphorous based organic flame retardant (the so called 'green materials') and copper oxide-hydroxide and aluminum oxide-hydroxide surfaces have been studied in comparison with 'conventional' EMC containing bromine and antimony as flame retardant. These green materials are designed to reduce the presence of toxic elements in the electronic packages and, consequently, in the environment. For the study were used a Scanning Acoustic Microscopy for delamination measurements, a dynamometer for the pull strength measurements and an ESCA spectrometer for chemical analysis of the interface. The general behavior of the green compound in terms of delamination, adhesion, and corrosion is found better or at least comparable than that of the conventional EMC.

  15. Rubber compounding and processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This chapter presents an overview on the compounding and processing techniques of natural rubber compounds. The introductory portion deals with different types of rubbers and principles of rubber compounding. The primary and secondary fillers used...

  16. Seasonal variability of microbial biomass phosphorus in urban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halecki, W; Gąsiorek, M

    2015-01-01

    Urban soils have been formed through human activities. Seasonal evaluation with time-control procedure are essential for plant, and activity of microorganisms. Therefore, these processes are crucial in the urban area due to geochemical changes in the past years. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of content of microbial biomass phosphorus (P) in the top layer of soils throughout the season. In this research, the concentration of microbial biomass P ranged from 0.01 to 6.29 mg·kg(-1). We used single-factor repeated-measure analysis of variance to test the effect of season on microbial biomass P content of selected urban soils. We found no statistically significant differences between the concentration of microbial biomass P in the investigated urban and sub-urban soils during the growing season. This analysis explicitly recognised that environmental urban conditions are steady. Specifically, we have studied how vegetation seasonality and ability of microbial biomass P are useful for detecting quality deviations, which affect the equilibrium of urban soil. In conclusion, seasonal variability of the stringency of assurance across the different compounds of soil reveals, as expected, the stable condition of the urban soils. Seasonal responses in microbial biomass P under urban soil use should establish a framework as a reference to the activity of the microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial community composition affects soil fungistasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Wietse; Verheggen, Patrick; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J A; Kowalchuk, George A; van Veen, Johannes A

    2003-02-01

    Most soils inhibit fungal germination and growth to a certain extent, a phenomenon known as soil fungistasis. Previous observations have implicated microorganisms as the causal agents of fungistasis, with their action mediated either by available carbon limitation (nutrient deprivation hypothesis) or production of antifungal compounds (antibiosis hypothesis). To obtain evidence for either of these hypotheses, we measured soil respiration and microbial numbers (as indicators of nutrient stress) and bacterial community composition (as an indicator of potential differences in the composition of antifungal components) during the development of fungistasis. This was done for two fungistatic dune soils in which fungistasis was initially fully or partly relieved by partial sterilization treatment or nutrient addition. Fungistasis development was measured as restriction of the ability of the fungi Chaetomium globosum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma harzianum to colonize soils. Fungistasis did not always reappear after soil treatments despite intense competition for carbon, suggesting that microbial community composition is important in the development of fungistasis. Both microbial community analysis and in vitro antagonism tests indicated that the presence of pseudomonads might be essential for the development of fungistasis. Overall, the results lend support to the antibiosis hypothesis.

  18. Microbial biodiversity assessment of the European Space Agency's ExoMars 2016 mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Kaisa; Rettberg, Petra; Pukall, Rüdiger; Auerbach, Anna; Wink, Lisa; Barczyk, Simon; Perras, Alexandra; Mahnert, Alexander; Margheritis, Diana; Kminek, Gerhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2017-10-25

    The ExoMars 2016 mission, consisting of the Trace Gas Orbiter and the Schiaparelli lander, was launched on March 14 2016 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan and reached its destination in October 2016. The Schiaparelli lander was subject to strict requirements for microbial cleanliness according to the obligatory planetary protection policy. To reach the required cleanliness, the ExoMars 2016 flight hardware was assembled in a newly built, biocontrolled cleanroom complex at Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. In this study, we performed microbiological surveys of the cleanroom facilities and the spacecraft hardware before and during the assembly, integration and testing (AIT) activities. Besides the European Space Agency (ESA) standard bioburden assay, that served as a proxy for the microbiological contamination in general, we performed various alternative cultivation assays and utilised molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR and next generation sequencing, to assess the absolute and relative abundance and broadest diversity of microorganisms and their signatures in the cleanroom and on the spacecraft hardware. Our results show that the bioburden, detected microbial contamination and microbial diversity decreased continuously after the cleanroom was decontaminated with more effective cleaning agents and during the ongoing AIT. The studied cleanrooms and change room were occupied by very distinct microbial communities: Overall, the change room harboured a higher number and diversity of microorganisms, including Propionibacterium, which was found to be significantly increased in the change room. In particular, the so called alternative cultivation assays proved important in detecting a broader cultivable diversity than covered by the standard bioburden assay and thus completed the picture on the cleanroom microbiota. During the whole project, the bioburden stayed at acceptable level and did not raise any concern for the ExoMars 2016 mission. The cleanroom complex at

  19. Microbial analyses of cement and grouting additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallbeck, L.; Jaegevall, S.; Paeaejaervi, A.; Rabe, L.; Edlund, J.; Eriksson, S.

    2012-01-01

    During sampling in the ONKALO tunnel in 2006, heavy growth of a slimy material was observed in connection with grouting. It was suggested to be microbial growth on organic additives leaching from the grout. Two sampling campaigns resulted in the isolation of several aerobic bacterial strains. Some of these strains were used in biodegradation studies of three solid cement powders, eight liquid grout additives, and six plastic drainage materials. Degradation was also studied using ONKALO groundwaters as inoculums. The isolated strains were most closely related to hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms. The biodegradation of seven of the products was tested using microorganisms isolated from the ONKALO slime in 2006; none of these strains could degrade the tested products. When ONKALO drillhole groundwaters were used as inoculums in the degradation studies, it was demonstrated that Structuro 111X, Mighty 150, and Super-Parmix supported growth of the groundwater microorganisms. Structuro 111X is a polycarboxylate condensate while Mighty 150 and Super-Parmix are condensates with formaldehyde and naphthalene. Some of the isolated microorganisms belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, many strains of which can degrade organic molecules. None of the plastic drainage materials supported growth during the degradation studies. Microorganisms were present in two of the liquid products when delivered, GroutAid and Super-Parmix. The potential of the organic compounds in grout additives to be degraded by microorganisms, increasing the risk of biofilm formation and complexing compound production, must be considered. Microbial growth will also increase the possibility of hydrogen sulphide formation. (orig.)

  20. Microbial transformation of citral by Penicillium sp..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Tavassoli, Afsaneh

    2010-01-01

    Thymol is present in the essential oils from herbs and spices, such as thyme. It is produced by these plant species as a chemical defense against phytopathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, this compound has attracted great attention in food industry, i.e., it has been used as a natural preservative in foods such as cheese to prevent fungal growth. Previous studies concerning the biotransformation of nerol by Penicillium sp. and microbial transformation of citral by sporulated surface cultures method (SSCM) of Penicillium digitatum have been reported. The objective of this research was to study the pathway involved during biotransformation of citral by Penicillium sp. using two methods. The culture preparation was done using different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain Penicillium for citral biotransformation. The biotransformation products were identified by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). A comparison of the two methods showed that SSCM was more effective, its major products were thymol (21.5 %), geranial (18.6 %) and nerol (13.7 %). LM produced only one compound — thymol — with a low efficiency.

  1. Insights into the phylogeny and coding potential of microbial dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Sczyrba, Alexander; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Anderson, Iain J.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Darling, Aaron; Malfatti, Stephanie; Swan, Brandon K.; Gies, Esther A.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Tsiamis, George; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Rubin, Edward M.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-07-01

    Genome sequencing enhances our understanding of the biological world by providing blueprints for the evolutionary and functional diversity that shapes the biosphere. However, microbial genomes that are currently available are of limited phylogenetic breadth, owing to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. We apply single-cell genomics to target and sequence 201 uncultivated archaeal and bacterial cells fromnine diverse habitats belonging to 29 major mostly uncharted branches of the tree of life, so-called microbial dark matter. With this additional genomic information, we are able to resolve many intra- and inter-phylum-level relationships and to propose two new superphyla. We uncover unexpected metabolic features that extend our understanding of biology and challenge established boundaries between the three domains of life. These include a novel amino acid use for the opal stop codon, an archaeal-type purine synthesis in Bacteria and complete sigma factors in Archaea similar to those in Bacteria. The single-cell genomes also served to phylogenetically anchor up to 20percent of metagenomic reads in some habitats, facilitating organism-level interpretation of ecosystem function. This study greatly expands the genomic representation of the tree of life and provides a systematic step towards a better understanding of biological evolution on our planet.

  2. Microbial characterization of bee pollen from the Vesuvius area collected by using three different traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Prisco, Annachiara; Di Prisco, Gennaro; La Storia, Antonietta; Caprio, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Flower pollen is collected by honeybee foragers, adhered on their rear legs and transported into the hives in the form of pellets. Once in the hives, bee pollen is moisturised with nectar and bee mouth secretions and due to enzymatically modifications it becomes the so-called bee-bread, the protein reservoir of young bees. Bee pollen can be artificially removed from bee legs and collected by using specific systems, the bee pollen traps. Bee pollen is commercialized for human consumption as fresh product and after freezing or drying. Although bee pollen is nowadays largely consumed in developed countries, as food or food supplement according to local legislation, little is known on its safety related to microbiological hazards. In this work, we aimed to characterize for the first time the microbiological profile of Italian bee pollen in fresh, frozen and dried form collected along an entire harvesting season. Moreover, monthly microbiological analyses were performed on frozen (storage at -18°C) and dried (storage at room temperature) bee pollen over a 4 months period. Further aim of this work was the evaluation of the possible impact on production level of three different traps used for pollen collection. Our results on microbial contamination of fresh and frozen bee pollen show that a more comprehensive microbiological risk assessment of bee pollen is required. On the other side, dried pollen showed very low microbial contamination and no pathogen survived after the drying process and during storage. PMID:28934240

  3. Research supporting potential modification of the NASA specification for dry heat microbial reduction of spacecraft hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, James A.; Beaudet, Robert; Schubert, Wayne

    Dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) is the primary method currently used to reduce the microbial load of spacecraft and component parts to comply with planetary protection re-quirements. However, manufacturing processes often involve heating flight hardware to high temperatures for purposes other than planetary protection DHMR. At present, the specifica-tion in NASA document NPR8020.12, describing the process lethality on B. atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) bacterial spores, does not allow for additional planetary protection bioburden reduction credit for processing outside a narrow temperature, time and humidity window. Our results from a comprehensive multi-year laboratory research effort have generated en-hanced data sets on four aspects of the current specification: time and temperature effects in combination, the effect that humidity has on spore lethality, and the lethality for spores with exceptionally high thermal resistance (so called "hardies"). This paper describes potential modifications to the specification, based on the data set gener-ated in the referenced studies. The proposed modifications are intended to broaden the scope of the current specification while still maintaining confidence in a conservative interpretation of the lethality of the DHMR process on microorganisms.

  4. Microbial Ecology of Soil Aggregation in Agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K. S.; Bell, S.; Tfailly, M.; Thompson, A.; Callister, S.

    2017-12-01

    Crop selection and soil texture influence the physicochemical attributes of the soil, which structures microbial communities and influences soil C cycling storage. At the molecular scale, microbial metabolites and necromass alter the soil environment, which creates feedbacks that influence ecosystem functions, including soil C accumulation. By integrating lab to field studies we aim to identify the molecules, organisms and metabolic pathways that control carbon cycling and stabilization in bioenergy soils. We investigated the relative influence of plants, microbes, and minerals on soil aggregate ecology at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research experiment. Sites in WI and MI, USA have been in corn and switchgrass cropping systems for a decade. By comparing soil aggregate ecology across sites and cropping systems we are able to test the relative importance of plant, microbe, mineral influences on soil aggregate dynamics. Soil microbial communities (16S) differ in diversity and phylogeny among sites and cropping systems. FT-ICR MS revealed differences in the molecular composition of water-soluble fraction of soil organic matter for cropping systems and soil origin for both relative abundance of assigned formulas and biogeochemical classes of compounds. We found the degree of aggregation, measured by mean weighted diameter of aggregate fractions, is influenced by plant-soil interactions. Similarly, the proportion of soil aggregate fractions varied by both soil and plant factors. Differences in aggregation were reflected in differences in bacterial, but not fungal community composition across aggregate fractions, within each soil. Scanning electron microscopy revealed stark differences in mineral-organic interactions that influence the microbial niche and the accessibility of substrates within the soil. The clay soils show greater surface heterogeneity, enabling interactions with organic fraction of the soil. This is consistent with molecular data that reveal differences

  5. Rumen microbial genomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.; Nelson, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    Improving microbial degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides remains one of the highest priority goals for all livestock enterprises, including the cattle herds and draught animals of developing countries. The North American Consortium for Genomics of Fibrolytic Ruminal Bacteria was created to promote the sequencing and comparative analysis of rumen microbial genomes, offering the potential to fully assess the genetic potential in a functional and comparative fashion. It has been found that the Fibrobacter succinogenes genome encodes many more endoglucanases and cellodextrinases than previously isolated, and several new processive endoglucanases have been identified by genome and proteomic analysis of Ruminococcus albus, in addition to a variety of strategies for its adhesion to fibre. The ramifications of acquiring genome sequence data for rumen microorganisms are profound, including the potential to elucidate and overcome the biochemical, ecological or physiological processes that are rate limiting for ruminal fibre degradation. (author)

  6. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  7. Degradation of microbial polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P

    2004-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), one of the largest groups of thermoplastic polyesters are receiving much attention as biodegradable substitutes for non-degradable plastics. Poly(D-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is the most ubiquitous and most intensively studied PHA. Microorganisms degrading these polyesters are widely distributed in various environments. Although various PHB-degrading microorganisms and PHB depolymerases have been studied and characterized, there are still many groups of microorganisms and enzymes with varying properties awaiting various applications. Distributions of PHB-degrading microorganisms, factors affecting the biodegradability of PHB, and microbial and enzymatic degradation of PHB are discussed in this review. We also propose an application of a new isolated, thermophilic PHB-degrading microorganism, Streptomyces strain MG, for producing pure monomers of PHA and useful chemicals, including D-3-hydroxycarboxylic acids such as D-3-hydroxybutyric acid, by enzymatic degradation of PHB.

  8. Global Microbial Identifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielinga, Peter; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2017-01-01

    ) will likely also enable a much better understanding of the pathogenesis of the infection and the molecular basis of the host response to infection. But the full potential of these advances will only transpire if the data in this area become transferable and thereby comparable, preferably in open-source...... of microorganisms, for the identification of relevant genes and for the comparison of genomes to detect outbreaks and emerging pathogens. To harness the full potential of WGS, a shared global database of genomes linked to relevant metadata and the necessary software tools needs to be generated, hence the global...... microbial identifier (GMI) initiative. This tool will ideally be used in amongst others in the diagnosis of infectious diseases in humans and animals, in the identification of microorganisms in food and environment, and to track and trace microbial agents in all arenas globally. This will require...

  9. Transformation of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshikov, Igor A; Silva, Eliane O; Furtado, Niege A J C

    2014-02-01

    The saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds include many drugs and compounds that may be used as synthons for the synthesis of other pharmacologically active substances. The need for new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles for organic synthesis, biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry, including optically active derivatives, has increased interest in microbial synthesis. This review provides an overview of microbial technologies that can be valuable to produce new derivatives of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles, including hydroxylated derivatives. The chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity of microbial processes can be indispensable for the synthesis of new compounds. Microbial processes carried out with fungi, including Beauveria bassiana, Cunninghamella verticillata, Penicillium simplicissimum, Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Sphingomonas sp. and Rhodococcus erythropolis, biotransform many substrates efficiently. Among the biological activities of saturated nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds are antimicrobial, antitumor, antihypertensive and anti-HIV activities; some derivatives are effective for the treatment and prevention of malaria and trypanosomiasis, and others are potent glycosidase inhibitors.

  10. Microbial Interactions With Dissolved Organic Matter Drive Carbon Dynamics and Community Succession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Wu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of dynamic interactions between natural organic matter (NOM and microbial communities is critical not only to delineate the routes of NOM degradation/transformation and carbon (C fluxes, but also to understand microbial community evolution and succession in ecosystems. Yet, these processes in subsurface environments are usually studied independently, and a comprehensive view has been elusive thus far. In this study, we fed sediment-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM to groundwater microbes and continually analyzed microbial transformation of DOM over a 50-day incubation. To document fine-scale changes in DOM chemistry, we applied high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS. We also monitored the trajectory of microbial biomass, community structure and activity over this time period. Together, these analyses provided an unprecedented comprehensive view of interactions between sediment-derived DOM and indigenous subsurface groundwater microbes. Microbial decomposition of labile C in DOM was immediately evident from biomass increase and total organic carbon (TOC decrease. The change of microbial composition was closely related to DOM turnover: microbial community in early stages of incubation was influenced by relatively labile tannin- and protein-like compounds; while in later stages the community composition evolved to be most correlated with less labile lipid- and lignin-like compounds. These changes in microbial community structure and function, coupled with the contribution of microbial products to DOM pool affected the further transformation of DOM, culminating in stark changes to DOM composition over time. Our study demonstrates a distinct response of microbial communities to biotransformation of DOM, which improves our understanding of coupled interactions between sediment-derived DOM, microbial processes, and community structure in

  11. Synthetic microbial ecology and the dynamic interplay between microbial genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinšek, Jan; Goldschmidt, Felix; Johnson, David R

    2016-11-01

    Assemblages of microbial genotypes growing together can display surprisingly complex and unexpected dynamics and result in community-level functions and behaviors that are not readily expected from analyzing each genotype in isolation. This complexity has, at least in part, inspired a discipline of synthetic microbial ecology. Synthetic microbial ecology focuses on designing, building and analyzing the dynamic behavior of ‘ecological circuits’ (i.e. a set of interacting microbial genotypes) and understanding how community-level properties emerge as a consequence of those interactions. In this review, we discuss typical objectives of synthetic microbial ecology and the main advantages and rationales of using synthetic microbial assemblages. We then summarize recent findings of current synthetic microbial ecology investigations. In particular, we focus on the causes and consequences of the interplay between different microbial genotypes and illustrate how simple interactions can create complex dynamics and promote unexpected community-level properties. We finally propose that distinguishing between active and passive interactions and accounting for the pervasiveness of competition can improve existing frameworks for designing and predicting the dynamics of microbial assemblages.

  12. Harmonisation of microbial sampling and testing methods for distillate fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, G.C.; Hill, E.C. [ECHA Microbiology Ltd., Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    Increased incidence of microbial infection in distillate fuels has led to a demand for organisations such as the Institute of Petroleum to propose standards for microbiological quality, based on numbers of viable microbial colony forming units. Variations in quality requirements, and in the spoilage significance of contaminating microbes plus a tendency for temporal and spatial changes in the distribution of microbes, makes such standards difficult to implement. The problem is compounded by a diversity in the procedures employed for sampling and testing for microbial contamination and in the interpretation of the data obtained. The following paper reviews these problems and describes the efforts of The Institute of Petroleum Microbiology Fuels Group to address these issues and in particular to bring about harmonisation of sampling and testing methods. The benefits and drawbacks of available test methods, both laboratory based and on-site, are discussed.

  13. Shear and shearless Lagrangian structures in compound channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrile, F.; Besio, G.; Stocchino, A.

    2018-03-01

    Transport processes in a physical model of a natural stream with a composite cross-section (compound channel) are investigated by means of a Lagrangian analysis based on nonlinear dynamical system theory. Two-dimensional free surface Eulerian experimental velocity fields of a uniform flow in a compound channel form the basis for the identification of the so-called Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Lagrangian structures are recognized as the key features that govern particle trajectories. We seek for two particular class of Lagrangian structures: Shear and shearless structures. The former are generated whenever the shear dominates the flow whereas the latter behave as jet-cores. These two type of structures are detected as ridges and trenches of the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents fields, respectively. Besides, shearlines computed applying the geodesic theory of transport barriers mark Shear Lagrangian Coherent Structures. So far, the detection of these structures in real experimental flows has not been deeply investigated. Indeed, the present results obtained in a wide range of the controlling parameters clearly show a different behaviour depending on the shallowness of the flow. Shear and Shearless Lagrangian Structures detected from laboratory experiments clearly appear as the flow develops in shallow conditions. The presence of these Lagrangian Structures tends to fade in deep flow conditions.

  14. Sanskrit Compound Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Vipul; Kulkarni, Amba

    Sanskrit is very rich in compound formation. Typically a compound does not code the relation between its components explicitly. To understand the meaning of a compound, it is necessary to identify its components, discover the relations between them and finally generate a paraphrase of the compound. In this paper, we discuss the automatic segmentation and type identification of a compound using simple statistics that results from the manually annotated data.

  15. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic commun...

  16. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic communities that catalyze reductive dehalogenation appear to differ in many respects. A large number of pure cultures which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic compounds are known, in contrast to only a few organisms which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds. Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1 is an anaerobe which dehalogenates aromatic compounds and is physiologically and morphologically unusual in a number of respects, including the ability to exploit reductive dehalogenation for energy metabolism. When possible, we use D. tiedjei as a model to understand dehalogenating organisms in the above-mentioned undefined systems. Aerobes use reductive dehalogenation for substrates which are resistant to known mechanisms of oxidative attack. Reductive dehalogenation, especially of aliphatic compounds, has recently been found in cell-free systems. These systems give us an insight into how and why microorganisms catalyze this activity. In some cases transition metal complexes serve as catalysts, whereas in other cases, particularly with aromatic substrates, the catalysts appear to be enzymes. Images PMID:1406492

  17. Microbial Cell Dynamics Lab (MCDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microbial Cell Dynamics Laboratory at PNNL enables scientists to study the molecular details of microbes under relevant environmental conditions. The MCDL seeks...

  18. Assessment of microbial in situ activity in contaminated aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaestner, M. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, A.; Nijenhuis, I.; Stelzer, N.; Bombach, P.; Richnow, H.H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Isotopenbiogeochemie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Geyer, R. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Umweltmikrobiologie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Tebbe, C.C. [Institut fuer Agraroekologie, Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft (FAL), D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Microbial ecologists and environmental engineers share the interest in identifying the key microorganisms responsible for compound turnover in the environment and in estimating the respective transformation rates. For the successful application of Natural Attenuation processes, a reliable assessment of the in situ turnover of a contaminant in an aquifer is essential. Here, we review and present new details of two recently developed approaches concerning the assessment of in situ biodegradation: (i) determination of biodegradation caused by microbial metabolism in a contamination plume by stable isotope fractionation analysis (SIFA) and (ii) determination of the actual degradation under the respective environmental conditions in the aquifer by using in situ microcosms (BACTRAPS registered) amended with {sup 13}C-labeled substrates as tracer compounds. Based on stable isotope fractionation analysis, the degradation occurring under anoxic biogeochemical conditions at a respective site can be calculated for the entire plume. This has been shown for benzene and toluene at the Zeitz site and partly for chlorobenzene at the Bitterfeld site. By use of the in situ microcosm approach with {sup 13}C-labeled compounds, the microbial in situ degradation under strictly anaerobic conditions could be proven for benzene and toluene in Zeitz and for chlorobenzene in Bitterfeld. The transformation of {sup 13}C-carbon of the labeled substrate into microbial fatty acids confirmed the assimilation of the pollutant resulting in the formation of biomass. In addition, metabolites such as benzylsuccinic acid were found in the toluene-amended microcosms indicating anaerobic degradation of toluene. This result corresponds to the geochemical conditions found at the field site and therefore, the microcosm approach with {sup 13}C-labeled compounds can be used to assign the predominant in situ degradation pathways in a contaminated aquifer. Since fatty acids profiles alone are often too

  19. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefert, Martial [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  20. Effects of microbial inhibitors on anaerobic degradation of DDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.S.; Chiu, T.C.; Yen, J.H. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan)

    2004-09-15

    Chlorinated insecticide DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] was extensively used for controlling pests in the agricultural field and human-being living environments in the past several decades. Due to the chemical stability, DDT was extremely persistent and recalcitrant in soils and sediments and it was banned by nations. Microorganisms usually play important roles in reducing organochlorine compounds in the environments. Under low-oxygen conditions, microbial dechlorination is thought as the onset of highly chlorinated compounds. Methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria participate in microbial dechlorination under anaerobic condition has been reported. In this study, a mixed anaerobic culture enabling to dechlorinate DDT was obtained from river sediment in Taiwan. In order to understand the effect of these microorganisms on DDT dechlorination, microbial inhibitors BESA (2-bromoethanesulfonate) and molybdate, for inhibiting methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria, respectively, were chosen to investigate the interaction between specific microbial communities and their degradation activities. Besides, a molecular technique, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), based on analyzing the 16S rDNA of bacteria, was used for monitoring the bacterial community structure in this study.

  1. Hydrogen production profiles using furans in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Gover, Tansu; Yaman, Bugra; Droguetti, Jessica; Yilancioglu, Kaan

    2017-06-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells including microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are novel biotechnological tools that can convert organic substances in wastewater or biomass into electricity or hydrogen. Electroactive microbial biofilms used in this technology have ability to transfer electrons from organic compounds to anodes. Evaluation of biofilm formation on anode is crucial for enhancing our understanding of hydrogen generation in terms of substrate utilization by microorganisms. In this study, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were analyzed for hydrogen generation using single chamber membrane-free MECs (17 mL), and anode biofilms were also examined. MECs were inoculated with mixed bacterial culture enriched using chloroethane sulphonate. Hydrogen was succesfully produced in the presence of HMF, but not furfural. MECs generated similar current densities (5.9 and 6 mA/cm 2 furfural and HMF, respectively). Biofilm samples obtained on the 24th and 40th day of cultivation using aromatic compounds were evaluated by using epi-fluorescent microscope. Our results show a correlation between biofilm density and hydrogen generation in single chamber MECs.

  2. Possibilities for the detection of microbial life on extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knacke, Roger F

    2003-01-01

    We consider possibilities for the remote detection of microbial life on extrasolar planets. The Darwin/Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) telescope concepts for observations of terrestrial planets focus on indirect searches for life through the detection of atmospheric gases related to life processes. Direct detection of extraterrestrial life may also be possible through well-designed searches for microbial life forms. Satellites in Earth orbit routinely monitor colonies of terrestrial algae in oceans and lakes by analysis of reflected ocean light in the visible region of the spectrum. These remote sensing techniques suggest strategies for extrasolar searches for signatures of chlorophylls and related photosynthetic compounds associated with life. However, identification of such life-related compounds on extrasolar planets would require observations through strong, interfering absorptions and scattering radiances from the remote atmospheres and landmasses. Techniques for removal of interfering radiances have been extensively developed for remote sensing from Earth orbit. Comparable techniques would have to be developed for extrasolar planet observations also, but doing so would be challenging for a remote planet. Darwin/TPF coronagraph concepts operating in the visible seem to be best suited for searches for extrasolar microbial life forms with instruments that can be projected for the 2010-2020 decades, although resolution and signal-to-noise ratio constraints severely limit detection possibilities on terrestrial-type planets. The generation of telescopes with large apertures and extremely high spatial resolutions that will follow Darwin/TPF could offer striking possibilities for the direct detection of extrasolar microbial life.

  3. New Zealand Coals - A Potential Feedstock for Deep Microbial Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glombitza, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    into the surrounding. Previous studies showed that especially oxygen containing compounds are lost from the macromolecular matrix during diagenesis and early catagenesis. Oxygen containing low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) such as formate, acetate and oxalate represent important substrates for microbial...... reactions. Formate, acetate and oxalate were found to decrease continously from early diagenesis to early catagenesis. This suggests a constant release of these compounds during this maturation interval providing a suitable feedstock for microbial ecosystems in geological time spans. Investigation...... of kerogen-bound high molecular weight fatty acids show for the long chain fatty acids (C20-C30), representing a terrestrial plant material signal, a constant decrease during diagenesis and early catagenesis. In contrast the short chain fatty acids (mainly C16 and C18) show an increase again during early...

  4. Microbial bebop: creating music from complex dynamics in microbial ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Larsen

    Full Text Available In order for society to make effective policy decisions on complex and far-reaching subjects, such as appropriate responses to global climate change, scientists must effectively communicate complex results to the non-scientifically specialized public. However, there are few ways however to transform highly complicated scientific data into formats that are engaging to the general community. Taking inspiration from patterns observed in nature and from some of the principles of jazz bebop improvisation, we have generated Microbial Bebop, a method by which microbial environmental data are transformed into music. Microbial Bebop uses meter, pitch, duration, and harmony to highlight the relationships between multiple data types in complex biological datasets. We use a comprehensive microbial ecology, time course dataset collected at the L4 marine monitoring station in the Western English Channel as an example of microbial ecological data that can be transformed into music. Four compositions were generated (www.bio.anl.gov/MicrobialBebop.htm. from L4 Station data using Microbial Bebop. Each composition, though deriving from the same dataset, is created to highlight different relationships between environmental conditions and microbial community structure. The approach presented here can be applied to a wide variety of complex biological datasets.

  5. Microbial bebop: creating music from complex dynamics in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In order for society to make effective policy decisions on complex and far-reaching subjects, such as appropriate responses to global climate change, scientists must effectively communicate complex results to the non-scientifically specialized public. However, there are few ways however to transform highly complicated scientific data into formats that are engaging to the general community. Taking inspiration from patterns observed in nature and from some of the principles of jazz bebop improvisation, we have generated Microbial Bebop, a method by which microbial environmental data are transformed into music. Microbial Bebop uses meter, pitch, duration, and harmony to highlight the relationships between multiple data types in complex biological datasets. We use a comprehensive microbial ecology, time course dataset collected at the L4 marine monitoring station in the Western English Channel as an example of microbial ecological data that can be transformed into music. Four compositions were generated (www.bio.anl.gov/MicrobialBebop.htm.) from L4 Station data using Microbial Bebop. Each composition, though deriving from the same dataset, is created to highlight different relationships between environmental conditions and microbial community structure. The approach presented here can be applied to a wide variety of complex biological datasets.

  6. Volatile organic compounds and Photobacterium phosphoreum associated with spoilage of modified-atmosphere-packaged raw pork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Timo T.; Dalgaard, Paw; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of volatile organic compounds was monitored in association with sensory quality, bacterial concentrations and culture-independent microbial community analyses in raw pork loin and pork collar during storage under high-oxygen modified atmosphere at +4°C. Of the 48 volatile compounds...

  7. Analysis of phenolic compounds for poultry feed by supercritical fluid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenolic compounds have generated interest as components in functional feed formulations due to their anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal properties. These compounds may have greater significance in the future as the routine use of antibiotics is reduced and the prevalence of resistant bac...

  8. Limited recovery of soil microbial activity after transient exposure to gasoline vapors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrzyński, Jakub J.; Christensen, Jan H.; Mayer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    During gasoline spills complex mixtures of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to terrestrial environments. Gasoline VOCs exert baseline toxicity (narcosis) and may thus broadly affect soil biota. We assessed the functional resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery of microbial...... functions) in soil microbial communities transiently exposed to gasoline vapors by passive dosing via headspace for 40 days followed by a recovery phase of 84 days. Chemical exposure was characterized with GC-MS, whereas microbial activity was monitored as soil respiration (CO2 release) and soil bacterial...... microbial activity indicating residual soil toxicity, which could not be attributed to BTEX, but rather to mixture toxicity of more persistent gasoline constituents or degradation products. Our results indicate a limited potential for functional recovery of soil microbial communities after transient...

  9. Dereplication of Microbial Natural Products by LC-DAD-TOFMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Månsson, Maria; Rank, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Dereplication, the rapid identification of known compounds present in a mixture, is crucial to the fast discovery of novel natural products. Determining the elemental composition of compounds in mixtures and tentatively identifying natural products using MS/MS and UV/vis spectra is becoming easier...... with advances in analytical equipment and better compound databases. Here we demonstrate the use of LC-UV/vis-MS-based dereplication using data from UV/vis diode array detection and ESI+/ESI– time-of-flight MS for assignment of 719 microbial natural product and mycotoxin reference standards. ESI+ was the most...... unambiguously using multiple adduct ions, while a further 41% of the compounds were detected only as [M – H]−. The most reliable interpretations of conflicting ESI+ and ESI– data on a chromatographic peak were from the ionization polarity with the most intense ionization. Poor ionization was most common...

  10. Toxicity of vapor phase petroleum contaminants to microbial degrader communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S.C.; Davey, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Petroleum products constitute the largest quantity of synthetic organic chemical products produced in the US. They are comprised of mostly hydrocarbon constituents from many different chemical classes including alkenes, cycloalkanes, aromatic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Many petroleum constituents are classified as volatile organic compounds or VOCs. Petroleum products also constitute a major portion of environmental pollution. One emerging technology, with promise for applications to VOCs in subsurface soil environments, is bioventing coupled with soil vapor extraction. These technologies involve volatilization of contaminants into the soil gas phase by injection and withdrawal of air. This air movement causes enhancement of the aerobic microbial degradation of the mobilized vapors by the indigenous populations. This study investigated the effects of exposure of mixed, subsurface microbial communities to vapor phase petroleum constituents or vapors of petroleum mixtures. Soil slurries were prepared and plated onto mineral salts agar plates and exposed to vapor phase contaminants at equilibrium with pure product. Representative n-alkane, branched alkane, cycloalkane, and aromatic compounds were tested as well as petroleum product mixtures. Vapor exposure altered the numbers and morphologies of the colonies enumerated when compared to controls. However, even at high, equilibrium vapor concentrations, microbial degrader populations were not completely inhibited

  11. Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems. Phototrophic

  12. Hydrodynamics of microbial filter feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Asadzadeh, Seyed Saeed; Dölger, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Microbial filter feeders are an important group of grazers, significant to the microbial loop, aquatic food webs, and biogeochemical cycling. Our understanding of microbial filter feeding is poor, and, importantly, it is unknown what force microbial filter feeders must generate to process adequate......-feeding choanoflagellate Diaphanoeca grandis using particle tracking, and demonstrate that the current understanding of microbial filter feeding is inconsistent with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and analytical estimates. Both approaches underestimate observed filtration rates by more than an order of magnitude......; the beating flagellum is simply unable to draw enough water through the fine filter. We find similar discrepancies for other choanoflagellate species, highlighting an apparent paradox. Our observations motivate us to suggest a radically different filtration mechanism that requires a flagellar vane (sheet...

  13. Microbial Degradation of Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-30

    with a 2-m glass, 3.2 mm I.D. column, packed with 3% Silar IOC on Gas-Chrom Q, (110-200 mesh) (Applied Science Laboratories, State College, PA) was...allowing the material to stand overnight to form trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives of polar compounds. All peaks recovered by GC on Silar 1OC rolumn

  14. Micro-analytical study of interactions between oil and lead compounds in paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotte, M.; Checroun, E.; Susini, J.; Walter, P.

    2007-01-01

    Oil paintings are complex hybrid materials, made of organic binders associated with inorganic minerals, susceptible to evolving over centuries. In particular, interactions of oil with lead compounds may give rise to the formation of lead soap aggregates, so-called protrusions. This phenomenon is studied here via X-ray and FTIR micro-analysis of an ancient painting dated from 1610. In complement, the synthesis of modern preparations, reconstructed from ancient recipes was assessed. Molecular and atomic images are obtained by combining synchrotron-based FTIR and X-ray fluorescence microscopies. Protrusions are identified in both ancient and modern samples, more particularly, in the ground layer of the paintings, below the colored layer. These observations imply that lead oxide, introduced as a siccative and not as a pigment, may be the element mainly responsible for the protrusions formation, and that this degradation may appear very rapidly on paintings. (orig.)

  15. Pharmaceutical Compounds in Wastewater: Wetland Treatment as a Potential Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. White

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical compounds are being released into the aquatic environment through wastewater discharge around the globe. While there is limited removal of these compounds within wastewater treatment plants, wetland treatment might prove to be an effective means to reduce the discharge of the compounds into the environment. Wetlands can promote removal of these pharmaceutical compounds through a number of mechanisms including photolysis, plant uptake, microbial degradation, and sorption to the soil. We review relevant laboratory research on these various mechanisms and provide data on the few studies that have examined wetland removal. There is a need to document the degree to which various pharmaceutical compounds are removed in full-scale treatment wetlands, as there is a paucity of data on overall pharmaceutical removal rates.

  16. Microbial genetic engineering and enzyme technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenberg, C.P.; Sahm, H.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of up-to-date contributions BIOTEC 1 has experts discussing the current topics in microbial gene technology and enzyme technology and speculating on future developments. Bacterial and yeast systems for the production of interferons, growth hormone or viral antigenes are described as well as the impact of gene technology on plants. Exciting is the prospect of degrading toxic compounds in our environment by microorganisms tuned in the laboratory. Enzymes are the most effective catalysts we know. They exhibit a very high substrate- and stereospecificity. These properties make enzymes extremely attractive as industrial catalysts, leading to new production processes that are non-polluting and save both energy and raw materials. (orig.) With 135 figs., 36 tabs.

  17. Microbial biosurfactants as additives for food industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Jenyffer Medeiros; Stamford, Tânia Lúcia Montenegro; Sarubbo, Leonie Asfora; de Luna, Juliana Moura; Rufino, Raquel Diniz; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biosurfactants with high ability to reduce surface and interfacial surface tension and conferring important properties such as emulsification, detergency, solubilization, lubrication and phase dispersion have a wide range of potential applications in many industries. Significant interest in these compounds has been demonstrated by environmental, bioremediation, oil, petroleum, food, beverage, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries attracted by their low toxicity, biodegradability and sustainable production technologies. Despite having significant potentials associated with emulsion formation, stabilization, antiadhesive and antimicrobial activities, significantly less output and applications have been reported in food industry. This has been exacerbated by uneconomical or uncompetitive costing issues for their production when compared to plant or chemical counterparts. In this review, biosurfactants properties, present uses and potential future applications as food additives acting as thickening, emulsifying, dispersing or stabilising agents in addition to the use of sustainable economic processes utilising agro-industrial wastes as alternative substrates for their production are discussed. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  19. New microbial growth factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  20. The effect of raw milk microbial flora on the sensory characteristics of Salers-type cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callon, C; Berdagué, J L; Dufour, E; Montel, M C

    2005-11-01

    The sensory characteristics of Salers Protected Denomination of Origin raw-milk cheeses are linked to the biochemical composition of the raw material (milk) and to the resultant microbial community. To evaluate the influence of the microbial community on sensory characteristics, Salers-type cheeses were manufactured with the same pasteurized milk, reinoculated with 3 different microbial communities from 3 different filtrates from microfiltered milks. Each cheese was subjected to microbial counts (on selective media), biochemical tests, and volatile and sensory component analyses at different times of ripening. Adding different microbial communities to specimens of the same (biochemically identical) pasteurized milk lead to different sensory characteristics of the cheeses. Cheeses with fresh cream, hazelnut, and caramel attributes were opposed to those with fermented cream, chemical, and garlic flavors. The aromatic compounds identified (esters, acids, alcohols, and aldehydes) in these cheeses were quite similar. Nevertheless, one milk was distinguished by a higher content of acetoin, and lower 2-butanone and 3-methylpentanone concentrations. Over the production period of 1 mo, the different cheeses were characterized by the same balance of the microbial population assessed by microbial counts on different media. This was associated with the stability of some sensory attributes describing these cheeses. Nevertheless, there was no linear correlation between microbial flora data and sensory characteristics as measured in this study.

  1. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Maryan, Natalia; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. - Highlights: ► The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine are highly diverse community. ► As(III) oxidizing and As(V) reducing bacteria are present in the mats. ► As redox transformations are linked to the metabolism of microbial mats bacteria. ► Microbial mats play a crucial role in the As biogeochemical cycle within the mine. - The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine can mediate oxidation/reduction reaction of arsenic and in this way may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater.

  2. Oxygen transfer rate identifies priming compounds in parsley cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Jana Viola; Schillheim, Britta; Mahr, Stefan; Reufer, Yannik; Sanjoyo, Sandi; Conrath, Uwe; Büchs, Jochen

    2015-11-25

    In modern agriculture, the call for an alternative crop protection strategy increases because of the desired reduction of fungicide and pesticide use and the continuously evolving resistance of pathogens and pests to agrochemicals. The direct activation of the plant immune system does not provide a promising plant protection measure because of high fitness costs. However, upon treatment with certain natural or synthetic compounds, plant cells can promote to a fitness cost-saving, primed state of enhanced defense. In the primed state, plants respond to biotic and abiotic stress with faster and stronger activation of defense, and this is often associated with immunity and abiotic stress tolerance. Until now, the identification of chemical compounds with priming-inducing activity (so-called plant activators) relied on tedious and invasive approaches, or required the late detection of secreted furanocoumarin phytoalexins in parsley cell cultures. Thus, simple, fast, straightforward, and noninvasive techniques for identifying priming-inducing compounds for plant protection are very welcome. This report demonstrates that a respiration activity-monitoring system (RAMOS) can identify compounds with defense priming-inducing activity in parsley cell suspension in culture. RAMOS relies on the quasi-continuous, noninvasive online determination of the oxygen transfer rate (OTR). Treatment of parsley culture cells with the known plant activator salicylic acid (SA), a natural plant defense signal, resulted in an OTR increase. Addition of the defense elicitor Pep13, a cell wall peptide of Phythophthora sojae, induced two distinctive OTR peaks that were higher in SA-primed cells than in unprimed cells upon Pep13 challenge. Both, the OTR increase after priming with SA and the Pep13 challenge were dose-dependent. Furthermore, there was a close correlation of a compound's activity to enhance the oxygen consumption in parsley cells and its capacity to prime Pep13-induced furanocoumarin

  3. Impact of androgenic/antiandrogenic compounds (AAC) on human sex steroid metabolizing key enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allera, A.; Lo, S.; King, I.; Steglich, F.; Klingmueller, D.

    2004-01-01

    Various pesticides, industrial pollutants and synthetic compounds, to which human populations are exposed, are known or suspected to interfere with endogenous sex hormone functions. Such interference potentially affect the development and expression of the male and female reproductive system or both. Chemicals in this class are thus referred to as endocrine disruptors (ED). This emphazises on the relevance of screening ED for a wide range of sex hormone-mimicking effects. These compounds are believed to exert influence on hormonal actions predominantly by (i) interfering with endogenous steroids in that they functionally interact with plasma membrane-located receptors as well as with nuclear receptors both for estrogens and androgens or (ii) affecting the levels of sex hormones as a result of their impact on steroid metabolizing key enzymes. Essential sex hormone-related enzymes within the endocrine system of humans are aromatase, 5α-reductase 2 as well as specific sulfotransferases and sulfatases (so-called phase I and phase II enzymes, respectively). Using suitable human tissues and human cancer cell lines (placenta, prostate, liver and JEG-3, lymph node carcinoma of prostate (LnCaP) cells) we investigated the impact of 10 widely used chemicals suspected of acting as ED with androgenic or antiandrogenic activity (so-called AAC) on the activity of these sex hormone metabolizing key enzymes in humans. In addition, the respective effects of six substances were also studied as positive controls due to their well-known specific hormonal agonistic/antagonistic activities. The aim of this report and subsequent investigations is to improve human health risk assessment for AAC and other ED

  4. The maturing of microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    A.J. Kluyver and C.B. van Niel introduced many scientists to the exceptional metabolic capacity of microbes and their remarkable ability to adapt to changing environments in The Microbe's Contribution to Biology. Beyond providing an overview of the physiology and adaptability of microbes, the book outlined many of the basic principles for the emerging discipline of microbial ecology. While the study of pure cultures was highlighted, provided a unifying framework for understanding the vast metabolic potential of microbes and their roles in the global cycling of elements, extrapolation from pure cultures to natural environments has often been overshadowed by microbiologists inability to culture many of the microbes seen in natural environments. A combination of genomic approaches is now providing a culture-independent view of the microbial world, revealing a more diverse and dynamic community of microbes than originally anticipated. As methods for determining the diversity of microbial communities become increasingly accessible, a major challenge to microbial ecologists is to link the structure of natural microbial communities with their functions. This article presents several examples from studies of aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities in which culture and culture-independent methods are providing an enhanced appreciation for the microbe's contribution to the evolution and maintenance of life on Earth, and offers some thoughts about the graduate-level educational programs needed to enhance the maturing field of microbial ecology.

  5. Global microbialization of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Andreas F; Fairoz, Mohamed F M; Kelly, Linda W; Nelson, Craig E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Giles, Steve; Hatay, Mark; Hisakawa, Nao; Knowles, Ben; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Pantos, Olga; Roach, Ty N F; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-04-25

    Microbialization refers to the observed shift in ecosystem trophic structure towards higher microbial biomass and energy use. On coral reefs, the proximal causes of microbialization are overfishing and eutrophication, both of which facilitate enhanced growth of fleshy algae, conferring a competitive advantage over calcifying corals and coralline algae. The proposed mechanism for this competitive advantage is the DDAM positive feedback loop (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), disease, algae, microorganism), where DOC released by ungrazed fleshy algae supports copiotrophic, potentially pathogenic bacterial communities, ultimately harming corals and maintaining algal competitive dominance. Using an unprecedented data set of >400 samples from 60 coral reef sites, we show that the central DDAM predictions are consistent across three ocean basins. Reef algal cover is positively correlated with lower concentrations of DOC and higher microbial abundances. On turf and fleshy macroalgal-rich reefs, higher relative abundances of copiotrophic microbial taxa were identified. These microbial communities shift their metabolic potential for carbohydrate degradation from the more energy efficient Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway on coral-dominated reefs to the less efficient Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways on algal-dominated reefs. This 'yield-to-power' switch by microorganism directly threatens reefs via increased hypoxia and greater CO2 release from the microbial respiration of DOC.

  6. Microbial electrode sensor for alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikuma, M [Ajinomoto Co., Inc., Kawasaki, Japan; Kubo, T; Yasuda, T; Karube, I; Suzuki, S

    1979-10-01

    A microbial electrode consisting of immobilized microorganisms, a gas permeable Teflon membrane, and an oxygen electrode was prepared for the continuous determination of methyl and ethyl alcohols. Immobilized Trichosporon brassicae was employed for a microbial electrode sensor for ethyl alcohol. When a sample solution containing ethyl alcohol was injected into a microbial electrode system, the current of the electrode decreased markedly with time until a steady state was reached. The response time was within 10 min by the steady state method and within 6 min by the pulse method. A linear relationship was observed between the current decrease and the concentration of ethyl alcohol below 22.5 mg/liter. The current was reproducible within +- 6% of the relative error when a sample solution containing 16.5 mg/liter ethyl alcohol. The standard deviation was 0.5 mg/liter in 40 experiments. The selectivity of the microbial electrode sensor for ethyl alcohol was satisfactory. The microbial electrode sensor was applied to a fermentation broth of yeasts and satisfactory comparative results were obtained (correlation coefficient 0.98). The current output of the microbial electrode sensor was almost constant for more than three weeks and 2100 assays. A microbial electrode sensor using immobilized bacteria for methyl alcohol was also described.

  7. The microbial ecology of permafrost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Janet; Tas, Neslihan

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost constitutes a major portion of the terrestrial cryosphere of the Earth and is a unique ecological niche for cold-adapted microorganisms. There is a relatively high microbial diversity in permafrost, although there is some variation in community composition across different permafrost......-gas emissions. This Review describes new data on the microbial ecology of permafrost and provides a platform for understanding microbial life strategies in frozen soil as well as the impact of climate change on permafrost microorganisms and their functional roles....

  8. Defining Disturbance for Microbial Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Craig J

    2017-08-01

    Disturbance can profoundly modify the structure of natural communities. However, microbial ecologists' concept of "disturbance" has often deviated from conventional practice. Definitions (or implicit usage) have frequently included climate change and other forms of chronic environmental stress, which contradict the macrobiologist's notion of disturbance as a discrete event that removes biomass. Physical constraints and disparate biological characteristics were compared to ask whether disturbances fundamentally differ in microbial and macroorganismal communities. A definition of "disturbance" for microbial ecologists is proposed that distinguishes from "stress" and other competing terms, and that is in accord with definitions accepted by plant and animal ecologists.

  9. Casca de algodão em substituição parcial à silagem de capim-elefante para novilhos. 2. Parâmetros ruminais e séricos, produção microbiana e excreção urinária de compostos nitrogenados Partial replacement of elephantgrass silage with cottonseed hulls. 2. Ruminal and serum metabolites, microbial protein synthesis, and urinary excretion of nitrogenous compounds in steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Luiz Chizzotti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quatro novilhos holandeses fistulados no rúmen, com peso médio de 259 kg, foram distribuídos em um quadrado latino 4 x 4 para se avaliar o efeito dos níveis de casca de algodão na dieta de novilhos sobre a concentração de nitrogênio uréico no soro (NUS e de amônia no rúmen, o pH ruminal, a excreção urinária de uréia e derivados de purinas e a produção de proteína microbiana estimada pelo método das bases purinas omasais e da excreção de derivados de purinas na urina. As dietas experimentais continham na base da matéria seca: 0, 10, 20 e 30% de casca de algodão peletizada, em substituição à silagem de capim-elefante, sendo a dieta total constituída de 60% de volumoso. Não houve efeito dos diferentes tratamentos sobre o pH e as concentrações de amônia no rúmen. A concentração de NUS e a excreção de uréia (em mg/kgPV diminuíram, enquanto a excreção de derivados de purinas na urina e a síntese de proteína microbiana no rúmen aumentaram linearmente com a inclusão da casca de algodão nas dietas. A estimativa da síntese de proteína microbiana não diferiu entre as metodologias das bases purínicas omasais e dos derivados de purina na urina. A casca de algodão mostrou-se um bom volumoso alternativo, podendo ser fornecida até o nível de 30% na MS total na dieta de novilhos de origem leiteira.Four ruminally cannulated Holstein steers averaging 259 kg of body weight were assigned to a 4x4 Latin square to study the effects of replacing elephantgrass silage with cottonseed hulls on serum urea nitrogen (SUN, ruminal metabolism, urinary excretion of nitrogenous compounds, and microbial protein synthesis measured by omasal purine bases or by urinary excretion of purine derivatives. Treatments (60% of forage contained on DM basis: 0, 10, 20 or 30% of cottonseed hulls that partially replaced elephantgrass silage in the diet. No significant differences in ruminal pH and concentration of ruminal ammonia were

  10. Effects of Ga substitution on the structural and magnetic properties of half metallic Fe{sub 2}MnSi Heusler compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedro, S. S., E-mail: sandrapedro@uerj.br; Caraballo Vivas, R. J.; Andrade, V. M.; Cruz, C.; Paixão, L. S.; Contreras, C.; Costa-Soares, T.; Rocco, D. L.; Reis, M. S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói-RJ (Brazil); Caldeira, L. [IF Sudeste MG, Campus Juiz de Fora - Núcleo de Física, Juiz de Fora-MG (Brazil); Coelho, A. A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Carvalho, A. Magnus G. [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, CNPEM, Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-07

    The so-called half-metallic magnets have been proposed as good candidates for spintronic applications due to the feature of exhibiting a hundred percent spin polarization at the Fermi level. Such materials follow the Slater-Pauling rule, which relates the magnetic moment with the valence electrons in the system. In this paper, we study the bulk polycrystalline half-metallic Fe{sub 2}MnSi Heusler compound replacing Si by Ga to determine how the Ga addition changes the magnetic, the structural, and the half-metal properties of this compound. The material does not follow the Slater-Pauling rule, probably due to a minor structural disorder degree in the system, but a linear dependence on the magnetic transition temperature with the valence electron number points to the half-metallic behavior of this compound.

  11. Diversity of Microbial Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZYmes) Associated with Freshwater and Soil Samples from Caatinga Biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ana Camila; Fróes, Adriana; Lopes, Fabyano Álvares Cardoso; Thompson, Fabiano L; Krüger, Ricardo Henrique; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Bruce, Thiago

    2017-07-01

    Semi-arid and arid areas occupy about 33% of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little information is available about microbial diversity in the semi-arid Caatinga, which represents a unique biome that extends to about 11% of the Brazilian territory and is home to extraordinary diversity and high endemism level of species. In this study, we characterized the diversity of microbial genes associated with biomass conversion (carbohydrate-active enzymes, or so-called CAZYmes) in soil and freshwater of the Caatinga. Our results showed distinct CAZYme profiles in the soil and freshwater samples. Glycoside hydrolases and glycosyltransferases were the most abundant CAZYme families, with glycoside hydrolases more dominant in soil (∼44%) and glycosyltransferases more abundant in freshwater (∼50%). The abundances of individual glycoside hydrolase, glycosyltransferase, and carbohydrate-binding module subfamilies varied widely between soil and water samples. A predominance of glycoside hydrolases was observed in soil, and a higher contribution of enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis was observed in freshwater. The main taxa associated with the CAZYme sequences were Planctomycetia (relative abundance in soil, 29%) and Alphaproteobacteria (relative abundance in freshwater, 27%). Approximately 5-7% of CAZYme sequences showed low similarity with sequences deposited in non-redundant databases, suggesting putative homologues. Our findings represent a first attempt to describe specific microbial CAZYme profiles for environmental samples. Characterizing these enzyme groups associated with the conversion of carbohydrates in nature will improve our understanding of the significant roles of enzymes in the carbon cycle. We identified a CAZYme signature that can be used to discriminate between soil and freshwater samples, and this signature may be related to the microbial species adapted to the habitat. The data show the potential ecological roles of the CAZYme repertoire and

  12. Microbial ecology-based engineering of Microbial Electrochemical Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christin; Korth, Benjamin; Harnisch, Falk

    2018-01-01

    Microbial ecology is devoted to the understanding of dynamics, activity and interaction of microorganisms in natural and technical ecosystems. Bioelectrochemical systems represent important technical ecosystems, where microbial ecology is of highest importance for their function. However, whereas aspects of, for example, materials and reactor engineering are commonly perceived as highly relevant, the study and engineering of microbial ecology are significantly underrepresented in bioelectrochemical systems. This shortfall may be assigned to a deficit on knowledge and power of these methods as well as the prerequisites for their thorough application. This article discusses not only the importance of microbial ecology for microbial electrochemical technologies but also shows which information can be derived for a knowledge-driven engineering. Instead of providing a comprehensive list of techniques from which it is hard to judge the applicability and value of information for a respective one, this review illustrates the suitability of selected techniques on a case study. Thereby, best practice for different research questions is provided and a set of key questions for experimental design, data acquisition and analysis is suggested. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Repurposing Established Compounds to Target Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard W. Renz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC carries a dismal prognosis, in particular, when patients present with unresectable disease. While significant progress has been made in understanding the biology of PDAC, this knowledge has not translated into a clear clinical benefit and current chemotherapeutic strategies only offer a modest improvement in overall survival. Accordingly, novel approaches are desperately needed. One hypothesis that could—at least in part—explain the desolate response of PDAC to chemotherapy is the so-called cancer stem cell (CSC concept, which attributes specific traits, such as chemoresistance, metastatic potential and a distinct metabolism to a small cellular subpopulation of the whole tumor. At the same time, however, some of these attributes could make CSCs more permissive for novel therapeutic strategies with compounds that are already in clinical use. Most recently, several publications have tried to enlighten the field with the idea of repurposing established drugs for antineoplastic use. As such, recycling drugs could present an intriguing and fast-track method with new therapeutic paradigms in anti-cancer and anti-CSC treatments. Here, we aim to summarize important aspects and novel findings of this emerging field.

  14. Microbial Cell Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Sullivan, Claretta [Eastern Virginia Medical School; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    limitation on the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  15. MICROBIAL MATS - A JOINT VENTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANGEMERDEN, H

    Microbial mats characteristically are dominated by a few functional groups of microbes: cyanobacteria, colorless sulfur bacteria, purple sulfur bacteria, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Their combined metabolic activities result in steep environmental microgradients, particularly of oxygen and

  16. Seasonality in ocean microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Stephen J; Vergin, Kevin L

    2012-02-10

    Ocean warming occurs every year in seasonal cycles that can help us to understand long-term responses of plankton to climate change. Rhythmic seasonal patterns of microbial community turnover are revealed when high-resolution measurements of microbial plankton diversity are applied to samples collected in lengthy time series. Seasonal cycles in microbial plankton are complex, but the expansion of fixed ocean stations monitoring long-term change and the development of automated instrumentation are providing the time-series data needed to understand how these cycles vary across broad geographical scales. By accumulating data and using predictive modeling, we gain insights into changes that will occur as the ocean surface continues to warm and as the extent and duration of ocean stratification increase. These developments will enable marine scientists to predict changes in geochemical cycles mediated by microbial communities and to gauge their broader impacts.

  17. Microbial safety of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandekar, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in hygiene, consumer knowledge and food treatment and processing, food-borne diseases have become one of the most widespread public health problems in the world to-day. About two thirds of all outbreaks are traced to microbial contaminated food - one of the most hazardous being Clostridium botulinum, E. coli 0157: H7 and Salmonella. The pathogens can be introduced in the food products anywhere in the food chain and hence it is of prime important to have microbial vigilance in the entire food chain. WHO estimates that food-borne and water-borne diarrhoeal diseases taken together kill about 2.2 million people annually. The infants, children, elderly and immune-compromised people are particularly susceptible to food-borne diseases. Unsafe food causes many acute and life-long diseases, ranging from diarrhoeal diseases to various forms of cancer. A number of factors such as emergence of new food-borne pathogens, development of drug resistance in the pathogens, changing life style, global trade of food etc. are responsible for the continued persistence of food-borne diseases. Due to consumer demand, a number of Ready-To-Eat (RTE) minimally processed foods are increasingly marketed. However, there is increased risk of food-borne diseases with these products. The food-borne disease outbreaks due to E. coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella and Campylobacter are responsible for recall of many foods resulting in heavy losses to food industry. The development of multi drug resistant pathogens due to indiscriminate use of antibiotics is also a major problem. Food Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre has been working on food-borne bacterial pathogens particularly Salmonella, Campylobacter, Vibrio and Aeromonas species, their prevalence in export quality seafood as well in foods sold in retail market such as poultry, fish, sprouts and salads. These pathogens from Indian foods have been characterized for the presence of virulence genes

  18. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  19. Contaminant immobilization via microbial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this study was to search the literature to identify biological techniques that could be applied to the restoration of contaminated groundwaters near uranium milling sites. Through bioremediation it was hypothesized that the hazardous heavy metals could be immobilized in a stable, low-solubility form, thereby halting their progress in the migrating groundwater. Three basic mechanisms were examined: reduction of heavy metals by microbially produced hydrogen sulfide; direct microbial mediated reduction; and biosorption

  20. Microbial genomes: Blueprints for life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Relman, David A.; Strauss, Evelyn

    2000-12-31

    Complete microbial genome sequences hold the promise of profound new insights into microbial pathogenesis, evolution, diagnostics, and therapeutics. From these insights will come a new foundation for understanding the evolution of single-celled life, as well as the evolution of more complex life forms. This report is an in-depth analysis of scientific issues that provides recommendations and will be widely disseminated to the scientific community, federal agencies, industry and the public.

  1. Chronic alcoholism and microbial keratitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ormerod, L. D.; Gomez, D. S.; Schanzlin, D. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    In a series of 227 consecutive, non-referred patients with microbial keratitis an analysis of the accumulated hospital records showed that one-third were associated with chronic alcoholism. The diagnosis of alcoholism was usually unsuspected on admission to hospital. The microbial pathogenesis in these patients was distinctive; coagulase-negative staphylococci, alpha- and beta-streptococci, moraxellae, enteric Gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infections were unusually prominent. Pseud...

  2. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  3. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.

    2000-01-01

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  4. Anaerobic microbial transformations of radioactive wastes in subsurface environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive wastes disposed of in subsurface environments contain a variety of radionuclides and organic compounds. Microorganisms play a major role in the transformation of organic and inorganic constituents of the waste and are partly responsible for the problems encountered at the waste disposal sites. These include microbial degradation of waste forms resulting in trench cover subsidence, migration of radionuclides, and production of radioactive gases such as 14 CO 2 , 14 CH 4 , HT, and CH 3 T. Microbial processes involved in solubilization, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are reviewed. Complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and heavy metals from the wastes. Microorganisms play a significant role in the transformation and cycling of tritium in the environment by (i) oxidation of tritium and tritiated methane under aerobic conditions and (ii) production of tritium and tritiated methane from wastes containing tritiated water and organic compounds under anaerobic conditions. 23 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  5. Microbial photosynthesis in the harnessing of solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirt, S J

    1982-01-01

    The shortage of fossil fuels restricts the world supply of reduced carbon compounds and energy sources. Biotechnology offers the most feasible route to renewing the supplies of reduced carbon compounds. This involves recycling of CO/sub 2/ through photosynthesis. Conventional agriculture has little or no potential for supplying biomass and its derivatives on sufficient scale to offer an alternative to the fossil fuels. The agricultural wastes, on the whole, are intractable to conversion into useful carbon and energy sources and in any case are not available in amounts to provide a significant alternative to the fossil fuels. In contrast, microbial photosynthesis, optimised in photobioreactors, has vast potential to provide organic matter on a scale to match the consumption of fossil fuels. The quantative study of microbial photosynthesis as a biotechnological route to biomass has been neglected. As a result there is a chaos of conflicting data on fundamental parameters, for example, the photosynthetic efficiency of biomass production. New photosynthetic biotechnology with fully controlled continuous-culture systems is providing unequivocal values for the parameters. For the scale-up of microbial photosynthesis a tubular-loop reactor is proposed. (Refs. 14).

  6. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  7. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  8. Microbial production of biovanillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Converti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review aims at providing an overview on the microbial production of vanillin, a new alternative method for the production of this important flavor of the food industry, which has the potential to become economically competitive in the next future. After a brief description of the applications of vanillin in different industrial sectors and of its physicochemical properties, we described the traditional ways of providing vanillin, specifically extraction and chemical synthesis (mainly oxidation and compared them with the new biotechnological options, i.e., biotransformations of caffeic acid, veratraldehyde and mainly ferulic acid. In the second part of the review, emphasis has been addressed to the factors most influencing the bioproduction of vanillin, specifically the age of inoculum, pH, temperature, type of co-substrate, as well as the inhibitory effects exerted either by excess substrate or product. The final part of the work summarized the downstream processes and the related unit operations involved in the recovery of vanillin from the bioconversion medium.

  9. Microbial production of biovanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converti, A; Aliakbarian, B; Domínguez, J M; Bustos Vázquez, G; Perego, P

    2010-07-01

    This review aims at providing an overview on the microbial production of vanillin, a new alternative method for the production of this important flavor of the food industry, which has the potential to become economically competitive in the next future. After a brief description of the applications of vanillin in different industrial sectors and of its physicochemical properties, we described the traditional ways of providing vanillin, specifically extraction and chemical synthesis (mainly oxidation) and compared them with the new biotechnological options, i.e., biotransformations of caffeic acid, veratraldehyde and mainly ferulic acid. In the second part of the review, emphasis has been addressed to the factors most influencing the bioproduction of vanillin, specifically the age of inoculum, pH, temperature, type of co-substrate, as well as the inhibitory effects exerted either by excess substrate or product. The final part of the work summarized the downstream processes and the related unit operations involved in the recovery of vanillin from the bioconversion medium.

  10. Microbial Propionic Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Axayacatl Gonzalez-Garcia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acid (propionate is a commercially valuable carboxylic acid produced through microbial fermentation. Propionic acid is mainly used in the food industry but has recently found applications in the cosmetic, plastics and pharmaceutical industries. Propionate can be produced via various metabolic pathways, which can be classified into three major groups: fermentative pathways, biosynthetic pathways, and amino acid catabolic pathways. The current review provides an in-depth description of the major metabolic routes for propionate production from an energy optimization perspective. Biological propionate production is limited by high downstream purification costs which can be addressed if the target yield, productivity and titre can be achieved. Genome shuffling combined with high throughput omics and metabolic engineering is providing new opportunities, and biological propionate production is likely to enter the market in the not so distant future. In order to realise the full potential of metabolic engineering and heterologous expression, however, a greater understanding of metabolic capabilities of the native producers, the fittest producers, is required.

  11. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, solar radiation and microbial activity on oceanic dimethylated sulfur cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Galí Tàpias, Martí

    2012-01-01

    The production and subsequent emission of volatile compounds is one of the numerous ways by which microbial plankton participate in the cycling of elements and influence the Earth's climate. Dimethylsulfide (DMS), produced by enzymatic decomposition of the algal intracellular compound dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), is the more abundant organic volatile in the upper ocean. Its global emission amounts ca. 28 Tg S per year, and represents the main biogenic source of sulfur to the troposphere...

  12. Microbial transformation of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Micro-organisms play a significant role in the transformation of the radioactive waste and waste forms disposed of at shallow-land burial sites. Microbial degradation products of organic wastes may influence the transport of buried radionuclides by leaching, solubilization, and formation of organoradionuclide complexes. The ability of indigenous microflora of the radioactive waste to degrade the organic compounds under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was examined. Leachate samples were extracted with methylene chloride and analysed for organic compounds by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In general, several of the organic compounds in the leachates were degraded under aerobic conditions. Addition of a nitrogen source increased the rate of decomposition. Under anaerobic conditions, the degradation of the organics was very slow, and changes in concentrations of several acidic compounds were observed. Several low-molecular-weight organic acids are formed by breakdown of complex organic materials and are further metabolized by micro-organisms; hence these compounds are in a dynamic state, being both synthesized and destroyed. Addition of a nitrogen source had only a slight effect on these degradation rates. Tributyl phosphate, a compound used in the extraction of metal ions from solutions of reactor products, was not degraded under anaerobic conditions. The formation of straight- and branched-chain aliphatic acids and their long residence time in an anaerobic environment could significantly affect the migration of radionuclides from the disposal sites. The chemical and biological stabilities of the synthetic chelating and decontamination agents and of naturally occurring and microbially synthesized radionuclide complexes are among the major factors determining the mobility of radionuclides from a burial environment into the biosphere. (author)

  13. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  14. Patterned ion exchange membranes for improved power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2014-12-01

    Power production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells (MRCs) can be limited by the internal resistance of the reverse electrodialysis stack. Typical MRC stacks use non-conductive spacers that block ion transport by the so-called spacer shadow effect. These spacers can be relatively thick compared to the membrane, and thus they increase internal stack resistance due to high solution (ohmic) resistance associated with a thick spacer. New types of patterned anion and cation exchange membranes were developed by casting membranes to create hemispherical protrusions on the membranes, enabling fluid flow between the membranes without the need for a non-conductive spacer. The use of the patterned membrane decreased the MRC stack resistance by ∼22 Ω, resulting in a 38% increase in power density from 2.50 ± 0.04 W m-2 (non-patterned membrane with a non-conductive spacer) to 3.44 ± 0.02 W m-2 (patterned membrane). The COD removal rate, coulombic efficiency, and energy efficiency of the MRC also increased using the patterned membranes compared to the non-patterned membranes. These results demonstrate that these patterned ion exchange membranes can be used to improve performance of an MRC. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The microbial community characteristics of ancient painted sculptures in Maijishan Grottoes, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yulong; Wu, Fasi; Wang, Wanfu; He, Dongpeng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Feng, Huyuan; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Guangxiu; An, Lizhe

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a culture-independent Illumina MiSeq sequencing strategy was applied to investigate the microbial communities colonizing the ancient painted sculptures of the Maijishan Grottoes, a famous World Cultural Heritage site listed by UNESCO in China. Four mixed samples were collected from Cave 4-4 of the Maijishan Grottoes, the so-called Upper Seven Buddha Pavilion, which was built during the Northern Zhou Dynasty (557-581AD). The 16/18S rRNA gene-based sequences revealed a rich bacterial diversity and a relatively low fungal abundance, including the bacterial groups Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and the fungal groups Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota. Among them, the bacteria genera of Pseudonocardia and Rubrobacter and unclassified fungi in the order of Capnodiales were dominant. The relative abundance of Pseudonocardia in the painted layer samples was higher than that in the dust sample, while Cyanobacteria dominated in the dust sample. Many of them have been discovered at other cultural heritage sites and associated with the biodeterioration of cultural relics. The presence and activity of these pioneering microorganisms may lead to an unexpected deterioration of the painted sculptures that are preserved in this heritage site. Thus, proper management strategies and potential risk monitoring should be used in the Maijishan Grottoes to improve the conservation of these precious painted sculptures.

  16. Degradation potential and microbial community structure of heavy oil-enriched microbial consortia from mangrove sediments in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacosa, Hernando P; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro

    2013-01-01

    Mangroves constitute valuable coastal resources that are vulnerable to oil pollution. One of the major processes to remove oil from contaminated mangrove sediment is microbial degradation. A study on heavy oil- and hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortia from mangrove sediments in Okinawa, Japan was performed to evaluate their capacity to biodegrade and their microbial community composition. Surface sediment samples were obtained from mangrove sites in Okinawa (Teima, Oura, and Okukubi) and enriched with heavy oil as the sole carbon and energy source. The results revealed that all enriched microbial consortia degraded more than 20% of heavy oil in 21 days. The K1 consortium from Okukubi site showed the most extensive degradative capacity after 7 and 21 days. All consortia degraded more than 50% of hexadecane but had little ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The consortia were dominated by Pseudomonas or Burkholderia. When incubated in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds, the active bacterial community shifted to favor the dominance of Pseudomonas. The K1 consortium was a superior degrader, demonstrating the highest ability to degrade aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds; it was even able to degrade heavy oil at a concentration of 15%(w/v). The dominance and turn-over of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia in the consortia suggest an important ecological role for and relationship between these two genera in the mangrove sediments of Okinawa.

  17. Continuous power generation and microbial community structure of the anode biofilms in a three-stage microbial fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyungmi; Okabe, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Urban and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    A mediator-less three-stage two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) system was developed and operated continuously for more than 1.5 years to evaluate continuous power generation while treating artificial wastewater containing glucose (10 mM) concurrently. A stable power density of 28 W/m3 was attained with an anode hydraulic retention time of 4.5 h and phosphate buffer as the cathode electrolyte. An overall dissolved organic carbon removal ratio was about 85%, and coulombic efficiency was about 46% in this MFC system. We also analyzed the microbial community structure of anode biofilms in each MFC. Since the environment in each MFC was different due to passing on the products to the next MFC in series, the microbial community structure was different accordingly. The anode biofilm in the first MFC consisted mainly of bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, identified as Aeromonas sp., while the Firmicutes dominated the anode biofilms in the second and third MFCs that were mainly fed with acetate. Cyclic voltammetric results supported the presence of a redox compound(s) associated with the anode biofilm matrix, rather than mobile (dissolved) forms, which could be responsible for the electron transfer to the anode. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the anode biofilms were comprised of morphologically different cells that were firmly attached on the anode surface and interconnected each other with anchor-like filamentous appendages, which might support the results of cyclic voltammetry. (orig.)

  18. [Characterization and microbial community shifts of rice strawdegrading microbial consortia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunfang; Ma, Shichun; Huang, Yan; Liu, Laiyan; Fan, Hui; Deng, Yu

    2016-12-04

    To study the relationship between microbial community and degradation rate of rice straw, we compared and analyzed cellulose-decomposing ability, microbial community structures and shifts of microbial consortia F1 and F2. We determined exoglucanase activity by 3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid colorimetry. We determined content of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin in rice straw by Van Soest method, and calculated degradation rates of rice straw by the weight changes before and after a 10-day incubation. We analyzed and compared the microbial communities and functional microbiology shifts by clone libraries, Miseq analysis and real time-PCR based on the 16S rRNA gene and cel48 genes. Total degradation rate, cellulose, and hemicellulose degradation rate of microbial consortia F1 were significantly higher than that of F2. The variation trend of exoglucanase activity in both microbial consortia F1 and F2 was consistent with that of cel48 gene copies. Microbial diversity of F1 was complex with aerobic bacteria as dominant species, whereas that of F2 was simple with a high proportion of anaerobic cellulose decomposing bacteria in the later stage of incubation. In the first 4 days, unclassified Bacillales and Bacillus were dominant in both F1 and F2. The dominant species and abundance became different after 4-day incubation, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were dominant phyla of F1 and F2, respectively. Although Petrimonas and Pusillimonas were common dominant species in F1 and F2, abundance of Petrimonas in F2 (38.30%) was significantly higher than that in F1 (9.47%), and the abundance of Clostridiales OPB54 in F2 increased to 14.85% after 8-day incubation. The abundance of cel48 gene related with cellulose degradation rate and exoglucanase activity, and cel48 gene has the potential as a molecular marker to monitor the process of cellulose degradation. Microbial community structure has a remarkable impact on the degradation efficiency of straw cellulose, and Petrimonas

  19. Diversity and Function of Microbial Community in Chinese Strong-Flavor Baijiu Ecosystem: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Strong flavor baijiu (SFB, also called Luzhou-flavor liquor, is the most popular Chinese baijiu. It is manufactured via solid fermentation, with daqu as the starter. Microbial diversity of the SFB ecosystem and the synergistic effects of the enzymes and compounds produced by them are responsible for the special flavor and mouthfeel of SFB. The present review covers research studies focused on microbial community analysis of the SFB ecosystem, including the culturable microorganisms, their metabolic functions, microbial community diversity and their interactions. The review specifically emphasizes on the most recently conducted culture-independent analysis of SFB microbial community diversity. Furthermore, the possible application of systems biology approaches for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of SFB production were also reviewed and prospected.

  20. Hydrodynamics of microbial filter feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Asadzadeh, Seyed Saeed; Dölger, Julia; Walther, Jens H; Kiørboe, Thomas; Andersen, Anders

    2017-08-29

    Microbial filter feeders are an important group of grazers, significant to the microbial loop, aquatic food webs, and biogeochemical cycling. Our understanding of microbial filter feeding is poor, and, importantly, it is unknown what force microbial filter feeders must generate to process adequate amounts of water. Also, the trade-off in the filter spacing remains unexplored, despite its simple formulation: A filter too coarse will allow suitably sized prey to pass unintercepted, whereas a filter too fine will cause strong flow resistance. We quantify the feeding flow of the filter-feeding choanoflagellate Diaphanoeca grandis using particle tracking, and demonstrate that the current understanding of microbial filter feeding is inconsistent with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and analytical estimates. Both approaches underestimate observed filtration rates by more than an order of magnitude; the beating flagellum is simply unable to draw enough water through the fine filter. We find similar discrepancies for other choanoflagellate species, highlighting an apparent paradox. Our observations motivate us to suggest a radically different filtration mechanism that requires a flagellar vane (sheet), something notoriously difficult to visualize but sporadically observed in the related choanocytes (sponges). A CFD model with a flagellar vane correctly predicts the filtration rate of D. grandis , and using a simple model we can account for the filtration rates of other microbial filter feeders. We finally predict how optimum filter mesh size increases with cell size in microbial filter feeders, a prediction that accords very well with observations. We expect our results to be of significance for small-scale biophysics and trait-based ecological modeling.

  1. Microbial transformation of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1980-06-01

    Microorganisms play a significant role in the transformation of the radioactive waste and waste forms disposed of at shallow-land burial sites. Microbial degradation products of organic wastes may influence the transport of buried radionuclides by leaching, solubilization, and formation of organoradionuclide complexes. The ability of indigenous microflora of the radioactive waste to degrade the organic compounds under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was examined. Leachate samples were extracted with methylene chloried and analyzed for organic compounds by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In general, several of the organic compounds in the leachates were degraded under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, the degradation of the organics was very slow, and changes in concentrations of several acidic compounds were observed. Several low-molecular-weight organic acids are formed by breakdown of complex organic materials and are further metabolized by microorganisms; hence these compounds are in a dynamic state, being both synthesized and destroyed. Tributyl phosphate, a compound used in the extraction of metal ions from solutions of reactor products, was not degraded under anaerobic conditions

  2. The antiSMASH database, a comprehensive database of microbial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blin, Kai; Medema, Marnix H.; Kottmann, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms are the main source of bioactive compounds that are in use as antimicrobial and anticancer drugs, fungicides, herbicides and pesticides. In the last decade, the increasing availability of microbial genomes has established genome mining as a very...

  3. Volatile-mediated suppression of plant pathogens is related to soil properties and microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Agtmaal, M.; Straathof, A.L.; Termorshuizen, Aad J; Lievens, Bart; Hoffland, Ellis; De Boer, W.

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the soil microbial community produces a suite of volatile organic compounds that suppress plant pathogens. However, it remains unknown which soil properties and management practices influence volatile-mediated pathogen suppression. The aim of this study was to

  4. Volatile-mediated suppression of plant pathogens is related to soil properties and microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agtmaal, van Maaike; Straathof, Angela L.; Termorshuizen, Aad; Lievens, Bart; Hoffland, Ellis; Boer, de Wietse

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the soil microbial community produces a suite of volatile organic compounds that suppress plant pathogens. However, it remains unknown which soil properties and management practices influence volatile-mediated pathogen suppression. The aim of this study was to

  5. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: “Omic” Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla Munguia-Fragozo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the “Omic” technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS. However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. “Omic” technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current “Omic” tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems.

  6. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: “Omic” Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V.; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F.; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the “Omic” technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. “Omic” technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current “Omic” tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems. PMID:26509157

  7. Linking phylogenetic and functional diversity to nutrient spiraling in microbial mats from Lower Kane Cave (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Annette Summers; Meisinger, Daniela B; Porter, Megan L; Payn, Robert A; Schmid, Michael; Stern, Libby A; Schleifer, K H; Lee, Natuschka M

    2010-01-01

    Microbial mats in sulfidic cave streams offer unique opportunities to study redox-based biogeochemical nutrient cycles. Previous work from Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, USA, focused on the aerobic portion of microbial mats, dominated by putative chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing groups within the Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. To evaluate nutrient cycling and turnover within the whole mat system, a multidisciplinary strategy was used to characterize the anaerobic portion of the mats, including application of the full-cycle rRNA approach, the most probable number method, and geochemical and isotopic analyses. Seventeen major taxonomic bacterial groups and one archaeal group were retrieved from the anaerobic portions of the mats, dominated by Deltaproteobacteria and uncultured members of the Chloroflexi phylum. A nutrient spiraling model was applied to evaluate upstream to downstream changes in microbial diversity based on carbon and sulfur nutrient concentrations. Variability in dissolved sulfide concentrations was attributed to changes in the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing microbial groups and shifts in the occurrence and abundance of sulfate-reducing microbes. Gradients in carbon and sulfur isotopic composition indicated that released and recycled byproduct compounds from upstream microbial activities were incorporated by downstream communities. On the basis of the type of available chemical energy, the variability of nutrient species in a spiraling model may explain observed differences in microbial taxonomic affiliations and metabolic functions, thereby spatially linking microbial diversity to nutrient spiraling in the cave stream ecosystem.

  8. The importance of anabolism in microbial control over soil carbon storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chao; Schimel, Joshua P.; Jastrow, Julie D.

    2017-07-25

    Studies of the decomposition, transformation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) have dramatically increased in recent years owing to growing interest in studying the global carbon (C) cycle as it pertains to climate change. While it is readily accepted that the magnitude of the organic C reservoir in soils depends upon microbial involvement, as soil C dynamics are ultimately the consequence of microbial growth and activity, it remains largely unknown how these microorganism-mediated processes lead to soil C stabilization. Here, we define two pathways—ex vivo modification and in vivo turnover—which jointly explain soil C dynamics driven by microbial catabolism and/or anabolism. Accordingly, we use the conceptual framework of the soil ‘microbial carbon pump’ (MCP) to demonstrate how microorganisms are an active player in soil C storage. The MCP couples microbial production of a set of organic compounds to their further stabilization, which we define as the entombing effect. This integration captures the cumulative long-term legacy of microbial assimilation on SOM formation, with mechanisms (whether via physical protection or a lack of activation energy due to chemical composition) that ultimately enable the entombment of microbial-derived C in soils. We propose a need for increased efforts and seek to inspire new studies that utilize the soil MCP as a conceptual guideline for improving mechanistic understandings of the contributions of soil C dynamics to the responses of the terrestrial C cycle under global change.

  9. Microbial biomass and activity in subsurface sediments from Vejen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Winding, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Subsurface sediment samples were collected from 4 to 31 m below landsurface in glacio-fluvial sediments from the Quaternary period. The samples were described in terms of pH, electrical conductivity, chloride concentration, organic matter content, and grain size distribution. Viable counts...... for mineralization of 14C-labelled compounds varied from 0.2 to 2.3 × 10−3 ml/(dpm · day) for acetate, and from 0 to 2.0 × 10−3 ml/(dpm · day) for phenol. Sediment texture influenced the total number of bacteria and potential for mineralization; with increasing content of clay and silt and decreasing content of sand...... a single abiotic parameter that could explain the variation of size and activity of the microbial population. The microbial data obtained in these geologically young sediments were compared to literature data from older sediments, and this comparison showed that age and type of geological formation might...

  10. Metabolic engineering of microbial competitive advantage for industrial fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A Joe; Lam, Felix H; Hamilton, Maureen; Consiglio, Andrew; MacEwen, Kyle; Brevnova, Elena E; Greenhagen, Emily; LaTouf, W Greg; South, Colin R; van Dijken, Hans; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-08-05

    Microbial contamination is an obstacle to widespread production of advanced biofuels and chemicals. Current practices such as process sterilization or antibiotic dosage carry excess costs or encourage the development of antibiotic resistance. We engineered Escherichia coli to assimilate melamine, a xenobiotic compound containing nitrogen. After adaptive laboratory evolution to improve pathway efficiency, the engineered strain rapidly outcompeted a control strain when melamine was supplied as the nitrogen source. We additionally engineered the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica to assimilate nitrogen from cyanamide and phosphorus from potassium phosphite, and they outcompeted contaminating strains in several low-cost feedstocks. Supplying essential growth nutrients through xenobiotic or ecologically rare chemicals provides microbial competitive advantage with minimal external risks, given that engineered biocatalysts only have improved fitness within the customized fermentation environment. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Carbon input increases microbial nitrogen demand, but not microbial nitrogen mining in boreal forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Alaei, Saeed; Bengtson, Per; Bodé, Samuel; Boeckx, Pascal; Schnecker, Jörg; Mayerhofer, Werner; Rütting, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Plant primary production at mid and high latitudes is often limited by low soil N availability. It has been hypothesized that plants can indirectly increase soil N availability via root exudation, i.e., via the release of easily degradable organic compounds such as sugars into the soil. These compounds can stimulate microbial activity and extracellular enzyme synthesis, and thus promote soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition ("priming effect"). Even more, increased C availability in the rhizosphere might specifically stimulate the synthesis of enzymes targeting N-rich polymers such as proteins that store most of the soil N, but are too large for immediate uptake ("N mining"). This effect might be particularly important in boreal forests, where plants often maintain high primary production in spite of low soil N availability. We here tested the hypothesis that increased C availability promotes protein depolymerization, and thus soil N availability. In a laboratory incubation experiment, we added 13C-labeled glucose to a range of soil samples derived from boreal forests across Sweden, and monitored the release of CO2 by C mineralization, distinguishing between CO2 from the added glucose and from the native, unlabeled soil organic C (SOC). Using a set of 15N pool dilution assays, we further measured gross rates of protein depolymerization (the breakdown of proteins into amino acids) and N mineralization (the microbial release of excess N as ammonium). Comparing unamended control samples, we found a high variability in C and N mineralization rates, even when normalized by SOC content. Both C and N mineralization were significantly correlated to SOM C/N ratios, with high C mineralization at high C/N and high N mineralization at low C/N, suggesting that microorganisms adjusted C and N mineralization rates to the C/N ratio of their substrate and released C or N that was in excess. The addition of glucose significantly stimulated the mineralization of native SOC in soils

  12. High-up: a remote reservoir of microbial extremophiles at Central Andean Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Helena Albarracín

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Central Andes region displays unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes and salt flats at mean altitudes of 3,700 m. Being isolated and hostile, these so-called High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL are pristine and have been exposed to little human influence. HAAL proved to be a rich source of microbes showing interesting adaptations to life in extreme settings (poly-extremophiles such as alkalinity, high concentrations of arsenic and dissolved salts, intense dryness, large daily ambient thermal amplitude, and extreme solar radiation levels. This work reviews HAAL microbiodiversity, taking into account different microbial niches, such as plankton, benthos, microbial mats and microbialites. The modern stromatolites and other microbialites discovered recently at HAAL are highlighted, as they provide unique modern -though quite imperfect- analogues of environments proxy for an earlier time in Earth’s history (volcanic setting and profuse hydrothermal activity, low atmospheric O2 pressure, thin ozone layer and high UV exposure. Likewise, we stress the importance of HAAL microbes as model poly-extremophiles in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying their resistance ability against UV and toxic or deleterious chemicals using genome mining and functional genomics. In future research directions, it will be necessary to exploit the full potential of HAAL poly-extremophiles in terms of their biotechnological applications. Current projects heading this way have yielded detailed molecular information and functional proof on novel extremoenzymes: i.e. DNA repair enzymes and arsenic efflux pumps for which medical and bioremediation applications, respectively, are envisaged. But still, much effort is required to unravel novel functions for this and other molecules that dwell in a unique biological treasure despite its being hidden high up, in the remote Andes.

  13. Effect of inclusion of different levels of silage on rumen microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers fed on rice straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Truong Giang Nguyen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Leucaena leucocephala (Leucaena is a perennial tropical legume that can be directly grazed or harvested and offered to ruminants as hay, silage, or fresh. However, Leucaena contain phenolic compounds, which are considered anti-nutritional factors as these may reduce intake, digestibility and thus animal performance. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to determine effects of Leucaena silage (LS feeding levels on rumen microbial populations, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis in dairy steers. Methods Four, rumen fistulated dairy steers with initial weight of 167±12 kg were randomly assigned to receive dietary treatments according to a 4×4 Latin square design. Treatments were as followings: T1 = untreated rice straw (RS; Control, T2 = 70% RS+30% LS, T3 = 40% RS+60% LS, and T4 = 100% LS. Dairy steers were fed rice straw and LS ad libitum and supplemented with concentrate at 0.2% of body weight/d. Results Results revealed that the rumen microbial population, especially cellulolytic, proteolytic bacteria and fungal zoospores were enhanced in steers that received 60% of LS (p0.05. Protozoal population was linearly decreased with increasing level of LS (p<0.05. Moreover, N-balance and microbial protein synthesis were enhanced by LS feeding (p<0.05 and were the highest in 60% LS group. Conclusion Based on this study, it could be concluded that replacement of RS with 60% LS significantly improved microbial population and microbial protein synthesis in diary steers.

  14. Influences of dissolved oxygen concentration on biocathodic microbial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Cristiani, Pierangela; Villa, Federica; Zecchin, Sarah; Colombo, Alessandra; Cavalca, Lucia; Schievano, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) at cathodic interface is a critical factor influencing microbial fuel cells (MFC) performance. In this work, three MFCs were operated with cathode under different DO conditions: i) air-breathing (A-MFC); ii) water-submerged (W-MFC) and iii) assisted by photosynthetic microorganisms (P-MFC). A plateau of maximum current was reached at 1.06±0.03mA, 1.48±0.06mA and 1.66±0.04mA, increasing respectively for W-MFC, P-MFC and A-MFC. Electrochemical and microbiological tools (Illumina sequencing, confocal microscopy and biofilm cryosectioning) were used to explore anodic and cathodic biofilm in each MFC type. In all cases, biocathodes improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared to abiotic condition and A-MFC was the best performing system. Photosynthetic cultures in the cathodic chamber supplied high DO level, up to 16mg O2 L -1 , which sustained aerobic microbial community in P-MFC biocathode. Halomonas, Pseudomonas and other microaerophilic genera reached >50% of the total OTUs. The presence of sulfur reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonas) and purple non-sulfur bacteria in A-MFC biocathode suggested that the recirculation of sulfur compounds could shuttle electrons to sustain the reduction of oxygen as final electron acceptor. The low DO concentration limited the cathode in W-MFC. A model of two different possible microbial mechanisms is proposed which can drive predominantly cathodic ORR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Colorful Microbial Cell Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pia Damm

    Yeast cell factories are powerful tools used for the production of high-value natural compounds otherwise not easily available. Many bioactive and industrially important plant secondary metabolites can be produced in yeast by engineering their biosynthetic pathways into yeast cells, as these both...... anthocyanins. Yeast cell factories present a platform to circumvent the problem of low yields of interesting molecular structures in plant tissues, as hand-picking of desired enzyme activities allows for specific biosynthesis of the precise pigment of interest, as well as choosing more stable structures...... for heterologous biosynthesis is possible. In cell factories, great improvements in yields can be achieved through molecular engineering of flux from endogenous yeast precursors, e.g. by elimination of by-product formation, and by genetic optimization of pathway components, such as fine-tuning of expression levels...

  16. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS IN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown literature and own experimental data concerning the use of microbial surface active glycolipids (rhamno-, sophoro- and trehalose lipids and lipopeptides for water and soil purification from oil and other hydrocarbons, removing toxic heavy metals (Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, degradation of complex pollution (oil and other hydrocarbons with heavy metals, and the role of microbial surfactants in phytoremediation processes. The factors that limit the use of microbial surfactants in environmental technologies are discussed. Thus, at certain concentrations biosurfactant can exhibit antimicrobial properties and inhibit microorganisms destructing xenobiotics. Microbial biodegradability of surfactants may also reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation. Development of effective technologies using microbial surfactants should include the following steps: monitoring of contaminated sites to determine the nature of pollution and analysis of the autochthonous microbiota; determining the mode of surfactant introduction (exogenous addition of stimulation of surfactant synthesis by autochthonous microbiota; establishing an optimal concentration of surfactant to prevent exhibition of antimicrobial properties and rapid biodegradation; research both in laboratory and field conditions.

  17. Compounding around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding is universal in its prevalence. Variations in disease patterns, culture, and tradition; the role of government in health care; and the availability of essential equipment and required agents shape a compounding profile unique to each country worldwide. In the following reflections, pharmacists form Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Germany, Puerto Rico, Spain, and the United States describe their experiences in the compounding setting unique to their practice and their nation. The unifying theme in their comments is the dedication of each contributor to enabling recovery and ensuring the good health of his or her clients.

  18. Environmental controls on microbial communities in continental serpentinite fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melitza eCrespo-Medina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical reactions associated with serpentinization alter the composition of dissolved organic compounds in circulating fluids and potentially liberate mantle-derived carbon and reducing power to support subsurface microbial communities. Previous studies have identified Betaproteobacteria from the order Burkholderiales and bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentinite–hosted microbiome, however there is limited knowledge of their metabolic capabilities or growth characteristics. In an effort to better characterize microbial communities, their metabolism, and factors limiting their activities, microcosm experiments were designed with fluids collected from several monitoring wells at the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO in northern California during expeditions in March and August 2013. The incubations were initiated with a hydrogen atmosphere and a variety of carbon sources (carbon dioxide, methane, acetate and formate, with and without the addition of nutrients and electron acceptors. Growth was monitored by direct microscopic counts; DNA yield and community composition was assessed at the end of the three month incubation. For the most part, results indicate that bacterial growth was favored by the addition of acetate and methane, and that the addition of nutrients and electron acceptors had no significant effect on microbial growth, suggesting no nutrient- or oxidant-limitation. However the addition of sulfur amendments led to different community compositions. The dominant organisms at the end of the incubations were closely related to Dethiobacter sp. and to the family Comamonadaceae, which are also prominent in culture-independent gene sequencing surveys. These experiments provide one of first insights into the biogeochemical dynamics of the serpentinite subsurface environment and will facilitate experiments to trace microbial activities in serpentinizing ecosystems.

  19. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  1. MEA 86 Compound data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data file contains the full raw parameter data for the 86 compounds tested in the developmental MEA assay, as well as Area Under the Curve (AUC) calculations...

  2. What is microbial community ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-11-01

    The activities of complex communities of microbes affect biogeochemical transformations in natural, managed and engineered ecosystems. Meaningfully defining what constitutes a community of interacting microbial populations is not trivial, but is important for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include the analysis of functional pathways for nutrient resource and energy flows, mechanistic understanding of interactions between microbial populations and their environment, and the emergent properties of the complex community. Some emergent properties mirror those analyzed by community ecologists who study plants and animals: biological diversity, functional redundancy and system stability. However, because microbes possess mechanisms for the horizontal transfer of genetic information, the metagenome may also be considered as a community property.

  3. Microbial processes in coastal pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capone, D.G.; Bauer, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors describe the nature and range of some of the interactions that can occur between the microbiota and environmental contaminants in coastal areas. The implications of such interactions are also discussed. Pollutant types include inorganic nutrients, heavy metals, bulk organics, organic contaminants, pathogenic microorganisms and microbial pollutants. Both the effects of pollutants such as petroleum hydrocarbons on natural microbial populations and the mitigation of contaminant effects by complexation and biodegradation are considered. Finally, several areas of emerging concerns are presented that involve a confluence of biogeochemistry, microbial ecology and applied and public health microbiology. These concerns range in relevance from local/regional to oceanic/global scales. 308 ref

  4. Unlock your Compound Management

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen Eller

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical industry faces the increased demand for innovative medicines against various diseases. In this regard, the compound library in pharmaceutical industry is the most valuable asset. However, the compound distribution from the library into the screening plates is often still done manually and binds highly qualified resources to very time-consuming, tedious and error-prone tasks. To overcome these challenges, Chemspeed launched the first automated true one-to-one gravimetric "pi...

  5. Effects of Microbial Transglutaminase on Physicochemical, Microbial and Sensorial Properties of Kefir Produced by Using Mixture Cow's and Soymilk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Hasan; Dağyıldız, Kübra

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects microbial transglutaminase (m-TGs) on the physicochemical, microbial and sensory properties of kefir produced by using mix cow and soymilk. Kefir batches were prepared using 0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 Units m-TGs for per g of milk protein. Adding m-TGs to milk caused an increase in the pH and viscosity and caused a decrease in titratable acidity and syneresis in the kefir samples. Total bacteria, lactobacilli and streptococci counts decreased, while yeast counts increased in all the samples during storage. Alcohols and acids compounds have increased in all the samples except in the control samples, while carbonyl compounds have decreased in all the samples during storage (1-30 d). The differences in the percentage of alcohols, carbonyl compounds and acids in total volatiles on the 1st and the 30th d of storage were observed at 8.47-23.52%, 6.94-25.46% and 59.64-63.69%, respectively. The consumer evaluation of the kefir samples showed that greater levels of acceptability were found for samples which had been added 1.5 U m-TGs for per g of milk protein.

  6. Do microbial exudates control EH electrode measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelova, E.; Parsons, C. T.; Smeaton, C. M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2017-12-01

    Redox electrodes are widely used as simple, inexpensive monitoring devices to rapidly measure redox potentials (EH) of waterlogged soils, sediments, and aquifers. While a variety of physicochemical and biogeochemical factors have been involved to explain measured EH values, the role of microorganisms remains comparatively understudied and uncertain. Besides catalyzing many inorganic redox reactions (e.g., nitrate reduction), microorganisms produce a variety of redox-active organic compounds (e.g., NAD+/NADH, GSSG/2GSH, FAD/FADH2), which can be released into the surrounding environment via active secretion, passive diffusion, or cell lysis. To isolate different microbial effects on EH measurements, we performed batch experiments using S. oneidensis MR-I as a model heterotrophic microorganism and flavins as example microbial exudates [1]. We monitored EH and pH along with flavin production (fluorescence measurements) during dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Dissolved flavins increased to 0.2 mM (riboflavin equivalent) under anoxic conditions during complete consumption of 1 mM nitrate by DNRA at pH 7.4 and 30 °C over 80 hours. The observed redox cascade from +255 to -250 mV did not follow the EH predicted for the reduction of NO3- to NO2- and NO2- to NH4+ by the Nernst equation. However, a set of separate abiotic experiments on the photoreduction of synthetic flavins (LMC, RF, FMN, and FAD, Sigma Aldrich) under the same conditions indicated that measured EH values are buffered at +270 ± 20 mV and -230 ± 50 mV when oxidized and reduced flavin species dominate, respectively. Moreover, based on the temporal changes in EH, we speculate that NO3- reduction by S. oneidensis consumes reduced flavins (i.e., NO3- accepts electrons from reduced flavins) and generates oxidized flavins, thus buffering EH at +255 mV. By contrast, NO2- reduction to NH4+ is independent of flavin speciation, which leads to the accumulation of reduced flavins in the solution and

  7. Soil microbial activities and its relationship with soil chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fields assessed are organically managed Soils (OMS), Inorganically Managed Soils (IMS) and an Uncultivated Land having grass coverage (ULS). Soil Microbial Respiration (SMR), Microbial Biomass Carbon (MBC), Microbial Biomass Nitrogen (MBN) and Microbial Biomass Phosphorus (MBP) were analyzed.

  8. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  9. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Growing awareness of heterogeneity in cells of microbial populations has emphasized the importance of advanced microscopy for visualization and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell variation. In this review, we highlight some of the recent advances in confocal...... microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  10. Systems biology of Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navid, A; Ghim, C; Fenley, A; Yoon, S; Lee, S; Almaas, E

    2008-04-11

    Microbes exist naturally in a wide range of environments, spanning the extremes of high acidity and high temperature to soil and the ocean, in communities where their interactions are significant. We present a practical discussion of three different approaches for modeling microbial communities: rate equations, individual-based modeling, and population dynamics. We illustrate the approaches with detailed examples. Each approach is best fit to different levels of system representation, and they have different needs for detailed biological input. Thus, this set of approaches is able to address the operation and function of microbial communities on a wide range of organizational levels.

  11. Microbial Heat Recovery Cell (MHRC) System Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-01

    This factsheet describes a project that aimed to develop a microbial heat recovery cell (MHRC) system that combines a microbial reverse electrodialysis technology with waste heat recovery to convert industrial effluents into electricity and hydrogen.

  12. Microbial quality of a marine tidal pool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the source of microbial pollution to a tidal pool was investigated. Both adjacent seawater which could contribute to possible faecal pollution and potential direct bather pollution were studied. The microbial quality of the marine...

  13. Marine Microbial Systems Ecology: Microbial Networks in the Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijzer, G.; Stal, L.J.; Cretoiu, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of DNA has revolutionized microbial ecology. Using this technology, it became for the first time possible to analyze hundreds of samples simultaneously and in great detail. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, metagenomics and metatranscriptomics became available to determine the

  14. Microbial stratification and microbially catalyzed processes along a hypersaline chemocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, A.; Joye, S. B.; Teske, A.

    2017-12-01

    Orca Basin is the largest deep hypersaline anoxic basin in the world, covering over 400 km2. Located at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico, this body of water reaches depths of 200 meters and is 8 times denser (and more saline) than the overlying seawater. The sharp pycnocline prevents any significant vertical mixing and serves as a particle trap for sinking organic matter. These rapid changes in salinity, oxygen, organic matter, and other geochemical parameters present unique conditions for the microbial communities present. We collected samples in 10m intervals throughout the chemocline. After filtering the water, we used high-throughput bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize the changing microbial community along the Orca Basin chemocline. The results reveal a dominance of microbial taxa whose biogeochemical function is entirely unknown. We then used metagenomic sequencing and reconstructed genomes for select samples, revealing the potential dominant metabolic processes in the Orca Basin chemocline. Understanding how these unique geochemical conditions shape microbial communities and metabolic capabilities will have implications for the ocean's biogeochemical cycles and the consequences of expanding oxygen minimum zones.

  15. Antimicrobial compounds from Alpinia conchigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ahmad Nazif; Ibrahim, Halijah; Rosmy Syamsir, Devi; Mohtar, Mastura; Vejayan, Jaya; Awang, Khalijah

    2013-02-13

    The rhizome of Alpinia conchigerahas been used as a condiment in the northern states of Peninsular Malaysia and occasionally in folk medicine in the east coast to treat fungal infections. In some states of Peninsular Malaysia, the rhizomes are consumed as a post-partum medicine and the young shoots are prepared into a vegetable dish. This study aimed to investigate the chemical constituents of the pseudostems and rhizomes of Malaysian Alpinia conchigera and to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of the pseudostems, rhizomes and the isolated compounds against three selected fungi and five strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The dried and ground pseudostems (0.8kg) and rhizomes (1.0kg) were successively extracted in Soxhlet extractor using n-hexane, dichloromethane (DCM) and methanol. The n-hexane and DCM extracts of the pseudostem and rhizome were subjected to isolation and purification using column chromatography on silica gel using a stepwise gradient system (n-hexane to methanol). Briefly, a serial two fold dilutions of the test materials dissolved in DMSO were prepared prior to addition of 100μl overnight microbial suspension (108 cfu/ml) followed by incubation at 37°C (bacteria) or 26°C (dermatophytes and candida) for 24h. The highest concentration of DMSO remaining after dilution (5%, v/v) caused no inhibition to bacterial/candida/dermatophytes' growth. Antibiotic cycloheximide was used as reference for anticandidal and antidermatophyte comparison while oxacilin was used as reference for antibacterial testing. DMSO served as negative control. Turbidity was taken as indication of growth, thus the lowest concentration which remains clear after macroscopic evaluation was taken as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The isolation of n-hexane and DCM extracts of the rhizomes and pseudostems of Alpinia conchigera via column chromatography yielded two triterpenes isolated as a mixture of stigmasterol and

  16. Microbial and biochemical studies on phytase enzyme in some microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelbary, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed calcium and magnesium salts of phytic acid myoinositol hexa phosphoric acid are widely distributed in food stuffs of plant origin, they may bind essential proteins, phospholipids and microelements to form indigestible compounds. In this concern, destruction of phytic acid and its salts by different methods is very important, one of them is by using microbial phytase. This study aims to produce phytase enzyme from microorganisms and study the best conditions of production and purification and also the properties of the partially purified phytase. 22 figs., 29 tabs., 61 refs

  17. Microbial community structure elucidates performance of Glyceria maxima plant microbial fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.A.; Rothballer, M.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Engel, M.; Schulz, M.; Hartmann, A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    The plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) is a technology in which living plant roots provide electron donor, via rhizodeposition, to a mixed microbial community to generate electricity in a microbial fuel cell. Analysis and localisation of the microbial community is necessary for gaining insight into

  18. Dielectric measurements of magnetic monopoles on the spin-ice compounds (Ho/Dy){sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietsch, Manuel; Grams, Christoph P.; Welter, Jean-Francois; Cho, Victoria; Lorenz, Thomas; Hemberger, Joachim [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Cologne (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In so-called spin-ice compounds a frustrated ground-state with finite zero-point entropy is stabilized via competing interactions and emergent magnetic monopoles excitations. It was postulated that a magnetic monopole holds an electric dipole moment, which allows to investigate their dynamics via the dielectric function ε(ν). In Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} a critical speeding-up for frequencies up to 100 kHz was reported down to temperatures of 200 mK with a specific focus on the critical endpoint present for a [111] magnetic field. In Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} both faster relaxation dynamics compared to the sister-compound and an additional relaxation process are suspected. Here we report on broadband dielectric spectroscopy measurements of ε(ν) in Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

  19. Low-temperature synthesis of the infinite-layer compound LaNiO2 by soft-chemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Tomohisa; Kato, Masatsune; Noji, Takashi; Koike, Yoji

    2010-01-01

    Bulk samples of LaNiO 2 with the so-called infinite-layer structure have successfully been synthesized. First, polycrystalline samples of LaNiO 3 with the perovskite structure were prepared using molten KOH at a temperature of 400-450degC. Then, they were finely ground with a double stoichiometric excess of reductant CaH 2 and sealed in an evacuated Pyrex tube. The sealed ampoule was then heated at 300degC for 24 h. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis has revealed that the product obtained after removing the residual CaH 2 and the byproduct CaO is of almost single phase with tetragonal symmetry, indicating the formation of the infinite-layer compound LaNiO 2 . (author)

  20. Microbial bio-fuels: a solution to carbon emissions and energy crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Kaushal, Sumit; Saraf, Shubhini A; Singh, Jay Shankar

    2018-06-01

    Increasing energy demand, limited fossil fuel resources and climate change have prompted development of alternative sustainable and economical fuel resources such as crop-based bio-ethanol and bio-diesel. However, there is concern over use of arable land that is used for food agriculture for creation of biofuel. Thus, there is a renewed interest in the use of microbes particularly microalgae for bio-fuel production. Microbes such as micro-algae and cyanobacteria that are used for biofuel production also produce other bioactive compounds under stressed conditions. Microbial agents used for biofuel production also produce bioactive compounds with antimicrobial, antiviral, anticoagulant, antioxidant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Because of importance of such high-value compounds in aquaculture and bioremediation, and the potential to reduce carbon emissions and energy security, the biofuels produced by microbial biotechnology might substitute the crop-based bio-ethanol and bio-diesel production.

  1. Microbial incorporation of nitrogen in stream detritus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane M. Sanzone; Jennifer L. Tank; Judy L. Meyer; Patrick J. Mulholland; Stuart E.G. Findlay

    2001-01-01

    We adapted the chloroform fumigation method to determine microbial nitrogen (N) and microbial incorporation of 15N on three common substrates [leaves, wood and fine benthic organic matter (FBOM)] in three forest streams. We compared microbial N and 15 content of samples collected during a 6-week15N-NH...

  2. Microbially produced phytotoxins and plant disease management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays, these evaluation techniques are becoming an important complement to classical breeding methods. The knowledge of the inactivation of microbial toxins has led to the use of microbial enzymes to inactivate phytotoxins thereby reducing incidence and severity of disease induced by microbial toxins. Considering ...

  3. Molecular characterization of organic matter mobilized from Bangladeshi aquifer sediment: tracking carbon compositional change during microbial utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Pracht

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer recharge waters and sediments can fuel microbial reactions with implications for groundwater quality. A previous incubation experiment showed that sedimentary organic carbon (SOC mobilized off sandy sediment collected from an arsenic-contaminated and methanogenic aquifer in Bangladesh was bioavailable; it was transformed into methane. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to molecularly characterize this mobilized SOC, reference its composition against dissolved organic carbon (DOC in surface recharge water, track compositional changes during incubation, and advance understanding of microbial processing of organic carbon in anaerobic environments. Organic carbon mobilized off aquifer sediment was more diverse, proportionately larger, more aromatic, and more oxidized than DOC in surface recharge. Mobilized SOC was predominately composed of terrestrially derived organic matter and had characteristics signifying that it evaded microbial processing within the aquifer. Approximately 50 % of identified compounds in mobilized SOC and in DOC from surface recharge water contained sulfur. During incubation, after mobilized SOC was converted into methane, new organosulfur compounds with high S-to-C ratios and a high nominal oxidation state of carbon (NOSC were detected. We reason that these detected compounds formed abiotically following microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, which could have occurred during incubation but was not directly measured or that they were microbially synthesized. Most notably, microbes transformed all carbon types during incubation, including those currently considered thermodynamically unviable for microbes to degrade in anaerobic conditions (i.e., those with a low NOSC. In anaerobic environments, energy yields from redox reactions are small and the amount of energy required to remove electrons from highly reduced carbon substrates during oxidation decreases the thermodynamic

  4. Molecular characterization of organic matter mobilized from Bangladeshi aquifer sediment: tracking carbon compositional change during microbial utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracht, Lara E.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Ardissono, Robert J.; Neumann, Rebecca B.

    2018-03-01

    Bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer recharge waters and sediments can fuel microbial reactions with implications for groundwater quality. A previous incubation experiment showed that sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) mobilized off sandy sediment collected from an arsenic-contaminated and methanogenic aquifer in Bangladesh was bioavailable; it was transformed into methane. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to molecularly characterize this mobilized SOC, reference its composition against dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface recharge water, track compositional changes during incubation, and advance understanding of microbial processing of organic carbon in anaerobic environments. Organic carbon mobilized off aquifer sediment was more diverse, proportionately larger, more aromatic, and more oxidized than DOC in surface recharge. Mobilized SOC was predominately composed of terrestrially derived organic matter and had characteristics signifying that it evaded microbial processing within the aquifer. Approximately 50 % of identified compounds in mobilized SOC and in DOC from surface recharge water contained sulfur. During incubation, after mobilized SOC was converted into methane, new organosulfur compounds with high S-to-C ratios and a high nominal oxidation state of carbon (NOSC) were detected. We reason that these detected compounds formed abiotically following microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, which could have occurred during incubation but was not directly measured or that they were microbially synthesized. Most notably, microbes transformed all carbon types during incubation, including those currently considered thermodynamically unviable for microbes to degrade in anaerobic conditions (i.e., those with a low NOSC). In anaerobic environments, energy yields from redox reactions are small and the amount of energy required to remove electrons from highly reduced carbon substrates during oxidation decreases the thermodynamic favorability of

  5. Microbial communities in blueberry soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial communities thrive in the soil of the plant root zone and it is clear that these communities play a role in plant health. Although blueberry fields can be productive for decades, yields are sometimes below expectations and fields that are replanted sometimes underperform and/or take too lo...

  6. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  7. Antimutagenesis in microbial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, C.H.; Shankel, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    There is shown to be a clear need to repeat several studies employing mutations involving known types of base-pair changes. It will be of obvious advantage in some instances to test for antimutagenic effects of chemicals in pairs of strains having and lacking a single well-defined repair function. The extension of antimutagenesis studies from phage and bacterial systems into eukaryotic systems is already taking place. Caution is also necessary in interpreting the antimutagenic effects of radiation-sensitive mutations. Reduction or abolition of mutability in a radiation-sensitive strain need not imply that an error-prone repair gene function is directly implicated in mutagenesis. Known antimutagens are, like known mutagens, so chemically diverse that a search for new types cannot logically be confined only to a few classes of compounds. If naturally occurring antimutagens are one of the normal regulators of spontaneous and induced mutation frequencies, then one might expect to be able to test this hypothesis by a biochemical analysis of some classes of mutators and mutagen hypermutable mutants. Mutators of several types are well known in several microorganisms, and uv hypermutable (hm) mutants have been described by Drake in phage T4, and 2-aminopurine hypermutable mutants have been isolated in E. coli B/r by Burr and Clarke (unpublished data). To date none of these has been investigated for, or shown to be lacking in, an endogenous antimutagen. It would be most useful if antimutagens should be found which strongly counteract the mutagenic activities of at least some environmental mutagens, particularly those having desirable pharmacological uses. Antimutagens have already been used, apparently successfully, as adjuvants in chemotherapy of patients in an attempt to reduce the frequency of occurrence of spontaneous antibiotic-resistant bacterial variants. They might also have some practical use in cancer chemotherapy or prevention. (U.S.)

  8. Balanço de compostos nitrogenados e produção de proteína microbiana em novilhas leiteiras alimentadas com palma forrageira, bagaço de cana-de-açúcar e uréia associados a diferentes suplementos Nitrogenous compounds balance and microbial protein production in crossbred heifers fed forage cactus, sugar cane bagasse and urea associated to different supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alexandre Silva Pessoa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da associação de palma forrageira ao bagaço de cana-de-açúcar e à uréia sobre o balanço de compostos nitrogenados e a produção de proteína microbiana em novilhas leiteiras recebendo ou não suplemento. Foram utilizadas 25 novilhas da raça Girolando, com peso vivo médio inicial de 227 kg, confinadas, distribuídas em delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso, estabelecidos de acordo com o peso dos animais. A ração controle (sem suplemento foi composta de 64,0% de palma forrageira, 30,0% de bagaço de cana-de-açúcar, 4,0% de mistura uréia:sulfato de amônio (9:1 e 2,0% de mistura mineral, com base na matéria seca (MS, e as rações experimentais, de 57,0% de palma forrageira, 26,0% de bagaço de cana-de-açúcar, 3,5% de mistura uréia:sulfato de amônio, 1,8% de mistura mineral e 11,7% de suplemento (0,5% do PV dos animais. Os suplementos testados foram: farelo de trigo, farelo de soja, farelo de algodão ou caroço de algodão. O balanço de nitrogênio não foi influenciado pelas dietas e apresentou valor médio de 49,3 g/dia. A suplementação com farelo de algodão ou com farelo de soja aumentou a excreção de nitrogênio na urina, a concentração de uréia e nitrogênio uréico no plasma e a excreção urinária de uréia e nitrogênio uréico. A associação da palma forrageira ao bagaço de cana-de-açúcar e à uréia, sem o uso de suplementos, permite eficiência de síntese microbiana de 105 gPBmic/kg de NDT consumido. A suplementação com caroço de algodão proporciona maior excreção urinária de alantoína e derivados de purina e melhor eficiência de síntese microbiana, portanto, é a mais indicada nestas condições.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of association of forage cactus to sugar cane bagasse and urea on nitrogenous compounds balance and microbial protein synthesis in milk heifers supplemented or not. Twenty-five Holstein-Gir crossbred heifers

  9. ANTI-MICROBIAL AND ANTI-AMOEBIC ACTIVITY SOME AZOMETHINES - POTENTIAL TEXTILE DYESTUFFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJORDJEVIC Dragan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new synthesized three azomethine derivatives applied in dyeing textiles checking the anti-microbial properties of active components, at the same time [1-3]. The emphasis is thrown on the verification of anti-microbial properties that are important for obtaining textile with significantly improved performance. All compounds were characterized and evaluated for their anti-microbial activity against 7 pathogenic bacteria, 1 parasitic protozoan and 1 fungus. It estimated anti-bacterial activity in vitro against the following microorganisms Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus faecalis, Enterobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, and Candida albicans. The anti-amoebic activity in vitro was evaluated against the HM1: IMSS strain of Entamoeba histolytica and the results were compared with the standard drug, metronidazole. The synthesized azomethines, showed very good substantivity for wool fibers, gave fine coloring, with good degree of exhaustion after dyeing. The combination of extended synthetic analogues of natural molecules leads to discovery of chemical entities which might be excellent anti-microbial and anti-amoebic compounds as depicted in our results. Being highly the effects this compound can be explored in future as an option for decreasing pathogenic potential of infecting from different sources. Azomethines containing hydrazone (dyestuff 1 and phenylhydrazone (dyestuff 2 as moiety show average yield and moderate inhibition activity while azomethines containing thiosemicarbazone (dyestuff 3 as moiety show higher yield and greater inhibition activity towards gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria as well as a fungus.

  10. The life sulfuric: microbial ecology of sulfur cycling in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Mußmann, Marc; Loy, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Almost the entire seafloor is covered with sediments that can be more than 10 000 m thick and represent a vast microbial ecosystem that is a major component of Earth's element and energy cycles. Notably, a significant proportion of microbial life in marine sediments can exploit energy conserved during transformations of sulfur compounds among different redox states. Sulfur cycling, which is primarily driven by sulfate reduction, is tightly interwoven with other important element cycles (carbon, nitrogen, iron, manganese) and therefore has profound implications for both cellular- and ecosystem-level processes. Sulfur-transforming microorganisms have evolved diverse genetic, metabolic, and in some cases, peculiar phenotypic features to fill an array of ecological niches in marine sediments. Here, we review recent and selected findings on the microbial guilds that are involved in the transformation of different sulfur compounds in marine sediments and emphasise how these are interlinked and have a major influence on ecology and biogeochemistry in the seafloor. Extraordinary discoveries have increased our knowledge on microbial sulfur cycling, mainly in sulfate-rich surface sediments, yet many questions remain regarding how sulfur redox processes may sustain the deep-subsurface biosphere and the impact of organic sulfur compounds on the marine sulfur cycle. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Fluorine-18 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijn, J.P. de

    1978-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis deals with the problems involved in the adaption of reactor-produced fluorine-18 to the synthesis of 18 F-labelled organic fluorine compounds. Several 18 F-labelling reagents were prepared and successfully applied. The limitations to the synthetic possibilities of reactor-produced fluoride- 18 become manifest in the last part of the thesis. An application to the synthesis of labelled aliphatic fluoro amino acids has appeared to be unsuccessful as yet, although some other synthetic approaches can be indicated. Seven journal articles (for which see the availability note) are used to compose the four chapters and three appendices. The connecting text gives a survey of known 18 F-compounds and methods for preparing such compounds. (Auth.)

  12. Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borole, Abhijeet P [Knoxville, TN

    2012-06-05

    The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

  13. Chloric organic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moalem, F.

    2000-01-01

    Since many years ago, hazardous and toxic refuses which are results of human activities has been carelessly without any Biological and Engineering facts and knowledge discharged into our land and water. The effects of discharging those materials in environment are different. Some of refuse materials shows short and other has long-time adverse effects in our environment, Among hazardous organic chemical materials, chlorine, consider, to be the main element. Organic materials with chlorine is called chlorine hydrocarbon as a hazardous compound. This paper discuss the hazardous materials especially chloric organic compound and their misuse effects in environment and human being

  14. Medicinal gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.; Cottrill, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A major use of gold compounds in the pharmaceutical industry is for anti-arthritic agents. The disease itself is not understood and little is known about the way in which the drugs act, but detailed pictures of the distribution of gold in the body are available, and some of the relevant biochemistry is beginning to emerge. The purpose of this article is to give a survey of the types of compounds presently employed in medicine, of the distribution of gold in the body which results from their use, and of some relevant chemistry. Emphasis is placed on results obtained in the last few years

  15. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  16. Prediction of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhanov, Gennady S; Kiselyova, N N

    2009-01-01

    The problems of predicting not yet synthesized intermetallic compounds are discussed. It is noted that the use of classical physicochemical analysis in the study of multicomponent metallic systems is faced with the complexity of presenting multidimensional phase diagrams. One way of predicting new intermetallics with specified properties is the use of modern processing technology with application of teaching of image recognition by the computer. The algorithms used most often in these methods are briefly considered and the efficiency of their use for predicting new compounds is demonstrated.

  17. Microbial communities in the deep subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    The diversity of microbial populations and microbial communities within the earth's subsurface is summarized in this review. Scientists are currently exploring the subsurface and addressing questions of microbial diversity, the interactions among microorganisms, and mechanisms for maintenance of subsurface microbial communities. Heterotrophic anaerobic microbial communities exist in relatively permeable sandstone or sandy sediments, located adjacent to organic-rich deposits. These microorganisms appear to be maintained by the consumption of organic compounds derived from adjacent deposits. Sources of organic material serving as electron donors include lignite-rich Eocene sediments beneath the Texas coastal plain, organic-rich Cretaceous shales from the southwestern US, as well as Cretaceous clays containing organic materials and fermentative bacteria from the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Additionally, highly diverse microbial communities occur in regions where a source of organic matter is not apparent but where igneous rock is present. Examples include the basalt-rich subsurface of the Columbia River valley and the granitic subsurface regions of Sweden and Canada. These subsurface microbial communities appear to be maintained by the action of lithotrophic bacteria growing on H2 that is chemically generated within the subsurface. Other deep-dwelling microbial communities exist within the deep sediments of oceans. These systems often rely on anaerobic metabolism and sulfate reduction. Microbial colonization extends to the depths below which high temperatures limit the ability of microbes to survive. Energy sources for the organisms living in the oceanic subsurface may originate as oceanic sedimentary deposits. In this review, each of these microbial communities is discussed in detail with specific reference to their energy sources, their observed growth patterns, and their diverse composition. This information is critical to develop further understanding of subsurface

  18. Microbial carbon pump and its significance for carbon sequestration in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Studies of the decomposition, transformation and stabilization of soil organic carbon have dramatically increased in recent years due to growing interest in studying the global carbon cycle as it pertains to climate change. While it is readily accepted that the magnitude of the organic carbon reservoir in soils depends upon microbial involvement because soil carbon dynamics are ultimately the consequence of microbial growth and activity, it remains largely unknown how these microbe-mediated processes lead to soil carbon stabilization. Here, two pathways, ex vivo modification and in vivo turnover, were defined to jointly explain soil carbon dynamics driven by microbial catabolism and/or anabolism. Accordingly, a conceptual framework consisting of the raised concept of the soil "microbial carbon pump" (MCP) was demonstrated to describe how microbes act as an active player in soil carbon storage. The hypothesis is that the long-term microbial assimilation process may facilitate the formation of a set of organic compounds that are stabilized (whether via protection by physical interactions or a reduction in activation energy due to chemical composition), ultimately leading to the sequestration of microbial-derived carbon in soils. The need for increased efforts was proposed to seek to inspire new studies that utilize the soil MCP as a conceptual guideline for improving mechanistic understandings of the contributions of soil carbon dynamics to the responses of the terrestrial carbon cycle under global change.

  19. Protection of Antarctic microbial communities – ‘out of sight, out of mind’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin A.; Cowan, Don A.; Wilmotte, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology techniques have shown the presence of diverse microbial communities and endemic species in Antarctica. Endemic microbes may be a potential source of novel biotechnologically important compounds, including, for example, new antibiotics. Thus, the scientific and biotechnological value of Antarctic terrestrial microbial habitats can be compromised by human visitation to a greater extent than previously realized. The ever-increasing human footprint in Antarctica makes consideration of this topic more pressing, as the number of locations known to be pristine habitats, where increasingly sophisticated cutting-edge research techniques may be used to their full potential, declines. Examination of the Protected Areas system of the Antarctic Treaty shows that microbial habitats are generally poorly protected. No other continent on Earth is dominated to the same degree by microbial species, and real opportunities exist to develop new ways of conceptualizing and implementing conservation of microbial biogeography on a continental scale. Here we highlight potential threats both to the conservation of terrestrial microbial ecosystems, and to future scientific research requiring their study. PMID:25762992

  20. Microbial degradation of pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benotti, Mark J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Brownawell, Bruce J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States)], E-mail: bruce.brownawell@sunysb.edu

    2009-03-15

    Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal surface water samples. Antipyrine, carbamazepine, cotinine, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim were the most refractory (half-lives, t{sub 1/2} = 35 to >100 days), making them excellent candidates for wastewater tracers. Nicotine, acetaminophen, and fluoxetine were labile across all treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 0.68-11 days). Caffeine, diltiazem, and nifedipine were also and relatively labile in all but one of the treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 3.5-13 days). Microbial degradation of caffeine was further confirmed by production {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The fastest decay of non-refractory compounds was always observed in more sewage-affected Jamaica Bay waters. Degradation rates for the majority of these pharmaceuticals are much slower than reported rates for small biomolecules, such as glucose and amino acids. Batch sorption experiments indicate that removal of these soluble pharmaceuticals from the water column to sediments is a relatively insignificant removal process in these receiving waters. - Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 structurally variable pharmaceuticals in wastewater-impacted estuarine and coastal seawater.

  1. Augmenting Plant Immune Responses and Biological Control by Microbial Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Moo Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant have developed sophisticated defence mechanisms against microbial pathogens. The recent accumulated information allow us to understand the nature of plant immune responses followed by recognition of microbial factors/determinants through cutting-edge genomics and multi-omics techniques. However, the practical approaches to sustain plant health using enhancement of plant immunity is yet to be fully appreciated. Here, we overviewed the general concept and representative examples on the plant immunity. The fungal, bacterial, and viral determinants that was previously reported as the triggers of plant immune responses are introduced and described as the potential protocol of biological control. Specifically, the role of chitin, glucan, lipopolysaccharides/extracellular polysaccharides, microbe/pathogen-associated molecular pattern, antibiotics, mimic-phytohormones, N-acyl homoserine lactone, harpin, vitamins, and volatile organic compounds are considered. We hope that this review stimulates scientific community and farmers to broaden their knowledge on the microbial determinant-based biological control and to apply the technology on the integrated pest management program.

  2. Antifungal Microbial Agents for Food Biopreservation-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva Salas, Marcia; Mounier, Jérôme; Valence, Florence; Coton, Monika; Thierry, Anne; Coton, Emmanuel

    2017-07-08

    Food spoilage is a major issue for the food industry, leading to food waste, substantial economic losses for manufacturers and consumers, and a negative impact on brand names. Among causes, fungal contamination can be encountered at various stages of the food chain (e.g., post-harvest, during processing or storage). Fungal development leads to food sensory defects varying from visual deterioration to noticeable odor, flavor, or texture changes but can also have negative health impacts via mycotoxin production by some molds. In order to avoid microbial spoilage and thus extend product shelf life, different treatments-including fungicides and chemical preservatives-are used. In parallel, public authorities encourage the food industry to limit the use of these chemical compounds and develop natural methods for food preservation. This is accompanied by a strong societal demand for 'clean label' food products, as consumers are looking for more natural, less severely processed and safer products. In this context, microbial agents corresponding to bioprotective cultures, fermentates, culture-free supernatant or purified molecules, exhibiting antifungal activities represent a growing interest as an alternative to chemical preservation. This review presents the main fungal spoilers encountered in food products, the antifungal microorganisms tested for food bioprotection, and their mechanisms of action. A focus is made in particular on the recent in situ studies and the constraints associated with the use of antifungal microbial agents for food biopreservation.

  3. Degradation and impact of phthalate plasticizers on soil microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartwright, C.D.; Thompson, I.P.; Burns, R.G.

    2000-05-01

    To assess the impact of phthalates on soil microorganisms and to supplement the environmental risk assessment for these xenobiotics, soil was treated with diethyl phthalate (DEP) or di (2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate (DEHP) at 0.1 to 100 mg/g. Bioavailability and membrane disruption were proposed as the characteristics responsible for the observed fate and toxicity of both compounds. Diethyl phthalate was biodegraded rapidly in soil with a half-life of 0.75 d at 20 C, and was not expected to persist in the environment. The DEHP, although biodegradable in aqueous solution, was recalcitrant in soil, because of poor bioavailability and was predicted to account for the majority of phthalate contamination in the environment. Addition of DEP or DEHP to soil at a concentration similar to that detected in nonindustrial environments had no impact on the structural diversity or functional diversity (BIOLOG) of the microbial community. At concentrations representative of a phthalate spill, DEP reduced numbers of both total culturable bacteria and pseudomonads within 1 d. This was due to disruption of membrane fluidity by the lipophilic phthalate, a mechanism not previously attributed to phthalates. However, DEHP had no effect on the microbial community or membrane fluidity, even at 100 mg/g, and was predicted to have no impact on microbial communities in the environment.

  4. Microbial effects on radioactive wastes at SLB sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to determine the significance of microbial degradation of organic wastes on radionuclide migration on shallow land burial for humid and arid sites, establish which mechanisms predominate and ascertain the conditions under which these mechanisms operate. Factors contolling gaseous eminations from low-level radioactive waste disposal sites are assessed. Importance of gaseous fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide and possibly hydrogen from the site stems from the inclusion of tritium and/or 14 C into the elemental composition of these compounds. In that the primary source of these gases is the biodegradation of organic components of the waste materials, primary emphasis of the study involved on examination of the biochemical pathways producing methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and the environmental parameters controlling the activity of the microbial community involved. Although the methane and carbon dioxide production rate indicates the degradation rate of the organic substances in the waste, it does not predict the methane evolution rate from the trench site. Methane fluxes from the soil surface are equivalent to the net synthesis minus the quantity oxidized by the microbial community as the gas passes through the soil profile. Gas studies were performed at three commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (West Valley, New York; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky) during the period 1976 to 1978. The results of these studies are presented. 3 tables

  5. Microbial degradation of pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benotti, Mark J.; Brownawell, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal surface water samples. Antipyrine, carbamazepine, cotinine, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim were the most refractory (half-lives, t 1/2 = 35 to >100 days), making them excellent candidates for wastewater tracers. Nicotine, acetaminophen, and fluoxetine were labile across all treatments (t 1/2 = 0.68-11 days). Caffeine, diltiazem, and nifedipine were also and relatively labile in all but one of the treatments (t 1/2 = 3.5-13 days). Microbial degradation of caffeine was further confirmed by production 14 CO 2 . The fastest decay of non-refractory compounds was always observed in more sewage-affected Jamaica Bay waters. Degradation rates for the majority of these pharmaceuticals are much slower than reported rates for small biomolecules, such as glucose and amino acids. Batch sorption experiments indicate that removal of these soluble pharmaceuticals from the water column to sediments is a relatively insignificant removal process in these receiving waters. - Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 structurally variable pharmaceuticals in wastewater-impacted estuarine and coastal seawater

  6. Toward Understanding, Managing, and Protecting Microbial Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial communities are at the very basis of life on earth, catalyzing biogeochemical reactions driving global nutrient cycles. However, unlike for plants and animals, microbial diversity is not on the biodiversity–conservation agenda. The latter, however, would imply that microbial diversity is not under any threat by anthropogenic disturbance or climate change. This maybe a misconception caused by the rudimentary knowledge we have concerning microbial diversity and its role in ecosystem functioning. This perspective paper identifies major areas with knowledge gaps within the field of environmental microbiology that preclude a comprehension of microbial ecosystems on the level we have for plants and animals. Opportunities and challenges are pointed out to open the microbial black box and to go from descriptive to predictive microbial ecology. PMID:21747797

  7. Towards understanding, managing and protecting microbial ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBodelier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities are at the very basis of life on earth, catalysing biogeochemical reactions driving global nutrient cycles. However, unlike for plants and animals, microbial diversity is not on the biodiversity conservation agenda. The latter, however, would imply that microbial diversity is not under any threat by anthropogenic disturbance or climate change. This maybe a misconception caused by the rudimentary knowledge we have concerning microbial diversity and its role in ecosystem functioning. This perspective paper indentifies major areas with knowledge gaps within the field of environmental microbiology that preclude a comprehension of microbial ecosystems on the level we have for plants and animals. Opportunities and challenges are pointed out to open the microbial black box and to go from descriptive to predictive microbial ecology.

  8. Toward understanding, managing, and protecting microbial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelier, Paul L E

    2011-01-01

    Microbial communities are at the very basis of life on earth, catalyzing biogeochemical reactions driving global nutrient cycles. However, unlike for plants and animals, microbial diversity is not on the biodiversity-conservation agenda. The latter, however, would imply that microbial diversity is not under any threat by anthropogenic disturbance or climate change. This maybe a misconception caused by the rudimentary knowledge we have concerning microbial diversity and its role in ecosystem functioning. This perspective paper identifies major areas with knowledge gaps within the field of environmental microbiology that preclude a comprehension of microbial ecosystems on the level we have for plants and animals. Opportunities and challenges are pointed out to open the microbial black box and to go from descriptive to predictive microbial ecology.

  9. DESM: portal for microbial knowledge exploration systems

    KAUST Repository

    Salhi, Adil

    2015-11-05

    Microorganisms produce an enormous variety of chemical compounds. It is of general interest for microbiology and biotechnology researchers to have means to explore information about molecular and genetic basis of functioning of different microorganisms and their ability for bioproduction. To enable such exploration, we compiled 45 topic-specific knowledgebases (KBs) accessible through DESM portal (www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/desm). The KBs contain information derived through text-mining of PubMed information and complemented by information data-mined from various other resources (e.g. ChEBI, Entrez Gene, GO, KOBAS, KEGG, UniPathways, BioGrid). All PubMed records were indexed using 4 538 278 concepts from 29 dictionaries, with 1 638 986 records utilized in KBs. Concepts used are normalized whenever possible. Most of the KBs focus on a particular type of microbial activity, such as production of biocatalysts or nutraceuticals. Others are focused on specific categories of microorganisms, e.g. streptomyces or cyanobacteria. KBs are all structured in a uniform manner and have a standardized user interface. Information exploration is enabled through various searches. Users can explore statistically most significant concepts or pairs of concepts, generate hypotheses, create interactive networks of associated concepts and export results. We believe DESM will be a useful complement to the existing resources to benefit microbiology and biotechnology research.

  10. Photochemically enhanced microbial degradation of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, A.; Matsumura, F.

    1991-01-01

    Biodegradation of persistent halogenated organic pollutants is of great interest from the viewpoint of its potential use to cleanup the contaminated sites and industrial waste streams on-site (i.e., in situ remediation). Recent studies have shown that lignin-degrading white rot fungi possess capabilities to degrade a variety of highly recalcitrant and toxic compounds. On the other hand, photodegradation by sunlight or ultraviolet light (UV) has not been considered as a potential technology to detoxify the contaminated sites, in spite of the availability of extensive research data, because of its limited reaching ability to subsurface locations. In view of the urgent needs for the development of technology to deal with mounting problems of toxic wastes, the authors have decided to experiment with the ideas of combining photochemical and microbial technologies. The main obstacle in developing such simultaneous combination systems has been the susceptibilities of microorganisms in general to UV irradiation. To overcome this problem, the authors have developed an ultraviolet- and fungicide-resistant strain of white rot fungus and now report their results

  11. Engineering Robustness of Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiwei; Nielsen, Jens; Zhou, Yongjin J

    2017-10-01

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology offer great prospects in developing microbial cell factories capable of converting renewable feedstocks into fuels, chemicals, food ingredients, and pharmaceuticals. However, prohibitively low production rate and mass concentration remain the major hurdles in industrial processes even though the biosynthetic pathways are comprehensively optimized. These limitations are caused by a variety of factors unamenable for host cell survival, such as harsh industrial conditions, fermentation inhibitors from biomass hydrolysates, and toxic compounds including metabolic intermediates and valuable target products. Therefore, engineered microbes with robust phenotypes is essential for achieving higher yield and productivity. In this review, the recent advances in engineering robustness and tolerance of cell factories is described to cope with these issues and briefly introduce novel strategies with great potential to enhance the robustness of cell factories, including metabolic pathway balancing, transporter engineering, and adaptive laboratory evolution. This review also highlights the integration of advanced systems and synthetic biology principles toward engineering the harmony of overall cell function, more than the specific pathways or enzymes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Fungal volatile compounds induce production of the secondary metabolite Sodorifen in Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, R. (Ruth); V. de Jager (Victor); Zühlke, D. (Daniela); Wolff, C. (Christian); J. Bernhardt (Jörg); Cankar, K. (Katarina); Beekwilder, J. (Jules); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); F. Sleutels (Frank); De Boer, W. (Wietse); Riedel, K. (Katharina); Garbeva, P. (Paolina)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe ability of bacteria and fungi to communicate with each other is a remarkable aspect of the microbial world. It is recognized that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act as communication signals, however the molecular responses by bacteria to fungal VOCs remain unknown. Here we perform

  13. Fungal volatile compounds induce production of the secondary metabolite Sodorifen in Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, R.L.; de Jager, V.C.L.; Zühlke, D.; Wolff, C.; Bernhardt, J.; Cankar, Katarina; Beekwilder, J.; van Ijcken, W.; Sleutels, Frank; De Boer, W.; Riedel, K.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of bacteria and fungi to communicate with each other is a remarkable aspect of the microbial world. It is recognized that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act as communication signals, however the molecular responses by bacteria to fungal VOCs remain unknown. Here we perform

  14. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  15. The Onium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarevsky, Nicolay V.; Slaveykova, Vera; Manev, Stefan; Lazarov, Dobri

    1997-06-01

    The onium salts are of a big interest for theoretical and structural chemistry, and for organic synthesis. Some representatives of the group (e.g. ammonium salts) were known from the oldest times. Many onium salts are met the nature: ammonium salts (either as inorganic salts, and organic derivatives, e.g. aminoacids, salts of biogenic amines and alkaloids, etc.); oxonium salts (plant pigments as anthocyans are organic oxonium compounds), etc. In 1894 C. Hartmann and V. Meyer prepared the first iodonium salts - 4-iododiphenyliodonium hydrogensulfate and diphenyliodonium salts, and suggested the ending -onium for all compounds with properties similar to those of ammonium salts. Nowadays onium compounds of almost all nonmetals are synthesised and studied. A great variety of physical methods: diffraction (e.g. XRD) and spectral methods (IR-, NMR-, and UV-spectra), as well as the chemical properties and methods of preparation of onium salts have been used in determination of the structure of these compounds. The application of different onium salts is immense. Ammonium, phosphonium and sulfonium salts are used as phase-transfer catalysts; diazonium salts - for the preparation of dyes, metalochromic and pH-indicators. All the onium salts and especially diazonium and iodonium salts are very useful reagents in organic synthesis.

  16. Forecasting of superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskii, E.M.; Gribulya, V.G.; Kiseleva, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    In forecasting new superconducting intermetallic compounds of the A15 and Mo 3 Se types most promising from the viewpoint of high critical temperature Tsub(c), high critical magnetic fields Hsub(c), and high critical currents and in estimating their transition temperature it is proposed to apply cybernetic methods of computer learning

  17. NATURAL POLYACETYLENE COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Nasukhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In article the review of the initial stage of researches of natural polyacetylene compounds is resulted. The high reactionary ability leading to fast oxidation and degradation of these compounds, especially at influence of Uf-light, oxygen of air, pH and other factors, has caused the serious difficulties connected with an establishment of structure and studying of their physical and chemical properties. Therefore the greatest quantity of works of this stage is connected with studying of essential oils of plants from families Apiaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae, Campanulaceae, Olacaceae, Pittosporaceae and Santalaceae where have been found out, basically, diacetylene compounds. About development of physical and chemical methods of the analysis of possibility of similar researches have considerably extended. More than 2000 polyacetylenes are known today, from them more than 1100 are found out in plants fam. Asteraceae. Revolution in the field of molecular biology has allowed to study processes of biosynthesis of these compounds intensively.

  18. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain

  19. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1990-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  20. Hyperon compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1987-11-01

    The formation of various hypernuclei from K - absorption at rest is discussed from the viewpoints of compound decay of highly excited hypernuclei in contrast to the direct reaction mechanism. Recent (stopped K - , π) experiments at KEK as well as old data of emulsion and bubble chamber experiments are discussed. Some future direction of hypernuclear spectroscopy is suggested. (author)

  1. Toxicology of perfluorinated compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Thorsten [Hessian State Laboratory, Wiesbaden (Germany); Mattern, Daniela; Brunn, Hubertus [Hessian State Laboratory, Giessen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Perfluorinated compounds [PFCs] have found a wide use in industrial products and processes and in a vast array of consumer products. PFCs are molecules made up of carbon chains to which fluorine atoms are bound. Due to the strength of the carbon/fluorine bond, the molecules are chemically very stable and are highly resistant to biological degradation; therefore, they belong to a class of compounds that tend to persist in the environment. These compounds can bioaccumulate and also undergo biomagnification. Within the class of PFC chemicals, perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorosulphonic acid are generally considered reference substances. Meanwhile, PFCs can be detected almost ubiquitously, e.g., in water, plants, different kinds of foodstuffs, in animals such as fish, birds, in mammals, as well as in human breast milk and blood. PFCs are proposed as a new class of 'persistent organic pollutants'. Numerous publications allude to the negative effects of PFCs on human health. The following review describes both external and internal exposures to PFCs, the toxicokinetics (uptake, distribution, metabolism, excretion), and the toxicodynamics (acute toxicity, subacute and subchronic toxicities, chronic toxicity including carcinogenesis, genotoxicity and epigenetic effects, reproductive and developmental toxicities, neurotoxicity, effects on the endocrine system, immunotoxicity and potential modes of action, combinational effects, and epidemiological studies on perfluorinated compounds). (orig.)

  2. Chemical compounds in teak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Viana da Silva Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinone compounds are largely generated at extractive fraction of the woods in a complex and variable biological system. The literature has indications for many segments from food industry to pharmaceutical industry. Within the field of industrial use of wood, they are less desirable since they are treated only as incidental substances in production strings of pulp, paper, charcoal, and sawmill. In spite of its small amount, compared to other chemical compounds called essential, these substances have received special attention from researchers revealing a diverse range of offerings to market products textiles, pharmaceuticals, colorants, and other polymers, for which are being tested and employed. Quinones are found in fungi, lichens, and mostly in higher plants. Tectona grandis, usually called teak, is able to biosynthesize anthraquinones, which is a quinone compound, byproduct of secondary metabolism. This species provides wood that is much prized in the furniture sector and can also be exploited for metabolites to supply the market in quinone compounds and commercial development of new technologies, adding value to the plantations of this species within our country.

  3. Key Concepts in Microbial Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Achilles, K.; Walker, G.; Weersing, K.; Team, A

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a multi-institution Science and Technology Center, established by the National Science Foundation in 2006. C-MORE's research mission is to facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the diverse assemblages of microorganisms in the sea, ranging from the genetic basis of marine microbial biogeochemistry including the metabolic regulation and environmental controls of gene expression, to the processes that underpin the fluxes of carbon, related bioelements, and energy in the marine environment. The C-MORE education and outreach program is focused on increasing scientific literacy in microbial oceanography among students, educators, and the general public. A first step toward this goal is defining the key concepts that constitute microbial oceanography. After lengthy discussions with scientists and educators, both within and outside C-MORE, we have arrived at six key concepts: 1) Marine microbes are very small and have been around for a long time; 2) Life on Earth could not exist without microbes; 3) Most marine microbes are beneficial; 4) Microbes are everywhere: they are extremely abundant and diverse; 5) Microbes significantly impact our global climate; and 6) There are new discoveries every day in the field of microbial oceanography. A C-MORE-produced brochure on these six key concepts will be distributed at the meeting. Advanced copies may be requested by email or downloaded from the C-MORE web site(http://cmore.soest.hawaii.edu/downloads/MO_key_concepts_hi-res.pdf). This brochure also includes information on career pathways in microbial oceanography, with the aim of broadening participation in the field. C-MORE is eager to work in partnership to incorporate these key concepts into other science literacy publications, particularly those involving ocean and climate literacy. We thank the following contributors and reviewers: P Chisholm, A Dolberry, and A Thompson (MIT); N Lawrence

  4. Enhancing microbial production of biofuels by expanding microbial metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Chen, Xingge; Li, Peng

    2017-09-01

    Fatty acid, isoprenoid, and alcohol pathways have been successfully engineered to produce biofuels. By introducing three genes, atfA, adhE, and pdc, into Escherichia coli to expand fatty acid pathway, up to 1.28 g/L of fatty acid ethyl esters can be achieved. The isoprenoid pathway can be expanded to produce bisabolene with a high titer of 900 mg/L in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Short- and long-chain alcohols can also be effectively biosynthesized by extending the carbon chain of ketoacids with an engineered "+1" alcohol pathway. Thus, it can be concluded that expanding microbial metabolic pathways has enormous potential for enhancing microbial production of biofuels for future industrial applications. However, some major challenges for microbial production of biofuels should be overcome to compete with traditional fossil fuels: lowering production costs, reducing the time required to construct genetic elements and to increase their predictability and reliability, and creating reusable parts with useful and predictable behavior. To address these challenges, several aspects should be further considered in future: mining and transformation of genetic elements related to metabolic pathways, assembling biofuel elements and coordinating their functions, enhancing the tolerance of host cells to biofuels, and creating modular subpathways that can be easily interconnected. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis of Electrogenic Microbial Communities in Differentially Inoculated Swine Wastewater-Fed Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Khilyas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs are promising new technologies for efficient removal of organic compounds from industrial wastewaters, including that generated from swine farming. We inoculated two pairs of laboratory-scale MFCs with sludge granules from a beer wastewater-treating anaerobic digester (IGBS or from sludge taken from the bottom of a tank receiving swine wastewater (SS. The SS-inoculated MFC outperformed the IGBS-inoculated MFC with regard to COD and VFA removal and electricity production. Using a metagenomic approach, we describe the microbial diversity of the MFC planktonic and anodic communities derived from the different inocula. Proteobacteria (mostly Deltaproteobacteria became the predominant phylum in both MFC anodic communities with amplification of the electrogenic genus Geobacter being the most pronounced. Eight dominant and three minor species of Geobacter were found in both MFC anodic communities. The anodic communities of the SS-inoculated MFCs had a higher proportion of Clostridium and Bacteroides relative to those of the IGBS-inoculated MFCs, which were enriched with Pelobacter. The archaeal populations of the SS- and IGBS-inoculated MFCs were dominated by Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, respectively. Our results show a long-term influence of inoculum type on the performance and microbial community composition of swine wastewater-treating MFCs.

  6. Simultaneous efficient removal of oxyfluorfen with electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell and its microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Han; Jiang, Qinrui; Zhu, Xiaoyu

    2018-02-01

    The performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to degrade oxyfluorfen was investigated. Approximately 77% of 50 mg/L oxyfluorfen was degraded within 24 h by anodic biofilm. The temperature, pH, and initial oxyfluorfen concentration had a significant effect on oxyfluorfen degrading, and a maximum degradation rate of 94.95% could theoretically be achieved at 31.96 °C, a pH of 7.65, and an initial oxyfluorfen concentration of 120.05 mg/L. Oxyfluorfen was further catabolized through various microbial metabolism pathways. Moreover, the anodic biofilm exhibited multiple catabolic capacities to 4-nitrophenol, chloramphenicol, pyraclostrobin, and sulfamethoxazole. Microbial community analysis indicated that functional bacteria Arcobacter, Acinetobacter, Azospirillum, Azonexus, and Comamonas were the predominant genera in the anodic biofilm. In terms of the efficient removal of various organic compounds and energy recovery, the MFC seemed to be a promising approach for the treatment of environmental contaminants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Selected Jesus sayings on materialism according to the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. 5-7) in judging the so-called prosperity theology

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Prosperity theology is a variegated movement that overlaps both the Charismatic and non-Charismatic spectrums. This theology certainly has a Charismatic flavouring, but it is by no means limited to Pentecostalism. The prosperity message is being preached world-wide on TBN Television, radio and printed media. This gospel focuses on human potential for successful living, emphasizing health and wealth. There is a clear shift notable from theocentric providence to anthropocentric prosperity in th...

  8. Evaluating the Nature of So-Called S*-State Feature in Transient Absorption of Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Hunter, C Neil; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-11-03

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S* state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation-bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. These findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes.

  9. [Critical assessment of a new endoscopic anatomic concept for the so-called cardia in the sense of the notions of Parmenides and Martin Heidegger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegler, M; Asari, R; Cosentini, E P; Wrba, F; Schoppmann, S F

    2014-04-01

    Current endoscopic anatomy interposes the gastric cardia between the tubular oesophagus and the proximal stomach. In contrast to that, recent evidence unfolds a different view. Using "PubMed" and "Scopus" searches, we examined if the novel understanding regarding the cardia goes in line with the concept of unfolding, as described by Heidegger based on the ancient didactic poetry of Parmenides. What has been taken as gastric cardia in fact represents reflux-damaged, dilated, columnar lined oesophagus (CLO): dilated distal oesophagus (DDO). Due to its macroscopic gastric appearance it cannot be discriminated from the stomach by endoscopy. Differentiation between DDE and proximal stomach requires the histopathology of measured multi-level biopsies obtained from the DDO and the proximal stomach. Cardaic, onxytocardiac mucosa and intestinal metaplasia (IM; Barrett's oesophagus) define CLO and thus the oesophageal location, while oxyntic mucosa (OM) of the proximal stomach verifies a gastric biopsy location. Endoscopically visible CLO and DDO define the morphological manifestation of reflux: the squamo-oxyntic gap (SOG). Biopsies obtained from the level of the diaphragmatic impressions allow differentiation between an enlarged hiatus with normal anatomic content (CLO; oesophagus) vs. hernia with abnormal content (OM; stomach). Non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus exists in 10 %-17 % of asymptomatic and in 20 %-100 % (with increasing CLO length) of reflux symptom-positive individuals (annual cancer risk: 0.2 %-0.7 %). These data justify biopsy of an endoscopically normal appearing squamocolumnar junction for the exclusion of Barrett's oesophagus and cancer risk. In the absence of contraindications, cancer risk-based therapy of dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus includes radiofrequency ablation (RFA) ± endoscopic resection. The perception of the cardia as reflux damaged DDO mirrors the concept of unfolding, as described by the interpretation of the didactic poem of Parmenides by Heidegger. Our data recommend to omit the term "cardia" and allocate morphology either to the oesophagus (CLO, DDO) or to the proximal stomach or indicate that allocation is impossible (i. e.. tumour-induced). Future studies will have to test the value of this novel concept for diagnosis, treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cancer prevention. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. The Role of Mg(OH)2 in the So-Called "Base-Free" Oxidation of Glycerol with AuPd Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jile; He, Qian; Miedziak, Peter J; Brett, Gemma L; Huang, Xiaoyang; Pattisson, Samuel; Douthwaite, Mark; Hutchings, Graham J

    2018-02-16

    Mg(OH) 2 - and Mg(OH) 2 -containing materials can provide excellent performance as supports for AuPd nanoparticles for the oxidation of glycerol in the absence of base, which is considered to be a result of additional basic sites on the surface of the support. However, its influence on the reaction solution is not generally discussed. In this paper, we examine the relationship between the basic Mg(OH) 2 support and AuPd nanoparticles in detail using four types of catalyst. For these reactions, the physical interaction between Mg(OH) 2 and AuPd was adjusted. It was found that the activity of the AuPd nanoparticles increased with the amount of Mg(OH) 2 added under base-free conditions, regardless of its interaction with the noble metals. In order to investigate how Mg(OH) 2 affected the glycerol oxidation, detailed information about the performance of AuPd/Mg(OH) 2 , physically mixed (AuPd/C+Mg(OH) 2 ) and (AuPd/C+NaHCO 3 ) was obtained and compared. Furthermore, NaOH and Mg(OH) 2 were added during the reaction using AuPd/C. All these results indicate that the distinctive and outstanding performance of Mg(OH) 2 supported catalysts in base-free condition is in fact directly related to its ability to affect the pH during the reaction and as such, assists with the initial activation of the primary alcohol, which is considered to be the rate determining step in the reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron tomography is useful in evaluating the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatments for so-called borderline unresectable pancreatic head cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Makoto; Katayama, Kanji; Yamaguchi, Akio; Iida, Atsushi; Goi, Takanori; Hirono, Yasuo; Nagano, Hideki; Koneri, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Currently, computed tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate the efficacy of treatments on tumor regression in unresectable pancreatic head carcinomas. Recently, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) examination has been used for the initial diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, for diagnosis of distant metastasis, and for recurrences of pancreatic carcinomas. PET has also been used for the qualitative diagnosis of existing tumors. The current study was designed to observe if PET examination can be used to gauge the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatments, and to estimate the prognosis for unresectable pancreatic head carcinomas in similar clinical stages and during therapy. This was a prospective cohort study and included 18 cases. All cases were unresectable pancreatic head cancers diagnosed as TNM classification stage 3, and had undergone identical multidisciplinary treatment regimens. The level of tumor markers, tumor-size reduction, and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) were correlated with prognosis. Pearson's correlation and Kaplan-Meyer survival rate curves were used for statistical analysis. Tumor-size reduction in CTs and the transition of tumor markers were not related to patient prognosis. Cases in which post-treatment SUV max values were reduced to <3.0 were correlated with a more favorable prognosis and demonstrated extended survival rates. PET examination can be used to estimate the prognosis of unresectable pancreatic head carcinomas which have undergone multidisciplinary treatments. (author)

  12. [Description of a particular case of the so-called Schmincke lymphoepithelioma and study of the correlation with Epstein-Barr virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, V; Cavallari, V; Bucolo, S; Abbate, G; Romano, G; Fera, G; Galletti, B

    2000-10-01

    For poorly differentiated rhinopharyngeal carcinomas, the clinical presentation (association with the Epstein-Barr virus, paraneoplastic syndromes, onset of lymphoma) and the histopathological features can be polymorphous and they can confound or delay diagnosis and preparation of an adequate treatment plan (radio-chemotherapy). Often these neoplasms arise as clinically primitive laterocervical metastases, masked by clinical findings and a history that can lead to the mistaken diagnosis of systemic lymphoproliferative processes such as Hodgkin's disease. Here an observation of this type is presented in a young patient (19 years old) who came under observation for a laterocervical tumefaction recurrent from a previous exeresis performed at another hospital and symptoms of serotine febricula, dysphagia and serology positive for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The patient underwent surgery and then radiotherapy and has been under close post-operative follow-up for two years. To date the patient's condition--both local and general--is good. The particular histology of the neoformation lies in the abundant infiltration of plasma cell and lymphocyte eosinophils, at times in blastic form. Moreover, elements with a large clear nucleus and evident nucleolus (Hodgkin-like) and scattered multinucleate Langhans-type giant cells can be seen. Immunohistologically the tumor cells markedly express for cytokeratin and the latent membrane protein (LMP1) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and show a high growth fraction. Under the electron microscope, the plurinucleate giant cells present large nuclei with morphology similar to that of tumor cells. The clear cytokeratin-positivity of the tumor elements and the histological and ultrastructural features mentioned led to the diagnosis of a massive metastasis from lymphoepithelial carcinoma, the Schmincke variant, plus EBV infection of the neoplastic cells. The authors conclude assuming that the particular granulomatous reaction is due to the host's reaction to the tumor cells, but also to the reaction to the viral antigens. In the former case we find an attempt to limit the carcinomatous process; in the latter it is a response caused by the EBV and is not, apparently, aimed at protecting against the neoplasm rather it facilitates the neoplastic process.

  13. The clinical phenotype associated with myositis-specific and associated autoantibodies: a meta-analysis revisiting the so-called antisynthetase syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, Jean-Christophe; Fabien, Nicole; Reynaud, Quitterie; Durieu, Isabelle; Durupt, Stéphane; Dutertre, Marine; Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    To describe the clinical spectrum associated with aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase (ARS) autoantibodies in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis defined according to Peter and Bohan's criteria. Cohort studies were selected from MEDLINE and Embase up to August 2013. Two investigators independently extracted data on study design, patient characteristics, and clinical features (interstitial lung disease [ILD], fever, mechanic's hands [MH], Raynaud's phenomenon [RPh], arthralgia, sclerodactyly, cancer and dermatomyositis-specific rash) according to the presence of myositis-specific (anti-aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase [ARS], anti-signal recognition particle [anti-SRP] and anti-Mi2) and myositis-associated (anti-PM/Scl, anti-U1-RNP and anti-Ku) autoantibodies. 27 studies (3487 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. Arthralgia (75%, CI 67-81) and ILD (69%, CI 63-74) were the most prevalent clinical signs associated with anti-ARS autoantibodies. Anti-Mi2 and anti-SRP autoantibodies were associated with few extramuscular signs. ARS autoantibodies were identified in 13% of patients with cancer-associated myositis (5-25). Patients with non-anti-Jo1 ARS had greater odds of presenting fever (RR 0.63, CI 0.52-0.90) and ILD (RR 0.87, CI 0.81-0.93) compared to those with anti-Jo1 autoantibodies. The frequencies of myositis (RR 1.60, CI 1.38-1.85), arthralgia (RR 1.52, CI 1.32-1.76) and MH (RR 1.47, CI 1.11-1.94) were almost 50% higher in patients with anti-Jo1 compared to non-anti-Jo1 ARS autoantibodies. Patients with anti-PM/Scl differed from those with anti-ARS autoantibodies by a greater prevalence of RPh (RR 0.70, CI 0.53-0.94) and sclerodactyly (RR 0.47, CI 0.25-0.89). ILD was less frequent in patients with anti-U1-RNP autoantibodies (RR 3.35, CI 1.07-10.43). No difference was observed between anti-ARS and myositis-associated autoantibodies for other outcomes. The presence of anti-ARS autoantibodies delimits a heterogeneous subset of patients with a high prevalence of myositis, MH, arthralgia in anti-Jo1 patients, and RPh and fever in non-anti-Jo1 patients. The clinical signs of populations positive for anti-PM/Scl and anti-ARS autoantibodies largely overlap, especially with regard to ILD, challenging the clinical delimitation of the antisynthetase syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Levels of trace elements in the fruits and vegetables from the so-called Land of fires in Campania Region (Southern Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Mauro; Cavallo, Stefania; Rosato, Guido; Chiaravalle, Eugenio; Miedico, Oto; Pellicanò, Roberta; Soprano, Vittorio; Baldi, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUZIONE: una vasta area compresa tra le province di Napoli e Caserta nella regione Campania ha negli ultimi anni attirato l'attenzione dei mass media a causa degli interramenti illeciti di rifiuti di varia origine nei campi o del loro abbandono lungo le strade. A tali pratiche illecite si aggiunge il fenomeno dei roghi incontrollati di questo materiale, motivo per il quale la zona è stata soprannominata "Terra dei fuochi". OBIETTIVI: ricerca di elementi in tracce presenti nei prodotti alimentari di origine vegetale prodotti nella Terra dei fuochi. DISEGNO E SETTING: piano di monitoraggio per il rilevamento dei livelli di alcuni metalli tossici ed essenziali nei vegetali coltivati in Campania nella Terra dei fuochi. La determinazione dei microelementi è stata effettuata dopo mineralizzazione della sostanza organica mediante microonde, utilizzando la spettrometria di massa a plasma induttivamente accoppiato (ICP-MS). RISULTATI: durante l'attività di monitoraggio sono stati raccolti 65 campioni di ortaggi e 49 campioni di frutta in 43 comuni rientranti nella Terra dei fuochi. Il contenuto medio di metalli tossici, cadmio e piombo nei prodotti ortofrutticoli è risultato ben lontano dai limiti massimi fissati dalla normativa europea. I valori delle concentrazioni sono significativamente inferiori rispetto a quanto riscontrato in zone ad alto impatto ambientale a causa della presenza di impianti industriali. CONCLUSIONI: la presenza di elementi tossici o potenzialmente tali nei campioni vegetali prodotti nella Terra dei fuochi è attribuibile a una varietà di fattori ambientali rilevanti (caratteristiche geologiche dell'area, inquinamento del suolo, dell'atmosfera e delle acque di irrigazione, pratiche illecite di smaltimento dei rifiuti industriali); non sembra, tuttavia, sussistere un rischio per la salute dei consumatori. Resta comunque l'allerta per la loro presenza nell'ambiente e la necessità che le attività di monitoraggio continuino.

  15. Reflections on Ethical Dilemmas in Working with So-Called "Vulnerable" and "Hard-to-Reach" Groups: Experiences from the Foodways and Futures Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Karolina; Douglas, Flora; McArdle, Karen; Carlisle, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on ethical limitations and dilemmas encountered during fieldwork of the Foodways and Futures project (2013-2016). Foodways and Futures is a qualitative action research project aimed at exploring the food choices of former homeless young people (aged 16-25) in Aberdeenshire. In Scotland, where over 13,000 young people become…

  16. La patrimonialisation des produits dits de terroir Heritage-making and the enhancement of so-called ‘terroir’ products: when rural meets urban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Delfosse

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aujourd’hui, le phénomène de patrimonialisation des produits agro-alimentaires concerne des campagnes rêvées à forte identité, mais aussi des espaces apparemment « sans qualité », des espaces « en creux ». La patrimonialisation des produits de terroir passe par différents processus : par le biais de fêtes, de la mise en art, de la gastronomie, ainsi que par des modes de vente comme le marché… Ces processus à l’œuvre montrent que la relation au monde rural est complexe. En effet, la patrimonialisation des produits de terroir peut aussi bien être le fait d’acteurs ruraux que d’acteurs urbains, de politiques de territoire urbaines que rurales. Les produits de terroir apparaissent comme un dénominateur commun réunissant, au moins occasionnellement, anciens, nouveaux habitants, voire habitants temporaires de territoires qui se dessinent. Ce phénomène est analysé à partir de trois exemples pris dans la région Rhône-Alpes: la fête de la fourme et des Côtes du Forez et la stratégie d’affirmation d’une petite ville, Montbrison, comme capitale d’un pays, le Forez ; Bourg-en-Bresse et sa volaille, ou comment des produits de terroir peuvent contribuer à affirmer une urbanité ; enfin, l’analyse de la création d’une marque territoriale pour affirmer l’existence d’un espace « sans nom », situé à l’ombre de métropoles et la nécessité de protéger sa ruralité face au phénomène de résidentialisation.Today, the enhancement of food heritage concerns not only rural areas with cultural identities but also areas which seem « without quality » or « hollowed out». The enhancement of local products (produits de terroir entails various processes such as festivals, art events, local gastronomy and sales outlets provided by local markets. These processes reveal just how complex the links with local places are. In fact, local product enhancement can result as much from rural activities (local players, rural policies as urban ones (city people and city policies. Local products appear as a common denominator uniting, albeit occasionally, old residents, new residents or temporary residents of emerging territories. The present study considers this aspect of local products in the context of three examples from the Rhone-Alpes region in France.

  17. On the separation of so-called non-volatile uranium fission products of uranium using the conversion of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhardt, W.

    1979-01-01

    The investigations are continued in the following work which arose from the concept of separating uranium fission products from uranium. This is achieved in that due to the lattice conversions occurring during the course of solid chemical reactions, fission products can easily pass from the uranium-contained solid to a second solid. The investigations carried out primarily concern the release behaviour of cerium and neodymium in the temperature region of 1200 to 1700 0 C. UO 2 + graphite, both in powder form, are selected as suitable reaction system having the preconditions needed for the lattice conversion for the release effect. The target aimed at from the practical aspect for the improved release of lanthanoids is achieved by an isobar test course - changing temperature from 1200 to 1500 0 C at constant pressure, with a cerium release of 75-80% and a neodynium release of 80-90% (maximum at 1400 0 C). The concepts on the mechanism of the fission product release are related to transport processes in crystal lattices, as well as chemical solid reactions and evaporation processes on the surface of UC 2 grains. (orig./RB) [de

  18. The determination of irradiation and so-called terrestrial ageing of rock meteorites based on the cosmogenic resulting radionuclides 53Mn and 26Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, P.

    1979-01-01

    The contents of cosmogenic occuring 53 Mn was determined by neutron activation in over 90 samples of 75 individual rock meteorites. The distinct depth effect of the 53 Mn production rate in rock meteorites could be measured by a depth profile at LL6 chondrite St. Severin (falling weight 271 kg). The experimental results confirm the present model concepts. By comparing with the spallogenic 22 Ne/ 21 Ne and 3 He/ 21 Ne ratios applicable as depth indicators, one could derive linear relationships suitable for correcting 53 Mn. They enable the determination of the average 53 Mn production rate from the saturation activities of long-term irradiated meteorites. Using this method it was possible to calculate the irradiation age of 40 rock meteorites. As 26 Al is formed with a similar effective cross-section to 53 Mn, the production rate ratio 53 Mn: 26 Al was also taken to derive the depth-independent irradiation ages. A method to determine the depth-independent terrestrial ageing of meteriorites has been developed based on the same isotope ratio, the effective field of application is between 0.10 to 2x10 6 a. Furthermore, an attempt was made to draw up the dependence of noble gas contents of 53 Mn resp. 53 Mn/ 26 Al irradiation age for the new determination of the 3 He, 21 Ne and 38 Ar production rates by means of a linear regression analysis. (orig./RB) [de

  19. The so-called 'Castor-Crisis': Transport of spent nuclear fuel elements and German 'Angst'. How to prevent the public relations catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, Werner

    1999-01-01

    Full text: 1. 'Castor-Crisis' - The Real Facts. - the background: radioactive contamination on the surface of transport containers for spent nuclear fuel elements; - legal aspects: transport limit values and notification obligations; - health aspects: radioactive contamination and ionising radiation; - the news media: divergence between technical facts and public perception. 2. 'Castor-Crisis' - The Reactions. 2.1 Technical measures: - 'action plan' of the Federal Ministry for Environment Protection and Reactor Safety; - IT-based European Information and Report System for the transport of nuclear combustibles => 'Transparent Transport Procedures'; - optimisation of decontamination procedures and transport organisation; - simplification of logistics, clearer responsibilities. 2.2 Communications measures: - defense strategy: 'we made a mistake...'; - information campaign: 'we owe you some answers...'; - regaining credibility: public testimonials of employees in newspaper ads, brochures etc.; - regaining credibility: neutral investigation of all relevant circumstances by KPMG. 3. 'Castor-Crisis' - The Lessons: - internal crisis management: improved co-ordination at company and branch level; - pro-active strategy: 'The benefits of nuclear energy' (avoidance Of CO 2 -emissions); - limits of communications; - communications efforts for nuclear energy - the European context. (author)

  20. [Remarks on the physician-patient relationship with cancer patients. Prerequisites, function, and goal of so-called Balint groups in an internal-oncological department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwein, F; Kauf, S; Schneider, G

    1976-01-01

    Drawing on their experience with their own cancer patients and with the Balint Group in the Oncological Department of Zürich's University Hospital, the authors describe the special problems arising in the doctor-patient relationship in this field. They show how the diagnosis of cancer can give rise to a feeling of sudden and complete object loss in the patient, thereby confronting the doctor with his own fear of death. The mobilization of archaic defence mechanisms in both the doctor and the patients can lead to an insoluble double-blind situation unless the doctor is able to give up his defence position and thus make it possible for the patient to give up his own fear of death and to accept the nature of his illness. The authors show how the doctor can break through the isolation of the patient in whose body-ego an archaic bad inner-object has been activated by the cancer, and build up good inner objects for him again. In the last chapter Winnicott's idea the "intermediate area" is shown to shed a new light on the phenomenon of redenial or belief in immortality.